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S TATE EDITION Vol 49 No 1667 SERVING VICTORIA SINCE 1969

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CL OC Musical CLOC Thea tr e’ w Theatr tre’ e’ss sho show

Jon goes on tour

■ CLOC Musical Theatre presents an outstanding interpretation of Les Misérables at the National Theatre until May 27. High public esteem of CLOC and the popularity of this remarkable musical attracted over 400 auditionees, resulting in a top-notch cast. Set in France between 1815 and 1832 at a time of social change and political revolution, the story follows the life of Jean Valjean, a prison parolee who reinvents himself as respectable mayor, factory owner, and guardian of young Cosette. The authoritarian Javert perseveres to recapture Valjean, and the ensuing years bring romance, sadness, and the tragic consequences of rebellion. Mark Doran makes the lead character of Valjean his own, delivering a magnificent portrayal with his splendid singing, physicality, and powerful dramatic performance. Congratulations to wig and makeup designer, David Wisken and team for creating the fabulous wigs and ageing effects. Principal cast members Shaun Kingma (Javert), Kirra Young (Fantine). India Morris (Eponine),Daniel Mottau (Marius), Scott Hili (Thénardier) Melanie Ott (Madame Thénardier), Emily Morris (Cosette), Matthew Green (Enjolras), Ben Jason-Easton (Gavroche),Ava Rose Houben- Carter (Little Cosette) and Charlotte Barnard (Little Eponine) all present individually unique, terrific performances, supported by a strong Company.. Turn to Page 35

■ Jon Stevens is hitting the road around Australia for a national tour to celebrate his latest album release Starlight. The tour, which will see him rock into six states and territories, will also feature special guest and Jon’s long-time friend Kate Ceberano. Jon will play at The Palms At Crown on Saturday, July 15.

Extra show ■ An extra Melbourne show has been added to Jerry Seinfeld’sAustralian tour on Monday, August 7 at Hisense Arena. This is the final show that will be added to Jerry Seinfeld’s tour which commences in August. Tickets go on sale on Friday.

Smooth birthday ■ Smooth FM celebrated its fifth birthday, becoming the number one FM radio station in Melbourne. To coincide with this occasion, the station released a special song, featuring the vocals of Australian rock and pop singer Rick Price.

birthday ■ Stranger Thing's Barb, aka Shan-

■nonAPurser, will appear at Oz Comic-

■ Scott Hili (Thénardier) and Melanie Ott (Mme Thénardier in Les Misérables. Photo: Ben Fon

Con Melbourne, on Saturday-Sunday, July 1-2. The event will be held at the will be held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre.

THE GREA T GREAT MUSIC OF THE ‘30s TO ‘60s Streaming through the Web PHONE: 9572 1466 ● See advert, back page

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This role involves delivering ans setting up essential equipment to help relieve pain and suffering for people in your local hospital. It’s a casual 24/7 service that pays well when busy, but also gives you a lot of down tim. • Pleased to hear from anyone including smei-retired or older persons keen for an interest or seconde job who lives in close to proximity to main hospitals. • Some knowledge of hospital like equipment is beneficial. • Moderate lifting involved • Must be able to use Smartphone confidently and have great attention to detail. Please forward your Application along with CV to applications@ahessential.com


Page 2 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

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Travel

MERIMBULA, NSW

2017 HOLIDAY VACANCIES AVAILABLE: ASK US!

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Set beside the sparkling waters of Merimbula Lake, you can watch the boats passing while eating breakfast. 1 and 2 bedroom fully self-contained apartments with spa and ensuite. Pool, BBQ and under cover parking. 2 minute walk to a safe swimming beach and shops, clubs and restaurants. Beautiful water views. 1 Beach Street, Merimbula, NSW 2548 Phone: (02) 6495 2205 E-mail: info@beachstreetapartments.net.au www.beachstreetapartments.net.au


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Healthy Living


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Healthy Living

What’s New


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 9

Showbiz Latest

‘My Fair Lady’ opening night

● The My Fair Lady cast at Melbourne’s Regent Theatre. Photo: Peter Kemp

● Charles Edwards and Anna O’Byrne. Photo: Kevin Trask

Melbourne Observations with Matt Bissett-Johnson

The Melbourne Observer is printed under contract by Streamline PressPty Ltd, 155 Johnston S t, Fitzr o y, ffor or the publisher ocal Media P ty L 7 096 680 06 3, of the rregis egis ed Fitzro publisher,, L Local Lttd. ABN 6 67 063, egistte rre office, 30 Glen Gully Rd, Eltham, Vic 3095. Distributed by All Day Distribution Responsibilityfor election and r e ffe e rrendum endum c omment is ac cept ed b y Ash L ong. C op yright © 20 1 7, L ocal Media comment acc by Long. Cop opyright Pty Ltd. ACN 096 680 063.

● Anna O’Byrne Photo: Peter Kemp

Mike McColl Jones

Top 5

THE T OP 5 ‘MY F AIR LAD Y’ TOP FAIR LADY’ SONGS THA T MIGHT SUIT THAT OTHER PE OPLE PEOPLE 5. Geoffrey Edlesten - "Get me to the Registry Office on time". 4. D.K Weir - "Flemington Gavotte". 3.Matthew Guy - "Just you wait, Daniel Andrews - Just you wait". 2. A reality show creator - "With a little bit of Muck". 1. Alan Joyce - "He threw a custard in my Face".


Page 10 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

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Obituary

Isobell Tunzi, 99½ extraordinary years

■ Isobell Tunzi, one of the matriarchs of the Melbourne Observerr family, has died at the age of 99½. Mrs Tunzi, mother of Fleur Long, passed away peacefully at the Royal Freemasons Homes, Melbourne, on Wednesday (May 10), exactly 99½ years after she was born on November 10, 1917. Isobell Johnson was born as the first of two children of Frederick and Annie Johnson, ofWandin Yallock, in the Yarra Valley. She was born at Nurse Arnaud’s hospital in Castella St, Lilydale. Her father was a market gardener, and her mother was a nurse. That nursing tradition continued with Isobell, continuing with her own daughters, Angela and Fleur. Frederick and Annie had married early in 1917, and late that year Isobell arriced. She said that her father, a teetotaller (in fact, a member of the Rechabite Lodge from age 16 to when he died at 84) might have been over-refreshed when he arrived at the Births Registrar at Coldstream, because her name was to have been ‘Isabella Alice’, a tribute to her grandmother ‘Isabella Alice Coxon’, who was a native-born Australian in Adelaide in 1856. Isabella and John Coxon were an important part of South Australian history. Life on the land , just after World War I, was hard, but there was no expectation that it would be easy. There was work to be done, everyone played their part in a close rural community, and there were plenty of relatives, with aunts, uncles and cousins in Wandin, Seville and Monbulk. Isobell described her father as a "hard worker and a good provider". She also said that he was 'God-fearing'. Church played a big part in the weekly family life. Isobell was baptised at St George's Anglican Church, Monbulk, in 1918. In her childhood, she often walked to Church with her grandmother, 'Little Granny'. The first family home was a small holding at Wandin Yallock: a bequest to Frederick Johnson from his grandfather. When Isobell was aged just one year and nine months, a brother arrived - Walter Edward - named after their two grandfathers. Isobell was an enthusiastic pupil at Wandin Yallock Primary School, starting there at age four, and she enjoyed returning there for reunions, most recently in 2010 for the 140th birthday. Her grandfather Edward Johnson had arrived in Australia at age 3, and had been one of the early pupils at Wandin Yallock. At age 7, Isobell and her family moved to the Doncaster-Blackburn area, as her father made the decision to return to the building trade. They lived there whilst their family home was completed at Balwyn. He later returned to market gardening with apples, berry fruits and root vegetables at Mulgrave, near the Waverley Police Academy. Isobell was confirmed at St Barnabas Church, Balwyn, by the Archbishop of the day. She attended Canterbury Girls' High School, and East Camberwell Girls' High. Isobell was frank about her childhood. Several years ago, she wrote: "I had a very hard mother who had

