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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2017

VICTORIA’S INDEPENDENT WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

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S TATE EDITION Vol 49 No 1671 SERVING VICTORIA SINCE 1969

HERO’S GUIDE including GST

■ Kerry Du Plessis, Sarah Clarke, Emma Hayden and Belinda Campbell star in A Hero’s Guide to Saving the Planet. Details are in Cheryl Threadgold’s report in the Observer Showbiz section inside this issue. THE GREA T GREAT MUSIC OF THE ‘30s TO ‘60s Streaming through the Web PHONE: 9572 1466 ● See advert, back page

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Travel

MERIMBULA, NSW

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Set beside the sparkling waters of Merimbula Lake, you can watch the boats passing while eating breakfast. 1 and 2 bedroom fully self-contained apartments with spa and ensuite. Pool, BBQ and under cover parking. 2 minute walk to a safe swimming beach and shops, clubs and restaurants. Beautiful water views. 1 Beach Street, Merimbula, NSW 2548 Phone: (02) 6495 2205 E-mail: info@beachstreetapartments.net.au www.beachstreetapartments.net.au


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Retirement


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Melbourne People

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Survivors Luncheon Rising Sun Hotel, South Melbourne Photos: Ash Long

● Tony Tadio and Annette Allison

● Kevin Trask and Dorothy Baker

● Ray Lawrence and partner Rosemary

● Paul Nicholson and Bruce McLean

● Ron Bourke and Ralphe Rickman

● Denis O’Kane and Allan Paull

● Hugh Hill and Brian Hyde

● Nigel Dick and Des Ford

● Carryl Browne and Max Bleach

● Brian Davis and Keith Livingston

● Ben Hosking and Peter Van

● Don Kinsey and Denis Scanlan


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 9

Showbiz Latest

It’s All About You!

Melbourne

Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again. Observer At Malthouse Theatre, Southbank The Best Columnists

Matt Bisset Johnson - Cartoonist Peter Kemp - The Arts Gavin Wood - West Hollywood Nick Le Souef - Outback Legend Kevin Trask - Whatever Happened Mark Twain - Observer Classics Len Baker - Harness Racing Ted Ryan - Thoroughbreds Rob Foenander - Country Music Cheryl Threadgold - Local Theatre James Sherlock and Aaron Rourke James Sherlock Aaron Rourke Cheryl Threadgold

Extended season for Velvet

Observer Showbiz

● Craig Reid in Velvet ■ The ARIA-nominated and award-winning aerialist Emma Goh, actor/singer Tom Oliver hit show Velvet has announced, due to popular who plays the young ingénue who slips bedemand, a one-week extension to its hind the red velvet rope at the glamorous nightMelbourne season at The Palms at Crown, club that is Velvet;Kaylah Attard and Rechelle and will now run until Sunday July 9. Mansour as the two sassy sirens, and musiMelbourne audiences can purchase tick- cal director and mix master Joe Accaria, ets for the additional performances at alongside the legendary diva Marcia Hines. ticketmaster.com.au Each performance invites the audience into Director Craig Ilott has created a hedo- a glitterball world where the performers and nistic world, pitting acrobatics against disco the audience walk the fine line between the divas as this sexy, sparkling and slightly sado- romantic and the audacious. masochistic show channels the original StuVenue: The Palms at Crown dio 54 nightclub. Performance dates: Until July 9 The international ensemble of circus, cabaPerformance times: Tues.-Fri. 7:30pm; ret and music talent includes muscle man Sat 5pm and 8pm; Sun 5:00pm. Stephen Williams, hula boy extraordinaire Tickets: from $45. ticketmaster.com.au Craig Reid, acrobatic Mirko Köckenberger, www.velvettheshow.com

‘Next Fall’ at The Loft

● Sophie Ross, Gareth Reeves and Elizabeth Esguerra in Revolt, She Said, Revolt Again Photo: Pia Johnson ■ Words matter: ‘revolutionise the language (revert it’). That’s the first message conveyed in Alice Birch’s Revolt. She said. Revolt Again. A couple, in a romantic moment, are discussing sex. He (Gareth Reeves) describes what he wants to ‘do’ to her. Words like spreading, penetrating and entering are employed. But when she (Sophie Ross) turns these words back on their originator, he’s not so enthusiastic. It’s very funny and the irony is not lost on the audience. In another vignette a boss (Belinda McClory) interrogates an employee (Elizabeth Esguerra) who wants to work less. “But you can have it all,” she says, exasperated. In another, a woman (Ming-Zhu Hii) has been presented with a diamond ring. “Essentially,” she says to her suitor, “you want to reduce your income tax.” Marg Howell’s moving box set edged by Emma Valente’s lighting frames the vignettes turning them into absurd scenes in a battle of the sexes sitcom. As each woman disrupts the longstanding gendered order of things, the narrative gets decidedly darker. Dissolving, frenetic and frenzied; the second half descends into an ordered chaos. The box set moves back and with it, the set deconstructs. Revolt, She said. Revolt. Again. shows, as director Janice Muller writes in the program notes, that history is one long war against women and their bodies. The message is sometimes lost in the pandemonium; it is too hyper and perplexing. Maybe that’s the point. The performance ends reflecting on the tragedy of what could have been as a young woman (Elizabeth Esguerra) asks the audience, “The whole world failed—it could have been so brilliant. Who knew that life could be so awful.” Performance Season: Until July 9 Venue: Malthouse Theatre, Southbank Bookings: www.malthousetheatre.com.au - Review by Kathryn Keeble

Latest News AroundVictoria

Papers: arrest

■ Emerald Police have arrested and interviewed a woman after large numbers of newspapers were allegedly dumped in Melbourne’s south-eastern suburbs. The bundles of newspapers were allegedly dumped across suburbs including Beaconsfield Upper, Narre Warren North, Pakenham Upper, Cockatoo, Yarra Glen and Yea. A 54-year-old Narre Warren woman was arrested today. She has been released and is expected to be charged on summons with obtaining financial advantage by deception and three counts of aggravated littering.

Body at Deer Park

■ Police are investigating after a man’s body was discovered at a residence in Deer Park on Monday afternoon. Emergency services were called to an address in Erin Square after the body of a man was discovered inside a house. Exact circumstances surrounding the man’s death are yet to be established but is being treated as suspicious.

Armed robberies

■ Detectives have arrested a Frankston man in relation to a series of alleged armed robberies.

Forecast ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Today (Wed.). Partly cloudy. 6°-14° Thurs. Rain. 6°-13° Fri. Partly cloudy. 2°-12° Sat. Mostly sunny. 4°-13° Sun. Mostly sunny. 6°-13°

Mike McColl Jones

Top 5

● Starring in Next Fall are Kaarin Fairfax (Arlene), Mark Davi s(Luke), Darrin Redgate (Adam), Paul Robertson (Butch), Sharon Davis (Holly) and James Biasetto (Brandon). Details are in the Observer Showbiz section.

THE T OP 5 DOG DISHES TOP THA T ARE IN SOME THAT BALI RES TAUR ANT REST URANT 5. Fido Mignon. 4. German Shepherd Pie. 3. Coq au vin spaniel 2. Beagle Bagel. 1. Poodle Noodles.


Page 10 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Melbourne

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Ash OnWednesday

Observer 80 at ‘Survivors’ lunch inc orpor ating the Melbourne A d vvertiser ertiser incorpor orpora Ad ertiser,, Melbourne T ict orian Rur al Ne ws Trrader ader,, V Vict ictorian Rural New and Melbourne Seniors News . Victoria’s Independent Newspaper First Published September 14, 1969 Ev ery W ednesda y Wednesda

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Our Team Editor: Ash Long Features Editor: Peter Mac Columnists: Len Baker (harness racing), Matt Bissett-Johnson (cartoonist), David Ellis (wine and travel), Rob Foenander (country music), Kerry Kulkens (astrology), Nick Le Souef (outback Australia), Mike McColl Jones (life), Greg Ne wman (r adio ), Terry Radf or d ((C C ourt ewman adio), Radfor ord roundsman), Aaron Rourke (movies), T ed Ry an (r acing), Jim Sherlock Ryan (racing), (movies, DVDs), Cheryl Threadgold (local thea e), K evin T sho wbiz), theatt rre Ke Trr ask ((sho showbiz), V eritas, G a vin W ood (Holly wood). Ga Wood Honorary Reviewers: Mark Briggs, Rita Crispin, Martin Curtis, Sherryn Danaher Danaher,, Barbar a Hughes, L yn Hurs t, K a thryn Lyn Hurst, Ka Keeble, Beth Klein, Deborah Marinaro, Gr aeme McC oubrie therine egor McCoubrie oubrie,, Ca Catherine therine,, McGr McGregor egor,, David McLean, Maggie Morrison, Jill P age ylie Rackham, Elizabeth Semmel. e,, K Kylie Distribution: Sam Fiorini, phone 9482 1145

■ More than 80 veterans of TV-radio-recording attended the Survivors twice-a-year luncheon earlier this month. Convenor Bruce McKay paid tribute to past members including the late Dan Webb. Members heard that Bill Armstrong, 89, was recovering well after heart surgery. Original member Ron Tudor, in his 90s, now lives in the country. The group was founded in the late 1970s by Bert Newton. Women are now allowed to be members. Annette Allison, on-time Channel 10 newsreader, was there. These days she is the Public Affairs Manager for the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Annette’s annual Outback Tour is already a sell-out. The itinerary includes Perth, Margaret River, Albany, Esperance, Kalgoorlie and Wave Rock.

Female of the Species

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Aries March 21-April 20. Colour: Green Lucky Day: Wednesday Racing Numbers: 1.4.8.5 Lotto Numbers: 12.13.18.25.32.45. Better time in business and finances and more chances to increase your income. Mix only with winner's losers could drag you down with their attitudes which you do not need now.

Gemini: May 21- June 21. Colour: Yellow Lucky Day: Friday Racing Numbers: 1.5.8.3. Lotto Numbers: 6.9.18.24.22.45. Money matters are needing care and think before you spend during this period. You could be feeling let down by someone you have been relying on for a long time. edit or@MelbourneObserv er editor@MelbourneObserv er..c om. om.aa u

“For the cause that lacks assistance, ‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance For the future in the distance, And the good that we can do”

Short Shots

● Susie Sparkes as Margot Mason in Female of the Species. Photo: Karim Ghantous ■ When Joanna Murray-Smith’s The Female of the Species premiered in 2006, Germaine Greer, the inspiration for the protagonist, was justifiably upset. The upset was that an incident where a disturbed young woman who had broken into her home and held Greer captive had been made into a comedy. Not least that Murray-Smith’s play laid the fault not with the deranged student but squarely with her Greer character. It did indeed feel gratuitous when first produced. However, whether intended or otherwise, distance has softened this play’s maleficence. The Female of the Species has all the elements of a great farce: unlikely characters thrown together in a ridiculous, improbable plot. Most importantly, it is very witty. Margot Mason, 70s feminist icon and author of the ground-breaking The Cerebral Vagina, is suffering from writer’s block. Unexpectedly, a former student of hers, Molly, arrives intent on revenge. There are some very dark themes swirling around; not least the ‘monstrous feminine’ and toxic motherhood. However, the play is also extremely funny and Peridot’s production shines brightly. Natasha Boyd tightly directs her actors with great emphasis on comic timing and pace. Susie Sparkes, despite spending most of the action handcuffed to her desk, is excellent as the vain, acerbic, self-absorbed feminist legend, Margot. Reschelle O’Connor is also very good as the fervent, gun-toting former student, Molly. Rachel Clayton sparkles as Margot’s much put-upon daughter, Tess. Andrew McIver as Tess’s husband Bryan, makes the most of his comic lines and much slapstick. Michael Knowles (Frank) andPaul Wanis (Theo) make up this terrific ensemble. Kudos also to Steve Karandais for a great set design. Performance season: Until June 24 Venue: Unicorn Theatre, Mt Waverley Secondary College, Lechte Road, Mt Waverley. - Review by Kathryn Keeble

with Kerry Kulkens

Taurus : April 21- May 20. Colour: Blue Lucky Day: Thursday Racing Numbers: 8.5.2.5 Lotto Numbers: 1.18.19.23.37.44. Any legal documents or contracts must be seemed by the experts before you sign on the dotted line. Some crises on the domestic sector should be cleared before you make up your mind.

with Ash Long, Editor

Distribution S ta te E dition: A v ailable w eekly a Edition: weekly att approx. 400 newsagents across the Melbourne metropolitan area, Mornington Peninsula, Geelong, Bellarine Peninsula, Surf coast, and Victorian regional centres. Recommended retail price: $2.95.

Long Shots

Your Stars

■ Melbourne Observer Racing Editor Ted Ryan has been in the wars. He was prescribed some blood pressure medication that did not agree with him, and he suffered several falls that hospitalised him. Ted has been on the sick list - but still managed to file his column for this week’s issue. You might some find some handy tips. ■ We welcome Greg Every as an addition to our list of honorary reviewers, who are led by Cheryl Threadgold. ■ Philip Brady, 3AW co-host of Nightline and Remember When, had 10 guests at the Survivors luncheon at South Melbourne this month. The birthday boy (age 78) was in a happy mood: he shouted the meals for 23 people! ■ Nigel Dick, 89, former Nine Network boss, is in good nick after being seriously ill following a knee operation that had complications. ■ Congratulations to old school mate James Hogan, retiring boss of Etihad, on his ‘AO’ honour from the Queen’s Birthday list.

Observer Treasury Thought For The Week

■ “A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out.”

Observer Curmudgeon

■ “Friends are God's way of taking care of us.”

Text For The Week

Cancer: June 22- July 22. Colour: Lilac Lucky Day: Saturday Racing Numbers: 3.5.2.1. Lotto Numbers: 12.18.24.29.35.33. If you promise more than you can deliver you could find problems in your personal relationships. Try to pacify loved ones who could be relying on your help. Leo : July 23- August 22. Colour: Mauve. Lucky Day: Tuesday. Racing Numbers: 5.4.8.4. Lotto Numbers: 15.19.25.40.36.23. The very best period of mixing business and pleasure and also making sure that all important information is reaching the right people. Time for reaping from your past efforts is now. Virgo :August 23- September 23. Colour: Green Lucky Day: Friday Racing Numbers: 1.5.7.4. Lotto Numbers: 10.45.1.41.26.33. Let people know how you feel and do not sit tight on your information during this period. Problems with machinery could be the cause of some mix ups later in the period. Libra: September 24- October 23. Colour Dark: Blue Lucky Day: Friday Racing Numbers: 1.5.8.7. Lotto Numbers: 15.19.24.28.34.45. A friend could be instrumental in bringing about changes in your daily routine. If you are about to change your mind it's advisable to check all aspects before decision making. Scorpio: October 24- November 22. Colour: Green Lucky Day: Wednesday Racing: 1.5.7.4. Lotto Numbers: 15.19.24.28.34.36. . A person or news from your past could interrupt your daily routine. Travel plans could be deferred or cancelled due to unexpected actions and more planning will be needed. Sagittarius : November 23- December 20 Lucky Colour: Orange Lucky Day: Monday Racing Numbers: 1.8.7.4 Lotto Numbers: 1.5.19.24.42.45 You might need to work harder to get your way with someone special. Health needs care and something you have been worrying about should be investigated right now. Capricorn: December 21- January 19. Colour: Fawn Lucky Day: Monday Racing Numbers: 2.5.2.4. Lotto Numbers: 12.19.15.24.45.32. New hobbies will take you out of the house a lot. Do not neglect your usual friends even your new found interest will be very time consuming at first. Wear beige for luck outside.

■ "Is not wisdom found among the aged? Does not long life bring understanding?" - Job 12:12 ■ "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and instruction.” - Proverbs 1:7

Aquarius January 20- February 19. Lucky Colour: Navy Blue Lucky Day: Friday Racing Numbers: 2.4.8.7. Lotto Numbers: 1.5.40.28.34.33 Too much pushing now will alienate people from your plans. Try the soft touch and you will fare better and more of your abilities will come to fore if you are wise now.

Contents of Court Lists are intended for information purposes only. The lists are extracted from Court Lists, as supplied to the public, by the Magistrates’ Court of Victoria, often one week prior to publication date; for current Court lists, please contact the Court. Further details of cases are available at www.magistratescourt.vic.gov.au The Melbourne Observer shall in no event accept any liability for loss or damage suffered by any person or body due to information provided. The information is provided on the basis that persons accessing it undertake responsibility for assessing the relevance and accuracy of its content. No inference of a party’s guilt or innocence should be made by publication of their name as a defendant. Court schedules may be changed at any time for any reason, including withdrawal of the action by the Plaintiff/Applicant. E&OE.

Pisces : February 20- March 20. Colour: White Lucky Day: Tuesday. Racing Numbers: 5.6.4.1. Lotto Numbers: 12.19.24.35.36.42. An offer too good to refuse could come your way suddenly. More work that you hoped for should be on offer very soon and your interests will gain in some way.

Visit Kerry Kulkens Magic Shop at 1693 Burwood Hwy, Belgrave Phone/Fax 9754 4587 www.kerrykulkens.com.au Like us on Facebook


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Melbourne Arts Extended season

■ Extended opening hours for Van Gogh and the Seasons have been announced. It is the fastest selling exhibition in the National Gallery of Victoria’s history, and the largest exhibition of Van Gogh masterpieces ever seen in Australia. The exhibition was scheduled to close on Sunday July 9 but has been extended until Wednesday July 12 due to the extraordinary demand. For its final three days it will be open from 8am until 11pm. A special 24-hour viewing will also take place on the final weekend from 10pm Saturday July 8 to 10pm on Sunday July 9, giving audiences an extra chance to see Van Gogh and the Seasons before the works return to their homes across the globe. Accommodating both night owls and early birds, the exhibition is also now open from 9am every weekday and 8am on weekends. Part of the Victorian Government’s Melbourne Writer Masterpiece series, Van Gogh and the Seasons has welcomed more that 230,000 visitors since opening on April 28. The exhibition has been a drawcard for audiences of all ages and visitors across the globe. Once Van Gogh and the Seasons closes, the NGV’s next major exhibition will be The House of Dior opening inAugust followed by the NGV Triennial – a major free summer exhibition featuring the works of 60 contemporary artists and designers from more than 30 countries. - Peter Kemp

Heide Museum

■ Making History - The Boyd Family The third exhibition in the Making History series, this display highlights the museum's rich collection of paintings, works on paper and ceramic objects by various members of the acclaimed Boyd dynasty and their close collaborators. With focus on the achievements of the 1940s and 50s, the exhibition highlights include elegant art nouveau-style pots by family patriarch Merric Boyd. Arthur Boyd's masterful group portrait painted in 1946 and a vibrant array of domestic ware produced by artists working for the celebrated Arthur Merric Boyd Pottery in the postwar period. The exhibition closes November 12. ■ The Springbrook Landscapes - Albert tucker and Fred Williams. Albert Tucker and Fred Williams painted the spectacular surrounds of the Springbrook rainforest while holidaying there together in 1971. The Australian landscape had been a creative focus for both of them over a decade, each having found a new appreciation for the local environment after spending time away from their homeland. Tucker, the elder by 13 years, lived and travelled extensively overseas from 1947 until 1960, while Williams based himself in London between 1952 and 1956. In the late 1960s the two artists began visiting each other's studios and established a rapport. Turn To Page 13

Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 11 Melbourne

Observer

Living the dream

● Claire Abagia (Ann Deever), Liam Gillespie (Chris Keller),George Werther (Joe Keller) and Julie Arnold (Kate Keller) in All My Sons. Photo: David Belton ■ Heidelberg Theatre Company presents All just fulfilling the American Dream– wealth, prosMy Sons from July 7-22 at 36 Turnham Ave, perity, financial security and indeed by helping Rosanna. keep the country free, they were helping others Written by American playwright Arthur to achieve the Dream also. Miller and directed by Chris McLean, the backPerformance details: July 7 – 22 ground to All My Sons is World War II, where Times: 8pm, with 2pm matinees on Sunday men and women fought and died overseas, and July 9, 16 and July 22 others – businessmen particularly – made their Venue: Heidelberg Theatre, 36 Turnham fortunes, or built upon them, by fulfilling lucra- Ave., Rosanna tive government contracts to produce the comTickets: Adults: $27 Concession, Senior’s ponents, machines and weapons that those sol- Card Holders and Members $24 Group of 10+ diers abroad were using to fight with. $22 per ticket. Those fortunate ones at home could, of Bookings: www.htc.org.au course, justify their positions by saying they were - Cheryl Threadgold

Honours for Mike, Patti ■ Melbourne Observer columnist Mike McColl Jones was recognised with an Order of Australia honour in the Queen’s Birthday list. Mike was recognised for his work in broadcasting, which included stints with Graham Kennedy, Don Lane, Peter Couchman, Bert Newton and Steve Vizard. Patti Newton’s honour recognises her work for charities including the Variety Club, and the Stroke Foundation.

