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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 2017

VICTORIA’S INDEPENDENT WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

48TH YEAR OF PUBLICATION $2.95

S TATE EDITION Vol 49 No 1670 SERVING VICTORIA SINCE 1969

SURVIVORS ■ Melbourne’s showbiz veterans gathered at the weekend for their twiceyearly ‘Survivors’ luncheon. The group, founded by Bert Newton in 1979, comprises veterans of the TV, radio and recording industries. More photos by Observer Editor Ash Long are on Page 8.

including GST

● Robun Turner (Uglow) with Bruce McKay

● Paul Nicholson and Brian Smith

■ 3AW broadcaster Philip Brady celebrated his 78th birthday this week. Friends gathered on Friday at Kew to celebrate the day. Lifelong pal Mike McColl Jones presented him with a crown, bringing back memories of Brady’s days as Prince Philip on The Tarax Show.

● Gordon Bennett and Tony Tardio at the Survivors luncheon last weekend

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Page 2 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

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Travel

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Melbourne People

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Survivors Luncheon Rising Sun Hotel, South Melbourne Photos: Ash Long

● Tony Tadio and Annette Allison

● Kevin Trask and Dorothy Baker

● Ray Lawrence and partner Rosemary

● Paul Nicholson and Bruce McLean

● Ron Bourke and Ralphe Rickman

● Denis O’Kane and Allan Paull

● Hugh Hill and Brian Hyde

● Nigel Dick and Des Ford

● Carryl Browne and Max Bleach

● Brian Davis and Keith Livingston

● Ben Hosking and Peter Van

● Don Kinsey and Denis Scanlan


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 9

Showbiz Latest

It’s All About You!

Melbourne

RADIO MAN MAL GARVIN Observer HAS PARKINSON’S DISEASE In This Edition

Long Shots - Survivors’ Luncheon News - Honours for Mike, Patti Cartoonist - Matt Bissett-Johnson Photos - TV, radio veterans Melb. Confidential - Cunning Little Vixen Victoria Pictorial - Nostalgic photos Gavin Wood - West Hollywood Kevin Trask - Whatever Happened Observer Boks - Mark Twain Outback Legend - Nick Le Souef OK - John O’Keefe Top 10 Lists Country Music Local Theatre DVD Reviews

Songkeepers in concert

Observer Showbiz

Latest News AroundVictoria

Pair arrested ● Arrkanala Lyilhitjika: at the Melbourne Recital Centre on August 7 ■ Melbourne Recital Centre in association ral practice in remote Central Australian comwith Melbourne International Film Festival munities. This performance is a unique Ausis presenting The Song Keepers in Concert, tralian musical conjunction: a union of Bathe Central Australian Aboriginal Women’s roque and Romantic era choral arrangements, Choir signature performance of Arrkanala and centuries-old sacred poetry (hymns) held Lyilhitjika. within the Western Arrarnta and Publicist Di Rolle says the Central Austra- Pitjantjatjara languages. lian Aboriginal Women’s Choir has become Comprising of four movements, each cona musical ‘tour de force’ since their historic taining hymns and songs which recall signifiand highly acclaimed concert tour of Germany cant periods of the story, Arrkanala Lyilhitjika in mid-2015. allows a conversation to emanate between the The unique ensemble sings sacred music multi-arts elements of the performance and in the Western Arrarnta and Pitjantjatjara the choral arrangements sung by the choir. languages, two living languages of the NorthArrkanan Lylilhitjika will inform, educate ern Territory and South Australia, together and provide a rare insight into a vital but largely with new music introduced through recent col- unknown aspect of Aboriginal culture in the laborations with other Centralian and interna- Central Desert. tional choirs. With male musicians dominating the conHaving first been introduced to choral sing- temporary indigenous performance landscape, ing by German mission pioneers to the West- Arrkanala Lylilhitjika is a story of the cultural ern Arrarnta people of Ntaria in the late 1800s, resilience of women, representing an unherthis musical innovation was a natural ‘fit’ to a alded aspect of contemporary Australian inpeople with a long history of transmitting their digenous musicianship. culture, wisdom and knowledge through song “It is a testament to the resilience of indigand ceremony. enous women in the Central Desert as they In this performance, the Central Austra- preserve and strengthen their identity, lanlian Aboriginal Women’s Choir tells a remark- guages and culture through song,” says Ms able but largely unknown story of over 100 Rolle. years of choral heritage and practice in rePrior to the main performance, there will mote Central Australian Aboriginal commu- be a welcome to country and a performance nities. by the Koorie Tiddas Youth Choir on August Arrkanala Lyilhitjika is a narrative musi- 7 at Melbourne Recital Centre. cal work comprising a 90-minute choral perVenue: Elisabeth Murdoch Hall (Two hours formance accompanied by a multi-arts rear incl. interval). A reserve $45, B reserve $35 narration, telling the remarkable story of choBookings: melbournerecital.com.au

Catchment Players to close after 42 years ■ Reservoir-based Catchment Players is to close after four decades. “After 42 years of producing high quality theatre and mentoring programs, the committee of management of Catchment Players are saddened to announce the closure of the company at the end of 2017,” said Brad Fischer, President, at the weekend. “This decision was not made lightly, and comes with deep disappointment that the company will not be continuing. “It has been no secret within the community that Catchment has fought back from financial struggle. The current committee has succeeded in eliminating debt and we are very proud of the tenacity and efforts of our volunteers.

“The decision to close the company has come about due to the lack of committee personnel joining us over the last few years, and the current committee being unable to continue in their roles. “We are thrilled to be presenting our final show, Honk! Jnr in October. We encourage our followers to audition and be a part of history with the final production we produce. “I thank the committee, our life members, casts, crews, orchestras, technical support, front of house and volunteers for the support they have provided to us over the years and I look forward to a successful production of Honk! Jnr to enable Catchment Players to take its final deserved bow,” Mr Fischer said.

● Mal Garvin ■ Mal Garvin, the radio executive who headed the failed 3AK station in Melbourne which lost millions of dollars, has announced that he has Parkinson’s Disease. “The next challenge to my faith has arrived,” Garvin told his social media friends at the weekend. “My specialist has told me its more than likely I have Parkinson's. “A kite flies higher into the head winds. Still would value your prayer,” Garvin said. Garvin was founder of the Fusion religious organisation, and stepped down from its leadership in 2010, after being exposed by broadcaster (now Senator) Derryn Hinch. “after Fusion Australia's national executive found him guilty of ''inappropriate behaviour'' and ''errors of judgment'' with ''a vulnerable young woman''. Hinch wrote in The Sunday Age in 2010: “In January last year, Mal Garvin was awarded the Order of Australia for ‘service to the community’' and for '’the development of social welfare programs that support and guide young people, and as a broadcaster and author’. “Just months after receiving the award, the 68-year-old was displaying his medal and boasting about it at the bedside of a young woman who had tried to kill herself, allegedly to escape his sexual advances. “A few months after that, the spiritual leader quietly ''retired'' from the youth and community network he had built, after Fusion Australia's national executive found him guilty of ''inappropriate behaviour'' and ''errors of judgment'' with ''a vulnerable young woman'',” Hinch wrote. Garvin was Managing Director of Fusion Media, which operated radio station 3AK. Many ex-staff remain unpaid.

■ Frankston Police were quickly on the scene after reports of assaults and a theft. Investigators have been told a man was sitting at the Frankston Railway Station with a female companion when he was allegedly struck by a teenager. Police arrived a short time later and arrested a 17year-old boy from Noble Park and a 20year-old man from Hallam.

Siege charges

■ A man has appeared at Melbourne Magistrates’ Court following an alleged siege in Wedge St, Epping. A 26-year-old Thomastown man has been charged with possess imitation firearm and other firearms and bail-related offences. He has been remanded to appear in court again on June 29.

Car rammed

■ Police have arrested four teenagers after a divisional van and a police car were allegedly rammed in Sale by a teenage girl driving a stolen car.

Terror incident

■ Police have charged a fourth man following the alleged terrorist incident in Brighton.

Forecast ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Today (Wed.). Mostly cloudy. 5°-14° Thurs. Partly cloudy. 7°-14° Fri. Showers. 6°-14° Sat. Mostly cloudy. 6°-12° Sun. Scattered showers. 6°-13°

Mike McColl Jones

Top 5

THE T OP 5 TOP PATRON S AINT NAMES SAINT THA T WERE REJE CTED THAT REJECTED 5.The patron saint of confectionery - St Jube. 4. The patron saint of massage parlours - St Kilda. 3. The patron saint of brassieres - St Abra. 2.The patron saint of cricket bowlers - St Hatrick. 1. The patron saint of Crow Calls - St Joan of 'aark!


Page 10 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Melbourne

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Ash OnWednesday

Observer 80 at ‘Survivors’ lunch inc orpor a ting the Melbourne A d vvertiser ertiser, incorpor orpora Ad Melbourne T ict orian Rur al Ne ws Trr ader ader,, V Vict ictorian Rural New and Melbourne Seniors News News.. Victoria’s Independent Newspaper First Published September 14, 1969 Every W ednesda y Wednesda ednesday

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Our Team Editor: Ash Long Features Editor: Peter Mac Columnists: Len Baker (harness racing), Matt Bissett-Johnson (cartoonist), David Ellis (wine and travel), Rob Foenander (country music), Kerry Kulkens (astrology), Nick Le Souef (outback Australia), Mike McColl Jones (life), Greg Ne wman (r adio ), T erry Radf or d ((C C ourt ewman (radio adio), Terry Radfor ord roundsman), Aaron Rourke (movies), Ted Ry an (r acing), Jim Sherlock Ryan (racing), (movies, DVDs), Cheryl Threadgold (local thea e ), K e vin T sho wbiz), theatt rre Ke Trrask ((sho showbiz), Veritas, G avin W ood (Holly w ood). Wood (Hollyw Honorary Reviewers: Mark Briggs, Rita Crispin, Martin Curtis, Sherryn Danaher Danaher,, Barbar a Hughes, L yn Hurs t, K athryn Barbara Lyn Hurst, Ka Keeble, Beth Klein, Deborah Marinaro, Gr aeme McC oubrie therine , McGr egor Graeme McCoubrie oubrie,, Ca Catherine McGregor egor,, David McLean, Maggie Morrison, Jill Pa g e ylie Rackham, Elizabeth Semmel. e,, K Kylie Distribution: Sam Fiorini, phone 9482 1145

■ More than 80 veterans of TV-radio-recording attended the Survivors twice-a-year luncheon on Saturday. Convenor Bruce McKay paid tribute to past members including the late Dan Webb. Members heard that BillArmstrong, 89, was recovering well after heart surgery. Original member Ron Tudor, in his 90s, now lives in the country. The group was founded in the late 1970s by Bert Newton. Women are now allowed to be members. Annette Allison, on-time Channel 10 newsreader, was there. These days she is the Public Affairs Manager for the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Annette’s annual Outback Tour is already a sell-out. The itinerary includes Perth, Margaret River, Albany, Esperance, Kalgoorlie and Wave Rock.

Female of the Species

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ARIES: (March 21- April 20) A Lucky Colour: White Lucky Day: Friday Racing Numbers: 2.9.6.5. Lotto Numbers: 1.12.15.26.35.40. Guard against promising something you might find hard to keep. You could be in the public gaze so keep calm and think before you talk. There could be more travel coming up soon.

GEMINI: (May 21- June 21) Lucky Colour: Green Lucky Day: Monday Racing Numbers: 5.6.2.3. Lotto Numbers: 5.12.23.36.30.11. There could be a few surprises in store for you during this period. You might need to concentrate on family relationships and try to work out a compromise, some luck in your love life. edit or@MelbourneObserv er editor@MelbourneObserv or@MelbourneObserver er..com. om.aa u

“For the cause that lacks assistance, ‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance For the future in the distance, And the good that we can do”

Short Shots

● Susie Sparkes as Margot Mason in Female of the Species. Photo: Karim Ghantous ■ When Joanna Murray-Smith’s The Female of the Species premiered in 2006, Germaine Greer, the inspiration for the protagonist, was justifiably upset. The upset was that an incident where a disturbed young woman who had broken into her home and held Greer captive had been made into a comedy. Not least that Murray-Smith’s play laid the fault not with the deranged student but squarely with her Greer character. It did indeed feel gratuitous when first produced. However, whether intended or otherwise, distance has softened this play’s maleficence. The Female of the Species has all the elements of a great farce: unlikely characters thrown together in a ridiculous, improbable plot. Most importantly, it is very witty. Margot Mason, 70s feminist icon and author of the ground-breaking The Cerebral Vagina, is suffering from writer’s block. Unexpectedly, a former student of hers, Molly, arrives intent on revenge. There are some very dark themes swirling around; not least the ‘monstrous feminine’ and toxic motherhood. However, the play is also extremely funny and Peridot’s production shines brightly. Natasha Boyd tightly directs her actors with great emphasis on comic timing and pace. Susie Sparkes, despite spending most of the action handcuffed to her desk, is excellent as the vain, acerbic, self-absorbed feminist legend, Margot. Reschelle O’Connor is also very good as the fervent, gun-toting former student, Molly. Rachel Clayton sparkles as Margot’s much put-upon daughter, Tess. Andrew McIver as Tess’s husband Bryan, makes the most of his comic lines and much slapstick. Michael Knowles (Frank) and PaulWanis (Theo) make up this terrific ensemble. Kudos also to Steve Karandais for a great set design. Performance season: Until June 24 Venue: Unicorn Theatre, Mt Waverley Secondary College, Lechte Road, Mt Waverley. Bookings: 9808 0770 or www.peridot.com.au - Review by Kathryn Keeble

with Kerry Kulkens

TAURUS: (April 21- May 20) Lucky Colour: Yellow Lucky Day: Tuesday Racing Numbers: 1.3.2.5 Lotto Numbers: 1.3.15.29.34.45. Not a good time to make a definite decision just now, make sure you know all the facts first. You could be over doing it so make sure you look after your health and get some rest.

with Ash Long, Editor

Distribution S ta dition: A vailable w eekly a tatte E Edition: weekly att approx. 400 newsagents across the Melbourne metropolitan area, Mornington Peninsula, Geelong, Bellarine Peninsula, Surf coast, and Victorian regional centres. Recommended retail price: $2.95.

Long Shots

Your Stars

■ Melbourne Observer Racing Editor Ted Ryan has been in the wars. He was prescribed some blood pressure medication that did not agree with him, and he suffered several falls that hospitalised him. Ted has been on the sick list - but still managed to file his column for this week’s issue. You might some find some handy tips. ■ We welcome Greg Every as an addition to our list of honorary reviewers, who are led by Cheryl Threadgold. ■ Philip Brady, 3AW co-host of Nightline and Remember When, had 10 guests at the Survivors luncheon at South Melbourne on Saturday. The birthday boy (age 78) was in a happy mood: he shouted the meals for 23 people! ■ Nigel Dick, 89, former Nine Network boss, is in good nick after being seriously ill following a knee operation that had complications. ■ Congratulations to old school mate James Hogan, retiring boss of Etihad, on his ‘AO’ honour from the Queen’s Birthday list.

Observer Treasury Thought For The Week ■ “A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out.”

Observer Curmudgeon ■ “Friends are God's way of taking care of us.”

Text For The Week ■ "Is not wisdom found among the aged? Does not long life bring understanding?" - Job 12:12 ■ "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and instruction.” - Proverbs 1:7 Contents of Court Lists are intended for information purposes only. The lists are extracted from Court Lists, as supplied to the public, by the Magistrates’ Court of Victoria, often one week prior to publication date; for current Court lists, please contact the Court. Further details of cases are available at www.magistratescourt.vic.gov.au The Melbourne Observer shall in no event accept any liability for loss or damage suffered by any person or body due to information provided. The information is provided on the basis that persons accessing it undertake responsibility for assessing the relevance and accuracy of its content. No inference of a party’s guilt or innocence should be made by publication of their name as a defendant. Court schedules may be changed at any time for any reason, including withdrawal of the action by the Plaintiff/Applicant. E&OE.

CANCER: (June 22- July 22) Lucky Colour: Peach Lucky Day: Thursday Racing Numbers: 4.6.2.3. Lotto Numbers: 4.12.25.29.8.33. There should not be too much trouble in your finances but do check all fine print before signing anything. Some happy surprises in career matters or business arrangements. LEO: (July 23- August 22) Lucky Colour: Blue Lucky Day: Wednesday Racing Numbers: 2.3.6.5. Lotto Numbers: 1.12.15.26.34.40. Many of your wishes could come true during this period so keep your options open to possible changes. Meeting an old friend could bring about travel or change. VIRGO: (August 23- September 23) Lucky Colour: Lilac Lucky Day: Saturday Racing Numbers: 6.5.3.2. Lotto Numbers: 6.12.25.9.33.34. Good feeling and plenty of energy should help you to achieve some of the tasks allotted to you. There could be something you did not expect that might sort out an old problem. LIBRA: (September 24- October 23) Lucky Colour: White Lucky Day: Sunday Racing Numbers: 5.6.2.3. Lotto Numbers: 5.12.26.39.7.11. There will be quite a few changes coming up in your life. Some may be changing their address and some may be changing their loved ones. The interest in the opposite sex is heightened. SCORPIO: (October 24- November 22) Lucky Colour: Blue Lucky Day: Thursday Racing Numbers: 5.9.4.2. Lotto Numbers: 5.12.4.19.6.3. Offers of a promotion at work are indicated. The domestic scene is looking very good. Travel could bring people into your life that may benefit your career. SAGITTARIUS: (November 23- December 20) Lucky Colour: violet Lucky Day: Monday Racing Numbers: 6.1.3.2. Lotto Numbers: 6.12.25.40.45.33. Many will be feeling very confident about anything they try. People of importance will be willing to further their career new ventures will be successful. CAPRICORN: (December 21- January 19) Lucky Colour: Yellow Lucky Day: Wednesday Racing Numbers: 6.9.7.2. Lotto Numbers: 4.15.45.20.33.3. New ventures would pay off if tried at the moment. Your confidence and energy levels are pretty high at present. The social scene will be very hectic. AQUARIUS: (January 20- February 19) Lucky Colour: Blue Lucky Day: Monday Racing Numbers: 2.3.6.2. Lotto Numbers: 2.13.26.24.40.5. Most will have learned from past experiences and see the situation very clearly to make their move and benefit through it. Especially where career is concerned. PISCES: (February 20- March 20) Lucky Colour: Pink Lucky Day: Thursday Racing Numbers: 9.6.4.2. Lotto Numbers: 4.12.15.16.20.33. Major changes are occurring around you some are outside your own influence. These changes may affect your close relationships. Old friendships may go and new ones may be formed. Some of you could be falling in love.