● Isobell Tunzi, nee Johnson never heard of 'spare the rod and the long corridor had all the thrills of spoil the child'. Her rod was a razor a Barbara Cartland novel, and took strap. I will always believe that the as much daring in Armstrong's walk extra attention given to me by both on the moon, and if caught, as much my grandmothers was to compen- danger. I was never caught, but probsate for treatment I got, and I loved ably the authorities thought I was dothem dearly." ing what I hoped they thought I was Annie died when Isobell was still doing, posting a letter." a teenager at secondary school. Isobell finally graduated in May Isobell lived for a time with her 1941, and proudly continued her links Grandmother Johnson, and later with the Alfred … going on to a rare lived there permanently until marry- achievement as a triple-certificate nurse. ing in 1950. Sister Johnson - 'Johnno' or One of her first jobs was in a city office, earning 19/9, with 3d taken 'Johnny' - continued work at places out in tax. She said there were only including the Women's Hospital, two good times of the week at the Keppel Street Infant Centre, the Reoffice: pay day, and Saturday 12 patriation General Hospital, Jessie McPherson Hospital, shift work at noon, knock-of time. Isobell had early ambitions for a the Preston and Northcote Commucareer in journalism, but the news- nity Hospital, and the Austin Hospapers were only hiring men. The pital. It was when she was working at nursing spark was ignited when she applied to train at the Alfred Hospi- the T & G Insurance Company, that she met Bill Tunzi, a handsome extal, and was accepted. Actually, the nursing had links to serviceman, who worked at Isobell's childhood. She recalled McPherson's from age 14, later as a wearing one of her father's handker- fitter and turner, then as a supervichiefs on her head, with a red cross sor. When he started, he rode his bike pencilled on it. The family pets were heavily bandaged - whether they to work from Tullamarne. After returning from active war service overneeded it or not. Before starting at the Alfred in seas in the 2/14th Battalion, Bill unOctober 1937, Isobell had to com- dertook a diesel engineering course plete a course in invalid cooking at at RMIT night school, and management courses. Swinburne Technical School. They met through his brother Isobell was out of action for eight months with kidney illness; George and his partner. Bill asked if turberculosis. She had tried to join he could accompany Isobell on the the Army as a nurse in these War Sydney Rd tram, going well past his years, but was told "we need nurses, stop to accompany her home. He asked if they might go on Sunnot patients". She confided, offering few details, that she had been en- day afternoon walks, which they did gaged; there was a war-time trag- to the Coburg Lake. Bill had had a previous marriage, and a daughter edy. In her own biographical notes on Heather, and asked Isobell if he her years at the Alfred, Isobell wrote: were free, would Isobell marry him? "I was never a social success but I And so, they were married at did have my moments and that trip Alphington on September 23, 1950. down the iron stairs behind the resi- They had half-a-house at Ivanhoe, dents' rooms, and the walk back along then accommodation at Ascot Vale.

The Tunzis were one of the pioneer families of the Peter Lalor Housing Co-Operative, in the suburb of the same name. Their community involvements were many. Bill was active in the founding of the Lalor Football Club, golf club, and the Freemasons, with memberships of the Lodges of Retorspect and Happiness. Isobell was active as a guide leader, even a probation officer, and she confided that she was studying for a law degree in the 1960s. She was tempted to tutor in the women's school at the Repat Hospital. Isobell was local correspondent for the Whittlesea Post local newspaper. In the early days of Lalor, she acted as a receptionist-nurse for the local doctors … she worked as a parttime cashier at the TAB.. Indeed the recently published 50-year history of Lalor ponders if she ever slept. Life at Lalor also included looking after step-daughter Heather, a grandmother, then Auntie Ess came to stay Tragedy struck in 1966, when her beloved Bill died from angina-related problems at age 49. Isobell suddenly had the task of raising a young teenage daughter, Angela, and a nineyear-old Fleur, single-handed. And she did. Working as a Nursing Sister at the Austin, she funded the girls education through Ivanhoe Girls' Grammar School. Isobell worked until the age of 72, still taking charge roles at the Kingston Hospital. In retirement she enjoyed croquet and bowls at Murrumbeena, and travelled extensively throughout Europe, made a trip to Fiji with Angela … and even made a trip to the Argentine. Her involvements were many: Order of the Eastern Star, the Alfred Hospital Nurses' League, Sisters of the Holy Name, Church missions, nursing groups from the Royal Women's Hospital and others. She even volunteered as an advertising saleswomen for the Anglican newspaper. Church was essential, she had a love of Anglicanism. "I never felt the need to experiment," she said. Her early days at St Barnabas had an entire social life encompassing tea meetings, dances and Bible class. Worship was an important ingredient of her life: St Mary's at Ascot Vale; St Stephen's at Darebin; St John's atEpping, and its sister church at St Paul's at Thomastown-Lalor; St Peter's at Murrumbeena; and the

weekly chapel services at the Freemasons Homes. She was a regular Communicant in services held at the home by a number of churches including Christ Church Anglican Church, South Yarra; and by Bro. Dennis of St Joseph's Catholic Church. Murrumbeena gave Isobell the opportunity to become an active participant in the Parish of St Peter, and in latter years she happily returned each year for the annual fair. Isobell was extremely proud of her donation of the stained glass window to St Luke, with a brass plaque honouring the Tunzi family. Isobell remained active in her life at the Freemasons Homes, and in the earlier years, was an active member of the writers' group. She was extremely proud of her 60-year association with the Ladies' Auxiliary. Shehad started pouring cups of tea in the old Coppin Hall. Isobell's maternal grandmother lived to the age of 93. Just a few years ago, Isobell wrote: "I planned to do the same, and here I am, 94. I have children, grand children and great grand children, but no razor straps!" It is at this point that I want to pause to pay tribute to Fleur, who visited her Mum, at least weekly, every week, every year for 20 years. As her carer, Fleur lovingly looked after all her mother's requirements, with special love and care. Isobell was also grateful for the care of the staff of the Royal Freemasons Homes, at Murrumbeena, at Punt Road, and at Mowbray House. Isobell discussed her life. She said it had been a hard life but a good life. With much love, we agree. It is a wise man who lets his mother-in-law have the last word. These are Isobell's words, written not so long ago: "My husband died when the girls were young and I remember thinking 'God will have to help me now. I hope he doesn't desert me too. I am sure he has pointed me several times as I battled on the right direction to give the girls what Bill started: School and extras, music, dancing, etc. "I shall thank Him as I see what good Mothers and Grandmothers they are, and what appear as very stable marriages. I must have done something right. “Praise the Lord." Praise the Lord indeed. - Ash Long, her son-in-law

● Fleur Long with her mother Isobell Tunzi, then 95, in 2012


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 11

Melbourne People

Northcote

● Northcote football team. Circa 1940-41.

● Carter’s Arms Hotel. Near Separation St corner. Circa 1910.

● Entrance to Northcote, from Clifton Hill

● The Savings Bank, Northcote. 1900-1930.

● High St, Northcote

● Northcote State School

● Northcote Football Club (VFA). 1933.

● High Street, Northcote.


Page 12 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, y May y 24, 2017 Melbourne

Observer

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West Hollywood

G’day USA was sparkling success

■ Hi everyone, from my suite at the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites comes this week's news.

How good are we!

■ The G'Day USA Los Angeles Gala Dinner was held in Los Angeles and this years honourees were Oscar award winning costume and production designer Catherine Martin and also Internationally acclaimed Executive Producer David Hill who both received the G'Day USA Lifetime Achievement Award. The G'Day USA award night is the pre-eminent businessnetworking event for Australia and US companies seeking to increase their visibility and presence in both markets. Frank Howson and John-Michael Howson submitted this original idea to the Australian Government all those years ago. Like most brilliant ideas a higher authority claimed it for themselves and the Australian Government now runs this event.

Richest man eats Maccas ■ Guests at an HBO party for new documentary "Becoming Warren Buffett" dined on the billionaire's favourite foods, such as "macaroni balls" and Dairy Queen treats, but the Oracle of Omaha had McDonald's delivered for him. "Someone snuck in a burger and a Coke. He has them every day," a source said. In the doc, Buffett credits his late wife Susan with inspiring him to give to charity. He told us he agreed to make the documentary to honour her and his late father. "I never thought my dad or my first wife had ever gotten full credit," Buffett said.

Big spending POTUS

■ President Barack Obama left the federal government approximately $9,335,000,000,000 deeper in debt than it was when he took office eight years ago, according to data released by the U.S. Treasury. The increased debt incurred under Obama equals approximately $75,129 for every person in the United States who had a full-time job in December. The $9,334,590,089,060.56 that the debt had increased under Obama is far more debt than was accumulated by any previous president. It equals nearly twice as much as the $4,889,100,310,609.44 in additional debt that piled up during the eight years George W. Bush served as president.

● Pictured at the event is one of its major sponsors, Ramada Plaza, West Hollywood's Managing Director Mr. Alan Johnson and his wife Lorna Johnson.

Free things to do in WeHo HOTEL MUSIC SERIES Listen to free acoustic music in an awesome setting. The Andaz's Under the Covers series happens monthly on Wednesday nights. The Roxy Theatre owner Nic Adler hand-picks the featured cover musicians, and conducts a pre-show interview with them in an Andaz hotel room (hence the name, "Under the Covers." For a poolside setting, visit The Standard Hollywood's weekly Wednesday night series, Desert Nights. You'll listen to acoustic performances in the intimate, candlelit Cactus Lounge and sip drinks by The Standard's expert bartenders.

Sir Paul ready for fight

■ Paul McCartney has filed a lawsuit against Sony to regain ownership of the Beatles' songs he co-wrote with John Lennon. Citing part of the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976 that allows songwriters to get copyrights back 56 years after a legal transfer of ownership, McCartney says he will reclaim rights in October 2018. According to legal documents, the songs include "Love Me Do," "All You Need Is Love," and "I Want to Hold Your Hand" all of which are currently in Sony's catalogue. McCartney had initially gotten the ball rolling on getting ownership of the songs back last March, but he decided to file a lawsuit when Sony put up resistance

‘The Donald’ was second

■ Donald Trump's inauguration ratings were the second highest in 36 years, according to Nielsen. 30.6 million viewers saw the swearing-in of the 45th president across 12 networks. The only inauguration over the last three decades that tops Trump's number in the linear ratings? Barack Obama's first inauguration back in 2009 had a record-setting 37.8 million viewers.