Melbourne Observations with Matt Bissett-Johnson

Showbiz News

● Mike McColl Jones, OAM

Also honoured was Antonio Zeccola, the founder and owner of Palace Cinemas and Palace Films. Actress Deborah Mailman was honored in the list. So too was Cate Blanchett “for eminent service to the performing arts as an international stage and screen actor, through seminal contributions as director of artistic organisations, as a role model for women and young performers, and as a supporter of humanitarian and environmental causes.”

Cheque book journalism ■ Cheque book journalism is alive and well particularly in current affair TV programs. The Brisbane lass knifed in the horrific London Bridge carnage was paid a rumoured $100,000 for an interview on Sunday on Seven. Apart from the upfront payment Seven had to stump up hidden extra costs of airfares and accomodation for father and sister of the victim, as well as same for presenter Melissa Doyle. It all adds up to big bucks. - John O’Keefe

What’s On Puppetry Festival

● Puppetry Festival at La Mama ■ The Melbourne Festival of Puppetry is back, to be presented across La Mama’s venues, including the La Mama Forecourt and purpose built Courtyard Tent Theatre, from July 4-9. This year’s festival will present more than 15 works for children and adults. The festival is like a puppet-sampler with styles ranging from black light theatre, shadow puppets, Muppet-style, Czech marionettes and extraordinary full-bodied puppets, all in one program. This year’s performances are featured from across Australia and across the world, including from the Philippines, the Anino Shadowplay Collective who make extraordinary shadow plays for family audiences. The adult program will include The People Who Play With Theatre from New Zealand presenting The Last Man On Earth is Trapped In A Supermarket. Also presenting short works at The Puppet Picnic is UK artist Billy Paul in his MisInformation Booth as well as artist Adam Bennett who hails from Perth via the UK. From across Australia artists will be welcomed from NSW, WA, regional Victoria and Melbourne, including performances by one of Jim Henson’s favourite puppeteers, the world-renowned puppeteer Richard Bradshaw (NSW). New to the festival this year is The Creature Technology Company Workshop Program, a workshop program for children and a professional development program for adults and artists. Taught by puppet experts, children can make a variety of puppets and then learn how to use them, including socks puppets, junk puppets, hand-and-rod puppets and shadow puppets. Adult professional development workshops includes Sorn Soran, a guest from Cambodia who will run an intensive in making and performing with traditional Cambodia Shadow puppets. The adult program will also offer two workshops by expert puppet designers and makers from CTC – the company behind the hit musical and puppet of King Kong. There are also free puppet events daily, and each night in the La Mama forecourt, so bring your lunch for the Puppet Picnic or enjoy wine at night while wandering through the avenue of Love and Death – an avenue of puppet booths with short shows for adults. There are puppetry shows suitable for the age groups 3 – 5 years, 4 – 8 years, 6 – 12 years, all ages and adults. For full details of shows, dates, times and bookings, visit www.lamama.com.au - Cheryl Threadgold


Page 12 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Melbourne

Observer

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West Hollywood

‘Visit West Hollywood’ team in Melb.

■ Hi everyone, from my suite at the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites comes this week's news.

Obamas buy a house ■ Barack and Michelle Obama have opted to buy the $8.1 million home they've been renting in Washington, D.C., just a few miles from the White House. They purchased the 8200-square-foot Tudor-style mansion in Kalorama, a wealthy enclave also home to Ivanka Trump and Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson. Kevin Lewis, the former President's spokesman, said, "Given that President and Mrs. Obama will be in Washington for at least another 2½ years, it made sense for them to buy a home rather than continuing to rent property." Sasha Obama, their youngest daughter, is still in high school.

Catch-up with Barry

■ Hollywood-based Australian cinematographer Barry Wilson was with the Visit West Hollywood team in Melbourne on its visit. When the team were in Melbourne promoting the wonders of West Hollywood to the local travel experts they met up with Barry, who was in Melbourne visiting his daughter. Barry has a long list of credits from early Australian television shows like Homicide, Matlock Police and The Flying Doctors before he searched for bigger shows here in Hollywood. Barry moved to Hollywood in 1989 and started as Director of Photography on Mission Impossible and then onto Time Trax and the Dukes of Hazzard, Melrose Place and scores of other movies and television shows. While Barry was in his hometown, he ran into Alan Johnson and the Visit West Hollywood Team who were travelling the east coast presenting seminars on the beauty and wonder of West Hollywood.

● Cinematographer Barry Wilson with the Managing Director and CEO of the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites in West Hollywood, Alan Johnson.

Orient Express murder ■ Hercule Poirot is putting together some clues. Someone on the train killed Johnny Depp, and our money is on it being the same person who thought an Imagine Dragons song was a good choice to soundtrack a Kenneth Branagh movie. The trailer for the actor-director's remake of Agatha Christie's famed 1934 murder-mystery novel Murder on the Orient Express has arrived, and it's stacked with stars: Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Penélope Cruz, Daisy Ridley, Judi Dench, Josh Gad, Willem Dafoe, Leslie Odom Jr., and Tom Bateman are all here. Hop aboard when Branagh's remake arrives this November.

GavinWood

From my Suite at the Ramada Plaza Complex on Santa Monica Blvd

Uber cashed up

■ Uber has spent billions to upend the transportation industry. Now, at least for the moment, it is burning slightly less cash in that effort. The company lost $708 million over the first three months of the year on revenue of $3.4 billion, not counting expenses like employee stock compensation. That is a narrowing of the previous quarter's loss of $991 million, on revenue of $2.9 billion. Uber said it was still sitting on $7.2 billion in cash, roughly the same amount it held at the end of 2016.

■ In a strange bit of irony, just as the Trump administration has pushed George Orwell's dystopian novel 1984 to No. 1 on the Amazon charts, the star of the film adaptation, John Hurt, has passed away after a fight with pancreatic cancer. He was 77. Born in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, UK, Hurt was the son of an actress and a vicar, and, after training at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), made his film debut in 1966's A Man for All Seasons. With his pained British voice and poignant stare, the actor would make an indelible impact on cinema, earning his first Academy Award nomination as Max, a heroin addict trapped in a Turkish prison, in Midnight Express, before performing one of film's most memorable death scenes in Ridley Scott's Alien. His next two films, as the severely deformed and chastised John Merrick in The Elephant Man (Oscar-nominated for Best Actor) and Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate, cemented his status as one of the greats, and marks a stellar four-film run.

Tobey’s $3.4m buy ■ Actor Tobey Maguire has used his prodigious real estate powers to snare a cool West Hollywood, Californoa, contemporary for $3.4 million. Maguire bought the 3258-square-foot house designed and sold by Clive Wilkinson, the architect who designed the interior of a Google building in Silicon Valley. T his was Wilkinson's personal residence and the only singlefamily home he has designed. Built in 2007, the three-bedroom, four-bath house sits on a lot that's a little over 7,000 square feet. Maguire, 41, starred in Spiderman,Cider House Rules, Seabiscuit, and The Great Gatsby. When he's not making movies or real estate deals, Maguire is all-in as a tournament poker player.

Drug co. uses muscle

■ A company that manages prescription drug plans for tens of millions of Americans has sued a tiny drug maker that makes an emergency treatment for heroin and painkiller overdoses, increasing the tension between the companies that make drugs and those that decide whether they should be covered. Express Scripts, the nation's largest pharmacy benefits manager, is suing Kaléo, the manufacturer of Evzio, the injectable overdose treatment whose price quintupled last year, drawing widespread outrage and inquiries from members of Congress. Express Scripts claims it is owed more than $14.5 million in fees and rebates related to Evzio, and it has dropped the drug from its preferred list.

My special deal for you

Joining the band

■ Deacon Frey, the son of the Eagles' singer Glenn Frey, who died in 2016 and country stalwart Vince Gill will join the Eagles for their upcoming shows at Classic West and Classic East here in the States. The two new additions to the band will split vocal duty on the many classic songs that featured lead vocals from Glenn Frey, including Peaceful Easy Feeling, Already Gone and Lyin' Eyes.

■ Twenty years after ending its nine-season run on ABC, Roseanne is reportedly coming back to TV. The move follows similar revivals by shows like Gilmore Girls, Will & Grace and The X-Files. All major members of the fictional blue-collar Conner family are expected to reappear on the rebooted eight-episode limited series, including Roseanne Barr, Sara Gilbert, Laurie Metcalf and John Goodman as patriarch Dan Conner, despite the fact it was revealed in the 1997 series finale that his character had died after having a heart attack a year earlier. In 2009, Barr wrote on her website that if she were to bring the show back, she would bring Goodman back by saying that Dan had faked his own death.

John Hurt dead at 77

Is this the end?

■ Between 20 per cent and 25 per cent of the nation's shopping malls will close in the next five years, according to a new report from Credit Suisse that predicts e-commerce will continue to pull shoppers away from bricks-and-mortar retailers. For many, the Wall Street firm's finding may come as no surprise. Long-standing retailers are dying off as shoppers' habits shift online. Credit Suisse expects apparel sales to represent 35 per cent of all e-commerce by 2030, up from 17 per cent today. Traditional mall anchors, such as Macy's, J.C. Penney and Sears, have announced numerous store closings in recent months. Clothiers including American Apparel, Bebe and BCBG Max Azria have filed for bankruptcy. The report estimates that around 8640 stores will close by the end of the year.

Roseanne returns

● Johnny Depp

www.gavinwood.us

■ If you are considering a move to Los Angeles or just coming over for a holiday then I have got a special deal for you. We would love to see you at the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites, 8585 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Hollywood. I have secured a terrific holiday deal for readers of the Melbourne Observer. Please mention 'Melbourne Observer' when you book and you will receive the 'Special Rate of the Day'. Please contact Joanna at info@ramadaweho.com Happy Holidays, Gavin Wood


www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 13

Melbourne

Confidential Talk is cheap, gossip is priceless

Arts Extra NGV Australia

■ Experience the artwork of Victoria’s emerging VCE students with a curatorial tour of Top Arts 2017. With special insights into the creative process the tour offers a behindthe-scenes look at folios and visual diaries of the exhibiting artists. Saturday July 1, 11am – 12.30pm NGV Australia, fees apply, booking required. Coinciding with Patrick Pound, The Great Exhibition, hear a panel discussion about why humans find the need to collect. Join artist Patrick Pound and experts Rebecca Carland, Curator of History of Collections Museum Victoria and John Stevens, Librarian, Collection Development and Discovery, State Library Victoria, as they review personal collections and institution repositories to discover what collecting tells us about ourselves, our past and our future. Saturday July 1, 2pm. NGV Australia. Free. As part of Melbourne Rare Book Week discover hidden treasures in the NGV collection as NGV Curators reveal rarely displayed works in an intimate behind the scenes viewing experience. Wednesday July 6. 1pm – 2pm. NGV International Free. Bookings required. As part of the NGV Festival of Photography, hear artists discuss their current NGV exhibitions with the following highlights: Join artist Ross Coulter as he discusses the influences and ideas behind the current exhibition Ross Coulter, Audience, a photographic series documenting audience members in 95 Melbourne galleries and museums in which there is no art, watching a performance that does not exist. Sunday July 9, 11am NGV International. Entry Free See Melbourne artist Zoe Croggon’s newly commissioned work and hear Zoe discuss how she draws on her experiences of studying ballet and dance to craft delicate photographic collages. Sunday July 9 11.30am. NGV International. Free. - Peter Kemp ● From Page 11

Heide Museum By then Tucker and his wife Barbara were settled in a bush-block in rural Hurstbridge on the outskirts of Melbourne. Their passion for the environment and its conservation had also led them to buy a tract of pristine rainforest at Springbrook in the Gold Coast hinterland, a place of natural beauty and significance. They invited Fred and Lyn Williams and their three children to join them there in August 1971, when the family was making a road trip to Brisbane for an exhibition of William's gouaches. Williams created numerous studies during his week at Springbrook and developed several more related pictures back in Melbourne. Encouraged by Tucker, he used these pictures to experiment with fast-drying acrylic paint in conjunction with gouache, his usual medium for outdoor work. It allowed him to trial a heightened palette that would capture the unique character of the area. Tucker was less inclined to work on location but joined Williams to sketch en plein air. He produced his Springbrook paintings later in the studio, evoking the colours and textures and atmosphere of the region with an unusual delicacy. The exhibition is currently running and will close August 27. ■ Art Talk: Girls and the City Renowned poet and emeritus professor Chris Wallace-Crabbe discusses the themes and stories behind Charles Blackman's Schoolgirls. - Peter Kemp

Cunning Little Vixen

Whispers Fathers’ leesons

■ Melbourne author Claire Halliday is releasing her book, Things My Father Taught Me, in time for Father Day. The book features interviews with Danny Katz, Ann Peacock, Anthony Callea, Darryn Lyons, Neil Mitchell, Normie Rowe, Catriona Rowntree, George Calombaris, Jo Stanley, Christian Wagstaff, Rev Tim Costello, Father Bob Maguire and Santo Cilauro.

Oh, Muriel!

■ Melbourne actress Maggie McKenna, 20, will star in the new stage production of Muriel’s Wedding The Musical. Joining the new Muriel on stage is Justine Clarke as the long suffering Betty, with other members of the Heslop clan played by Briallen Clarke (Joanie), Michael Whalley (Perry) and Connor Sweeney (Malcolm). ● Antoinette Halloran (Fox) and Celeste Lazarenko (Vixen). Photo: Charlie Kinross ■ The forest comes alive in returns to the Victorian Opera ment of the forest the Victorian Opera’s new pro- following his acclaimed “Human fashions and acduction of Leo Janácak’sCun- Sondheim trilogy. cessories are repurposed to ning Little Vixen . Maunder reflects: “On the coloured animal characters, This rarely heard opera will surface, Cunning Little Vixen Similarly, manufactured matebe staged for five perfor- is simple enough, a musical bi- rials are reinvented to create mances at Arts Centre ography of a fox based on a the natural world.” Melbourne’s Playhouse from comic strip filled with furry faThe 90-minute opera will be June 22 -July 1. miliars. sung in English and is considA celebration of the beauty “It could be seen as little ered to be a good introduction of nature and cycle of life, more than an opera for chil- to opera for families and firstCunning Little Vixen muses on dren, but it’s impossible to dis- timers, the interaction between human miss. It contains some of the Performance details: June and animal life. most moving music ever writ- 22, 24, 27, 28 at 7.30pm Set in an idyllic forest, the ten, verifying life’s most proVenue: Arts Centre story follows a Vixen’s lyrical found and eternal truths.” Melbourne journey from youth to adultThe production draws upon Bookings:1300 182 183 hood. man-made materials to capture www.victorianopera.com.au Director Stuart Maunder the whimsy and the enchant- Cheryl Threadgold

Merrily We Roll Along ■ Watch This presents Merrily We Roll Along from June 29 – July 15 at Southbank Theatre, The Lawler. With music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by George Furth, the show is directed by Sara Grenfell, with musical direction by Cameron Thomas. Watch This, Australia’s first company dedicated to performing works by legendary composer Sondheim, follows its recent sell-out season of Company with another witty and deeply moving collaboration between Sondheim and Furth. Franklin Shepard has made it to the top: a wealthy LA movie producer, he rubs shoulders with Hollywood’s A-list. But he desperately wishes things had turned out differently. Where did his life veer off course? As it wheels back through the landscape of Franklin’s past, his choices and their consequences, Merrily We Roll Along explores the forces that shape our lives: success and what it costs, friendship and what it can bear, dreams and what they become. Choreography by David Wynen, and the cast is led by Lyall Brooks, Nicole Melloy, Nelson Gardner, Cristina D’Agostinoand SophieWeiss. Dates: Thurs., June 29 – Sat., July 15. 7.30pm Bookings: mtc.com.au Tickets: Adult $49, Conc $39 (Student, Equity, Pension). Gala Opening Night $55 Venue: Southbank Theatre, The Lawler, 140 Southbank Boulevard - Cheryl Threadgold

Rumour Mill

Hear It Here First

Channel 31 axed

■ Community television is set to go off the air at the end of this month. Melbourne’s C31 has issued a statement to say that the government, namely the Department of Communications and Communications Minister Senator Mitch Fifield, has denied the sector, which also includes channels in Adelaide and Perth, any extension beyond the current end of June deadline to go off air. - Televisionau.com

Paid $280,000

■ UBS Securities Australia Limited has paid penalties totalling $280,000 to comply with two infringement notices given to it by the Markets Disciplinary Panel.

Countdown ■ There are only 24 more Melbourne Observers until Christmas.