Visit Kerry Kulkens Magic Shop at 1693 Burwood Hwy, Belgrave Phone/Fax 9754 4587 www.kerrykulkens.com.au Like us on Facebook


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Melbourne Arts Extended season

■ Extended opening hours for Van Gogh and the Seasons have been announced. It is the fastest selling exhibition in the National Gallery of Victoria’s history, and the largest exhibition of Van Gogh masterpieces ever seen in Australia. The exhibition was scheduled to close on Sunday July 9 but has been extended until Wednesday July 12 due to the extraordinary demand. For its final three days it will be open from 8am until 11pm. A special 24-hour viewing will also take place on the final weekend from 10pm Saturday July 8 to 10pm on Sunday July 9, giving audiences an extra chance to see Van Gogh and the Seasons before the works return to their homes across the globe. Accommodating both night owls and early birds, the exhibition is also now open from 9am every weekday and 8am on weekends. Part of the Victorian Government’s Melbourne Writer Masterpiece series, Van Gogh and the Seasons has welcomed more that 230,000 visitors since opening on April 28. The exhibition has been a drawcard for audiences of all ages and visitors across the globe. Once Van Gogh and the Seasons closes, the NGV’s next major exhibition will be The House of Dior opening in August followed by the NGV Triennial – a major free summer exhibition featuring the works of 60 contemporary artists and designers from more than 30 countries. - Peter Kemp

Heide Museum

■ Making History - The Boyd Family The third exhibition in the Making History series, this display highlights the museum's rich collection of paintings, works on paper and ceramic objects by various members of the acclaimed Boyd dynasty and their close collaborators. With focus on the achievements of the 1940s and 50s, the exhibition highlights include elegant art nouveau-style pots by family patriarch Merric Boyd. Arthur Boyd's masterful group portrait painted in 1946 and a vibrant array of domestic ware produced by artists working for the celebrated Arthur Merric Boyd Pottery in the postwar period. The exhibition closes November 12. ■ The Springbrook Landscapes - Albert tucker and Fred Williams. Albert Tucker and Fred Williams painted the spectacular surrounds of the Springbrook rainforest while holidaying there together in 1971. The Australian landscape had been a creative focus for both of them over a decade, each having found a new appreciation for the local environment after spending time away from their homeland. Tucker, the elder by 13 years, lived and travelled extensively overseas from 1947 until 1960, while Williams based himself in London between 1952 and 1956. In the late 1960s the two artists began visiting each other's studios and established a rapport. Turn To Page 13

Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 11 Melbourne

Observer

Living the dream

● Claire Abagia (Ann Deever), Liam Gillespie (Chris Keller),George Werther (Joe Keller) and Julie Arnold (Kate Keller) in All My Sons. Photo: David Belton ■ Heidelberg Theatre Company presents All just fulfilling the American Dream – wealth, prosMy Sons from July 7-22 at 36 Turnham Ave, perity, financial security and indeed by helping Rosanna. keep the country free, they were helping others Written by American playwright Arthur to achieve the Dream also. Miller and directed by Chris McLean, the backPerformance details: July 7 – 22 ground to All My Sons is World War II, where Times: 8pm, with 2pm matinees on Sunday men and women fought and died overseas, and July 9, 16 and July 22 others – businessmen particularly – made their Venue: Heidelberg Theatre, 36 Turnham fortunes, or built upon them, by fulfilling lucra- Ave., Rosanna tive government contracts to produce the comTickets: Adults: $27 Concession, Senior’s ponents, machines and weapons that those sol- Card Holders and Members $24 Group of 10+ diers abroad were using to fight with. $22 per ticket. Those fortunate ones at home could, of Bookings: www.htc.org.au course, justify their positions by saying they were - Cheryl Threadgold

Honours for Mike, Patti ■ Melbourne Observer columnist Mike McColl Jones was recognised with an Order of Australia honour in the Queen’s Birthday list. Mike was recognised for his work in broadcasting, which included stints with Graham Kennedy, Don Lane, Peter Couchman, Bert Newton and Steve Vizard. Patti Newton’s honour recognises her work for charities including the Variety Club, and the Stroke Foundation.

Melbourne Observations

with Matt Bissett-Johnson

Showbiz News

● Mike McColl Jones, OAM

Also honoured was Antonio Zeccola, the founder and owner of Palace Cinemas and Palace Films. Actress Deborah Mailman was honored in the list. So too was Cate Blanchett “for eminent service to the performing arts as an international stage and screen actor, through seminal contributions as director of artistic organisations, as a role model for women and young performers, and as a supporter of humanitarian and environmental causes.”

Cheque book journalism

■ Cheque book journalism is alive and well particularly in current affair TV programs. The Brisbane lass knifed in the horrific London Bridge carnage was paid a rumoured $100,000 for an interview on Sunday on Seven. Apart from the upfront payment Seven had to stump up hidden extra costs of airfares and accomodation for father and sister of the victim, as well as same for presenter Melissa Doyle. It all adds up to big bucks. - John O’Keefe

What’s On Puppetry Festival

● Puppetry Festival at La Mama ■ The Melbourne Festival of Puppetry is back, to be presented across La Mama’s venues, including the La Mama Forecourt and purpose built Courtyard Tent Theatre, from July 4-9. This year’s festival will present more than 15 works for children and adults. The festival is like a puppet-sampler with styles ranging from black light theatre, shadow puppets, Muppet-style, Czech marionettes and extraordinary full-bodied puppets, all in one program. This year’s performances are featured from across Australia and across the world, including from the Philippines, the Anino Shadowplay Collective who make extraordinary shadow plays for family audiences. The adult program will include The People Who Play With Theatre from New Zealand presenting The Last Man On Earth is Trapped In A Supermarket. Also presenting short works at The Puppet Picnic is UK artist Billy Paul in his MisInformation Booth as well as artist Adam Bennett who hails from Perth via the UK. From across Australia artists will be welcomed from NSW, WA, regional Victoria and Melbourne, including performances by one of Jim Henson’s favourite puppeteers, the world-renowned puppeteer Richard Bradshaw (NSW). New to the festival this year is The Creature Technology Company Workshop Program, a workshop program for children and a professional development program for adults and artists. Taught by puppet experts, children can make a variety of puppets and then learn how to use them, including socks puppets, junk puppets, hand-and-rod puppets and shadow puppets. Adult professional development workshops includes Sorn Soran, a guest from Cambodia who will run an intensive in making and performing with traditional Cambodia Shadow puppets. The adult program will also offer two workshops by expert puppet designers and makers from CTC – the company behind the hit musical and puppet of King Kong. There are also free puppet events daily, and each night in the La Mama forecourt, so bring your lunch for the Puppet Picnic or enjoy wine at night while wandering through the avenue of Love and Death – an avenue of puppet booths with short shows for adults. There are puppetry shows suitable for the age groups 3 – 5 years, 4 – 8 years, 6 – 12 years, all ages and adults. For full details of shows, dates, times and bookings, visit www.lamama.com.au - Cheryl Threadgold


Page 12 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 Melbourne

Observer

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West Hollywood

‘Visit West Hollywood’ team in Melb.

■ Hi everyone, from my suite at the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites comes this week's news.

Obamas buy a house ■ Barack and Michelle Obama have opted to buy the $8.1 million home they've been renting in Washington, D.C., just a few miles from the White House. They purchased the 8200-square-foot Tudor-style mansion in Kalorama, a wealthy enclave also home to Ivanka Trump and Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson. Kevin Lewis, the former President's spokesman, said, "Given that President and Mrs. Obama will be in Washington for at least another 2½ years, it made sense for them to buy a home rather than continuing to rent property." Sasha Obama, their youngest daughter, is still in high school.

Catch-up with Barry

■ Hollywood-based Australian cinematographer Barry Wilson was with the Visit West Hollywood team in Melbourne on its visit. When the team were in Melbourne promoting the wonders of West Hollywood to the local travel experts they met up with Barry, who was in Melbourne visiting his daughter. Barry has a long list of credits from early Australian television shows like Homicide, Matlock Police and The Flying Doctors before he searched for bigger shows here in Hollywood. Barry moved to Hollywood in 1989 and started as Director of Photography on Mission Impossible and then onto Time Trax and the Dukes of Hazzard, Melrose Place and scores of other movies and television shows. While Barry was in his hometown, he ran into Alan Johnson and the Visit West Hollywood Team who were travelling the east coast presenting seminars on the beauty and wonder of West Hollywood.

● Cinematographer Barry Wilson with the Managing Director and CEO of the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites in West Hollywood, Alan Johnson.

Orient Express murder ■ Hercule Poirot is putting together some clues. Someone on the train killed Johnny Depp, and our money is on it being the same person who thought an Imagine Dragons song was a good choice to soundtrack a Kenneth Branagh movie. The trailer for the actor-director's remake of Agatha Christie's famed 1934 murder-mystery novel Murder on the Orient Express has arrived, and it's stacked with stars: Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Penélope Cruz, Daisy Ridley, Judi Dench, Josh Gad, Willem Dafoe, Leslie Odom Jr., and Tom Bateman are all here. Hop aboard when Branagh's remake arrives this November.

GavinWood

From my Suite at the Ramada Plaza Complex on Santa Monica Blvd

Uber cashed up

■ Uber has spent billions to upend the transportation industry. Now, at least for the moment, it is burning slightly less cash in that effort. The company lost $708 million over the first three months of the year on revenue of $3.4 billion, not counting expenses like employee stock compensation. That is a narrowing of the previous quarter's loss of $991 million, on revenue of $2.9 billion. Uber said it was still sitting on $7.2 billion in cash, roughly the same amount it held at the end of 2016.

■ In a strange bit of irony, just as the Trump administration has pushed George Orwell's dystopian novel 1984 to No. 1 on the Amazon charts, the star of the film adaptation, John Hurt, has passed away after a fight with pancreatic cancer. He was 77. Born in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, UK, Hurt was the son of an actress and a vicar, and, after training at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), made his film debut in 1966's A Man for All Seasons. With his pained British voice and poignant stare, the actor would make an indelible impact on cinema, earning his first Academy Award nomination as Max, a heroin addict trapped in a Turkish prison, in Midnight Express, before performing one of film's most memorable death scenes in Ridley Scott's Alien. His next two films, as the severely deformed and chastised John Merrick in The Elephant Man (Oscar-nominated for Best Actor) and Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate, cemented his status as one of the greats, and marks a stellar four-film run.

Tobey’s $3.4m buy ■ Actor Tobey Maguire has used his prodigious real estate powers to snare a cool West Hollywood, Californoa, contemporary for $3.4 million. Maguire bought the 3258-square-foot house designed and sold by Clive Wilkinson, the architect who designed the interior of a Google building in Silicon Valley. T his was Wilkinson's personal residence and the only singlefamily home he has designed. Built in 2007, the three-bedroom, four-bath house sits on a lot that's a little over 7,000 square feet. Maguire, 41, starred in Spiderman,Cider House Rules, Seabiscuit, and The Great Gatsby. When he's not making movies or real estate deals, Maguire is all-in as a tournament poker player.

Drug co. uses muscle

■ A company that manages prescription drug plans for tens of millions of Americans has sued a tiny drug maker that makes an emergency treatment for heroin and painkiller overdoses, increasing the tension between the companies that make drugs and those that decide whether they should be covered. Express Scripts, the nation's largest pharmacy benefits manager, is suing Kaléo, the manufacturer of Evzio, the injectable overdose treatment whose price quintupled last year, drawing widespread outrage and inquiries from members of Congress. Express Scripts claims it is owed more than $14.5 million in fees and rebates related to Evzio, and it has dropped the drug from its preferred list.

My special deal for you

Joining the band

■ Deacon Frey, the son of the Eagles' singer Glenn Frey, who died in 2016 and country stalwart Vince Gill will join the Eagles for their upcoming shows at Classic West and Classic East here in the States. The two new additions to the band will split vocal duty on the many classic songs that featured lead vocals from Glenn Frey, including Peaceful Easy Feeling, Already Gone and Lyin' Eyes.

■ Twenty years after ending its nine-season run on ABC, Roseanne is reportedly coming back to TV. The move follows similar revivals by shows like Gilmore Girls, Will & Grace and The X-Files. All major members of the fictional blue-collar Conner family are expected to reappear on the rebooted eight-episode limited series, including Roseanne Barr, Sara Gilbert, Laurie Metcalf and John Goodman as patriarch Dan Conner, despite the fact it was revealed in the 1997 series finale that his character had died after having a heart attack a year earlier. In 2009, Barr wrote on her website that if she were to bring the show back, she would bring Goodman back by saying that Dan had faked his own death.

John Hurt dead at 77

Is this the end?

■ Between 20 per cent and 25 per cent of the nation's shopping malls will close in the next five years, according to a new report from Credit Suisse that predicts e-commerce will continue to pull shoppers away from bricks-and-mortar retailers. For many, the Wall Street firm's finding may come as no surprise. Long-standing retailers are dying off as shoppers' habits shift online. Credit Suisse expects apparel sales to represent 35 per cent of all e-commerce by 2030, up from 17 per cent today. Traditional mall anchors, such as Macy's, J.C. Penney and Sears, have announced numerous store closings in recent months. Clothiers including American Apparel, Bebe and BCBG Max Azria have filed for bankruptcy. The report estimates that around 8640 stores will close by the end of the year.

Roseanne returns

● Johnny Depp

www.gavinwood.us

■ If you are considering a move to Los Angeles or just coming over for a holiday then I have got a special deal for you. We would love to see you at the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites, 8585 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Hollywood. I have secured a terrific holiday deal for readers of the Melbourne Observer. Please mention 'Melbourne Observer' when you book and you will receive the 'Special Rate of the Day'. Please contact Joanna at info@ramadaweho.com Happy Holidays, Gavin Wood


www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 13

Melbourne

Confidential Talk is cheap, gossip is priceless

Arts Extra NGV Australia

■ Experience the artwork of Victoria’s emerging VCE students with a curatorial tour of Top Arts 2017. With special insights into the creative process the tour offers a behindthe-scenes look at folios and visual diaries of the exhibiting artists. Saturday July 1, 11am – 12.30pm NGVAustralia, fees apply, booking required. Coinciding with Patrick Pound, The Great Exhibition, hear a panel discussion about why humans find the need to collect. Join artist Patrick Pound and experts Rebecca Carland, Curator of History of Collections Museum Victoria and John Stevens, Librarian, Collection Development and Discovery, State Library Victoria, as they review personal collections and institution repositories to discover what collecting tells us about ourselves, our past and our future. Saturday July 1, 2pm. NGVAustralia. Free. As part of Melbourne Rare Book Week discover hidden treasures in the NGV collection as NGV Curators reveal rarely displayed works in an intimate behind the scenes viewing experience. Wednesday July 6. 1pm – 2pm. NGV International Free. Bookings required. As part of the NGV Festival of Photography, hear artists discuss their current NGV exhibitions with the following highlights: Join artist Ross Coulter as he discusses the influences and ideas behind the current exhibition Ross Coulter, Audience, a photographic series documenting audience members in 95 Melbourne galleries and museums in which there is no art, watching a performance that does not exist. Sunday July 9, 11am NGV International. Entry Free See Melbourne artist Zoe Croggon’s newly commissioned work and hear Zoe discuss how she draws on her experiences of studying ballet and dance to craft delicate photographic collages. Sunday July 9 11.30am. NGV International. Free. - Peter Kemp ● From Page 11

Heide Museum By then Tucker and his wife Barbara were settled in a bush-block in rural Hurstbridge on the outskirts of Melbourne. Their passion for the environment and its conservation had also led them to buy a tract of pristine rainforest at Springbrook in the Gold Coast hinterland, a place of natural beauty and significance. They invited Fred and Lyn Williams and their three children to join them there in August 1971, when the family was making a road trip to Brisbane for an exhibition of William's gouaches. Williams created numerous studies during his week at Springbrook and developed several more related pictures back in Melbourne. Encouraged by Tucker, he used these pictures to experiment with fast-drying acrylic paint in conjunction with gouache, his usual medium for outdoor work. It allowed him to trial a heightened palette that would capture the unique character of the area. Tucker was less inclined to work on location but joined Williams to sketch en plein air. He produced his Springbrook paintings later in the studio, evoking the colours and textures and atmosphere of the region with an unusual delicacy. The exhibition is currently running and will close August 27. ■ Art Talk: Girls and the City Renowned poet and emeritus professor Chris Wallace-Crabbe discusses the themes and stories behind Charles Blackman's Schoolgirls. - Peter Kemp

Cunning Little Vixen

Whispers Fathers’ leesons

■ Melbourne author Claire Halliday is releasing her book, Things My Father Taught Me, in time for Father Day. The book features interviews with Danny Katz, Ann Peacock, Anthony Callea, Darryn Lyons, Neil Mitchell, Normie Rowe, Catriona Rowntree, George Calombaris, Jo Stanley, Christian Wagstaff, Rev Tim Costello, Father Bob Maguire and Santo Cilauro.

Oh, Muriel!