BOOK SIGNINGSAT BOOK SOUP Meet your favourite author, listen to a reading and get an autographed book or a picture at Book Shop in West Hollywood. The famous bookstore features author readings most nights a week, and admission is always free.

GavinWood

From my Suite at the Ramada Plaza Complex on Santa Monica Blvd

PERSUE THE SUNSET STRIPFARMER'S MARKET Relax after work or bring the family on an adventure Thursday nights at the Sunset Strip Farmer's Market. Every Thursday night, the famous street hosts a night time farmer's market full of produce, dairy and meat, food vendors and entertainment. While purchasing groceries for dinner costs money, there is often live music and entertainment, which is always free for attendees. REMODELYOUR HOMEATTHE PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER The Blue Building of the architecture masterpiece that is the Pacific Design Centre is home to countless interior design showrooms. Bring a sketchpad, a camera and your questions: spend the day browsing for ideas for your current house or future dream home.

Special Holiday Offer ■ If you are considering a move to Los Angeles or just coming over for a holiday to see all the sights then I have got a special deal for you. We would love to see you at the Ramada Plaza Hotel and Suites, 8585 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Hollywood. I have secured a terrific Holiday deal for readers of the Melbourne Observer. Please mention 'Melbourne Observer' when you book and you will receive the 'Special Rate of the Day'. Please contact: Joanna at info@ramadaweho.com Happy Holidays, Gavin Wood

GET HEALTHYONYOUR SPECIALDAY Why celebrate turning another year older by stuffing your face with cake and champagne? Add even more years to your life by claiming your free class and gym usage at Lift West Hollywood The gym wants to give you the very special birthday gift of fitness, so mark your calendar on your birthday.

● Sir Paul McCartney

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GETACELEBRITY'SAUTOGRAPH (ANDATASTY TREAT)AT MILLIONS OF MILKSHAKES. Take a walk down the red carpet at Santa Monica Boulevard's Millions of Milkshakes! You never know who'll stop by. Kim Kardashian, Miley Cyrus, Heidi and Spencer, Mario Lopez and more have all stopped by the store to sign autographs, meet fans, take pictures and, of course, create their own drinks! Stop by on a regular day for a delicious celebrity-created treat. Or find out when a star is coming to town and get in line!


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Melbourne

Observer

Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 13

Travellers’ Good Buys

with David Ellis

World’s most expensive cheese ■ The world’s most expensive cheese doesn’t come from cows or goats, and you won’t find it in the plushest restaurants or finest delis in London, New York or Paris. Instead this cheese comes from the milk of donkeys, just 100 jennies amongst a pack of 130 of them that live in a Special Nature Preserve outside the Serbian capital Belgrade. And if you want to find out why it can command such a bizarre price, you’ll have to go to Belgrade to try it for yourself, because it’s not sold retail anywhere else in the world - and you’ll pay the equivalent of around AU$3000 a kilo for your little indulgence. Called “Pule” it’s made in what’s said to be the world’s only donkey cheese factory, with 25 litres of donkey milk (6.6 gallons) required for each kilogram of cheese, and annual production a mere 200 kilograms. Those who’ve tried it in local restaurants, say it’s white and crumbly, intensely flavoured, has a natural saltiness to it, and is smoked in the final stages of production. Highly nutritious donkey milk that’s beneficial to babies’ immune systems and is used in many European beauty and skin-care products, is also available at an equally pricey 40 Euros a litre (around AU$59) – because donkeys are simply not big daily milk producers.

And which reminds us that ancient Egypt’s Queen Cleopatra bathed nightly in donkey’s milk to preserve the beauty and youth of her skin… and to indulge her whim, needed 700 of the animals on stand-by no matter where she travelled.

● Serbian donkey cheese is white, crumbly and intensely flavoured and the most expensive cheese in the world.

Melbourne

Observer Wines & Liqueurs

with David Ellis

To go with Christmas turkey ■ It’s not often we get the chance to taste a $150 bottle of what is obviously up there with the very best of the best, so when that opportunity did come our way recently it proved not only one of our most memorable tasting experiences, it decided us on just what we’ll be putting with the family Christmas turkey this year. We’re talking about a Wynn’s Michael Shiraz from the best-of-vintage fruit off their best vineyards in Coonawarra, and made only in exceptional years when the most extraordinary of fruit is available, in this case 2013. First labelled in 1955, company proprietor David Wynn released the wine as a one-off in that year after noticing the outstanding quality of two particular barrels, and naming it Michael after his son. It has since gone on to become something of a legend of the Australian industry, and one of the most highly-regarded of Aussie Shiraz – which is saying something. Endless layers of fruit, spice and texture are centre to this 2013, together with powdery tannins, nutty oak and suggestions of ginger. And all of which make for it being the perfect partner with the Christmas turkey, and why all our family will be pitching-in for a couple of bottles with ours this year.

One to note ■ It is hard to believe that it is 45 years since Yellowglen first hit hotel and bottle-shop shelves across this country, and since then showing that Australia can be up there with the best when it comes to making stand-out bubblies for all-occasion celebrations. One such that’s now available and worth looking at for special events or festivities is their 2009 Perle Vintage, made from the classic sparkling wine grape varieties of Pinot Noir (60 per cent), Chardonnay (30 per cent) and Pinot Meunier (10 per cent) harvested from across select of Yellowglen’s vineyards in Victoria and South Australia. At $25 its prominent lemon zest and mineral flavours are coupled with grapefruit and nougat to make for a wonderfully elegant and memorable celebratory drop.

Pictured

■ Something of a legend, and one of the most highly-regarded of Aussie Shiraz. ■ Pearler of a bubbly for all-occasion celebrations.

■ The countless movie-costumed characters, topless “desnudas” and street performers who for years have made walking New York’s Times Square something of an obstacle course for its 39m annual visitors, have finally been corralled. Because they can now only solicit for tips when performing or posing for photographs from within defined “Activity Zones.” The City Council created the Zones after escalating complaints of overly-aggressive touting by not only many of the costumed performers, but by the busty, body-painted, hug-youfor-a-price “desnudas” who wear little more than a G-string, in this city where there are no laws against going topless. Daily complaints have ranged from Batman grabbing $50 from the wallet of an Irish tourist and running off with it, to Elmo hurling anti-Semetic slurs at a Jewish visitor who wouldn’t come up with the coin, and the Cookie Monster groping a teen. Spider-Man also found himself in trouble for punching a child who wouldn’t pay him $10 for a photo, and then assaulting a police officer who intervened, while Chewbacca was cautioned for “overt verbal aggression” over a tip. Now everyone’s watching to see if the formal “Activity Zones” will sterilise the once-colour of Times Square, and reduce tourists’ interest in going there to be photographed with its cartoon and movie characters, and hugged by its topless “desnudas.”

■ There’s a horse in America that looks like any other except for one thing – she stands only about as high as, or even less than, many a family pet dog. Thumbelina as she is named, is a dwarf off-spring of a couple of extreme miniature horses known as Falabellas, that themselves grow only to between 70 and 86 centimetres tall (20 to 34 inches.) And in her case she is half that at a mere 43cm high (17 inches) and weighs in at a very petite 26kg (57 pounds)… or about the size of an Aussie kelpie. The Falabella was originally developed in Argentina from a rare species of horse discovered there in the mid-1800s, and introduced to America in the 1940s for their novelty value in hauling miniature stagecoaches in street parades and around wineries. When Thumbelina was born, her owners on a farm in Missouri realised she was highly intelligent and trainable, and today after having put her through some specially-designed training programs, are able to take her to visit sick children in hospitals and clinics, and like a guide dog, to lead elderly locals on shopping and other outings. And as she was born with foot defects, they have designed special shoes for her so that when not “working” with children and the elderly, Thumbelina can run and play with the other regular Falabella miniature horses on her Missouri farm. - David Ellis


Page 14 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

■ When I was a youngster I was a big fan of Bing Crosby but I had no idea that he had a younger brother who was also in showbusiness. George Robert ‘Bob’ Crosby was born in Spokane, Washington, in 1913. Bob was one of seven children born to Harry Lowe Crosby, a bookkeeper at a Tacoma brewery and his wife Kate Harrigan Crosby. Bob was 10 years younger than his brother Harry, who as Bing Crosby, achieved fame as the most popular singer of the 20th century. After matriculating at Gonzaga University, Bob followed his older brother into the music business during the 1930s as a singer and then became the leader of one of the premier jazz bands. Bob married his first wife Marie Grounitz in 1933. He became famous with the Bob Crosby Orchestra which incorporated the Bob Cats and featured some of the best musicians in America at that time. Orchestra members included Yank Lawson, Billy Butterfield, Charlie Spivak, Irving Fazola, Warren Smith, Joe Sullivan, Bob Zurke, Jess Stacy, Bob Haggart and many others. This was the great era of Dixieland and Swing music. In 1940, a young teenager named Doris Day was hired as the band's vocalist. The orchestra had some great hit records which included South Rampart Street Parade, March of the Bob Cats, In a Little Gypsy Tea Room, Whispers in The Dark, Day In, Day Out,

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Whatever Happened To ... Bob Crosby

By Kevin Trask of 3AW and 96.5 Inner FM

Down Argentine Way, You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby, Dolores and Big Noise from Winnetka. Bob became the father to five children from his marriage to June Kuhn. He appeared in films such as Let's Make Music, Presenting Lily Mars, Two Tickets to Broadway and The Five Pennies with Danny Kaye. He served with the marines during World War II and performed with his band to entertain the troops. Bob Crosby was successful in radio and television during his career. In 1952, he became the resident musical director on The Jack Benny Show television series. He was also a regular guest star on The Gisele MacKenzie Show.