E-Mail: Confidential@MelbourneObserver.com.au

Theatre Extra Review: Circosis

■ The National Institute of Circus Arts presents a sparkling showcase of final-year students’ work in Circosis, Left Brain, Right Brain, at the NICA National Circus Centre, Prahran, until June 24. The show’s title uses the concept of our brains being divided down the middle into two hemispheres, with each half performing a distinct set of operations. The show’s first half features the ‘cast of left brain’, and the second half , the ‘cast of right brain’. Director Kate Fryer writes in the program: “Circosis blurs the lines between creativity and obsession, institution and freedom of expression.” The result is a terrific, beautifully staged show, featuring entertaining, at times awesome, individual circus acts by highly talented young performers. From the dramatic to comedic, circus performance styles include hoop diving, clowning, aerial straps, aerial ladder, rotating ring, comedy acrobatics, hand balancing, Chinese pole, rope, trapeze and more. Creative, quirky dance movements expressed intermittently by cast wearing plainnecked, pale grey tops and pants, effectively symbolise “institution and freedom of expression”. Social commentary recognised on other issues includes animal cruelty and the environment. The audience is continuously entertained, as cast wearing the grey outfits change props and sets, and present short comedic pieces, even fire-eating, to sustain show momentum during set changes. All performers present skilled, wonderful performances, both as individuals and in teamwork. Standout acts for me on opening night were Nelson Smyles’s hoop-diving act, Ela Bartilomo’s emotive rope act, Ashleigh Roper’s hoop performance with three stunning, magical wardrobe changes, and the fullteam final ensemble performance. At the end of the show, NICA’s Executive Director, Rose Stephens, congratulated the students on their artistic vision, effort and dedication to their work. Bravo indeed! These talented graduates are our circus stars of the future, both at home and abroad. Circosis finishes on June 24 and is well worth seeing. Performance Details: Until June 24 Venue: NICA National Circus Centre, 3959 Green St, Prahran Bookings: www.nica.com.au - Review by Cheryl Threadgold


Page 14 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

■ John Hawker was born in Bristol, England, in 1935. In his teenage years John trained to become a musician at Trinity College in London. He came to Australia in 1951 when his parents immigrated. Johnnyobtained work playing trombone in bands and orchestras in Sydney. He was working mainly in theatres such as the Prince Edward Theatre and became interested in jazz music. He was in the band for the first of the Lee Gordon Big Shows and played for Ella Fitzgerald, Artie Shaw, Jerry Colonna and Buddy Rich. John was only 23 at the time and had never heard of Ella Fitzgerald. He received some good advice from Artie Shaw who told him: "The music had been written for a purpose and if you play what is on the part, the purpose will have been fulfilled if you play it well." Johnny remembered that advice all his life. He went onto ‘staff’ with the Channel Seven Orchestra in Melbourne and that was the start of a career on television that continued for more than 20 years. Johnny was playing for shows such as Sunnyside Up and the Delo and Daly Show. I actually first met him at his engagement party to the singer Gaynor Bunning in the early sixties, but they did not marry. Johnny married Anne Hathaway in 1963.

www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Whatever Happened To ... Johnny Hawker

By Kevin Trask of 3AW and 96.5 Inner FM

Johnny was not a singer but Ron Tudor at Astor Records wanted to find a song for Anne and Johnny to record as a singing duo. Johnny was not all that keen, and after Ron had presented many suggestions, Johnny said to Anne, "We will do the next one he comes up with just to keep him quiet." Of course, it was to be a cover of a song that was on top of the hit parade in the UK by another husband and wife duo Esther and Abi Ofarim called Cinderella Rockefella. In 1968 Anne and Johnny Hawker had a sensational hit song with Cinderella Rockefella and topped the charts in Australia with their version. They followed up with a string of hit songs

● Anne and Johnny Hawker

which included Timothy and Boom Bang-ABang. Anne and Johnny were guest artists on television shows such as In Melbourne Tonight. Johnny worked on many Australian recordings as an arranger, including Grantley Dee's Wild One. In the early 1970s Johnny became resident musical director for Young Talent Time and was with the show for four years. Each week Johnny had to write the arrangements for about 13 songs. Our readers may recall that his 12-piece band played for several years at Alexander's Night Club in Brighton during the 1980s. On a Saturday afternoons they also played at the Anchor and Hope Hotel in Richmond. Johnny wrote orchestrations for films such as Romper Stomper and The Heartbreak Kid. There is a great interview with Johnny and Anne on the Wrokdown website with Wendy Stapleton. Sadly, Johnny Hawker, one of our respected musicians, passed away on of March 14, 2016 at the age of 81. Johnny is survived by Anne and their four children. Kevin Trask Kevin can be heard on radio The Time Tunnel - on Remember When - Sundays at 9.10pm on 3AW That's Entertainment - 96.5FM Sundays at 12 Noon www.innerfm.org.au

Shirtless men and svelte young things ■ The Finke is on again. "Will the bikes or the buggies win this year?" was always a hot topic when I lived in Alice Springs. Whilst I've never had more than but a passing interest in the Finke Desert Race itself, I would venture out on the evening before to check out the vehicles before their epic journey. And I'd get a glimpse or two as they raced by at breakneck speed through the dry riverbed. There were always the spunky, scantily clad Finke Grid Girls strutting around on the day of the race, but this year the organisers have tried to calm things down a little - now they are mere ‘Ambassadors’ - still svelte young things, but with a little more dignity. Now there is a move afoot to include shapely and muscly young males to strut around the grid. They wouldn't do much for me, but one lady opined: "As a feminist I am sick of not having had a chance to ogle with Nick Le Souef hot shirtless men while watching the race." Lightning Ridge Opals Whilst there are more than a few 63 Elizabeth Street, bingles each year, it always amazed Melbourne me that there weren't many more. Phone 9654 4444 The vehicles, both the buggies and www.opals.net.au the bikes, roar through the sand at such speed that half the time they're airborne, and just witnessing them is ing fun, intoxication, and campfires frightening experience. getting out of control. Each of these cases seems as ■ Bush fires are always a situation though it will be repeated year after in the Northern Territory. year, and it doesn't seem as though In the Top End they're welcomed there is much chance of reducing any and started every year as part of the of them. annual burn-off. And the poor old cockies just This has been going on for thou- watch their profits go up in smoke. sands of years - it's just that white farmers have now replaced the original ab- ■ In this electronic age there is a new original inhabitants in starting the fires. craze amongst young school kids in As one drives north in the Top End Alice Springs - marbles. "It's absothere are fires raging everywhere. lutely raging now," said Mad Harry's It's a bit different in the Centre. sales assistant, May Stringer. Local aborigines have used fire as the Drifting back to my primary school part of their traditional ceremonies for days at Kyabram HES and Sorrento centuries as well. However, growth is State, that was it for me - allies. much more sparse down there, plus I loved them, and as I was a pretty the cockies rely on this growth to feed good shot, I managed to win a lot - the their stock. rule was that if you lost a game you'd But the local inhabitants just love give up an alley to the winner. Not to light fires, many merely just for the your favourite one, your taw, but any sake of it. one in reasonable condition. For instance, last week there were There were many games which us 50 blazes alone in the area, and in little kids played - tracker, killer, big May there were 172 fires. ring, little ring, etc. etc. I don't know According to Senior Station Officer whether other kids invented them, or Jim Barnum, there were three main whether they were handed down from courses for outbreaks - juveniles hav- earlier decades or centuries, but they

The Outback Legend

with great games. There were two ways of holding an alley - by far the easiest and most common was to place of marble in the crook of one's index finger, and then propel it forward with the thumbnail. However there was a more complicated and accurate way, taking the finger and thumb again, but at different angles. Those that adopted this method usually were far more accurate and successful. Great games. ■ There is a new tour of the Rock available. I've never been on an official or organised tour around the edifice, even though they operate. This one, however, is for anyone, any Tom, Dick or Harry anywhere in the world - it's online. Google has introduced these tours, including the National Park and rock paintings. It's available to billions throughout the world, and interestingly includes sacred sites, and the ancient art in the caves, which the local aborigines discourage visitors from photographing, plus water-holes and trails. Google Managing Director, Justin Pellegrino, said that they had been working with ParksAustralia, and traditional owners for a couple of years, so it all must be OK. There are also 360 Degree Story Spheres, which are the interactive videos of traditional aboriginal stories and songs. So not only those who traipse all the way out there get the chance to see this awesome spectacle, but now couch potatoes from Iceland to India will have the same chance. ■ Every so often my Alice Springs shop would be visited by some celebrity or other - David Suzuki, the Blues Brothers, an old BBC comedian or two. It was always interesting to have a chat to them. Even the Queen wandered by in the Mall one sunny day - admittedly she didn't wander in to buy an opal from me, but she did wander by. Generally these chaps were just wafting quietly and anonymously by, with no fanfare at all. Indeed I once missed my favourite author, Bill Bryson .As he stepped out of the Mall I was driving by, and unfortunately missed him. The latest one was Pippa and the new husband on their honeymoon.

The advantage for the NT of a visit by Her Maj, or Pippa, is the millions of people all over the world, particularly the UK, watching this trotting around the Territory from the comfort of their own TV screens. And this means plenty of free publicity for this fair land.

The Queen herself, I first saw at Cerberus in the fifties, as a Sorrento Sea Scout. I did notice, when she was in Alice Springs, that she was still a tiny little thing - she hadn't grown much in those intervening years. - Nick Le Souef

OK. With John O’Keefe Triple M signs pair

■ The gags should come thick and fast when Mick Malloy teams with Jane Kennedy to host a new drive program. The program commences in Melbourne in October, then goes national in January 2018 to 30 stations around Australia. Last time the pair teamed together was for the iconic D Generation .

Party pooper

■ Cannes Lion Festival is the annual match-up when film starlets, producers and TV programers get close up and personal and over indulge with feasting on board yachts moored just off Cannes. Festival organisers have decided to pull the pin and banned parties on board the flotilla of glamourous floating palaces. More business, less smoozing and boozing is the edict.

Casting couch

■ During the week Emily Power is Editor of Domain, the real estate bible. Of a Saturday morning she teams with Darren James on 3AW to discuss property gossip. She is a born natural for radio with a great voice, bright personality , similar in manner to Kate Stevenson with Ross and John on AW's breakfast show. Radio producers should pay attention to this rising media star.

No new paper clips

■ Administrators at Ten have placed a ban on any new purchasers by staffers, unless fully approved and filled out in triplicate. Those over-the-top entertainment expenses are also on hold - bring your own sandwiches.

Freebies for twins

■ The announcement of Beyonce giving birth to twins had barely hit the headlines before a Australian company was on the hunt for companies prepared to donate gifts for the twins. The payoff being that Mum and twins may be photographed using the products. It's a long bow, let alone cost of despatching goods overseas..

Music Wars

■ There's a new book release Music Wars - the sound of the underground that chronicles the explosive trading history of Central Station Records and their iconic music store in Flinders St . It is an account of court cases, thuggery and vandalism. The boutique record store took on the big boys and won. An absorbing read at bookstores now. - John O’Keefe


Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 15

Observer Classic Books

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn “Oh, yes’m, I did. Sarah Mary Williams. Sarah’s my first name. Some calls me Sarah, some calls me Mary.” “Oh, that’s the way of it?” “Yes’m.” I was feeling better then, but I wished I was out of there, anyway. I couldn’t look up yet. Well, the woman fell to talking about how hard times was, and how poor they had to live, and how the rats was as free as if they owned the place, and so forth and so on, and then I got easy again. She was right about the rats. You’d see one stick his nose out of a hole in the corner every little while. She said she had to have things handy to throw at them when she was alone, or they wouldn’t give her no peace. She showed me a bar of lead twisted up into a knot, and said she was a good shot with it generly, but she’d wrenched her arm a day or two ago, and didn’t know whether she could throw true now. But she watched for a chance, and directly banged away at a rat; but she missed him wide, and said “Ouch!” it hurt her arm so. Then she told me to try for the next one. I wanted to be getting away before the old man got back, but of course I didn’t let on. I got the thing, and the first rat that showed his nose I let drive, and if he’d a stayed where he was he’d a been a tolerable sick rat. She said that was first-rate, and she reckoned I would hive the next one. She went and got the lump of lead and fetched it back, and brought along a hank of yarn which she wanted me to help her with. I held up my two hands and she put the hank over them, and went on talking about her and her husband’s matters. But she broke off to say: “Keep your eye on the rats. You better have the lead in your lap, handy.” So she dropped the lump into my lap just at that moment, and I clapped my legs together on it and she went on talking. But only about a minute. Then she took off the hank and looked me straight in the face, and very pleasant, and says: “Come, now, what’s your real name?” “Wh — what, mum?” “What’s your real name? Is it Bill, or Tom, or Bob? — or what is it?” I reckon I shook like a leaf, and I didn’t know hardly what to do. But I says: “Please to don’t poke fun at a poor girl like me, mum. If I’m in the way here, I’ll —” “No, you won’t. Set down and stay where you are. I ain’t going to hurt you, and I ain’t going to tell on you, nuther. You just tell me your secret, and trust me. I’ll keep it; and, what’s more, I’ll help you. So’ll my old man if you want him to. You see, you’re a runaway ’prentice, that’s all. It ain’t anything. There ain’t no harm in it. You’ve been treated bad, and you made up your mind to cut. Bless you, child, I wouldn’t tell on you. Tell me all about it now, that’s a good boy.” So I said it wouldn’t be no use to try to play it any longer, and I would just make a clean breast and tell her everything, but she musn’t go back on her promise. Then I told her my father and mother was dead, and the law had bound me out to a mean old farmer in the country thirty mile back from the river, and he treated me so bad I couldn’t stand it no longer; he went away to be gone a couple of days, and so I took my chance and stole some of his daughter’s old clothes and cleared out, and I had been three nights coming the thirty miles. I traveled nights, and hid daytimes and slept, and the bag of bread and meat I carried from home lasted me all the way, and I had a-plenty. I said I believed my uncle Abner Moore would take care of me, and so that was why I struck out for this town of Goshen. “Goshen, child? This ain’t Goshen. This is St. Petersburg. Goshen’s ten mile further up the river. Who told you this was Goshen?” “Why, a man I met at daybreak this morning, just as I was going to turn into the woods for my regular sleep. He told me when the roads forked I must take the right hand, and five mile would fetch me to Goshen.” “He was drunk, I reckon. He told you just exactly wrong.” “Well, he did act like he was drunk, but it ain’t no matter now. I got to be moving along. I’ll fetch Goshen before daylight.” “Hold on a minute. I’ll put you up a snack to eat. You might want it.”

r

e rv se US N Ob N IO BO CT SE

www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

the willow cove where she was hid. We put out the camp fire at the cavern the first thing, and didn’t show a candle outside after that. I took the canoe out from the shore a little piece, and took a look; but if there was a boat around I couldn’t see it, for stars and shadows ain’t good to see by. Then we got out the raft and slipped along down in the shade, past the foot of the island dead still — never saying a word. Chapter XII. IT must a been close on to one o’clock when we got below the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty slow. If a boat was to come along we was going to take to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was well a boat didn’t come, for we hadn’t ever thought to put the gun in the canoe, or a fishing-line, or anything to eat. We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many things. It warn’t good judgment to put EVERYTHING on the raft. If the men went to the island I just expect they found the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my building the fire never fooled them it warn’t no fault of mine. I played it as low down on them as I could. When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a towhead in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sandbar that has cottonwoods on it as thick as harrow-teeth. We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn’t afraid of anybody running across us. We laid there all day, and watched the rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn’t set down and watch a camp fire — no, sir, she’d fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn’t she tell her husband to fetch a dog? Jim said he bet she did think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he believed they must a gone up-town to get a dog and so they lost all that time, or else we wouldn’t be here on a towhead sixteen or seventeen mile below the village — no, indeedy, we would be in that same old town again. So I said I didn’t care Mark Twain what was the reason they didn’t get us as long So she put me up a snack, and says: the lump of lead. Why, I spotted you for a boy as they didn’t. “Say, when a cow’s laying down, which end of when you was threading the needle; and I con- When it was beginning to come on dark we poked her gets up first? Answer up prompt now — trived the other things just to make certain. Now our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and don’t stop to study over it. Which end gets up trot along to your uncle, Sarah Mary Williams looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; first?” George Elexander Peters, and if you get into so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft “The hind end, mum.” trouble you send word to Mrs. Judith Loftus, and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing “Well, then, a horse?” which is me, and I’ll do what I can to get you out weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry. “The for’rard end, mum.” of it. Keep the river road all the way, and next Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it “Which side of a tree does the moss grow on?” time you tramp take shoes and socks with you. a foot or more above the level of the raft, so now “North side.” The river road’s a rocky one, and your feet’ll be the blankets and all the traps was out of reach of “If fifteen cows is browsing on a hillside, how in a condition when you get to Goshen, I reckon.” steamboat waves. Right in the middle of the many of them eats with their heads pointed the I went up the bank about fifty yards, and then I wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or same direction?” doubled on my tracks and slipped back to where six inches deep with a frame around it for to “The whole fifteen, mum.” my canoe was, a good piece below the house. I hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in “Well, I reckon you HAVE lived in the country. jumped in, and was off in a hurry. I went up- sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would I thought maybe you was trying to hocus me stream far enough to make the head of the is- keep it from being seen. We made an extra steeragain. What’s your real name, now?” land, and then started across. I took off the sun- ing-oar, too, because one of the others might get “George Peters, mum.” bonnet, for I didn’t want no blinders on then. broke on a snag or something. We fixed up a “Well, try to remember it, George. Don’t forget When I was about the middle I heard the clock short forked stick to hang the old lantern on, and tell me it’s Elexander before you go, and begin to strike, so I stops and listens; the sound because we must always light the lantern whenthen get out by saying it’s George Elexander come faint over the water but clear — eleven. ever we see a steamboat coming down-stream, when I catch you. And don’t go about women in When I struck the head of the island I never to keep from getting run over; but we wouldn’t that old calico. You do a girl tolerable poor, but waited to blow, though I was most winded, but I have to light it for up-stream boats unless we you might fool men, maybe. Bless you, child, shoved right into the timber where my old camp see we was in what they call a “crossing”; for when you set out to thread a needle don’t hold used to be, and started a good fire there on a the river was pretty high yet, very low banks the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold high and dry spot. being still a little under water; so up-bound boats the needle still and poke the thread at it; that’s Then I jumped in the canoe and dug out for our didn’t always run the channel, but hunted easy the way a woman most always does, but a man place, a mile and a half below, as hard as I water. always does t’other way. And when you throw could go. I landed, and slopped through the tim- This second night we run between seven and at a rat or anything, hitch yourself up a tiptoe ber and up the ridge and into the cavern. There eight hours, with a current that was making over and fetch your hand up over your head as awk- Jim laid, sound asleep on the ground. I roused four mile an hour. We catched fish and talked, ward as you can, and miss your rat about six or him out and says: and we took a swim now and then to keep off seven foot. Throw stiff-armed from the shoul- “Git up and hump yourself, Jim! There ain’t a sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down der, like there was a pivot there for it to turn on, minute to lose. They’re after us!” the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up like a girl; not from the wrist and elbow, with Jim never asked no questions, he never said a at the stars, and we didn’t ever feel like talking your arm out to one side, like a boy. And, mind word; but the way he worked for the next half an loud, and it warn’t often that we laughed — only you, when a girl tries to catch anything in her hour showed about how he was scared. By that a little kind of a low chuckle. We had mighty lap she throws her knees apart; she don’t clap time everything we had in the world was on our good weather as a general thing, and nothing them together, the way you did when you catched raft, and she was ready to be shoved out from Continued on Page 16


