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Future famous Pages 7 & 15

INSIDE SALARY SURVEY ADSCHOOL REPORTS OUT OF HOME DAVE KING & RON SNEDDON

9 421902 251009

I get paid $250,000 to write headlines like this: New Salary Survey inside.

marsdeninch T 09 304 0558 F 09 309 0558

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From business cards to billboard skins. The latest technology. The best people.

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contents

CONTENTS

2 3 8

Editorial

Morningside hub big night out

q + a with Dave King

10 12

q + a with Ron Sneddon

What’s New

16 18 23

#SMJ2 report + pix

AUT Adschool

Technology to Connect

24

MDS Adschool

30

Letterbox

36

29

Fatso

34

Interactive Bytes

50 52 57

Out of Home

Email Marketing

Salary Survey

The Front Page

Ad Media December 2010

1


editorial

VOLUME 25 NUMBER 11

is a registered magazine published by Mediaweb Limited PO Box 5544, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141 Phone 64-9-845 5114, Fax: 64-9-845 5116 Website: www.mediaweb.co.nz

Editor

David Gapes – david@admedia.co.nz 64-9-575 9088, 021 596 686

Advertising

Kelly Lucas admanager@admedia.co.nz 64-9-366 0443, 021 996 529

Designer

Chris Grimstone chrisg@mediaweb.co.nz

Production Manager Fran Marshall franm@mediaweb.co.nz

New Subscriptions

www.admedia.co.nz/subscribe

Subscription Enquiries 64-9-845 5114 subs@mediaweb.co.nz

Annual subscription rate NZ 11 issues AdMedia, 48 issues Fastline - $200.00 incl. GST.

Publisher Mediaweb Limited Printing Benefitz Distribution Gordon & Gotch All content is subject to copyright and may be used only at Mediaweb’s discretion. Copyright © 2010: Mediaweb Limited. ISSN 0112-6997 (Print) ISSN 1179-870X (Online)

Look out for the wall!

G

lenda Wynyard’s always been somebody you could not ignore. An alpha female with a powerful intellect and an encyclopaedic knowledge of the ad business, she could easily have been an intimidating presence. But no. What you get is an unassuming personality and a twinkle in the eye. All round, these are qualities that have earned her wide respect in our industry. The failure of the Media Counsel in January saw Wynyard disappear from public view for some time while she licked her wounds and tried to mend broken bridges. Now she’s back, leading a resurgent Roy Morgan Research NZ as it gears up for a push into the hotly contested online research market. Inevitably, she made a strong impression on our columnist, Scoop’s Alastair Thompson, when they met recently to discuss Roy Morgan’s broadening horizons. His column (on P34) will be the first opportunity most of our readers will have had to catch up with the formidable adwoman since the dark days of January.Thompson took a terrific photo of Wynyard, too, under an oak outside the Roy Morgan HQ in the elegant NZ Finance tower in Swanson St. Speaking of photography (and intellectual firepower), we have more great shots of top ad people as our illuminating q + a series continues with Ron Sneddon and Dave King. And our photo-coverage of the Morningside Hub Xmas party made us instantly regret putting work before pleasure for what looks like one of the year’s great advertising/rock’n’roll parties. This month, we take pleasure in once again displaying the best work from NZ’s two eminent creative adschools – AUT Adschool and MDS Adschool, and acknowledge the work of the outstanding teachers who lead these schools (and wrote & collated our end-of-year reports). This year, AUT saw 11 of its 19 grads pick up jobs at ad agencies. Across the road at MDS it was 11 students out of 20 – solid proof (if ever it was needed) of the core role these institutions play in the market. This is our last issue of the year.We’ll be back, refreshed, in January.We were going to wish you all Happy Xmas but then we remembered this quote from Dave Barry ... In the old days, it was not called the Holiday Season; the Christians called it Christmas and went to church; the Jews called it Hanukka and went to synagogue; the atheists went to parties and drank. People passing each other on the street would say “Merry Christmas!” or “Happy Hanukka!” or (to the atheists) “Look out for the wall!”

David Gapes (david@admedia.co.nz)

2

www.admedia.co.nz


morningside big night out

Party of the year

MARIA KRAJCIROVIC.

S

WAYNE BELL, JAN HELLRIEGEL.

MARIANNE SCHULTZ, DON SOPHIE BANNAN.

GUTHRIE.

MARIA KRAJCIROVIC.

CONAN GORBEY, ALISTAIR

MCGLASHAN, SIMON MAR

K-BROWN.

SOPHIE BANNAN.

top motion footage from the Morningside Hub’s Party in mid-December is soon to be released, says Christina Force, owner of Collective Force and joint organiser of the recent event at their art deco building in Taylor’s Rd. The camera was set up on the rooftop at 9am on Friday and shot the entire set up and conversion of the Automatic/Our Production Team carpark into the venue of the biggest party in the industry this year. And what a party it was! The production brains of Our Production Team and Automatic Films teamed up with Arch Hill Recordings and Native Tongue Music Publishing’s top bands and musicians with amazing projected graphics, film and photography, and arranged delicious food, cocktails, wine and beer to give us an unforgettable show. Sounds of The Calico Brothers, Jan Hellriegel, Mahoney Jane Harris, White Swan Black Swan, Flip Grater, Steve Abel, Don McGlashan, Julia Deans and Barry Saunders floated, bounced and crooned from the stage whilst guests from the music, advertising and film industries munched on Hungarian

LANG LEAV, MICHAEL FAUDET.

Ad Media December 2010

3


CIROVIC. MARIA KRAJ

morningside big night out

SITOR FROM

AND A VI AN STURM

SOPHIE BANNAN.

SE

WALKER.

THE DON MCGLASHAN BAN MARIA KRAJCIROVIC.

D.

MARIA KRAJCIROVIC.

GLEN WOOD, PETER VEGAS.

BARRY SAUNDERS.

Bread and Ripe desserts washed down with Sacred Hill Wine and VnC Cocktails. As the sun glowing on the art deco building in Morningside disappeared, the projections placed inside and outside the building revealed film footage put together by Automatic Films director Greg Woods and shots by Collective Force photographers. Drab Doo Riffs brought the party to its crescendo with 40 minutes of ‘p’twanging guitar, boom-schmacking drums, and basically-scream-your-head-off vocals (www.nativetongue.co.nz/ the-drab-doo-riffs.html) rocking the party to midnight. All the companies involved, which also included DMG who put together the hilarious online invitation, were thrilled with the event and turnout. Links to clips of the stop motion footage can be found at www. admedia.co.nz. – Christina Force (christina@collectiveforce.co.nz)

NDD 0123_B

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MARIA KRAJCIROVIC.

LINDON PUFFIN, IVY ROSSITER, CATHERINE

Y. HAWKES BA


s n a i n o t g n i l l e W

get it!

White knuckle landings in a severe crosswind on a runway ellington experience. W ly ue iq un a is , ll’s gi ar rc ve In an th shorter erything in ev d an od go e th d, ba e th e ar sh we e us Beca * readers every day! Make sure 0 00 5, 22 t ge we , n betwee on market... gt in ell W e th s he ac re y all tu ac ge ssa me your For advertising enquiries, call us direct on (04) 474 0000, or the Fairfax Network on Auckland (09) 970 4000 or Wellington (04) 474 0479 * Nielsen Media Research confirmed this in the National Readership Survey to September 2010.

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morningside hub party

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cover story

Cool cat’s

chair stack T

o l a u n c h A S B ’s Creating Futures platform, Droga5 tapped NZ’s finest young design talents to interpret the written ‘manifesto’ however they wished. They were credited on the ad with details to their own sites, helping them create their future fame. The chair stack is drawn by young Auckland-based talent Lauren ‘Ralphi’ Marriott, who also likes drawing cats marvelling at stars, depressed polar bears and texting baboons. “We wanted to use local artists who are truly world-class tal-

If you like your results next day rather than next month, use newspaper.

ents, and make sure they were recognised,” says Droga5 Creative Director Guy Roberts. “And it fitted perfectly into the Creating Futures idea, in a fresh, unbanklike way.” Other artists included Wellington-based graphic designer Walter Hansen, who turned around his incredibly intricate image in a single weekend, and typographer extraordinaire Charl Laubscher. Co-Creative Director Corey Chalmers says: “At Droga5 we want to change the way traditional media can be used, and this is a great example of a fresh approach co-created with a designer who could actually express themselves with ASB’s full support. “The client was incredibly supportive and challenged us to make images as unique and personal as possible. Now go visit the artists’ websites and pay them huge money to make things of beauty for you.” Lauren Marriott (http://cargocollective.com/ralphiillustration) Charl Laubscher (http://cargocollective.com/charllaubscher) Walter Hansen (http://printsbywalterhansen.com)

Nothing works faster than newspaper. We’ll get your advertising message in front of 1.6 million* people all through the day, as they avidly digest what is going on in the world. (Peak viewing for TV is right at the end of the day). Being daily, production turnaround is very fast, saving you money and allowing clever, tactical messaging. To find out more about how newspapers deliver results now, visit www.nabs.co.nz

*NMR National Readership Survey Q2 2009 to Q1 2010 All people 10+

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Ad Media December 2010

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8

www.admedia.co.nz DAVE KING: 1 OF 3.


