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MARCH 2, 2018

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THE SKINNY ON DARWIN’S THEORY

It would have been so easy to put a monkey picture here. The banana is much more subtle, don’t you think?

Are you thinking the Medical Examiner is not the place for a theological debate? We could make a strong case for discussing health and wellness within the context of spirituality. That has been done by many researchers and it would not be beyond our editorial scope. For now, let’s simply consider the personal ramifications of our answer, whatever it might be, to the title question at right. We’re not debating which author gets our endorsement, whether Moses (he wrote Genesis) or Charles Darwin (he wrote On the Origin of Species). The Reader’s Digest version of this issue’s cover story is simply this: for the majority today who believe we’re here as the end result of evolution, the survival of the fittest, doesn’t that conviction bring along with it a life-and-death obligation to be fit? On the other hand, for those who believe we’re God’s creation, if they don’t take care of themselves “religiously,” well, wouldn’t that be like littering in the Garden of Eden? +

Do you believe in

EVOLUTION? A ccording to a 2017 Gallup poll, American’s belief in the creationist version of the origins of life is at an all-time low, at least since Gallup began polling on the topic (in 1982). Creation by God is the belief of 38 percent of respondents, but an equal number believe that humans evolved over millions of years as God guided the process

along. The 2017 findings mark the first year in which creation wasn’t the outright winner. Overall, 57 percent of Americans believe in evolution, either purely by chance or the version where God got the primordial soup started and then Darwin finished the job. Furthermore, the same poll found that the more formal education a person

has, the more likely they are to believe in evolution. In fact, among those with a post-graduate degree, Gallup found that 76 percent believe in evolution (31 percent: outright evolution; 45 percent: humans evolved with God’s guidance). Since 1982, the number who believe in the God-free version has doubled. To simplify the findings, then, it could be stated that

the smarter a person is (based on their level of education), the more likely they are to believe in evolution. Purely from the perspective of health, that is a curious combination, indeed. Highly educated people who say they believe in Darwin’s “survival of the fittest” are doing a pretty pathetic job of living by Darwinian Please see EVOLUTION page 2

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EVOLUTION… from page 1 principles, according to all the statistics on obesity, lack of exercise, smoking, poor diet, and so on. The road to devolution? The road isn’t paved with good intentions, brothers and sisters. It’s paved with donuts, super-sized french fries, plenty of red meat, and gallons of sugary soft drinks. About 400,000 Americans eat themselves to death every year, although heart disease gets the official credit. The real culprit, say researchers and health educators, is all too often the poor day-in, day-out dietary choices we make. If people could rewrite the rules and get away with it, they would tweak the theory by just one letter: survival of the fattest. Darwin must be spinning in his grave. A theory up in smoke? If survival is our most

primal instinct, then why are tobacco-related illnesses our #2 killer? And surely the most preventable. A man’s gotta eat, but really, who needs to smoke? Do you believe in evolution? Then check out Darwin 3:16 for yourself: “Thou shall not deliberately inhale toxic chemicals into thy lungs and compromise thine own respiratory system, lest thou disprove my theory.” People are evolving all right, but into vegetables Not just any vegetables: potatoes. Couch potatoes, to be specific. We’ve all seen this evolution first-hand. For all you die-hard creationists out there, sorry, but it’s true. According to LiveScience, Americans on average log nine years of couch time between crib and coffin. But we do have the most highly evolved thumbs and posteriors in recorded history.

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And the best flab ever. Darwin would have us out there being fit, but we’re slackers and back sliders. Every day, people need to ask themselves, WWDD? Pressure turns coal into diamonds All it takes is a few eons. But in a mere fraction of that time, pressure can turn a healthy human being into a cadaver. Sadly, Darwin’s many faithful disciples are letting stressful lifestyles rob them of their immune system, their enjoyment of ascending to the top of the food chain, sometimes stealing their sanity, and eventually their very life. Oh, ye of little faith! If Charles Darwin came back today and heard someone stressed over their massive credit card debt, run up to buy expensive non-essentials, we know exactly what he would say: “What’s a credit card?” It’s a miracle! Darwinians may not be able to turn water into wine, but they perform other miracles, like turning wine into all kinds of trouble: alcoholism and its countless attendant ills, cirrhosis of the liver, vehicular homicide, and more. Alcohol abuse is directly implicated in some 100,000 deaths each year in the U.S. alone. Even Darwin might endorse that Biblical advice to take “a little wine.” You gotta believe If we aren’t evolving upward, then explain cars. A hundred years ago the horse and buggy was still in use. Today, cars have air conditioning, space-based navigational systems, satellite radio, and more complicated computers than early NASA missions. That proves the

ascent of man, right? But wait. What about texting, eating, and telephoning while driving? What about not wearing seat belts? Know what the most commonly violated law is? Thou shall not break the speed limit. No wonder auto accidents are the #1 cause of accidental death for people in the prime of life. We’re driving down our survival rate. Literally. Sleep is for sissies We didn’t get to be the highest life form on this entire planet by sleeping our lives away. A little more sleep and slumber and we could be dethroned. Lord knows — I mean Darwin knows — cockroaches are virtually indestructible. What are they up to? Nothing good. So what if less than 7 or 8 hours of sleep per night has been linked to cancer, obesity, diabetes, falling asleep during meetings at work, and inattentiveness behind the wheel of speeding 2-ton vehicles? Let us vigilantly guard our position lest we be dethroned by cockroaches. Make love, not war War kills people. Millions of them. Love makes people. Millions of them. This fact is a no-brainer for the type of highly evolved creatures we are. Of course, that doesn’t exactly explain why some people have multiple sexual partners, especially when having sex with someone - unprotected sex in particular - is like having sex with every person they’ve ever had sex with (including all the people those people ever had sex with). The toll: 12,000,000 newly contracted sexually transmitted diseases a year in the U.S. Talk about bed bugs. Looks like they’ve been busy

So when all is said and done, here’s the deal: do you believe in evolution? Survival of the fittest? Really and truly believe it? Then here are three words to live by: fitter, not fatter. Here are three more: fit, fitter, fittest. +

CREATION BELIEVERS: DONʼT THINK YOUʼRE OFF THE HOOK Do you believe in creation? In other words, that we’re divinely designed and built? That life is a gift from God? That the body is a temple? Then yours had jolly well better be. Note: we didn’t say jelly. We said jolly. That doesn’t require looking like a supermodel or a poster child for the nearest gym or fitness center. But one would expect that it would mean no deliberate fouling of God’s temple through things like poor diet, cigarette use or habitual drug or alcohol abuse. It would seem to mandate a reasonable amount of care and regular maintenance religiously applied. The bottom line: regardless of what we believe in, we all need to hop to it. As it stands right now, most of us need to live our faith. Believer or non, an unhealthy lifestyle is actually a refutation of our core values. +

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There is no higher power Take doctors, for instance. We’re constantly evolving upward over time, right? So why on earth would we spend our hard-earned money to have them tell us to adjust our lifestyle? We’ve only got about 8,750 hours a year, give or take. And we’re going to spend one or two of those on an annual check-up? And then only have 8,748 left? Get serious. Evolution over time is going to take us to new heights anyway.