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Observer Classic Books From Page 15 ever happened to us at all — that night, nor the next, nor the next. Every night we passed towns, some of them away up on black hillsides, nothing but just a shiny bed of lights; not a house could you see. The fifth night we passed St. Louis, and it was like the whole world lit up. In St. Petersburg they used to say there was twenty or thirty thousand people in St. Louis, but I never believed it till I see that wonderful spread of lights at two o’clock that still night. There warn’t a sound there; everybody was asleep. Every night now I used to slip ashore towards ten o’clock at some little village, and buy ten or fifteen cents’ worth of meal or bacon or other stuff to eat; and sometimes I lifted a chicken that warn’t roosting comfortable, and took him along. Pap always said, take a chicken when you get a chance, because if you don’t want him yourself you can easy find somebody that does, and a good deed ain’t ever forgot. I never see pap when he didn’t want the chicken himself, but that is what he used to say, anyway. Mornings before daylight I slipped into cornfields and borrowed a watermelon, or a mushmelon, or a punkin, or some new corn, or things of that kind. Pap always said it warn’t no harm to borrow things if you was meaning to pay them back some time; but the widow said it warn’t anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it. Jim said he reckoned the widow was partly right and pap was partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two or three things from the list and say we wouldn’t borrow them any more — then he reckoned it wouldn’t be no harm to borrow the others. So we talked it over all one night, drifting along down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons, or what. But towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory, and concluded to drop crabapples and p’simmons. We warn’t feeling just right before that, but it was all comfortable now. I was glad the way it come out, too, because crabapples ain’t ever good, and the p’simmons wouldn’t be ripe for two or three months yet. We shot a water-fowl now and then that got up too early in the morning or didn’t go to bed early enough in the evening. Take it all round, we lived pretty high. The fifth night below St. Louis we had a big storm after midnight, with a power of thunder and lightning, and the rain poured down in a solid sheet. We stayed in the wigwam and let the raft take care of itself. When the lightning glared out we could see a big straight river ahead, and high, rocky bluffs on both sides. By and by says I, “Hel-LO, Jim, looky yonder!” It was a steamboat that had killed herself on a rock. We was drifting straight down for her. The lightning showed her very distinct. She was leaning over, with part of her upper deck above water, and you could see every little chimbly-guy clean and clear, and a chair by the big bell, with an old slouch hat hanging on the back of it, when the flashes come. Well, it being away in the night and stormy, and all so mysterious-like, I felt just the way any other boy would a felt when I see that wreck laying there so mournful and lonesome in themiddle of the river. I wanted to get aboard of her and slink around a little, and see what there was there. So I says: “Le’s land on her, Jim.” But Jim was dead against it at first. He says: “I doan’ want to go fool’n ’long er no wrack. We’s doin’ blame’ well, en we better let blame’ well alone, as de good book says. Like as not dey’s a watchman on dat wrack.” “Watchman your grandmother,” I says; “there ain’t nothing to watch but the texas and the pilothouse; and do you reckon anybody’s going to resk his life for a texas and a pilot-house such a night as this, when it’s likely to break up and wash off down the river any minute?” Jim couldn’t say nothing to that, so he didn’t try. “And besides,” I says, “we might borrow something worth having out of the captain’s stateroom. Seegars, I bet you — and cost five cents apiece, solid cash. Steamboat captains is always rich, and get sixty dollars a month, and THEY don’t care a cent what a thing costs, you know, long as they want it. Stick a candle in your pocket; I can’t rest, Jim, till we give her a rummaging. Do you reckon Tom Sawyer would ever go by this thing? Not for pie, he wouldn’t. He’d call it an adventure — that’s what he’d call it; and he’d land on that wreck if it was his last act. And

wouldn’t he throw style into it? — wouldn’t he spread himself, nor nothing? Why, you’d think it was Christopher C’lumbus discovering Kingdom-Come. I wish Tom Sawyer WAS here.” Jim he grumbled a little, but give in. He said we mustn’t talk any more than we could help, and then talk mighty low. The lightning showed us the wreck again just in time, and we fetched the stabboard derrick, and made fast there. The deck was high out here. We went sneaking down the slope of it to labboard, in the dark, towards the texas, feeling our way slow with our feet, and spreading our hands out to fend off the guys, for it was so dark we couldn’t see no sign of them. Pretty soon we struck the forward end of the skylight, and clumb on to it; and the next step fetched us in front of the captain’s door, which was open, and by Jimminy, away down through the texas-hall we see a light! and all in the same second we seem to hear low voices in yonder! Jim whispered and said he was feeling powerful sick, and told me to come along. I says, all right, and was going to start for the raft; but just then I heard a voice wail out and say: “Oh, please don’t, boys; I swear I won’t ever tell!” Another voice said, pretty loud: “It’s a lie, Jim Turner. You’ve acted this way before. You always want more’n your share of the truck, and you’ve always got it, too, because you’ve swore ’t if you didn’t you’d tell. But this time you’ve said it jest one time too many. You’re the meanest, treacherousest hound in this country.” By this time Jim was gone for the raft. I was just a-biling with curiosity; and I says to myself, Tom Sawyer wouldn’t back out now, and so I won’t either; I’m a-going to see what’s going on here. So I dropped on my hands and knees in the little passage, and crept aft in the dark till there warn’t but one stateroom betwixt me and the cross-hall of the texas. Then in there I see a man stretched on the floor and tied hand and foot, and two men standing over him, and one of them had a dim lantern in his hand, and the other one had a pistol. This one kept pointing the pistol at the man’s head on the floor, and saying: “I’d LIKE to! And I orter, too — a mean skunk!” The man on the floor would shrivel up and say, “Oh, please don’t, Bill; I hain’t ever goin’ to tell.” And every time he said that the man with the lantern would laugh and say: “’Deed you AIN’T! You never said no truer thing ’n that, you bet you.” And once he said: “Hear him beg! and yit if we hadn’t got the best of him and tied him he’d a killed us both. And what FOR? Jist for noth’n. Jist because we stood on our RIGHTS— that’s what for. But I lay you ain’t a-goin’ to threaten nobody any more, Jim Turner. Put UP that pistol, Bill.” Bill says: “I don’t want to, Jake Packard. I’m for killin’ him — and didn’t he kill old Hatfield jist the same way — and don’t he deserve it?” “But I don’t WANT him killed, and I’ve got my reasons for it.” “Bless yo’ heart for them words, Jake Packard! I’ll never forgit you long’s I live!” says the man on the floor, sort of blubbering. Packard didn’t take no notice of that, but hung up his lantern on a nail and started towards where I was there in the dark, and motioned Bill to come. I crawfished as fast as I could about two yards, but the boat slanted so that I couldn’t make very good time; so to keep from getting run over and catched I crawled into a stateroom on the upper side. The man came a-pawing along in the dark, and when Packard got to my stateroom, he says: “Here — come in here.” And in he come, and Bill after him. But before they got in I was up in the upper berth, cornered, and sorry I come. Then they stood there, with their hands on the ledge of the berth, and talked. I couldn’t see them, but I could tell where they was by the whisky they’d been having. I was glad I didn’t drink whisky; but it wouldn’t made much difference anyway, because most of the time they couldn’t a treed me because I didn’t breathe. I was too scared. And, besides, a body COULDN’T breathe and hear such talk. They talked low and earnest. Bill wanted to kill Turner. He says: “He’s said he’ll tell, and he will. If we was to give both our shares to him NOW it wouldn’t make no difference after the row and the way we’ve served him. Shore’s you’re born, he’ll turn State’s evidence; now you hear ME. I’m

for putting him out of his troubles.” “So’m I,” says Packard, very quiet. “Blame it, I’d sorter begun to think you wasn’t. Well, then, that’s all right. Le’s go and do it.” “Hold on a minute; I hain’t had my say yit. You listen to me. Shooting’s good, but there’s quieter ways if the thing’s GOT to be done. But what I say is this: it ain’t good sense to go court’n around after a halter if you can git at what you’re up to in some way that’s jist as good and at the same time don’t bring you into no resks. Ain’t that so?” “You bet it is. But how you goin’ to manage it this time?” “Well, my idea is this: we’ll rustle around and gather up whatever pickins we’ve overlooked in the staterooms, and shove for shore and hide the truck. Then we’ll wait. Now I say it ain’t agoin’ to be more’n two hours befo’ this wrack breaks up and washes off down the river. See? He’ll be drownded, and won’t have nobody to blame for it but his own self. I reckon that’s a considerble sight better ’n killin’ of him. I’m unfavorable to killin’ a man as long as you can git aroun’ it; it ain’t good sense, it ain’t good morals. Ain’t I right?” “Yes, I reck’n you are. But s’pose she DON’T break up and wash off?” “Well, we can wait the two hours anyway and see, can’t we?” “All right, then; come along.” So they started, and I lit out, all in a cold sweat, and scrambled forward. It was dark as pitch there; but I said, in a kind of a coarse whisper, “Jim!” and he answered up, right at my elbow, with a sort of a moan, and I says: “Quick, Jim, it ain’t no time for fooling around and moaning; there’s a gang of murderers in yonder, and if we don’t hunt up their boat and set her drifting down the river so these fellows can’t get away from the wreck there’s one of ’em going to be in a bad fix. But if we find their boat we can put ALL of ’em in a bad fix — for the sheriff ’ll get ’em. Quick — hurry! I’ll hunt the labboard side, you hunt the stabboard. You start at the raft, and —” “Oh, my lordy, lordy! RAF’? Dey ain’ no raf’no mo’; she done broke loose en gone I— en here we is!” Chapter XIII. WELL, I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut up on a wreck with such a gang as that! But it warn’t no time to be sentimentering. We’d GOT to find that boat now — had to have it for ourselves. So we went a-quaking and shaking down the stabboard side, and slow work it was, too — seemed a week before we got to the stern. No sign of a boat. Jim said he didn’t believe he could go any further — so scared he hadn’t hardly any strength left, he said. But I said, come on, if we get left on this wreck we are in a fix, sure. So on we prowled again. We struck for the stern of the texas, and found it, and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight, hanging on from shutter to shutter, for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got pretty close to the cross-hall door there was the skiff, sure enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thankful. In another second I would a been aboard of her, but just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head out only about a couple of foot from me, and I thought I was gone; but he jerked it in again, and says: “Heave that blame lantern out o’ sight, Bill!” He flung a bag of something into the boat, and then got in himself and set down. It was Packard. Then Bill HE come out and got in. Packard says, in a low voice: “All ready — shove off!” I couldn’t hardly hang on to the shutters, I was so weak. But Bill says: “Hold on —’d you go through him?” “No. Didn’t you?” “No. So he’s got his share o’ the cash yet.” “Well, then, come along; no use to take truck and leave money.” “Say, won’t he suspicion what we’re up to?” “Maybe he won’t. But we got to have it anyway. Come along.” So they got out and went in. The door slammed to because it was on the careened side; and in a half second I was in the boat, and Jim come tumbling after me. I out with my knife and cut the rope, and away we went! We didn’t touch an oar, and we didn’t speak nor whisper, nor hardly even breathe. We went gliding swift along, dead silent, past the tip of the paddle-box, and past the stern; then in a second or two more we was a hundred yards below the

wreck, and the darkness soaked her up, every last sign of her, and we was safe, and knowed it. When we was three or four hundred yards downstream we see the lantern show like a little spark at the texas door for a second, and we knowed by that that the rascals had missed their boat, and was beginning to understand that they was in just as much trouble now as Jim Turner was. Then Jim manned the oars, and we took out after our raft. Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men — I reckon I hadn’t had time to before. I begun to think how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain’t no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet, and then how would I like it? So says I to Jim: “The first light we see we’ll land a hundred yards below it or above it, in a place where it’s a good hiding-place for you and the skiff, and then I’ll go and fix up some kind of a yarn, and get somebody to go for that gang and get them out of their scrape, so they can be hung when their time comes.” But that idea was a failure; for pretty soon it begun to storm again, and this time worse than ever. The rain poured down, and never a light showed; everybody in bed, I reckon. We boomed along down the river, watching for lights and watching for our raft. After a long time the rain let up, but the clouds stayed, and the lightning kept whimpering, and by and by a flash showed us a black thing ahead, floating, and we made for it. It was the raft, and mighty glad was we to get aboard of it again. We seen a light now away down to the right, on shore. So I said I would go for it. The skiff was half full of plunder which that gang had stole there on the wreck. We hustled it on to the raft in a pile, and I told Jim to float along down, and show a light when he judged he had gone about two mile, and keep it burning till I come; then I manned my oars and shoved for the light. As I got down towards it three or four more showed — up on a hillside. It was a village. I closed in above the shore light, and laid on my oars and floated. As I went by I see it was a lantern hanging on the jackstaff of a double-hull ferryboat. I skimmed around for the watchman, a-wondering whereabouts he slept; and by and by I found him roosting on the bitts forward, with his head down between his knees. I gave his shoulder two or three little shoves, and begun to cry. He stirred up in a kind of a startlish way; but when he see it was only me he took a good gap and stretch, and then he says: “Hello, what’s up? Don’t cry, bub. What’s the trouble?” I says: “Pap, and mam, and sis, and —” Then I broke down. He says: “Oh, dang it now, DON’T take on so; we all has to have our troubles, and this ’n ’ll come out all right. What’s the matter with ’em?” “They’re — they’re — are you the watchman of the boat?” “Yes,” he says, kind of pretty-well-satisfied like. “I’m the captain and the owner and the mate and the pilot and watchman and head deck-hand; and sometimes I’m the freight and passengers. I ain’t as rich as old Jim Hornback, and I can’t be so blame’ generous and good to Tom, Dick, and Harry as what he is, and slam around money the way he does; but I’ve told him a many a time ’t I wouldn’t trade places with him; for, says I, a sailor’s life’s the life for me, and I’m derned if I’D live two mile out o’ town, where there ain’t nothing ever goin’ on, not for all his spondulicks and as much more on top of it. Says I—” I broke in and says: “They’re in an awful peck of trouble, and —” “WHO is?” “Why, pap and mam and sis and Miss Hooker; and if you’d take your ferryboat and go up there —” “Up where? Where are they?” “On the wreck.” “What wreck?” “Why, there ain’t but one.” “What, you don’t mean the Walter Scott?” “Yes.” “Good land! what are they doin’ THERE, for gracious sakes?” “Well, they didn’t go there a-purpose.” “I bet they didn’t! Why, great goodness, there ain’t no chance for ’em if they don’t git off mighty quick! Why, how in the nation did they ever git into such a scrape?”

To Be Continued Next Issue


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Observer Crossword Solution No 32 S S P O T V O I N B R O A T O I O W N A T C T H F F U L B L L Y O O B M E L D O N A G W C I N D M E I D S N I O M O E R E S I G H S T Y

M A R H Y I D T E E M P I S S I N E G F L R O R S E N O C R E D E S R E C D O M R E D V I E S T O L U C E H I N E S T T E M P Y E R

A N A G E O R E A D A C H V M I L R N E T U L A Y T E D O E M I S U M E N N R N I C S O L C A A V E N D W N E S C U E D E S P H A I R S L I M E A N T B D E L E A V E T M C M A D O R E C P E L O U S L M S C A P I N N A C M S H E A H O E T A S B E R U E S S R M I S R A I N R E P G S R E S S U E E E S I S T

R I D H E N I T I O F P Y T S A K E N T E R A Y R L I

A L L A M I A S F R A U G E A L S E E P I E A M P U T Y L

S T R E A W A R F S T O N N A L C H O T O E E M O D E S M X I D A T L D S E T V S T O S I K P E E K S U S R M R O V E P N R E T A H A N C E

C A L L I E A L W E L A N C W A T A N R R A B M I D S Y S T E S I S P R E A A S C A T A E E N M I R A Y E G U N D E R P E A P F A M I S T S E P S T R O N O L A N T A L L R I L Y C A O D O S B N E A S Y C S T L R E B U H O D C A M E I A S T I C K Y A M F R A A B O O X R O A I L A N G E C E S S U A U B G S E A L

S I N I O L G E H O L I R M A R E A T S R E S P A D Y U E D I N G E T R R H U N G E S E A P A S S I U E D N S I D T E O M E R W M I S I N T E U N W U R P S O H A I R S T I L T A V R O N U B S O U T T L I L A E A G L S T M T E X A S I T A T D C E M A A N E

R E G U L A E A L A D E C L C G I T E E N A G S T A B R O N T R A Y S O B L R S O L O I S O C U N C L E A L R A C L E X E M E E K R N E D U E P I N D O N E E N E S T R E E R T S O R E A R O M A G P T I E I A R R A N T I G R D E A L E B Y L A R V E L A L C A A I L A R I M M A D N E S T O M O U R N E N E X E E Y E P D A F T E S S D I N H E R I E M T S A B D I T K O A S S I G N

T I N I N S E W A E M U T S Y E R A N N E I S T E T W A D D L E D I S P E N S E R

S R A D

N O

O N O E D U L K E E Y O K A M I Y A S S A S L E E M B L P E S A L L M O B S M E E S I S N E S E M I U U

A S I S A U R G O G O O T L V D C A T E N S M E N T

C V A R A I F N E E P I T N O E S E S A S T I A F I R I A C C A H I V E V I E L L D I T L E R A P T L E A T A I T E U D E E N W R L A P

L

E D U C A T O R S

N S K N I E V E L C S

O R C H E S T R A

V

Church

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Offer expires Dec. 31, 2017


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REDUCED! Cabin Package price $368.00 (Normally $520.00)


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Page 56 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Theatre Extra The Haunting

● Cameron Daddo (Lord Grey) and Gig Clarke (David Filde) in The Haunting. Photo: Nicole Riseley. ■ For a fan of Charles Dickens’ Ghost stories, The Haunting could have been a memorable night out. Hugh Janes’s adaptation, directed by Jennifer Sarah Dean, wove five of them, along with elements of Dickens’s life into a narrative inspired by Janes’s own family story. In any ghost story, there is a level of investment the audience must make and for those of us only familiar with Dickens’s main works, this exposition heavy play took its toll on our patience. It began with much promise; an unexpected deafening screech of an owl (or was it a branch on the glass?) cut across our pre show chatter and set the audience immediately into the mood. But, the sound throughout the play, brilliant as it was, was not enough to keep me in the moment. The challenges of candle and lamp light moving around the set meant that the many miscues made it much harder for us to suspend our disbelief – something so crucial in this particular genre. The costume design was a highlight for me, and I kept wishing the apparitions would be visible for longer so I could get a better look at the fabulous designs of Rhiannon Irving. John Kerr’s set, props and illusion design were also impressive and he should be commended for his work. It has been many years since I have seen Cameron Daddo on stage and it was great to see those twinkling eyes again. Stylistically, however, his performance was very different to that of Gig Clarke’s. Where Clarke seem utterly in the moment, completely focused on the world of the play, Daddo appeared conscious of the audience, seemingly breaking the fourth wall on a number of occasions, putting the style of both performances at odds with one another. Clarke’s performance was excellent; his timing and manner perfectly suited to the role. If you’re a fan of the ghost story, and in particular a fan of Dickens, then this one’s for you. I would suggest that a familiarity with the stories it is based on will help your engagement with the first act in particular. Performance Season: Until July 1 Venue: The Athenaeum Theatre, 188 Collins St, Melbourne Bookings: Ticketek - review by Kylie Rackham

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Photos From The Past

● No need for a roundabout in those days. At the Downey St-Grant St intersection.

● Goulburn River,Alexandra. Photo: Lindsay G. Cumming

● Alexandra Railway Station. Circa 1910. Photo: Lindsay G. Cumming

● Alexandra Cricket Club. Circa 1940s. Photo: Lindsay G. Cumming

News Extra Alice Cooper show ■ Alice Cooper is punting on massive crowds to attend his Melbourne concert. Seating capacity has been doubled and on October 20 his concert will now be held at Rod Laver Arena. - John O’Keefe

At The Substation ■ St Martins Theatre will present Banjos, Boots, abd Beyoncé (a different kind of Bush Dance). from Thursday-Sunday, July 6-8 at The Substation, Newport.

