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NEWS

FEATURES

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3 Fijian fun Air Pacific unveils Fiji Airways’ new brandmark and Tourism Fiji tours New Zealand with its second regional roadshow

8 Upskill TAANZ and ATTTO team up to revise content of the National Certificate in Travel 13 Airline update

4 Quintessential Queensland Queensland Tourism Industry Council chief executive officer Daniel Gschwind talks about new challenges in getting Kiwis across the ditch 5 Folks and Dracula’s rebrand 6 Properties

PROFILE

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20 Stopover cities Maximise layovers in Singapore, Dubai, Los Angeles and Kuala Lumpur 26 Corporate travel The latest in corporate travel news

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August 2012

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editorial feature

New tactics and positive thinking Courtesy of Marina Bay Sands

www.traveltrade.co.nz a Mediaweb magazine editor: Hayley Barnett P: +64 22 030 0472 E: hayleyb@mediaweb.co.nz Group SALES MANAGER: Lisa Morris ad sales: Tracy Fairey P: +64 21 963 166 E: tracyf@mediaweb.co.nz ADVERTISING/SALES CO-ORDINATOR: Pip Maclean P: +64 9 419 2259 E: ads@mediaweb.co.nz DESIGNER: Bex Mikaere PRODUCTION MANAGER: Fran Marshall P: 0274 304 559 E: franm@mediaweb.co.nz CIRCULATION/SUBSCRIPTIONS: Sue McDiarmid P: +649 300 2671 E: subscriptions@mediaweb.co.nz aCCOUNTANT: Pam King P: +64 9 300 2670 E: pamk@mediaweb.co.nz

We have a jam-packed issue for you this month. With an airline product guide lift-out and update, part one of the Samoa supplement, the annual upskill and corporate travel features, and an informative stopover cities section, we’re bursting at the seams with travel knowledge. In writing the airline update it was a relief to hear many airlines are looking forward to what they predict will be a much healthier year compared with the last few. Kiwis are getting out and about and discovering new places away from home again. Corporate travellers are moving back up the cabin into business class and we’re getting more bang for our buck in the United States and Europe. But the strong Aussie dollar means our neighbours are feeling the pinch. New

Zealanders are avoiding transTasman holidays and even cheap airfares and attractive travel packages aren’t enough to entice us across the ditch anymore. Airlines have had to be much more tactical and work harder to earn the same amount of seats. Read more about the year’s overview and travel predictions for 2013 on page 13. The product guide is also available for downloading on our website for future reference. Hayley Barnett NZ Traveltrade editor Email: hayleyb@mediaweb.co.nz Phone: 022 030 0472 facebook.com/ nztraveltrademagazine Sign up for our free weekly newsletter at ➦ www.traveltrade.co.nz

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NEWS

Fiji Airways unveils brandmark Air Pacific (FJ), Fiji’s international airline, has revealed its new brandmark to be used to represent the carrier when it relaunches as Fiji Airways in 2013. The unveiling of the airline’s new brandmark is part of FJ’s restructuring and rebranding, which will start its final phase in early 2013 when the airline returns to its 1951 name of Fiji Airways and welcomes the first of three new A330s. Designed by a local Fijian Masi artist, the new symbol represents Fiji’s culture and heritage with a traditional art form that has been a part of Fijian culture for several centuries. “It was over a year ago that we started work on this project to re-brand our

The new Fiji Airways brandmark

airline and design a new brandmark for the new Fiji Airways,” said FJ’s CEO and managing director David Pflieger. “While the new name had a lot of history associated with it, we decided we wanted a new and distinctly Fijian symbol and brandmark that would help

us best represent the country while also ensuring our planes stand out at some of the world’s busiest airports.”   The final phase of Air Pacific’s revitalisation will begin with the delivery of the airline’s new fleet of A330s which arrive in Fiji in March, May, and November of 2013. All three of the planes will arrive with the airline’s new brand identity and colour scheme which will be fully revealed on October 10 in conjunction with Fiji Day, the celebration of Fiji’s independence. The full re-branding is due to be complete by the end of 2013, by which time the new Fiji Airways brand will roll out across the marketplace.

Roadshow serves up Fijian fun Tourism Fiji toured five cities throughout the country recently during its second Nadi/Denarau regional roadshow. Attended by more than 200 travel partners and agents, the roadshow visited Dunedin, Timaru, Christchurch, Tauranga and Auckland. The roadshow gave attendees the chance to hear from nine different Denarau and regional operators including Air Pacific, Sheraton Fiji, Sheraton Denarau Villas, Westin Denarau Resort and Spa, Sonaisali Island Resort, Anchorage Beach Resort, Tanoa Hotel Group, The Terraces Apartment Resort and Fiji Beach Resort and Spa managed by the Hilton.

United Travel Katikati manager Darryl Tapsell says the event provided a great overview of the product on offer. “I found the evening very informative, especially with some of the resorts around Denarau and the planned expansions,” says Tapsell. “This is going to make a greater range of upmarket properties and facilities available. “It is great to have those that live and work in Fiji come to these events to give firsthand knowledge.” As part of the roadshow an incentive was launched to generate sales and give agents the opportunity to increase Fiji bookings, particularly for the Nadi/ Denarau region.

Front (l-r): Anu Murti, Anchorage Beach Resort; Melanie Secker, Sonaisali Island Resort; and Yvette Samson, Sheraton Resorts and Westin Denarau. Back (l-r): Ragigia Dawai, Tourism Fiji; Nicholas Ridling, Tanoa Hotel Group; Ogina Lata, The Terraces; Nicholas Dew, Air Pacific; and Adrienne Sword, Fiji Beach Resort and Spa – Hilton.

August 2012

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news

Quintessential Queensland Queensland Tourism Industry Council (QTIC) chief executive officer Daniel Gschwind talks to Warwick Sinclair about the challenges of a strong Aussie dollar, the need for increased connections across the Tasman and family selling tips for agents. How much importance does Queensland place on the New Zealand tourism market?

New Zealand is by far the most important inbound market for Queensland with more than 410,000 Kiwis travelling to our state in the year to March 2012, spending close to A$500m in our economy. Looking at it from the other side, Queensland is also the most popular Australian destination for New Zealand visitors. More than 40 per cent of all trans-Tasman visitors to Australia list Queensland as their main destination. We're fortunate to have three international airports in Queensland with direct services to a total of seven cities in New Zealand. Direct flights, not least for short breaks, is what travellers are looking for and it puts us in a strong competitive position. It also gives us opportunities for more target marketing.

August 2012

What should Kiwi agents look for with families seeking value-for-money holidays in Queensland? The Australian domestic leisure market is driven by families and Queensland has established a long track record of offering the quintessential family holiday. Whether it is the theme parks of the Gold Coast or more recent additions of guided family excursions in our World Heritage areas, including the Barrier Reef, families of all ages can be entertained for extended periods. Ease of access would certainly give a strong edge to Queensland’s destinations. Who needs a longer flight with bored children? Other strong selling points are the tropical climate and natural assets, which provide a comfortable and culturally familiar setting with low health risks, compared to many other international destinations. Most importantly, Queensland’s leisure destinations have made significant efforts to present resorts and attractions

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that have strong focus on family facilities and activities.

What are the top two challenges in store for Tourism Queensland this financial year?

Every destination is constantly challenged to keep up with an increasingly competitive market. Maintaining a brand profile in our key markets and being heard in a crowded advertising space is difficult. Secondly, Queensland and the new Queensland government is facing is own budget challenges. Finding sufficient financial support from the public purse and also leveraging adequate industry funds into coordinated marketing is a difficult task in tight financial conditions. The collaboration between governments and industry stakeholders will be critical in maintaining momentum. The new Queensland government has recently signed a major partnership agreement with the QTIC mapping out the shared objectives for the next few years and the actions that will be jointly pursued to reach goals. The industry has high hopes and high expectations this will invigorate industry and give direction for government support.  

A strong Aussie dollar. Good or bad for tourism?

The strong Aussie dollar presents a significant challenge for all exportdependent industries, including tourism. Not only does it make our competitors relatively cheaper in the eyes of potential international visitors, it also encourages Australians to substitute their domestic holiday with a trip overseas. The latter has seen outbound travel by Australians grow at a double-digit rate over the last few years, at the expense of domestic tourism. There is, of course, very little that anyone can do about the exchange rate and as a consequence the local

Daniel Gschwind operators are very much focused on working on the quality and value of the products and services that we can offer. There is a rebounding confidence in the industry that we are in fact able to offer value-for-money to our visitors, domestic and international, and we are seeing some evidence to that effect in the arrivals.

Are the inbound connections from New Zealand to Queensland sufficient or do our carriers need to up the ante?

We are very fortunate to have numerous point-to-point services between New Zealand and Queensland. Strong competition between carriers has also ensured that prices tend to be highly attractive for travellers, making it more affordable for many more people to make trips. Air services are very much tourism’s ‘pipelines’. The industry will always benefit from new links and greater frequency, and with Queensland’s diversity of destinations, additional flights for instance to the Gold Coast would be enthusiastically embraced by the industry.  Queensland and New Zealand are highly complementary destinations and I strongly believe that both sides of the Tasman would reap the rewards of more aviation connections.


News

new travel folk Regan Mitchell

REGAN MITCHELL is the new general manager of Orbit Corporate Travel, Auckland. Beginning his career in retail marketing at DFS Galleria, Christchurch, Mitchell progressed to start up and head Regency Duty Free in Wellington as retail manager, growing the operation to encompass two stores in the capital. Moving into travel management in 2008, Mitchell joined HRG as senior account manager and was promoted to head of business development across New Zealand as the business transitioned to Atlantic Pacific American Express.