Editor’s note: This article ran in similar form in the Medical Examiner issue of July 1, 2011

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Keep it going — but how? One of the cool things about human beings (not all of them, but a good number) is our never-ending quest to improve ourselves. Maybe we want to learn French, master a new computer program, or learn how to play the piano. Or perhaps our goals are in the realm of health and wellness. We want to cut down on sodas, quit smoking, lose weight or get more exercise. Or all of the above and a few more things too. The problem usually isn’t getting started. It’s keeping it going when we meet with setbacks and discouragement. How can we rekindle the initial motivation and reach our goal? In a perfect world, we get to choose goals that appeal to us. That’s a huge step in the right direction. Accomplishing the objective will not be drudgery if your heart is in it. But we don’t always get to choose our favorite things. Maybe our doctor told us our life depends upon giving up something we truly love. That won’t be easy, and responding out of fear usually only produces only temporary results. For example, you’re told you’re a heart attack waiting to happen, and if you

don’t lose 50 pounds on the double you won’t have to wait long. Perhaps you’ve personally seen how this works with a friend or family member. They go on a crash diet and lose the weight. And they keep it off. For a few months. Then one day you turn around and they’re back to their original weight, with a few extra pounds thrown in for good measure. Generally speaking, doing something for someone else — quitting smoking because your spouse wants you to, for instance — won’t work for long, even if that someone is your doctor. The solution to this motivation killer is going to require some serious reflection and meditation. If

the goal is worth pursuing, the challenge is to make it yours, to really own it, to see its value for yourself, not to please the other person. Here are three more ways to maintain forward progress over the long haul. Small change anyone? Big changes need to start small. Don’t try to start an avalanche with a 12-ton boulder. A few basketball-sized rocks just might do the trick. In other words, don’t sign up for a 10K run when you can’t walk around the block. Build toward your goal one brick at a time. Is that enough metaphors for you? Mix it up If more walking is your goal, don’t limit it to your Official Walking Time Activity. Do it all the time. When you get home from work, check your mailbox by walking down the driveway and around the block to get to the mailbox. Be forgiving and patient There will absolutely be setbacks and failures. There will be steps forward followed by steps back. There will be times when measurable progress is non-existent. Stay the course. Remember why you started. Keep going. You will get there. +

BINGEREAD

Why do doctors meticulously scrub their hands before surgery — and then put on sterile gloves? There are a few misconceptions inherent in this question, perhaps the fi rst being that meticulous scrubbing results in 100% sterilized hands (and therefore no need for sterile gloves). Another erroneous but common belief is that hand sanitizing is done to protect the patient. After all, it’s their body that is about to be opened up and exposed to possible invaders. The truth is that meticulous hand washing and sterile gloves are for the protection of both doctor and patient. Each poses some degree of risk to the other. Historically, though, sterile gloves were instituted solely for the protection of medical personnel, not patients. And not doctors, either. According to an April 8, 1933 article in The British Medical Journal, the introduction was made around 1891 in the operating room of noted surgeon William S. Halsted. As the story goes, the nurse (who later went on to become Mrs. Halsted) in charge of surgical instruments complained to Dr. Halsted about skin irritation from mercuric chloride used for sterilization. He contacted the Goodyear Rubber Company and asked them “to make as an experiment two pairs of thin rubber gloves with gauntlets,” says the BMJ article. The gloves were a success, and so began a slow evolution from use by surgical techs to the gradual adoption of their use by every member of operating teams, doctors being the last to adopt them as standard wear. Although a good scrubbing with antiseptic soap definitely reduces bacteria, completely sterilized hands is not a realistic goal. Gloves are still important. One of the additional goals of vigorous washing is to exfoliate the hands so that shedding of skin and accompanying bacteria is minimized during surgery. Gloves these days are made of the thinnest materials possible, and holes and tears during surgery are common. That’s another reason why the cleanest possible hands inside those gloves is a good idea. +

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#62 IN A SERIES

Who is this? ON THE ROAD TO BETTER HEALTH A PATIENT’S PERSPECTIVE Editor’s note: Augusta writer Marcia Ribble, Ph.D., is a retired English and creative writing professor who offers her unique perspective as a patient. Contact her at marciaribble@hotmail.com by Marcia Ribble

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ou really have to hand it to this young doctor. He had just graduated from medical school at New York’s Bellevue Hospital Medical College when he was thrown by circumstances beyond his control into a terrible and tragic situation. The following ten hours would test the mettle of the most experienced physician, but for someone who been a doctor for all of six short weeks, it was a true test of both skill and courage. And this trial by fire didn’t happen in a hospital setting. No, this man, Charles Augustus Leale, all of 23 years old at the time, was enjoying a relaxing evening of entertainment when gunfire erupted, followed by terrified screams and a frantic call heard above the chaos, “Is there a doctor in the house?” It was the night of April 14, 1865 and now you know the place: Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. Leale was in Washington as assigned by the U.S. Army, in charge of the Wounded Commissioned Officers’ Ward at the Army General Hospital in Armory Square. Having seen Lincoln in person during a stroll past the White House a few days earlier, Leale decided to attend the play Our American Cousin when he heard Lincoln planned to attend. His interest was more in the president and his intriguing facial features than the play, so he took the closest seat to the president’s box that was available. As it happened, Leale was the closest physician and the first to arrive in the box. There he was presented with a truly dire situation: the president of the United States, in Leale’s own words, “appeared to be dead.” In an account entitled “Lincoln’s Last Hours” written within hours of the events at Ford’s Theatre but first published in 1909 on the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth, Leale rememberes entering the box and hearing the word “Halt!” in his mind. He obeyed, pausing briefly to survey the scene, at which time he told himself, “Be calm!” His actions indicate he followed his own advice. The situation certainly called for calm, but it had to be a challenge. The president “was in a state of general paralysis...[and] was in a profoundly comatose condition, while his breathing was intermittent and exceedingly stertorous.” Leale checked the right radial pulse “but could percive no movement of the artery.” Mrs. Lincoln was understandably upset, weeping loudly and bitterly and imploring, “O Doctor, do what you can for him, do what you can!” By all accounts, Leale encountered a patient who had literally minutes, perhaps seconds, to live. In fact, after an initial assessment, Leale gave his prognosis: “His wound is mortal; it is impossible for him to recover.” Leale, whose main experience as a doctor was with gunshot wounds, was to write that he had never seen or heard of any other person with similar wounds to live even for an hour. Although Lincoln never regained consciousness, he survived almost 9 hours after being shot. For most of the long night, Leale held the president’s right hand, both to monitor his pulse and “to let him know that he was in touch with humanity and had a friend.” For his part, Leale lived past his 90th birthday and died in 1932 as one of the last surviving witnesses to Lincoln’s assassination. +

With the 80° weather we’ve had recently, it’s hard to believe that just a few weeks ago there was actually a slight chance of overnight snow in the forecast. But it got me thinking: Waiting for snow is something I recall doing as a child when I lived up north. All I needed to stay up all night was a weather report forecasting snow. The anticipation was thrilling and I would sit near my bedroom window watching, hoping, and even praying for snow. Sometimes Jack Frost had already visited my window with his twirls and whirls so inventively that the patterns never repeated, a fantastic forest here, a sparkling path there, and ferns in the corners. Magical! I had endless patience even when I was only four or five because I wanted to see the fi rst snowflakes, to discover what kind of snow it would be. My favorites were the big puffy flakes that drifted down in clumps like fairies dancing, building up in soft piles that with a little wind would fulfi ll perfectly the promises of “The Night Before Christmas.” Caught up in the wind the snow fairies would pirouette up against any object and slide back into the sky with reckless abandon. I was there, in the center of the snow, watching it form perfection, in drifts, in layers, with not so much as a bird’s tiny feet marking its smooth surface. Oh, my child soul delighted in snow! I made plans watching it descend, plans to go sledding, plans to make snow pies, plans for snowballs and snow families and forts and slides.