Alexandra

● Sugarloaf Weir. Circa 1925. Photo: T.A. Fox

● Grant St, Alexandra. Circa 1960


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Observer Victorian Sport

Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 57

Melbourne

Vic. trotting scene accelerates Supremacy battle ■ Emma Stewart dominated Tuesday's Bendigo Super Sires meeting which saw the two year olds battle for supremacy over 2150 metres, winning five races on the program. The winners being : Concealment - Mark Pitt (C & G), Nostra Villa - Chris Alford (Fillies), Tam Major - Chris Alford (C & G), Poster Boy - Chris Alford (C & G) and Nostra Beach - Mark Pitt (Fillies). Veteran entertainer Shirlene Clancy figured as a winning owner at Bendigo when home bred Artistic Fella-Star Cheval gelding Regal Cheval snared a Super Sires heat at Supertab odds of $66.60. Trained by Bill Galea at Rockbank, Star Cheval driven by Gordon concessional reinsman Darby McGuigan enjoyed a perfect passage trailing the heavily supported leader Liftntorque from the Stewart stable, before easing off his back on turning and finishing best to prevail by 1.1 metres in a rate of 1-58 from Stewart's Big Bad Bruce and Liftntorque.

This Week

■ Wednesday - Horsham/Bendigo, Thursday - Yarra Valley/Geelong, Friday - Melton (Super Series Semi-Finals), Saturday Kilmore, Sunday - Charlton, Monday - Melton, Tuesday - Terang.

Horses To Follow

■ Christian Major, My Skypocket, Carnera, Wake Up Wilbur, Gin, King Solomon, Frances Annie, Dark Secret, Gunbalunya, Into The Unknown, Nikkibadwagon, Moonrock.

Buried four back ■ At Shepparton on Wednesday, Longlea (Bendigo) trainer Glenn Sharp captured the Saddleworld Shepparton Trotters Handicap for T1 or better class over 2190 metres with Spud, a 5y Tennotrump-Move On By gelding raced by veteran Central Highlands potato farmer Martin White. Driven by Gavin Lang, Spud spent most of the race buried four back along the markers from barrier four, with Outpunch Encounter taking over from Kains Boy shortly after the start. Easing wide in the straight, Spud finished full of running to defeat a game Black Valley which raced uncovered in a rate of 2-05.2. Kains Boy was third.. The margins 1.1 by 2.1 metres.

Changes to Cup ■ Harness Racing Victoria last week announced dramatic changes to the Victoria Cup - the second biggest pacing event conducted in the state. With stakes halved from $400,000 to $200,000, the (Group 1) Victoria Cup will now be held in October as part of a new look carnival also featuring the (Group 1) Bill Collins Mile for Trotters.

Harness Review

■ Listen to Len Baker on Harness Review, 8pm10pm Mondays, on 97.9 FM, streamed in 979fm.com.au

■ Victoria's trotting scene is starting to go into full swing again with a week of action taking place last week featuring heats of the Empire Stallions Vicbred Super Series for two, three and four year olds being held around the provincials. Three year old heats for both colts and geldings and fillies over 2180 metres were held at Kilmore last Thursday, with Western District (Terang) trainer Marg Lee and the state's leading trainer Emma Stewart taking honours for the night - Lee providing three winners and Stewart two. Outstanding Rocknroll Hanover-Amarillen filly Miss Graceland easily captured the second heat in a rate of 1-59.8 for the Stewart camp. With Chris Alford in the sulky, Miss Graceland wasn't rushed from an inside second line draw, settling at the rear, before going forward midrace to take the lead away from the in-form Carlas Pixel racing for the bell which had crossed Sydneysider Ourark early in the piece. Coasting for the final circuit, Miss Graceland was unextended to score by 9.7 metres in advance of Carlas Pixel, with Soho Angel 8 metres back in third place after a mid-field trip. The Marg/Jason Lee night commenced with Always AVirgin/Feel The Magic filly Keayang Secret greeting the judge in the third heat. Leading out from gate two, Keayang Secret was never headed, scoring by a nine metre margin from Nitro Nikky which raced uncovered and rank outsider Delightful System (one/three). The mile rate 1-59.4. It was the Lee team taking the 2nd C&G heat with Keayang Da Vinci, a home bred gelded son of Mach Three and Keayang Princess in a 1-59 rate. Starting from gate two on the second line, Keayang Da Vinci was sent forward from mid-field in the final circuit, proving too strong at the finish for a game Scotlynn Beach which faced the breeze by a 2.7 metre margin. Solid As A Rock was a head away in third place after following the winner throughout. Heat three for the C & G saw Emma Stewart's Rocknroll Hanver-National Gallery gelding Rocknroll Icon successful in 1-58.1. With Chris Alford in charge of the reins, Rocknroll Icon was sent forward from gate six to lead, before easily recording a 10.6 metre margin over Somebeachshadow (one/one) and Bathurst visitor Our Triple Play which trailed the winner, using the sprint lane to no avail in finishing 2.9 metres away in third place. Marg Lee's Jilliby Kung Fu snared the 5th heat after the red-hot favourite Our Little General dropped out after leading. Settling in the middle of the field from gate three on the second line, Jilliby Kung Fu, a Four Starzzz SharkSlip Slop Slap colt ran home solidly out wide to grab Tasmanian Scooterwillrev (one/two) in the last bound to register a head margin in 1-59. Blissful Stride (one/one) was third 2.2 metres back. Exciting ex-Kiwi colt Stars Align (Art Major-Nosotros) was successful in the first of the colts & geldins heats. Trained at Lara by Dean Braun, Stars Align driven by Chris Alford led throughout from gate three to blitz his rivals by 12.5 metres in a rate of 1-58.3. All A Breeze (one/one) was second, with Canada Bay which trailed the winner being 8.5 metres back in third place.

Favoured runners ■ The four year olds stepped out at Bray Raceway Ballarat on Friday and once again plenty of favoured runners were successful. Bacchus Marsh part-owner/trainer Michael Chircop's something special Courage Under Fire-Sheza Keeper gelding General Dodge chalked up his sixth successive victory by taking the 3rd heat over 2200 metres. With neighbour Jodi Quinlan taking the drive, General Dodge led throughout from gate two, toying with his rivals to record a 10.7 metre margin over Kiwi Moonrock which only arrived the day before in a rate of 1-56.6. Brocks Territory was 7 metres away in third place after overracing in the breeze. Sydneysider Charlaval was also impressive

Harness Racing

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Observer

len-baker@ bigpond.com

with Len Baker in winning heat two in 1-58 for co-trainers KerryAnn Turner and Robbie Morris. Sent forward from near last mid-race to park in the open outside the pacemaker Battle Born, Charlaval gained the upper hand on turning to score by 14.2 metres from Dont Hold Back and the roughie from the Mallee Tippitinya. American Ideal-Pixel Perfect entire Soho Tribeca was an easy victor of heat four after crossing the Nullabor, Trained and driven by Inter Dominion winner Kim Prentice (Baltic Eagle), Soho Tribeca led throughout from the pole to record a 9.8 metre margin over Rock Classic which trailed and Christian Major (one/ one) in a rate of 1-56.6. Other winners on the card were : Warefare (Wayne Potter- Nathan Jack), Rockstar Angel (David Aiken - Michael Bellman), Whirily School (Emma Stewart - Greg Sugars) and Bou Chard (Rod Carberry - Michael Bellman).

Ex-Kiwi wins ■ Yarra Valley raced on Monday and Riddell trainer Nicole Molander was victorious with exKiwi 3Y0 Somebeachsomewhere-Lady Gaga gelding Nicol Shard in the 1650 metre United Petroleum Pace for C0 class. Driven by Gavin Lang, Nicol Shard starting outside the front line was able to assume control from polemarker Thisboyzonfire after travelling a short distance and just lasted by a half head from Thisboyzonfire along the sprint lane, with Radar Hill (three back the markers) 8.8 metres back in third place. The mile rate 156.2.

Numerous wins ■ Eight year old Bettors Delight-Tyalla gelding Baccarat trained at Clyde by Jane Davies registered his 14th victory at start number 95 when greeting the judge in the De Bortoli Pace for C4 to C6 class over 2150 metres at the "Valley". Driven by Chris Alford who has achieved numerous successes for the stable including an Inter Dominion aboard Golden Reign, Baccarat ran home strongly from mid-field to record a 5 metre margin in advance of Double Shot (one/ one) and iron mare Hollys Miss Molly in a rate of 1-58.8.

Extreme pressure

■ Ararat raced on Wednesday as well and Dean Braun's 9yo ex-Kiwi Bettors DelightSnowy River Girl gelding Im Young Tommy was impressive in taking the 2195 metre Claimer. Driven by Chris Alford, Im Young Tommy moved forward from mid-field racing for the bell to park outside the free running leader Whats The Big Idea for the final circuit. Appearing to be under extreme pressure approaching the final bend, Im Young Tommy rallied strongly in the straight to record an easy 5.6 metre margin over Manoeuver Man and Rajah Wealt, returning a rate of 1-58.8. It was Im Young Tommy's 14th success at start number 158. - Len Baker

Wine and Travel Heathcote Reds

■ My fondest memory of the late, great Murray Tyrrell is of him at an old-fashioned basket press in his family's Hunter Valley winery, sometime in the mid-1970s, sleeves rolled up to the armpits, hands scooping up red grapes, the juice running down his arms and staining his white shirt. "Look at that colour," he enthused. "This will make a great wine." That was well before the family's involvement in the Heathcote area of Central Victoria in the mid-1990s, though Murray was still around to oversee the beginnings of that venture. The area is certainly a deal cooler than the Hunter Valley and provides viticulturists with a completely different set of problems. Murray would certainly be pleased with the latest of Tyrrells' Heathcote reds, which have a steely firmness to them yet also a warmth and generosity of flavour that characterises the region as one of Australia's best for shiraz. WINE REVIEWS Tyrrells 2014 Rufus Stone Heathcote Shiraz ($25): It's hard to believe that this wine comes 20 years after Tyrrells initial Heathcote release. My how time flies. It's certainly spicy, something that winemaker Andrew Spinaze attributes to the incorporation of the first full crop of grapes from the 1860-clone taken from Chateau Tahbilk's vineyard. Tyrrells 2014 Lunatiq Heathcote Shiraz ($40): People thought the Tyrrells were crazy diversifying to Heathcote and hence the name. I think that the last laugh has been with them because this is a superb red, with whole-bunch fermentation adding a gentle complexity to the wine. It's a big wine loaded with plummy, berry character but also with an elegance that seems to set Heathcote apart. Tyrrells 2012 Vat 1 Hunter Semillon ($85): This is one of the wines by which Tyrrells is usually judged to be amongAustralia's greatest producers. I remember that extremely forthright wine writer, the late Mark Shield, once describing good young Hunter Semillon as "mean and squinty-eyed" and wondering how they developed such amazing depth and complexity as they aged. I've no doubt that the introduction of screw-cap closures has slowed that aging process but will, with time, create even more outstanding mature wines. This wine is more than five years old and only part way to its potential. It's still quite restrained but shows a core of vibrant citruslike fruit flavour that will see it live at least another decade. - John Rozentals

Trump’s new jet

■ Just as many new recipients of a company car have to decide what to do with the old-faithful family vehicle – keep it, sell it or give it to the kids – on a far loftier level President Donald Trump had to decide what to do with a different old-faithful, and that was his personal Boeing 757 jet he calls “T-Bird.” Because as President he was given an even bigger Boeing to flit around in, a 747200 known to the world as “Air Force One.” Donald Trump had declared on his election that his US$100m 757 “T-Bird” would transition to presidential jet, as it was, after all, worthy of the role with leather armchairs for 43 passengers, gold plated seatbelt buckles, his own master bedroom with gold plated ensuite shower and handbasin taps, a guest’s bedroom, a surround-sound TV-cum-homecinema with 145cm (near five feet) screen, and dining and boardroom areas. But his new presidential minders declared a firm No, citing security reasons and telling him he had to use Air Force One. No argument. - David Ellis


Page 58 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Observer Victorian Sport Melbourne

Early look at Caulfield Cup ■ Sportsbet have put out an early chart for the Cups later in the year, and I thought I would have a quick gander over those in favourtism for the Caulfield Cup to be run on October 21. One of those heading the charts at $17 is the international galloper, Francis of Assisi, who won the Bendigo Cup last year with a leg in the air demolishing a good field at the nursery of champions. In the care of astute trainer, Charlie Appleby, in the dominant colours of the Godolphin team, Francis of Assisi could be the one to beat come late October if the stable deems to go that way. At eight years of age when the Cups come around, Francis of Assisi has only had 18 starts for eight wins and two minor placings accumulating around half a million dollars in stakemoney. Melbourne Cup winning jockey, Kerrin Mc Evoy, piloted the rising eight year-old to victory in the Bendigo Cup, and feels despite rising eight, he could be hard to beat over the 2400 metre trip. Francis of Assisi is a handy galloper who can sit on the pace or lead, and a race like the Caulfield Cup could be right up his alley. On the same line of betting is the brilliant three-year old filly, Egg Tart, from the powerful Chris Waller stable in Sydney. She will be four when the Cup is run, and a lot more powerful that she has shown when winning some big races. Egg Tart has started eight times for the impeccable record of six wins and a third. Egg Tart has accumulated $800,000, in winnings, and in dashing fashion. Just this season alone, she has won the Queensland Oaks over 2200 metres, and the South Australian Oaks over 2010 metres, both in great style. A lot of good judges are rating her as the next best thing to Winx: now that is a big rap. An interesting runner is Humidor, the former New Zealand galloper, who won the Australian Cup in good style and will stay as long as your mother-in-law. Prepared by leading trainer Darren Weir, he will be hard to beat, having had 15starts for five wins, six seconds and a third, missing a place on only three occasions. Humidor is bred i by top sire Teofilo. We all know that he will be well primed for the Caulfield Cup, if Weir wants to go that way, probably better over the 2400 metres of the Caulfield Cup. Stretching him out to the 3200 metres of the Melbourne may test him, if Darren decides to go that way. Throughout his career, Humidor has accumulated over $1.4 million. An interesting one in the market is Frontiersman, a rising eight year-old who has not won in his only 11 starts having run a second a third, being by international sire, Musket. If he goes around I feel he will find it hard going over the high pressure of the 2400 metres of the Caulfield Cup, which is on from go to whoa. Rising four- year old, New Zealander, Gingernuts, could be the one to beat. He has had nine starts for five wins and a second, Gingernuts has a most impressive record, having won the Avondale Guineas in New Zealand. He took out the New Zealand Derby over 2400 metres in fantastic fashion, then went to Sydney winning the Rosehill Guineas over 2000 metres. However he was found out running fifth in the Australian Derby, but he still has the form on the board. He is in the very smart camp of former New Zealand top rider, Steven Autidge and J. Richards. Don't leave him out. Another top galloper you have to include if he goes around and that is Hartnell. The former international in a number of his runs has run into the champion mare, Winx. With a change of trainers in the Godolphin camp, James Cummings will take over the reins.

● Francis of Assisi. Racing Photos Ruthven was narrowly beaten in the South Australian Derby, and then ran a good fourth in the Australian Derby in Sydney. What topped the pops was his big win in the Queensland Derby, blitzing a good field of fellow three-year olds running away in strong style. He has already accumulated over $800,000 in stakemoney, being by Domesday throwing back to the mighty galloper, Octagonal. Of the others you have last year's Caulfield Cup placegetter, Exospheric, in the care of Hall of Fame trainer, Lee Freedman. Big Duke and Articus from the Weir camp are promising and will keep improving, and have good form to their credit.

Ted Ryan

Future focus

Despite being in his early thirties, Cummings has the polish firstly from his father, Anthony Cummings, and his grandfather, Bart, the best. Hartnell gave his all when third in the Melbourne Cup, and is a grand galloper. I think the stable might have a go at the Melbourne Cup, because you won't find Winx going around. Leading young Victorian trainer, Ciaron Maher, has a smart three year-old up and coming stayer in Ruthven. From his 10 starts he has only missed a place twice, having won three, and run second five times.

■ Racing Victoria's focus remains on Industry growth and sustainability. While Racing Victoria is disappointed with the Australian Competition Tribunal's disapproval of a proposed Tabcorp merger with the Tatts Group , its focus remains on continuing to foster sustainability and growth in the sport that provides the equivalent of 20,000 full-time jobs and drives more than $2.1 billion in annual economic activity in Victoria. Racing Victoria's Chief Executive, Giles Thompson, said "Our primary concern has been the potential negative impact the merger will have on competition for the next Victorian Wagering Licence. "The more competition there is, the greater the opportunity to grow investment in thoroughbred racing in the state. "We now look forward to engaging with the Victorian State Government to ensure the Victorian Racing Industry remains well funded and well supported beyond the current licence expiry in 2024. "It is vital that this occurs, because the revenue allows Racing Victoria to invest in integrity, equine welfare, prizemoney, and infrastructure to support the equivalent of 20,000 full-time employees and incentivise participation from more than 50,000 racehorse owners. "Racing Victoria enjoys a strong relationship with Tabcorp, our joint venture partner, and have done so for a long period of time". " We are committed to working closely with them to ensure that the Victorian TAB competes effectively and that our industry expands for the betterment of all stakeholders.”

www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Over Matter Review: Detour ■ Screenwriter/Director Christopher Smith received positive reviews with his similar dual creative roles for, among others, Get Santa, Triangle and Severance. He rightfully deserves praise for his work on Detour, which previewed at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2016 Harper, a law student believes his stepfather is responsible for a car crash which sees his mother in a coma. Harper is suffering and wants to make his stepfather pay for it. After too much to drink and mixing with the malevolent duo Johnny and Cherry, Harper finds himself on a road trip to Las Vegas in a 1971 Mustang Mach 1 Coupe. The trip is not without its difficulties, diversions and distractions. An early line by Harper’s lecturer mentions knowing the law so you can break it. This can also be applied to Smith’s approach to this film. He uses a split screen narrative structure that helps the thriller ride of deception and murder where it is never completely clear who can be trusted. Not to be confused with Edgar G. Ulmer’s 1945 film and its 1992 remake, Detour does borrow a clip from the early movie. Detour can lay claim to becoming a memorable cult movie. Film buffs may wish to see the film more than once to pick up on what they missed the first time and to immerse themselves in the differing story paths amplified by the deftly handled, but not overused, split-screen technique that Smith employs. The music matches the moods of the film well. Genre: Psychological Thriller Summary: A young law student, grieving for his dying mother, struggles to decide whether he should kill his unfaithful stepfather. Cast: Harper (Tye Sheridan -Mud, The Tree of Life, X-Men: Apocalypse), Johnny (Emory Cohen – Brooklyn) and Cherry (Bel Powley -Diary of a Teenage Girl). Rating: MA15+. Runtime: 97 minutes. Stars: 3.5. Screening: From June 22 at Lido Cinemas, 675 Glenferrie Rd, Hawthorn - Review by Greg Every