Funrun M

&C Saatchi ECD Dave King is one of a select group of NZ-born creatives who have achieved global repu-

tations. In 2007, he made #22 on the Campaign Brief Australasian CDs top 100 – just ahead of James Mok, Roy Meares and Jeremy Taine. In 2008 he moved up to #11, and this year he was named the No 2 Direct CD in the world by the Won Report. He’s served on many juries, including Axis, AWARD, Adfest, and the Cannes Lions. Next year, he’ll be foreman on the Direct jury at D&AD. Just two months ago, former Y&R CD Vaughn Davis said of him: “If there were three guys whose photos I’d stick above my bed, they’d be Dave King, Wayne Pick and Matt Shirtcliffe.” What was your first job in advertising? I was working client side at Telecom in Wellington and was always envious of the creatives like Cory Chalmers who came and presented to us. So I did Ideas School, did OK then sent a note to Sharon Henderson who had just announced that they were opening up Aim Direct in Wellington. We had a disastrous meeting where the art director I had teamed up with walked out, saying she would only work with Colenso or Saatchi. I thought that had screwed everything up but Shaz called a few days later saying she had a job for me, but in Auckland. And there was one proviso: That a guy called Pat Murphy liked me and felt he could work with me. Thankfully Pat was in a generous mood. What was your greatest moment in advertising? There are lots of moments I look back on and smile about. Getting my first job, getting my first award, getting my job

at M&C Saatchi in Sydney are all great moments. I think when you have clients actually talking you up and thanking you for making a difference to their business is something that you always feel great about. To date, however, taking over the running of M&C Saatchi here in New Zealand has been the best. We’re an unbelievable brand in many parts of the world and this is our opportunity to do the same here. And I get to do it with the nicest group of people I’ve experienced to date. As well as Tony and Darryn. The worst? Redundancies. A couple of years ago, like most agencies, we had to let a fair few people go. Having to sit and tell talented friends that there was no longer the work to keep them on was horrible and not something I’d want to go through again.

q + a

Will M&C Saatchi bid for the business? I’ll get back to you on that one. Going to the Rugby World Cup? I’m 15 minutes walk to Eden Park. It’d be kind of lame not to go. I’m getting tickets to Fiji vs Samoa. There should be some nice big hits in that. What current work from another NZ agency do you wish M&C Saatchi had done? I absolutely love the John Kirwan depression stuff James and the guys at Draft have done. Not only has it inspired me, it’s also helped. It’s honest, real and just plain awesome. On a lighter scale, I loved the Kit Kat seat that Pete and JWT did. So too the welcoming of the Aussie cricketers by DDB. Made me laugh.

Is advertising still fun? Shit yes. Every day here is a blast. Even when things are bad, they’re still good. It’s essential that you get on with the people you work with, you don’t employ wankers or prima donnas, and you do great work. We inherited some brilliant people and some wonderful clients here and we’re well on the way to becoming what we think we should be. The challenge of making us as good here as we are in Sydney is something that adds spice every day. It’s really enjoyable.

What are your advertising influences? Gordon Clarke once yelled at us for not getting out of the office. He was right. Most of the work that I’m most proud of has come about by watching real people doing real things. People by themselves looking sad, students scraping together a couple of bucks for a burger at 2am, dudes sneaking out of bars when it’s their round. See what people do then figure out a way of resonating with them. The creatives I worked with at M&C Saatchi in Sydney were the other big influence. Ben, Tom, Graham, Oli but mostly my old partner Gav, and Michael Andrews. They are truly inspirational. And funny.

Looking forward to seeing how the Supercity works out? It’s not something that takes up too much of my time thinking about to be honest. If they put a train line into Grey Lynn I’d think they’d done a decent job. And a decent red light district.

Guiding principles? Your ads have to be based on a real truth, not an advertising truth. Get clients then punters nodding along with the truth and you’re two thirds of the way there. Be genuine. Be nice. And have fun. Every day. Ad Media December 2010

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10

www.admedia.co.nz

RON SNEDDON: GOD BLESS SOLITAIRE.


q + a

Truth M

serum

r Smith media director Ron Sneddon has been at the agency since 2002, but we won’t call him a ‘veteran’

(read down). We will say that he’s one of the most respected media experts in the business – and, back in the days (2000-2006) when he wrote a ballsy monthly media column (called Bang) in AdMedia, one of the most fearsome. In the years since, Sneddon’s largely kept his head down and his arse up. Mr Smith has become a significant full-service independent with a growing portfolio of retail and national clients. In 2009, Mr Smith achieved finalist status in the Fairfax AdMedia Indie Agency of the Year awards. And just this year, Sneddon finally became a fully fledged member of The Establishment when he was voted onto the CAANZ executive board. What was your first job in media? Trainee reporter on the NZ Herald – I was sacked after my first story, in which I managed to confuse putting your clock forwards (or backwards) for the start of daylight saving. That day the Herald readers got to work an hour early (or late). What’s the thing you’re worst at? Attention to detail.

Being around to see our client ITM secure sponsorship of what is now the ITM Cup. We happened to get the drop that the incumbent Air NZ was bailing out so we jumped on a plane to NZRU headquarters in Wellington the next day, and not too long after, ITM had it in the bag. It’s been very satisfying seeing this brand create an enormous national profile, outside of their traditional audiences. Air NZ spent years and millions to leverage the association. ITM had that job done on day one thanks to the national media, the rugby public and the players embracing the ITM brand. Looking forward to seeing how the Supercity works out? Like most people who don’t live in South Auckland, I’ve completely ignored it. A big mistake, now we’ve got Len Brown! Will Mr Smith bid for the business? Only if Len quits. Going to the Rugby World Cup? I went in the online auction thing and wound up with tickets for England vs Scotland. I felt really happy with that otherwise I would be going to see the All Blacks, who I can’t stand.

What’s the thing you’re best at? Well, these days, timeliness.

What media do you love the most? I’m an Apple fan. I take my iPad to the loo. God bless Solitaire.

What is your greatest moment in media so far?

Which media is overated? Word of mouth.

At what point do you go from being a person who works in media, to being a media veteran? The word veteran makes it sound as though you’ve been to the Korean War, which I haven’t. Mark Jennings referred to me as a veteran the other day. Right after that I smashed him in the nuts with my cane. What’s your greatest business frustration? You ask any media supplier what is the most lamentable thing in their business today and they’ll tell you it’s inexperienced, junior media managers fooling about with clients’ multimillion-dollar budgets. These are the poorly paid factory workers, whose masters have given away their margin in the interests of cutting each others’ throats. And we wonder why everything’s up for pitch all the time? The shop mentality has commoditised media to the point where a client’s first question is, how cheap can I get it, not how good can I get it. What’s your greatest personal frustration? Not having a very good singing voice. If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing? Presbyterian minister. Guiding principles? Drink the very best wine you can afford. There is no such thing as a great red for $12.99. Tell the truth and hug ya Mum.

Ad Media December 2010

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what’s new

AD OF THE MONTH The latest two releases in ASB’s Creating Features TVC rollout focus on the story of a boy and his pet sheep, and the bank’s controversial IVF scheme. Both get beautiful treatment at the hands of Droga5 and Flying Fish. Engaging stories, accurate scripts & casting, and cinematic production from master director Gregor Nicholas.

WHAT’S NEW ADS LIVE AT WWW.ADMEDIA.CO.NZ

Not that bizarre, this Bazaar. Agency: Hot Foot Client company: George Weston Foods Brand/product: Bazaar Breads Client contacts: Sandra Geange, Simon Dixon Media used: TV, Magazine, Web Creative director: Kim Ellison Account director: Casey McPike    Creative team: Kim Ellison, Paul Taylor, Matthias May Agency producer: Nick Barnes Production/film co: FSP Producer: Peter Mayo Director: Miles Murphy Post production: Toybox    Soundtrack: Nigel @ Sale Street Studio      

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what’s new

Air Asia hit the streets of Christchurch on the 1st of December announcing a new route from Christchurch to Kuala Lumpar. The Air Asia CEO was itching to drive one of the 6 cars! Agency: Strategy Client company: Air Asia X Brand/product: NZ Launch Client contact: Darren Wright Media used: Outdoor Account manager: Kylie Matchitt Media director: Val Brunsden

Congratulations to our November winner of the NAB Newspaper Ad of the Month competition, Droga5. Client company: ASB Client contacts: Catherine McGrath, Deborah Simpson, Rachel Gardiner, Kathryn Thomas Agency: Droga5 Creative partner: Mike O’Sullivan Creative directors: Guy Roberts, Corey Chalmers Business partner: Andrew Stone Business director: James Polhill Production manager: Rob Malone Designers: Michelle Maude, Rob Jenkinson Illustrator: Lauren Marriott (cargocollective.com/ralphiillustration)

Ad Media December 2010

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what’s new

A powerful campaign that supports the future of Resident Doctors in New Zealand. Facing deteriorating terms and conditions of employment this campaign is crucial in stemming the exodus of young doctors across the ditch. Agency: Reach Consulting Client company: NZRDA Brand/product: Resident Doctors    Media used: TV, Online video Agency producer: Jillian Talbot Production/Post prod online: Pure Producer: Matt Kerr Director: Jamie McKenzie

To remind people in Christchurch to support their local restaurants at Christmas we built a 6x3 mosaic billboard out of broken crockery from the hardest hit restaurants.      Agency: Hotfoot Client company: Restaurant Association of NZ Brand/product: Restaurant Association Christchurch Client contacts: Steve MacKenzie, Bart Littlejohn Media used: Outdoor, Web, Radio    Creative director: Kim Ellison Account director: Craig Polley Media strategist: Peter Myles Creative team: Kim Ellison, Matthias May Art team: Spencer Pullon, Hannah Kidd, Matthias May

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what’s new

ASB refreshes its brand with the new Creating Futures positioning. The first two commercials highlight the emotional journey of a couple undergoing IVF treatment, and a boy who must decide what he loves more – his Nintendo or his pet sheep. Agency: Droga5 Client company: ASB Client contacts: Catherine McGrath, Deborah Simpson, Rachel Gardiner, Kathryn Thomas Media used: TV Creative partner: Mike O’Sullivan Creative directors: Guy Roberts, Corey Chalmers Business partner: Andrew Stone Business director: James Polhill Digital partner: Jose Alomajan Agency producer: Jackie Clark, Yes Ltd Production co: Flying Fish Producer: Penelope Sinclair Director: Gregor Nicholas Post production online: Fish Digital, Blockhead, Toy Box Post production offline: Fish Digital Post production supervisor: Ken Sparks Editor: Paul Maxwell Sound mix: Digital Post Music: Franklin Road Franklin Rd producer: Stacey Thomas

Ad Media December 2010

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social media junction 2

Holistic is the new black AdMedia correspondent Amar Trivedi summarises the Social Media Junction 2 experience.

A

t the Cannes Lions 2010, when Best Buy’s Twitter-based TwelpForce took out the Titanium & Integrated Grand Prix, Old Spice The man your man could smell like took out the Film Grand Prix, and Ikea Facebook Tag Showroom won the Gold Cyber Lion, it cemented social media’s place in the marketing mix, and for once, the creatives agreed. Social media ... what’s the big idea? • A big idea creates behavioural change and hence, causes discomfort & fear. It always faces stiff resistance at first. • But once it takes root, it grows organically and quickly gets embedded into our every day – making us go, how did we ever live without this? • The acid test of a big idea lies in its ability to travel and adapt across media, markets, countries and cultures. Social media ticks all the above.