■ Melbourne actress Maggie McKenna, 20, will star in the new stage production of Muriel’s Wedding The Musical. Joining the new Muriel on stage is Justine Clarke as the long suffering Betty, with other members of the Heslop clan played by Briallen Clarke (Joanie), Michael Whalley (Perry) and Connor Sweeney (Malcolm). ● Antoinette Halloran (Fox) and Celeste Lazarenko (Vixen). Photo: Charlie Kinross ■ The forest comes alive in returns to the Victorian Opera ment of the forest the Victorian Opera’s new pro- following his acclaimed “Human fashions and acduction of Leo Janácak’sCun- Sondheim trilogy. cessories are repurposed to ning Little Vixen . Maunder reflects: “On the coloured animal characters, This rarely heard opera will surface, Cunning Little Vixen Similarly, manufactured matebe staged for five perfor- is simple enough, a musical bi- rials are reinvented to create mances at Arts Centre ography of a fox based on a the natural world.” Melbourne’s Playhouse from comic strip filled with furry faThe 90-minute opera will be June 22 -July 1. miliars. sung in English and is considA celebration of the beauty “It could be seen as little ered to be a good introduction of nature and cycle of life, more than an opera for chil- to opera for families and firstCunning Little Vixen muses on dren, but it’s impossible to dis- timers, the interaction between human miss. It contains some of the Performance details: June and animal life. most moving music ever writ- 22, 24, 27, 28 at 7.30pm Set in an idyllic forest, the ten, verifying life’s most proVenue: Arts Centre story follows a Vixen’s lyrical found and eternal truths.” Melbourne journey from youth to adultThe production draws upon Bookings:1300 182 183 hood. man-made materials to capture www.victorianopera.com.au Director Stuart Maunder the whimsy and the enchant- Cheryl Threadgold

Merrily We Roll Along ■ Watch This presents Merrily We Roll Along from June 29 – July 15 at Southbank Theatre, The Lawler. With music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by George Furth, the show is directed by Sara Grenfell, with musical direction by Cameron Thomas. Watch This, Australia’s first company dedicated to performing works by legendary composer Sondheim, follows its recent sell-out season of Company with another witty and deeply moving collaboration between Sondheim and Furth. Franklin Shepard has made it to the top: a wealthy LA movie producer, he rubs shoulders with Hollywood’s A-list. But he desperately wishes things had turned out differently. Where did his life veer off course? As it wheels back through the landscape of Franklin’s past, his choices and their consequences, Merrily We Roll Along explores the forces that shape our lives: success and what it costs, friendship and what it can bear, dreams and what they become. Choreography by David Wynen, and the cast is led by Lyall Brooks, Nicole Melloy, Nelson Gardner, Cristina D’Agostinoand SophieWeiss. Dates: Thurs., June 29 – Sat., July 15. 7.30pm Bookings: mtc.com.au Tickets: Adult $49, Conc $39 (Student, Equity, Pension). Gala Opening Night $55 Venue: Southbank Theatre, The Lawler, 140 Southbank Boulevard - Cheryl Threadgold

Rumour Mill

Hear It Here First

Channel 31 axed

■ Community television is set to go off the air at the end of this month. Melbourne’s C31 has issued a statement to say that the government, namely the Department of Communications and Communications Minister Senator Mitch Fifield, has denied the sector, which also includes channels in Adelaide and Perth, any extension beyond the current end of June deadline to go off air. - Televisionau.com

Paid $280,000

■ UBS Securities Australia Limited has paid penalties totalling $280,000 to comply with two infringement notices given to it by the Markets Disciplinary Panel.

Countdown ■ There are only 25 more Melbourne Observers until Christmas.

E-Mail: Confidential@MelbourneObserver.com.au

Theatre Extra Review: Circosis

■ The National Institute of Circus Arts presents a sparkling showcase of final-year students’ work in Circosis, Left Brain, Right Brain, at the NICA National Circus Centre, Prahran, until June 24. The show’s title uses the concept of our brains being divided down the middle into two hemispheres, with each half performing a distinct set of operations. The show’s first half features the ‘cast of left brain’, and the second half , the ‘cast of right brain’. Director Kate Fryer writes in the program: “Circosis blurs the lines between creativity and obsession, institution and freedom of expression.” The result is a terrific, beautifully staged show, featuring entertaining, at times awesome, individual circus acts by highly talented young performers. From the dramatic to comedic, circus performance styles include hoop diving, clowning, aerial straps, aerial ladder, rotating ring, comedy acrobatics, hand balancing, Chinese pole, rope, trapeze and more. Creative, quirky dance movements expressed intermittently by cast wearing plainnecked, pale grey tops and pants, effectively symbolise “institution and freedom of expression”. Social commentary recognised on other issues includes animal cruelty and the environment. The audience is continuously entertained, as cast wearing the grey outfits change props and sets, and present short comedic pieces, even fire-eating, to sustain show momentum during set changes. All performers present skilled, wonderful performances, both as individuals and in teamwork. Standout acts for me on opening night were Nelson Smyles’s hoop-diving act, Ela Bartilomo’s emotive rope act, Ashleigh Roper’s hoop performance with three stunning, magical wardrobe changes, and the fullteam final ensemble performance. At the end of the show, NICA’s Executive Director, Rose Stephens, congratulated the students on their artistic vision, effort and dedication to their work. Bravo indeed! These talented graduates are our circus stars of the future, both at home and abroad. Circosis finishes on June 24 and is well worth seeing. Performance Details: Until June 24 Venue: NICA National Circus Centre, 3959 Green St, Prahran Bookings: www.nica.com.au - Review by Cheryl Threadgold


Page 14 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

■ In recent times, I had the pleasure of recording a radio interview with Lee Majors and then meeting him face-to-face during the Supernova event at the Royal Melbourne Showgrounds. I always thought Lee looked a bit like Elvis Presley and after meeting him face-to-face there is no doubt they are very similar in appearance. Harvey Lee Yeary was born in Michigan in 1939. His parents died when he was young and he was adopted by an aunt and uncle. Harvey graduated from Eastern Kentucky University in 1962. He was a promising footballer but took acting lessons and decided that he wanted to be an actor. He adopted the stage name of Lee Majors and landed his first acting job as Joan Crawford's husband in the film Strait Jacket. In 1965, he was cast as ‘Heath Barkley’ in the television western series The Big Valley. Lee was working with the legendary Hollywood actress Barbara Stanwyck and a great cast which included Linda Evans as his younger sister, and Richard Long and Peter Breck as his brothers. Lee told me he learned a lot from working with his mentor Barbara Stanwyck who advised him to "always be on time and know your lines". During the filming of The Big Valley he took time out to star with Charlton Heston in the film Will Penny. His next major role was as Colonel Steve Austin, an ex-astronaut with bionic implants in The Six Million Dollar Man.

www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Whatever Happened To ... Lee Majors

By Kevin Trask of 3AW and 96.5 Inner FM

This was his biggest success and the series ran from 1973 till 1978. Australia's own Ted Hamilton was a guest star in an episode The Six Million Dollar Man playing the character of ‘Jaffe’. Lee Majors has been married four times and has four children. His second wife was the actress Farrah Fawcett. The song Midnight Train To Georgia was inspired by Lee Majors and Farrah Fawcett. Songwriter Jim Weatherly phoned his friend Lee Majors one day and the call was answered by Farrah. Jim and Farrah chatted briefly and she told him she was going to visit her mother and was taking "the midnight plane to Houston."

couple and they made television history in 1976 - a husband and wife each starring in separate top-rated shows - Lee in The Six Million Dollar Man and Farrah in Charlie's Angels. During their marriage Farrah was known as Farrah Fawcett-Majors. But the long periods of separation during filming took its toll and the couple divorced in 1982. Several years later Lee Majors was cast as ‘Colt Seavers’ in The Fall Guy. His character was a Hollywood stunt man who also worked as a bounty hunter. Lee has been constantly working in films and when I asked him about his longevity he said: "It is a matter of being right place at the right time". Lee came to Melbourne for the Logies in 1975 and recalled enjoying a bottle of tequila on the plane with John Wayne on the flight to Australia. Lee had heart bypass surgery in 2003 and has enjoyed good health in recent years. He is now married to Faith Majors and loves coming to Australia. Lee has just been in New Zealand filming the television series Dead Rising and ● Lee Majors working with Lucy Lawless. - Kevin Trask This became the inspiration for the song. Kevin can be heard on radio Plane was changed to train and Houston beThe Time Tunnel on Remember When came Georgia. Sundays at 9.10pm on 3AW The recording of Midnight Train to Georgia That's Entertainment - 96.5FM by Gladys Knight and The Pips went to numSundays at 12 Noon ber one on the hit parade in 1973. Lee and Farrah were regarded as the perfect 96.5FM is streaming on the internet.

Tourists spend little at Coober Pedy ■ Ross and John, early in our mornings on 3AW, often speak of "the law of unintended consequences". A situation around Coober Pedy exemplifies this. It's an opal field of just out of Lambina, up the road a way, where opal was discovered early on, and about 10 years ago some miners revisited it, and began mining operations, unearthing many beautiful gems. I've seen much of this opal, cut and polished and sold it. I am not sure what the precise details are, but there is some actual aboriginal control over the land, and the residents of the area do benefit from the mining operations. They fossick around, seeking smaller pieces of opals which the miners miss in their quest for larger pieces, and this seems to be their main source of income. Recently, however, they wanted a bit more, so demanded $50 for every new claim. with Nick Le Souef OK, said the miners, then shortly thereafter this increased to $200 a Lightning Ridge Opals claim. Again, OK. 63 Elizabeth Street, Shortly thereafter, $1000. Thanks Melbourne but no thanks, said the miners, and Phone 9654 4444 left, back to Coober Pedy. So no more www.opals.net.au profitable opal scavenging for these local inhabitants. A permanent biting of the hand that Coober Pedy, which I have always fed them. considered to be the beginning of the Outback, I saw one kangaroo, one ■ Overseas visitors, when travelling emu, and four wedgies. our Outback highways and byways, Hardly swarms of Aussie wildlife. often complain that they never see any local wildlife hopping or scuttling or ■ And another surprise or two. slithering about. Every trip north or south from "Australia is the land of kangaroos Coober Pedy I've always needed a - we hear that they're hopping down few extra spiders, or their ilk, for the the main streets, but we haven't even displays in my Melbourne shop. seen one yet." Just south of Port Augusta or there "Wait till you get up into the is a stand of large gum trees, issuing Outback," I would always reply. But forth from an underground river bed. even then I have always had my The surrounds are basically salt doubts. bush plains, but the gums just sprout There have been times when I've out of nowhere, nourished by the river seen roos in plague proportions. One slowly flowing beneath. night when driving from Walgett to There are many different species Lightning Ridge, a mere 47 miles, I of huntsman spider in Australia, couldn't get out of second gear for the mostly relatively harmless, but a few myriads of them hopping all over the not, and always in the past I have disroad. covered the largest I've ever encounAnd I have often seen flocks of tered beneath the bark of these trees emus loping across the gibber plains huge striped grey and black monsters. beside the car. So, this time, I needed a few more. And often swarms of less exciting, Every past foray has netted me about smaller creatures, such as locusts, half a dozen of these creatures. This frogs and moths and dragon flies. time, for the first time ever, not a sniff. This trip, between PortAugusta and Then, a few kilometres further on,

The Outback Legend

There are always a few joeys hang- game." ing in Josephine's hand-made Apparently, she told me, in past pouches. One I gave a bit of a nurse to centuries they were employed to fly was in his pouch for 22 hours a day. messages to the front in times of war, And there are heaps of pigeons so were regarded and classified as winging around causing some havoc "beasts of burden" by our bureaucratic and annoyance. forebears, and no-one has since "Can't you shoot them?" I enquired thought to revoke the edict. of Josephine. "They're not endangered Very helpful to those who regard ■ Tourism is a changeable beast, and or anything, and they're not an indig- them as "winged rats". enous species, so they should be fair - Nick Le Souef can give a deceptive appearance. For instance, upon my latest travels north along the Stuart Highway to Coober Pedy, the road was festooned with grey nomads in their lumbering Patrols and Land Cruisers, lugging their large vans along behind them. ■ The sale of Swisse Vitamins to Chinese interests has seen cancellation And of course the streets of Coober of a swag of celebrity endorsements on TV. High profile sportspeople to Pedy are full of such combinations. stage and screen personalities have been scratched in an economy drive It looks as though tourism in the imposed by new owners. town is booming. Wrong. Although a Land Cruiser may be tens of thousands of dollars in value, as are the huge vans which scurry ■ Melbourne producion company JAM TV is responsible for post producalong behind, it's the grey nomads tion of A Moveable Feast that recently made its debut on Seven, guiding them that's the problem. The food and travel show features radio duo Kate and Ross Stevenson They all like to save money on (no relation). First episode pulled in 147,000 Melbourne viewers. JAM TV motel stops, but on everything else as is yet another company within the Eddie McGuire empire well. They stock up on vittles at supermarkets along the way, and their drinking is restricted to happy hours in the ■ It was panic stations when Hamish Blake interviewed TV panelist and caravan parks along the way. QANTAS director Todd Sampson on his radio show. Sampson was exWhich means that in every town plaining a recent incident on a plane , and without warning he dropped the tourist town, Coober Pedy included, magic word , Hamish went into a panic as there was no beep control on the they spend a pittance, generally just program syndicated to 43 stations . Conversation ended ubuptly , don't exon petrol. pect Todd to become a regular on radio. And rarely buy opals, being very happy to leave this activity generally to the overseas tourists with far deeper ■ Ten was looking to again program another series of Shark Tank, this pockets. time with a new host, Sarah Harris. Since inception the panel has invested And this breed is becoming a rarity $9 million of their own funds towards various ventures pitched to the panel. in Coober Pedy these days, so poor Many have been successful, some have bombed, all have gained sound old Coober isn't being knocked off its business advice. tourism feet right now.

is a rocky gorge with flat rocks under which centipedes and scorpions reside. Plenty of the former, perfect for my purposes. But, like the huntsmen, nary a scorpion - again the first time ever. I don't appreciate a shortage of scorpions and spiders.

OK. With John O’Keefe No go after sale to Chinese

Eddie Everywhere

Magic word dropped

Shark bites

■ And one of my friends who I always make a point of visiting is Josephine, the kangaroo carer. She's always rescuing animals in peril, particularly joeys whose mothers have been skittled on the road, or have been claimed by a local roo shooter. So I drop in to see her, and give some of her charges a friendly pat on the head. Because they have been brought in as joeys, they regard Josephine and her friends as their family. They are sometimes released, but never into the wild - this would be instant peril - but into wildlife parks where they can impress visitors as to how tame and friendly they are.

Rotten smiles

■ Legendary wild man of rock Johnny Rotten has become brand ambassador for a new dental hygiene company in Munich. Product is called Happy Teeth and Johnny has had his craggy, old teeth replaced with a set of pearly white chompers. Johnny discusses his new teeth in a TV commercial set for release in the UK.

Secrets of TV, radio

■ It's hard to keep a secret in Melbourne. Rumour File on 3AW usually busts secrets wide open , like , who will headline the AFL Grand Final. Usually the rumours swirl around for months. A Rumour File correspondent correctly nominated the Killers way back late Ma , months before the official announcement date. The Rumour File is a 'must hear' for TV news chiefs to learn what's happened overnight and despatch a film crew to make it for evening news. - John O’Keefe


Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 15

Observer Classic Books

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn “Oh, yes’m, I did. Sarah Mary Williams. Sarah’s my first name. Some calls me Sarah, some calls me Mary.” “Oh, that’s the way of it?” “Yes’m.” I was feeling better then, but I wished I was out of there, anyway. I couldn’t look up yet. Well, the woman fell to talking about how hard times was, and how poor they had to live, and how the rats was as free as if they owned the place, and so forth and so on, and then I got easy again. She was right about the rats. You’d see one stick his nose out of a hole in the corner every little while. She said she had to have things handy to throw at them when she was alone, or they wouldn’t give her no peace. She showed me a bar of lead twisted up into a knot, and said she was a good shot with it generly, but she’d wrenched her arm a day or two ago, and didn’t know whether she could throw true now. But she watched for a chance, and directly banged away at a rat; but she missed him wide, and said “Ouch!” it hurt her arm so. Then she told me to try for the next one. I wanted to be getting away before the old man got back, but of course I didn’t let on. I got the thing, and the first rat that showed his nose I let drive, and if he’d a stayed where he was he’d a been a tolerable sick rat. She said that was first-rate, and she reckoned I would hive the next one. She went and got the lump of lead and fetched it back, and brought along a hank of yarn which she wanted me to help her with. I held up my two hands and she put the hank over them, and went on talking about her and her husband’s matters. But she broke off to say: “Keep your eye on the rats. You better have the lead in your lap, handy.” So she dropped the lump into my lap just at that moment, and I clapped my legs together on it and she went on talking. But only about a minute. Then she took off the hank and looked me straight in the face, and very pleasant, and says: “Come, now, what’s your real name?” “Wh — what, mum?” “What’s your real name? Is it Bill, or Tom, or Bob? — or what is it?” I reckon I shook like a leaf, and I didn’t know hardly what to do. But I says: “Please to don’t poke fun at a poor girl like me, mum. If I’m in the way here, I’ll —” “No, you won’t. Set down and stay where you are. I ain’t going to hurt you, and I ain’t going to tell on you, nuther. You just tell me your secret, and trust me. I’ll keep it; and, what’s more, I’ll help you. So’ll my old man if you want him to. You see, you’re a runaway ’prentice, that’s all. It ain’t anything. There ain’t no harm in it. You’ve been treated bad, and you made up your mind to cut. Bless you, child, I wouldn’t tell on you. Tell me all about it now, that’s a good boy.” So I said it wouldn’t be no use to try to play it any longer, and I would just make a clean breast and tell her everything, but she musn’t go back on her promise. Then I told her my father and mother was dead, and the law had bound me out to a mean old farmer in the country thirty mile back from the river, and he treated me so bad I couldn’t stand it no longer; he went away to be gone a couple of days, and so I took my chance and stole some of his daughter’s old clothes and cleared out, and I had been three nights coming the thirty miles. I traveled nights, and hid daytimes and slept, and the bag of bread and meat I carried from home lasted me all the way, and I had a-plenty. I said I believed my uncle Abner Moore would take care of me, and so that was why I struck out for this town of Goshen. “Goshen, child? This ain’t Goshen. This is St. Petersburg. Goshen’s ten mile further up the river. Who told you this was Goshen?” “Why, a man I met at daybreak this morning, just as I was going to turn into the woods for my regular sleep. He told me when the roads forked I must take the right hand, and five mile would fetch me to Goshen.” “He was drunk, I reckon. He told you just exactly wrong.” “Well, he did act like he was drunk, but it ain’t no matter now. I got to be moving along. I’ll fetch Goshen before daylight.” “Hold on a minute. I’ll put you up a snack to eat. You might want it.”