Chris Paykel

Corporate travel specialist CHRIS PAYKEL is Emirates’ new sales manager for New Zealand. Paykel has had a wide-ranging career encompassing the hotel and leisure industry as well as senior international travel agency positions. Emirates’ New Zealand regional manager Chris Lethbridge says Paykel’s depth of international travel knowledge, client relationship management experience and team leadership skills will be valuable as the airline strengthens its position in New Zealand.

Graham Yan

Dynasty Hotel Group (DHG), which operates Heritage Hotel Management in New Zealand, has appointed GRAHAM YAN, formerly chief financial officer, to the new position of chief executive officer. Based in Auckland, Yan will be responsible for the overall management of the DHG, overseeing both the group’s hotel management and property investment portfolio. “I look forward to continuing to develop Heritage Hotels and leading our team to grow the hotel portfolio throughout Australasia with the Heritage, CityLife and Heritage Boutique Collection brands,” says Yan.

Life's a circus at Dracula's

August 2012

Dracula's is rebranding as Dracula’s Cabaret Circus and unveiling its latest Gold Coast production, Transfusion. Dracula’s marketing manager Robyn Phillips says the new title is more apt in capturing the energy and antics of the wait staff and cast. “We have largely scrapped the punk zombie look in favour of sexy corseted wait staff in burlesque attire, while still keeping the mohawks and tattoos,” says Phillips.  The show has moved from the stage and is now largely performed mid-theatre on an elevating catwalk. There are also four separate podiums that frame the stage and ceiling mounted tracks that fly the cast around the theatre. Technical director Paul Newman explains: “We have to keep up-to-date with expanding technology in entertainment. People are spending more time watching 3D TV and movies and are obsessed with mobile phones. We recognised this and knew that we needed to take our Vaudeville show and turn it into a 3D, hi-tech circus. We are confident we’ve succeeded in achieving that.” New production Transfusion includes aerial acrobatics stand-up comedy, puppetry and singing in a jazz club atmosphere. Richard Macionis and Rudi Testa are reunited on stage, while jazz singer Charne Louise heads the vocal line up. 

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properties

East-ern appeal The four-and-a-half-star East Hotel opened in Canberra recently between the retail and restaurant hubs of Manuka and Kingston. The six-story hotel has 140 rooms in various studio and apartment-style combinations, catering for both adults and kids. The hotel has standalone dining and bar facilities, with Ox Eatery and its associated bar and delicatessen.

Peppers adds Carrington

Peppers has added golf property The Carrington Resort to its network of retreats, offering lodge and villa accommodation; vineyard and cellar door; and conference and event facilities located on the Karikari Peninsula in the Northland region, four

hours north of Auckland. To be known as Peppers Carrington Resort, it will be the third addition to the network in 2012 with Peppers Parehua Martinborough and Peppers Awaroa Lodge joining the portfolio earlier this year, bringing the total to seven across New Zealand.

Floral affair at Crowne The 25th anniversary of Australian flower festival Floriade will kick off on September 15 in Canberra and to help celebrate the Crowne Plaza Canberra is offering guests a series of floral and foodie experiences. During the month-long event, the hotel will offer a Floriade package, including overnight accommodation in a superior room, buffet breakfast for two in Redsalt Restaurant, complimentary car parking, a two-for-one drink voucher in Binara One bar, and a welcome pack including a Pantone journal, sunscreen and bottled water, from A$250 per night. Crowne Plaza is a five-minute walk from the festival site at Commonwealth Park.

Aggie’s spreads to Tahiti

Following the recent purchase of Le Meridien Tahiti by Aggie Grey’s Samoa, the resort will now be marketed in the Southern Hemisphere as Aggie Grey’s Le Meridien Tahiti. The resort is centrally located with close proximity to Papeete and the international airport. Laura Wadsworth from Sunseeker Travel Marketing is on board to represent Aggie Greys Le Meridien Tahiti in the New Zealand market. Expanding on her current role with Aggie Greys Hotel and Resort Samoa, she will be working closely with the Le Meridien sales and marketing team in Tahiti to provide on-the-ground assistance for product training, wholesaler liaison and general sales and marketing in New Zealand.

Stay ImpreSSed.

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profile

The road less travelled When a group of like-minded travel agency owner-operators banded together in 2010, World Travellers was born – and Rod Vickers jumped at the chance to take control of his business and make a fresh start. After two challenging years, World Travellers Titirangi is reaping the rewards of its efforts to create a positive and stimulating workplace, maintain equal partnerships with suppliers and utilise new technologies to “benefit our business rather than just sit around wishing for the old days”. World Travellers is wholly owned by its member stores, who are all shareholders, and operates as a cooperative. It now numbers 15 stores who are either already trading under the brand name or are working through their notice periods with their current franchise groups. Here, Traveltrade talks to Vickers about why he joined the cooperative and how he forged a different path under a new brand.

Give us an idea of your career background. Who were you aligned with before World Travellers? I have been with World Travellers since its inception, following eight years as managing director of Titirangi Travel under the United Travel franchise. My travel career spans 20 years, including senior consultancy roles with House of Travel, AA Travel and Budget Travel. Prior to that I spent two years based in the United Kingdom, training in travel and travelling extensively with my wife Krystene.

The World Travellers Titirangi team from left: Yvette Bowers, Barbara Brough and Rod Vickers

What made you decide to join the World Travellers brand? We have all experienced significant changes in the travel industry over the past 20 years. The introduction of low cost carriers, gradual erosion of airline commissions and the exponential growth of social media and online booking brought into sharp focus the inadequacies within the old franchise model. For me, the World Travellers model embraces the new way people search for and book their travel, utilising new technologies to benefit our business rather than just sitting around wishing for the old days. We have ownership of the brand and management systems, a low cost and fully transparent head office, and freedom of choice with regard to local advertising.

What challenges have you faced during set up and how have you tackled them? As with any new venture taking that first step into the unknown takes real guts. Our initial challenge was to gain traction within the market as a key player who is here to stay. As individuals we already had strong working relationships with many suppliers. Our strategy was to build on these under the new brand and forge new partnerships. Deciding on new technologies was also a crucial factor. It was important to get all our staff on board, evaluate their feedback and adjust the new systems to work most effectively for them and our clients. Now, with 16 offices throughout New Zealand, everyone is thriving.

What advice can you give to others who would like to run their own travel store? Looking back, I should have started the process of owning my own business a few years earlier. My advice is: take hold of your future; get plenty of independent advice; and look for the right opportunity with a business model aimed at profit and growth for you personally. Ask lots of questions, and if they can’t come up with the answers with open and honest data to prove it, walk away.

What are the most important factors in attracting and retaining customers? A positive and stimulating atmosphere. Your office needs to be a place where everyone feels excited about their travel as soon as they walk in. No matter where a customer would like to go we aim to have at least one of our consultants having been there themselves, and ready to enthusiastically share their experience. Not only does this keep our clients coming back, they recommend us to all their friends as well.

What do you look for when employing new staff? Honesty, enthusiasm, relates well to people, a passion for travel and a willingness to learn and try new things.

What are you reading?

What is your strategy for the coming year?

During these recent wet weekends I have been re-reading my favourite chapters from Bill Bryson’s ‘Neither Here Nor There’.

To continue finding ways of remaining vital and relevant in all aspects of clients' travel requirements. Also, working in equal partnership with our suppliers to get the right product out there at the right times to the local market. This strategy has already begun to pay dividends.

Be honest and willing to admit mistakes. I like to be passionate and positive about people and life in general, and discerning. I think you should always listen to your gut feeling, as it will almost always be right.

Do you have any guiding principles? August 2012

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upskill

It’s no longer just transactional selling any more. Managing that customer relationship by identifying what their needs are and being able to meet those in an individualised way is really the future for travel agents. - ATTTO chief executive Kathy Wolfe

Let’s look at our warrant of fitness In a bid to improve our national travel qualifications, the Travel Agency Association New Zealand (TAANZ) has been working with the Aviation Tourism and Travel Training Organisation (ATTTO) to revise content of the National Certificate in Travel. Hayley Barnett spoke to each of them

August 2012

about the proposed content and how agents can brush up their skills. Over the past few years agents have had to learn to roll with the punches and adapt to change, and now travel qualifications are transforming to reflect the new environment. Not only has ATTTO raised the entry level for travel qualifications to meet TAANZ membership requirements and to offer an improved job-ready skillset, but for experienced operators the organisation is addressing challenges around customer relationship management. “It’s no longer just transactional selling any more,” says ATTTO chief executive Kathy Wolfe. “Managing that customer relationship by identifying what their needs are and being able to meet those in an individualised way is really the future for travel agents.” When more and more clients are going online, Wolfe says agents should 8

provide a service that goes above and beyond the current selling model. “We have to look at how agents can ensure the customer relationship is not just a one-off sale. It’s about looking at where the customer wants to go in the future and how to become their agency of choice.” ATTTO and TAANZ were given the stamp of approval by NZQA on revision of content which largely aims up at selling, relationship management and working on the retention of customers. “These are not skills that are easily acquired and certainly not easily taught but the responsibility on providers is to do exactly that,” says TAANZ chief executive officer Andrew Olsen. He says it was through collaboration with key industry members that the change in qualifications has come about.

“All of the industry, particularly the big brands, are of the view that current qualifications are inadequate and don't address some of the key components of what their agents and businesses are about,” says Olsen. “A great proportion of students coming out of training courses have a certificate but it's hit and miss on whether they can sell in the emotive, intangible world of service delivery and up-sell. The focus of qualifications needs to be on the customer experience. When graduates of the new qualifications apply for a job, agencies will take them on as willingly as any other industry sector would a qualified and capable graduate.” House of Travel (HOT) group human resources manager Jayne Thornley says the new content will be a welcome addition for agents looking to up-skill. “The agent/customer relationship is paramount and the skills required to build relationships and sell effectively are frequently over-looked at the industry training level,” says Thornley. “Content that focuses on the customer relationships, retention and selling techniques is a step in the right direction.”