In a world of catchphrases, sticky content and viral videos, the use of social media itself has become a meme (pronounced meem). Meme is a cultural unit (an idea or value or pattern of behaviour) that is passed from one person to another by non-genetic means (as by imitation). Memes are the cultural counterpart of genes. Sample this: Facebook has 500 million+ users – that’s one in 14 humans! Heck, there’s even a Hollywood movie on it – if that’s not a big idea, what is? So it’s hardly surprising that clever corporate folk turned up in droves to attend Social Media Junction 2 (#SMJ2), a meeting of the best social media and digital marketing minds in NZ. It included: Day 1: Public Sector Social Media Workshop with Simon Wakeman, Medway Council, UK. Day 2: A star-studded Securing ROI in SM Marketing conference featuring six top

LET PR), S), NICHOLAS O’FLAHERTY (BUL ADEN BUSHELL (MEDIA MONITOR ). (ASB LLUM SIMONE MCCA

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international speakers and Kiwi marketing stalwarts. Day 3: Social Media Content Strategy MasterClass with Lee Odden, TopRank Online Marketing, USA. Organised by Bullet PR, the event proved a rich ground for learning in real-time, as each day threw up solid ken on SM marketing covering topics like social content strategy, policy & protocol, ROI metrics, monitoring & measurement, engagement & response, online community management, business blogging ... Along with real-world examples and popular case studies, the speakers brought a fresh mix of stories on the successful use of SM overseas (and locally), and shared their unique perspective on SM best practice and hands-on usage. Top take-out from #SMJ2: Content used to be king. Today it is king, queen, prince, princess and the kingdom. At a time when anyone with a PC, camera or smartphone is a scriptwriter, storyteller, filmmaker, the need of the hour is quality content & specialist content creators.

BULLET PR: ROBYN ELLSON , JENNIFER DUVAL-SMITH, LOUISE RICE, ALEX ERASMUS, NICHOLA S O’FLAHERTY.


social media junction 2

Q – In the midst of inundating content, how do you ensure your message stands out? A – Skill integration, knowledge-sharing, in-house training, crossfunctional resourcing & optimised social content. But it’s easier said than done.To create engaging content, optimise, promote, distribute & measure it via multiple touchpoints, you need all the pieces in the jigsaw to fit seamlessly. The marketing communications team (brand, product, sales, customer reps); the web & digital team (developers, designers, SEO, analysts) & the ad/PR agency (servicing, creative, strategy, media) all need to work together. And then, there’s the community = cocreators! Quite clearly, holistic is the new black. Key Learnings #SMJ2: • Don’t just do social – be social. Participate. Share. Express. Comment. Be useful. Add value. • A collaborative mindset, readiness to experiment, openness to negative feedback, and a plan to invest resources are prerequisites to corporate SM engagement. • Getting the balance between transparency and privacy – right mix of listening & responding; tone of brand & personal voice – needs practice and patience. • SM is neither free nor easy. It’s time-consuming. And yes, it is real work!

DDEN, ITH, LEE O DUVAL-SM , AMAR TRIVEDI. ER IF N N JE TY O’FLAHER NICHOLAS

SANDRA KING (FAIRFAX MED IA),

VAUGHN DAVIS (THE GOAT FARM).

The Panellists International Speaker Panel: Cliff Rosenberg (Linkedin Australia & NZ), Simon Wakeman (Medway Council), Louise Denver (Deloitte Australia), Michael Fox (Shoes of Prey), Lee Odden (Top Rank), Darren Whitelaw (Government of Victoria); chair Vincent Heeringa (Tangible Media). Kiwi Speaker Panel: Jarrod Bear (Tui), Alex Erasmus (Bullet PR), Simone McCallum (ASB), Stuart McMullin (Hell), Richard Irvine (Telecom); chair Michael Carney (Netmarketing Services).

• Content – It’s not about the quantity. It’s about quantity ... with quality. • Strategise before going social. Give it a good think. It’s not a campaign. It’s a commitment. • Success Mantra: Don’t just work hard. Work holistic! View the detailed #SMJ2 post + pics at www.MrSocial1.blogspot. com. Compliments of the season and best wishes for the new year. trivediamar@hotmail.com | facebook.com/trivediamar | @Mr_Madness | LinkedIN.com/in/trivediamar.

NATALIE ROBINSO N (TELEC TRIBAL), OM RICHARD IRVINE (T ), CLAIRE BONHAM ELECOM), LOUIS VA HOLDEN (RAPP N WYK (G EN-I).

ON WAKEMAN.

AMAR TRIVEDI, SIM

Ad Media December 2010

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aut adschool end-of-year report

People

power

I

t’s tempting to judge the year by how many teams get placements, and on that count we’re very happy: 13 creatives out of 19 in agencies already. Not to mention three suits – one shortlisted for the CAANZ suit scholarship, two hired. Or we could look at awards: • Won the 50 Cent Classic at the Art of the Envelope. • Shortlisted for the TVNZ Axis student award (winner to be announced at Axis 2011). • Three teams out of five shortlisted (from four different schools nationally) for the NZ Post Student Marketer of the Year. Not bad. But hey, we all know advertising is about its people and this year’s people have been outstanding. Once again, we’ve had the privilege of spending a year with some fantastic new talent. Once again, that new talent has had the benefit of learning from and working with the best in the business. This year special thanks go (in no particular) order to Toby Talbot (DDB), Andrew Holt (Clemenger BBDO), Perry Bradley (Film Construction), Ron Rendel (Film Construction), Karl Fleet (Colenso BBDO), Chris Schofield (DraftFCB), Billy McQueen (DraftFCB),

Ben Lightfoot (McCann Worldwide), James Mok (DraftFCB), Mike O’Sullivan (Droga5), Jane Eagle (Aim Proximity), Michael Barnfield (Aim Proximity), Tim Huse (Sugar), Damon O’Leary (Ogilvy), Pete Ogden (JWT), Andy Blood (TBWA\Whybin), Vaughn Davis (The Goat Farm), James Tucker (DDB), Helen Steemson (Words for Breakfast), Jono Aidney (Sugar), Simon Vicars (DDB), Kim Pick (Rapp), Amy Thexton (TBWA\Whybin), Robert Munro (NAB), Vanessa Winley (TVNZ), Julie Donaldson (TL+C), Tim Cunningham (QVS), Cara Chapman (Random House), Fiona Woolley (NZ Post), Marco Marinkovich (Creative Bank) Sue Young (Rapp Tribal), Alex Stoneham (Rapp Tribal), Chris Monaghan (AmbientX), Mark Pickering (AmbientX), Jane Jamieson (DraftFCB), Tim and Bex (Saatchi, now on other side of the planet at 180 Amsterdam), Tara McKenty (TBWA\Whybin), Iain Nealie (TBWA\Whybin), James Dashfield (Mediaworks), Kelly Ouerkerk (DDB), Terri Byrne (Planet fm). In the end though, it’s all about the work. Here’s some of – but not all of – what we and others think is the best. What do you think? – Jane Berney, Dave Brown, Paul White

ERIN GULYAS & CHRISTABEL SPONG (ART OF THE ENVELOPE WINNER).

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aut adschool end-of-year report

KEVIN BACHTIAR & SASHA ARANDELOVIC (PRINT).

BRONWYN RETIEF & ELLIOT RAWSON (HEINZ BAT).

ERIN GULYAS & CHRISTABEL SPONG (WEIGHTWATCHERS).

Ad Media December 2010

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aut adschool end-of-year report

WICKY TAFAU & FRANCES COOKE (MADMEN).

WICKY TAFAU & FRANCES COOKE (THE DOG WHISPERER).

BRONWYN RETIEF & ELLIOT RAWSON (INSTANT KIWI).

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aut adschool end-of-year report KEVIN BACHTIAR & SASHA ARANDELOVIC (PARKINSONS).

JARED VAN HEUNEN & JENNI WU (PANADOL RAPID).

KEVIN BACHTIAR & SASHA ARANDELOVIC (TIP TOP).

Ad Media December 2010

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aut adschool end-of-year report

WICKY TAFAU & FRANCES COOKE (OUTRAGEOUS EXHIBITION).

WICKY TAFAU & FRANCES COOKE (SUPERNANNY).

KEVIN BACHTIAR & SASHA ARANDELOVIC (ADSHELS).

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technology to connect

Crouch, touch,

engage!

By Chris Graham

D

oes this sound familiar? I am sure I have heard it somewhere before, or am I getting confused with listen, touch, engage from a marketing article? Customers, I am told, are tired of brand owners and their one-way monologue approach to marketing (me to, to be honest!). But then again I am a bit of a control freak. Listen, touch, engage will always work for me. I perpetually preach about triggered responses, personalised multi-channel marketing, if a customer does X then the system responds with Y, in any media and with LISTEN, TOUCH, ENGAGE! a high degree of customer insight. We then capture everything in a CRM and although we may listen, touch and engage it is all a highly formalised ritual relationship, sort of a basic two-step with androids, instead of a free-flowing open discussion. I guess as marketing professionals, the listen, touch, and engage scenario is fine as long as we are calling the shots? Unfortunately, I am not sure that the next step in marketing will be quite so controllable; in fact it might be a bit of a scrum. Where we sit and look at social media portals and wait for the right titbit to be passed to us, then we pick it up and run with it, but with no guarantee that the engagement will flow along a defined path that we can control or call a interaction. As anyone who reads this section regularly will know, I am a great advocate of Salesforce CRM, if you don’t know what it is I suggest you visit Salesforce.com – almost 700,000 installs now and millions of users. One of the things Salesforce allows you to do is load add-ons into it via a connection called Appexchange. These add-ons could be bulk email systems, account mapping systems or printon-demand solutions; virtually anything is available to enhance Salesforce. However, the ones that caught my eye recently, and which inspired this article, are related to social media. I am no expert on social media – then again I am not sure anyone is. How can you be an expert in an unmanageable and uncontrollable environment? We can, however, try to get control and make a noise at the right time. Within Salesforce you can set up a range of Appexchange

add-ons to monitor keywords from Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, chatter, Gmail, Gmail applications and virtually any social media format imaginable. Then within your CRM system you define the keywords that you want to listen for and then you wait. Salesforce will track and record any of the key words that you have highlighted allowing you to engage in the conversation and hopefully sell your products. Although the reality of it is perhaps that you can ensure that your brand is not maligned or misquoted and perhaps selling products will be secondary. One of the clever things about this technology is that it can apply a score or rating card to the responses it gathers and the words it listens for. This allows you to put a conversion rate, or status of readiness to buy, next to a potential customer as you track their movements through websites, Twitter, Facebook and so on. Very Big Brother I know but if the boot fits you’ve got to wear it. Finally because all this is tracked in a CRM system you will have analytics, measurements and stats coming out of your ears. But if we are moving into a multi-faceted marketing environment where accountability and measurement are key then we need to measure the activity and response rates in social media as well. Not exactly controlling the processes but it makes me feel a little bit safer in that I know who is talking about me and when. Chris Graham (chris@purls.me) is ceo of PURL Technologies, specialist in artwork automation and 1-2-1.