Mark Twain So she put me up a snack, and says: “Say, when a cow’s laying down, which end of her gets up first? Answer up prompt now — don’t stop to study over it. Which end gets up first?” “The hind end, mum.” “Well, then, a horse?” “The for’rard end, mum.” “Which side of a tree does the moss grow on?” “North side.” “If fifteen cows is browsing on a hillside, how many of them eats with their heads pointed the same direction?” “The whole fifteen, mum.” “Well, I reckon you HAVE lived in the country. I thought maybe you was trying to hocus me again. What’s your real name, now?” “George Peters, mum.” “Well, try to remember it, George. Don’t forget and tell me it’s Elexander before you go, and then get out by saying it’s George Elexander when I catch you. And don’t go about women in that old calico. You do a girl tolerable poor, but you might fool men, maybe. Bless you, child, when you set out to thread a needle don’t hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that’s the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t’other way. And when you throw at a rat or anything, hitch yourself up a tiptoe and fetch your hand up over your head as awkward as you can, and miss your rat about six or seven foot. Throw stiff-armed from the shoulder, like there was a pivot there for it to turn on, like a girl; not from the wrist and elbow, with your arm out to one side, like a boy. And, mind you, when a girl tries to catch anything in her lap she throws her knees apart; she don’t clap them together, the way you did when you catched

the lump of lead. Why, I spotted you for a boy when you was threading the needle; and I contrived the other things just to make certain. Now trot along to your uncle, Sarah Mary Williams George Elexander Peters, and if you get into trouble you send word to Mrs. Judith Loftus, which is me, and I’ll do what I can to get you out of it. Keep the river road all the way, and next time you tramp take shoes and socks with you. The river road’s a rocky one, and your feet’ll be in a condition when you get to Goshen, I reckon.” I went up the bank about fifty yards, and then I doubled on my tracks and slipped back to where my canoe was, a good piece below the house. I jumped in, and was off in a hurry. I went upstream far enough to make the head of the island, and then started across. I took off the sunbonnet, for I didn’t want no blinders on then. When I was about the middle I heard the clock begin to strike, so I stops and listens; the sound come faint over the water but clear — eleven. When I struck the head of the island I never waited to blow, though I was most winded, but I shoved right into the timber where my old camp used to be, and started a good fire there on a high and dry spot. Then I jumped in the canoe and dug out for our place, a mile and a half below, as hard as I could go. I landed, and slopped through the timber and up the ridge and into the cavern. There Jim laid, sound asleep on the ground. I roused him out and says: “Git up and hump yourself, Jim! There ain’t a minute to lose. They’re after us!” Jim never asked no questions, he never said a word; but the way he worked for the next half an hour showed about how he was scared. By that time everything we had in the world was on our raft, and she was ready to be shoved out from

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the willow cove where she was hid. We put out the camp fire at the cavern the first thing, and didn’t show a candle outside after that. I took the canoe out from the shore a little piece, and took a look; but if there was a boat around I couldn’t see it, for stars and shadows ain’t good to see by. Then we got out the raft and slipped along down in the shade, past the foot of the island dead still — never saying a word. Chapter XII. IT must a been close on to one o’clock when we got below the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty slow. If a boat was to come along we was going to take to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was well a boat didn’t come, for we hadn’t ever thought to put the gun in the canoe, or a fishing-line, or anything to eat. We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many things. It warn’t good judgment to put EVERYTHING on the raft. If the men went to the island I just expect they found the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my building the fire never fooled them it warn’t no fault of mine. I played it as low down on them as I could. When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a towhead in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sandbar that has cottonwoods on it as thick as harrow-teeth. We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn’t afraid of anybody running across us. We laid there all day, and watched the rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn’t set down and watch a camp fire — no, sir, she’d fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn’t she tell her husband to fetch a dog? Jim said he bet she did think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he believed they must a gone up-town to get a dog and so they lost all that time, or else we wouldn’t be here on a towhead sixteen or seventeen mile below the village — no, indeedy, we would be in that same old town again. So I said I didn’t care what was the reason they didn’t get us as long as they didn’t. When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot or more above the level of the raft, so now the blankets and all the traps was out of reach of steamboat waves. Right in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would keep it from being seen. We made an extra steering-oar, too, because one of the others might get broke on a snag or something. We fixed up a short forked stick to hang the old lantern on, because we must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat coming down-stream, to keep from getting run over; but we wouldn’t have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see we was in what they call a “crossing”; for the river was pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under water; so up-bound boats didn’t always run the channel, but hunted easy water. This second night we run between seven and eight hours, with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We catched fish and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn’t ever feel like talking loud, and it warn’t often that we laughed — only a little kind of a low chuckle. We had mighty good weather as a general thing, and nothing

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Observer Classic Books From Page 15 ever happened to us at all — that night, nor the next, nor the next. Every night we passed towns, some of them away up on black hillsides, nothing but just a shiny bed of lights; not a house could you see. The fifth night we passed St. Louis, and it was like the whole world lit up. In St. Petersburg they used to say there was twenty or thirty thousand people in St. Louis, but I never believed it till I see that wonderful spread of lights at two o’clock that still night. There warn’t a sound there; everybody was asleep. Every night now I used to slip ashore towards ten o’clock at some little village, and buy ten or fifteen cents’ worth of meal or bacon or other stuff to eat; and sometimes I lifted a chicken that warn’t roosting comfortable, and took him along. Pap always said, take a chicken when you get a chance, because if you don’t want him yourself you can easy find somebody that does, and a good deed ain’t ever forgot. I never see pap when he didn’t want the chicken himself, but that is what he used to say, anyway. Mornings before daylight I slipped into cornfields and borrowed a watermelon, or a mushmelon, or a punkin, or some new corn, or things of that kind. Pap always said it warn’t no harm to borrow things if you was meaning to pay them back some time; but the widow said it warn’t anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it. Jim said he reckoned the widow was partly right and pap was partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two or three things from the list and say we wouldn’t borrow them any more — then he reckoned it wouldn’t be no harm to borrow the others. So we talked it over all one night, drifting along down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons, or what. But towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory, and concluded to drop crabapples and p’simmons. We warn’t feeling just right before that, but it was all comfortable now. I was glad the way it come out, too, because crabapples ain’t ever good, and the p’simmons wouldn’t be ripe for two or three months yet. We shot a water-fowl now and then that got up too early in the morning or didn’t go to bed early enough in the evening. Take it all round, we lived pretty high. The fifth night below St. Louis we had a big storm after midnight, with a power of thunder and lightning, and the rain poured down in a solid sheet. We stayed in the wigwam and let the raft take care of itself. When the lightning glared out we could see a big straight river ahead, and high, rocky bluffs on both sides. By and by says I, “Hel-LO, Jim, looky yonder!” It was a steamboat that had killed herself on a rock. We was drifting straight down for her. The lightning showed her very distinct. She was leaning over, with part of her upper deck above water, and you could see every little chimbly-guy clean and clear, and a chair by the big bell, with an old slouch hat hanging on the back of it, when the flashes come. Well, it being away in the night and stormy, and all so mysterious-like, I felt just the way any other boy would a felt when I see that wreck laying there so mournful and lonesome in themiddle of the river. I wanted to get aboard of her and slink around a little, and see what there was there. So I says: “Le’s land on her, Jim.” But Jim was dead against it at first. He says: “I doan’ want to go fool’n ’long er no wrack. We’s doin’ blame’ well, en we better let blame’ well alone, as de good book says. Like as not dey’s a watchman on dat wrack.” “Watchman your grandmother,” I says; “there ain’t nothing to watch but the texas and the pilothouse; and do you reckon anybody’s going to resk his life for a texas and a pilot-house such a night as this, when it’s likely to break up and wash off down the river any minute?” Jim couldn’t say nothing to that, so he didn’t try. “And besides,” I says, “we might borrow something worth having out of the captain’s stateroom. Seegars, I bet you — and cost five cents apiece, solid cash. Steamboat captains is always rich, and get sixty dollars a month, and THEY don’t care a cent what a thing costs, you know, long as they want it. Stick a candle in your pocket; I can’t rest, Jim, till we give her a rummaging. Do you reckon Tom Sawyer would ever go by this thing? Not for pie, he wouldn’t. He’d call it an adventure — that’s what he’d call it; and he’d land on that wreck if it was his last act. And

wouldn’t he throw style into it? — wouldn’t he spread himself, nor nothing? Why, you’d think it was Christopher C’lumbus discovering Kingdom-Come. I wish Tom Sawyer WAS here.” Jim he grumbled a little, but give in. He said we mustn’t talk any more than we could help, and then talk mighty low. The lightning showed us the wreck again just in time, and we fetched the stabboard derrick, and made fast there. The deck was high out here. We went sneaking down the slope of it to labboard, in the dark, towards the texas, feeling our way slow with our feet, and spreading our hands out to fend off the guys, for it was so dark we couldn’t see no sign of them. Pretty soon we struck the forward end of the skylight, and clumb on to it; and the next step fetched us in front of the captain’s door, which was open, and by Jimminy, away down through the texas-hall we see a light! and all in the same second we seem to hear low voices in yonder! Jim whispered and said he was feeling powerful sick, and told me to come along. I says, all right, and was going to start for the raft; but just then I heard a voice wail out and say: “Oh, please don’t, boys; I swear I won’t ever tell!” Another voice said, pretty loud: “It’s a lie, Jim Turner. You’ve acted this way before. You always want more’n your share of the truck, and you’ve always got it, too, because you’ve swore ’t if you didn’t you’d tell. But this time you’ve said it jest one time too many. You’re the meanest, treacherousest hound in this country.” By this time Jim was gone for the raft. I was just a-biling with curiosity; and I says to myself, Tom Sawyer wouldn’t back out now, and so I won’t either; I’m a-going to see what’s going on here. So I dropped on my hands and knees in the little passage, and crept aft in the dark till there warn’t but one stateroom betwixt me and the cross-hall of the texas. Then in there I see a man stretched on the floor and tied hand and foot, and two men standing over him, and one of them had a dim lantern in his hand, and the other one had a pistol. This one kept pointing the pistol at the man’s head on the floor, and saying: “I’d LIKE to! And I orter, too — a mean skunk!” The man on the floor would shrivel up and say, “Oh, please don’t, Bill; I hain’t ever goin’ to tell.” And every time he said that the man with the lantern would laugh and say: “’Deed you AIN’T! You never said no truer thing ’n that, you bet you.” And once he said: “Hear him beg! and yit if we hadn’t got the best of him and tied him he’d a killed us both. And what FOR? Jist for noth’n. Jist because we stood on our RIGHTS— that’s what for. But I lay you ain’t a-goin’ to threaten nobody any more, Jim Turner. Put UP that pistol, Bill.” Bill says: “I don’t want to, Jake Packard. I’m for killin’ him — and didn’t he kill old Hatfield jist the same way — and don’t he deserve it?” “But I don’t WANT him killed, and I’ve got my reasons for it.” “Bless yo’ heart for them words, Jake Packard! I’ll never forgit you long’s I live!” says the man on the floor, sort of blubbering. Packard didn’t take no notice of that, but hung up his lantern on a nail and started towards where I was there in the dark, and motioned Bill to come. I crawfished as fast as I could about two yards, but the boat slanted so that I couldn’t make very good time; so to keep from getting run over and catched I crawled into a stateroom on the upper side. The man came a-pawing along in the dark, and when Packard got to my stateroom, he says: “Here — come in here.” And in he come, and Bill after him. But before they got in I was up in the upper berth, cornered, and sorry I come. Then they stood there, with their hands on the ledge of the berth, and talked. I couldn’t see them, but I could tell where they was by the whisky they’d been having. I was glad I didn’t drink whisky; but it wouldn’t made much difference anyway, because most of the time they couldn’t a treed me because I didn’t breathe. I was too scared. And, besides, a body COULDN’T breathe and hear such talk. They talked low and earnest. Bill wanted to kill Turner. He says: “He’s said he’ll tell, and he will. If we was to give both our shares to him NOW it wouldn’t make no difference after the row and the way we’ve served him. Shore’s you’re born, he’ll turn State’s evidence; now you hear ME. I’m

for putting him out of his troubles.” “So’m I,” says Packard, very quiet. “Blame it, I’d sorter begun to think you wasn’t. Well, then, that’s all right. Le’s go and do it.” “Hold on a minute; I hain’t had my say yit. You listen to me. Shooting’s good, but there’s quieter ways if the thing’s GOT to be done. But what I say is this: it ain’t good sense to go court’n around after a halter if you can git at what you’re up to in some way that’s jist as good and at the same time don’t bring you into no resks. Ain’t that so?” “You bet it is. But how you goin’ to manage it this time?” “Well, my idea is this: we’ll rustle around and gather up whatever pickins we’ve overlooked in the staterooms, and shove for shore and hide the truck. Then we’ll wait. Now I say it ain’t agoin’ to be more’n two hours befo’ this wrack breaks up and washes off down the river. See? He’ll be drownded, and won’t have nobody to blame for it but his own self. I reckon that’s a considerble sight better ’n killin’ of him. I’m unfavorable to killin’ a man as long as you can git aroun’ it; it ain’t good sense, it ain’t good morals. Ain’t I right?” “Yes, I reck’n you are. But s’pose she DON’T break up and wash off?” “Well, we can wait the two hours anyway and see, can’t we?” “All right, then; come along.” So they started, and I lit out, all in a cold sweat, and scrambled forward. It was dark as pitch there; but I said, in a kind of a coarse whisper, “Jim!” and he answered up, right at my elbow, with a sort of a moan, and I says: “Quick, Jim, it ain’t no time for fooling around and moaning; there’s a gang of murderers in yonder, and if we don’t hunt up their boat and set her drifting down the river so these fellows can’t get away from the wreck there’s one of ’em going to be in a bad fix. But if we find their boat we can put ALL of ’em in a bad fix — for the sheriff ’ll get ’em. Quick — hurry! I’ll hunt the labboard side, you hunt the stabboard. You start at the raft, and —” “Oh, my lordy, lordy! RAF’? Dey ain’ no raf’ no mo’; she done broke loose en gone I— en here we is!” Chapter XIII. WELL, I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut up on a wreck with such a gang as that! But it warn’t no time to be sentimentering. We’d GOT to find that boat now — had to have it for ourselves. So we went a-quaking and shaking down the stabboard side, and slow work it was, too — seemed a week before we got to the stern. No sign of a boat. Jim said he didn’t believe he could go any further — so scared he hadn’t hardly any strength left, he said. But I said, come on, if we get left on this wreck we are in a fix, sure. So on we prowled again. We struck for the stern of the texas, and found it, and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight, hanging on from shutter to shutter, for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got pretty close to the cross-hall door there was the skiff, sure enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thankful. In another second I would a been aboard of her, but just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head out only about a couple of foot from me, and I thought I was gone; but he jerked it in again, and says: “Heave that blame lantern out o’ sight, Bill!” He flung a bag of something into the boat, and then got in himself and set down. It was Packard. Then Bill HE come out and got in. Packard says, in a low voice: “All ready — shove off!” I couldn’t hardly hang on to the shutters, I was so weak. But Bill says: “Hold on —’d you go through him?” “No. Didn’t you?” “No. So he’s got his share o’ the cash yet.” “Well, then, come along; no use to take truck and leave money.” “Say, won’t he suspicion what we’re up to?” “Maybe he won’t. But we got to have it anyway. Come along.” So they got out and went in. The door slammed to because it was on the careened side; and in a half second I was in the boat, and Jim come tumbling after me. I out with my knife and cut the rope, and away we went! We didn’t touch an oar, and we didn’t speak nor whisper, nor hardly even breathe. We went gliding swift along, dead silent, past the tip of the paddle-box, and past the stern; then in a second or two more we was a hundred yards below the

wreck, and the darkness soaked her up, every last sign of her, and we was safe, and knowed it. When we was three or four hundred yards downstream we see the lantern show like a little spark at the texas door for a second, and we knowed by that that the rascals had missed their boat, and was beginning to understand that they was in just as much trouble now as Jim Turner was. Then Jim manned the oars, and we took out after our raft. Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men — I reckon I hadn’t had time to before. I begun to think how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain’t no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet, and then how would I like it? So says I to Jim: “The first light we see we’ll land a hundred yards below it or above it, in a place where it’s a good hiding-place for you and the skiff, and then I’ll go and fix up some kind of a yarn, and get somebody to go for that gang and get them out of their scrape, so they can be hung when their time comes.” But that idea was a failure; for pretty soon it begun to storm again, and this time worse than ever. The rain poured down, and never a light showed; everybody in bed, I reckon. We boomed along down the river, watching for lights and watching for our raft. After a long time the rain let up, but the clouds stayed, and the lightning kept whimpering, and by and by a flash showed us a black thing ahead, floating, and we made for it. It was the raft, and mighty glad was we to get aboard of it again. We seen a light now away down to the right, on shore. So I said I would go for it. The skiff was half full of plunder which that gang had stole there on the wreck. We hustled it on to the raft in a pile, and I told Jim to float along down, and show a light when he judged he had gone about two mile, and keep it burning till I come; then I manned my oars and shoved for the light. As I got down towards it three or four more showed — up on a hillside. It was a village. I closed in above the shore light, and laid on my oars and floated. As I went by I see it was a lantern hanging on the jackstaff of a double-hull ferryboat. I skimmed around for the watchman, a-wondering whereabouts he slept; and by and by I found him roosting on the bitts forward, with his head down between his knees. I gave his shoulder two or three little shoves, and begun to cry. He stirred up in a kind of a startlish way; but when he see it was only me he took a good gap and stretch, and then he says: “Hello, what’s up? Don’t cry, bub. What’s the trouble?” I says: “Pap, and mam, and sis, and —” Then I broke down. He says: “Oh, dang it now, DON’T take on so; we all has to have our troubles, and this ’n ’ll come out all right. What’s the matter with ’em?” “They’re — they’re — are you the watchman of the boat?” “Yes,” he says, kind of pretty-well-satisfied like. “I’m the captain and the owner and the mate and the pilot and watchman and head deck-hand; and sometimes I’m the freight and passengers. I ain’t as rich as old Jim Hornback, and I can’t be so blame’ generous and good to Tom, Dick, and Harry as what he is, and slam around money the way he does; but I’ve told him a many a time ’t I wouldn’t trade places with him; for, says I, a sailor’s life’s the life for me, and I’m derned if I’D live two mile out o’ town, where there ain’t nothing ever goin’ on, not for all his spondulicks and as much more on top of it. Says I—” I broke in and says: “They’re in an awful peck of trouble, and —” “WHO is?” “Why, pap and mam and sis and Miss Hooker; and if you’d take your ferryboat and go up there —” “Up where? Where are they?” “On the wreck.” “What wreck?” “Why, there ain’t but one.” “What, you don’t mean the Walter Scott?” “Yes.” “Good land! what are they doin’ THERE, for gracious sakes?” “Well, they didn’t go there a-purpose.” “I bet they didn’t! Why, great goodness, there ain’t no chance for ’em if they don’t git off mighty quick! Why, how in the nation did they ever git into such a scrape?”