Less spending shouldn’t mean less training In tough times it's easy to assume cuts in training budgets will help ease financial pressure, but Olsen says reducing training should not even be considered as a last resort. “The value of training must be


questioned,” says Olsen. “It’s a cost to the business like any other and should have some tangible ROI. The main questions are ‘train for what’ and ‘how do I measure the training return’? Once that is decided, I challenge agents to maintain or even double training budgets, not halve them as a ‘nice to have’ but low priority or disposable business cost. “If you look at certified industries like plumbing, no one who comes into you home to fix a leaking faucet does so without being certified. They must continually upskill to maintain their certification and this is directly attributable to the regulated environment they operate within. New Zealand's travel agent industry is regulated by TAANZ and we need to ensure customers are dealing with well trained ‘warranted’ agents.”

Think outside the box Upskilling is essential for experienced agents, but it’s not only about completing qualifications. Flight Centre’s learning centre team leader Michaela Connor says it’s important for agents to brainstorm and find their own ways of doing things. “Experienced agents should embrace change and always find a way to improve by looking at what they can do differently in order to be more successful,” says Connor. “Having the ability to work ‘on’ the business as well as ‘in’ the business is really crucial, as well as constantly upskilling and working on personal development.” Building loyal customer relationships starts with knowing what the customer needs. Olsen says shifting focus to the customer and simply asking what they want can bring agents closer to repeat business. “Agents need to get into the heads of their customers regularly and often,” says Olsen. “Don’t leave it to the boss or survey for a ‘climate sample’ or send a marketing department a brief to discover a complex mystery – it’s much easier. Ask the customer what they like and don’t like about what you do. Do it face-to-face and do it often.” Another vital piece of the training puzzle is experience. HOT’s Jayne Thornley says famils are a great way to learn more about a country. “Depending on the individual development goals of the agent, we try to source the right training/upskilling available, be it internal or external to meet their requirements – this may not always come in the form of courses, but may include experiencing a destination firsthand as a famil,” says Thornley. “Nothing sells travel more than personal experience and the excitement of being able to describe these experiences to the customer.”

ATTTO hunts for training talent

Managing demand and travel offers

Amadeus Offers Reasons to smile #2 “I no longer have to manually add fare rules to all my quotes ” New and exclusive to Amadeus, Offers is bringing smiles to the faces of travel consultants all over Australia and New Zealand by halving the time it takes to present trip quotes and convert them into bookings. New Zealand 0800 949 009 sales@au.amadeus.com www.nz.amadeus.com

August 2012

ATTTO has launched the search for New Zealand’s top trainees for its annual A+ Awards. The awards, which are currently open for nomination, recognise trainees who have made an extra commitment to complete training, while making a contribution and inspiring others within their workplaces. ATTTO chief executive Kathy Wolfe says the awards are a way of recognising the commitment needed to undertake training at the same time as working. “The launch of the A+ awards last year gave us the opportunity to highlight the commitment of our trainees, and helped us highlight the success stories that training has underpinned,” she says. “Training is a key part of developing and realising the value of employees within organisations. It helps retain great people, builds skills, increases productivity and makes a big difference to people’s confidence.” Nearly 1400 people employed across the aviation,

Offers

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I challenge agents to maintain or even double training budgets, not halve them as a ‘nice to have’ but low priority or disposable business cost.

August 2012

- TAANZ chief executive officer Andrew Olsen

tourism, training and museums sectors completed an NZQA National Diploma or National Certificate through ATTTO in the 12 months to 1 July, 2012. All of these individuals are eligible for the awards. Last year’s ATTTO Supreme Award winner was Sam Chambers from United Travel, Mairangi Bay. “Winning the award was a huge confidence boost,” says Chambers. “I’ve been able to use some of the award sponsorship to do some travel and see more of the world I sell to my clients. I’ve also used the study sponsorship to start my next qualification, which is in business. “If you are eligible to enter this year’s awards, get someone to nominate you or nominate yourself.” There are five awards covering all ATTTO sectors: Aviation which includes pilots, safety management, aeronautical engineering, aeronautical maintenance, air traffic control; Aviation Service excellence award including airport operations, ground operations, flight attendants, airport operations; Tourism; Travel; and Museums. The ATTTO Supreme Award is the overall winner from the five main categories as chosen by ATTTO’s CE and chair. Final application deadline is October 1. The Peoples’ Choice Award is open to all finalists. A winner will be voted for 10

by visitors to NZSkillsConnect.co.nz. Voting for this will open October 3. The awards are supported by the Aviation Industry Association (AIA), Tourism Industry Association (TIA), Travel Agents Association (TAANZ) and Museums Aotearoa. Award nominations are now open at www.attto. org.nz/aawards. This year, the awards will be held on November 2, 2012 at Te Papa in Wellington.

Amadeus Offers more time Amadeus this year launched Amadeus Offers, which claims to save agents time by managing pre-booking activities for flights and hotels, quote handling and offering of alternative arrangements. Amadeus Offers works by accessing availability and pricing information via the Using Amadeus Selling Platform, agents can issue professional, easy-toread offers that automatically include flight and hotel itineraries, pricing and mini-fare rules. Agents then have the option to email the quote to the traveller in a number of formats or present the proposal via Amadeus Checkmytrip, a personalised online portal which allows travel agency customers to view itineraries and other relevant destination details. Once selected, the traveller’s desired offer can then be confirmed and converted into a

booking in a single transaction, avoiding the need to perform the entire search flow again. “As well as providing time savings, the brand new levels of automation that Amadeus Offers delivers can greatly improve customer service and reliability by ensuring all itinerary information, pricing and fare conditions are correctly stated,” says Amadeus IT Pacific managing director Sari Vahakoski. “The new solution also helps to improve customer service by enabling the generation of reports for analysis and business intelligence on pre-booking behaviours, conversion rates and trends.”

Itinerary management made easy Another Amadeus solution sees itinerary management simplified for agents, with the recent launch of Amadeus Printmytrip. Printmytrip is a fully web-based itinerary management tool that streamlines the delivery of branded travel documentation. The new solution was introduced at the Discover Amadeus showcase where guests were given a live demonstration of Printmytrip. Amadeus Printmytrip is also fully integrated with the Amadeus Selling Platform, allowing agents to easily


distribute travel quotations, itineraries and e-tickets, as well as include booking information such as fare types, cabin class and baggage allowance to the traveller’s itinerary. In addition to customisable features, Printmytrip Premium enables travel agents to brand the itinerary and up-sell products and services through advertising.

Get to know Dubai

of Dubai, test your knowledge through quizzes in every module and, after passing these, qualify as a Dubai Expert. 

Become an Hawai’ian Destination Specialist

With direct flights to Hawai’i from Auckland, there’s no better time to get to know of the islands. Become a Hawai’i Destination Specialist by joining online training programme Ke Kula ‘O Hawai’i (The School of Hawai’i). “It’s a self-study training course to assist you in selling Hawai’i,” says Hawai’i Tourism Oceania’s Jill Gardner. “You will gain extensive knowledge about the islands, their offerings and what makes them so unique. “We suggest you start with the introduction course, omitting the Pop Quiz if your time is limited. Once you see how well you have done, you 11

August 2012

Brush up your Dubai knowledge and be in with a chance to attend a famil to the

Middle Eastern hub with online training programme Dubai Expert. “Not only does it provide another vehicle for agents to understand the destination’s diversity, but the Dubai Experts are also selected for Dubai famils and other incentives,” says Dubai Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing representative Lara Nickson. “It has been designed to provide an allencompassing knowledge of Dubai and is broken down into three key modules that include Know Dubai, Sell Dubai and Add Dubai. W encourage agents to register for the programme.”  The Know Dubai - Knowledge is Power course focuses on building knowledge about Dubai as a destination and the various tourism products it offers.  The Sell Dubai course will help agents ‘sell’ Dubai. Here, agents will be provided with background information and details to help answer holidaymakers’ most frequently asked questions.  Add Dubai differentiates the DMC/ agency/call centre as a Dubai Specialist. This course is for owners/partners or managers of travel companies who would like to add Dubai to their portfolio. To complete the programme, visit http://anz.dubaixperts.com and go to ‘Register me now’. Once approved, simply log in, read the information on all aspects


might later proceed to the Papa Islands training courses which have a separate module for each of the six islands.” Hawai’i Destination Specialistcertified agents receive exclusive business-building tools, including a bi-monthly e-newsletter and VIP invitations. An online material order form allows agents to order materials when they need them, such as personalised island itinerary maps highlighting popular attractions and downloadable Hawai’i colour posters. Follow these eight quick steps to become a Hawai‘i Destination Specialist: 1. Go to www.hawaiitourism.co.nz/ traveltrade 2. Create an account and once approved go to Hawai’i Destination Specialist Programme tab. 3. Choose Ke Kula O Hawai‘i from the right-hand menu 4. Click to start Module 1: Introduction Course - Ke Kula O Hawaii 5. Allow 30 minutes to complete (course can be paused and completed at leisure) 6. Certification Test is at the end of the course menu. The Unit categories (listed above the certification test) contain the

information you require to complete the test 7. The pop quizzes are useful to include, but are not compulsory 8. Once you have passed the Certification Test you become a Hawai’i Destination Specialist For more in-depth knowledge on each of the Hawaiian Islands study the Papa Island courses, which are outlined on the website.