Travel Extra

■ It has taken 144 years to do it, but Norway is finally starting work next year on the world’s first tunnel for ocean-going ships, and which was first sketched on drawing boards back in 1874. The engineering wonder will be blasted through the mountainous Stad Peninsula that juts 20km into the ocean between the Norwegian Sea to the north, and the North Sea to the south. Coupled with fierce winds for over a third of the year, it means that where the two oceans meet off the Peninsula’s furthest extremity, is Scandinavia’s most treacherous point for violent storms, mountainous waves – and shipwrecks. Now after 144 years of proposals and arguments the Norwegian Government has earmarked 2.7 billion Krone (AU$500 million plus) for this revolutionary ship’s tunnel. At 1.7km long, 45m high and 36m wide, it will be able to accommodate cargo and passenger vessels up to 16,000 tonnes, including the fjordland cruise ships of Norway’s popular Hurtigruten Group, saving them venturing through that perilous Stadhavet Sea. Some 3-million cubic metres of solid rock will be blasted out during the near-five years it will take to build the tunnel, which will even have an observation deck at one end for sightseers to watch dozens of ships entering and leaving the tunnel daily. And while it will be a world’s first for ocean-going shipping when it opens in 2023, tunnels for canal and river vessels are nothing new … the first was dug for a canal to go through a mountain in France as far back as 1679. - David Ellis


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Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 59 e urn lbo Me

Every Week in the Melbourne Observer

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Observer Showbiz

Radio: 3 ...................... Page 60 Theatre: K............................................... Page 61 Country Music: R ................ Page 60 Jim and Aar on: T.................................... Page 62 Aaron: Cheryl Threadgold: L ........... Page 63 PL US THE LLO OVATT”S MEGA CRO PLUS CROSSSWORD

MESMERISING ACROBATICS The Execution

● Cabaret chanteuse Anya Anastasia in The Execution ■ Award-winning cabaret chanteuse is bringing a new, fierce, and tightly choreographed new breed of contemporary cabaret to the intentionally petite stage of The Butterfly Club. See the action up close as it becomes personal. Anya Anastasias says she is stripping … her extravagant stage shows back to the core essence of her artistic mission statement: to hold the world accountable through mischievous mockery, passing her judgement and rattling cages. Off with their self-serving heads. Anya Anastasia, along with the long-suffering journalists in Australian media, sees it as her civic duty as a satirist, artist, and song-writer to demand accountability and be the judge, jury and executioner as she brings current affairs under the cabaret spotlight. Anastasia’s wit and satire bites down hard on the contemporary tongue, forget the feathered four-foot headdresses, forget the confetti cannons and the extravagant lighting design of large scale cabaret and variety, get down with the thinkers, the spectacle here is the ideas, and the deft execution of their articulation. While Anastasia’s work has always had a strong element of social and political commentary, this new contemporary cabaret cuts is her first hard hitting attempt at turning her full lyrical prowess to the task of questioning and articulating how people are feeling in our current political landscape, no holding back. Far more cerebral in its presentation, The Execution is a side-step from Anastasia’s recent critically acclaimed show Rogue Romantic which is set to tour to London and Edinburgh in July and August this year, in which Anya plays a feisty and seductive cabaret chanteuse. Venue: The Butterfly Club Time: 8.30pm Dates: Until July 2 Bookings: www.thebutterflyclub.com - Cheryl Threadgold

Hero’s Guide

● Masha Terentieva.in Blanc de Blanc in the Aurora Spiegeltent, St Kilda. ■ Taking inspiration from the seductive decadence of the 1920s, Blanc de Blanc delivers a stunning and hilarious “champagne cabaret” featuring breathtaking acrobatics, feats of strength and agility, dance, mime and much more. Blanc de Blanc is the centrepiece of creative art space Map 57 in St Kilda until July 30. Map 57, presented by The Gardeners of Unearthly Delight, is hosting this scintillating burlesque circus fusion in the atmospheric Aurora Spiegeltent. Fret and Strut’s Scott Maidment, Blanc de Blanc director and creator, has gathered an impressive cast from across the globe, including Aussies J'aiMime, James Browne (costumes) and LA-based Laura New. Choreographed by Kevin Maher, this exuberant, energetic and provocatively clad cast shake, shimmy and tease between gravity-defying circus tricks against a soundtrack of pop hits and golden oldies. Highlights include Masha Teretieva’s mesmerising acrobatics on an unlikely hotel luggage cart, and Shun Sugimoto’s contortionist breakdancing. Spencer Novich is hilarious with his extraordinary mimetheatrics. Lighting (Philip Gladwell) and sound effects are delivered with dramatic and impeccable precision. In the second act Milena Stracynski and Laura New sing another string to their bow of talents, which brings me to two gripes - there wasn’t enough live music and the MC character Monsieur Romeo was creepy rather than sexy. Without a doubt the ultimate highlight came from the jawdropping aerial acrobatics from Stracynski and Hampus Jansson. Their display of strength and grace was stunning, made all the more dramatic by the occasional spray of water as they ascend skyward from the jacuzzi. Yes you heard right - a jacuzzi. This is a show dedicated to champagne that sparkles and bubbles literally with burlesque abandon. The ensemble in the most part is superb and delivers creative and hilarious performances - you do not want to miss the spectacle of the human champagne fountain. Performance dates: Tuesday to Sunday until July 30 Venue: Aurora Spiegeltent, Map 57, Jacka Boulevard, St Kilda (next to Palais) Tickets: $65, concession $55 or standing $38 Bookings: 8609 1015 or online at www.map57.com - Review by Beth Klein

● Kerry Du Plessis, Sarah Clarke, Emma Hayden and Belinda Campbell in A Hero’s Guide to Saving the Planet . ■ By 2050 will there be more plastic in the ocean than fish? Not if local superheroes have anything to say about it. Wit Incorporated Theatre Company brings the city a Month of Super Clean Up Action. Continuing through July, there are events every week for the whole family to be involved with. “We’re inviting families to get their own capes on, come along and join us, as we pick up and sort out the litter on our streets,” says Wit Incorporated Artistic Director Belinda Campbell. On Saturday (July 1), action really heats up, as the team at Wit Incorporated challenges everyone in the City of Maribyrnong to take part in Plastic Free July. July 1 also marks the opening of the premiere of A Hero’s Guide to Saving the Planet, a superhero adventure story for all ages. Complete with silly jokes, gags, epic ukulele songs, this play follows the quest of Captain Eco and Susan as the journey through superhero training and saving the world from The Waster. “The show is here to help educate and inspire audiences to change up wasteful behaviour. As well as being full of useful information, it’s a huge amount of silliness and fun,” says Campbell. The show runs until July 15, with shows at 10 am and 1 pm Wednesday to Sunday. Families of two adults, two children or one adult, three children, can get a special family ticket for $70 by emailing hello@witinc.com.au ■ Plastic Free July. Join us as we say ‘no’ to single use plastics for a month. July 1-31. www.plasticfreejuly.org ■ A Hero’s Guide to Saving the Planet. Environmental superhero adventure. 10am and 1 pm, Wednesday to Sunday. July 1-15. Bluestone Church Arts Space. Tickets at: www.witinc.com.au/whats-on/hero - Cheryl Threadgold

Ch. 31 off air ■ Melbourne community television station Channel 31 will this week be removed from free-to-air reception. Due to a Federal Government decision, all community TV stations have lost their frequencies. Instead, the Federal Government is to sell off the frequencies to commercial communication operators. Channel 31 will continue to operate online at: www.c31.org.au All programs will be available on demand at the website at any time. The Melbourne Community Television Consortium was formed in 1990 to lobby for the allocation of a trial community broadcasting licence in Melbourne. The consortium was initially comprised of several groups which had conducted brief, short range test broadcasts in the late 1980s. Licensing of community TV broadcasters commenced in early 1994, under a Temporary Open Narrowcast licence.


Page 60 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Observer Showbiz Country Crossroads

By Rob Foenander info@countrycrossroads.com.au

Deadly Hearts ■ In the lead up to NAIDOC Week 2017, ABC Music is proud to present Deadly Hearts - a celebration of music, culture, and identity, from the hearts and mouths of the new generation of indigenous Australia. The 12-track release will include interpretations of some iconic Australian songs and is described as a landmark album from the young talented storytellers.

July at the Vale

■ Country music at the Pascoe Vale RSL for July includes ■ Friday July 7: Doug Bruce and the Tailgaters, ■ Friday July 14: Les and Joy Keats Memorial Awards Night ■ Friday July 21: Rodger Delfos & The Beatriders: ■ Friday July 28: Palace Gypsies - Rob Foenander ■ Nova Entertainment has appointed Ben Latimer as Smooth FM's Program Director, taking over from Georgie Page

■ Writer-producer-actor Mel Brooks is 91 (1926). He was born in New York. English actor John Inman was born in Lancashire, England, in 1935. He died aged 71 in 2007 Basketball player Michelle Timms was born in Melbourne in 1945 (52).

Town Hall Gallery

News around Victoria

■ A motion supporting community radio’s important role in providing a platform for diverse voices has been passed in the Senate. Senators Hinch, Ludlam, Xenophon and Lambie moved that the Government should increase funding for community digital radio to $4.5m per annum in 2018-19 and commit to funding at that level on an ongoing basis. Senator Hinch welcomed this critical support: "I am thrilled that the Senate backed my motion to not only increase funds to vital community radio in 2018-19 but to ensure that the funding is ongoing. “That means community radio won’t have to go cap-in-hand every year like Oliver for his bowl of gruel in Oliver Twist.

“I had a successful career in commercial radio for a long time but I also know the value TO the community OF community radio. “You provide information, entertainment, cultural awareness and education, to more than five million diverse Australians a week. “You reach indigenous Australians, the LGBTI community, migrants, refugees, the elderly. And you give a chance for local musicians to get their material out there in a forum not provided by the commercials. “Not to mention giving a start to people like my younger doppelganger Paul Murray." “This funding would provide community radio with greater certainty and stability as DAB+ continues to grow in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth and Brisbane, and expands to Canberra, Darwin, Hobart and beyond.

PETER KEMP’S ARTS ROUNDS

NGV gift

■ Earlier this year it was announced there would be a significant acquisition of 249 prints by acclaimed American artist Jim Dine, traversing more than four decades of practice. The gift includes some of his most iconic print works featuring his signature motifs of hearts, bathrooms, tools, skulls and Pinocchio from the period of 1969 - 2013. Emerging as a central figure in American art alongside Pop Art luminaries including Robert Rauschenberg in 1960s New York, Jim Dine has built a career exploring and pushing the boundaries of works in the print medium, whilst also practising as a painter, sculptor, photographer and poet. At 81 years old, Dine has gifted some of his most iconic and monumental works to the NGV Collection, preserving his legacy in art history and making this the largest collection of his works in the Southern Hemisphere. He continues today to work and exhibit regularly. Gallery visitors can see a selection of Jim Dine's works on display on Level 2, 20th Century Gardens.

r Obser vbeiz On This Day Show

Wednesday Thursday June 29 June 28

The Arts

Radio

Community radio boost

Carter and Carter ■ The annual taste of Tamworth series of concerts kicks off on July 21. Kinglake husband and wife team David and Merelyn Carter host the shows that also feature some of the Australia's finest country music stars. This years artists include Carter and Carter, Luke O' Shea, Karin Page and Anthony Taylor. Show locations and more info at www.carter-carter.com

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■ Artist Ken Done was born in Sydney in 1940 (77). TV presenter Mike Willesee was born in Perth in 1941 (76). He is currently appearing on the Sunday Night program. Aussie Rules identity John Northey was born in 1943. He made his name at Richmond.

Grants

■ The Cultural Facilities Community Access Grants provide access to Boroondara's two cultural facilities, Hawthorn Arts Centre and Kew Court House, for Boroondara-based community groups, arts organisations and artists free of charge and with limited staffing. These bookings are for events between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018. The application period will be open for a four week period. All applications will be assessed and applicants notified accordingly in late July. Applications close July 14. For more information visit Boroondara.vic.gov.au/arts.

Kingston

■ Kingston Arts is currently seeking applications for both solo and group art exhibitions in 2018. Kingston Arts aims to provide a dynamic program of visual arts by local, emerging and established artists to explore contemporary art in a supportive environment, which pioneers thought-provoking and professional exhibitions. Eligible artistic practices include painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, installation,

video, performances and sound. Applications are now open and close October 18. To apply go to kingstonarts.com.au/exhibitions Venue: G3 Artspace Shirley Burke Theatre 64 Parkers Rd, Parkdale.

Burrinja

■ Glenn Loughrey; In Exile form the Edge. A Personal Journey. Glenn Loughrey is a Wradjuri man from NSW and Priest at St Oswald's Anglican Church, Glen Iris. He is an artist who fuses indigenous art styles with Western forms of storytelling. In this exhibition he presents a collection of acrylic paintings reflecting the diversity if indigenous identity and its disconnect from the dominant culture. He explores his own journey of discovery to reclaim the sense of country on a personal and community level. Glenn will talk about his personal journey of discovery to reclaim the sense of country on a personal and community level. Exhibition closes July 23. Glenn Loughrey's talk is on July 1 at 2pm-3.30pm. - Peter Kemp

■ Town Hall Gallery's winter exhibition Dark Contrasts explores the principles of collage in new and exciting ways. With a focus on seven Australian artists who are drawn to darker imagery in their works, the exhibition delves into textiles, photography and printmaking along with more traditional forms of cut-and-paste paper collage. The exhibition features artists Paul Compton, Kate Derum, Matthew Greentree, Damon Kowarsky, David Rosetzky, Jacqui Stockdale and Irene Wellm. Exhibition opens July 8 and runs to August 27. Spanning three gallery spaces, Town Hall Gallery features a diverse range of contemporary public programs, curated and exhibitions drawn from the Town Hall Gallery Collection, celebrating the rich cultural heritage of the City of Boroondara. Part of the Public Galleries Association of Victoria, Town Hall Gallery supports local, national and international artists at varying stages of their careers, and others a space for local artists and community groups to exhibit professionally on the Community Project Wall. - Peter Kemp

NGV gala ■ The NGV has announced that Grammy Award-winning musician and style icon Kimbra will perform at the inaugural NGV Gala, a special black-tie evening featuring art, fashion, music, fine wine and food where visitors will enjoy exclusive first access to world premiere exhibition The House of Dior, Seventy Years of Haute Couture, on Saturday August 26 at NGV International. Conceptually curated by NGV Gala cochairs Tony Ellwood, Director, NGV and Edwina McCann, Editor, Vogue Australia, guests will experience the NGV as it's neverbeen-seen before with visually stunning installations and experiential zones throughout the gallery. Especially designed for the inaugural NGV Gala, celebrated florist Flowers Vasette will create extraordinary, large-scale and eye-caching floral installations, captivating guest imaginations upon entry as they arrive on the David Jones red carpet. Excusive to Melbourne, The House of Dior, Seventy Years of Haute Couture is a collaboration between the NGV and The House of Dior and will feature a sumptuous display of more than 140 garments from Christian Dior Couture designed 1847 to 2017. Australia has strong ties to The House of Dior from its inception, with the representative parade outside Paris held in David Jones in 1948. - Peter Kemp Melbourne

Observer

Friday June 30

Saturday July 1

■ US jazz drummer Buddy Rich was born in New York in 1917. He died aged 69 in 1987. Record producer Tony Hatch was born in The UK in 1939. Singer Glenn Shorrock is 73 (1944). Prominent 3AW talk-back caller Gigi Hellmuth celebrates her birthday today.

■ English actress Olivia de Havilland was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1916. Singer John Farnham was born in Dagenham, England, in 1949 (66). Diana, Princess of Wales, was born in 1964. She died tragically in France in 1997 after a motor vehicle accident. Actress Pamela Anderson is 50.

Sunday July 2 ■ Comedy writer Larry David was born in New York in 1947 (70). Actor Grant Dodwell was born in Sydney in 1952 (65). US fashion model Jerry Hall was born in Texas in 1956 (61). Australian swimmer Daniel Kowalski was born in Singapore in 1975 (42).

Monday July 3

■ Australian singer Kevin Johnson was born in Rockhampton in 1942 (75). Judith Durham (Judith Cock) was born in Melbourne in 1943 (74). Michael Cole, American actor and Logies star, was born in Wis-consin in 1945. He is 72 today.

Tuesday July 4 ■ American conductor and record producer Mitch Miller was born in New York in 1911. He died aged 99 in 2010. Actress Eva Saint Marie was born in 1924 (in New Jersey. Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida was born in 1927. She starred in Falcon Crest.

Thanks to GREG NEWMAN of Jocks Journal for assistance with birthday and anniversary dates. Jocks Journal is Australia’s longest running radio industry publication. Find out more at www.jocksjournal.com


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ShowBiz!

Observer Showbiz

Raising ‘Ell

■ Raising ‘Ell can be seen at The Butterfly Club from July 12 -16 as part of the Cabaret Fringe Festival. Imagine Dante’s journey in the Inferno, but set in 2017. The seven deadly sins are replaced by Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Tinder, Grindr and YouTube. Raising ‘Ell is the latest cabaret offering by Ella Filar and features four singers and three musicians. With her performance roots in Left-OfBerlin, Eastern European Soviet bloc, Filar harks back to the political nature of cabaret when it was original, cutting, raw, rude and provocative. Filar’s work remains true to the original nature of the genre, fitting perfectly with the program focus for the 2017 Melbourne Cabaret Fringe Festival at The Butterfly Club. “Are we real or virtual?’ ponders Filar. “Once we’ve been posted, pinged, tweeted and swiped right, left and right again, all we’re left with is the bizarre multiple distortions of projected self. This is no entertainment for entertainment’s sake; this is intensely political and socially charged Kabaret with a ‘K’!” Performers include Linda Cookson, Bruce Langdon, Olivia Laskowski, Chris Molyneux, Martin Zakharov (sax, clarinet), Rudolf Dombrovski (violin), and Ella Filar (piano) Performance Dates: July 12,13,14,15 and 16. Time: 7pm. Venue: The Butterfly Club. Tickets: www.thebutterflyclub.com - Cheryl Threadgold

Call of the Ice

■ Though 1911 is in the distant past, the events surrounding Sir Douglas Mawson’s epic exploration of the remotest parts of the eastern coast of the Antarctic are relived in a 2016 month long escapade to the Antarctic by Tamblyn Lord as an act of homage to his childhood hero, Mawson. Following on from Lord’s earlier season of Mawson’s Providence in 2015, Call Of The Ice is a further development of his obsession and fascination of Australia’s pioneering explorers. While much of the production centres on Lord’s experiences and graphic visuals, both photographic and video of the month long sea voyage in the attempt to reach Mawson’s historic hut, he also draws upon Mawson’s own diary as recorded in Home Of The Blizzard. Bringing it to life on stage with set design by Gav Barby by symbolic ice shapes and a steel framed bed base that with manipulation and use of a sheet transformed to many elements in support of the dialogue. Strong was the emphasis on courage, endurance, patience and idealism by Lord as they sailed through some of the roughest seas, wind forces and turbulences known to man. The question was posed to us, “Would you like to go to the Antarctic?” to experience isolation, silence, boredom, sea sickness, starvation and even death. In what could be termed a theatrical documentary aided by Lord’s and Andy Nixon’s projected visuals the challenges and exhilaration of the Antarctic both then and now, while somewhat similar, were overshadowed by Lord’s vivid images and portrayals of the extreme physical and mental hardship that was Mawson’s Adelie Land Voyage expedition of 1911-14. Lord’s childhood hero. Season: Until July 2 at 7.30pm Venue: La Mama Courthouse. 349 Drummond St, Carlton Bookings: www.lamama.com.au - Review by Graeme McCoubrie

Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 61

TV, Radio, Theatre Latest Melbourne show business news - without fear or favour

Model Citizens circus

■ The Big Top in Birrarung Marr is well worth a visit until July 16 to see Circus Oz’swonderful new show Model Citizens. On opening night, Aunty Di Kerr and Carolyn Briggs paid respect to their elders and extended friendship to all in attendance. Congratulations to Aunty Di for her moving, succinct talk without using notes. Circus Oz Artistic Director, Rob Tannion creates a unique audience experience by combining the ensemble’s brilliant circus performance skills with dynamic live music, songs, visual spectacle from lighting effects, humour and thoughtprovoking social commentary, all connected by the theme of the ‘model citizen’. Exciting circus performance styles include aerial slings, silks, group acrobatics, physical contortion, knife throwing, Cyr wheel, hoops, balancing, straightjacket escape, trapeze, slack rope, pole and juggling. What is a ‘model citizen’? Kon Karapanagiotidis ● Spanish slack rope performer and violinist Alexander summed it up well at the end of Weibel Weibel enthrals Circus Oz audiences. Photo: Rob Blackburn the show, reminding us the title cluding show content, and proincludes everyone of all race, violin with a burning bow. But, every act is awesome, viding tickets and workshops religions, age and social status. During the show, props clev- and the artists’ friendly inter- to many groups, communities, erly reminded us of the ‘sub- action with the audience en- including asylum seekers, and urban dream’, including the sures we feel connected with charities. Atop show. Congratulations iron, clothes peg, safety pin, them and their performances. Melburnians have every Circus Oz. Weber barbecue and credit right to be proud of Circus Oz, Performance Season: Uncards. The Circus Oz ensemble of now based in Collingwood and til July 16 Duration: 2 hours (includ15 performers, each contrib- acknowledged worldwide for ing 20 minute interval) utes their versatile talents and their great shows. The company was founded Venue: Circus Oz Big Top, individual personalities to make in 1978, and as well as comLocation: Birrarung Marr, this a memorable show. A highlight for me was vio- bining traditional circus skills Melbourne (between Federalinist/slack rope performer with diversity, also has a com- tion Square and Batman AvAlexanderWeibel Weibelplay- mendable commitment to so- enue) Tickets: $30 - $95 ing his violin while balancing cial justice and community Bookings: ticketek.com.au on the narrow slack rope, and work. This takes various forms, in- Cheryl Threadgold joining a fire-eater to play his

Produced by Elton John ■ Boyslikeme brings to Melbourne the Tony Award-nominated play Next Fall from July 12 – 30 in The Loft at Chapel off Chapel. Luke believes in God. Adam believes in everything else. Next Fall portrays the ups and downs of this unlikely couple’s five-year relationship with sharp humour and unflinching honesty. When an accident changes everything, the most deeply held beliefs of family and friends are put to the test and Adam is forced to turn to Luke’s family and friends for support ... and answers. Next Fall paints a beautiful and funny portrait of modern romance, asking the hard questions about commitment, love and faith. Essentially it’s about family. What constitutes a family, what rights do and should a long term defacto partner have in a crisis if the absent family has a different view? Given the whole current marriage equality malarkey these themes are as relevant now as ever. Produced on Broadway by Elton John and his partner David Furnish, it enjoyed critical commercial success. Elton remarked at the Broadway premiere "What happens in this play is so relevant to where America is at this moment in time with

CHERYL THREADGOLD PREVIEWS ‘NEXT FALL’ religion, with gay couples, homosexuality in general with 'don't ask — don't tell.' “What it all boils down to is that we want somebody to love. We all need to have somebody to hold. We all need somebody. “I thought this was one of the most beautiful pieces of writing I'd read in a long time. “It's a wonderful play and I'm as proud to have my name on this as I am on Billy Elliot. They're both really good pieces of work, and they both send out a great message." Next Fall was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Play and the Drama Desk Award for Most Outstanding Play. It won the Outer Circle Critics Award for Best New Play. Directed by Peter Blackburn, the six member cast are: Kaarin Fairfax as Arlene, Mark Davis as Luke, Darrin Redgate as Adam, Paul Robertson as Butch, Sharon Davis as Holly and James Biasetto as Brandon. The season runs from July 12-30 in The Loft at Chapel off Chapel. Bookings at www.chapeloffchapel.com.au or 8290 7000.

Mirusia returns ■ The Australian artist Mirusia first came to the attention on most people when she appreared onstage in 2008 when she sang at Etihad Stadium in the spectacular show André Rieu Live in Australia. She sang Botany Bay and on won over the huge audience that night. Apparently Mirusia came to the attention of André Rieu when her aunt contacted the famous orchestra leader and asked him to listen to her young niece from Brisbane. After hearing this magnificent talent singing on her website, André rang Mirusia and asked her to join his concert as a soloist for the national tour. That was the beginning of a wonderful career for this young soprano and Mirusia currently enjoys being a flourishing solo performer, with six studio albums and a string of successful Australian and international tours to her name. Mirusia married in 2015 and is expecting her first child in December. She has just performed her new show From The Heart in The Netherlands. She will be in Melbourne in September to perform. Mirusia is also a guest star in Scotland The Brave which will be at Hamer Hall on Friday (June 30) at 8pm, and Sunday (July 2) at 2pm. - Kevin Trask

Niche

■ Running from August 16-26 as a part of the 2017 Darebin Arts Speakeasy season, Elbow Room brings Melbourne audiences their highly anticipated new show. Powered by an original soundtrack from Steve Toulmin and Marcel Dorney, directed by Nic Holas and created and performed by Eryn Jean Norvill and Emily Tomlins (a tiny chorus), Niche is a surreal, irreverent story about what we really want from celebrity in the digital age. Niche takes us in into the world of its namesake, a famous pop star whose celebrity stems from hit songs about her life. Desiring to achieve the ultimate domination with her stardom, her management hires Jodee - an epidemiologist who knows about dangerous viruses - to help her. As the lives of these two women collide, each is drawn deeper into the web of this dangerous ruse. In a world for competing egos are we in a race to the bottom or the top? Belonging is everything. Replication is more. “The idea for Niche has been growing and evolving between Eryn Jean and myself for years. We create in a number of different ways. Most of the time we make each other laugh, often we challenge each other, sometimes we surprise each other and ourselves, but it's always a joy.” explains Co-Artistic Director Emily Tomlins. Forming in Melbourne in 2008, Elbow Room are widely recognised for their distinctive combination of intellectual curiosity and performative wit. Works such as We Get It, After All This, The Motion of Light inWater and Prehistoric have garnered multiple awards (including Green Room wins for writing, directing and ensemble performance), critical acclaim, sell-out seasons in several cities, and multiple re-presentations by festivals around Australia. Performance Season: August 16-26 . Wed. - Sat. 7.30pm, Sun 6.30pm Tickets: $33 Full, $28 Concession and Groups 4+, $25 Preview Bookings: 9481 9500 or www.northcote townhall.com.au Venue: Northcote Town Hall, Main Hall 189 High St, Northcote www.elbowroomproductions.com - Cheryl Threadgold


Page 62 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Observer Showbiz What’s Hot and What’s Not in Blu-Rays and DVDs

● Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, one of the very best in the series, 40 years on and Star Wars is still an exhilarating ride. FILM: ROGUE ONE - A STAR WARS STORY: Genre: Sci-Fi/Action/Adventure/Fantasy. Cast: Felicity Jones, Forest Whitaker, Ben Mendelsohn, Diego Luna. Year: 2016. Rating: M . Length: 133 Minutes. Stars: **** Verdict: With 40th anniversary celebrations starting this week, Star Wars still thrills with this exhilarating prequel to the original "Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope" (1977). The Rebellion who are up against the ruthless and unforgiving Empire, who learn of the existence of a new super weapon, the Death Star, and a possible weakness in its construction is uncovered, the Rebel Alliance set out to steal the plans for the Death Star. The future of the entire galaxy now rests upon its success, and in doing so, set up the epic saga to follow. All the bells and whistles you expect from a "Star Wars" movie are right here, loud and clear, like fireworks on New Year's Eve. This is the best and most entertaining edition to the landmark series since "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980). Director Gareth Edwards (Monsters/2010) keeps in sharp, exciting, dark, witty and thrilling for every moment of its inter-galactic screen time. Stellar cast, along with a jaw-dropping surprise or two, all shine, most notably Ben Ben Mendelsohn as a villain. Along with spectacular eye-popping special effects and rousing music score, they all combine to create an unforgettable rollercoaster ride! May the 4th be with you. FILM: ARRIVAL: Genre: Mystery/Sci-Fi/Drama. Cast: Amy Adams, Jeremy Renner, Forest Whitaker. Year: 2016. Rating: TBC. Length: 116 Minutes. Stars: **** Verdict: Set present day, twelve mysterious spacecraft touch down across the globe, an elite team, led by expert linguist Louise Banks - is brought together to investigate and tasked with interpreting the language of the alien visitors, and search for answers, as Earth balances on the verge of global war. Amy Adams is a standout in every frame of her screen time as the linguist desperate to solve a riddle from another world, and supported with superb performances by Jeremy Renner as a theoretical physicist (Mathematician) and Forest Whitaker as the U.S. Army Colonel heading the base camp. As far away removed from the 'Star Wars' universe as you can get, 2017 Oscar nominations include Best Picture, Screenplay (by Eric Heisserer), Cinematography (by Bradford Young), Editing and Production Design. Following the compelling 'Incendies' (2010), the fiercely gripping 'Prisoners' (2013) and 2015's nail-biting 'Sicario,' director Denis Villeneuve excels again! Not for everyone's palate, more in tone and atmosphere to Andrei Tarkovsky's 1972 'Solaris' than 'Star Wars,' this is however thought provoking, highly ambiguous, intellectually stimulating and haunting 'thinking man's' mystery-science fiction-drama that is sure to create much discussion and debate long after it's over. Affectionate nods to such sci-fi classics include 'The Day The Earth Stood Still,' 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind,' 'Contact,' '2001: A Space Odyssey,' 'It Came From Outer Space,' and 'The Abyss.' FILM: JACK REACHER - NEVER GO BACK: Genre: Action/Crime/Thriller. Cast: Tom Cruise, Cobie Smulders, Aldis Hodge. Year: 2016. Rating: M. Length: 118 Minutes. Stars: ** Verdict: Sequel to the genuinely gripping 2012 film, 'Jack Reacher,' of former major in the U.S. Army Military Police Corps, this time follows Reacher who goes on-the-run with an Army Major who has been framed for espionage. Inferior cliché riddled screenplay drips like sludge, surprisingly bland direction by the usually reliable Edward Zwick (Glory, The Last Samurai, Blood Diamond), saggy pacing, and poor performances, of which star and co-producer Tom Cruise has rarely been so dull or uninspired, and plot holes bigger than a moon crater. Brain numbingly boring, 'Jack Reacher: Never Go Back' is based on the novel by Lee Child, in which there are 21 in total, and was to be the second in an intended action franchise, however, this has no doubt put the nail in the coffin of that idea. Jack Reacher should never have gone back. A total misfire!

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Movies, DVDs With Jim Sherlock and Aaron Rourke

Assassination Classroom

● The students of Class 3-E face a unique, formidable opponent in the energetic Assassination Classroom movie collection, now available on DVD. ■ Movie Collection (M). Now anime and threads together a satisavailable on DVD. fying first film, nicely balancing the Adapted from the popular story's sci-fi, comedic, and draManga which also became a suc- matic elements. The cast are all likeable, and are cessful anime series, these two live-action movies are loaded with able to give their characters enough infectious energy and technical in- individuality to make them interestgenuity, and while the second entry ing. Part Two is more uneven, espeis noticeably flawed, they prove to cially when it explains the alien's be an entertaining double bill. Assassination Classroom backstory with a prolonged flash(2015) (****) opens with the stu- back that consumes nearly half the dents of Class 3-E, deemed the movie. While required to forward the worst of Kunugigaoka Junior High School, being set a seemingly character and its motivations, it is also unnecessarily protracted, alincomprehensible task. A bright yellow, tentacled crea- most to the point of bogging the ture has destroyed most of the whole movie down. Star power prevents this section moon, and states that if he is not terminated by March of the follow- from grinding to a halt, but more ing year, Earth will suffer the same efficient use of screen time would have made these revelations far fate. Perplexing the Ministry Of De- more effective. Once the focus returns to what's fence is the creature's demand of wanting to teach Class 3-E during happening in the classroom, the these final months, a request that is momentum picks up, building to a climax that is action-packed and readily approved. Seeing this as a chance to kill emotionally apt. The visual effects for the alien the alien, Ministry agent Karaare first-rate, capturing the comic suma (Kippei Shiina) makes a deal with the bemused students, telling book look of the manga perfectly, them that whoever assassinates but also seamlessly placing the their otherworldly teacher will re- creature in its live-action setting. Assassination Classroom: Movie ceive ten billion yen. (released through MadUsing specially designed weap- Collection man Entertainment) is a brightly onry, the teenagers are trained by concocted genre mash-up that ofboth Karasuma and femme fatale fers the kind of exuberant viewing Irina Jelavic (Kang Ji-Young), most viewers will find both whose name is frequently (and de- that amusing and diverting. liberately) mis-pronounced. The anime series, which also Standing out amongst the class comes highly recommended, is also are Nagisa Shiota (Ryosuke available, on both DVD and BluYamada), Karuma Akabane Ray. (Masaki Suda), Kaede Kayano ■ Twin Peaks: Series 3.Now Show(Maika Yamamoto) and Manami ing on Stan every Monday. Okuda (Miku Uehara). Eight episodes in, and this reAlso transferred to the group is turn to the famous town is utterly an A.I. machine, loaded with mesmerising. While still a work in enough guns to level the entire progress, it is impossible to deschool. scribe what might be happening and A love-hate relationship devel- why, but this long-waited return by ops between alien and pupil, as it iconic film-maker David Lynch seems genuinely interested in pro- (Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Wild At viding the bullied and downtrodden Heart, The Elephant Man) is an ulstudents with the best education tra-stylish, multi-layered, and highly possible. interpretive delight. Assassination Classroom: Only once all 18 episodes have Graduation (2016) (***) continues screened that the dissection and the bizarre scenario, and offers arguing over what it all means can many answers to the numerous begin. questions raised in the first film. Positively shines over all the big On board this time is Japanese budget, over-rated product filling pop superstar Kazunari Ninomiya TV screens at the moment. Lynch regular Kyle (from the mega-successful group Arashi), as well as Hiroki Narimiya MacLachlan (Dune, Blue Velvet) and Mirei Kiritani. Director deserves special praise, but the Eiichiro Hasumi (who directed the entire, surprisingly eclectic cast are first three Umizaru films, Wild 7, all great, including David Lynch and the exceptional TV series himself as hearing impaired FBI Mozu and its big screen spin-off) Deputy Director Gordon Cole. - Aaron Rourke takes the episodic nature of the

Top 10 Lists JUNE 25 to JULY 1 THE AUSTRALIAN BOX OFFICE TOP TEN: 1 DESPICABLE ME 3 2 WONDER WOMAN 3 ALL EYEZ ON ME 4 THE MUMMY 5 ROUGH NIGHT 6 BAYWATCH 7 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES 8 MY COUSIN RACHEL 9 CHURCHILL 10 VICEROY'S HOUSE NEW RELEASES AND COMING SOON TO CINEMAS AROUND AUSTRALIA: JUNE 22: A QUIET PASSION, BUGS: MICRO MONSTERS 3D, CARS 3, DETOUR, MCLAREN, TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT, UNA. JUNE 29: DIARY OF A WHIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL, LADY MACBETH, MONSIEUR CHOCOLAT, SWORD ART ONLINE THE MOVIE: ORDINAL SCALE (ENGLISH VERSION), THE HOUSE, THE VILLAINESS. THE DVD AND BLU-RAY TOP RENTALS & SALES: 1. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST [Fantasy/Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans]. 2. T2: TRAINSPOTTING [Drama/Ewan McGregor, Ewan Bremner, Robert Carlyle]. 3. THE SPACE BETWEEN US [Fantasy/ Drama/Asa Butterfield, Carla Gugino, Gary Oldman]. 4. LOVING [Drama/Ruth Negga, Joel Edgerton, Will Dalton]. 5. A CURE FOR WELLNESS [Thriller/Jason Isaacs, Mia Goth, Dane DeHaan]. 6. SILENCE [Drama/Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver, Liam Neeson]. 7. LOGAN [Action/Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Dafne Keen]. 8. A FEW LESS MEN [Comedy/Xavier Samuel, Kris Marshall, Dacre Montgomery]. 9. RED DOG: TRUE BLUE [Drama/Bryan Brown, Josh Lucas, Rachael Taylor]. Also: BEFORE I FALL, MANCHESTER BY THE SEA, XXX: THE RETURN OF XANDER CAGE, THE GREAT WALL, MISS SLOANE, FENCES, LION, TONI ERDMANN, COLLIDE, RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER. NEW RELEASE HIGHLIGHTS ON DVD THIS WEEK: AFTERMATH [Drama/Arnold Schwarzenegger, Maggie Grace, Kevin Zegers]. THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE [Animated/ Rosario Dawson, Will Arnett, Michael Cera]. POWER RANGERS [207/Action/Naomi Scott, Dacre Montgomery, R.J. Cyler]. NEW RELEASE HIGHLIGHTS ON BLU-RAY THIS WEEK: AFTERMATH [Drama/Arnold Schwarzenegger, Maggie Grace, Kevin Zegers]. THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE [Animated/ Rosario Dawson, Will Arnett, Michael Cera]. THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE 3D + Blu-ray [Animated/Rosario Dawson, Michael Cera]. POWER RANGERS [207/Action/Naomi Scott, Dacre Montgomery, R.J. Cyler]. THE STRAIN: Season 2. NEW & RE-RELEASE AND CLASSIC MOVIES ON DVD HIGHLIGHTS: NONE LISTED FOR THIS WEEK. NEW RELEASE TELEVISION, DOCUMENTARY AND MUSIC DVD HIGHLIGHTS: THE STRAIN: Season 2. THE YOUNG POPE: Season 1. ANH'S BRUSH WITH FAME: Season 2 - James Sherlock


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 63

Observer Showbiz Poppea

Local Theatre With Cheryl Threadgold

‘Memory of Water’ at Malvern SHOWS

● Rebecca Rashleigh plays the title role in The Coronation of Poppea ■ Lyric Opera presents The Coronation of Poppea, Monteverdi’s passionate baroque drama, in which greed and thirst for power take no prisoners, at Chapel off Chapel from July 15-22. Commemorating the 450th year of Monteverdi’s birth, Lyric Opera is re-imagining his last and arguably greatest opera, The Coronation of Poppea, in an edgy and intimate production that sets the story in 1960s Rome. First performed in Venice in 1643, in The Coronation of Poppea the beautiful Poppea uses her feminine charms to convince the Emperor Nero to abandon his wife, destroy his friends and crown her Empress. Lyric’sArtistic Director, Pat Miller, said the themes of greed, passion and power would strike a chord with contemporary audiences: “Don’t think of it as an opera ….think House of Cards meets a Melbourne pop up bar or art show with a seriously old school soundtrack – hipster heaven. It’s the perfect show for opera novices and established aficionados alike.” Making his operatic debut, Director Tyran Parke will draw on his work in contemporary musical theatre – most recently a sold out season of Big Fish at Hayes Theatre in Sydney – to give the production a fresh feel. “Poppea draws on an unimaginable thirst for power, while also exploring love. Both themes are incredibly relevant over 400 years later. We will respect the integrity of the score, but bring grit and contemporary energy,” says Parke. “Lyric Opera is the perfect company to push the envelope on this production; they have given me creative freedom to stretch traditional boundaries and really bring something special to it.” The cast will be led by Rebecca Rashleigh in the title role opposite Opera Australia’s Nick Jones as Nero, making his Lyric debut. Caroline Vercoe will play the scorned Empress alongside countertenor sensation Nicholas Tolputt and bass Damian Whiteley. Performed up close and personal in the intimate setting of Chapel off Chapel, The Coronation of Poppea will be sung in Italian with English surtitles, accompanied by an eclectic instrumental ensemble. The design team includes Lyric regulars Rob Sowinski and Bryn Cullen along with rising talent Dann Barber. Performance Season: July 15 – 22 at 7.30pm Venue: Chapel off Chapel, 12 Little Chapel St., Prahran. Tickets are available at Chapel off Chapel.