If I got out early, I could tromp the big round circle of a pie into the snow’s surface, getting snow in my boots, then mark the pieces by dividing the pie in half, and quarters, and eighths. We would use it to play snow tag, running in the cold air, not caring a whit if our cheeks were rosy, our noses running, our fingers frigid, or even if we couldn’t feel our toes. I was happy, the kind of happiness adults often lose as they leave childhood. But I have a secret: I never stopped being thrilled by snow falling. It is 3:07 am. I am 74 and I am up waiting for snow, just like I did when I was five and fifteen and thirty and fifty. Even though I am now afraid of falling when the sidewalks become iced and slippery, I still wait with the same enthusiastic sense of wonder I had all those years ago. I no longer have to go out into the snow and play, because I have over 70 years of memories, not just in my imagination, but also in my muscles and on my skin. All I have to do is close my eyes and I am transported into the snow world again. I can feel my cold hands and feet. I can feel my knees prickling with the pins and needles of frost warming up again when I go in the house exhausted from running. I can feel the knobby grates of our floor register, big enough for several children to stand on. I smell the scents of our wet woolen mittens drying, the hot cocoa Mom is making for us, the deliciousness of buttered hot toast we’ll dunk in our cocoa. I think I need to make some buttered toast and some hot cocoa right now. +

MYTH OF THE MONTH A burning candle in your ear can remove ear wax Despite what its proponents may believe, ear candling is pretty close to 100 percent pure quackery. The theory is that placing a hollow lit candle into the ear while lying on the other ear will create a slight vacuum, enough to remove ear wax and other impurities from the ears and sinuses (and for true believers, even the brain). Other alleged benefits: relief from ear infections, migraines and sinus pressure. Considering the consistency of ear wax, ear doctors say a vacuum that

strong would shred the eardrum long before it removed any wax. Alleged “impurities” removed and caught on a plate have been clinically proven to be from one source: the candle. Candling is in very select company: it is one of the few products that, at least according to the FDA, are “dangerous to health” when used as “prescribed, recommended, or suggested in the labeling thereof...” There is no reputable data to suggest that candling is effective for any condition. +


MARCH 2, 2018

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Musings of a Distractible Mind

by Augusta physician Rob Lamberts, MD, recovering physician, internet blogger extraordinaire, and TEDx Augusta 2018 speaker. Reach him via Twitter: @doc_rob or via his website: moredistractible.org

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MARCH 2, 2018

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ne of my pet peeves is how most medical practices greet their patients when they call. Nearly all the practices I call insert the line, “if this is a medical emergency, please hang up and dial 911.” The problem with this is that the doctor’s office is asking the patient to evaluate their medical condition before talking to someone who can help them evaluate their medical condition. Some people are probably calling to figure out if their problem really is a medical emergency, but are told to doctor themselves before talking to a doctor. Phone systems are generally used as defensive weapons to keep patients away from doctors and nurses, instead leading them through a digital maze where they can leave a message and hope to speak to someone in the near future. Talking on the phone is not reimbursed (usually), and so the main goal is to get the person to make an appointment, where speech is reimbursed. This creates a very frustrating environment for people who have simple questions or who don’t know if they really need to be seen. In response to this, very early in my new practice I put the following on my voice message when people call: “I’m not going to tell you to call 911 if this is an emergency because I don’t think my patients are morons.” This got a lot of laughs and pats on the back from my patients. And that’s when all hell broke loose. I had a new canvas on which to paint my silliness, and so my phone messages became increasingly silly. Here are some actual examples of my office phone greeting:

Hi, this is Dr. Rob Lamberts and you’ve either accidentally or deliberately reached my office. Please listen to the message that follows because I worked hard on it and it would be a shame for you to miss it. Our office will be closed on Monday, July 4th to celebrate the day Will Smith saved us from the Aliens. This is Dr. Rob Lamberts, and you have reached my office. Thanks for calling in these, the dog days of summer. If you have problems with your dog, please contact your veterinarian. If your dogs hurt, please call your podiatrist. If your dogs are hot, get your buns over here so we can ketchup. I’ll pause for a moment so you can recover from that one. Hi, you’ve reached the office of Dr. Rob Lamberts. Our office will be closed on Thanksgiving day and the day after, so please keep your black Friday injuries to a minimum. Hi, this is Dr. Rob and this is my new phone message. I know there are lots of folks who enjoy listening to these messages, and frankly it worries me about the negative psychological effects I’m having on people. Anyway, you can celebrate this message in the usual fashion and listen to it for educational and entertainment purposes. Our office will be closed on December 24 and 25 for Christmas. We will also be closed on January 1 so we can all practice writing 2018 when we date things. Hi, this is Dr. Rob and you have either dialed correctly or you have gotten extraordinarily lucky. This is my new, and hopefully

improved, voice message. If you are one of those who hate waiting through these long soliloquies, please memorize the options that follow and dial them immediately the next time you call and skip my nonsense. If you like these messages, I suggest you take up another hobby, such as stamp collecting, improv theater, or levitation. (People started complaining about my long messages, so I did this): You have reached Dr. Rob Lamberts’ office. To quiet all those who are complaining my messages are too long, I’ve put all the the good stuff at the end. (Insert options here) There, all you curmudgeons, how was that? Short enough for you? OK, you can hang up now. Go ahead. [Aside, as though to a staff member after thinking I had hung up]:Are they gone? Finally. Thought we’d never get rid of them. You just can’t make some people happy. I mean, here I have these voice messages that give people HOURS of entertainment (because some last that long) and yet they just moan, moan, moan, like I’d stolen their puppy or something. Well, I’m glad you stayed and have such a good sense of humor. There are more, but I think you get the picture. How did my patients respond to this? They absolutely love it, and play it for their friends. I had one person tell me that when she feels depressed, she just calls my office to hear the message. Given how disconnected people feel in our system, I think this is a very valuable thing. +

Where is Bad Billy Laveau? Even the best storytellers have only so many stories to tell, and Bad Billy Laveau let us know a few weeks ago that he was tapped out and heading off into retirement. Bad Billy was the kind of writer you either loved or hated, but over the many years he wrote for the Medical Examiner (since 2009) the people who liked his column vastly outnumbered those who didn’t. It would not be an exaggeration to say his column was the most popular feature in this newspaper by a wide margin, and a huge thank you to him is in order. If you’re new to the Examiner and never got acquainted, or you’re a long-time reader who still wants an occasional dose of “What Everybody Ought to Know,” just click your way over to issuu.com/medicalexaminer where more than 150 back issues await your perusal. What’s next for this spot? A nationally acclaimed medical writer and blogger from right here in Augusta, Dr. Rob Lamberts, is taking over, as you can plainly see above. His sense of humor is, as we often say here in the South, par excellence, but he tackles serious subjects too (although he may sometimes do so with a spoonful of humor). We think you’ll quickly agree this is going to be an upgrade. +