Do you deserve an If you or you know someone who you think has done well in their training this year they could be our next A+ winner. The supreme winner gets a $2,000 scholarship to help take their career to the next level, sector winners win a trophy and prizes to the value of $500.

2012

?

For more details and instructions on how to enter visit www.attto.org.nz/aawards Initial nominations close 14 September, 2012 Sam Chambers United Travel Mairangi Bay August 2012

Take your greatest journey /

12

TAANZ Travel Trainee of the Year A+ Supreme Award Winner 2011


Airline update

Business as usual No one denies 2012 has been a challenging year so far. Record fuel prices and a volatile economy have affected all international airlines, but the industry is holding onto signs of improvement, however small, adopting a positive outlook for 2013. Singapore Airlines (SQ) has reported vast improvements in the corporate market this year with business travellers slowly moving up the cabin after switching to economy when the global financial crisis hit. SQ New Zealand passenger marketing manager Murray Wild says rising numbers are a sign of things to come. “It’s still a tough market but our loads in the front cabin are very encouraging,” says Wild. “There’s not the same amount of down-selling from corporates compared with last year. So far, this year has been much better than anticipated so we’re bullish about what’s in front of us for the next 12 months.” SQ experienced a significant turnaround in the first quarter of this financial year compared with last, and finished the last financial year in profit, but Wild says it still faces the same hurdles every airline is tackling. “We had a successful first quarter this year, but that’s only a result of making sure we look after costs outside of fuel,” he says. “Fuel prices are still volatile and can have a huge impact on our bottom line so it has been a matter of trying to control other expenditure as much as possible

The aviation industry didn’t expect a great deal from 2012 but many airlines are pleasantly surprised, showing healthy signs of recovery, writes Hayley Barnett.

without neglecting the business.” Emirates (EK) thanks leisure travellers for turning 2012 into a recovery year for the airline. Pent up demand from Kiwis who chose to stay home during the Rugby World Cup has seen EK capitalise on travellers keen to make the most of the strong New Zealand dollar this year. “A lot of people changed their travel patterns in 2011,” says Emirates New Zealand rep Chris Lethbridge. “They have begun to travel more extensively now so that, coupled with the strong New Zealand dollar against the Euro and Pound, has made travel an attractive proposition for people again. Certain markets are tough, but there is recovery there.” One of EK’s toughest markets this year is Australia. The strength of the Aussie dollar has been a harsh deterrent for Kiwis who would normally travel across the ditch each year. “The issue with Australia is that airfares have never been cheaper but the New Zealand dollar doesn’t go as far as it has in the past so that’s been a challenge for us,” adds Lethbridge. “We’ve had to be very tactical in our price offering and have worked harder for the same amount of business.” Although many airlines are recovering swiftly, others aren’t quite so lucky. Along with current market challenges, Qantas (QF) has had to face industrial action and, as a result, embarked on a major business transformation programme to turn around its loss.

QF New Zealand general manager Rohan Garnett says the transformation programme has short term costs but hopes it will equip the airline for a sustainable future. “We launched a five-year plan to transform Qantas International which focuses on targeting global gateway cities through airline partnerships, growing with Asia, offering travel experiences and building a viable business. We are focusing on operating more efficiently to address our high cost base and put a huge focus on customer service after extensive industrial action and the grounding of the Qantas fleet.” Improvements on QF trans-Tasman routes include new Boeing 737-800 aircraft, a full food and drink service for all customers and ‘faster, smarter’ check-in technology. South American airline LAN has spent the year focused on its merger with TAM and the creation of LATAM, and the upcoming introduction of the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft from the end of 2012. “Our year has been extremely busy but very rewarding,” said LAN Airlines representative Katharine Mason. “We have faced some tough challenges but through the benefits of our merger with TAM and our growing fleet we will make considerable progress in improving the efficiency of our flight operations.” Read on for a full update on new airline offerings.

New Caledonia

where the French Riviera meets the South Pacific

• Less than 3 hours from Auckland flying Aircalin • Four convenient daytime flights every week • Great value fares and packages

• A city break, an island hop, or a self-drive holiday • Modern Airbus fleet, including spacious A330 (271 seats) • The only Business Class service between Auckland and Nouméa

• Full ser vice, regardless of the fare paid. All meals, drinks, inflight enter tainment and 1 piece (23kgs) of checked luggage included

(09) 977 2238 reservations@aircalin.co.nz

www.aircalin.com


Airline update

HA takes off this March Hawaiian Airlines (HA) will commence nonstop flights between Auckland and Honolulu, Hawaii, three times weekly from March 14, 2013.  HA’s new service will add more than 40,000 seats annually between Auckland and Honolulu.  Tourism New Zealand chief executive Kevin Bowler said the new service is a significant step in improving visitor arrivals from the United States and strengthening relations between the US and New Zealand. “The United States is a vital market for New Zealand leisure and business travel, and is a key focus for our marketing efforts given the significant potential for growth that exists,” said Bowler. HA will operate its New Zealand flights with B767-300ER aircraft, seating 264 passengers. All HA economy class fares from New Zealand will include meals, refreshments, main screen video

Hawaiian Airlines begins non-stop flights from Auckland to Hawaii in 2013

entertainment and blankets, while business class also will include more seating, quilts and dig-E-player portable video entertainment units.

SA/QF codeshare extended AIRLINE OFFICE

RESERVATIONS/ TICKETING

FAX

Air Niugini

09 977 2230

09 977 2212

airniugini@walshegroup.com

Aircalin

09 977 2238

09 977 2212

aircalin@walshegroup.com

China Airlines

09 977 2288

09 977 2212

chinaairlines@walshegroup.com

Delta Air Lines

09 977 2232

09 977 2212

delta@walshegroup.com

Etihad Airways

09 977 2207

09 977 2212

etihad@walshegroup.com

Hahn Air

SYD 0800 747 380

Hawaiian Airlines

09 977 2227

hahnair@walshegroup.com 09 977 2212

hawaiian@walshegroup.com

Royal Brunei Airlines

09 977 2209

09 977 2212

aklrba@rba.com.bn (Reservations) aklcto@rba.com.bn (Ticket Office)

Scandinavian Airlines

SYD +61 2 8915 1915 (Sales 09 977 2214 - AKL)

09 977 2212

sas@walshegroup.com

South African Airways

09 977 2237

09 977 2212

saa@walshegroup.com

DEPARTMENT

KEY CONTACT

Enquiries/Information BSP Accounting General Finance

14

EMAIL

Tracey Polkinghorne

PHONE

FAX

09 977 2200

09 977 2212

09 977 2204

09 977 2212

EMAIL info@walshegroup.com bsp@walshegroup.com accounts@walshegroup.com

South African Airways (SA) and Qantas (QF) have extended their codeshare agreement until the end of March 31, 2013. SA country manager for Australasia Tim Clyde-Smith says the decision is welcome news, allowing the airline to continue to serve its passengers and the travel industry until next year. “We welcome the IASC interim decision, pending its review of the Qantas application to extend the codeshare until 2016, and believe this will greatly assist our ability to book and fly passengers over the Christmas holiday period, traditionally our busiest time of the year,” says Clyde-Smith. “We look forward to working with the travel industry who have faced uncertainty as the previous December 31 cut-off date got closer.”


Airline update

EK goes double daily

LAN and TAM merge South America’s LAN Airlines and TAM Airlines recently completed a merger to create new aviation partnership, LATAM Airlines Group. The new partnership offers a combined network of 160 destinations – double the 80 on the continent now served by the LAN group, comprising LAN Airlines, LAN Peru, LAN Argentina, LAN Ecuador, LAN Colombia and LAN Express. The two airlines are continuing to operate as separate brands with LAN now concentrating on expansion of its short-haul and long-haul aircraft fleets, with more than 100 A320 aircraft on order for use on domestic routes and regional international sectors, and 32 B787 Dreamliners on order for long-haul international services. LAN operates flights between New Zealand and South America, offering six A340-300 services per week from Auckland to Santiago, with onward connections to destinations throughout South America.

DELHI

SAN FRANCISCO

SAZ0234_130x177_TTMag_v2.indd 1

PA R I S

SHANGHAI

Emirates will introduce its doubledaily double-deckers this October. The airline, which offers four daily services from New Zealand to Dubai and beyond via Australia, will double its A380 superjumbo flights to and from Auckland. The Dubai-based international airline said it will operate the double-decker A380 on its daily Auckland-Melbourne-Dubai service, replacing the current B777-300ER flight. EK regional manager New Zealand Chris Lethbridge says the aircraft is one of the reasons EK has been able to grow the total market in and out of New Zealand. “EK operates the only A380 service all the way from Auckland to London, Manchester, Paris, Munich and Rome… and offers the same first class private suites, business class seats that convert to lie-flat beds, and economy class on all four services out of New Zealand… with seating pods in business class, shower spas in first class and an onboard lounge for all passengers in premium classes.”

SINGAPORE

J A K A R TA

SYDNEY

EK A380 shower

Lethbridge says Melbourne was an attractive destination for many New Zealanders and he believes the expansion in capacity and new aircraft will be a popular move. “The A380 has been very popular for people flying just to Sydney. I think we will see the same success with the type for those people going to Melbourne and beyond.” In addition to the services through Sydney and Melbourne to Dubai and beyond, EK also flies daily from Auckland to Dubai via Brisbane, and from Christchurch to Dubai via Sydney and Bangkok.