Ad Media December 2010

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mds adschool end-of-year report

40 weeks at the

Media Design

School By CD Kate Humphries

4

0 weeks and by the end of it, the students were feeling each and every one of those weeks. 40 weeks, starting out under a blazing sun in early February and finishing mid-November with the sun firing down on our end-of-year show at the Mini Garage. 40 weeks of fast and furious endeavour (and far too many four-letter words). 40 weeks of fertile work from students who managed to take out both the NAB main student & topical prizes; a Crowbar gold for copywriting, a silver for art direction, a silver for print, as well as a bronze and two out of three finalists places in the TVNZ Axis student challenge (the winner is announced at the Axis Awards in March); an Anno finalist place; and news just in – the winning place in Express magazine’s Safe Sex competition (the ads are being published in the December 15th issue). 40 weeks of flirting with fame via our social media projects: Shirts Off for Les Mills earned itself some healthy coverage, which is more than you can say for Hadleigh Sinclair, who took his shirt off a second time for Giappo Milkshakes. Three more students got to grips with a naughty Anglo Saxon word to promote Savour & Devour. Based on the insight that the two things everyone loves to savour and devour are revenge and cup cakes, they launched an alliterative-sounding cup cake business’ which featured on The Ad Show, BFM, RDU, Breakfast with Paul Henry, Campbell Live and in hundreds of blogs. 40 weeks and finally, financial help! Not only did Marsden Inch chuck in extra money behind the bar at the show, they’ve also decided to award a Marsden Inch Scholarship in 2011. So a big thanks to Jeneal, Rob and Cindy for recognizing that throwing

24

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your heart and soul into the business can be hard on the pocket. 40 weeks on, and out of 20 students at our show: two now have jobs, 11 have placements, four have ones starting in the New Year, and two agencies have sold concepts from the students’ portfolios to their clients. 40 weeks worth of thanks to the ferocious Jeneal and the fragrant David for their tireless tutouring; to MDS graphic design tutor Penny Dombroski for her help with competition entries (and for designing our end-of-year invite); and to Arran Birchenough for gifting us a year’s free access to Getty images. Well that’s enough F words from me; I’m off now for a spot of festive feasting and fighting with the whanau. But before I go, 40 weeks of gratitude for their feedback (as either mentor, guest and/or industry panellist) to Toby Talbot, Mike O’Sullivan, Karl Fleet, Guy Roberts, Corey Chalmers, Andy Blood, Greg Wood, Paul Catmur, Anne Boothroyd, Peter Vegas, Lisa Fedyszyn, Jonno McMahon, Tony Clewitt, Chris Schofield, Billy McQueen, Josh & Jamie, Matthias May, Mark Addy, Peter Ogden, Mike Ramsey, Jordan Young, Richard Loseby, Martin Hermans, Gianni Russo, Lorenz Perry, Steve McCabe, Kim Fraser, Anthony Wilson, Iain MacMillan, Matt Hampton, Adam Taylor, Antony Bell, Tamryn Kerr, Rachel Walker, Damian Galvin, Rory McKechnie, Karen Maurice O’Leary, Lucian Law, Christie Cooper, James Conner, Tom Paine, Sarah Longworth, Vaughn Davis, Simon Vicars, Jamie Tucker, Mike Wilson, Carlos Savage, Jesse Stevens, Matt Weaver, Carla Rotundo, Keren Phillips, Hayden Raw, Helen Steemson, Gordon Frykberg, Darryl Paton, Josh Frizzel, Adam Steven, Maya McNichol, Trent Brooks, Bob Moore, Rob Lewis, Matthew Masters, Nick Smith, Samantha Ramulu & Eugene Eastlake.


mds adschool end-of-year report

CHICKEN ART NICK SKELTON-KYD & HAMISH ABEL’S FRENZ FREE-RANGE CHICKENS WALK ABOUT CREATING CHICKEN ART.

CHICKEN PEDOMETERS: BY GIVING CHICKENS PEDOMETERS BETH O’BRIEN & THOMAS DARLOW DEMONSTRATE JUST HOW FREE-RANGE FRENZ CHICKENS ACTUALLY ARE.

GIAPPO MILKSHAKES: ‘VIRAL-HADLEIGH’ STRIPS OFF AND STRIKES AGAIN WITH A VIRAL IDEA FOR GIAPPO MILKSHAKES.

SHIRTS OFF HADLEIGH SINCLAIR & JONNO FOX’S TOPICAL “SHIRTS OFF” CAMPAIGN FOR LES MILLS MAKES THE NEWS

Ad Media December 2010

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mds adschool end-of-year report

HIV POKED A FINALIST IN EXPRESS MAGAZINE’S SAFE SEX COMPETITION, JENNIE LIDDELL & JULIA FERRIER’S CAMPAIGN USES FACEBOOK’S POKED FUNCTION TO SHOW HOW EASY IT IS FOR HIV TO SPREAD.

CAREFREE TAMPONS HADLEIGH SINCLAIR & ALEX TYLER’S CAMPAIGN SHOWS WOMEN’S ‘HIGH-FIVING’ DELIGHT IN CAREFREE’S NEW LEAKPROOF TECHNOLOGY.

PEARS SOAP APP AN APP FROM ED KNOWLES AND CHARLES TWADDLE TRANSLATES MODERN TEXT MESSAGES INTO MORE EVOCATIVE 1789 LOVE LETTERS AS PART OF A PEAR’S SOAP ‘ORIGINAL BEAUTY’ CAMPAIGN.

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mds adschool end-of-year report

RAYBANS TOM DARLOW’S “MAKES ANY LOOK INTENTIONAL” CAMPAIGN FOR RAYBANS.

HIV GIFTWRAP THE WINNER OF EXPRESS MAGAZINE’S SAFE SEX COMPETITION SOPHIE BURTON & PO TANNER’S “IT’S NOT A GIFT UNLESS YOU WRAP IT” CAMPAIGN. AUCKLAND MEMORIAL PARK JEN WALDRON & ROB COOK’S WEB BANNERS FOR AUCKLAND MEMORIAL PARK

Ad Media December 2010

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mds adschool end-of-year report

STOLEN RUM SOPHIE BURTON & EMILY DRAKE’S POS FOR STOLEN RUM ‘STEALS’ ATTENTION AWAY FROM OTHER RUMS.

STORAGE KING PART OF A BILLBOARD CAMPAIGN BY CHARLES TWADDLE & ED KNOWLES, WHICH IMMEDIATELY DEMONSTRATES THE BENEFIT OF STORAGE KING.

ONE NEWS SARAH LITWIN-SCHMID & EMILY DRAKE’S BILLBOARDS FOR TV ONE’S NEWS AT SIX.

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motivation

Sharing orporate social responsibility – it might be a bandwagon to some, but for Fatso it’s helping to acquire and convert new customers. Fatso is the quirky brand we’ve come to love via those catchy Dennis TVCs. While the ads work to convert new customers, so too do referrals from existing customers. Historically Fatso’s acquisition strategy has involved incentivising customers who refer friends and family with monetary rewards, gifts and prizes. While such acquisition drives have proved successful in the short term, they were difficult to sustain in the long term and suffered from a lack of continuity. Following Fatso’s merger with DVD Unlimited and Movieshack, the company began to think about new ways to acquire customers. Business manager Cuan Gray was inspired by the work of other Kiwi brands that really spoke to their customer bases, motivating them to do something – even something small that might help a customer to take the time to send an email or click on a referral link. Gray joined Fatso in 2007, reuniting with founder Rob Berman who he’d worked with at mail order business Chrisco. “Previous experience working in the mail order hamper industry proved to us that a referral mechanism that really speaks to your customers can be the catalyst to decent growth,” Gray says. Searching for a new initiative to promote referrals for HELPING CHARITY: CUAN GRAY. existing Fatso members, Gray came up with the charity donation idea. “I asked myself, what can we do to incentivise our customers? How about if they want to give money away – not their own, but ours – in aid of a good cause.” So Fatso’s charity referral scheme was born. It works like this: for members who refer a friend for a free trial, Fatso donates to the customer’s choice of one of three charities. If the referred party decides to try a free trial with Fatso, the donation goes up. And if they end up joining Fatso as a member the business coughs up again.

By Michelle Gimblett

Fatso’s referral scheme sees charities receive up to $13 from just one customer referral. “For us the historical cost of a single customer acquisition via advertising and marketing has been far greater than the full donation cost per referral,” says Gray. “We’re not trying to be the saviours of the world here, but we do think this is a really sustainable model that incentivises customers along the way. Plus there’s the added bonus of helping out some very deserving NZ charities at the same time.” This coupled with the average New Zealander’s altruistic streak has seen the initiative achieve instant popularity amongst Fatso’s members. Online tallies of how much each member has contributed to each charity against the total donation tally have proved successful and even created a bit of friendly competition amongst members. An acquisition driver with a difference, Fatso has plans to develop the referral scheme further in years to come. But for now, they’re happy to sit back and watch as their customers give their money away and refer their mates, colleagues and families into the friendly Fatso fold. Michelle Gimblett and her boutique PR shop noodle (www.noodlehq.co.nz) assist Fatso with PR and copywriting.

fatso.co.nz

C

the ove

How it works Fatso selected three charities for customers to direct their Fatso donations to: • Project Kiwi Trust is NZ’s first community-based kiwi conservation initiative, saving Coromandel North Island brown kiwi on the Kuaotunu Peninsula. • SPCA provides shelter for animals requiring care and ensures the promotion of successful long-term adoptions for suitable animals. • Variety is the children’s charity that helps Kiwi kids who are sick, disabled or disadvantaged, to be the best they can be.