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Southern Girls Eat Clean Kimchi Fried Rice - A Healthy Korean Dish Kimchi fried rice is a hugely flavorful meal that is very quick and easy to prepare. I fi rst had Kimchi a couple of years ago and immediately started looking for ways to add it to recipes. Kimchi is a spicy Korean condiment that is made from fermented cabbage, (and sometimes radish) salt, vinegar, garlic, chile peppers and other spices and it is reddish in color. In Korea, Kimchi is served with every meal and mixed with rice or noodles or eaten alone. It is used in everything from soups to pancakes and is also used as a topping for burgers or pizza. Kimchi is loaded with vitamins A, B and C, but its biggest health benefit is that it is an excellent probiotic. As you know, probiotics provide good bacteria for the gut which is beneficial and necessary for good digestion. There are many different brands of Kimchi on the market, but my favorite is Sunja brand. Jars of Kimchi are usually found in the cooler area at the supermarket. I suppose you could try to make your own, but to me a good store brand with no additives or preservatives is much easier. Normally, Kimchi fried rice is made with white rice however, I wanted to add a more nutritional grain. I use long grain brown rice for this dish and it just perfect. I also add another vegetable or two to the rice beside the Kimchi and cracked black pepper 6. Taste the dish and add salt just to increase the nutritional • 2-4 pastured eggs and pepper accordingly. value even more. Generally, • 2-3 scallions, chopped 7. Remove the Kimchi fried I use snow peas, chopped rice from pan and place in carrots or zucchini..... really Instructions: a shallow serving bowl. Set whatever I have on hand 1. Cook rice according to aside. works just fine. When I made package directions or cook rice 8. Wipe the pan clean and this last week I threw in some in a rice cooker and set aside. add the last 1-1⁄2 Tbsp. of zucchini. A fried pastured egg 2. Heat the 11⁄2 Tbsp. of sesame oil to the saute pan. tops off the rice nicely too. sesame oil in a large saute pan Place over high heat. Allow You should definitely try this over medium to high heat. Add the oil to get hot. recipe if you love Asian food. garlic, onion and fresh veggie 9. Break pastured eggs into Flavor fi lled and nutritious, of choice to pan. Cook, stirring the pan with oil and cook this dish will become one of often for approximately 5-8 until the whites of the eggs your favorites! minutes or until the onion and are done and the yellow is garlic have softened and the slightly hardened. Ingredients: veggies are tender crisp. (Be 10. Serve the Kimchi rice with • 3 Tbsp. of sesame oil careful not to burn the garlic. a fried pastured egg on each • 1 cup of Kimchi (Sunja is a Add a Tbsp. or two of water to serving. great brand) pan to avoid this if necessary.) 11. Garnish with chopped • 2-1⁄4 cups of cooked long 3. Add the Kimchi to the pan, scallions and serve grain brown rice reduce heat to medium low immediately. + • 2-3 cloves of fresh garlic, and cook until the Kimchi crushed is fragrant and starting to Information on Kimchi was • 1 small sweet yellow onion, lightly brown. found at health.com chopped 4. Place the cooked rice in Alisa Rhinehart writes the blog • 1 cup of fresh vegetables the saute pan and stir well www.southerngirlseatclean. such as zucchini, snow peas or to mix with Kimchi mixture. com She is a working wife carrots, chopped Cook for approximately 3-5 and mother living • 2 Tbsp. of gluten free soy minutes. in Evans. Visit her sauce 5. Add soy sauce and crushed blog for more recipes • 1⁄2 tsp. of crushed red red pepper to the Kimchi fried and information on pepper rice and stir well. Saute for clean eating. • Sea salt (Or Real Salt brand) another 1-2 minutes.

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AUGUSTAMEDICALEXAMiNER

ASK DR. KARP

NO NONSENSE

NUTRITION Norma from Vancouver asks, “Is there a diet good for brain health?”

There is a way of eating which might promote brain health. The data on dietary supplements that claim to be brainhealthy are much less convincing. One big problem with the area of nutrition and brain health is that it is filled with so much quackery. It becomes hard to separate the facts from the fiction. Just think about all those TV commercials you see about this or that brain health supplement. One such supplement that always gets a lot of attention is ginkgo biloba, which is advertised as a dietary supplement which will “support” mental acuity. It is said to treat memory loss associated with aging and reverse early stages of age-related mental decline, such as found in dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. There are a number of the important scientific studies published on the effects of ginkgo biloba on brain health. One study looked at the relationship between ginkgo biloba supplements and the reduced incidence of dementia (from all causes) and Alzheimer’s disease in individuals with either normal cognition or those with mild cognitive impairment. The study found no reduction afforded by ginkgo biloba. Another important paper reviewed and analyzed all the published studies on ginkgo biloba; this “study of studies” found that ginkgo biloba had no predictable and clinically significant benefit for people with dementia or cognitive impairment. And what about all that glowing jelly-fish protein supplement you see constantly advertised on TV? There is no data to support its effect on memory. Save your money. In contrast to supplements, there are foods which may affect brain health. The same eating patterns which promote heart health and prevent diabetes, stroke,

hypertension, and obesity are the same eating patterns which promote brain health. So, number one, if you are really serious about the health of your brain, don’t be overweight or obese. Did you know that adults who are obese in middle age are twice as likely to develop dementia later on in life? Did you know that middleaged individuals who have either high cholesterol or high blood pressure are six times as likely to develop dementia later in life as those whose values are not elevated? Eating a lot of saturated fat and highcholesterol foods is also associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease. On the other hand, vegetables which are associated with lower risks of developing dementia are kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, alfalfa sprouts, broccoli, beets, red bell peppers, onions, corn, and eggplants. “Brain-healthy” fruits include prunes, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, plums, oranges, red grapes and cherries. What about proteins sources and the brain? Great protein sources for brain health are the ones which are lower in saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol and higher in unsaturated fat; these include foods like salmon, trout, halibut, mackerel, and other oily fish. And don’t forget those healthy nuts; almonds, pecans, and walnuts. But not macadamia nuts. which are high in saturated fat (one

MARCH 2, 2018 of the few exceptions in the nut family). Remember to go easy on the nuts if you are overweight. Nuts are very high in calories. Is there any real information on how much of each of these foods you must eat to have a “healthy” brain? No. The fact is, all these foods are healthy and tasty and you should be eating them anyway. So don’t eat for this organ or that organ, because a healthy diet is healthy for all of your organs and promotes heart health, kidney health, brain health and whatever. Finally, let’s spend a minute discussing exercise and brain health. Contrary to what brain apps and brain health websites say, the best type of exercise for your brain is physical exercise, not mental exercise. If you want to improve brain power, go outside and take a walk instead of buying a brain app for your iPad or sitting in a chair doing a crossword puzzle. Physical exercise increases executive functioning, success in doing spatial tasks and improves mental reaction times and quantitative skills. If you have been sedentary and begin exercising, you can improve your brain health at any age. Exercise increases oxygen flow to the brain, which is accompanied by an improvement in mental sharpness. What is the “No-Nonsense Nutrition” advice for today? If you want to have a healthy brain, ignore the media noise about vitamins, supplements and computer apps. If you want to help maintain your brain health, do the same things you do for your heart, to prevent diabetes, and to reduce your blood pressure: eat healthy foods, as defined by the USDA Dietary Guidelines. Eat mainly fruits and veggies, low-fat meats and dairy, high fiber and whole grain breads and cereals and move, move, move! +

Have a question about food, diet or nutrition? Post or private message your question on Facebook - www.Facebook.com/AskDrKarp - or email your question to askdrkarp@gmail.com If your question is chosen for a column, your name will be changed to insure your privacy. Warren B. Karp, Ph.D., D.M.D. is Professor Emeritus at Augusta University. He has served as Director of the Nutrition Consult Service at The Dental College of Georgia and is past Vice Chair of the Columbia County Board of Health. You can fi nd out more about Dr. Karp and the download site for the public domain eBook, Nutrition for Smarties, at www.wbkarp.com Dr. Karp obtains no funding for writing his columns, articles or books and has no fi nancial or other interests in any food, book, nutrition product or company. His interest is only in providing freely-available, evidenced-based, scientific nutrition knowledge and education. The information is for educational use only; it is not intended to be used to diagnose, manage or treat any patient or client. Tthe views and opinions expressed here are Dr. Karp’s alone and do not reflect the views and opinions of Augusta University or anyone else.