OV E R 6 0 M A J O R C I T I E S

1/08/12 2:11 PM 15


Product guide Airline Name

SB Aircalin

AF Air France

Aircraft type

Seat pitch/inches Business

Economy

Business

Economy

A330-200

50

33

2 pieces

1 piece

A320

40

33

Various

NZ Air New Zealand Various

NF Air Vanuatu

B737-800

CI China Airlines

A380 ex AKL

Business

Premium

Economy

Business

Premium

Economy

38 pitch 19 width

33 pitch 45 width

3 pieces

2 pieces

1 piece

181-185 degrees

123 degrees

118 degrees

200cm long

40% more space

Business

Premium

76

B777 ex SYD

Economy

2 pieces

1 piece

23kg each Business

Economy

2 pieces

1 piece

23kg each

23kg 20kg (Noumea/Nadi)

Business

Economy

Business

Economy

50

32

30kg each

20kg each

Business

Economy

Business

Economy

2 pieces

1 piece

32

Business

23kg each Economy

First

Business

Economy

32-33

50kg

40kg

30kg

79 to 87

B777-300ER

A330 ex BNE

Premium

3 pieces

30

82

A340 ex SYD/ MEL

Business

Economy

78

72 First

Business

Economy

First

Business

Economy

88

88

32

50kg each

40kg each

23kg each

HA B767 Ex AKL Hawaiian Airlines (from 14Mar)

JQ Jetstar

32-33

23kg each

39

A380

EY Etihad

Economy

38-40

First EK Emirates

23kg each

61 flatbed

Business

DL Delta Airlines

Baggage allowance/kgs

Business

Economy

42

32

Economy 2 pieces 32kg each

Business

Economy

A330

38

31

A320

-

28

Premium Business

Business

Economy

Business

Economy

30kg

10kg carry on (pay for extra)

Premium Business

Economy

3 pieces LA LAN Airlines

A340-300

74

32

2 pieces 23kg each AKL-SYD 23kg total

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines

Business

Economy

Business

Economy

A330

35 sleeper seats

31 pitch/ 45 width

2 pieces

1 piece

B777

170 degrees, 190cm long

118 degrees

32kg, all 158cm

23kg each

A380

Suite 81

First A345 SQ Singapore Airlines

A330 B773ER B773R (retro-fitted) B772 B772R (retro-fitted)

Business

16

A340-300

First

Business

Economy

32

2 pieces

2 pieces

1 piece

-

40kg each

30kg each

20kg

55

-

60 51

71

62

32

52

-

* Infants 10kg * PPS Club entitled to 100% more free baggage * KrisFlyer Elit Gold and Star Alliance Gold Members allowed 20kg additional

63 Business

SA South African Airways

Economy

73

Economy

33.5

Business

Economy

2 pieces

1 piece 23kg


Product guide Commissions

Frequent Flyer Programme

Online/text check in

7%

A330: 16cm in-seat screens (economy); 26cm pop-up screens (business). A320: overhead monitors throughout cabin (economy); DVD with movie options (business) New video on-demand system coming soon.

Flying Blue

Online check-in ex NOU only on specified routes

4%

Almost 400 hours of on-demand programming, 85 movies and 15 video games. 6.4’’ TV screen (economy); 10.4” individual screen (premium/business).

Flying Blue

www.airfrance.co.nz

Airpoints

www.airnewzealand.co.nz

4% (longhaul)

7%

5% AKL-BNE 7% elsewhere

Inflight Entertainment Information

10.6” TV screen (economy and premium), 12.1” (business). More than 40 new release movies.

Audio entertainment is available with six channels on Qantas Frequent Flyer Points on any international services. In-flight information videos on the culture Earn Air Vanuatu operated service, booked with of Vanuatu and things to see and do feature on LCD screens an Air Vanuatu flight number throughout the cabin.  All widebody aircraft feature personal entertainment in all seats.

Dynasty Flyer

www.china-airlines.com

Delta SkyMiles is free to join. DL is also a partner in other carrier programmes including Virgin Australia’s Velocity and those operated by SkyTeam Partners

www.delta.com

ICE digital widescreen with over 1200 channels of on-demand entertainment. BBC text news updated during flights. SMS and email service and personal satellite phones in all classes. Wi-Fi on most A380s.

Skywards

www.emirates.com/nz

7%

A340/A330 ex SYD/MEL/BNE offers personal entertainment at every seat onboard.

Etihad Guest is free to join. EY is also a partner in other carrier programmes including Virgin Australia’s Velocity and Air New Zealand Airpoints

www.etihadairways.com

5%

Main cabin screen for all passengers and dig-E-players available for rental at US$15.

Hawaiian Miles Program is free to join. HA is also a partner in other carrier programmes including Virgin Australia’s Velocity Programme

www.hawaiianair.com

5% 0% for journeys originating B777 ex SYD offers personal entertainment at every seat from or within North onboard. America

5% (first and business) 4% (economy/longhaul) 3% (trans-Tasman)

-

Business: offered a personal video on demand unit.Economy: a limited quantity of video on-demand units available for hire. Reserve and pay for a unit when booking, or purchase once onboard.

Jetstar/Qantas

www.jetstar.com

5%

15.4” seat back screens (business), 8.9” screens (economy), 47 movies, 123 series channels, 750 music CDs and 20 games.

Lanpass

www.lan.com

4%

Personal audio-video on demand with over 85 movies, including SMS and e-mail service.

Flying Blue

www.klm.co.nz

4%

KrisWorld, personal in-flight entertainment system with over 1000 entertainment options, including movies, television, games and destination guides, plus audio-video on demand in every seat.

KrisFlyer (free to join)

www.singaporeair.com Online available 48 hours before departure

7%

On the A340-300 / A340-600 aircraft personal TVs are available at all seats on board, providing a wide variety of TV shows, documentaries and the latest movies. Economy class passengers travelling on A340-200, B737-800 and A319 aircraft are offered mainscreen entertainment in economy and personal TVs in business class.

SAA has its own frequent flyer programme known as Voyager, which is free to join. SAA is a member of STAR Alliance, the world’s largest airline group, and has reciprocal frequent flyer arrangements with Star members including NZ. SAA is also a partner in the QF Frequent Flyer Programme.

Online check in is available for SA operated flights within Africa only

17


ADVERTORIAL

New features with Air France With the summer holiday season, Air France is offering new services, at the airport, on board and online. These new and innovative services reflect the company’s strategy to enhance its range of products and services as part of its transformation plan.

Travel made easier

Guy Martin signature dishes

For customers looking for more autonomy in organizing their trip, Air France is offering new express channels where passengers can print their own baggage labels at the self-service kiosk and go directly to the dedicated “Express” baggage dropoff area without queuing at check-in counters. Easily identifiable “Express” signage has been developed for this purpose. This express channel has been introduced this summer at a dozen French airports including Paris-Orly, Paris-Charles de Gaulle terminals 2F and 2G, Bordeaux, Lyon, Mulhouse, Nantes, Nice, Pau, Strasbourg and Toulon.

Gastronomic dining and comfort on board Enjoy a unique gourmet experience with A la Carte dining Get off to a head start on your holidays by ordering one of five A la Carte menus available as an alternative to the menu of the day (free of charge): enjoy a genuine French fine dining experience with the Tradition menu, “Une Selection LENÔTRE”, specially designed for Air France by the famous Lenôtre culinary institute, “Fresh from the sea” with Ocean, “A green touch to complement the blue sky” with Bio (Organic), and “A taste of Dolce Vita” with Italia. This new offer is available in the Voyageur and Premium Voyageur cabins on most long-haul flights departing from Paris-Charles de Gaulle and Paris-Orly. The five menus with prices varying between NZ$19 and NZ$40 can be ordered online on the Air France site at the time of booking in the “Manage my bookings” section, and up to 24 hours before.

In Business class, Guy Martin signature dishes and a full sleep seat For the next five months, customers on all longhaul flights from Paris-Charles de Gaulle can enjoy signature dishes designed by Guy Martin, Michelin-starred chef at Grand Véfour restaurant. To ensure frequent travellers can enjoy a variety of dishes, these culinary delights are renewed twice a month. This original and contemporary in-flight culinary experience is conducted in partnership with Servair chefs. After savouring these new dishes, customers can enjoy the exceptional comfort provided by the new longer, wider and more spacious full sleep seats, currently available on over half of the long-haul fleet serving over 50 destinations.

Los Angeles, Singapore by A380 and two new long-haul destinations Fly away to the four corners of the world with Air France’s offer of two new long-haul destinations: Wuhan in China, with 3 weekly flights and Abuja in Nigeria, served with one daily flight. With the arrival of two new Airbus A380s in its fleet, Air France also operates a daily flight to Los Angeles and three weekly flights to Singapore with its super jumbo.

For more information visit www.afkl.biz or contact the trade support: 09 918 98 25


AF-SING12250-07_Girl Window_Travel Bulletin_330x240_v1p.indd 1

5/4/12 1:21 PM


stopover cities

Singapore sling Tamara Rubanowski

finds herself mesmerised by modern architecture and a vast array of dining

August 2012

options for any budget.