Ad Media December 2010

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letterbox

Boxing

champions E

lectronic mail may be faster but, perhaps ironically, it is an increasingly digitised world that is now giving traditional snail mail a more measurably effective marketing clout. That’s because there are now some very sophisticated tools for identifying those households that are likely to be most receptive to a particular marketing offer or brand promotion. The old scatter-gun approach to mass mailouts is being replaced by almost surgically precise targeting. And the feedback loops are also getting stronger which means that DM clients can better measure the return on investment for specific campaigns. Over the past nine months, data analytics and direct response have helped create a major shift in the direct marketing game, according to PMP’s Mark Thompson. “The other part of this shift is that it has allowed people to do unaddressed campaigns in the same way they used to do addressed – so you can’t really split the two any more.”

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The days of snail mail are far from over. In terms of reach and reception, the letterbox remains a powerful messaging medium. And when linked to increasingly clever analytics, it can lead to a knockout campaign. Vicki Jayne checks out the allure of post. As general manager of both PMP Distribution and its targeting & analytics business, Pacific Micro Marketing, Thompson straddles what used to be fairly separate functions that, operating in tandem, add a new layer of sophistication to the DM process. “There’s hardly anything we do in this business that doesn’t now have some increased level of sophistication,” he says. “It’s way beyond where things used to be. So, on the transactional side of things, we are executing cost effective DM campaigns for clients using targeted and ‘washed’ unaddressed delivery, where previously they would have mailed it.

“Our wash is undertaken using a geodemographic profiling tool – Mosaic™ in PMP’s case – that helps us rinse out unwanted addresses (including those of existing clients when it comes to acquisition offers), leaving only those that best fit the target profile. In an increasingly cost-constrained world, people want to get a tailored message into the market. “It’s the valuable middle ground between unaddressed and putting a stamp on your DM but allows you to be a lot thriftier and get to a lot more people using the same amount of printed material than if you just spammed everybody or invested heavily in going addressed. It’s


letterbox

MARK THOMPSON (PMP).

DAVID NATION (REACHMEDIA).

204775

all about stretching the dollar.” On the response side of the equation, PMP now uses ‘media measure’ – a software tool that utlises personalised URLs to close the feedback loop and track response to the DM message. “Recipients are directed onto the URL where their response, or lack of it, their engagement with the offer, the creative and the brand can all be measured and viewed live by the agency and end client,” Thompson says. “Data is collected segmented and fed into the next campaign. We are able to offer this service for both addressed and unaddressed mail campaigns.” Content and offers within the same campaign can be fine tuned and catalogues varied to get the best possible

HIGH DEFINITION. Letterbox media delivered direct to your customers is perennially the most cost effective method of advertising. Let’s be clear, PMP is New Zealand’s ONLY unaddressed distribution network that can segment your advertising at a household level for maximum results and higher ROI. With an 89% reach of all people over 15 for as little as 3 cents each, it’s the right choice. Add value to your client’s business,

call us today on 0800 938 666 or visit www.pmplimited.co.nz

Ad Media December 2010

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art of the envelope

letterbox

Cutting-edge design that NZ’s designing gene is healthier than ever. In fact, pushing the envelope has become something of a national pastime (www.pushtheenvelope.co.nz). While awards entries were down a bit this year, inventiveness wasn’t, says Corey Martin, spokesman for longtime award sponsor Candida. “While a lot of entries used traditional envelopes, there was one made of possum skin which appealed to the senses – both sight and touch.” That promotion for Mini was one of nine finalists – three in each of

the three categories. Category

winners were the Kustom Konnection Saw (Mailed Masterpiece); They What builder could resist an envelope in the form of a papier-

Took Everything for AMI by AUT’s Erin Gulyas, Christabel

mâché saw – a DM promotion for Genesis Energy that not

Spong & Frances Cooke (The 50 Cent Classic); and AXIS

only increased new connections by 15% but earned DraftFCB

Awards for NZ Post by Saatchi & Saatchi’s Alex Hamilton,

the Best in Show at last month’s Art of the Envelope Awards.

Matt Shirtcliffe, Jeff Harris & Heath Davy (in the Redefine &

And – with fewer foreign-stamped missives from far-flung friends to brighten the mailbox – envelopes are gaining a kind of retro appeal that helps the DM cause. Visual appeal is certainly an important incentive to open mail, and the awards, now in the ninth year, demonstrated

ROI from targeted demographics, he says. The use of analytics has become much more the norm, says Reachmedia general manager sales & marketing, David Nation. “The data available means you can optimise not just the message but start looking at which products are more likely to be sold in a specific area and version out your catalogues to get quite specific, well-targeted distribution. A few years back NZ’s big iconic retailers would have considered ever y household in the nation as a potential customer, Nation says. “Now they’re targeting, not so much on a demographic base but on information relevance. Once you start understanding the market niches within the wider country – the

32

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Redesign category). NZ Post’s Fiona Woolley said sponsors were thrilled with the level of creativity involved. “We hope it will help inspire people to continue designing envelope art that truly pushes creative boundaries.”

areas of high spend across the various different categories – then you can start specifically targeting those both in terms of acquisition and retention.” The company partners with Datamine and there is an associated cost, says Nation. “But the reality is that cost is outweighed by the top cost we save at the printer and the ROI goes up dramatically. We have clients generating anywhere between 25% to 30% at the tills from one campaign – and these are national retailers. One actually did $40 million more of sales for the new season than they did the year before – just as a result of a letterbox campaign and how they optimised that.” The company delivers around a billion

DM pieces a year – some 85%-90% for its top 20 clients, says Nation. And with the bulk of its work in the retail sector, the company now backs its letterbox offer with an online catalogue aggregation tool, lassoo.co.nz. “While it’s vital to bring out products that connect retailer with consumer it’s also increasingly going the other way – consumers communicating with retailers. What always used to be a push monologue, is now a push-pull dialogue. “That’s what Lassoo is all about, and outside of that we also have some interactive services. The iPhone and iPad applications we created are getting some great results.” The keywords for customers are rel-


letterbox

evance and convenience – and the key to that is a more integrated approach. “It’s really a multi-channel environment now for retailers and one of their challenges is losing market share to international ecom providers,” says Nation. “Our goal is to put them into that space – so they compete. We know that the letterbox works very well and is very effective and is certainly not going away but it’s important to support it with a digital integration.” When it comes to honing in on the audience that is going to be most receptive to the message being delivered, NZ Post’s Datahub offers a heap of help. Whether marketers want to target those who’ve just shifted house (and might be up for a new telly) or those planning to buy a car in the next year, data can be diced and sliced to suit. Analytics has become a huge trend in direct marketing, notes Fiona Woolley, NZ Post’s manager, market engagement. “Because of that, we’ve developed a data segmentation model called Genius which breaks data down into super tight targeting – with what we call mesh blocks. “That can consist of as few as 25 households. To the geographic and demographic data, we’ve also added in our lifestyle survey info, overlaid with data from the Census and Property IQ.” It all makes for some amazingly precise target market accuracy and that, increas-

ingly, is what companies are after, says Woolley. And it’s all opt-in based which ensures messages are going to people who are receptive to them. So, for instance, when the Auckland Regional Transport Authority wanted people to know about its new Mt Eden bus service, it was able to use insights gained from the Genius segmentation and profiling tool to tailor its message to the relevant target audience. That resulted in a response rate of over 24% - nearly five times the expected rate. As a channel, letterbox is just steadily growing, says Woolley. “What people find is that the measurement side of it is also very clear and works beautifully in terms of directing people to a website – and integrating with other media, acts as the point of entry or backup.” One recent campaign in the UK mailed out 3D glasses so people could get more from watching its TV ad, and overseas trends suggest a shift toward greater channel integration and increasing use of DM as a branding promotion tool rather than being primarily offer orientated as it is in NZ. What is certain is that the letterbox hasn’t lost its marketing allure. It’s gaining ground in more than one way. With less competition for space from more traditional snail mail, it attracts even more attention – and opening rates are already high.

FIONA WOOLLEY (NZ POST).

With a lot of companies moving online, there’s more room for DM than ever, suggests Ben Goodale, founder of integrated one-to-one agency JustONE. “So when you do it, it works even better than it did before. We’re getting the best return on it that we’ve ever had – an ROI of up to $30 for each dollar of cost. “You can’t argue with that. So why would you stop doing something that works – why not do more!”

Do it yourself Direct Marketing MailBase™ is the ideal ‘DIY’ tool for creating your own Direct Marketing campaign. It lets you put together your postcards, envelopes and flyers, then have them printed and posted for you, without any hassle. As well as being able to use your own address lists, Mailbase™ gives you the option to find potential customers to send your mail campaign to by using New Zealand Post data lists. Try it now at www.nzpost.co.nz/mailbase or for more information call 0800 736 336

Ad Media December 2010

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interactive bytes

Show me the data!

By Alastair Thompson

PHOTO: ALASTAIR THOMPSON.

F

34

ROY MORGAN’S GLENDA WYNYARD: EMBRACING ONLINE.

www.admedia.co.nz

or a relative newcomer to the advertising business such as myself, meeting Roy Morgan Research sales chief Glenda Wynyard has been an education and a half. Glenda begins our discussion over coffee telling me how she used research in the old days – which was a lot. Then we quickly move on to the reason for my call to her – a planned tie-up between Roy Morgan Research and online measurement company Effective Measure which heralds a push into the hotly contested online research market by the old-school surveybased company. But then she shows me my data and my education begins. Or perhaps more accurately, she starts to show me my data. As it turns out, there is a lot of it. But first let’s back up a bit. Roy Morgan is an old-school media research provider. Currently, no tags or computer logs are involved in its Asteroid media research product. Roy Morgan is one of the market leaders in the singlesource survey market which means it does not have lots of survey panels for different purposes; rather it surveys just about any subject you can imagine as part of a continuous survey of New Zealanders. The media measurement side of the equation comes from a media diary for which it receives approximately 12,000 fully completed questionnaires. This data is then matched across the rest of the survey (or product poll) to provide an unparalleled granularity of information across most media formats. According to Glenda, Roy Morgan’s clients have reported staggering accuracy against their internal audits of their existing client base as a benchmark when comparing its survey data. As Scoop has been included in the media


interactive bytes

comscore, roy morgan or nielsen?

survey since 2006 (as a newspaper website) it turns out this wealth of information is available about our readers too. So what does this mean? It means the changing attitudes of audiences (eg, do they think threats to the environment are exaggerated, through to what political party they will vote for if an election was held right now) can be plotted over time and compared to those of readers of other publications. It means Scoop can tell you the percentage of its readers who have: shopped at

Kirkcaldies; purchased a laptop in the last 12 months; regularly spend over $400 a week on groceries; trade shares; are obese or underweight. In short it means that we now know who our readers are. And it turns out that Scoop’s audience are as we always thought – educated, professional, early adopter, decision-makers. They are keen on functional (rather than flashy) technology, want to use their phones to surf the internet, drink stout and cider more than most and are remarkably cosmopolitan in their taste for restaurants.