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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 17

Observer Crossword Solution No 32 S S P O T V O I N B R O A T O I O W N A T C T H F F U L B L L Y O O B M E L D O N A G W C I N D M E I D S N I O M O E R E S I G H S T Y

M A R H Y I D T E E M P I S S I N E G F L R O R S E N O C R E D E S R E C D O M R E D V I E S T O L U C E H I N E S T T E M P Y E R

A N A G E O R E A D A C H V M I L R N E T U L A Y T E D O E M I S U M E N N R N I C S O L C A A V E N D W N E S C U E D E S P H A I R S L I M E A N T B D E L E A V E T M C M A D O R E C P E L O U S L M S C A P I N N A C M S H E A H O E T A S B E R U E S S R M I S R A I N R E P G S R E S S U E E E S I S T

R I D H E N I T I O F P Y T S A K E N T E R A Y R L I

A L L A M I A S F R A U G E A L S E E P I E A M P U T Y L

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C A L L I E A L W E L A N C W A T A N R R A B M I D S Y S T E S I S P R E A A S C A T A E E N M I R A Y E G U N D E R P E A P F A M I S T S E P S T R O N O L A N T A L L R I L Y C A O D O S B N E A S Y C S T L R E B U H O D C A M E I A S T I C K Y A M F R A A B O O X R O A I L A N G E C E S S U A U B G S E A L

S I N I O L G E H O L I R M A R E A T S R E S P A D Y U E D I N G E T R R H U N G E S E A P A S S I U E D N S I D T E O M E R W M I S I N T E U N W U R P S O H A I R S T I L T A V R O N U B S O U T T L I L A E A G L S T M T E X A S I T A T D C E M A A N E

R E G U L A E A L A D E C L C G I T E E N A G S T A B R O N T R A Y S O B L R S O L O I S O C U N C L E A L R A C L E X E M E E K R N E D U E P I N D O N E E N E S T R E E R T S O R E A R O M A G P T I E I A R R A N T I G R D E A L E B Y L A R V E L A L C A A I L A R I M M A D N E S T O M O U R N E N E X E E Y E P D A F T E S S D I N H E R I E M T S A B D I T K O A S S I G N

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C V A R A I F N E E P I T N O E S E S A S T I A F I R I A C C A H I V E V I E L L D I T L E R A P T L E A T A I T E U D E E N W R L A P

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Page 18 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

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MARINERS COVE MOTEL & APARTMENTS


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Page 32 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Theatre Extra The Haunting

● Cameron Daddo (Lord Grey) and Gig Clarke (David Filde) in The Haunting. Photo: Nicole Riseley. ■ For a fan of Charles Dickens’ Ghost stories, The Haunting could have been a memorable night out. Hugh Janes’s adaptation, directed by Jennifer Sarah Dean, wove five of them, along with elements of Dickens’s life into a narrative inspired by Janes’s own family story. In any ghost story, there is a level of investment the audience must make and for those of us only familiar with Dickens’s main works, this exposition heavy play took its toll on our patience. It began with much promise; an unexpected deafening screech of an owl (or was it a branch on the glass?) cut across our pre show chatter and set the audience immediately into the mood. But, the sound throughout the play, brilliant as it was, was not enough to keep me in the moment. The challenges of candle and lamp light moving around the set meant that the many miscues made it much harder for us to suspend our disbelief – something so crucial in this particular genre. The costume design was a highlight for me, and I kept wishing the apparitions would be visible for longer so I could get a better look at the fabulous designs of Rhiannon Irving. John Kerr’s set, props and illusion design were also impressive and he should be commended for his work. It has been many years since I have seen Cameron Daddo on stage and it was great to see those twinkling eyes again. Stylistically, however, his performance was very different to that of Gig Clarke’s. Where Clarke seem utterly in the moment, completely focused on the world of the play, Daddo appeared conscious of the audience, seemingly breaking the fourth wall on a number of occasions, putting the style of both performances at odds with one another. Clarke’s performance was excellent; his timing and manner perfectly suited to the role. If you’re a fan of the ghost story, and in particular a fan of Dickens, then this one’s for you. I would suggest that a familiarity with the stories it is based on will help your engagement with the first act in particular. Performance Season: Until July 1 Venue: The Athenaeum Theatre, 188 Collins St, Melbourne Bookings: Ticketek - review by Kylie Rackham

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Photos From The Past

● No need for a roundabout in those days. At the Downey St-Grant St intersection.

● Goulburn River,Alexandra. Photo: Lindsay G. Cumming

● Alexandra Railway Station. Circa 1910. Photo: Lindsay G. Cumming

● Alexandra Cricket Club. Circa 1940s. Photo: Lindsay G. Cumming

News Extra Alice Cooper show ■ Alice Cooper is punting on massive crowds to attend his Melbourne concert. Seating capacity has been doubled and on October 20 his concert will now be held at Rod Laver Arena. - John O’Keefe

At The Substation ■ St Martins Theatre will present Banjos, Boots, abd Beyoncé (a different kind of Bush Dance). from Thursday-Sunday, July 6-8 at The Substation, Newport.

Alexandra

● Sugarloaf Weir. Circa 1925. Photo: T.A. Fox

● Grant St, Alexandra. Circa 1960


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Observer Victorian Sport Melbourne

Reforms for apprentice jockeys ■ Racing Victoria has made important changes to the health, well- being and working conditions of apprentice jockeys following a joint-review commissioned by RV, in consultation with the Australian Trainers ‘Association and the Victorian Jockeys’Association. These recommendations follow changes announced by RV last year and, where relevant, any necessary recommendations to help improve matters concerning an apprentice's employment, fatigue, management and career advancement. These recommendations included a reduction in the number of days an apprentice can ride in succession from nine to six, and a prohibition on apprentices accepting rides at both a day and a twilight/night meeting on the same day. RV, in consultation with the ATA and the AJA, have all agreed to adopt the list below of recommendations in a bid to strengthen the industry's support of apprentice jockey's welfare and development. ■ Raise the minimum age at which apprentices can start riding from 15 to 16. ■ Set the number of minimum winning rides at 20, before an apprentice can engage a jockey agent. This rule will apply to current apprentices without an agent whom have ridden less than 20 winners and to all future apprentice intakes. ■ That in January of each year, RV will: • Welcome expression of interest from people wishing to apply into the Apprentice Jockey Training Program for the following year. • Maintain a record of these and ensure that all applicants are a registered stable hand. • In the 12-month period prior to their intake, provide registered applicants with the opportunity for feedback from the apprentice jockey training team, regarding their riding skill and athletic development. ■ That the deed of apprenticeship be amended in summary, the main amendments will be to reinforce to all participants the importance of being vigilant to the health and wellbeing of apprentices and in particular, the overseer role played by the trainer, guardian and jockey manager in this regard. ■ Under the new agreement , all original trainers eligible for ongoing payments following an apprentice jockey's transfer from one trainer to another, provided the apprentice has completed 18 months of the apprenticeship with the original trainer. The original trainer will be entitled a minimum amount of 6.25 per cent of payments ongoing for the duration of the apprenticeship. That all jockey managers who currently do or wish to manage apprentices in the future, will be required to undergo an RV accredited training course on fatigue and related issues.

Southern Cross

■ Today is the last day to grab a bargain at the big Southern Cross mixed sales at Inglis, at Oaklands. The Inglis Company has been delighted with the sales so far over the previous four days and hope for a big one today. The final lots those of the Yearlings-Lots 744770 will get underway this morning at 11am. Following the Yearlings, Fillies and mares will go under the hammer with Lots 771-to 827 up for auction. Then the final action, the sale of Colts and Geldings, Lots 828 to 842. They are always great days with the professional group and you may pick up a bargain. Hope to see you there.

● Quality plus at Inglis’s Mixed sales Hemisphere's premier stock sale. the Total sale gross during the final stages sat on $144, 344,750 for 1636 lots sold. This is a record, smashing last year's gross by $ 7 million or 35 per cent. Overall average price for every lot sold across the National Weanling, Broodmare, Yearling and Racehorse Sales, is $88,230,-up almost 15 per cent on last year, when less lots were offered. One of the final top sellers was a three yearold filly by Stratum from Melbourne Rose who sold for $100,000 to recent Champagne Stakes winning trainer Paul Perry. Stock from Godolphin proved extremely popular at the national racehorse sale with that draft's top sellers including Saxophone sold for $65,000 to Rosemont Stud. The Australian Bloodstock Company bought Divine Action, also for $ 65,000. Rosemont Stud also snared Fanfaron for $ 50,000. "It was great to see such strong competition on the racehorses; it proves that live auctions are the most effective way to market racehorses, "Magic Millions Managing Director, Vin Cox, noted. "The National Sale had closed out with a gross over $144 million - which all but equalled the gross from our record breaking January sale of $146 million and far surpassing the $107 million of the 2016 National Sale.” he added. " The vendors and their staff, buyers,the Magic Millions team, bar and wait staff, grounds and night crews, however special mention to the transport companies and their staff for what was an unprecedented logistical exercise, to turn the place around three times is a fantastic performance," Cox added. The Magic Millions focus now switches, West, for the Perth Winter Yearling, Thoroughbred and racehorse sales this coming Sunday.

Ted Ryan

Magic Millions

■ Records have tumbled with the curtain brought down on a hugely successful 2017 Magic Millions National Sale just concluded on the Coast. The final day's selling comprised Book 2 yearlings and racehorses grossed over $ 1.56 million to post a new record for the Southern

● Sales bring high prices at Inglis Great Southern Sale. Photos: Inglis.

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Over Matter Review: Detour ■ Screenwriter/Director Christopher Smith received positive reviews with his similar dual creative roles for, among others, Get Santa, Triangle and Severance. He rightfully deserves praise for his work on Detour, which previewed at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2016 Harper, a law student believes his stepfather is responsible for a car crash which sees his mother in a coma. Harper is suffering and wants to make his stepfather pay for it. After too much to drink and mixing with the malevolent duo Johnny and Cherry, Harper finds himself on a road trip to Las Vegas in a 1971 Mustang Mach 1 Coupe. The trip is not without its difficulties, diversions and distractions. An early line by Harper’s lecturer mentions knowing the law so you can break it. This can also be applied to Smith’s approach to this film. He uses a split screen narrative structure that helps the thriller ride of deception and murder where it is never completely clear who can be trusted. Not to be confused with Edgar G. Ulmer’s 1945 film and its 1992 remake, Detour does borrow a clip from the early movie. Detour can lay claim to becoming a memorable cult movie. Film buffs may wish to see the film more than once to pick up on what they missed the first time and to immerse themselves in the differing story paths amplified by the deftly handled, but not overused, split-screen technique that Smith employs. The music matches the moods of the film well. Genre: Psychological Thriller Summary: A young law student, grieving for his dying mother, struggles to decide whether he should kill his unfaithful stepfather. Cast: Harper (Tye Sheridan -Mud, The Tree of Life, X-Men: Apocalypse), Johnny (Emory Cohen – Brooklyn) and Cherry (Bel Powley -Diary of a Teenage Girl). Rating: MA15+. Runtime: 97 minutes. Stars: 3.5. Screening: From June 22 at Lido Cinemas, 675 Glenferrie Rd, Hawthorn - Review by Greg Every

Travel Extra

■ It has taken 144 years to do it, but Norway is finally starting work next year on the world’s first tunnel for ocean-going ships, and which was first sketched on drawing boards back in 1874. The engineering wonder will be blasted through the mountainous Stad Peninsula that juts 20km into the ocean between the Norwegian Sea to the north, and the North Sea to the south. Coupled with fierce winds for over a third of the year, it means that where the two oceans meet off the Peninsula’s furthest extremity, is Scandinavia’s most treacherous point for violent storms, mountainous waves – and shipwrecks. Now after 144 years of proposals and arguments the Norwegian Government has earmarked 2.7 billion Krone (AU$500 million plus) for this revolutionary ship’s tunnel. At 1.7km long, 45m high and 36m wide, it will be able to accommodate cargo and passenger vessels up to 16,000 tonnes, including the fjordland cruise ships of Norway’s popular Hurtigruten Group, saving them venturing through that perilous Stadhavet Sea. Some 3-million cubic metres of solid rock will be blasted out during the near-five years it will take to build the tunnel, which will even have an observation deck at one end for sightseers to watch dozens of ships entering and leaving the tunnel daily. And while it will be a world’s first for ocean-going shipping when it opens in 2023, tunnels for canal and river vessels are nothing new … the first was dug for a canal to go through a mountain in France as far back as 1679. - David Ellis


Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 35

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Radio: Red-faced ABC Radio ..................................... Page 36 Theatre: ‘Utterly impossible’ ........................................... Page 37 Country Music: John Denver tribute ................................ Page 36 Jim and Aar on: Top 10 lists, best movies ........................... Page 38 Aaron: Cheryl Threadgold: Local theatre, shows, auditions .......... Page 39 PL US THE LLO OVATT”S MEGA CRO PLUS CROSS SWORD

THE MIKADO AT WARRANDYTE Review: Undercoat

Meet Stephen Nicolazzo

● Stephen Nicolazzo, director of The Moors ■ The latest project of Melbourne-based theatre director Stephen Nicolazzo is The Moors by Jen Silverman, playing at the Red Stitch Actors Theatre , St Kilda, until July 9. A graduate from the University of Melbourne (Creative Arts) and also from the National Institute of Dramatic Art (Directing), Stephen started directing at age 18, when he gathered all of his savings, hired a theatre and got some friends together to stage and direct his first show. “It was a dud,” says Stephen, “but it marked the beginning of my theatrical career, and gave me the confidence to pursue directing throughout my time at university in independent contexts, then post-NIDA.” Stephen regards directing as a special craft. “Directing is all about how your eye can sculpt a drama,” he says. “It is a delicate and intricate profession, one that requires rigor, discipline, and imagination. “You are building a world for people to experience, and with that comes a certain level of responsibility; this is what I hold so dear to me about a director’s role . You are guiding people through a world they may never have experienced before.” Among Stephen’s many directorial and creative projects is to co-found the award-winning independent company Little Ones Theatre, with designers Eugyeene Teh and Katie Sfetkidis, and producer Jo Porter. The innovative focus of this company is queer theatre-making. “Our productions are actually more focused on adapting iconic pop cultural texts and classics than presenting original works,” says Stephen, who explains the company is more interested in genre, in particular, queering genre. “The criteria for a Little Ones Theatre production is always driven by finding stories that explore sexuality and gender through a unique and theatrical lens.” Stephen says two things attracted him to direct The Moors. “Firstly, I have never collaborated with Red Stitch before and wanted to experience working for such an iconic part of Melbourne’s theatre community. Secondly, the script read as though it had been written just for me – its style, humour and genre, all felt kindred to my approach to theatre-making.’ The Moors focuses on the lives of two spinster sisters, Agatha and Huldey, who live in isolation on the wild and windy moors. Huldey is a hopeless and talentless diarist. Agatha is a scheming ice-queen with lesbian tendencies. One day, a young governess arrives at their home at the request of their brother, Branwell (who is absent and a direct reference to the Bronte sisters actual brother) and she is thrown into a house of horrors, sensuality, and uncanny situations that will change her life forever. Stephen is also continuing to work with his company, Little Ones Theatre, to present works that speak to female and queer experience. “We would like to also bring our work to an international audience in the future,’ says Stephen, ‘as we feel that our highly visual aesthetic transcends language and appeal to a multitude of audiences all Turn to Page 00 over the world.”

● Jenny Wakefield (Katisha) in The Mikado ■ The Diamond Valley Singers present Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Mikado from July 7-15 at Warrandyte High School. Accompanied by the Eltham Orchestra, the Diamond Valley Singers present this complex satire, characterised by the clever wordplay, memorable tunes and endearing characters that have remained popular with audiences for well over a century. Enjoy memorable songs such as I’ve Got A Little List, Three Little Maids and I Am So Proud. The policy of the Diamond Valley Singers is to “act locally and think globally”, and all proceeds from performances will be donated to International Needs Australia, Open House in Ivanhoe and the Elizabeth Nursery School in Malowi. Performances: July 7, 8, 12, 14, 15 at 8pm, July 8, 9 and 15 at 2pm Venue: The fully refurbished Warrandyte High School, Alexander Rd., Warrandyte Bookings: www.dvsingers.org - Cheryl Threadgold

■ Cynthia Troup’s Undercoat: A Parafoxical Tale is staged under the direction of Bagryana Popov with Alice Darling. Cynthia plays with idea of human-induced ‘contamination from above’ premised on the folk tale of Henny Penny who sees the world’s demise through her refrain “the sky is falling in”. Her script draws on Teolinda Gersao’s story The Red Fox Fur Coat in which a humble bank clerk makes sacrifices to purchase a fox fur coat enabling her to escape the city and transform into her true wild self in the forest. The deliberately disconcerting opening scene takes place in a wet, back alley behind the theatre where, amongst the detritus, we encounter our first urban fox, Ruber, who confronts the audience with an environmental change, morallaced rap performance. We enter the theatre into a misty, eucalypt forest with car wreck centre stage. On this atmospheric set, capricious vulpine characters lurk in and out of shadows heightening our sense a vulnerability aware that we have entered a nonhuman realm. She, played by Caroline Lee, is a woman trying to free herself from the car wreck. Three foxes encroach towards the wreck. Ruber (Emma Annand), the youngest fox, plays with language and movement. Ranger (Jean Goodwin), is the trickster, rubbish-rummaging fox. Fox Vobiscum (Maude Davey) exhibits a pervading dominance. The foxes are skilfully portrayed as twitching, high-strung, wild animals wary of She. She makes a gradual, painful metamorphosis as she exposes a fox tale and a lust for locusts. Cynthia’s seven-scene script is poetic and dense with word-play such as pun in scene titles, “What the Fox” and “Best Fox Forward”, along with rhythmic repetition, sayings, fable references and paradox. Undercoat was performed at La Mama Theatre. - Review by Sherryn Danaher

10 network problems ■ Ten Network will be put up for sale or recapitalisation as it enters voluntary administration, after failing to secure the financial backing of its two main billionaire shareholders. Lachlan Murdoch and Bruce Gordon were not prepared to support a new $250m refinancing package beyond December 23. Mark Korda, Jennifer Nettleton and Jarrod Villani of KordaMentha will take on the role of voluntary administrators, effective immediately.