● Bob Crosby

In 1961 Bob Crosby and his orchestra were appearing at The Tivoli Theatre in Melbourne in his show titled Hollywood Bandbox. He headlined the opening show at the new Tele-theatre in Fitzroy for HSV7. Bob promoted local talent during his trips to Australia and was very impressed with singers such as Darryl Stewart. In his later years, Bob Crosby reformed his bands for recordings and concerts. Bob lived in the shadow of his famous brother Bing Crosby and pretended during interviews that being the brother of a superstar was amusing. In later years, he admitted it was a sore point. "It got so bad that whenever someone asked me what my occupation was, I used to answer automatically Bing Crosby's brother". But in reality, Bob Crosby had a great career of his own in show business and was highly respected. Bob Crosby died in La Jolla, California in 1993 at the age of seventy nine due to complications from cancer. Kevin Trask Kevin can be heard on radio The Time Tunnel - on Remember When Sundays at 9.10pm on 3AW That's Entertainment - 96.5FM Sundays at Noon 96.5FM is streaming on the internet. To listen, go to www.innerfm.org.au and follow the prompts.

When people go missing in the bush ■ I noticed a couple of days ago that an elderly couple was missing in the Outback. Well, not quite the actual Outback - this time it was in a spot north of Mount Gambier. They had been driving about looking at caves in the Penola area when they were reported lost, having failed to turn up at their expected spot. Of course police were notified, and off they went. And of course they found the car, bogged on a bush track, but no occupants. Happily, police located them shortly thereafter - they had wandered off along the track in search of help. Which breaks the fundamental law of the bush in the Outback anywhere never leave your car. There have been so many tragic endings to bogged and broken-down cars in the bush that it's the safest thing to do. If you get bogged, stay with the car - you will very shortly be missed; provided you follow the second most important rule, and tell someone where you're going. A large car is much easier to spot for a searcher, whether in another vehicle or an aeroplane, than a strolling pedestrian. In fact the wisest thing to do this to wait for a while for people to realise that you're lost, and take a couple of tires off the car, and set them alight to show your searchers some plumes of black smoke to indicate where you are. ■ A couple of days ago a tradie was caught "performing an act of offensive behaviour in public view". Using a Devil's Marble as a toilet. Just a bit too sensitive for such an action - the Devil's Marbles were handed back to traditional owners in 2008 and rules and regulations and were drawn up to forbid even climbing on these strange rocks. When I lived in the NT there were always arguments about sacred sites - there were often gum trees smoking away in the dry riverbed. They were sacred sites of one tribal or family group - always there were arguments about various cultural matters. But the most famous was with the lawyers representing the aborigines on the Alice Springs-Darwin railway. They had negotiated with the landowners that any tree over a foot in diam-

The Outback Legend

her backyard. She went out to investigate, to end up with fists in her face. Fortunately she got a photo of them so that the local police will hopefully nab them. In my growing years the thought of myself or my mates punching such a lady in the face was just not on anyone's radar. Not these days, though.

■ A few of my distant, if not very numerous relatives, had decided that it would be a good idea to contemplate a gathering of our family in the not too distant future. So, I have enthusiastically joined in, and we're scraping together as many as we can find. My great-great grandfather and his brother came out to this fair land in 1837. You'd think that, having started so early on in the infant colony, there'd be thousands of us roaming around by now. Not so. with Nick Le Souef However, with as many as we can, we're sending as many invites as we Lightning Ridge Opals can. 63 Elizabeth Street, Some family members have no inMelbourne terest in family trees, yet others have. Phone 9654 4444 My dad was always fascinated www.opals.net.au with ours - the first one on our family tree was a Nicolas Le Souef, who mareter was a sacred site, so they were ried the third daughter of the King of generally left alone, with the rails go- Naples in 1497. ing around them. However, occasionAnd then we were chucked out of ally, one needed to go, and, for a "con- France during the Huguenot Revolusideration" of $20,000, according to a tion. mate of mine from one of the properThen to the UK, then a couple here. ties along the way, the sacredness of And we stayed. that tree could be placed on to another one. ■ I was recently watching an episode on the ABC. An Outback property ■ I've just heard a report today about owner was explaining his efforts to Melbourne's traffic, or, more specifi- reinvigorate his vast acres, and return cally, drivers themselves. The rudest them to their former productive glory. in the country. Most Australian Outback ProperAs I drive along the Monash and I ties rely on cattle for their financial wish to change Lanes, and flip my in- survival, and this one had been no exdicator down, that is, in most cases, ception. an invitation for any motorist in that However he was trying a different neighbouring lane to speed up and tack, and had removed all the stock, block me. cattle and sheep, in an attempt to reAnd how many times have you place the former flora and fauna. And been waiting in a road or track, want- he was succeeding handsomely. ing to get on to a main road, hoping He wanted the native grasses to that some helpful motorist will slow grow so abundantly that he could redown in the line of stopped traffic just introduce his cattle and still have plenty before a red light up ahead, and let for all. you in. Fat chance! The wildlife was also abundant, In Alice Springs last week there but he was having trouble with kangawas 34 year-old lady in her house, roos and wild goats and who were deciwhen she noticed three young men in mating the pasture which was a flour-

ishing. So he was inviting dingoes in to even the balance with the kangaroos. But unfortunately his sheep-rearing neighbours were appalled by this they are amiably trying to come to terms with this, but it's an on-going issue. As I drive through the Centre I always notice cattle everywhere, and wonder how much the country would

benefit from their absence. This is the age old problem - what's the use of beautiful countryside abundant with native grasses and wildlife if there's nothing to sell to pay the bills. So, except for eco-tourism, the dollar always comes first. - Nick Le Souef ‘The Outback Legend’

Theatre Extra Bug Lab launch

■ Imagine a creature that injects its venom into the brain of its enemy to create a zombie incubator for its children. Imagine being swarmed by bees who know how to increase the core temperature in the centre of the swarm to the exact degree to ‘cook’ you. Imagine a creature built like a tank able to spray a boiling, lethal chemical cocktail on its enemies. Sounds like science fiction? Melbourne Museum’s winter blockbuster exhibition Bug Lab: Little Bugs, Super Powers will let Melburnians get up close and personal with six of the bug world’s superstars: the Orchid Mantis, the Bombardier Beetle, the Jewel Wasp, the Dragonfly, Japanese honeybees and New Zealand’s most dangerous spider, the Katipõ. Collectively these super bugs demonstrate their fantastic superpowers of camouflage, mind control, super speed, swarm intelligence and deadly venom. Expect to be confronted by giant creatures crafted by internationally acclaimed creative studio, Weta Workshop—the masterminds behind films such as The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit trilogies, District 9 and Avatar. It took 40 people four months to create the giant bees alone; from 3D model makers to scientist advisers to hair technicians collaborating to showcase these wonders of the natural world. An immersive, interactive exhibition, science is at its forefront. The exhibition also highlights what the human world is learning from its tiny cohabiters; innovations such as collision-tolerant drones based on studying the humble fly, butterfly wing inspired nanotechnology and 3D technologies created from studying the production of spider silk. ‘For 450 million years, bugs have been getting smarter,’ Richard Taylor, Creative Director of Weta Workshop says, ‘now they’re sharing their genius to help humans make the world a better place.’ Bug Lab is on at the Melbourne Museum from June 23 to October 15. - Kathryn Keeble

Dixie Swim Club

■ Strathmore Theatrical Arts Group (STAG) presents The Dixie Swim Club from May 25 to June 4 at the Strathmore Community Theatre, under the direction of Kris Weber.. Written by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and Jamie Wooten, The Dixie Swim Club tells the histories of five ex-college girlfriends on five of the annual catch-ups at a beach house over 33 years where they meet to laugh, confess and support each other away from their families. Performance Details: May 25 to 27 at 8pm; June 1-3 at 8pm; May 28 and June 4 at 2pm Venue: Strathmore Community Centre, Cnr Leoman and Napier Streets, Strathmore (Mel 16H10) Tickets: $20. Adult. $ 15 Concession. Group discounts are available. Bookings: 9382 6284. or. www.stagtheatre.org - Cheryl Threadgold


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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn PERSONS attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot. BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR, Per G.G., Chief of Ordnance. Explanatory IN this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Missouri negro dialect; the extremest form of the backwoods Southwestern dialect; the ordinary “Pike County” dialect; and four modified varieties of this last. The shadings have not been done in a haphazard fashion, or by guesswork; but painstakingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support of personal familiarity with these several forms of speech. I make this explanation for the reason that without it many readers would suppose that all these characters were trying to talk alike and not succeeding. THE AUTHOR. Huckleberry Finn

— twelve licks; and all still again — stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees — something was a stirring. I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a “me-yow! me-yow!” down there. That was good! Says I, “me-yow! me-yow!” as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me. Chapter II.