We also know they are mostly married and/or in stable relationships and are heavily represented in the communications and finance industries. It is hard to overstate how important knowing – and being able to prove – this information will be for us as a publisher in coming months. So as the race to provide research services to the online industry heats up, it turns out that the old tried-and-true survey company still has plenty of life in it. And will take some beating from the computerised newcomers.

Starters orders A race is well and truly on between research companies to find

they tie with the left or right finger on top – so long as a site

a new benchmark for online measurement in NZ.

is included in the survey (and lots are). For niche publishers

Incumbent Nielsen is gearing up to respond to the Comscore challenge (reported in this column in October) with plans to

looking to target pitches to particular clients and back them up with data, it is the perfect tool.

launch a new, 3000-strong, panel-based research product in

And for clients with time to research their media buy in detail,

the new year. Beta test data is being promised to publishers

it contains a wealth of useful comparative information, not

mid-year, with launch to follow once it is confirmed to be work-

the least being the ability to compare and estimate reach &

ing as planned.

frequency across multiple media channels, like a newspaper, a

Australian single-source survey specialist Roy Morgan is also

website, a TV show and a magazine.

planning on making a play with a combination product com-

As it stands, Nielsen’s current Market Intelligence (MI) product

bining their single-source survey with traffic data from online

fits somewhere in between the two. It has substantially more

measurement company Effective Measure.

detailed demographic information than Comscore’s, but nothing

And finally there is the prospect that Google’s Adplanner

like the detail of Roy Morgan’s.

might suddenly get a lot more useful if they start attaching

A key weakness is the ‘unique browser’ measurement which

demographic data to their measurement stats as they have

currently counts the NZ readership base at 17 million and

in the US.

growing (Comscore, Roy Morgan and Nielsen’s new products

Each research supplier has its own strengths and weaknesses,

all provide numbers of people).

both in terms of what it can tell clients about media audiences,

As the industry standard measuring stick for publishers in NZ,

and in terms of which segment of the industry will find it most

Nielsen provides great competitive performance information in

attractive to buy.

real time across the industry – but is listing worth the cost to

Comscore’s Media Matrix is strong in the breadth of its international coverage and smart online tools. On the flipside it tells

a publisher? Especially if many of the major agencies are no longer using it?

almost nothing about the readers of any given site apart from

And then there are the three new products which we are

what else they read (behavioural data), their sex, and some

likely to see more of in the coming year – Nielsen Hybrid, Roy

pretty wide age bands.

Morgan + Effective Measure and whatever happens to Google

This clearly has appeal for digital media buying teams – but

Adplanner: Starters orders!

not necessarily so much for publishers and clients. And as publishers can in any event get ‘unified’ and listed for free, they may not need to buy it anyway.

InterActive Bytes is compiled for AdMedia by Scoop.co.nz, NZ’s leading indigenous online news agency attracting a reader-

By contrast Roy Morgan’s Asteroid product can almost tell a

ship of over 400,000 unique visitors a month (Nielsen). Send

publisher what colour its audiences shoelaces are and whether

feedback to co-editor Alastair Thompson (alastair@scoop.co.nz).

Ad Media December 2010

35


out of home

Street cred

O

ut-of-home fared better than many other sectors during the financial crisis, says Jo Davenport, project manager for the Outdoor Media Association (OMANZ). And things have looked up in 2010 with 6% improvement on 2009 in the first six months of the year, 16% growth in Q3 and over 19% growth in October. “Although we wouldn’t call the overall expected outcome a bounce-back, we’re certainly heartened by an accelerating revival with

hopefully more to come next year,” Davenport says. It’s a testament to the effectiveness of OOH, says Oggi md Gordon Frykberg. “Market demand is improving and forward bookings are the strongest they’ve been for several years, so our outlook for 2011 and beyond is positive,” says Phil Clemas, gm at APN Outdoor and the new OMANZ chair. And as the country gears up for the Rugby World Cup, demand for inventory is expected to increase.

The out-of-home sector continues to communicate its compelling proposition, while improving the quality of the offering. Patricia Moore reports.

Ad Media December 2010

37


out of home

KHYBER PASS (APN).

Members are already reporting strong bookings and demand, as clients and agencies identify the importance of OOH in their media mix, says Davenport. “We’re looking forward to showcasing exceptional creative executions over the RWC as clients and their agencies look to maximise impact and effectiveness of their message. Out of Home media provides them the perfect canvas to do that.” Indeed the RWC appears to be creating more than a little excitement in the OOH camp. At iSite, ceo Wayne Chapman says they’ve focused on positioning themselves “to maximise the long runway to the World Cup, with OOH sure to be a focal point”. And Cameron Taylor, sales manager at Eye NZ says the Eye Fly business has seen particularly strong demand around the event. “With more than 85,000 international visitors expected, Auckland Airport provides advertisers the opportunity to reach large-scale numbers of cashed-up travellers.” “RWC is a great opportunity to showcase what we have to offer and could well provide the impetus to lead the repositioning of the market. I don’t think that price gouging will be tolerated but there will be some premiums achieved over this period from realistic standout sites,” says OTW gm Mark Venter. OOH today covers more ground than

40

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QUEEN ST (APN).

AUCKLAND INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (EYE).


EYE_ADMEDIA_RWC1210

MasterCard's Eye Fly campaign at Auckland Airport

Ensure your brand scores and makes the conversion every time. Reach a global audience of travellers with Eye Fly. Insight

Execution

Inspire a global audience and be a contender alongside the best brands worldwide.

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out of home

VICTORIA ST WEST (OGGI).

OMNIGRAPHICS.

ever before. Mel Graham, national sales manager for Ultimate Media, says the network of 110 bars and 105 fitness centres across the country is increasing “literally by the month”. She attributes this to its range of products – which includes

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42

Admedia Strip Winter 2010.indd 1

www.admedia.co.nz

25/05/10 3:14 PM


out of home

the new Venuvision large digital screen – and to the fact that it’s targeting consumers in a positive environment. “They’ve chosen to be there and remain there for a significant amount of time allowing for greater message cut-through and take-out,” she says. Then there are those mobile sites. While large line-haul trucks have traditionally carried branding for the operator or its clients, Trevor Booth at Moving Billboards says they’re targeting a wider range of market sectors. “Line-haul trucks have size, presence and mobility and they’re able to reach a wide audience over a diverse geographic area and demographic strata. “Tr uck-side adver tising is popular in the US and Europe, and has grown based on a very low cost per view, high recall rates, and the ability to stand out in a cluttered OOH environment. Media costs are comparable to larger static

VICTORIA PARK, AUCKLAND (OGGI).

billboards and the advertiser has threedimensional space of over 100sqm to be creative with.” But according to Adshel marketing exec-

utive Rochelle Weaver, bus shelters are the “new sexy site”. Street furniture continues to amaze, she says, and with campaigns like the McCafe steaming bus shelter, and

Ad Media December 2010

43


out of home

the Emirates real-life soccer game with its experiential element, she may well be right.“We give advertisers the opportunity to connect with their customers and unlock the creative potential of OOH.” The financial crisis has seen smarter thinking around OOH – how it’s used and the message it carries, says Omnigraphics gm Steven Spear. “We’re not necessarily seeing bigger campaigns, but better ones in terms of creative execution and outside-the-square thinking.” Diversification is another big factor, he says. “From a production point of view this means being able to handle a wider range of solutions for an ever-increasing range of applications. Advertisers and

QUEEN ST (ADSHEL).

WELLINGTON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (iSITE).

44

www.admedia.co.nz

QUEEN ST (ADSHEL).

clients are often looking for innovative ideas; the end result is always something unique and refreshing for out-of-home.” Benefitz md Aidan Bennett also highlights innovation and diversity. “Most players in the market are far more diverse now than a decade ago,” he says. This has required investment in technology. “The capability of the latest grand and large format printing machinery is a real bonus. We now have affordable digital machines that print on all sorts of things – PVC, PE, fabrics, glass, wood, plastic, etc. The possibilities are almost endless.” A side effect of the financial downturn has been less emphasis on sustainable solutions and enquiries, says Murray Davis, CE at Image Centre and Boston Digital. “Notwithstanding that, we’ve continued to invest in development and research of recycled and recyclable billboard substrates, rigid substrates and alternative inks. Critically though, Boston looks to offer alternative solutions at cost-effective prices. In line with this, a significant proportion of Boston Digital’s billboard skins are now printed on recycled stock.” Widely acclaimed as the next big thing, digital out-of-home (DOOH) has shown impressive growth in most developed markets, says Oggi’s Frykberg. Digital formats, including mobile technology, are also becoming increasingly common on street furniture. But it may be a while before NZ sees anything approaching the


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out of home

Disney digital billboard erected recently in New York’s Times Square. Standing 68 feet above the square and stretching 2250 square feet, it showcases Disney content 365 days a year. At the other end of the spectrum, seven digital sites in Cleveland Ohio, advertise the city’s most wanted – and are apparently catching crims. “We’re some way off becoming another Times Square or Tokyo,” says Clemas. APNO has launched large format digital billboards in both Sydney and Melbourne and is investigating options here, he says. “We definitely see a future where digital becomes more prominent in the outdoor space, certainly at the premium level. Our priority will be on large format and high

SYMONDS ST (OTW).

VICTORIA ST WEST (OTW).