Singapore is the perfect place for a stopover and this futuristic metropolis is one of my favourite destinations. Despite being a melting pot of many exotic cultures, the city is a clean and safe haven for weary travellers and offers a feast for all the senses on any budget. The dining venues in Singapore are truly spectacular – no wonder the locals eat out almost every night of the week. Visit the rooftop restaurant at Mustafa Centre for good quality vegetarian meals and authentic Indian curries where clients can enjoy views over Little India, complete with fairy lights and exotic scents wafting up from the streets and temples below. You will find value for money here, with dinner available for less than $10. At the other end of the spectrum,

20

Marina Bay Sands Hotel offers the finest dining options in a setting that is simply out of this world. The new complex consists of three hotel towers crowned by the Sands SkyPark. With over 2500 rooms and suites, this is the biggest hotel in Singapore, overlooking the South China Sea, Marina Bay and the Singapore skyline. There are 230 luxury suites that come with butler service and privileged access to VIP areas. The wide array of foodie experiences ranges from South East Asian specialties and exquisite Chinese fare to a Michelinstarred restaurant, as well as a European-style patisserie and KU DÉ TA, an uber-cool lounge. The Sands SkyPark is an architectural masterpiece, which sits on top of the three hotel towers. This 1.2 hectare tropical oasis is longer

than the Eiffel Tower is tall and large enough to park four-and-a-half A380 jumbo jets. It extends to form one of the world’s largest public cantilevers; built at a height of 200 metres. Its lush, landscaped gardens are home to 250 trees and more than 600 plants. At a total of 12,400 square metres it is big enough to fit three football fields. You can visit the viewing platform, but hotel guests have exclusive use of the 150-metre infinity swimming pool, the world’s largest outdoor pool at that height. By 8pm every night, The Club at Marina Bay Sands offers an indulgent Chocolate Bar concept that is open to the public and it’s the perfect way to finish the day. Clarke Quay is the place to try the famous Singaporean Chilli Crab and it’s


2

4 1 Marina Bay Sands SkyPark pool 2 KU DÉ TA Sky Terrace 3 Singapore Merlion 4 Prawn Laksa

1

a couple of dollars they can ride the subway across town and all the way to Sentosa Island. Taxis are also available at a reasonable price, but the fare is more expensive during rush hour times in the morning and evening. No visit to Singapore is complete without a shopping stint at the Orchard Road malls. This shopping Mecca is home to every designer label under the sun. Clients can easily spend several days there and they still won’t see it all. If clients are stopping in Singapore for just a few hours, they will find the best airport services imaginable. Make sure they take advantage of free movies and games for the kids, peaceful quiet zones for relaxation, indoor gardens and the excellent shopping and dining options.

Top tip

Destination Asia offer a transfer service from all Singapore hotels to the airport. It’s a reliable, air-conditioned and personalised service that you can prebook from New Zealand. Tamara Rubanowski is a passionate journalist, magazine editor and member of the New Zealand Guild Of Food Writers. Tamara has worked for lifestyle publications, trade magazines and international media for more than 15 years. She likes to see her work as an exciting journey, with every day presenting a new adventure.

21

August 2012

only a short stroll (or ferry ride) away from the Marina Bay Sands complex. If clients enjoy venturing off the beaten track to dine with the locals, then you must visit the hawkers’ food stalls near the beach where you can try spicy satays, fragrant stir-fries, laksas and sizzling seafood. The plates are only a few dollars each. Wash it all down with chilled beers or fresh coconut juice, with your feet in the warm sand and views of the ocean. A visit to the famous Raffles Hotel for afternoon tea or a Singapore Sling cocktail is also highly recommended, but book a table in advance as the hotel’s security is tight and if clients are not staying at the hotel they may be turned away. Familiarise clients with the public transport system in Singapore. For just

3


stopover cities

Diverse Dubai Luxury is a given in Dubai but Toni Myers finds there’s also a surprising range of attractions and activities for clients looking for more in a stopover.

August 2012

The Atlantis Hotel

From the surreality of the Atlantis Hotel, a water-world themed wonderland for kids and their families, to the quiet elegance of the soon-to-open JW Marriott Marquis Dubai for the timepoor and stressed business traveller seeking calm and relaxation; Dubai boasts accommodation and attractions to satisfy the most critical of visitors. For those interested in looking beyond the shops and white sand beaches, Dubai reveals unexpected highlights from desert treks and Bedouin villages to snow skiing and KidZania, a truly impressive and popular mini-commercial centre in Dubai Mall for kids. It’s a secure environment (parents can safely leave their kids for several hours while the parents hit the shops) where kids get to try out various occupations – hairdressing, art and design, and retail in a real but miniaturised operating environment. Equalling Emirates’ reputation for both economy and business class service, Dubai’s accommodation standards exceed the star rating classification that has gained international acceptance. For example, a four-star Dubai rating equals five stars in Europe. Defying the persistent downturn in

22

other economies, hotel construction continues apace. The new addition to the JW Marriott luxury brand, the Marquis Dubai, for example, will be the world’s tallest hotel, featuring nine restaurants and 1608 rooms. It will target the luxury business traveller but Dubai operators are quick to point out the lines between business and leisure travel are blurring, with a growing number of visitors combining business trips with an extended family stopover to take advantage of the sun, warmth, sea sports and numerous other attractions. The Jumeirah Zabeel Saray is a property that epitomises the luxury end of Arabian culture with one of the largest and most sumptuous spas in the region in an Ottoman-themed complex. Discerning business and leisure clients will be thankful for the spotless efficiency of the Dubai airport hub for transit. For an extended stay and outdoor exploring though, it’s best to avoid peak northern hemisphere summer months unless you’re well acclimatised. In typical Kiwi fashion, I set off walking from Dubai Mall to find a meeting place I assumed was 10 minutes away. But the modern areas of the city are not designed for walking and after 30 minutes in the heat I got a

good dose of heatstroke. Generally though, the omnipresent air-conditioning takes care of the heat and Dubai evenings are a joy with locals, expats and visitors flocking to the plethora of bars, many of them poolside or beside the white sand beaches created along The Palm – the distinctive and largest manmade palm-shaped island comprising roads and resorts that is one of a number of engineering and construction feats that can’t fail to impress. As the day cools to a pleasant warmth, Dubai nightlife heats up and clients can experience the relaxed socialising that’s so attractive to young expat professionals who choose to spend a few years or more working in this upbeat economy. And the culture dictates that there is no threat or jeopardy for women on their own out in the city at night; and likewise it’s a very safe environment for children who want a bit of holiday freedom away from their parents. If it hadn’t been for my travel agent originally recommending I try Emirates for my business and leisure trips up to Europe, it may have taken years before I discovered the delights of Dubai as a stopover. I’m glad it didn’t. Toni Myers flew to Dubai earlier this year courtesy of Emirates and DTCM.


stopover cities Venice Beach

Grauman's Chinese Theatre

August 2012

LAX layover In 2011, Los Angeles experienced the largest number of visitors and spending in the history of the city and, according to the US Department of Commerce, a record 70,000 Kiwis visited the North American hub last year. LA Tourism regional manager Alison Roberts Brown puts its popularity down to the climate, public transportation and entertainment. “There are no unpleasant seasons in Los Angeles,” said Roberts Brown. “It is the only place you can ski in the morning and surf in the afternoon, with 75 miles of coastline and several beaches. It also has the most active mass transportation development programme in the nation. The city’s transit programme includes light rail, subway, traditional rail commuter services and a bus system.” With its movie stars, beaches, museums and theme parks, clients can easily spend a lot of time in LA, and if they have time between flights at LAX, suggest they step outside the airport and start California dreamin’.   For two- to three-hour layovers Suggest clients head over to the Encounter Restaurant outside Terminal 2. The spider-shaped restaurant is synonymous with Los Angeles International Airport, and the observation deck and restaurant/bar was recently renovated. This is a fun place to watch the planes take off and land. For four- to six-hour layovers Ten minutes from the airport by taxi

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is Manhattan Beach. After poking around shops at Manhattan Village and sitting at the beach, clients should head over to Second Story, a restaurant at the Belamar Hotel where they will get a taste of California cuisine. The menu includes dishes such as marinated skirt steak and pancetta-wrapped pork tenderloin. Another 10 minutes away is Venice Beach. The Boardwalk sports souvenirs, street performers, roller skaters and ‘muscle men’ working out. A bit further is Santa Monica. Suggest casual dining at the Fourth Street Grille at the Doubletree Hotel. The hotel is four blocks from the Santa Monica Pier, where clients can ride the 90-yearold carousel and ferris wheel, or stroll on the pier. To the right of the pier is the original location of Muscle Beach where Baywatch was often filmed. The Third Street Promenade, an outdoor, pedestrian-only collection of stores, movie theatres and cafes, stretches several blocks and is perfect for upscale shopping. For eight-hour-plus layovers The FlyAway bus service will take clients to Union Station in 45 minutes (longer in rush hour traffic). From there they can take Metro buses and trains to various points throughout the city. The Metro has a free iPhone app and route maps can be found at the airport. Downtown sights include MOCA (Museum of Contemporary Art), Walt Disney Concert Hall, the Music Centre, Olvera Street, Chinatown, and

various shopping districts. From downtown, it’s a 20-minute metro red line ride from Union Station to Hollywood where clients can walk to Grauman’s Chinese Theatre to explore its famous cement footprints of Hollywood celebrities. Just around the corner is the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood and Highland, home of the Oscars. Clients can get to Disneyland from anywhere in Los Angeles using public transportation such as the Metro, otherwise organise a shuttle from LAX.

Tour options

Amazing LA Tours will pick up passengers at LAX or any of the airport hotels. Tours include Beverly Hills/ Hollywood, Celebrity Homes, Full Day Tour of Los Angeles, and Universal Studios Hollywood with a Front-of-theLine Pass.   

Coming to Disneyland in 2013

Disney princesses will greet their admirers in a new Fantasy Faire, which will be nestled near the moat of Sleeping Beauty Castle. Aspiring princesses and knights can visit with a Disney Princess, play a role in a storytelling experience, and visit a merchandise shop filled with royal costumes and accessories. And as the Princesses settle in their new home in 2013, plans will be underway for a new show at the Fantasyland Theatre near the ‘It’s a Small World’ ride.