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AUGUSTAMEDICALEXAMiNER

Do I have a fat cat? Or dog? Important questions from the FDA to ask your vet Your 8-year-old chocolate lab is putting on weight, and you know she should probably lose a pound or two. But when she looks at you pleadingly with those big brown eyes, how can you resist handing out just one more treat? It’s not easy. But it may be important. “Just as obesity has become a serious problem in people, it’s also a growing problem in pets, one that can seriously harm your pet’s health,” says Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian in the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Among CVM’s responsibilities are making sure that food for animals—which includes animal feed, pet food, and pet treats—is properly labeled with truthful claims, and is safe for animals and the people who handle it. According to a 2015 survey by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, an estimated 58% of cats and 54% of dogs in the United States are overweight. “The diseases we see in our overweight pets are strikingly similar to those seen in overweight people,” Stamper says, naming as examples diabetes mellitus (also known as Type 2 Diabetes, in which the body does not use insulin properly), osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, heart and respiratory disease, and kidney disease. “We want our pets to live happy lives, but we also want them to live long ones,” Stamper says. Obesity in your pet can significantly shorten the animal’s life span. How Fat is Too Fat? In pets, 20 percent over ideal body weight is considered obese. But the ideal weight is relative, depending on the animal’s breed, age, body type, and metabolism. “In dogs, some breeds

Yes, that’s a donut on his nose seem more inclined toward obesity than others,” Stamper notes. Labs and beagles are two examples, as well as long, low dogs such as dachshunds and basset hounds. In contrast, while veterinarians are reporting more overweight and obese felines, no one specific cat breed is prone to obesity. Neutering can slow down a dog or cat’s metabolism, and so can aging, especially if the animal gets less exercise than when younger. It is important to talk to your veterinarian about how much food your dog or cat should be eating. Keeping Track: Important Questions to Ask Your Vet The real expert on the ideal weight for your animal is your vet, who marks changes over time in a way that you—who sees your animal every day—may not. How does your vet know if a pet’s weight has edged past normal and become unhealthy? Many use body condition scoring systems for both dogs and cats, such as a 1-5 point scale (with a “1” being very skinny, and a “5” being obese.) Where on the scale does your animal fall? “Ask your vet to explain the scoring system he or she uses,” Stamper says. And ask for specifics about what to look for, such as: • What are some specific

FLOYD & LEOPARD

signs that my animal is gaining weight? • What is a good normal weight for my pet? • What type of food do you recommend, and how much is a serving? How many times a day should I feed my pet? (Stamper notes that the amount recommended on the side of the food bag may not be right for your particular animal, depending on your pet’s age, activity level, or other factors). • Does my pet have a health condition (such as arthritis) that makes it advisable to keep weight on the low side? “There’s a good reason why your animals get weighed at every vet visit,” Stamper says. Pet owners should make it a habit to ask how their animal is doing weight-wise and whether there is cause for concern if their animal is significantly overweight—or underweight. Weight loss or being too skinny can be the sign of a health problem, too, Stamper adds. In particular, a dog or cat who normally enjoys eating but suddenly shows a lack of appetite can be Please see FAT CAT page 16

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IT’S A QUESTION OF CARE How can an Aging Life Care Manager help? by Amy Hane, a licensed Master Social Worker in South Carolina and Georgia, an Advanced Professional Aging Life Care Manager and also a Certified Advanced Social Work Case Manager.

AUGUSTAMEDICALEXAMiNER

Working with an Aging Life Care Manager helps your loved one and you by creating space between the person in need and the person providing care. The space is important, as this is not necessarily physical space; this is emotional space. In the typical scenario when someone is caring for an aging loved one, you are often the adult child, sibling or spouse of the person who is in need of care. As the person’s needs increase, whether they’re physical or related to cognitive decline, your role increases as well.

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This causes a great deal of tension between you, as the caregiver, and the person whom you love, the care receiver. An Aging Life Care Manager can be hired to have an objective opinion about the situation at hand and offer guidance as to how you are handling matters and to help you see the situation from the care receiver’s perspective. An Aging Life Care Manager can also to help provide perspective for the aging person who is needing care and often resisting it, which in turn creates resentment on the part of

MARCH 2, 2018

the caregiver. The ability to be emotionally removed from the situation is one of the greatest benefits from hiring an Aging Life Care Manager. Aging Life Care Managers care deeply about our clients and the families with whom we work, but we are also trained to step away from the situation and help you as the caregiver and the person needing the care make the best objective decisions possible without emotions clouding the picture. When we are making

decisions about care we have to be pragmatic. We have to understand that a care manager’s job is to ensure that the person in question gets the care they need, and hopefully, the person will be healthy, safe, secure and also happy. However, if the person is not pleased with their situation, but the caregivers know that the care manager helped them choose a safe and secure situation for their loved that works for everybody involved, then that is ultimately the greatest benefit. +

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MARCH 2, 2018

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AUGUSTAMEDICALEXAMiNER

The blog spot From the Bookshelf — posted by Laurence Kinsella, MD on Feb. 24, 2018 (edited for space)

10 TIPS THAT MAKE ME A (MOSTLY) HAPPY MD I love my job. At least most of the time. I love the sigh of relief when the patient hears the hand tremor isn’t Parkinson’s disease or poor memory may be due to depression and not dementia. I love the challenge of staying current on an everexpanding knowledge base. I am grateful and honored to be in a respected and wellcompensated profession. I am a mostly happy doctor. Despite the frustrations of everyday practice, is there anything more fulfilling than caring for people? And I thought I was doing a good job. But my patients were telling me a different story. The body language of watching a computer is all wrong. Patients don’t believe I am listening if I’m glued to my screen. I needed to resolve the competing demands for documentation and the need to demonstrate presence to my patients’ concerns. If you are one of the 60 percent of doctors who have experienced symptoms of burnout, here are ten changes I made that have helped reduce resentment and restore a sense of control, engagement and gratitude in clinical practice. 1. Patients complete a card with three questions for the doctor. I make sure we have addressed every issue on the card. No longer does the patient say, “one more thing” as my hand is on the doorknob. 2. The two-minute rule. I spend the first two minutes with direct eye contact and try not to interrupt while asking the patient to tell me their story. 3. After a few minutes of listening, I ask permission to look away and take some notes on the screen. 4. I reassure the patient that they’re in the right place for their medical concern. I thank the patient for entrusting their care to me, offering email contact and regular follow-up and communication until the problem is resolved. 5. Optimize the EMR’s strengths. The EMR can gather data from other physicians, test results and can serve as an educational tool. Use the EMR to demonstrate images and reports to the patient, adding medical articles, online resources for exercise equipment, sleep hygiene courses, etc. 6. I end all encounters with the question: “Is there anything else I can help you with today?” Most of the time, the patient gratefully acknowledges that all questions have been answered. 7. Close the encounter before the patient leaves the room. The note, after visit summary (AVS), orders and letter to the referring provider are completed before the patient leaves the room. 8. I often finish with a request: “May I give you a hug?” While embracing, I will say a secular blessing, “Be well.” It is a simple act in the doctor-patient relationship that expresses empathy and support. There are caveats: I always ask permission. An older female is generally safe; a younger female is embraced with caution or not at all, always with family in room; a male — generally not. A hug has the power to lighten the mood and to share the burden of illness. 9. If the patient is smiling at the end of the encounter, I will encourage them to complete our survey and write a review on an online rating service. 10. I exercise to meet the demands of practice. I became a group fitness instructor, teaching 3-4 classes a week, which has made me a more enthusiastic advocate for exercise with my patients. What have I learned? I’ve changed more than my patients. I have moved from resentment to gratitude for a deeper doctor-patient relationship than I thought was possible during our brief encounters. +

I am a mostly happy doctor

Laurence Kinsella is a neurologist.