LADY MACBETH

■ From a 160-minute Russian opera first performed in 1934, Lady Macbeth comes to a screen adaption in the best of British traditions in an 80-minute gem. As a film directed by British William Oldroyd it includes all the elements that caused the Opera’s banning for 30years by Stalin with the denunciation of composer Dimitri Shostakovich until 1962 when the revised the Opera, re-naming it Katerina Izmailova. While generally accepted it has been his original Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District that has been regularly performed since his death in 1975. Lady Macbeth is set in the 1860’s, with a young Katherine (Florence Pugh) being sold into marriage to a wealthy middle

aged landowner, Alexander (Paul Hilton). It is a loveless marriage with Katherine confined to the house in a large country estate. She is trapped in every way with disinterested Alexander, not allowing her out of the house, requiring her to just sit in the drawing room during the day or on retiring have her stand naked for him to view for his personal sexual self-gratification. Alexander’s tyrannical father Boris (Christopher Fairbank) is no better and when they both left to travel to investigate an explosion in their coal mine, Katherine is free to explore the estate with a compelling desire to satisfy what has been her unfulfilled sexual appetite. Groomsman Sebastian (Cosmo Jarvis) becomes her regular object of

affection to the extent it is all consuming leading to murder after the return of both Alexander and Boris. It is powerfully portrayed, with many silent scenes strong in projection and body language with an engrossing performance by young Florence Pugh. Her character’s twists and turns were well executed as we had empathy and yet abhorrence with her as Katherine. Australian cinematographer Ari Wegner luminously captured all that that director William Oldroyd required with this riveting and often violent psychodrama. Where: At selected cinemas from June 28. - Review by Graeme McCoubrie


Page 36 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Observer Showbiz Country Crossroads

By Rob Foenander info@countrycrossroads.com.au

Denver tribute ■ Melbourne's ‘Mr Versatile’, Col Perkins, will present his John Denver 20th anniversary show tribute on Friday (June 23) at the Frankston Arts Centre. The popular Col will take the audience on an 80-minute journey, revisiting Denver's hits and memorable songs. Special guest will be Brendan Scott. More info and bookings: 9784 1060.Goo

In Oakleigh Tonight ■ At The Caravan Club, Oakleigh's very own tonight show In Oakleigh Tonight will return on Thursday July 6 and will run on the first Thursday of every month from then on. Variety entertainment is back with RRR's Jon von Goes hosting the night. Singing, dancing, interviews, a desk, a couch, a house band, a house poet, a barrel, a wheel, prizes, mall talk, local legends, big and small names, dinner and show is what is on offer. - Rob Foenander

Media Flashes

■ Daniel Flitton has left The Age, where he had been a reporter since 2007. ■ The Age's Science Editor Bridie Smith announced she left Fairfax after 16 years. ■ Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten paid tribute to The Age’s Michael Gordon who has left his Canberra position. ■ Rania Spooner has left The Age. So has Stathi Paxinos after 20 years.

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LOCAL THEATRE

Radio

No fake news at Arts House

News around Victoria

ABC radio is red-faced ■ “ABC Radio apologises for the content going to air,” said the Melbourne station’s management after breakfast show presenter Red Symons was heard to make statements regarded as “offensive” to a fellow broadcaster. Symons came under fire over an interview with podcaster Beverley Wang, in which he asked the presenter if she was "yellow" and "What's the deal with Asians?". Australia's Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane said while it is important to discuss race, those conversations must be respectful, reported Greg Newman of Jocks Journal. "Racism doesn't require malice in your heart. It is as much about impact as it is about intent," he said. "It's important we're able to talk about race, but let's do it with respect. Too often prejudice is tolerated as good-natured banter, when it should be rejected for the racism it represents." The full audio of the interview, shared online by Wang, has since been pulled from the Radio National website.

Border battle ■ Only 1.2 per cent separated Triple M 105.7 (22.9) and Hit 104.9 in Albury (21.7) in the latest Xtra Insights radio survey, reported by Jocks Journal. It was the first survey in Albury since 2014. “In third position was ABC Goulburn Murray with 14.4 per cent and then 1494 2AY with 11.4 They also were the No 1 station in evenings. Hit 104.9 came No 1 in breakfast (21.4) just ahead of Triple M (21.1).

Administrators in

■ Barry Wight and Daniel Juratowitch of restructuring advisory firm Cor Cordis have been appointed as Voluntary Administrators of EON Sports Radio, effective June 13. EON was launched in July last year as a digital 24-7 sports radio network transmitting on the digital audio broadcasting network and via various applications operating on smart devices and online.

Changes at 3AW?

■ Advertising guru John Singleton and longtime adviser Mark Carnegie have lodged a formal bid to buy Fairfax Media’s 54 per cent stake in Macquarie Media - which operates 3AW and Talking Lifestyle (formerly Magic 1278). Singleton and Carnegie formally handed a request to Fairfax chief Greg Hywood on Friday (June 16) after the market closed seeking access to the publisher’s due diligence room to firm up -finance with the ANZ.

On This Day Friday Wednesday Thursday June 22 June 23 June 21 ■ Boxer Lionel Rose was born in Warragul in 1948. He died aged 62. John Paul Young was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1950 (67). Racing driver Craig Lowndes was born in Victoria in 1974 (43). Prince William Arthur Philip Louis Windsor is 35 today.

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■ Film preducer Mike Todd was born in 1907. He died aged 51 in 1958 when his private plane Lucky Liz, named after wife Elizabeth Taylor, crashed. Actress Meryl Streep was born in 1949 (68). TV sports commentator Bruce McAvaney was born in South Aust. in 1953 (64).

■ Edward III, King in 1936, was born in 1894. He died aged 77 in 1972. He abdicated so that he could marry Wallis Simpson. Singer Diana Trask was born in 1940 (77). Actor Bryan Brown was born in Sydney in 1947 (70). Actress Geraldine Turner is 68 (1949).

● Red Symons, ABC Melbourne

Paul’s final show

■ The fight between Melbourne’s Triple R community radio station and veteran program maker Paul Harris is finally over. After 36 years, the last broadcast of Film Buff’s Forecast took place last Saturday (June 17). Triple M had offered Harris a one-hour slot on Sundays, which he declined.

Radio Briefs ■ Victorian Senator Derryn Hinch, formerly of 3AW, renewed calls last week in Federal Parliament for a national, publicly available register of sex offenders. ■ Community radio station 3CR, which broadcasts on 855AM, is currently conducting its annual fund-raising radiothon.

Journalist job offer

■ ACE Radio, which has 13 stations in country Victoria, is advertising for a journalist to join its team in Western Victoria. The job vacanacy is based in a “solo newsroom”. Enquiries to Mat Cummins at: matc@team.aceradio.com.au

■ Maintaining its reputation as Melbourne’s home of all things experimental and contemporary, Arts House launches a brave and bold new season featuring a diverse program of events, installations, performances and conversations. Chair of Arts, Culture and Heritage at City of Melbourne, Cr Rohan Leppert, said Arts House Season Two is a fascinating series of works. “The works and events as part of Arts House Season Two will challenge, provoke and entertain,” Cr Leppert said. “From world premieres by international artists to incredible local works by some of Melbourne’s best, Season 2 at Arts House is not to be missed.” Arts House Artistic Director, Angharad Wynne- Jones said: “Works that explore urgent social issues and experiment with form can take us to unfamiliar places but combined with each other and the energy of our audiences, they also offer new, inspiring worlds of thinking, feeling and acting.” Season Two, 2017 begins with a clutch of works that explore the always complex, sometimes divisive concept of place and displacement head on m featuring local and international artists including Nástio Mosquito (Respectable Thief), wani (Tales of an Afronaut), Sethembile Msezane (Excerpts from the past), PYT Fairfield (Tribunal) and Samara Hersch and Lara Thoms (We All Know What’s Happening). Midway through the season, Arts House will present the premiere of new works by Melbourne-based artists Stephanie Lake (Pile of Bones), Melanie Lane (Nightdance) and Speak Percussion (Assembly Operation). A collaboration with Melbourne Fringe on The Children’s Party aims to critically empower young people, while Survival Skills for Desperate Times, is a collaboration with Melbourne Festival, highlighting 18 artists as the ultimate survivalists. In November, Arts House will join with the community and emergency services partners to present the second instalment of Refuge – a five-year investigation into the role of artists and cultural institutions in preparing for, and building resilience to, climate change. As part of Refuge, Arts House will investigate and rehearse the impacts of extreme heat and collaborate with emergency management professionals, artists, local and international communities to prepare and transform the North Melbourne Town Hall into a designated emergency relief centre for 24 hours. Arts House audiences will dream a little with multidisciplinary artist Fleur Elise Noble’s Rooman, before ending the year in song with Sam Halmarack and JOF’s We Are Lightning! Tickets to Arts House Season Two, 2017 are on sale now. artshouse.com.au - Cheryl Threadgold Melbourne

Observer

Saturday June 24 ■ Recording industry pioneer Bill Armstrong is 88. He is recovering from illnesss. Drummer Mick Fleetwood is 75 (1942). He was born in Cornwall. Athlete Raelene Boyle was born in Coburg in 1951 (66). Michael Tuck, AFL veteran, is 64 (1953).

Sunday June 25 ■ Actress June Lockhart, who played the mother in the Lassie TV series, is 912 (1925). Singer-songwriter Carly Simon was born in New York City in 1945 (72). English comedian Rick Gervais was born in 1961 (56).

Monday June 26 ■ Singer Marcie Jones is 72. She was born in Melbourne in 1945. Opera singer June Bronhill was born as June Gough in Broken Hill in 1929. She died aged 75 in 2005. Actor Steve Bisley was born in Newcastle, NSW, in 1950 (67). US singer Chris Isaak is 61 (1956).

Tuesday June 27

■ Military leader Sir John Monash was born in 1865. He died aged 66 in 1931. AFL footballer and former coach Paul Roos was born in in 1963 (54). Actor Tobey Maguire was born in Santa Monica in 1975 (42). Singer Eve Von Bibra is 51 (1966).

Thanks to GREG NEWMAN of Jocks Journal for assistance with birthday and anniversary dates. Jocks Journal is Australia’s longest running radio industry publication. ■ Melbourne Find out more at www.jocksjournal.com


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ShowBiz!

Observer Showbiz

Fringe Festival

■ The Butterfly Club announces the return of the Melbourne Cabaret Fringe Festival from July 4 -16. Building on the success of the inaugural festival in 2016, this year’s program brings together seven independent cabaret shows that have garnered awards and critical acclaim around the world. The Melbourne Cabaret Festival has a long-standing relationship with The Butterfly Club, and the two organisations have worked closely for many years. The Melbourne Cabaret Festival Fringe was launched in 2016 as a CBD counterpart to the Melbourne Cabaret Festival, which now takes place exclusively in the City of Stonnington. This year’s Melbourne Cabaret Fringe Festival program has a curatorial focus on productions that push the boundaries of the artform - aiming to help define the uniquely ‘Melbourne’ format of cabaret: productions that take risk, make social commentary, play with format and run for under an hour - allowing audiences to sample multiple productions in a single winter night, with a cocktail in hand. “This year’s Melbourne Cabaret Festival program has been programmed by Artistic Director Dolly Diamond - the program is big, loud and proud. “As a counter-point, we have focussed on productions that are independent: intimate, risky, subversive or untested” says Xander Woollard, who has programmed the festival. The program includes Melbourne comedians Jude Perl and Lauren Edwards in Yada Yada Yada , based on 90s sitcoms; Fully Made Up! An improvised Cabaret is one part Liza Minelli and one part Shirley Bassey; Tash York in Adulting, which relates to all the hard truths about growing up and dealing with it; Raising ‘Ell! replaces the seven deadly sins with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Tinderm Grindr and Youtube, and Dante is played by four singers, a saxophone, a violin and a piano. There’s also Send Nudes relates to being sarcastically single and trying to be funny is easier than waiting to get asked on second dates; Finding Felix about matters we face on our road to self-discovery; and Tragedy! (a new comedy) pokes fun at a world of smartphones and narcissists and everyone’s desire to have their fifteen minutes, plus Greek tragedies, pop culture and original chorus collide in this work of pop-art-cabaret. Bookings are highly recommended for the Melbourne Cabaret Fringe Festival. Dates: July 4-16 Time: Various Cost: $25-32 Venue: The Butterfly Club, 5 Carson Place, Melbourne Tickets and full performance details: thebutterflyclub.com - Cheryl Threadgold

Platformia

■ The Hearsay Theatre Group presents Platformia from June 21-23 at 8pm at the Owl and Cat Theatre, Richmond, as part of the Platform New Works Festival . The show is an interactive work, fusing elements of videogame design with theatrical storytelling to create a dynamic emergent narrative. Think pub trivia meets Dungeons and Dragons. Players are cast in the story, and join the protagonists on a daring adventure through the land of Platformia - the whimsical, fun will be audience-driven. Performance Details: June 21-23 at 8pm Venue: Owl and Cat Theatre, Swan St, Richmond (opposite the Richmond station) Bookings: www.owlandcat.com.au - Cheryl Threadgold

Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 37

TV, Radio, Theatre Latest Melbourne show business news - without fear or favour

Utterly impossible

■ Magician Josh Staley debuts not one, but three new shows at the forthcoming Melbourne Magic Festival being presented from July 3 - 5 at the Northcote Town Hall. Josh creates live performance art that is said to seem utterly impossible. He is the winner of multiple awards and achievements, including Australian junior champion of close up magic. He has appeared on TV, performed across Australia and internationally, and is a Guinness World Record holder, helping lead a team of magicians to break the world recorded for

● Magician Josh Staley.

‘longest magic show’ He also works as a corporate performer, an entertainer at private parties or at sell out shows such as the Melbourne Comedy and Magic Festivals . Magic is about creating a moment in time, where something truly impossible takes places, and Josh aims to create these moments every time he performs. The Melbourne Magic Festival is celebrating its 10th year in 2017. For bookings to see Josh Staley’s three shows, visit: melbournemagic festival.com/ enigma/ - Cheryl Threadgold

Stellar cast in Velvet

Magic Festival ■ The 10th Annual Melbourne Magic Festival casts its spell across the Northcote Town Hall and beyond from July 3-15 and promises mind-bending fun for all ages with more than 300 performances of 65 different shows including top international guest magicians from all over the world. Since magically appearing on Australia’s major event calendar 10 years ago, The Melbourne Magic Festival is now officially recognised as the largest festival of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere and attracts more than 10,000 magicians and magic fans from all over the country and beyond to one of the world’s greatest family festivals. In addition to over 60 magicians from all over Australia, the Festival welcomes international special guests – Joshua Jay, Lee Eun Gyeol and Dani DaOrtiz - who will perform, lecture and present Masterclasses. Founder and Artistic Director, Tim Ellis, will be presenting his 25th Magic Festival show this year, and says it promises to be his best ever. This is Magic! features Tim’s internationally award-winning magic including his original take on the classic ‘Cups and Balls’ with a 1950’s Rock’n’Roll theme. Tim says he will also levitate his beautiful assistant Natalie, read several minds, bend cutlery like Uri Geller, and perform the most jaw-dropping card trick ever seen. “We want to give the public the opportunity to experience the beauty and diversity of the world of theatrical magic.” says Tim. “From shows designed to engage children in a world of wonder, to shows that bring that same childlike wonder back into the lives of adults,” says Tim. Originally housed solely at the Northcote Town Hall, the Melbourne Magic Festival has outgrown its home base and expanded for 2017 with events in venues including The Arts Centre Melbourne, The Magic Zone in Bayswater, The 86 in Collingwood, Tall Dark & Art in Moorabbin, Swinburne University in Hawthorn, and The Magic School of Confidence in Malvern East. Tickets are now on sale and the full program of events can be found at www.MelbourneMagicFestival.com - Cheryl Threadgold

Old Friend, Old Foe

● Craig Reid in Velvet. ■ Craig Ilott, director/creator, has amassed a accompanying the cast in their myriad acts. stellar cast of performers and technical team to We were most impressed by Craig Reid’s create Velvet, a Divine Discotheque Circus. amazing skills in his comic performance as ‘The Inspired by New York’s Club 54, it’s the story Incredible Hula Boy’. of a young performer (Tom Oliver) taken under While losing count of hoops, we were mesthe wing of a cabaret star (legendary Marcia merised by luminescent lighting effects from Hines) as he’s exposed to the nightclub world of within the rings. hedonism and cultural acceptance regardless Craig’s cheeky face and eye expression, of gender, class or shape. capped off with his daring to wear tight circus Wide-eyed and dressed in Mormon-like at- leotards, brought whoops and cheers from the tire, his innocence is tested as he discovers the audience. world of discotheque, glitz, circus and sadoThe Palms was alive with discotheque beat masochism. His induction is reinforced through superb with seventies songs such as Stayin’Alive , Last acts by aerial performers (Emma Goh and Dance, Boogie Wonderland and Turn the Beat Stephen Williams), acrobat (Mirko Kocken- Around’. The thrust stage transformed the venue into berger), go-go dancers/singers (Kaylah Attard and Rechelle Mansour), ‘The Incredible Hula disco nightclub and delivered performers more Boy’ (Craig Reid) and all overseen (literally) by intimate contact with the audience. A perfect antidote for Melbourne’s cold winmaster DJ (Joe Accaria). It was Marcia Hines’s commanding voice ter nights. Performance dates: Until June 23 and stage presence in lavish sequinned cosTimes: Tues, Wed, Thurs, Fri 7.30pm, tumes that sparked ovations from the audience Tickets: $50-118.90 and revealed her unsubduable talent. Multi-dimensional musician Joe Accaria is Running time: Approx. 90 minutes ever switched on, whether working the crowd Bookings: www.ticketmaster.com.au with his disco warm-up, playing solo drum or - Review by Sherryn Danaher