WE went tiptoeing along a path amongst the trees back towards the end of the widow’s garden, stooping down so as the branches wouldn’t scrape our heads. When we was passing by the kitchen I fell over a root and made a noise. We scrouched down and laid still. Miss Watson’s big nigger, named Jim, was setting in the kitchen door; we could see him pretty clear, because there was a light behind him. He got up and stretched his neck out about a minute, listening. Then he says: “Who dah?” Scene: The Mississippi Valley Time: Forty to He listened some more; then he come tiptoeing fifty years ago down and stood right between us; we could a Chapter I. touched him, nearly. Well, likely it was minutes and minutes that there warn’t a sound, and we YOU don’t know about me without you have all there so close together. There was a place on read a book by the name of The Adventures of my ankle that got to itching, but I dasn’t scratch Tom Sawyer; but that ain’t no matter. That book it; and then my ear begun to itch; and next my was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the back, right between my shoulders. Seemed like truth, mainly. There was things which he I’d die if I couldn’t scratch. Well, I’ve noticed stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is that thing plenty times since. If you are with the nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time quality, or at a funeral, or trying to go to sleep or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the when you ain’t sleepy — if you are anywheres widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly — Tom’s where it won’t do for you to scratch, why you Aunt Polly, she is — and Mary, and the Widow will itch all over in upwards of a thousand places. Douglas is all told about in that book, which is Pretty soon Jim says: mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I “Say, who is you? Whar is you? Dog my cats ef said before. I didn’ hear sumf’n. Well, I know what I’s gwyne Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom to do: I’s gwyne to set down here and listen tell and me found the money that the robbers hid in I hears it agin.” the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thouSo he set down on the ground betwixt me and sand dollars apiece — all gold. It was an awful Tom. He leaned his back up against a tree, and sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge stretched his legs out till one of them most Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest, and touched one of mine. My nose begun to itch. It it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year itched till the tears come into my eyes. But I round — more than a body could tell what to do dasn’t scratch. Then it begun to itch on the inwith. The Widow Douglas she took me for her side. Next I got to itching underneath. I didn’t son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it know how I was going to set still. This was rough living in the house all the time, conmiserableness went on as much as six or seven sidering how dismal regular and decent the Mark Twain minutes; but it seemed a sight longer than that. I widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn’t stand it no longer I lit out. I got into my me for doing a thing that had some good in it. body was off to bed. I went up to my room with was itching in eleven different places now. I old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was And she took snuff, too; of course that was all a piece of candle, and put it on the table. Then I reckoned I couldn’t stand it more’n a minute set down in a chair by the window and tried to longer, but I set my teeth hard and got ready to free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted right, because she done it herself. me up and said he was going to start a band of Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old think of something cheerful, but it warn’t no use. try. Just then Jim begun to breathe heavy; next robbers, and I might join if I would go back to maid, with goggles on, had just come to live I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. he begun to snore — and then I was pretty soon the widow and be respectable. So I went back. with her, and took a set at me now with a spell- The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in comfortable again. The widow she cried over me, and called me a ing-book. She worked me middling hard for the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, Tom he made a sign to me — kind of a little poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other about an hour, and then the widow made her away off, who-whooing about somebody that noise with his mouth — and we went creeping names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. ease up. I couldn’t stood it much longer. Then was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying away on our hands and knees. When we was She put me in them new clothes again, and I for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. about somebody that was going to die; and the ten foot off Tom whispered to me, and wanted couldn’t do nothing but sweat and sweat, and Miss Watson would say, “Don’t put your feet up wind was trying to whisper something to me, to tie Jim to the tree for fun. But I said no; he feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing there, Huckleberry;” and “Don’t scrunch up like and I couldn’t make out what it was, and so it might wake and make a disturbance, and then commenced again. The widow rung a bell for that, Huckleberry — set up straight;” and pretty made the cold shivers run over me. Then away they’d find out I warn’t in. Then Tom said he supper, and you had to come to time. When you soon she would say, “Don’t gap and stretch like out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that hadn’t got candles enough, and he would slip in got to the table you couldn’t go right to eating, that, Huckleberry — why don’t you try to be- a ghost makes when it wants to tell about some- the kitchen and get some more. I didn’t want but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down have?” Then she told me all about the bad place, thing that’s on its mind and can’t make itself him to try. I said Jim might wake up and come. her head and grumble a little over the victuals, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad understood, and so can’t rest easy in its grave, But Tom wanted to resk it; so we slid in there though there warn’t really anything the matter then, but I didn’t mean no harm. All I wanted and has to go about that way every night griev- and got three candles, and Tom laid five cents with them — that is, nothing only everything was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a ing. I got so down-hearted and scared I did wish on the table for pay. Then we got out, and I was was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and change, I warn’t particular. She said it was I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went in a sweat to get away; but nothing would do ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn’t crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and Tom but he must crawl to where Jim was, on his juice kind of swaps around, and the things go say it for the whole world; she was going to live it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it hands and knees, and play something on him. I so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn’t was all shriveled up. I didn’t need anybody to waited, and it seemed a good while, everything better. After supper she got out her book and learned see no advantage in going where she was go- tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would was so still and lonesome. me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was ing, so I made up my mind I wouldn’t try for it. fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and As soon as Tom was back we cut along the in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by But I never said so, because it would only make most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and path, around the garden fence, and by and by turned around in my tracks three times and fetched up on the steep top of the hill the other she let it out that Moses had been dead a consid- trouble, and wouldn’t do no good. erable long time; so then I didn’t care no more Now she had got a start, and she went on and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up side of the house. Tom said he slipped Jim’s hat about him, because I don’t take no stock in dead told me all about the good place. She said all a a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep off of his head and hung it on a limb right over body would have to do there was to go around witches away. But I hadn’t no confidence. You him, and Jim stirred a little, but he didn’t wake. people. Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the all day long with a harp and sing, forever and do that when you’ve lost a horseshoe that you’ve Afterwards Jim said the witches be witched him widow to let me. But she wouldn’t. She said it ever. So I didn’t think much of it. But I never found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but and put him in a trance, and rode him all over was a mean practice and wasn’t clean, and I said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Saw- I hadn’t ever heard anybody say it was any way the State, and then set him under the trees again, must try to not do it any more. That is just the yer would go there, and she said not by a con- to keep off bad luck when you’d killed a spider. and hung his hat on a limb to show who done it. way with some people. They get down on a siderable sight. I was glad about that, because I I set down again, a-shaking all over, and got out And next time Jim told it he said they rode him my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as down to New Orleans; and, after that, every time thing when they don’t know nothing about it. wanted him and me to be together. Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got still as death now, and so the widow wouldn’t he told it he spread it more and more, till by and was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being tiresome and lonesome. By and by they fetched know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock by he said they rode him all over the world, and gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with the niggers in and had prayers, and then every- away off in the town go boom — boom — boom Continued on Page 16


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Observer Classic Books From Page 15 tired him most to death, and his back was all over saddle-boils. Jim was monstrous proud about it, and he got so he wouldn’t hardly notice the other niggers. Niggers would come miles to hear Jim tell about it, and he was more looked up to than any nigger in that country. Strange niggers would stand with their mouths open and look him all over, same as if he was a wonder. Niggers is always talking about witches in the dark by the kitchen fire; but whenever one was talking and letting on to know all about such things, Jim would happen in and say, “Hm! What you know ’bout witches?” and that nigger was corked up and had to take a back seat. Jim always kept that five-center piece round his neck with a string, and said it was a charm the devil give to him with his own hands, and told him he could cure anybody with it and fetch witches whenever he wanted to just by saying something to it; but he never told what it was he said to it. Niggers would come from all around there and give Jim anything they had, just for a sight of that five-center piece; but they wouldn’t touch it, because the devil had had his hands on it. Jim was most ruined for a servant, because he got stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode by witches. Well, when Tom and me got to the edge of the hilltop we looked away down into the village and could see three or four lights twinkling, where there was sick folks, maybe; and the stars over us was sparkling ever so fine; and down by the village was the river, a whole mile broad, and awful still and grand. We went down the hill and found Jo Harper and Ben Rogers, and two or three more of the boys, hid in the old tanyard. So we unhitched a skiff and pulled down the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside, and went ashore. We went to a clump of bushes, and Tom made everybody swear to keep the secret, and then showed them a hole in the hill, right in the thickest part of the bushes. Then we lit the candles, and crawled in on our hands and knees. We went about two hundred yards, and then the cave opened up. Tom poked about amongst the passages, and pretty soon ducked under a wall where you wouldn’t a noticed that there was a hole. We went along a narrow place and got into a kind of room, all damp and sweaty and cold, and there we stopped. Tom says: “Now, we’ll start this band of robbers and call it Tom Sawyer’s Gang. Everybody that wants to join has got to take an oath, and write his name in blood.” Everybody was willing. So Tom got out a sheet of paper that he had wrote the oath on, and read it. It swore every boy to stick to the band, and never tell any of the secrets; and if anybody done anything to any boy in the band, whichever boy was ordered to kill that person and his family must do it, and he mustn’t eat and he mustn’t sleep till he had killed them and hacked a cross in their breasts, which was the sign of the band. And nobody that didn’t belong to the band could use that mark, and if he did he must be sued; and if he done it again he must be killed. And if anybody that belonged to the band told the secrets, he must have his throat cut, and then have his carcass burnt up and the ashes scattered all around, and his name blotted off of the list with blood and never mentioned again by the gang, but have a curse put on it and be forgot forever. Everybody said it was a real beautiful oath, and asked Tom if he got it out of his own head. He said, some of it, but the rest was out of piratebooks and robber-books, and every gang that was high-toned had it. Some thought it would be good to kill the FAMILIES of boys that told the secrets. Tom said it was a good idea, so he took a pencil and wrote it in. Then Ben Rogers says: “Here’s Huck Finn, he hain’t got no family; what you going to do ’bout him?” “Well, hain’t he got a father?” says Tom Sawyer. “Yes, he’s got a father, but you can’t never find him these days. He used to lay drunk with the hogs in the tanyard, but he hain’t been seen in these parts for a year or more.” They talked it over, and they was going to rule me out, because they said every boy must have a family or somebody to kill, or else it wouldn’t be fair and square for the others. Well, nobody could think of anything to do — everybody was stumped, and set still. I was most ready to cry; but all at once I thought of a way, and so I offered them Miss Watson — they could kill her. Everybody said:

“Oh, she’ll do. That’s all right. Huck can come in.” Then they all stuck a pin in their fingers to get blood to sign with, and I made my mark on the paper. “Now,” says Ben Rogers, “what’s the line of business of this Gang?” “Nothing only robbery and murder,” Tom said. “But who are we going to rob? — houses, or cattle, or —” “Stuff! stealing cattle and such things ain’t robbery; it’s burglary,” says Tom Sawyer. “We ain’t burglars. That ain’t no sort of style. We are highwaymen. We stop stages and carriages on the road, with masks on, and kill the people and take their watches and money.” “Must we always kill the people?” “Oh, certainly. It’s best. Some authorities think different, but mostly it’s considered best to kill them — except some that you bring to the cave here, and keep them till they’re ransomed.” “Ransomed? What’s that?” “I don’t know. But that’s what they do. I’ve seen it in books; and so of course that’s what we’ve got to do.” “But how can we do it if we don’t know what it is?” “Why, blame it all, we’ve GOT to do it. Don’t I tell you it’s in the books? Do you want to go to doing different from what’s in the books, and get things all muddled up?” “Oh, that’s all very fine to SAY, Tom Sawyer, but how in the nation are these fellows going to be ransomed if we don’t know how to do it to them? — that’s the thing I want to get at. Now, what do you reckon it is?” “Well, I don’t know. But per’aps if we keep them till they’re ransomed, it means that we keep them till they’re dead.” “Now, that’s something LIKE. That’ll answer. Why couldn’t you said that before? We’ll keep them till they’re ransomed to death; and a bothersome lot they’ll be, too — eating up everything, and always trying to get loose.” “How you talk, Ben Rogers. How can they get loose when there’s a guard over them, ready to shoot them down if they move a peg?” “A guard! Well, that IS good. So somebody’s got to set up all night and never get any sleep, just so as to watch them. I think that’s foolishness. Why can’t a body take a club and ransom them as soon as they get here?” “Because it ain’t in the books so — that’s why. Now, Ben Rogers, do you want to do things regular, or don’t you? — that’s the idea. Don’t you reckon that the people that made the books knows what’s the correct thing to do? Do you reckon YOU can learn ’em anything? Not by a good deal. No, sir, we’ll just go on and ransom them in the regular way.” “All right. I don’t mind; but I say it’s a fool way, anyhow. Say, do we kill the women, too?” “Well, Ben Rogers, if I was as ignorant as you I wouldn’t let on. Kill the women? No; nobody ever saw anything in the books like that. You fetch them to the cave, and you’re always as polite as pie to them; and by and by they fall in love with you, and never want to go home any more.” “Well, if that’s the way I’m agreed, but I don’t take no stock in it. Mighty soon we’ll have the cave so cluttered up with women, and fellows waiting to be ransomed, that there won’t be no place for the robbers. But go ahead, I ain’t got nothing to say.” Little Tommy Barnes was asleep now, and when they waked him up he was scared, and cried, and said he wanted to go home to his ma, and didn’t want to be a robber any more. So they all made fun of him, and called him crybaby, and that made him mad, and he said he would go straight and tell all the secrets. But Tom give him five cents to keep quiet, and said we would all go home and meet next week, and rob somebody and kill some people. Ben Rogers said he couldn’t get out much, only Sundays, and so he wanted to begin next Sunday; but all the boys said it would be wicked to do it on Sunday, and that settled the thing. They agreed to get together and fix a day as soon as they could, and then we elected Tom Sawyer first captain and Jo Harper second captain of the Gang, and so started home. I clumb up the shed and crept into my window just before day was breaking. My new clothes was all greased up and clayey, and I was dogtired. Chapter III. WELL, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes;

but the widow she didn’t scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave awhile if I could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn’t so. I tried it. Once I got a fishline, but no hooks. It warn’t any good to me without hooks. I tried for the hooks three or four times, but somehow I couldn’t make it work. By and by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn’t make it out no way. I set down one time back in the woods, and had a long think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything they pray for, why don’t Deacon Winn get back the money he lost on pork? Why can’t the widow get back her silver snuffbox that was stole? Why can’t Miss Watson fat up? No, says I to my self, there ain’t nothing in it. I went and told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could get by praying for it was “spiritual gifts.” This was too many for me, but she told me what she meant — I must help other people, and do everything I could for other people, and look out for them all the time, and never think about myself. This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I couldn’t see no advantage about it — except for the other people; so at last I reckoned I wouldn’t worry about it any more, but just let it go. Sometimes the widow would take me one side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body’s mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand considerable show with the widow’s Providence, but if Miss Watson’s got him there warn’t no help for him any more. I thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow’s if he wanted me, though I couldn’t make out how he was a-going to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing I was so ignorant, and so kind of low-down and ornery. Pap he hadn’t been seen for more than a year, and that was comfortable for me; I didn’t want to see him no more. He used to always whale me when he was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he was found in the river drownded, about twelve mile above town, so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this drownded man was just his size, and was ragged, and had uncommon long hair, which was all like pap; but they couldn’t make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the water so long it warn’t much like a face at all. They said he was floating on his back in the water. They took him and buried him on the bank. But I warn’t comfortable long, because I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty well that a drownded man don’t float on his back, but on his face. So I knowed, then, that this warn’t pap, but a woman dressed up in a man’s clothes. So I was uncomfortable again. I judged the old man would turn up again by and by, though I wished he wouldn’t. We played robber now and then about a month, and then I resigned. All the boys did. We hadn’t robbed nobody, hadn’t killed any people, but only just pretended. We used to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-drivers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we never hived any of them. Tom Sawyer called the hogs “ingots,” and he called the turnips and stuff “julery,” and we would go to the cave and powwow over what we had done, and how many people we had killed and marked. But I couldn’t see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run about town with a blazing stick, which he called a slogan (which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six hundred camels, and over a thousand “sumter” mules, all loaded down with di’monds, and they didn’t have only a guard of four hundred soldiers, and so we would lay in ambuscade, as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things. He said we must slick up our swords and guns, and get ready. He never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the swords and guns all scoured up for it, though they was only lath and broomsticks, and you might scour at them till you rotted, and then they warn’t worth a mouthful of ashes more

than what they was before. I didn’t believe we could lick such a crowd of Spaniards and Arabs, but I wanted to see the camels and elephants, so I was on hand next day, Saturday, in the ambuscade; and when we got the word we rushed out of the woods and down the hill. But there warn’t no Spaniards and A-rabs, and there warn’t no camels nor no elephants. It warn’t anything but a Sunday-school picnic, and only a primer-class at that. We busted it up, and chased the children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher charged in, and made us drop everything and cut. I didn’t see no di’monds, and I told Tom Sawyer so. He said there was loads of them there, anyway; and he said there was A-rabs there, too, and elephants and things. I said, why couldn’t we see them, then? He said if I warn’t so ignorant, but had read a book called Don Quixote, I would know without asking. He said it was all done by enchantment. He said there was hundreds of soldiers there, and elephants and treasure, and so on, but we had enemies which he called magicians; and they had turned the whole thing into an infant Sunday-school, just out of spite. I said, all right; then the thing for us to do was to go for the magicians. Tom Sawyer said I was a numskull. “Why,” said he, “a magician could call up a lot of genies, and they would hash you up like nothing before you could say Jack Robinson. They are as tall as a tree and as big around as a church.” “Well,” I says, “s’pose we got some genies to help US— can’t we lick the other crowd then?” “How you going to get them?” “I don’t know. How do THEY get them?” “Why, they rub an old tin lamp or an iron ring, and then the genies come tearing in, with the thunder and lightning a-ripping around and the smoke a-rolling, and everything they’re told to do they up and do it. They don’t think nothing of pulling a shot-tower up by the roots, and belting a Sunday-school superintendent over the head with it — or any other man.” “Who makes them tear around so?” “Why, whoever rubs the lamp or the ring. They belong to whoever rubs the lamp or the ring, and they’ve got to do whatever he says. If he tells them to build a palace forty miles long out of di’monds, and fill it full of chewing-gum, or whatever you want, and fetch an emperor’s daughter from China for you to marry, they’ve got to do it — and they’ve got to do it before sunup next morning, too. And more: they’ve got to waltz that palace around over the country wherever you want it, you understand.” “Well,” says I, “I think they are a pack of flatheads for not keeping the palace themselves ’stead of fooling them away like that. And what’s more — if I was one of them I would see a man in Jericho before I would drop my business and come to him for the rubbing of an old tin lamp.” “How you talk, Huck Finn. Why, you’d HAVE to come when he rubbed it, whether you wanted to or not.” “What! and I as high as a tree and as big as a church? All right, then; I WOULD come; but I lay I’d make that man climb the highest tree there was in the country.” “Shucks, it ain’t no use to talk to you, Huck Finn. You don’t seem to know anything, somehow — perfect saphead.” I thought all this over for two or three days, and then I reckoned I would see if there was anything in it. I got an old tin lamp and an iron ring, and went out in the woods and rubbed and rubbed till I sweat like an Injun, calculating to build a palace and sell it; but it warn’t no use, none of the genies come. So then I judged that all that stuff was only just one of Tom Sawyer’s lies. I reckoned he believed in the A-rabs and the elephants, but as for me I think different. It had all the marks of a Sunday-school.