■ Malvern Theatre Company: The Memory of Water (by Shelagh Stephenson) Until July 1 at 29 Burke Rd., Malvern. Director: Gayle Poor. Bookings: www.malverntheatre.com.au 1300 131 552 ■ Windmill Theatre Company: Chicago Until July 2 at The Drum Theatre, 226 Lonsdale St., Dandenong. www.windmilltheatre.com.au 8571 1666 ■ Williamstown Little Theatre: Vincent in Brixton (by Nicholas Wright) June 29 - July 15 at 2-4 Albert St., Williamstown. Director: Shirley Sydenham. Bookings: www.wlt.org.au 9885 9678 ■ Mordialloc Theatre Company: Australia Day (by Jonathan Biggins) June 30 - July 15 at Shirley Burke Theatre, 64 Parkers Rd., Parkdale. Director: Martin Gibbs. www.mordialloctheatre.com 9587 5141 ■ Diamond Valley Singers: The Mikado (by Gilbert & Sullivan) July 7 - 15 at the Warrandyte High School, Alexander rd., Warrandyte. Bookings: 9439 7843 www.dvsingers.com ■ Fab Nobs Theatre: Shrek Jnr. July 7 - 16 at 7:30pm at The Fab Factory, 33 Industry Place, Bayswater. Bookings: www.fabnobstheatre.com.au or 0401 018 846

■ Peoples Playhouse Inc: The Little Mermaid July 7 - 15 at the Cranbourne Community Centre, Brunt St., Cranbourne. Bookings and further details: www.peoplesplayhouse.com ■ Heidelberg Theatre Company: All My sons (by Arthur Miller) July 7 - 22 at 36 Turnham Ave., Rosanna. Director: Chris McLean. Tickets: $27/$24. Bookings: www.htc.org.au

AUDITIONS ■ MLOC Productions: Shout, The Legend of the Wild One Until July 2 at various locations in Mordialloc and Parkdale. Director: Rhylee Nowell; Musical Director: Tim Ryan; Choreography: Sabrina Klock. Audition Bookings: auditions@mloc.org.au : ■ Williamstown Little Theatre: The Seafarer (by Conor McPherson) July 2 at 10.00am and July 3 at 7.00pm at 3 Albert St., Williamstown. Director: Bruce Akers. Enquiries: 0432 984 781. ■ Mordialloc Theatre Company: Equally Divided (by Ronald Harwood) July 2, 3 at 7.30pm at Guide Hall, Glebe Ave., Cheltenham. Director: Cheryl Ballantine Richards. Enquiries: 0412 133 071 ■ Mooroolbark Theatre: Becky's New Car (by Steven Dietz) July 10 at 7.00pm at Red Earth Theatre, Mooroolbark Community Centre, 135 Bryce Ave., Mooroolbark. Director: Louise Woodward. Enquiries: 0416 777 356.

Cunning Little Vixen

Melbourne

Observer BANJOS, BOOTS AND BEYONCE ■ St Martins Youth Arts Centre presents Banjos, Boots and Beyoncé (a different kind of bush dance) from July 6 – 8 at The Substation, Newport. Directed by Luke Kerridge, St Martins, one of Australia’s well-established theatre companies working with children, throws the rules book away and kids call the shots in this fun night of dance, banter and iced vovos. This is not an average bush dance but a reimagining through the lens of St Martins’ young artists. An interactive work for adults, Banjos, Boots & Beyonce challenges our assumptions of what children are capable of, reminding us adults how to have fun. Award-winning director Luke Kerridge has teamed with the St Martins Ensemble, including children who participated in St Martins’ workshops in South Yarra, Northcote and St Albans, choreographer Ghenoa Gela, assistant director Dale Thorburn, designer Romanie Harper and DJ MzRizk, to create a work that reinforces the relevancy of social contact, while questioning the clichés and nuances of Australian culture. Season: Thursday– Saturday July 6-8 at 7pm Tickets: Dancefloor: A$30/C$25 + B/fee Wallflower: $5 + B/fee. Bookings essential. Venue: The Substation, 1 Market Street, Newport Tickets and info: thesubstation.org.au/ whats-on/banjos-boots-and-beyonce/

● Banjos, Boots and Beyonce

RISING STARS

● Celeste Lazarenko and Antoinette Halloran in The Cunning Little Vixen. Photo: Jeff Busby ■ The lights went up on a for- which is never ending, and we Ryan ), Forester’s Wife/Owl est and slowly the stage was are all integral to that story. (Dimity Shepherd), Schoolinhabited by many, many forThere is an awareness of the master/Mosquito (Brenton est creatures moving almost importance that humans and Spiteri), Harasta (Samuel magically – bees, caterpillars, nature’s creatures all cohabit Dundas),Badger/Parson ( Jergrasshoppers and the young this forest, which resonates with emy Kleeman). They are very innocent vixen – enjoying the our current environmental con- ably supported by the Chorus beauty of the forest, when the cerns. and the Children’s Chorus. forester appears and grabs the This is a captivating and enThe superb orchestra under vixen cub. chanting production directed the baton of Conductor Jack This introduces Victorian beautifully by Stuart Maundelighted us and the Opera’s The Cunning Little der. The clever and witty cos- Symonds production team Set Designer Vixen at the Playhouse, Arts tumes designed by Roger Kirk (Richard Roberts), Lighting Centre Melbourne another are a highlight. The strong viDesigner (Trudy Dalgleish), fabulous production in their brant colours contrast brilliantly 2017 ‘Fables’ season. against the background of the Stage Manager (Katharine Timms) with chorus preparaComposer Leos Janacek forest. was inspired by a comic strip The magnificent and pow- tion by Phoebe Briggs all conwhich he adapted into an op- erful vocal performances from tributed admirably to a stunning era, which is a philosophical all the principals are an ex- production. Arts Centre Melbourne, journey, reflecting on the cycle tremely strong feature also. of life and death. The Vixen (Celeste Laza- Playhouse. Until July 1 victorianopera.com.au It premiered in 1924. We renko), Fox (Antoinette are all part of a bigger story Halloran), Forester (Barry - Review by Jill Page

■ Melbourne Comedy’s Rising Stars returns with comedians from TV and radio at 10pm on Saturday, July 1 at The Butterfly Club. The show features comedians from Channel 10’s Have You Been Paying Attention, Comedy Central's Just For Laughs, ABC's Comedy Up Late, SBS's RAW Comedy, Triple J'sGood Az Friday and ABC's Comedy Bites! Hosted by Peter Jones (Triple J's Good Az Friday, writer for Channel 10's The Project), the line-up includes Dilruk Jayasinha (Channel 10's Have You Been Paying Attention?, Comedy Central's Just For Laughs, ABC's Comedy Up Late), Kirsty Webeck (2016 Kings of Comedy Comedian of the Year), Michael Shafar (SBS's RAW Comedy, ABC's Comedy Bites) and more. The secret to the show’s success lies in its curation. Melbourne Comedy’s Rising Stars is dedicated to introducing comedians who are on their way up. These are comics who have performed to sell-out crowds internationally, all over the country and at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. Bookings are highly recommended. Dates and Times: Saturday, July 1, 10pm. Cost: $25-32 Venue: The Butterfly Club, 5 Carson Place, Melbourne 3000 Tickets: https://thebutterflyclub.com/ show/melbourne-comedys-rising-stars-2017


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Page 64 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 Melbourne

Observer

Lovatts Crossword No 32 Across

2. Supervisory (position) 7. Pays brief visit (5,2) 11. Rule 17. Yacht pole 18. Untruth 19. Spanish cheer 20. Ellipse 21. Hangover symptom 22. Decreased 23. Woeful 26. Unfilled space 28. Citizen soldiers 29. Adolescent 31. Existence 34. World computer link 36. Archfiend 39. Female equines 41. Roused 43. Suspension of workers (3-3) 46. Morocco's capital 47. Writer, Emily ... 49. Frolicked 51. Pharaohs' tombs 52. Repaints (car) 53. Short-sighted 54. Lieu 55. Flip in air 56. Ill-treatment 61. Featured musicians 64. Nautical speed unit 65. Fellows 66. Extending 67. ... or nay 69. Possessor 71. US coins 74. Not apparent 76. Penny-pincher 78. Elderly horse 79. Phlegm condition 81. Anti-terrorist squad (1,1,1) 83. Wigwam 84. Aunt's husband 86. Scented purple flower 89. Desert illusions 90. Humility 93. Roll (dice) 94. Sailor's yes (3,3) 97. Made (wage) 100. From India or China 101. Saviour 103. Subway 106. Long letter 108. Short-circuited 109. Mistake (4-2) 110. Untied 111. Islamic governors 112. Renowned 113. Power group 115. Salon worker (4,7) 118. Minor roads (4,7) 121. Be without 124. Early harps 128. Hickory tree nut 129. Aimed 130. Cosmos scientists 134. Brings up (child) 135. Excessively fat 136. Overshadow 137. Fragrance 138. Existing

Across 139. Abandon 140. Alluring 143. Natural disaster, ... wave 144. Vote in 147. Film 150. Extinct bird 151. White flower (7,4) 155. Not justified 157. Chime 158. Smell 159. Concur 162. Snapshots 164. Harrowing trial 167. Doctor 168. Rid of lice 169. Comfy seat (4,5) 172. Journalists' credits (2-5) 173. Polite 174. Unassuming 177. Deprive of food 180. Islands 181. Flight from reality 183. Reconstructed 184. Notorious gangster (2,6) 186. Potato variety 187. In vain, to no ... 188. Fulfilled (demand) 191. Actress, ... Diaz 195. See next page (1,1,1) 197. Megastars 198. Earphones 200. Idiocy 202. Middle-distance runner 203. Weeding implement 205. Protrudes (6,3) 206. ... de Cologne 208. Pleasant 209. Fireproof material 212. Funeral guests 215. US Mormon state 217. Feeble 220. Capital of Iowa, Des ... 222. Hiding game 224. Close watch (5,3) 226. Fries lightly 228. Wife, the ... 229. Bake (meat) 230. Crazier 232. Check 235. La Scala city 236. Dallas is there 238. Well-meaning person (2-6) 241. Spot 242. Admonish 243. Gain through will 244. Singer, ... Horne 246. Require 252. Mental stress 253. Renounce throne 254. Eyelid swelling 255. Focal point 256. Rug 257. East European 258. Opposition 259. Shipping route (3,4) 260. School project

Down

Down

1. Right on target (4-2) 2. Dr Jekyll's alter ego (2,4) 3. Ark builder 4. Moves (towards) 5. Recognise 6. Peru beasts 7. Battery segment 8. Grass 9. Weary sound 10. Xmas 11. Responds 12. Contraptions 13. Crocodile relatives 14. Taverns 15. Small lump 16. Wine jug 24. Trophies 25. Addressed crowd 26. Shaking motion 27. Listing articles 28. Actors Gibson or Brooks 30. Lamb's mother 32. Lack of aptitude 33. Instructors 35. Lament 37. Defence force 38. Beastliest 39. Raider 40. Glimpse 42. Map guide 44. Chooses 45. Thrifty 47. Long-snouted monkey 48. Ice-free Norwegian port 50. Rounded roof 53. Ponder 57. Freedom from guilt 58. Bare 59. Rocket ship crew 60. Talks keenly 62. Mountaineer's tool (3,3) 63. Oppress 65. Judi Dench stars in ... Henderson Presents 68. Aviator, ... Johnson 70. Vigilantly 72. Admission 73. Old photo colour 74. Open sore 75. Dessert, ... caramel 77. Kenya & Tanzania region (4,6) 80. Letter jumbles 82. Italian city 85. Come together 87. Daunted 88. Prince Edward, ... of Wessex 91. Biblical garden 92. Auction 95. Containing nothing 96. Upwardly mobile young people 98. Ripped apart, torn ... 99. Naked models 102. Group loyalty (6,2,5) 104. Nimble-fingered 105. Helps 107. Piercingly 113. Flowered 114. Requested from menu 116. US cotton state 117. Betrayal crime 119. Cavalryman 120. Codswallop 122. Accomplish 123. US motorbike stuntman, Evel ... 125. Extract (metal) 126. In the Arctic Circle 127. Specifically (2,3) 128. Sacred song 130. Astern

131. Weight unit 132. Record label (1,1,1) 133. Droop 141. Pseudonyms 142. US Rhode Island resort 145. Lengthy (4-6) 146. Droll plays 148. Totally preoccupies 149. Unable to read and write 152. Behaved 153. Louts 154. Finish 155. Great Bear constellation, ... Major 156. Jockey 160. Congers or morays 161. Native American tribespeople 163. Stitched garment edges 165. Cain & ... 166. Vending machine 167. Hitler book, ... Kampf 170. Vile act 171. Largest Turkish city 175. Leaves out 176. Praise highly 178. Panic 179. Current (permit) 182. Prison occupant 185. Progressed (4,2) 188. Names used wrongly 189. Most easily offended 190. Cigar dust 192. Almond biscuit 193. Most corroded 194. Flightless bird 195. Trite remark 196. Band 199. Induces 201. Made amends 204. Rowing aids 207. In present condition (2,2) 210. Companies 211. Samples (wine) 213. Coral bank 214. Safari 216. Large yacht 217. Scavenge 218. Tardiest 219. Your school, ... mater 221. Slip up 223. German or Greek 225. Eastern veils 227. In the past, long ... 228. Russian space station 231. Putrefy 233. Four score 234. Toughen (steel) 235. Liqueur, crème de ... 237. Afternoon nap 239. Most senior 240. Enfold 245. Urges on, ... up 247. Junior Scouts 248. Epic tale 249. Notion 250. Highest point 251. Windmill arm


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Solution on Page 56

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Places To Go

Right beside RSL, Golf Club and Gippsland Lakes

Caravans,Camping andTouring


ADVERTISING FEATURE

Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 67

Places To Go

Learn about Ned Kelly at Glenrowan The historic small town of Glenrowan is situated in N E Victoria just 2½-hours drive, north, down the Hume Freeway between the towns of Benalla and Wangaratta. Glenrowan is the site of Ned Kelly and his gang’s unsuccessful fight against the Victorian Police force which saw the capture of Ned Kelly, the death of his brother Dan, gang members Steve Hart and Joe Byrne. The siege of Glenrowan on June 28 at Anne Jones’s Glenrowan Inn also tragically saw the death of her son Johnny and that of rail line worker Martin Cherry. At Kate’s Cottage Gift and Souvenirs shop you will find a huge range of Ned Kelly T-shirts, rare collectable books, interesting and unusual memorabilia and souvenirs. Step through the back of this shop to access the Ned Kelly Museum and replica of the Kelly Homestead (ramshackle hut). This proudly is No 1 on TripAdvisor and the holder of a Certificate of Excellence award. Open 7 days a week (excepting Christmas day). A free map of this historic town is available here. Come and explore your bushranger history at Glenrowan. w w w. k a t e s c o t t a g e g l e n r o w a n . c o m . a u


Page 68 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

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Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 69

Real Estate


Page 70 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Eildon

Woodfield

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Thornton

Eildon

UNDER CONTRACT

‘Lemon Gum Cottage’ • Tidy 2 bedroom home on a flat block • Large living with split system & gas heater • Front and rear verandah • Single carport and timber lockup garage • Re-stumped & freshly painted $180,000

Alexandra

NEW

Prime Commercial Investment:• Long secure lease • Excellent return on investment • Approx 408sqm land with rear access • Tidy brick building, low maintenance $245,000

“Hazewind” • Beautiful 3 bedroom 2 bathroom home on 126 acres • Modern galleystyle kitchen & Open plan living area • Wrap around verandas with access from all rooms • Under cover carport, 3 car shed & Large enclosed workshop $699,000

Alexandra

NEW PRICE

Impressive Country Home offering:• 3 double bedrooms with built-in robes, 2 bathrooms • Open plan living with undercover outdoor area • Double lock-up colorbond shed and double carport • Concrete drive and established gardens • Adjacent to Goulburn River $485,000

Sales Specialis ts I Belinda Hocking 04 18 115 55774 Specialists 0418 Property Management I Sarah Brockhus - 0457 537 222 Cathkin

SOLD

A Rare Opportunity • 3.5 Acres of river flats • Prime building block with Power, Phone and Bore • Established trees providing privacy • Located close to Eildon and surrounded by rural land. $225,000

Alexandra

Looking for an Investment property? • Great corner block walking distance to schools and shops • Recently renovated Kitchen and Bathroom • 3 Good sized bedrooms with lots of natural light • Carport and shed for plenty of storage • Currently rented at $215 per week $199,000

Eildon

SOLD

Country Oasis featuring:• Nearly 1 acre of land of private gardens • 3 bedrooms plus study • Huge kitchen/family room • 2 living areas, plus rumpus, OFP • Large central bathroom, ducted heating • Huge shed and workshop. $435,000

Cut eW eek ender Cute Week eekender • Well-presented 2 bedroom cottage • Open Kitchen and living area with wood heater • Original kitchen and bathroom and floorboards throughout • Re-stumped and freshly painted • Neat secure rear yard with lock-up workshop • Perfect weekender! NEW PRICE: $179,500

Landmark Harcourts Alexandra 56 Grant Street, Alexandra I 5772 3444 $1,425,000 For Sale

Woodlea. 3731 Goulburn Valley Highway, Cathkin

LIFESTYLE FARM WITH GOULBURN RIVER ACCESS

‘Woodlea’ presents an outstanding opportunity to secure a picturesque lifestyle property with income generated from the working farm. There are 216 acres (210 freehold and 10 acres leasehold) of improved pasture with a good balance of flat to slight undulating country, good carrying capacity and with Goulburn River access. The 3 bedroom homestead has 2 bathrooms, "chef's kitchen" with views over the rear garden. The formal sitting room has an open fire place; the family room with vaulted ceilings overlooks the front garden and deck. The home is fresh and "homely" and is surrounded by an exquisite 2 acres of English garden. There is a lawn tennis court. The recently renovated cottage is fully self-contained and maybe another income source from farm stay or B&B. Don't miss this wonderful varied lifestyle property: P r i v a t e S a l e $ 11,, 4 2 5 5,, 0 0 0

Sales Specialist I Stuart Oddy 0402 349 120 w w w .landmarkhar .landmarkharcc ourts. ourts.cc om.au

Landmark Har Harcc ourts Y Yee a 5 2 High SStr tr eet, Y ea I 5577 9 7 2277 9 9 treet, Yea


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Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Page 71


Page 72 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 28, 2017

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Melbourne Observer. June 28, 2017  

Melbourne Observer. June 28, 2017

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