46

www.admedia.co.nz

LINK BUS, AUCKLAND (iSITE).

quality definition which is not a cheap route to take. But the quality will be leading edge and our belief is less is more.” He adds in-store and other smaller format options “will also grow in far greater proliferation if we are to follow overseas trends”. “Probably more than traditional OOH, DOOH was a victim in the advertising downturn,” says Frykberg. “Not only because dollars were short but also the fact that it was perceived as ‘new’ media and its ability to extract dollars from already reduced advertising budgets was even more difficult – particularly with TV being offered at all-time low rates.” But with two years under the belt, he says OGGI Digital is now seeing a much greater acceptance and with the market’s overall improvement this is translating into dollars spent. “DOOH offers such enormous flexibility in terms of reach, creativity and easy integration with the other social media opportunities gaining currency that it’s very hard to argue that it doesn’t represent the future of OOH.” Image Centre and Boston Digital are embracing it, says Murray Davis. Digital formats complement static imagery on billboards, buses and street furniture, he says. “The digital platform has the potential to add meaningful entertainment, interaction and utility to the outdoor medium. At the same time we see digital complementing a medium which natu-


The best headline ever, and we could only fit the full stop.

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measurability

out of home

Counting the beat ROI rules and measurability has always been an issue in OOH.

Weaver says Adshel proves the effectiveness of its street

Across the Tasman, the OOH measurement tool MOVE was

furniture medium via the Adshel Campaign Monitor which

rolled out earlier this year and Jo Davenport says OMANZ is

measures actual campaign recall along with creative effec-

“watching with interest”. (MOVE introduces a new Likelihood

tiveness, relevancy and ability to influence buying behaviour.

To See measurement currency which means only those people

They’ve invested close to $400,000 over the past five years,

from among the chosen demographic, who in all probability

she says.

saw the OOH campaign, are included in the audience measurement results.) However economics may mean MOVE or a similar process

Leonie Collins, ANZ gm marketing. “Eye has pioneered world

is still some way off here – as Clemas points out, the Austral-

firsts including Eye Tracking which has now been completed

ian outdoor industry invested over five years of research and

in four countries (including NZ) across multiple formats.”

several million dollars in the project.

Cutting-edge technology tracks eye movement and field

But, says Frykberg, its existence reflects the fact that OOH takes

of vision and a post-study questionnaire is conducted. “The

the matter very seriously. “On the other hand, DOOH has the

studies allowed Eye to gain first-hand insight into how indi-

capacity not just for measurement but for sophisticated research,

viduals engage with Eye’s advertising media, capturing real

and we will see this being introduced as demand increases.”

behaviours and real time consumers in real environments.”

rally interacts with people as they go about their everyday lives.” But it’s not without its problems, says Bennett at Benefitz, citing issues around reliability, technology and expertise. “It certainly will happen because technology is improving all the time. However, I believe the simplicity of static images means printing of large images will remain strong for a long time.” Or, as iSite’s Chapman puts it: “The tyranny of scale works against a digital gold rush here.”

PARNELL (IMAGE CENTRE).

48

And at Eye, the commitment to driving the industry forward has seen them at the forefront of insights and research, says

www.admedia.co.nz

Meanwhile, the challenge for the industry is to continue to communicate the compelling proposition that is out of home, while improving the quality of the offering, says OTW’s Mark Venter. “This is already happening and is definitely the way forward. In the current cluttered and competitive media market it’s even more important that we remind our time-poor, resourcestretched buyers just how long it took to get to work this morning.”

BENEFITZ MD AIDAN BENNETT AT THE BRUCE MASON CENTRE, NORTH SHORE.


We love the outdoors. Billboards, Banners, Vehicle Graphics, Fleet Images, Building Mesh, Adshels and more. Auckland

Wellington

34 Westmoreland Street West, Grey Lynn

62-66 Vivian Street, Wellington

Ph 09 360 5700 Fax 09 360 5702

Ph 04 8015879 Fax 04 801 5878

Email ashley@bostondigital.co.nz

Email glen@bostondigital.co.nz

Or rob@bostondigital.co.nz


email marketing

Getting eng@ged Email should be high on the marketing agenda in 2011. Jerry Flay outlines the challenges and the solutions.

S

o far NZ has escaped the worst of the global economic downturn, but uncertainty over retail trends, further turmoil in the Northern Hemisphere and general edginess have combined to raise a cloud of doubt over 2011. Prudent businesses are looking closely at their upcoming budgets, and in such times, it is usually marketing which goes under the spotlight. Big budget campaigns and extensive media exposure may well contract. In such times, direct marketing usually remains untouched, and in 2011, email, along with the as-yet underexploited social networks, will be the focus of many companies’ efforts. Email is cost-effective, and, most important of all, ROI can be measured relatively accurately. Email marketing has yet to fulfil its potential in NZ, primarily because on a basic level it can be transacted cheaply and easily, and this has created a flood of poorly advised, ill-conceived campaigns from smaller (and occasionally larger) companies that have produced little and been allowed to stagnate. Agencies have also limited their larger clients’ exposure to this channel – a cynic might say that email’s relatively low price might endanger agency budgets, if it proved effective. But needs must when the devil drives, and email should be high on the marketing agenda for 2011. So what are the challenges facing the planning and transaction of a successful email campaign for 2011? Surely it should be a relatively simple thing? Sadly not. The challenges facing the email marketer grow daily; they can be broadly split into three categories: Delivery – getting the email to your audience, Engagement – getting them to read it, and Fulfilment – getting them to act on it. Each is dependent on the former having been successfully negotiated. If you fall at the first hurdle, you are out of the race. Delivery of email gets harder every day. The barriers of ISP filter-

50

www.admedia.co.nz

JERRY FLAY: NEEDS MUST WHEN THE DEVIL DRIVES.

ing, desktop spam tagging and of course the lost-in-space factor, make email marketers’ lives very hard – mainly because there are no uniform standards to adhere to. You need an understanding of all local ISP practices, as well as the international ones – Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail etc. Then you have to deal with issues such as sender ID, domain reputation and shared/unique IP addresses – very boring, very technical, and easily ignored. But they might stop 25% of your emails reaching their destination! The quality of HTML, image-to-text ratios, use of words and phrases associated with spam (who still uses click here in their emails?) all impact on delivery rates – and the difference between getting it right and wrong can be another 25% of your audience. Although the war on spam will never be won, ISPs try harder every day to fight it, and their rules change; popular browsers such


email marketing

the ROI

delivering

marketing

Is email

as Gmail introducing Mark as Spam buttons – how many times does that have to be hit before Gmail starts blocking your emails? Do you know how your database breaks down in terms of browsers like Gmail, Windows Live etc – and do you test using each of these before general campaign deployment? To overcome the delivery issue, devote time and resources to first get a better understanding of the rules, then monitor them for changes – best achieved by continual testing and database analysis. Let’s assume, for the moment, that you have your delivery issues sorted. Next up are Engagement & Fulfilment – you have to get your audience to read your email, then take action on it. Inboxes have become like a very crowded, noisy party – you may get overlooked, and sometimes you need to shout to get heard. You may not even get in if you have no invite or the doorman doesn’t recognise you. Factors such as sender ID and subject lines are important, but more so is how you compile your audience database, and what you tell them at time of sign up. If people expect a weekly email from you with good offers, then give them just that – variation leads to disengagement, diminishing of trust and unsubscribes, or worse still reader inertia; they can’t be bothered to unsubscribe, nor can they find the time or enthusiasm to read your emails. They become ghost recipients. These are most often encountered by those companies send random and occasional emails – usually coinciding with the appointment of a new marketing manager. Emails that are irregular are often perceived as out-of-the-blue, and rarely have much impact. Email is very direct and personal; it also has the added advantage of being the easiest form of marketing to result in direct action – people clicking through to your site and buying from it. If people tell you they want to hear from you, then make sure they do, and make sure also that what you tell them is what they want to hear. Make it easy for them to say yes. Email copywriting is a whole new skill in itself, as is email design. Emails are not web pages, and should not look like them. Nor should they attempt to carry the same volume of information. So many people are still headlining their email with web banners. Email is a conversation, not a documentary.

Avoid formality. Don’t be opaque. Create motivation to act now. In short, do not be afraid to be direct. Highlight benefits, not features. If people don’t like it, they will unsubscribe, but the benefit of that will be far outweighed by those who buy now. Unsubscribes are probably the best metric you have. Depending on how you assembled your database, how often you communicate etc, you should expect between 0.5% and 2% unsubscribing from each mailing. Being outside those parameters is a signal you are doing something wrong. Don’t be fooled by very low unsubscribe rates – it’s just reader inertia. Metrics are a very real part of email – you can tell with reasonable, but not absolute accuracy, how your audience reacts to each send out. The email industry in America has produced lots of benchmark standards for opening rates, click-through rates etc. By and large these are rubbish. Email metrics are about trends, as each company doing the marketing, and their audiences are unique. Improving opening rates and click throughs are what counts, not the actual numbers. So each campaign offers two types of direct feedback on whether your audience are reading your email and doing what you want them to – attributable sales and campaign metrics. If you are serious about email, you will spend a lot of time studying these, and working out how to develop positive trends. Most companies don’t! Testing by segmenting your audience is a great way to do this. Not sure about which subject line to use? Split your audience in two and use both. Segmenting needs time to give valuable results, but it costs nothing. These are just some of the challenges facing email marketers who want to benefit from using this uniquely direct channel in 2011. If each of these, successfully negotiated, adds 2% to your key metrics, then overall you will show major improvements on ROI. And that’s what it’s all about. Jerry Flay has been involved in email marketing since 1996, in both Europe and the USA, and currently runs Inbox, a NZbased email marketing agency (www.inbox.net.nz).

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Ad Media December 2010

51


salary survey

y d Steady a e SasStsheadgoes y Nobody will be surprised to learn that there was very little change in salaries during 2010. There were a few gentle rises in senior account management, graphic arts, and web design. Also freelance rates eased up, as did senior and junior creative salaries. None of the recruiters we talked to for this survey reported any falls – but some do expect salaries to creep up again in 2011.

A

cross the board, Portfolio Recruitment’s Debbie Kitson discerned a slight upward shift in salaries at the junior/ intermediate level – but little movement at the upper end. “Movements have been largely candidate-led, rather than client-led,” Kitson says. “But in order to secure the best talent, clients have realised they need to push the budget a little higher.”