● Julia Hanna and Lily Downs in Old Friend, Old Foe. Photo: Alicia Benn-Lawler ■ Old Friend, Old Foe is being presented at the Metanoia Theatre, Mechanics Institute, Brunswick until June 24. Written by Anna den Hartog and directed by Alicia Benn-Lawler, the story asks what if your imaginary friend is not a friend at all? This dark piece is said to allow us to see how we can defeat our inner voices and demons. Starring Kirsty Snowden (Every Grain of Sand, A Winter’s Tale) and Rebecca Morton (Tales of a City by the Sea, The Crucible), with a female ensemble, this is the story of one woman’s quest to find her own authentic voice amidst the noise. The production company Rapt Productions has been established by Rebecca Morton, Alicia Benn-Lawler and Phil Roberts. The company aims to build relationships between regional playwrights, directors, actors and performers. Performance details: Until June 24 Venue: Metanoia Theatre, Mechanics institute, 270 Sydney Rd, Brunswick Booking details: https:// metanoiatheatre.com/event/old-friend-oldfoe/ - Cheryl Threadgold


Page 38 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Observer Showbiz What’s Hot and What’s Not in Blu-Rays and DVDs FILM: T2-TRAINSPOTTING: Genre: Drama. Cast: Ewan McGregor, Ewan Bremmer, Jonny Lee Miller, Robert Carlyle and Kelly MacDonald. Year: 2017. Rating: R18+ Length: 117 Minutes. Stars: ****½ Verdict: It's 21 years since Danny Boyle's groundbreaking and influential "Trainspotting" hit screen and cha After betraying his friends and making off with the money in "Trainspotting," Mark Renton returns to Scotland after 20 years and reunites with his old friends Sick Boy, Spud, and the volatile Begbie. Sorrow, loss, joy, aging, vengeance, hatred, friendship, extortion, love, longing, fear, regret, blackmail and self-destruction, are all lined up to welcome him, and ready to join the dance. Impossible to replicate the original "Trainspotting," director Danny Boyle succeeds here with this exhilarating follow up, which all comes together wonderfully as a cinematic and storytelling odyssey of a world that has changed as past and present talk to each other throughout the period when we first met them 20 years before. The original cast all return with flawless performances, with the comfort and ease of putting on a favourite pair of slippers, along with spectacular Scottish locations, editing, and cinematography .... all brought wonderfully together by a stellar screenplay and killer soundtrack. Here is a film is deeply rooted in memory and aging, middle age disillusion, not only memory of the characters and the first film, but of the time and culture, and for us who were there and now two decades older. Danny Boyle has done what very few before him have achieved, he created much more than just a worthy sequel, one that doesn't disappoint. He has again created an intelligent, dark, stimulating, exciting, funny and thought-provoking, full throttle, adrenaline pumping blast that punches a hole right through the screen and straight to the senses! But the question that now remains is, will there be a "T3 Trainspotting" in 20 years to come? FILM: SILENCE: Genre: History/Mystery/Drama. Cast: Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver, Liam Neeson, Ciaran Hinds. Year: 2016. Rating: MA15+ Length: 161 Minutes. Stars: **** Verdict: Legendary Oscar winning filmmaker Martin Scorsese's epic and compelling story of two 17th century Jesuit missionaries who face the ultimate test of faith when they travel to Japan in search of their missing mentor, at a time when Catholicism was outlawed and their presence forbidden. Rounding out his religious trilogy, beginning with 'The Last Temptation of Christ,' and then 'Kundun,' Martin Scorsese has crafted a powerful and spellbinding exploration of mystery, anguish, conflict and faith. Performances by Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver, Liam Neeson and a wonderful ensemble of Japanese cast all excel, as do Production Design, Period Detail and Costume Design. Devoid of cliché, the beautifully fluent and respectful Screenplay by Scorsese and Jay Cocks, Editing by Oscar winner Thelma Schoonmaker Powell, and breathtaking 2017 Oscar nominated cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, all combine to create an experience on the highest level. Reflective of 'The Mission' (1986) and with a respectful bow to such filmmakers as Ingmar Bergman and Akira Kurosawa, 'Silence' is a masterful, deeply moving, intelligent, thought provoking, brutal, courageous, gripping and poetic cinematic tour-de-force from a master filmmaker and storyteller still very much at the peak of his game. FILM: HIDDEN FIGURES: Genre: Biography/Drama. Cast: Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monáe, Kevin Costner, Kirsten Dunst, Jim Parsons and Mahershala Ali. Year: 2016. Rating: PG. Length: 127 Minutes. Stars: **** Verdict: Superbly balanced character driven historical drama based on the non-fiction book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly about a group of female African-American mathematicians who served a vital role at NASA in the 1960's during the early years of the U.S. space program throughout racial tensions. Stars Taraji P. Henson as Katherine G. Johnson, a mathematician who calculated flight trajectories for Project Mercury and other missions, Octavia Spencer as Dorothy Vaughan and Janelle Monáe as Mary Jackson, are all outstanding in their respective roles, with Octavia Spencer winning a well deserved Oscar nomination for Supporting Actress. Kevin Costner is also a standout as the head of Langley's Space Task Group. Period Detail, Sets, Costume and Production Design all excel. "Hidden Figures" is a gripping, witty, thought provoking, uplifting, poignant and hugely entertaining tribute to an extraordinary group of women who all broke barriers in more ways than one and had the right stuff. UNMISSABLE! - James Sherlock

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Movies, DVDs With Jim Sherlock and Aaron Rourke

Rourke’s Reviews Rough Night

■ (MA). 101 minutes. Now showing in cinemas. Failing to generate laughs and sustain interest, this latest Hollywood dive into the loud and moronic makes one wonder if modern film-makers are going to be able to drag American comedy out of the nadir it has been experiencing for quite some time now. After a standard opening sequence where Jess (Scarlett Johannson), Alice (Jillian Bell), Blair (Zoe Kravitz) and Frankie (Ilana Glazer) are introduced as (though looking a little too old to be) partying college students, we fast forward 10 years, with each member of the quartet living quite different lives. Coming together to celebrate Jess's upcoming marriage to buttoned-down Peter (Paul W. Downs), the group head to Miami for a bachelorette party at a fancy house located on the beach. Joined by Australian Pippa (Kate McKinnon), whom Jess has got to know over the internet, the longtime friends will have a night they will never forget, especially when they hire a stripper for the bride-to-be. Rough Night is a complete shambles, with sloppy writing (which has been clearly influenced by films such as Very Bad Things, Weekend At Bernie's, Bad Moms, Bridesmaids and Bachelor Party), poor character foundation, and even a decided lack of internal logic. Every person is nothing more than a cardboard cliche, which makes it impossible for the audience to become involved with their plight. Add to that forced performances from a cast that fail to click, and this continual obsession with US film-makers allowing everyone on screen to ad-lib to their heart's content, bloating or sinking almost every scene, and you have a film that is an utter disaster. Since American Pie in 1999, and the rise of imbecilic comedians such as Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider, Will Ferrell (his upcoming Risky Business role-reversal film The House looks awful), and David Spade, American comedy has been in a one-note, obnoxious rut, one that I wish would finish as soon as possible. RATING - *

Very Bad Nights

■ (MA) (1998). 100 minutes. ****. Available on DVD. The movie that the creators of Rough Night had definitely seen before scribbling their sub-standard misfire, this is a much darker feature that manages to be both effectively grisly and frequently funny. Jon Favreau and Cameron Diaz play the engaged couple this time, with the groom-to-be taken to Las Vegas by his close knit group of friends (including Christian Slater, Jeremy Piven, Daniel Stern and Leland Orser) for a wild weekend on the town. But when a female stripper is accidentally killed at their hotel

room, friends soon become enemies as a plan to get rid of the corpse takes a number of unexpected turns. Debutant writer/director Peter Berg (who more recently helmed Deepwater Horizon and Patriots Day) never allows the material to morph into something palatable or agreeable, and one has to commend him on staying true to his individual vision. This made a great double with Antonia Bird's criminally underrated Ravenous (1999), another unique black comedy that has unfortunately gone under the radar as the years have passed. Performances are perfectly in tune with Berg's pitch-black script. One of the few comedies around where a strong stomach is required.

Weekend At Bernie’s ■ (PG) (1989). 97 minutes. ***. Available on DVD. After a weak first act, this amusing, knockabout comedy takes off once its premise kicks in, with the best performance coming from an actor who for the most part plays dead. The story centres on Larry and Richard (Andrew McCarthy and Jonathan Silverman), two lowrung employees trying to succeed at a big-time corporation, who go to their smarmy boss Bernie (Terry Kiser) when they unwittingly uncover fraudulent behaviour going on at the office. Seemingly pleased with their efforts, Bernie invites them to his luxury beach house, but the truth is that Bernie is the actual embezzler, and intends to kill the duo. But before he can carry out his plan he is assassinated by his boss, a mafia-type whose wife Bernie has been having an affair with. Not wanting to spoil the weekend, the two pretend that their host is still alive, to staggeringly successful effect. McCarthy (Class, St. Elmo’s Fire) and Silverman (Broadway Bound, 12.01) are personable enough as the beguiled duo who find themselves out of their depth, while Catherine Mary Stewart (The Last Straighter, Night Of The Comet) is as likeable as ever as Richard’s love interest. Peter Hyams regular Don Calfa also scores as the growingly desperate hitman. The real star however is Kiser, who is unforgettable as Bernie. His hilariously lifeless turn has to be seen to be believed, and all the best laughs can be attributed to Kiser’s skilfully physical presentation. Surprisingly, this is directed by Ted Kotcheff, who gave us Wake In Fright, North Dallas Forty, Split Image and First Blood. Whatever you do, please stay clear of the 1993 sequel, which is positively excruciating. - Aaron Rourke

Top 10 Lists JUNE 18 to JUNE 24 THE AUSTRALIAN BOX OFFICE TOP TEN: 1. WONDER WOMAN. 2. THE MUMMY. 3. BAYWATCH. 4. PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES. 5. MY COUSIN RACHEL. 6. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2. 7. CHURCHILL. 8. VICEROY'S HOUSE. 9. KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD. 10. A DOG'S PURPOSE. NEW RELEASES AND COMING SOON TO CINEMAS AROUND AUSTRALIA: JUNE 15: BLACK BUTLER: BOOK OF THE ATLANTIC, DESPICABLE ME 3, HOTEL COOLGARDIE, KEDI, RISK, ROUGH NIGHT, THE PROMISE, WHITNEY: CAN I BE ME. JUNE 22: A QUIET PASSION, BUGS: MICRO MONSTERS 3D, CARS 3, DETOUR, MCLAREN, TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT, UNA. THE DVD AND BLU-RAY TOP RENTALS & SALES: 1. T2: TRAINSPOTTING [Drama/Ewan McGregor, Ewan Bremner, Robert Carlyle]. 2. SILENCE [Drama/Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver, Liam Neeson]. 3. LOGAN [Action/Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Dafne Keen]. 4. A FEW LESS MEN [Comedy/Xavier Samuel, Kris Marshall, Dacre Montgomery]. 5. RED DOG: TRUE BLUE [Drama/Bryan Brown, Josh Lucas, Rachael Taylor]. 6. HIDDEN FIGURES [Drama/Taraji P. Henson, Janelle Monae, Octavia Spencer]. 7. MISS SLOANE [Drama/Jessica Chastain, Mark Strong, John Lithgow]. 8. THE GREAT WALL [Action/Matt Damon, Willem Dafoe]. 9. XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE [Action/Vin Diesel, Toni Collette]. Also: FENCES, GOLD, LION, TONI ERDMANN, COLLIDE, RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER, FIFTY SHADES DARKER, FIST FIGHT, LA LA LAND, MOONLIGHT. NEW RELEASE HIGHLIGHTS ON DVD THIS WEEK: LOVING [Drama/Ruth Negga, Joel Edgerton, Will Dalton]. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST [Fantasy/Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans]. A CURE FOR WELLNESS [Thriller/Jason Isaacs, Mia Goth, Dane DeHaan]. THE SPACE BETWEEN US [Fantasy/Drama/ Asa Butterfield, Carla Gugino, Gary Oldman]. NESSIE & ME [Family/Adventure/Toni Hudson, Michael Pare]. BEFORE I FALL [Drama/Zoey deutch, Halston Sage]. NEW RELEASE HIGHLIGHTS ON BLU-RAY THIS WEEK: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST [Fantasy/Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans]. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 3D + Blu-Ray [Fantasy/Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans]. A CURE FOR WELLNESS [Thriller/Jason Isaacs, Mia Goth, Dane DeHaan]. THE SPACE BETWEEN US [Fantasy/Drama/ Asa Butterfield, Carla Gugino, Gary Oldman]. ORANGE IN THE NEW BLACK: Season 4. BEFORE I FALL [Drama/Zoey deutch, Halston Sage]. NEW & RE-RELEASE AND CLASSIC MOVIES ON DVD HIGHLIGHTS: NONE LISTED FOR THIS WEEK. NEW RELEASE TELEVISION, DOCUMENTARY AND MUSIC DVD HIGHLIGHTS: THE WARRIORS: Season 1. ORANGE IN THE NEW BLACK: Season 4. THE ALIENS: Season 1. BONES: Season 12. SS-GB (Mini-Series). SPY IN THE WILD. - James Sherlock


www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 39

Observer Showbiz White Lies

● Magician Pierre Ulric Photo: Jack Hawkins ■ White Lies created by and starring mystery performer Pierre Ulric will be presented from July 11-15 at the Northcote Town Hall as part of the Melbourne Magic Festival. White Lies delves into the mysterious aspects of the world; investigating the nature of humans and our perceptions of time. Audiences will experience psychological illusions, mind control, and visual hallucinations in this dynamic hour long performance. “I studied environmental biology at university and have been working as an environmental consultant in the resource sector for about 15 years. “I decided to go full time with the magic last year even though I’ve been working and doing professional gigs since I was 14 years old. It was really only a matter of time before this transition,” explains Ulric. “Theatrical surrealism is a term that I coined to better define what I do. Magic is a type of theatre and the magician is essentially an actor playing the part of a magician. “White Lies is a unique magic show in that it doesn’t follow a standard time sequence. The script is designed to create a feeling of unpredictability in the spectators perception of time.” Set against a background of music, multimedia visuals and deadpan humour, Melbourne magic lovers can hope to have their minds read, lose their senses and encounter visual hallucinations where objects melt, bend and levitate. White Lies is entertaining and thought provoking theatrical surrealism at its best. A Perth-based magician, Pierre Ulric migrated to Australia from his native Canadian province of Québec 19 years ago. He has been involved in the craft for over 25 years and has received several peer awards and nominations, including Strolling Magic Champion (Australian National Convention, WA, 2003) and Magician of the Year Award (West Australian Society of Magicians, 2003 and 2005) . Performance Season: July 11-15 at 8.15pm Venue: Northcote town Hall (Studio 3), 189 High St., Northcote Tickets: $24 full, $15 concession, $65 family, $12 groups 20+ Bookings: www.melbournemagic festival.com/white-lies or 9481 9502.