Chapter IV. WELL, three or four months run along, and it was well into the winter now. I had been to school most all the time and could spell and read and write just a little, and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven is thirty-five, and I don’t reckon I could ever get any further than that if I was to live forever. I don’t take no stock in mathematics, anyway. At first I hated the school, but by and by I got so I could stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey, and the hiding I got next day

Continued on Page 29


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 17

Education

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Business Opportunities


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Business Opportunities

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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 29

Places To Go

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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 31

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Page 16 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 10, 2017

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Observer Classic Books From Page 15 tired him most to death, and his back was all over saddle-boils. Jim was monstrous proud about it, and he got so he wouldn’t hardly notice the other niggers. Niggers would come miles to hear Jim tell about it, and he was more looked up to than any nigger in that country. Strange niggers would stand with their mouths open and look him all over, same as if he was a wonder. Niggers is always talking about witches in the dark by the kitchen fire; but whenever one was talking and letting on to know all about such things, Jim would happen in and say, “Hm! What you know ’bout witches?” and that nigger was corked up and had to take a back seat. Jim always kept that five-center piece round his neck with a string, and said it was a charm the devil give to him with his own hands, and told him he could cure anybody with it and fetch witches whenever he wanted to just by saying something to it; but he never told what it was he said to it. Niggers would come from all around there and give Jim anything they had, just for a sight of that five-center piece; but they wouldn’t touch it, because the devil had had his hands on it. Jim was most ruined for a servant, because he got stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode by witches. Well, when Tom and me got to the edge of the hilltop we looked away down into the village and could see three or four lights twinkling, where there was sick folks, maybe; and the stars over us was sparkling ever so fine; and down by the village was the river, a whole mile broad, and awful still and grand. We went down the hill and found Jo Harper and Ben Rogers, and two or three more of the boys, hid in the old tanyard. So we unhitched a skiff and pulled down the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside, and went ashore. We went to a clump of bushes, and Tom made everybody swear to keep the secret, and then showed them a hole in the hill, right in the thickest part of the bushes. Then we lit the candles, and crawled in on our hands and knees. We went about two hundred yards, and then the cave opened up. Tom poked about amongst the passages, and pretty soon ducked under a wall where you wouldn’t a noticed that there was a hole. We went along a narrow place and got into a kind of room, all damp and sweaty and cold, and there we stopped. Tom says: “Now, we’ll start this band of robbers and call it Tom Sawyer’s Gang. Everybody that wants to join has got to take an oath, and write his name in blood.” Everybody was willing. So Tom got out a sheet of paper that he had wrote the oath on, and read it. It swore every boy to stick to the band, and never tell any of the secrets; and if anybody done anything to any boy in the band, whichever boy was ordered to kill that person and his family must do it, and he mustn’t eat and he mustn’t sleep till he had killed them and hacked a cross in their breasts, which was the sign of the band. And nobody that didn’t belong to the band could use that mark, and if he did he must be sued; and if he done it again he must be killed. And if anybody that belonged to the band told the secrets, he must have his throat cut, and then have his carcass burnt up and the ashes scattered all around, and his name blotted off of the list with blood and never mentioned again by the gang, but have a curse put on it and be forgot forever. Everybody said it was a real beautiful oath, and asked Tom if he got it out of his own head. He said, some of it, but the rest was out of piratebooks and robber-books, and every gang that was high-toned had it. Some thought it would be good to kill the FAMILIES of boys that told the secrets. Tom said it was a good idea, so he took a pencil and wrote it in. Then Ben Rogers says: “Here’s Huck Finn, he hain’t got no family; what you going to do ’bout him?” “Well, hain’t he got a father?” says Tom Sawyer. “Yes, he’s got a father, but you can’t never find him these days. He used to lay drunk with the hogs in the tanyard, but he hain’t been seen in these parts for a year or more.” They talked it over, and they was going to rule me out, because they said every boy must have a family or somebody to kill, or else it wouldn’t be fair and square for the others. Well, nobody could think of anything to do — everybody was stumped, and set still. I was most ready to cry; but all at once I thought of a way, and so I offered them Miss Watson — they could kill her. Everybody said:

“Oh, she’ll do. That’s all right. Huck can come in.” Then they all stuck a pin in their fingers to get blood to sign with, and I made my mark on the paper. “Now,” says Ben Rogers, “what’s the line of business of this Gang?” “Nothing only robbery and murder,” Tom said. “But who are we going to rob? — houses, or cattle, or —” “Stuff! stealing cattle and such things ain’t robbery; it’s burglary,” says Tom Sawyer. “We ain’t burglars. That ain’t no sort of style. We are highwaymen. We stop stages and carriages on the road, with masks on, and kill the people and take their watches and money.” “Must we always kill the people?” “Oh, certainly. It’s best. Some authorities think different, but mostly it’s considered best to kill them — except some that you bring to the cave here, and keep them till they’re ransomed.” “Ransomed? What’s that?” “I don’t know. But that’s what they do. I’ve seen it in books; and so of course that’s what we’ve got to do.” “But how can we do it if we don’t know what it is?” “Why, blame it all, we’ve GOT to do it. Don’t I tell you it’s in the books? Do you want to go to doing different from what’s in the books, and get things all muddled up?” “Oh, that’s all very fine to SAY, Tom Sawyer, but how in the nation are these fellows going to be ransomed if we don’t know how to do it to them? — that’s the thing I want to get at. Now, what do you reckon it is?” “Well, I don’t know. But per’aps if we keep them till they’re ransomed, it means that we keep them till they’re dead.” “Now, that’s something LIKE. That’ll answer. Why couldn’t you said that before? We’ll keep them till they’re ransomed to death; and a bothersome lot they’ll be, too — eating up everything, and always trying to get loose.” “How you talk, Ben Rogers. How can they get loose when there’s a guard over them, ready to shoot them down if they move a peg?” “A guard! Well, that IS good. So somebody’s got to set up all night and never get any sleep, just so as to watch them. I think that’s foolishness. Why can’t a body take a club and ransom them as soon as they get here?” “Because it ain’t in the books so — that’s why. Now, Ben Rogers, do you want to do things regular, or don’t you? — that’s the idea. Don’t you reckon that the people that made the books knows what’s the correct thing to do? Do you reckon YOU can learn ’em anything? Not by a good deal. No, sir, we’ll just go on and ransom them in the regular way.” “All right. I don’t mind; but I say it’s a fool way, anyhow. Say, do we kill the women, too?” “Well, Ben Rogers, if I was as ignorant as you I wouldn’t let on. Kill the women? No; nobody ever saw anything in the books like that. You fetch them to the cave, and you’re always as polite as pie to them; and by and by they fall in love with you, and never want to go home any more.” “Well, if that’s the way I’m agreed, but I don’t take no stock in it. Mighty soon we’ll have the cave so cluttered up with women, and fellows waiting to be ransomed, that there won’t be no place for the robbers. But go ahead, I ain’t got nothing to say.” Little Tommy Barnes was asleep now, and when they waked him up he was scared, and cried, and said he wanted to go home to his ma, and didn’t want to be a robber any more. So they all made fun of him, and called him crybaby, and that made him mad, and he said he would go straight and tell all the secrets. But Tom give him five cents to keep quiet, and said we would all go home and meet next week, and rob somebody and kill some people. Ben Rogers said he couldn’t get out much, only Sundays, and so he wanted to begin next Sunday; but all the boys said it would be wicked to do it on Sunday, and that settled the thing. They agreed to get together and fix a day as soon as they could, and then we elected Tom Sawyer first captain and Jo Harper second captain of the Gang, and so started home. I clumb up the shed and crept into my window just before day was breaking. My new clothes was all greased up and clayey, and I was dogtired. Chapter III. WELL, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes;