Top five experiences

Cool Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur Railway Station

1: Sip a lychee daiquiri at SkyBar and watch the lights of the Petronas Towers come on at twilight SkyBar offers intoxicating views and the chance to enjoy cocktails in a contemporary setting. Located on level 33 of the Traders Hotel, this view is one that should not be missed. 2: Hire a car and drive from Kuala Lumpur up into the Cameron Highlands along the Tapah Road through the tea plantations This is one of Malaysia’s lesser known wonders. Clients can spend some leisurely time exploring a number of townships in this highland paradise. 3: Live like a big kid for the day and experience the thrills of five themed parks in one location Sunway Lagoon is made up of five different theme parks. Whether clients are looking to cool down at Asia’s Best Water Park, looking for a hair-raising experience at Scream Park, enjoying the rides at Amusement Park, getting their adrenaline pumping at Extreme Park, or getting up close and personal with animals at Wildlife Park, there is something for all at Sunway Lagoon. 4: Dine in a 360-degree revolving restaurant Atmosphere 360 is a revolving restaurant situated 282m above ground level, located inside the tallest tower in Southeast Asia – Menara Kuala Lumpur. The restaurant is furnished in a spaceship-like atmosphere with starry fibre optic ceiling lights. Offering quality produce, each dish is carefully conceived and deliciously presented for discerning taste buds.

What to do in Kuala Lumpur Old Railway Station

which stand as testament to the city’s architectural heritage.

Little India – Brickfields

This used to be a simple residential neighbourhood but was recently transformed into a wide street with Indian stores and restaurants run by the country’s Indian community.

Petronas Twin Towers

At a height of 451.9m, the Petronas Twin Towers is the icon of modern Malaysia. The 88-storey building was inspired by the geometric shape in Islamic art. Enjoy the view of the city from the sky bridge at levels 41 and 42.

Aquaria KLCC

This oceanarium showcases over 5000 different exhibits of aquatic and land bound creatures. Walk through the aquarium’s 90m-long tunnel to view sharks, stingrays and turtles. Watching the daily fish-feeding session is a must.

Boasting Moghul-inspired neo-Saracen architecture with curving domes and arches, the Kuala Lumpur railway station is a striking landmark in the city. Built in 1910 it is no longer the jumping off point for long distance destinations but its charm still remains.

Kuala Lumpur Lake Gardens

Chinatown

Menara KL Tower

Petaling Street, or Chinatown, is a lively stretch of shops, restaurants and hawker stalls. It is one of Kuala Lumpur’s best known shopping spots and comes alive at night. The streets are lined by buildings, clan houses and temples

At the heart of the city, the Lake Gardens sprawl over 200 acres. Built around two lakes, the area offers a Deer Park, Butterfly Park with over 6000 butterflies and the award-winning sculptures at the ASEAN Sculpture Garden. Poised atop Bukit Nanas, this communications tower stands at 421m and is situated within the Bukit Nanas Forest Reserve. Clients can enjoy a 360-degree view from the observation tower and dine at the revolving restaurant.

August 2012

5: Walk up 272 steps and gaze upon the limestone caves The Batu Caves are situated 13kms north of the capital city Kuala Lumpur and is considered a sacred place. They consist of three main caves, which are made of limestone and are 400m long and 100m high. But watch out for the monkeys!

Kuala Lumpur is a dynamic city of contrasts. The city began as a mining settlement in the late 1800s, but now has an impressive skyline including the world’s tallest twin towers, the old Morrish railway station and numerous mosques, temples and churches. The bustling metropolis is a melting pot of races and cultures, and is home to a population of 1.6 million people. For short stopovers, it’s possible to get around the Malaysian capital by foot as there are many tourist attractions within close proximity. Alternatively, organised tours and public transport are readily available and allow clients to see the heart of the city and surrounding areas. Another option is to hire a car and drive 13km from Kuala Lumpur up into the Cameron Highlands along the Tapah Road through the tea plantations.

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corporate travel

Corporate time travelling Carlson Wagonlit Travel New Zealand director Kim Milne offers some insight into what we can expect of corporate travel in 2013. The global financial crisis is a phrase many feel is still too close to their hearts. Yet most New Zealanders were lucky to scrape through relatively unscathed in contrast to many other nations. As the oil price raged and airfares soared, the travel industry was dealt a significant blow. With a gradual return of some industry normality over 2011 and into 2012, it comes as welcome news to hear that 2013 looks set to continue on this path for the Asia Pacific region. As a result, businesses can expect to continue benefiting from savings across effectively managed travel programmes. But for New Zealand in particular, travel programmes will need to be carefully managed as air, hotel and car rental costs look set to reflect the growing demand for these services. New Zealand, Australia, China, and Singapore are among the countries that will experience the most significant growth next year, with demand continuing to outweigh supply. Although a major focus for international expansion, India will face challenges in 2013 as its airline and hotel industries navigate some of the problematic effects of rapid expansion in recent

years. For New Zealand business travellers looking at booking trips in 2013, expect to see increases of up to four per cent for airline tickets, up to five per cent for hotel stays and up to six per cent for car rentals. A

Air

The emergence and rapid growth of the low cost carrier (LCC) market has created a very interesting and dynamic air travel market, with pressure put on many of the legacy carriers. New Zealand has fared extremely well, with alliances and codeshare agreements, in addition to strong marketing campaigns, ensuring the viability and success of airlines such as Air New Zealand. However, New Zealand airfares will continue to rise in 2013, with domestic airfare prices set to grow approximately 3.8 per cent in 2013 and international business class fares set to rise approximately 2.8 per cent. Across the Tasman, however, the air travel landscape will continue to evolve as Virgin Australia challenges Qantas for the business traveller market. Our sun-drenched neighbours

August 2012

A

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B

will also see an average airfare increase of one per cent on domestic routes due to the recently implemented carbon tax. B

Hotels

As a region, the hotel outlook will achieve modest price inflation in 2013. However, results will vary widely by country with New Zealand expected to see higher hotel rates, while Indian and Chinese hotel suppliers offer more reduced rates to travel buyers. It will be Singapore that leads the way with increases expected to top eight per cent next year; strong demand for business travel has continued to outweigh supply. Interestingly, CWT has seen Hong Kong shift from five-star properties to three-star due to its proximity to China, and the benefits of the growing travelling Chinese middle class. Within New Zealand, hotel rates will rise around five per cent in Auckland and for per cent in Wellington, with the stronger increases in four- to five-star properties and C

more moderate gains in three-star hotels. C

Car rentals

The car rental markets for both New Zealand and Australia are expected to perform strongly in 2013, with increases of four to seven per cent expected depending on car type. We will see this unfold due to tighter fleet management by suppliers, with available supply more closely aligned with demand to control prices. Car rental also plays a role in the success of some local economies within New Zealand and Australia, particularly for New Zealand’s flourishing wine regions and top conference locations, including Queenstown, Rotorua, Marlborough and the Bay of Islands. Broadly speaking, the Asia Pacific region has been a strong economic performer over the past several years, following the global recession. With an economic outlook that reassures some market nerves, 2013 should be a year of more measured and somewhat normal travel costs.

Accommodating the business traveller. Quest offers business travellers the ultimate in serviced apartment accommodation with a range of stylish studio, one and two bedroom apartments in a location that suits your business needs.

Call 0800 944 400 or visit www.questapartments.co.nz The Quest Serviced Apartment Group – 140 properties throughout New Zealand, Australia and Fiji.

August 2012

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Quest expands and de-brands Specialist corporate long-stay accommodation provider the Quest Serviced Apartment Group is overhauling its Kiwi properties, from introducing new, purpose-built properties, to refurbishing others. The Quest Group in New Zealand opened four new properties in the past 12 months; Quest Henderson, Quest Albany, Quest on Hobson and Quest Hamilton, and has a further five properties in the pipeline for late-2012 and 2013, including the rebuild of its Christchurch branch which managed to escape structural damage despite its location in the Red Zone. A 36-room property being developed in Hinemoa Street, Rotorua, is set to open this November. In 13 years Quest Group has established itself as the largest serviced apartment operator in New Zealand, and is continuing to grow at 15 per cent per annum. “We aim to be everywhere our

Quest Albany

corporate clients need to be,” said the New Zealand CEO Stephen Mansfield. “We know travelling on business is not fun so Quest has put forward a formula whereby corporate travellers feel comfortable and not embarrassed about the bill they have to pay. We focus on the

fact that most people would rather be at home.” This year, Quest has de-branded two properties that no longer meet the requirements of the franchise group – Wellington’s Willis Street building and Auckland Central’s Mount Street property, with two more earmarked for the next 12 months. “Clients have told us the buildings themselves no longer meet their needs,” said Mansfield. “The brand intends to offer four-star serviced apartment accommodation to corporate long-stay clients across all properties.” A major refurbishment programme is now underway to bring older properties in line with the current Quest specification. The Quest Group in New Zealand currently has a total capacity of over 1300 apartments in 32 complexes from Invercargill to Auckland’s North Shore, one in Suva/Fiji and over 130 Quest complexes throughout Australia.