Local Theatre With Cheryl Threadgold

The Mooors at St Kilda ■ Red Stitch’s Australian premiere of The Moors by American playwright Jen Silverman, is an exciting, quirky and thoroughly enjoyable piece of theatre about lust, isolation, possession and a maniacal craving for attention. Working in the smallest of confines this intimate and stark production is a credit to director Stephen Nicolazzo’s vision. Where international productions have staged elaborate Victorian parlours, Nicolazzo has no set to speak of - his ‘parlour’ is so indistinct it’s every room in the house and out. The result is stunning performance-based immersive theatre. Lighting (Katie Sfetkidis), costumes (Eugyeene The) and sound (Daniel Nixon), add an eerie drama and mood to the production. Silverman’s play is influenced by the Bronte sisters and conjures the isolated and bleak existence on a Wuthering Heights-like moor. Set against the austerity of the Victorian era this is an erotic tale told with modern day humour. Sisters Agatha (Alex Aldrich) and Hudley (Anna MCarthy), live a remote and isolated life on the “moors”. When a London governess comes to tend to their brother’s

● Alex Aldrich, Dion Mills, Anna McCarthy and Zoe Boesen in The Moors at Red Stitch Actors Theatre. Photo: Teresa Noble child everything changes. Not (maid Marjory) is deliciously all is what it seems and a irreverent, sinister and cunning. tantalising tale unfolds. A parallel story revolves Aldrich’s Agatha is strong, around the neglected and misrestrained and full of mystery. understood pet dog, The MasHer cutting frankness is glori- tiff (Dion Mills). ous as she manages to convey Also craving love and attenthe devilish and heartlessness tion this giant beast finds comof Agatha before a tenderness panionship in an unlikely is revealed. moorhen (Olga Makeeva). Anna McCarthy is brilliant Mills is edgy and desperate, as the deluded and child-like Makeeva is wary but trusting – Hudley. So affected by the iso- an intriguing volatile and powlation and coldness of her sis- erful exchange unravels. ter - she lives out fantasies in Congratulations to Red her head. Stitch for another innovative McCarthy has a fantastic and vibrant work. comic sense and delivers her Performance season:8pm lines with a naïve humour con- Wednesday to Saturday and vincingly portraying a complex 6:30pmSundays until 9 July character that is adorable, paVenue: Red Stitch Actors thetic and ultimately menacing. Theatre, Rear 2 Chapel St, St Zoe Boesen (Emilie) is the Kilda East lovely, lonely and lustful govTickets:$49 erness. Her transformation is Bookings: www.redstitch. convincing. Grace Lowry net - Beth Klein

■ Williamstown Musical Theatre Company: Seussical Jr Until June 25 at the Williamstown Mechanics Institute, Cnr Electra and Melbourne Sts., Williamstown. Bookings: www.wmtc.org. au or call 1300 881 545. ■ Peridot Theatre: The Female of the Species (by Joanna-Murray Smith) Until June 24 at the Unicorn Theatre, Mt Waverley Secondary College, Lechte Rd., mt Waverley. Director: Natasha Boyd. Bookings: 9808 0770 or www.peridot.com.au ■ Gemco Players Community Theatre: Space Captain Smith Until June 24 at The Gem Theatre, Kilvington Drive, Emerald. Bookings: www.gemcoplayers.org 0411 723 530 ■ Malvern Theatre Company: The Memory of Water (by Shelagh Stephenson) Until July 1 at 29 Burke Rd., Malvern. Director: Gayle Poor. Bookings:www.malverntheatre.com.au 1300 131 552 ■ Windmill Theatre Company: Chicago Until July 2 at The Drum Theatre, 226 Lonsdale St., Dandenong. www.windmilltheatre.com.au 8571 1666 ■ Williamstown Little Theatre: Vincent in Brixton (by Nicholas Wright) June 29 - July 15 at 2-4 Albert St., Williamstown. Director: Shirley Sydenham. Bookings: www.wlt.org.au 9885 9678 ■ Mordialloc Theatre Company: Australia Day (by Jonathan Biggins) June 30 - July 15 at Shirley Burke Theatre, 64 Parkers Rd., Parkdale. Director: Martin Gibbs. www.mordialloctheatre.com 9587 5141 ■ Fab Nobs Theatre: Shrek Jnr July 7 - 16 at 7:30pm at The Fab Factory, 33 Industry Place, Bayswater. Bookings: www.fabnobstheatre.com.au Anne 0401 018 846 ■ Peoples Playhouse Inc: The Little Mermaid July 7 - 15 at the Cranbourne Community Cen-

THE WIDOR PROJECT

tre, Brunt St., Cranbourne. Bookings and further details: www.peoplesplayhouse.com ■ Heidelberg Theatre Company: All My sons (by Arthur Miller) July 7 - 22 at 36 Turnham Ave., Rosanna. Director: Chris McLean. Tickets: $27/$24. Bookings: www.htc.org.au

● Organist Joseph Nolan ■ As part of the City of Melbourne’s Grand Organ Program, world-renowned interpreter of classical organ music British-Australian Joseph Nolan, presented all 10 of Widor’s organ symphonies in a season over four days. French organist, teacher and composer, Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937) was first taught organ music by his father who was the organist at St François in Lyon. As a young man, Charles-Marie was noted as a skilled improvisor. In 1890, he succeeded César Franck as organ professor at the Paris Conservatoire and is most notable for these 10 organ symphonies. Joseph Nolan, formerly of Her Majesty’s Chapels Royal, is now Master of Music at St George’s Cathedral, Perth. To a nearly full auditorium in Melbourne Town Hall, Nolan started the concert series playing the hour-long program Symphonies 7 and 5 on Melbourne Town Hall’s famous Grand Organ. This was an exclusive event with free admission. What a treat for teachers, fans and classical organ enthusiasts and for visitors who had come in to see the Town Hall and stayed to witness a brilliant virtuoso performance. The audience was silent throughout, rapt by Nolan’s energetic and powerful virtuoso performance of Symphonies 7 and 5 and thanked Nolan with standing ovations and bravos. - Review by Rita Crispin

AUDITIONS

STEPHEN NICOLAZZO

Seussical Jr at W’town SHOWS

Melbourne

Observer

■ Essendon Theatre Company: Baby with the Bathwater (by Christopher Durang), June 25 at 6.00pm, June 29 at 7.30pm at the Bradshaw Street Community Hall, Bradshaw St., West Essendon (enter off Buckley St). Director: Drew Mason. Audition bookings: drew.mason@ optusnet.com.au or 9382 6284. ■ The 1812 Theatre: Nunsense (by Dan Goggin) June 25, 26 at 7.00pm at 3 Rose St., Upper Ferntree Gully. Director: Trish Carr. Enquiries: 9720 1177. ■ The Basin Theatre Group: Australia Day (by Jonathan Biggins) June 26 at 7.00pm at The Basin Theatre, Doongalla Rd., The Basin. Director: Angela Ellis. Enquiries: 0412 566 934. ■ MLOC Productions: Shout, The Legend of the Wild One June 27 - July 2 at various locations in Mordialloc and Parkdale. Director: Rhylee Nowell; Musical Director: Tim Ryan; Choreography: Sabrina Klock. Audition Bookings: auditions@mloc.org.au : ■ Williamstown Little Theatre: The Seafarer (by Conor McPherson) July 2 at 10.00am and July 3 at 7.00pm at 3 Albert St., Williamstown. Director: Bruce Akers. Enquiries: 0432 984 781. ■ Mordialloc Theatre Company: Equally Divided (by Ronald Harwood) July 2, 3 at 7.30pm at Guide Hall, Glebe Ave., Cheltenham. Director: Cheryl Ballantine Richards. Enquiries: 0412 133 071 ■ Mooroolbark Theatre: Becky's New Car (by Steven Dietz) July 10 at 7.00pm at Red Earth Theatre, Mooroolbark Community Centre, 135 Bryce Ave., Mooroolbark. Director: Louise Woodward. Enquiries: 0416 777 356.

● From Page 35 After The Moors, Stephen will be directing a stage adaptation of Australian author Christos Tsiolkas's short story collection, Merciless Gods, by Helpmann Award winning writer Dan Giovannoni . “It has been three years in the making, and is an epic piece of theatre that explores the spectrum of sexuality, religion and migration to Australia” says Stephen. “Merciless Gods is a passion project, one I care deeply about as a third-generation Italian homo, and it will be playing in Melbourne this July, and in Sydney at Griffin Theatre Company at the end of October.” To book tickets for The Moors, visit www.redstitch.net or call 9533 8083. - Cheryl Threadgold

OUR REVIEWERS

■ Cheryl Threadgold heads our team of honorary reviewers including Mark Briggs, Rita Crispin, Martin Curtis, Sherryn Danaher, Barbara Hughes, Lyn Hurst, Kathryn Keeble, Beth Klein, Deborah Marinaro, Graeme McCoubrie, Catherine, McGregor, David McLean, Maggie Morrison, Jill Page, Kylie Rackham, Elizabeth Semmel. We welcome Greg Every who has joined the review team. Barbara Hughes is doing some professional performance work, and is taking a break from review work.


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Page 40 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 Melbourne

Observer

Lovatts Crossword No 32 Across

2. Supervisory (position) 7. Pays brief visit (5,2) 11. Rule 17. Yacht pole 18. Untruth 19. Spanish cheer 20. Ellipse 21. Hangover symptom 22. Decreased 23. Woeful 26. Unfilled space 28. Citizen soldiers 29. Adolescent 31. Existence 34. World computer link 36. Archfiend 39. Female equines 41. Roused 43. Suspension of workers (3-3) 46. Morocco's capital 47. Writer, Emily ... 49. Frolicked 51. Pharaohs' tombs 52. Repaints (car) 53. Short-sighted 54. Lieu 55. Flip in air 56. Ill-treatment 61. Featured musicians 64. Nautical speed unit 65. Fellows 66. Extending 67. ... or nay 69. Possessor 71. US coins 74. Not apparent 76. Penny-pincher 78. Elderly horse 79. Phlegm condition 81. Anti-terrorist squad (1,1,1) 83. Wigwam 84. Aunt's husband 86. Scented purple flower 89. Desert illusions 90. Humility 93. Roll (dice) 94. Sailor's yes (3,3) 97. Made (wage) 100. From India or China 101. Saviour 103. Subway 106. Long letter 108. Short-circuited 109. Mistake (4-2) 110. Untied 111. Islamic governors 112. Renowned 113. Power group 115. Salon worker (4,7) 118. Minor roads (4,7) 121. Be without 124. Early harps 128. Hickory tree nut 129. Aimed 130. Cosmos scientists 134. Brings up (child) 135. Excessively fat 136. Overshadow 137. Fragrance 138. Existing

Across 139. Abandon 140. Alluring 143. Natural disaster, ... wave 144. Vote in 147. Film 150. Extinct bird 151. White flower (7,4) 155. Not justified 157. Chime 158. Smell 159. Concur 162. Snapshots 164. Harrowing trial 167. Doctor 168. Rid of lice 169. Comfy seat (4,5) 172. Journalists' credits (2-5) 173. Polite 174. Unassuming 177. Deprive of food 180. Islands 181. Flight from reality 183. Reconstructed 184. Notorious gangster (2,6) 186. Potato variety 187. In vain, to no ... 188. Fulfilled (demand) 191. Actress, ... Diaz 195. See next page (1,1,1) 197. Megastars 198. Earphones 200. Idiocy 202. Middle-distance runner 203. Weeding implement 205. Protrudes (6,3) 206. ... de Cologne 208. Pleasant 209. Fireproof material 212. Funeral guests 215. US Mormon state 217. Feeble 220. Capital of Iowa, Des ... 222. Hiding game 224. Close watch (5,3) 226. Fries lightly 228. Wife, the ... 229. Bake (meat) 230. Crazier 232. Check 235. La Scala city 236. Dallas is there 238. Well-meaning person (2-6) 241. Spot 242. Admonish 243. Gain through will 244. Singer, ... Horne 246. Require 252. Mental stress 253. Renounce throne 254. Eyelid swelling 255. Focal point 256. Rug 257. East European 258. Opposition 259. Shipping route (3,4) 260. School project

Down

Down

1. Right on target (4-2) 2. Dr Jekyll's alter ego (2,4) 3. Ark builder 4. Moves (towards) 5. Recognise 6. Peru beasts 7. Battery segment 8. Grass 9. Weary sound 10. Xmas 11. Responds 12. Contraptions 13. Crocodile relatives 14. Taverns 15. Small lump 16. Wine jug 24. Trophies 25. Addressed crowd 26. Shaking motion 27. Listing articles 28. Actors Gibson or Brooks 30. Lamb's mother 32. Lack of aptitude 33. Instructors 35. Lament 37. Defence force 38. Beastliest 39. Raider 40. Glimpse 42. Map guide 44. Chooses 45. Thrifty 47. Long-snouted monkey 48. Ice-free Norwegian port 50. Rounded roof 53. Ponder 57. Freedom from guilt 58. Bare 59. Rocket ship crew 60. Talks keenly 62. Mountaineer's tool (3,3) 63. Oppress 65. Judi Dench stars in ... Henderson Presents 68. Aviator, ... Johnson 70. Vigilantly 72. Admission 73. Old photo colour 74. Open sore 75. Dessert, ... caramel 77. Kenya & Tanzania region (4,6) 80. Letter jumbles 82. Italian city 85. Come together 87. Daunted 88. Prince Edward, ... of Wessex 91. Biblical garden 92. Auction 95. Containing nothing 96. Upwardly mobile young people 98. Ripped apart, torn ... 99. Naked models 102. Group loyalty (6,2,5) 104. Nimble-fingered 105. Helps 107. Piercingly 113. Flowered 114. Requested from menu 116. US cotton state 117. Betrayal crime 119. Cavalryman 120. Codswallop 122. Accomplish 123. US motorbike stuntman, Evel ... 125. Extract (metal) 126. In the Arctic Circle 127. Specifically (2,3) 128. Sacred song 130. Astern

131. Weight unit 132. Record label (1,1,1) 133. Droop 141. Pseudonyms 142. US Rhode Island resort 145. Lengthy (4-6) 146. Droll plays 148. Totally preoccupies 149. Unable to read and write 152. Behaved 153. Louts 154. Finish 155. Great Bear constellation, ... Major 156. Jockey 160. Congers or morays 161. Native American tribespeople 163. Stitched garment edges 165. Cain & ... 166. Vending machine 167. Hitler book, ... Kampf 170. Vile act 171. Largest Turkish city 175. Leaves out 176. Praise highly 178. Panic 179. Current (permit) 182. Prison occupant 185. Progressed (4,2) 188. Names used wrongly 189. Most easily offended 190. Cigar dust 192. Almond biscuit 193. Most corroded 194. Flightless bird 195. Trite remark 196. Band 199. Induces 201. Made amends 204. Rowing aids 207. In present condition (2,2) 210. Companies 211. Samples (wine) 213. Coral bank 214. Safari 216. Large yacht 217. Scavenge 218. Tardiest 219. Your school, ... mater 221. Slip up 223. German or Greek 225. Eastern veils 227. In the past, long ... 228. Russian space station 231. Putrefy 233. Four score 234. Toughen (steel) 235. Liqueur, crème de ... 237. Afternoon nap 239. Most senior 240. Enfold 245. Urges on, ... up 247. Junior Scouts 248. Epic tale 249. Notion 250. Highest point 251. Windmill arm


Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 41

Solution on Page 17

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Page 42 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Places To Go

Right beside RSL, Golf Club and Gippsland Lakes

Caravans,Camping andTouring


ADVERTISING FEATURE

Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 43

Places To Go

Learn about Ned Kelly at Glenrowan The historic small town of Glenrowan is situated in N E Victoria just 2½-hours drive, north, down the Hume Freeway between the towns of Benalla and Wangaratta. Glenrowan is the site of Ned Kelly and his gang’s unsuccessful fight against the Victorian Police force which saw the capture of Ned Kelly, the death of his brother Dan, gang members Steve Hart and Joe Byrne. The siege of Glenrowan on June 28 at Anne Jones’s Glenrowan Inn also tragically saw the death of her son Johnny and that of rail line worker Martin Cherry. At Kate’s Cottage Gift and Souvenirs shop you will find a huge range of Ned Kelly T-shirts, rare collectable books, interesting and unusual memorabilia and souvenirs. Step through the back of this shop to access the Ned Kelly Museum and replica of the Kelly Homestead (ramshackle hut). This proudly is No 1 on TripAdvisor and the holder of a Certificate of Excellence award. Open 7 days a week (excepting Christmas day). A free map of this historic town is available here. Come and explore your bushranger history at Glenrowan. w w w. k a t e s c o t t a g e g l e n r o w a n . c o m . a u


Page 44 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

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Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 45

Real Estate


Page 46 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Alexandra

Eildon

www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Kanumbra

Alexandra

UNDER CONTRACT

Perfect Country Home • 4 Bedroom 2 bathroom home on 15 acres • Master bedroom with BIR and ensuite with spa bath • In ground Swimming pool and beautifully landscaped gardens • large sheds two fully lockable and Cattle yards. $760,000

Woodfield

“Noonamena” Luxurious getaway on 83acres:• Rendered brick home with 4 bedrooms plus office • Central heating and cooling, huge entertaining deck • Separate luxury guesthouse (ideal B&B) above double garage • Tennis court and i.g. pool. Stunning views over Lake Eildon $795,000

Thornton

200 Acres on the Crystal Creek • Tidy 3 bedroom fibro home with split system • Undercover entertaining deck and double carport • Undulating to rising hill country with part grazing and part bush • Mature nut trees and a variety of fruit trees • Abundant water supply with potable bore and new tanks $495,000

Alexandra

Escape to the Country! • Delightful timber cottage on approx. 18 Acres • 3 Bedroom loft style home with wood heater • American barn style shed with concrete floor and mezzanine • Seasonal creek and 2 spring fed dams & solar power $335,000

Eildon

SOLD

“Hazewind” • Beautiful 3 bedroom 2 bathroom home on 126 acres • Modern galleystyle kitchen & Open plan living area • Wrap around verandas with access from all rooms • Under cover carport, 3 car shed & Large enclosed workshop $699,000

A Rare Opportunity • 3.5 Acres of river flats • Prime building block with Power, Phone and Bore • Established trees providing privacy • Located close to Eildon and surrounded by rural land. $225,000

Rare Opportunity to purchase this unique commercial freehold:• Chinese Restaurant seating up to 150 • Full commercial Kitchen with stainless steel benches and splashbacks • 4 bedroom double brick residence with • Dual street frontage 900sqm approx $450,000

Sales Specialis ts I Belinda Hocking 04 18 115 55774 Specialists 0418 Property Management I Sarah Brockhus - 0457 537 222 Cathkin

OPEN THIS SATURDAY, MAY 27 - 11AM TO 12 NOON

Huge block with 2 houses! • Huge block with main residence and a unit • Main house with 3 bedrooms and ensuite • Wood heater, air-conditioning & huge outdoor entertaining deck • Unit with 1 bedrooms, ensuite with spa bath & wood heater $315,000

Landmark Harcourts Alexandra 56 Grant Street, Alexandra I 5772 3444 $1,425,000 For Sale

Woodlea. 3731 Goulburn Valley Highway, Cathkin

LIFESTYLE FARM WITH GOULBURN RIVER ACCESS

‘Woodlea’ presents an outstanding opportunity to secure a picturesque lifestyle property with income generated from the working farm. There are 216 acres (210 freehold and 10 acres leasehold) of improved pasture with a good balance of flat to slight undulating country, good carrying capacity and with Goulburn River access. The 3 bedroom homestead has 2 bathrooms, "chef's kitchen" with views over the rear garden. The formal sitting room has an open fire place; the family room with vaulted ceilings overlooks the front garden and deck. The home is fresh and "homely" and is surrounded by an exquisite 2 acres of English garden. There is a lawn tennis court. The recently renovated cottage is fully self-contained and maybe another income source from farm stay or B&B. Don't miss this wonderful varied lifestyle property: P r i v a t e S a l e $ 11,, 4 2 5 5,, 0 0 0

Sales Specialist I Stuart Oddy 0402 349 120 w w w .landmarkhar .landmarkharcc ourts. ourts.cc om.au

Landmark Har Harcc ourts Y Yee a 5 2 High SStr tr eet, Y ea I 5577 9 7 2277 9 9 treet, Yea


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Melbourne Obser ver - Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - Page 47


Page 48 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

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Melbourne Observer. June 21, 2017  

Melbourne Observer. June 21, 2017

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