2010 was quite a busy year across the board, with increased contract and freelance activity across web, account management, mac ops, designers and studio requirements, she says. At Davies & Partners, Billie Davies saw an improvement in the number of jobs on offer in 2010, compared to 2009. “However, the numbers are not up to pre-recession levels,” she says. “We are also back to a chronic shortage

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52

www.admedia.co.nz

of candidates in DM and Digital – we’re struggling to find enough people to fill specialist roles. And we still struggle to find enough quality talent to meet agency demand. There are some very talented creatives out there – just not enough of them.” Jobmedia’s Michael Bowie is upbeat about the past 12 months. “What a difference a year makes,” he says. “2010 has been a year of consistent growth in demand – particularly for sales roles on the media owner side, and planner/buyers and suits with agencies.” Both media owners and agencies expect this demand to continue into 2011 “as staff levels continue to rise”. In 2010, shortages at mid-level planning/buying and suiting were caused partly by a surge in the traditional Kiwi OE, Bowie says. “Recently announced immigrant work status restrictions in the UK, however, may reduce the time these Kiwis spend away from home.”


salary survey

There’s also been an upswing in expats returning, along with skilled migrants, due to the severe economic malaise in the UK and Ireland. Bowie’s also seen a lift in demand for contractors, as well as mums looking for part-time roles. Salaries have also crept up as employers seek to attract or retain quality staff. “We’re also seeing incidences of candidates playing current and potential employers off against each other ... but when we ask candidates why they’re leaving, it’s rarely because of the money.” Marsden Inch’s Robert Roydhouse says he first noticed a lift back at Labour Weekend 2009. “We saw the shaking off of recessionary winter shackles, the start of daylight saving, and the costume change to summer shorts, singlets and jandals,” he says. “Marsden Inch saw contracting roles – used to get around headcount and salary freezes – become fulltime roles, almost overnight. And it hasn’t stopped as 2010 progressed. “Our observations support FTE placements being up around 55% YoY, and we don’t see it moving much from today’s levels going into 2011. “We have witnessed a more measured, mature approach to new roles by both employers and employees. Gone are the days of grabbing whoever’s available, and employees grabbing the next $10k. “We’re also pleased to see the healthy return of cultural dynamics and personality chemistry – often more important than salary levels.”

AD AGENCY – ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT Position

Low ($000s)

Average ($000s)

High ($000s)

Managing Director

160

260

500

CEO

180

280

400

General Manager

140

160

240

Group Account Director

120

150

200

Senior Account Director

120

130

125

Account Director

95

110

125

Senior Account Manager

65

80

95

Account Manager

45

55

65

Junior Account Director

85

95

105

Business Development Manager

90

95

110-150

180

200

250

Strategic Planner

70

100

170

Planner

50

60

80

Strategic Planning Director

This snapshot of ad industry salaries was taken during November & December. It is based on email interviews with every specialist NZ recruitment agency – 3rdeye, Portfolio, Jobmedia, Davies & Partners, Metro, Marsden Inch, and Firebrand (formerly Aquent).

The recalibration of the ad industry, has seen realism return on both sides, Roydhouse says. “Employers largely recognise that 90-hour weeks are not the norm any more, and employees realise there’s more to a job than just money.” In 2011, Roydhouse expects the talent

pool to grow, boosted in part by the Marsden Inch Ad School scholarship, and a strengthening relationship with AUT. “We also have spent much time and energy counselling expat Kiwis, who may want to return home,” he says. “Many of our recent candidates are leaving highly

Ad Media December 2010

53


salary survey

AD AGENCY - CREATIVE Executive Creative Director

200

230

375

-

150

200

130

150

300

-

130

-

100

140

180

Intermediate Creative

50

80

90

Junior Creative

35

40

45

Studio Manager

70

80

90

Production Manager

70

80

100

TV Producer (in-house)

50

75

120

Creative Group Head Creative Director Production Director Senior Creative

paid positions overseas to bring great international expertise home – without the normally expected excessive price tag.” Metro Recruitment’s Caroline Lynch saw increased activity in the final quarter of 2009 and the first half of 2010. “This was in response to people having stayed in jobs for security and then feeling more confident to move as agencies started to replace and recruit in areas where they had been under-resourced.” In the second half of 2010, Lynch has also observed increased demand for short-term contractors in all areas, including media, account service, production and studio. “The larger agencies have remained fairly consistent with their recruitment this year – the movement of clients being the main reason for staff changes.”

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54

www.admedia.co.nz

| | ||| |

Cell: 021 988 331 Cell: 021 988 331 www.metier.co.nz Cell: 021 988 331 www.metier.co.nz www.metier.co.nz

PO Box 99643, Newmarket, PO Box 99643, Newmarket, Auckland, New Newmarket, Zealand PO Box 99643, Auckland, New Zealand Auckland, New Zealand


salary survey

WEB DESIGN

FREELANCE

Senior Designer

80

95

120

Intermediate Designer

50

60

70

Junior Designer

35

45

50

Interactive Producer

75

100

130

85

95

105

Senior Interactive Producer

Designer

40

60

80

Creative

60

80

120

45

75

100

45

70

90

Web Developer Web Designer

Indie and digital agencies, grew. “There’s also been continued growth in sales promotions, brand activation and experiential communications,” Lynch says. “It is still not a buoyant market – although much improved on 2009. We believe 2011 will be a year of consolidation and caution.” 3rdeye’s Andy Sive also sees consolidation in the market, driven by big account changes during 2010. “In 2011, I believe we will continue to see the slow, steady growth we saw in 2010,” he says. “We have the Rugby World Cup and an election – both of which will cause some excitement in the marketplace.” Sive also expects rationalisations in some media and agencies, as offshore shareholders maximise profit in NZ. “Growth in employment opportunities will be heavily in favour of those in the digital space – across media, suiting and creative,” he says. The digital space is becoming more blurred with digital specialists often working across other digital disciplines. “Recently, a digital creative was placed in a digital planning role, and someone with no agency experience – but a lot of client-side digital experience – was placed in a media digital role.” Soon we will not be speaking of digital, brand and DM, Sive says. “The demand will be for folk who are channel neutral.” At Sydney-based Firebrand (formerly Aquent), senior agent Jo Bayley says there’s still a shortage of “good, key

Ad Media December 2010

55


salary survey

GRAPHIC ARTS Production Manager Traffic Manager

PUBLIC RELATIONS

70

80

120

55

70

80

Group Account Director Account Director

Senior Mac

60

Artist

70

80

Account Manager

Intermediate

42

Mac Artist

50

55

Senior Consultant

Junior Mac

30

Artist

35

40

Consultant

MEDIA AGENCY Managing Director/GM

170

220

300

Media Director

100

120

140

Senior Planner/Buyer

75

85

115

Intermediate Planner/Buyer

45

60

70

Junior Planner/Buyer

35

40

45

130

140

150

100

110

120

50

55

60

60

100

150

35

40

50

talent”, especially in digital, retail and direct/online marketing. She predicts this shortage to increase in 2011, and salaries start to rise in response. “As a global recruiter, Firebrand has also had an increase in good candidates talking to us about positions in Australia and Asia,” Bayley says. “Talent who have been sitting tight in the past 18 months will be starting to realise their value. “It’s going to be more important than ever for agencies to look after their good staff if they want to retain them.”

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INSIDE

SALARY SURVEY ADSCHOOL REPORTS OUT OF HOME DAVE KING & RON SNEDD ON

marsdeninch

T 09 304 0558

F 09 309 0558 www.marsdeninch.co .nz


the front page

Read all

I

about it!

t’s been another funny old year in the advertising world. Account upheavals, endless people arrivals and departures across agencies, advertisers and media companies, happy times and sad times. We’ve emerged from the financial meltdown a little poorer, more cynical and battle hardened but still holding that glint of optimism this addictive business instils in all of us. One great benefit is the colourful people you encounter. They add the sparkle and fabric that make it all worthwhile. They are the mischief makers who become part of folklore. Advertising people like Len Potts spicing up an agency fmcg training course by replacing the tape with a porn video. David Collinge changing his business card at J Inglis Wright from Copywriter to The World’s Last Great Romantic. The most terrifying, ill-tempered client in NZ – Unilever marketing manager Alan Donald – who famously told Mike Knowles he wasn’t his fucking messenger boy when asked if he’d mind taking some contact reports back to Petone. Then there are the columnists whose articles enrich our lives. Locally there’s Paul Holmes, a past Qantas Awards winner, whose words flow beautifully onto the page. He writes as he speaks. My God he can hold you right to the last word. And Christopher Hitchens, currently fighting oesophageal cancer, who chronicles the battle in his Vanity Fair articles. I’ll miss Hitchens when he passes but for now I’ll read every word he types. And the print media. We don’t have those newsstands you see in cities across the world. The little kiosks manned by a grumpy newsagent surrounded by every magazine and daily newspaper you can imagine. Our towns each have one paper (it’s a credit to our thirst for news that we have 22 daily papers for a population the size of Melbourne) rather than the two, three or more large cities sustain. What you read in London or New York defines your political leaning or cultural bent (bless the Page 3 girls). Here what you read reflects the fact you like a damn good read. And contrary to some naysayers the world is reading more newspapers than ever before. Rupert Murdoch didn’t shell out $US5 billion to secure The Wall Street Journal on a whim. And Murdoch is right to charge people for his newspaper websites. Barry Colman began charging some of his online NBR content last year and good on him.

By Robert Munro

GOOD ON HIM: NBR’S BARRY COLMAN.

Our local newspaper website content is superb and that’s why advertisers are flocking to them. It’s all about how you choose to consume your newspaper. For a deeper read we take the print edition and spend quality time. Around 35 minutes during the week and an hour or more at the weekend. The cream on top is the online papers we dip in and out of throughout the day. Call me a biased bugger but I reckon we’re pretty spoilt locally with our print and online newspapers. Now back to that folklore: The time the lads in the creative department arranged a stripper for my leaving do. They booked a room at the James Cook Hotel right opposite my office window. Everyone crammed into it after the long boozy lunch to watch the business-suit attired brunette put on a memorable show that brought a lean to the building as some 400 office workers couldn’t believe their luck. If I could have monetised that news story I’d be a rich man... where’s Rupert when you need him? Robert Munro is the general manager of the Newspaper Advertising Bureau (robert@nabs.co.nz).

Ad Media December 2010

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Merry Christmas from iSite Media

Thank you for your support in 2010. All it takes to reach more people Out of Home this summer. Call us and get the market leader working for you: 0800 247 483 www.isitemedia.co.nz

AdMedia December 2010  

agencies, advertising, media

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