Author Sherry Turkle has made something of a career out of this topic. One of her previous books, a 2012 volume, was entitled Alone Together, in which the MIT scholar noted that our relentless connections have paradoxically led us into solitude and isolation. As its subtitle puts it, we expect more from technology and less from each other. This book explores the subject again as society’s (that means us, you and me) addiction grows deeper. As it turns out, conversationalists seem to be destined for the endangered species list. We have all seen the evidence: the briefest lull in conversation at work, at lunch, at the family dinner table or even a candle-lit restaurant sends people to their phones for texting, checking their email, or posting Twitter and Facebook updates. “I only do that when I’m bored,” someone might offer in their defense. But Turkle counters that we get bored at the drop of a hat these days because we have become

accustomed to a constant flow of “connection, information, and entertainment. We are forever elsewhere.” We pay attention to our immediate environment if it interests us, and the second it doesn’t we’re gone, in mind if not in body, disconnected here but connected out there somewhere. “Relax, I talk all the time and so do my friends,” counters a skeptic. Good for you. But sociologists increasingly note the many ways we seek to actively avoid conversations, preferring to hide behind a screen. To

illustrate, there was a time when to be sent to someone’s answering machine was an annoyance; now we’re annoyed when we’re told someone does not have an answering machine. Conversation, as Turkle points out, is a uniquely human capability that builds empathy and understanding with others, and which ironically requires contemplation and selfreflection. By contrast, screen communication is often simplistic, brief and onedimensional. 3-D friendships reflect the same cardboard cut-out dimensions Solitude, once the perfect opportunity for daydreaming and imagination-building in children, is consumed by screen time. But it isn’t all doom and gloom. “Once aware, we can begin to rethink our practices.” She writes of this problem with optimism. + Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in the Digital Age by Sherry Turkle; 448 pages, published by Penguin Press in 2015

Research News Toss the glasses someday? The Jersusalem Post reported last week on an announcement by Israeli researchers of a breakthrough which could spell the end of eyeglasses. In animal studies, opthalmologists have already demonstrated the effectiveness of their discovery, which works something like this: A patient opens an application on their smartphone which measures their eye refraction right there on the couch at home. The app creates a laser pattern which can be used to “stamp” an optical pattern on their cornea. Eyedrops of a nanoparticle solution then react with the stamp to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, or other refractory conditions. It sounds like it will need plenty of additional study, but it looks promising.

Speaking of vision... New research published earlier this week in the journal Human Molecular Genetics reports on findings right here in Augusta that may help prevent or reverse glaucoma. Dr. Yutao Liu, a geneticist and vision scientist in the Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy at AU’s Medical College of Georgia, identified distinct types of genetic molecules associated with two different types of glaucoma. Discovering the genes is a key step in discovering the precise targets for interventions that could prevent or even reverse what is a leading cause of vision loss worldwide Gun safety research Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health released the findings of a survey of 1,444

U.S. gun owners. The survey found that more than half of all U.S. gun owners do not safely store their guns. For purposes of the survey, safe storage was defined as all guns stored in a locked gun safe, cabinet, or case, locked into a gunrack, or stored with a trigger lock or other locking mechanism. By that definition, 54 percent of households are not storing their weapons safely. That statistic flips among households with children under 18: 55 percent of those gun owners do have their guns properly stored. Overall, 34 percent of the households surveyed had children under the age of 18 present. The #1 reason people gave for not storing guns properly: home defense. People who gave that response were least likely to practice safe storage for all their guns. +


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AUGUSTAMEDICALEXAMiNER

THE EXAMiNERS

MARCH 2, 2018

THE MYSTERY WORD

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Didn’t a friend of yours move to Europe? Not that great. He How is that working was a podiatrist, you know. out for him?

by Dan Pearson

Was? Didn’t he open a practice That was the plan, but over there? it didn’t work out.

They don’t use feet over there. They use meters.

What happened?

The Mystery Word for this issue: HYPRATE

© 2018 Daniel Pearson All rights reserved.

EXAMINER CROSSWORD

PUZZLE ACROSS 1. Forearm bone 5. Virus abbrev. 8. Area in short 12. A criminal might jump it 13. Pigeon coop 14. McCain’s running mate 15. Verge 16. Party of Five actress 18. Patch in Aiken 19. Snakelike fish 20. National standard 21. Type of party 22. Sites for games & concerts 24. _____ drive 26. Doc’s Rx book 27. Former Walton Way bakery 30. Blood vessel prefix 33. DOJ drug agency 34. University bigwig 36. ___ brain (insult) 37. Swoon 39. Self-esteem 40. Word in a sloth’s name 42. Nutrition label abbrev. 43. A punctuation mark and a body part 45. Queasiness 47. New Zealand parrot 48. Augusta native Bernanke 49. Abraham’s successor 52. Cabin component 55. NCAA Division I conf. 57. Louvre pyramid architect 58. High tennis shot 60. James with a statue downtown 63. Smoke pipe 64. They often play in 22-As. 65. “The ____” is on Telfair St. 66. Bits of thread 67. Clarets

All Mystery Word finders will be eligible to win by random drawing. We’ll announce the winner in our next issue!

VISIT WWW.AUGUSTARX.COM 1

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Click on “READER CONTESTS”

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S H A C E U P Y T U O L A E H S O I T F U Y D O L A S T F U G C T D D I I P N O S R O I O Y I I T WW N T O C H M H

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2018 All rights reserved

by Daniel R. Pearson © 2018 All rights reserved. Built in part with software from www.crauswords.com

68. Male child 69. Fed food agency DOWN 1. Ride sharing service 2. Local amphitheater (in brief) 3. Its capital is Niamey 4. Malt beverage 5. Loses heat 6. Ridiculousness broadcaster 7. He serves under the prez 8. Call of the crow 9. Long narrow cut 10. Aid beginning (sometimes) 11. Rectangular pier 13. Free of clouds 14. Dental prefix 17. Type of suit 19. Internal; within (prefix) 23. Prefix before center 25. Cushion 27. Rep.’s colleague 28. Brooks of AU 29. Type of palm 30. Likely

31. Inert gaseous element 32. Greek goddess of the earth 33. Day in Tijuana 35. Invasive beginning 37. Surrey’s ______ Market 38. Dental org. 41. Classic Hollywood’s Taylor, raised in Augusta 43. Monetary unit of Ghana 44. Scull power 46. Acts as an usher 47. Rest on the knees 49. Put to use 50. Downtown street 51. Hurt 52. Tolkien work, in short 53. Double curve 54. Happy 56. Big name in Augusta baseball 59. Blocker beginning 61. Ambulance svc. 62. ___ Speedwagon 63. Viral infection, briefly Solution p. 14

— Satchel Paige

DIRECTIONS: Recreate a timeless nugget of wisdom by using the letters in each vertical column to fill the boxes above them. Once any letter is used, cross it out in the lower half of the puzzle. Letters may be used only once. Black squares indicate spaces between words, and words may extend onto a second line. Solution on page 14.

E

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2018 All rights reserved. Built with software from www.crauswords.com

U D O K U

DIRECTIONS: Every line, vertical and horizontal, and all nine 9-square boxes must each contain the numbers 1 though 9. Solution on page 14.

Use the letters provided at bottom to create words to solve the puzzle above. All the listed letters following #1 are the first letters of the various words; the letters following #2 are the second letters of each word, and so on. Try solving words with letter clues or numbers with minimal choices listed. A sample is shown. Solution on page 14.

H 1 2 3 4 5 6

NUMBER SAMPLE: BY

1 2 3 4

D AK N 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 V O P 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2

3

4

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7

1.THYMAPNAPMAPHCMY 2.IOAIAHAHAOOOA 3.KURRVIAVAUKA 4.EEEENNLINI 5.NNONISSD 6.GTSGR 7.TE 8.N

1. ILB 2. SLO 3. VI 4. NE 5. D =

L 1

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by Daniel R. Pearson © 2018 All rights reserved

WORDS

Simply unscramble the letters, then begin exploring our ads. When you find the correctly spelled word hidden in one of our ads — enter at AugustaRx.com


MARCH 2, 2018

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AUGUSTAMEDICALEXAMiNER

THEBESTMEDICINE

The

Advice Doctor

“Of course, my son.” “Do I have to tell her that the war is over?”

ha... ha...

