October 2021 Issue of In Business Magazine

Page 38

INNOVATIONS FOR BUSINESS

Hyperautomation Is Useless if Businesses Don’t Invest in a Solid Foundation And, surprisingly, a big part of that foundation is people Kevin Buckley is a business automation executive with Technologent. He has more than 25 years’ experience as a technical and business consultant with a proven track record of delivering technical and business value in all numerous industries. He is skilled in understanding business workflow processes, robotic process automation, IT, business transformation, cloud enablement and digital transformation. technologent.com

OCT. 2021

38

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

by Kevin Buckley

Hyperautomation is an idea being discussed and deployed by both the business and IT side of many businesses, large and small. In many cases, hyperautomation means different things to each group in terms of expected outcomes. I am often asked where and how business should invest to provide a solid foundation for hyperautomation. I think the answer may come as a surprise. Hint: It’s not technology. But first, let’s start with a definition of hyperautomation, because it can mean different things to different folks. Since Gartner named hyperautomation as the No. 1 trend on its list of top 10 strategic technology trends for 2021, I like to use its definition because Gartner is a source that both business and IT trust and rely on. Gartner defines hyperautomation this way: Hyperautomation is a business-driven, disciplined approach that organizations use to rapidly identify, vet, and automate as many business and IT processes as possible.

Hyperautomation is a business-driven, disciplined approach that organizations use to rapidly identify, vet, and automate as many business and IT processes as possible.

Hyperautomation involves the orchestrated use of multiple technologies, tools, or platforms, including: • Artificial intelligence (AI) • Machine learning (ML) • Event-driven software architecture • Robotic process automation (RPA) • Business process management (BPM) and intelligent business process management suites (iBPMS) • Integration platform as a service (iPaaS) • Low-code/no-code tools • Packaged software • Other types of decision, process, and task automation tools Much of this may, in fact, look like technology. But is that where the investment needs to be? We have found that most companies are already heavily invested in underlying