August 2012

All work, no play for Kiwis New Zealand business travellers are less inclined to mix business and pleasure while travelling on company time and money, according to the Accor Asia Pacific Business Traveller Survey 2012. When asked whether they had extended their business trip to take a holiday break or to visit friends and family, or had taken a friend or partner on the trip, New Zealand corporate travellers were the least likely of the eight countries surveyed. Only 11 per cent of Kiwis said they had extended their trip to visit friends and relatives, a mere 10 per cent had tacked on a holiday and only 12 per cent of respondents had taken a friend or partner along on a business trip. This compares with 33 per cent of Taiwanese, 25 per cent of Malaysians and 20 per cent of Hong Kong residents who have extended their business trips to take a holiday. New Zealanders only just pipped the Aussies by three per cent when it came to taking a non-work companion on business. Kiwis are also reluctant to take advantage of their company credit card for “non-work” activities while on business travel, though men are more likely than women to take advantage. Kiwis travel on business and attend meetings more for networking and internal purposes rather than their Asian counterparts whose main task is to sell. For instance, while the principal reason for business travel by Indian and Chinese corporate travellers is for “visiting customers”, New Zealand business travellers stated that “internal company meetings” was their primary reason for travel. Meanwhile, MICE travel accounted for 28 per cent of all trips taken in the first six months of 2012. The quality of the agenda/ programme (60 per cent) is what drives New Zealand business travellers to attend MICE events rather than seek business 28

development opportunities. The survey also found that business travel is still dominated by the boys – almost three quarters of business travellers who responded to the survey across the eight countries were male. Location is still number one when determining choice of hotel – while location was the primary reason for selecting a hotel by travellers from all Asia Pacific countries, 60 per cent of New Zealanders placed the highest importance on location ahead of free Wi-Fi and price. Of the top three services when staying in a hotel, New Zealanders voted for a comfortable bed number one (74 per cent), followed by a good quality clean bathroom/shower (43 per cent) ahead of free internet (36 per cent). New Zealander corporate travellers also prefer to book themselves – 62 per cent of Kiwis usually book directly with the hotel online.


Free wireless trumps breakfast ■ James Hacon is an international speaker, writer and consultant in marketing for travel and tourism. ➥ www.jameshacon.com

Look back five or ten years and I’m sure your clients loved it when you found a room rate included a cooked breakfast. The latest trend survey by online booking engine Hotel.com suggests this is second to the most demanded hotel amenity: free WIFI. You can see a similar picture when browsing reviews of hotels on review site TripAdvisor, with many negative comments showing annoyance at expensive internet access. Personally, as someone who travels around quarter of the year, I must agree. Whilst I travel with a cell phone and a tablet with cellular data, WIFI is still the biggest thing I look for to ensure I can quickly and easily connect via my laptop at the hotel. When you consider this growing trend and how traditional retail travel agents are looking to maintain a significant market share, it leads me to wonder if the travel wholesalers should be promoting the free wireless or even get one up on direct bookings. In my experience many smaller and independent accommodation operators are leading the way with free WIFI, perhaps not seeing it as too much of an overhead. Whilst their large chain hotel counterparts seem to be dragging the chain by continuing to charge exorbitant amounts for internet, often only by means of wire access too. As a former hotelier, I think back

to my days at the helm of a hotel when I too argued against the cost of going fully wireless and giving free access; a difficult call to see a revenue line turn to a cost, I can assure you. Sitting on the other side of the fence, it’s a different matter. I reel at the idea of having to pay as much as 25 per cent of the cost of my room for wireless when I know how cheap bandwidth is even in New Zealand. I have now taken on the mission to push and promote the idea of free wireless for the year. So far, so good. How? By comparing it to another free and antiquated hotel giveaway – the newspaper. Many hotels still give away a free newspaper, many of which will end up in the recycling bin. When you look at the financials closely, it will cost most hotels less to give free wireless internet than a newspaper. I know what most guests would prefer. When I go on to suggest they could swap the concept around and start charging for the newspaper to add a new line of revenue, I’m normally pushing it a little too far. But the result is the same, I’ve convinced another hotel to go the wireless way. So how can wholesalers get one up on direct booking? Easy. Use your influence over chain hotels that rely on your business so much to ensure that your customers get free wireless. You could even go one step further and ensure that all hotels featured in your brochures offer free WIFI – it’ll earn you brownie points, take it from me.

August 2012

Photo Credits || Siri Stafford

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Keith Summer MD Gilpin Travel

“I have been using the services of Paul at Travel Accounting for over 12 years. Paul and his team are always professional and approachable and provide sound advice which has been invaluable over this time. Over the years I have called on Paul to assist me with many areas of my business from Agency Accounts, Accounting Systems, TAANZ Bonding, Business Structure. As we have grown Travel Accounting has been instrumental in getting our business operating more efficiently due to their specialised knowledge of the Travel Industry. In fact sometimes I regard them more as mentors than accountants. I have no hesitation in recommending the services of Paul and the Team at Travel Accounting and appreciate the advice we have received over the years.”

Under pressure ■ Paul Davies pauldavies@travelaccounting.co.nz www.travelaccounting.co.nz Competition between corporate travel agencies is putting increased pressure on margins and profitability. One anonymous corporate travel agent said Air New Zealand-owned Tandem Travel is targeting their clients with deals that are hard to compete with. “In what other industry can a supplier compete directly with its own customers to take business from them?” they commented. This strategy put increasing pressure on independent corporate travel agents to reduce margins as Tandem can offer all the products and services that they can at reduced prices. So how can travel agencies compete with their own supplier? Perhaps now is the time to re-evaluate your suppliers and what they offer. How can you ensure your systems are efficient and how can you benchmark your business against the best in the industry? Profit improvements can only be achieved by four means: 1. Increase sales – maybe difficult in this market 2. Increase margins – even more difficult given the competition 3. Reducing costs – these need careful review 4. Improve productivity – systems, systems, systems This requires business analysis using KPIs to analyse performance: • Revenue to sales – greater than 11 per cent • Staff costs to revenue – less than 52 per cent • Other costs to revenue – less than 26 per cent • Resulting profit is greater than 22 per cent of revenue.

Trish Ryder Director Manly United Travel

39 Maungawhau Road, Epsom Auckland 1023

August 2012

PO Box 109515, Newmarket Auckland 1149 Tel: 09 524 6178 Fax: 09 524 6179 Email: pauldavies@travelaccounting.co.nz

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These figures are taken from the analysis of our top four corporate travel agencies selected on the basis of net profit/ revenue. Generally corporate travel agencies pay a higher proportion of their revenue to their staff than leisure agencies. But they can operate with lower overheads as location is not as important.


h u m a n r e s o u r c e s

What are you measuring? ■ Diane Hallifax Human Resource Advisor Everest Group Limited In most businesses key performance indicators are used to determine if business performance is on track. But how many businesses measure and track human resource related performance indicators? And what should you, or could you be tracking? And why would you? By tracking data that relates to your people you can identify what is important to your business’ strategic success by having access to information that can assist with decision making about people management issues. For example, if your business has a customer service department, tracking turnover rates may be important. If you have a high turnover in that department you can undertake analysis to determine why the turnover is so high, what that means in terms of loss of product and business knowledge and how that impacts on your customers. In this example a simple way of finding out why the turnover is so high is asking employees at exit interviews the reason for leaving. If you are tracking this type of data you will be able to pick up a trend and then do something positive to reverse the trend.

So what could you measure and how do you calculate those measurements? Some common human resource performance indicators include: • Turnover – the number of employees leaving divided by the average number of full time employees • Recruiting efficiency – the total recruiting costs divided by the total number of new hires • Time to fill – the average number of days from when a job vacancy occurs until the day a new employee starts work • Time to hire – average number of days from job vacancy to when a new employee accepts a job offer • Cost per hire – the total recruiting costs, including advertising, search fees, interview time, hiring manager time, background checks and administration divided by the number of new hires • Sickness frequency – tracking and reporting on the total number of sick days per year by month • Training hours per employee – dividing training undertaken by the number of employees • Training costs per employee – dividing the cost of training by the number of employees • Percentage of staff with health and safety training – the number of employees who have been trained divided by total number of employees. What is measured is managed and in the current competitive market businesses need to be able to make decisions based on accurate and relevant data. You don’t want to measure and report on everything, however you do need information that you can use in making good decisions about workforce issues.

August 2012

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PARTY PIX

There’s

something about Sudima

2

1

Sudima Auckland Airport was officially opened recently by Prime Minister John Key. Auckland’s travel industry joined Sudima Hotels staff to celebrate the big day.

3

4

5

6

1: From l-r: Janet Wilson, Travelliance; Richard Elliot, Air Vanuatu; Cheryl Coldicutt, Air New Zealand; and Jeanette Carleton, Air Pacific 2: Sudesh and Laxmi Junjhnuwala, Sudima Hotels 3: Lily He, Eva Air, and Colin Lee, China Airlines 4: Larrie Newman, Quickleen; Mark Pitt, Virgin Australia; and Matt Newman, Quickleen 5: Kelly Bennett, Pacific Destinationz, and Francis Mortimer, New Zealand Pacific Discovery

7

8

9

August 2012

6: Simon Robertson, Auckland Airport; Rob Downie, BNZ; and Joan Withers, Auckland Airport 7: Anna Mabey, Sudima Auckland Airport; Dean Stenton, Dean Stenton Print Consultants; and Bruce Heberley, Bus Travel NZ 8: Mark Barclay, Adventure Pacific, and Rob Finlayson, Leisure Time Tours 9: Debbie Kelly and Nicola Teal, Orbit Corporate Travel; and Duncan Wigzell, Atlas Travel 32


Get ready to be floored!

Start your engines—a brand-new land is coming to Disney California Adventure Park! All around you, the world of Disney•Pixar’s Cars comes to life. Buckle up for fun on Radiator Springs Racers, Mater’s Junkyard Jamboree and Luigi’s Flying Tires. And at night, the whole town lights up with a neon glow brighter than a new car’s paint job!

For more information www.disneyland.com.au/carsland ©Disney/Pixar ©Disney DLRTIM-12-22645


emiratesagents.com/nz

Every day is a big occasion Let your clients rediscover the romance of travel aboard Emirates’ Airbus A380, flying daily to Dubai via Sydney and Melbourne*. From luxurious First Class Private Suites and Shower Spas, to the special ambience of our First and Business Class Onboard Lounge, it’s the most extraordinary way to fly.

*A380 Melbourne flights commence on 2nd October 2012.

NZ Traveltrade August 2012  

Magazine for the travel industry within New Zealand and the world

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