©

Little Boy: Daddy, mommy told me you were shot in the army. Dad: No son, I was shot in the leggy. Moe: How many politicians does it take to change a light bulb? Joe: Please. The light bulb just burned out. Now is not the time to discuss it.

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n elderly French man went to his village priest to offer confession. “Father,” he began, “during the darkest days of World War II, a beautiful young woman knocked on my door and asked me to hide her from the Germans. I said of course, and I hid her in my attic. The Germans never found her.” “You did a wonderful thing, my son,” said the priest, touched by the old man’s kindness. “You have nothing you need to confess.” “I wish that was all, Father,” continued the man. “But I was weak and I told her that she had to submit to my advances as payment for living in my attic.” “The war was a very difficult time for everyone,” said the priest compassionately. “Don’t forget, you took a huge risk. You could have been killed for harboring her, and if the Germans had found her, I’m sure it would have been much worse than your demands. I know God in his kindness and mercy will balance the good and the bad and judge you kindly.” “Thank you so much,” said the man. “That is a huge load off my mind.” “You are welcome, child,” said the priest. “Can I ask you one more question, Father?”

Moe: I was behind a lady at the donut shop today who ordered 12 dozen glazed donuts. Joe: That’s gross! Moe: Where have you been? You’re shivering and covered in mud. Joe: I fell down a well. Moe: I sure wish I could say my day was well-spent. Moe: What would you call a TV clicker on a tiny desert island in the middle of the ocean? Joe: Remote. Moe: My ex-wife still misses me. Joe: True, but watch out. I’m sure her aim will get better over time. Which reminds me: I told my girlfriend to meet me at the gym. But then I didn’t go. Moe: Why not? Joe: To give her the message that we’re not working out. +

Why subscribe to the MEDICAL EXAMINER? What do you mean? Staring at my phone all day has had no affect on ME!

Because try as they might, no one can stare at their phone all day.

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STATE

Dear Would Love, I am so glad you raised this issue, and in such a timely manner. As you correctly point out, times will be changing in just a few days (we go back to Daylight Saving Time on Sunday, March 11). Twice each year, millions of people experience disruptions in their sleep patterns as the clocks change, and the results can be anything from minor to deadly. It doesn’t seem like a single hour would make that much difference one way or another, but various studies have shown an increase in traffic accidents and fatalities when DST begins in the spring. The cause is thought to be two-fold: first, drivers are suddenly in the dark during a regular commute that took place the week before in daylight; and, drivers have varying degrees of fatigue due to the disruption of sleep patterns caused by the change. The body’s internal clock is not as easy to reset as the bedside alarm clock. When our regular bedtime is say, 11:00 pm, and we “spring forward,” 11:00 pm suddenly becomes midnight. If you’re one of those people who sets an alarm but wakes up automatically before the alarm goes off, here’s what will happen on Monday morning, March 12: when your alarm clock goes off at its normal time, say 6:00 am, you will have been lying there staring at the ceiling since 5 o’clock. It feels like you’ve been hit coming and going: you lost an hour at bedtime, and now you’ve lost another in the morning. No wonder one study saw a peak in traffic accidents on the Monday morning after DST starts. (It should be noted that other studies have found no change connected to beginning or ending DST.) The decreases in performance, concentration and memory don’t affect everyone, but for those who are it can take two to three weeks to fully adjust to the time change. Some people try to get a head start on the adjustment process by changing their clocks when they go to bed Friday night (in this case March 9) and by putting their kids to bed a little earlier all week beginning a week before the change. You’re right! Times are changing! But advance planning helps. +

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By popular demand we’re making at-cost subscriptions available for the convenience of our readers. If you live beyond the Aiken-Augusta area or miss issues between doctor’s appointments — don’t you hate it when that happens? — we’ll command your mail carrier to bring every issue to your house! NAME ADDRESS CITY

Dear Advice Doctor, Boy have times changed! I remember when a person could write to an advice columnist and get a straight answer — and one that actually answered their question. What a concept! I guess that is too complicated for you to master, but I will give you credit for one thing: you have an absoluetly perfect record of getting every question wrong. You have never correctly answered anyone’s question. Not once. What’s your secret, “Advice” Doctor? — Would Love to Know

Do you have a question for The Advice Doctor about life, love, personal relationships, career, raising children, or any other important topic? Send it to News@AugustaRx.com. Replies will only be provided in the Examiner.

Why read the Medical Examiner: Reason #41

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Choose ____ six months for $20; or ____ one year for $36. Mail this completed form with payment to Augusta Medical Examiner, PO Box 397, Augusta GA 30903-0397

BEFORE READING.

AFTER READING.


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THE MYSTERY SOLVED The Mystery Word in our last issue was: BRAIN

...cleverly hidden on the logo in the p. 14 house ad for WRITER WANTED THE WINNER: SUE GRIZZARD Want to find your name here next time? If it is, we’ll send you some cool swag from our goodie bag. The new Mystery Word is on page 12. Start looking!

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SEVEN SIMPLE RULES: 1. Unscramble and find the designated word hidden within one of the ads in this issue. 2. Visit the Reader Contests page at www.AugustaRx.com. 3. Tell us what you found and where you found it. 4. If you’re right and you’re the one we pick at random, you win. (Winners within the past six months are ineligible.) 5. Prizes awarded to winners may vary from issue to issue. Limited sizes are available of shirt prize. 6. A photo ID may be required to claim some prizes. 7. Other entrants may win a lesser prize at the sole discretion of the publisher.

WRITER WANTED

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SEE PAGE 12

The Celebrated WORDS BY NUMBER MYSTERY WORD CONTEST ...wherein we hide (with fiendish cleverness) a simple word. All you have to do is unscramble the word (found on page 12), then find it concealed within one of our ads. Click in to the contest link at www.AugustaRx.com and enter. If we pick you in our random drawing of correct entries, you’ll score our goodie package!

MARCH 2, 2018

“If your stomach disputes you lie down and pacify it with cool thoughts.” — Satchel Paige

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QUOTATION QUOTATION PUZZLE SOLUTION:

“Having children makes you no more a parent than having a piano makes you a pianist.”

READ EVERY ISSUE ONLINE

— Michael Levine

The new scrambled Mystery Word is found on page 12

WWW.ISSUU.COM/ MEDICALEXAMINER

The Medical Examiner has for years published a monthly column by an Augusta medical student as a chronicle of his or her thoughts and experiences during medical school. Are you interested in becoming the next author of The Short White Coat?

Please call (706) 860-5455 or write to Dan@AugustaRX.com

Want to reach Augusta’s multi-billion-dollar medical community?

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Our target audience is • 25,000 CSRA healthcare professionals • 500,000 area residents who are interested in better health and better living If these are people you’d like to reach, call 706

.860.5455 or visit www.AugustaRx.com


MARCH 2, 2018

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AUGUSTAMEDICALEXAMiNER

SEVENTH IN A SERIES

The vitamin alphabet As you may have noticed if you’ve been following this series of articles so far, the stories of the discoverers of various vitamins are sometimes more interesting than the role of the vitamins, and that might be the case again here. And believe the Medical Examiner when we say that no disrespect to vitamin B7 is intended. It is a vitally important component of good health and diet. We can’t live without it, but thankfully we don’t have to: it’s very rare to experience a deficiency in this vitamin, also known as biotin. That’s a good thing, because biotin helps metabolize fats and carbohydrates, is involved in protein synthesis, helps promote cell growth, and helps us maintain a steady blood sugar level. Biotin’s main claim to fame

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— you may see it on labels for products that claim to strengthen hair and nails — is a little weak when it comes to actual clinical proof. Its main work isn’t done in the beauty aisle. A little biotin goes a long way. Despite its role in the important functions listed above, most countries (including the US) have not established a minimum daily requirement, but for labeling purposes 30 µg per day has been established. One µg is a microgram, which is one millionth of a gram. So 30 of those are you’re good to go, at least in the biotin department. (The abbreviation “mcg,” short for microgram, means the same thing.) Vitamin B7 was codiscovered in 1931 by a man we’ve heard from in this series before: German scientist Paul

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Gyorgy. American scientist Dean Burk is credited as codiscoverer, having spent some time as a research fellow at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Berlin before spending

the bulk of his career with the US Department of Agriculture, and as chief chemist at the National Cancer Institute. But biotin’s German heritage shows up on its resume. It was originally known as vitamin H, with H representing “Haut und Haar,” the German words for skin and hair. Since we’ve already profiled Dr. Gyorgy, let’s take a look at the life of Dean Burk. He’s quite an interesting guy and obviously a brilliant scientist. He was the second of four sons born (in 1904) to Frederic Burk, the founder of the San Francisco Normal School, which we now call San Francisco State University. The younger Burk enrolled at the University of California

MEDICAL AUGUSTA’S MOST INFECTIOUS NEWSPAPER

at Davis at age 15, then transferred to UC Berkeley, graduating at age 19 in 1923 with a degree in entomology (the study of insects). By age 23 he was Dr. Burk, owning a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Berkeley. Burk was a close friend and co-author of scientific papers (of which he published more than 250 during his lifetime) with Otto Warburg, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1931. For his part, Burk was co-developer of an early prototype of the Magnetic Resonance Scanner. He did hit a few off notes during his scientific career. He was an avid proponent of laetrile as a cancer treatment, now viewed as ineffective and possibly dangerous; and he also viewed fluoridation in public water supplies as a form of mass murder. +


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FAT CAT… from page 9 exhibiting a symptom of a serious health problem that may warrant a visit to the vet to be sure everything’s okay. Signs to Look For In the meantime there are some basic signs to look for to determine whether or not your pet is at a healthy weight. • Look at your animal from above. Does your pet have a definite waist? “If not, and her back is broad and flat like a footstool, she is likely overweight,” Stamper says. • Run your hands along your animal’s side. Can you easily feel the ribs, or do you have to push hard to feel them? Are they too prominent? • Does your animal have a “tucked” abdomen, or a

MARCH 2, 2018

After a tragedy: tips for parents It is natural for children to worry, especially when scary or stressful events happen in their lives. Talk to your children about these events. This can help put frightening information into a more balanced setting. Monitor what children see and hear about stressful events happening in their lives. Here are some suggestions to help children cope: sagging stomach? If you can • Maintain a normal routine. Helping easily grab a handful of fat, children wake up, go to sleep, and eat meals at that’s a sign your animal is regular times provide them a sense of stability. overweight. Going to school and participating in typical All things in moderation, after-school activities also provide stability and Stamper says. For most extra support. animals, the occasional treat • Talk, listen, and encourage expression. is just fine. Create opportunities to have your children talk, “It’s not unusual for people but do not force them. Listen to your child’s who are focused on their thoughts and feelings and share some of yours. own weight to be overly After a traumatic event, it is important for focused on their animals’ children to feel they can share their feelings weight,” she adds. “The key and that you understand their fears and is to talk to your vet if you’re worries. Keep having these conversations. Ask concerned.” + them regularly how they feel in a week, in a

month, and so on. • Watch and listen. Be alert for any change in behavior. Are children sleeping more or less? Are they withdrawing from friends or family? Are they behaving in any way out of the ordinary? Any changes in behavior, even small ones, may be signs that your child is having trouble and may need support. • Reassure. Stressful events can challenge a child’s sense of physical and emotional safety and security. Take opportunities to reassure your child about his or her safety and wellbeing. Discuss ways that you, the school, and the community are taking steps to keep them safe. • Connect with others. Make an on-going effort to talk to other parents and your child’s teachers about ways to help your child cope. It is often helpful for parents, schools, and health professionals to work together for the wellbeing of all children in stressful times. + — Source: CDC

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY +

ALLERGY

Tesneem K. Chaudhary, MD Allergy & Asthma Center 3685 Wheeler Road, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

AMBULANCE SERVICE

AMBULANCE • STRETCHER • WHEELCHAIR

706-863-9800

CHIROPRACTIC Evans Chiropractic Health Center Dr. William M. Rice 108 SRP Drive, Suite A 706-860-4001 www.evanschiro.net

FAMILY MEDICINE

DENTISTRY

Dr. Judson S. Hickey Periodontist 2315-B Central Ave Augusta 30904 706-739-0071

Urgent MD Augusta: 706-922-6300 Grovetown: 706-434-3500 Floss ‘em or lose ‘em! Thomson: 706-595-7825 Primary Care Rates

Jason H. Lee, DMD 116 Davis Road Augusta 30907 706-860-4048 Steven L. Wilson, DMD Family Dentistry 4059 Columbia Road Martinez 30907 706-863-9445

DERMATOLOGY

OPHTHALMOLOGY Roger M. Smith, M.D. 820 St. Sebastian Way Suite 5-A Augusta 30901 706-724-3339 PRACTICE CLOSED

PHARMACY Medical Center West Pharmacy 465 North Belair Road Evans 30809 706-854-2424 www.medicalcenterwestpharmacy.com

SENIOR LIVING

Augusta Gardens Senior Living Community 3725 Wheeler Road Augusta 30909 SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 706-868-6500 www.augustagardenscommunity.com

SLEEP MEDICINE Sleep Institute of Augusta Bashir Chaudhary, MD 3685 Wheeler Rd, Suite 101 Augusta 30909 706-868-8555

TRANSPORTATION Caring Man in a Van Wheelchair-Stretcher Transports • Serving Augusta Metro 855-342-1566 www.CaringManinaVan.com

Georgia Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center 2283 Wrightsboro Rd. (at Johns Road) Parks Pharmacy Augusta 30904 437 Georgia Ave. 706-733-3373 N. Augusta 29841 www.GaDerm.com Vein Specialists of Augusta Resolution Counseling Professionals 803-279-7450 G. Lionel Zumbro, Jr., MD, FACS, RVT, RPVI 3633 Wheeler Rd, Suite 365 www.parkspharmacy.com 501 Blackburn Dr, Martinez 30907 Augusta 30909 706-854-8340 706-432-6866 Karen L. Carter, MD www.VeinsAugusta.com www.visitrcp.com 1303 D’Antignac St, Suite 2100 Psych Consultants Augusta 30901 2820 Hillcreek Dr 706-396-0600 www.augustadevelopmentalspecialists.com Augusta 30909 Augusta Area Healthcare Provider (706) 410-1202 Your Practice Prices from less than $100 for six months www.psych-consultants.com And up to four additional lines of your choosing and, if desired, your logo. CALL 706.860.5455 TODAY! Keep your contact information in Steppingstones to Recovery this convenient place seen by tens of 2610 Commons Blvd. If you would like your medical practice listed in thousands of patients every month. Augusta 30909 the Professional Directory, Literally! Call (706) 860-5455 for all 706-733-1935 call the Medical Examiner at 706.860.5455 the details

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Mar2 18  

You believe in survival of the fittest? And you smoke? Say again? Oh, you believe in creation. And you smoke too? That makes zero sense. In...

Mar2 18  

You believe in survival of the fittest? And you smoke? Say again? Oh, you believe in creation. And you smoke too? That makes zero sense. In...