but the widow she didn’t scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave awhile if I could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn’t so. I tried it. Once I got a fishline, but no hooks. It warn’t any good to me without hooks. I tried for the hooks three or four times, but somehow I couldn’t make it work. By and by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn’t make it out no way. I set down one time back in the woods, and had a long think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything they pray for, why don’t Deacon Winn get back the money he lost on pork? Why can’t the widow get back her silver snuffbox that was stole? Why can’t Miss Watson fat up? No, says I to my self, there ain’t nothing in it. I went and told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could get by praying for it was “spiritual gifts.” This was too many for me, but she told me what she meant — I must help other people, and do everything I could for other people, and look out for them all the time, and never think about myself. This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I couldn’t see no advantage about it — except for the other people; so at last I reckoned I wouldn’t worry about it any more, but just let it go. Sometimes the widow would take me one side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body’s mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand considerable show with the widow’s Providence, but if Miss Watson’s got him there warn’t no help for him any more. I thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow’s if he wanted me, though I couldn’t make out how he was a-going to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing I was so ignorant, and so kind of low-down and ornery. Pap he hadn’t been seen for more than a year, and that was comfortable for me; I didn’t want to see him no more. He used to always whale me when he was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he was found in the river drownded, about twelve mile above town, so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this drownded man was just his size, and was ragged, and had uncommon long hair, which was all like pap; but they couldn’t make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the water so long it warn’t much like a face at all. They said he was floating on his back in the water. They took him and buried him on the bank. But I warn’t comfortable long, because I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty well that a drownded man don’t float on his back, but on his face. So I knowed, then, that this warn’t pap, but a woman dressed up in a man’s clothes. So I was uncomfortable again. I judged the old man would turn up again by and by, though I wished he wouldn’t. We played robber now and then about a month, and then I resigned. All the boys did. We hadn’t robbed nobody, hadn’t killed any people, but only just pretended. We used to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-drivers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we never hived any of them. Tom Sawyer called the hogs “ingots,” and he called the turnips and stuff “julery,” and we would go to the cave and powwow over what we had done, and how many people we had killed and marked. But I couldn’t see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run about town with a blazing stick, which he called a slogan (which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six hundred camels, and over a thousand “sumter” mules, all loaded down with di’monds, and they didn’t have only a guard of four hundred soldiers, and so we would lay in ambuscade, as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things. He said we must slick up our swords and guns, and get ready. He never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the swords and guns all scoured up for it, though they was only lath and broomsticks, and you might scour at them till you rotted, and then they warn’t worth a mouthful of ashes more

than what they was before. I didn’t believe we could lick such a crowd of Spaniards and Arabs, but I wanted to see the camels and elephants, so I was on hand next day, Saturday, in the ambuscade; and when we got the word we rushed out of the woods and down the hill. But there warn’t no Spaniards and A-rabs, and there warn’t no camels nor no elephants. It warn’t anything but a Sunday-school picnic, and only a primer-class at that. We busted it up, and chased the children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher charged in, and made us drop everything and cut. I didn’t see no di’monds, and I told Tom Sawyer so. He said there was loads of them there, anyway; and he said there was A-rabs there, too, and elephants and things. I said, why couldn’t we see them, then? He said if I warn’t so ignorant, but had read a book called Don Quixote, I would know without asking. He said it was all done by enchantment. He said there was hundreds of soldiers there, and elephants and treasure, and so on, but we had enemies which he called magicians; and they had turned the whole thing into an infant Sunday-school, just out of spite. I said, all right; then the thing for us to do was to go for the magicians. Tom Sawyer said I was a numskull. “Why,” said he, “a magician could call up a lot of genies, and they would hash you up like nothing before you could say Jack Robinson. They are as tall as a tree and as big around as a church.” “Well,” I says, “s’pose we got some genies to help US— can’t we lick the other crowd then?” “How you going to get them?” “I don’t know. How do THEY get them?” “Why, they rub an old tin lamp or an iron ring, and then the genies come tearing in, with the thunder and lightning a-ripping around and the smoke a-rolling, and everything they’re told to do they up and do it. They don’t think nothing of pulling a shot-tower up by the roots, and belting a Sunday-school superintendent over the head with it — or any other man.” “Who makes them tear around so?” “Why, whoever rubs the lamp or the ring. They belong to whoever rubs the lamp or the ring, and they’ve got to do whatever he says. If he tells them to build a palace forty miles long out of di’monds, and fill it full of chewing-gum, or whatever you want, and fetch an emperor’s daughter from China for you to marry, they’ve got to do it — and they’ve got to do it before sunup next morning, too. And more: they’ve got to waltz that palace around over the country wherever you want it, you understand.” “Well,” says I, “I think they are a pack of flatheads for not keeping the palace themselves ’stead of fooling them away like that. And what’s more — if I was one of them I would see a man in Jericho before I would drop my business and come to him for the rubbing of an old tin lamp.” “How you talk, Huck Finn. Why, you’d HAVE to come when he rubbed it, whether you wanted to or not.” “What! and I as high as a tree and as big as a church? All right, then; I WOULD come; but I lay I’d make that man climb the highest tree there was in the country.” “Shucks, it ain’t no use to talk to you, Huck Finn. You don’t seem to know anything, somehow — perfect saphead.” I thought all this over for two or three days, and then I reckoned I would see if there was anything in it. I got an old tin lamp and an iron ring, and went out in the woods and rubbed and rubbed till I sweat like an Injun, calculating to build a palace and sell it; but it warn’t no use, none of the genies come. So then I judged that all that stuff was only just one of Tom Sawyer’s lies. I reckoned he believed in the A-rabs and the elephants, but as for me I think different. It had all the marks of a Sunday-school.

Chapter IV. WELL, three or four months run along, and it was well into the winter now. I had been to school most all the time and could spell and read and write just a little, and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven is thirty-five, and I don’t reckon I could ever get any further than that if I was to live forever. I don’t take no stock in mathematics, anyway. At first I hated the school, but by and by I got so I could stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey, and the hiding I got next day

Continued on Page 29


Page 30 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Victoria Pictorial

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Service Stations Historic Photo Collection

● Footscray Motors, Hugh Williams Pty Ltd. Hopkins St.

● Dalgety Service Station. Church St, Richmond.

● Ripponlea Service Station

● Discount petrol sold by George Ljubinkovic. 1968

● Shell Service Station.

● Adelphi Service Station. Cnr St Georges Rd and Nicholson St.

● Halls Gap

● Junction Petrol Station. St Kilda Junction. Circa 1934.


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 35 e urn lbo Me

Every Week in the Melbourne Observer

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Theatre: Wild Bore at Malthouse ............................ Page 37 Country Music: Rob Foenander’s column .............. Page 37 Jim and Aar on: Top 10 lists, best movies ...................... P age 38 Aaron: Cheryl Threadgold: Local theatre shows, auditions ..... Page 39 US THE LLO OVATT”S MEGA CRO PL PLUS CROSSSWORD

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER Double Exposure

Poetic Licence

■ A Boston-born Jew in Montreal and a Gaza-born Palestinian in Melbourne have just published the first Englishlanguage anthology worldwide in any genre of drama, prose or poetry by Jewish and Palestinian writers. The winner of Canada’s prestigious biennial 2017 Patrick O’Neill Award, Double Exposure: Plays of the Jewish and Palestinian Diasporas is edited by award-winning playwrights Stephen Orlov of Montreal and Samah Sabawi of Melbourne, one of each of their acclaimed plays also featuring in the anthology. Following panels and readings to sell-out audiences at writers festivals and events in New York City, Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto, Orlov and Sabawi have arrived in Australia to discuss the plays and their unique collaboration editing this captivating anthology about the most inflammatory ongoing regional conflict of the past seventy years. Orlov and Sabawi will discuss the complexities, obstacles and revelations in editing this groundbreaking collection of plays about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict at special events in Melbourne and Adelaide from May 26 to June 8. The book delivers stories with authentic characters that challenge one of the remaining thematic taboos for most major theatres in the Western world, fueled for decades by prejudice, ignorance and timidity for decades. “The Diaspora journey from page to stage is marked by the cultural footprints of our ancestors and the emotional, material and familial ties of so many to the conflict. This is an issue for all of humanity, not merely for Jews and Palestinians,” says Orlov and Sabawi in the anthology’s preface. The plays are penned by highly acclaimed dramatists now residing in the diaspora of five continents: Bitterenders by Hannah Khalil in Ireland; Facts by Arthur Milner in Gatineau, Québec; The Peace Maker by Natasha Greenblatt in Toronto; Sabra Falling by Ismail Khalidi in Chile; Sperm Count by Stephen Orlov in Montreal; Tales of a City by the Sea by Samah Sabawi in Australia; and Twenty-One Positions: A Cartographic Dream of the Middle East by Abdelfattah AbuSrour in Aida Refugee Camp, Bethlehem, West Bank, Lisa Schlesinger in America, and Naomi Wallace in England; with introductions and interviews by award-winning American playwrights, Karen Hartman and Betty Shamieh. The play’s simultaneous world premieres in Melbourne and the West Bank, along with an Australian tour, played to sold-out houses, but its Gaza premiere had to be cancelled because of destruction and casualties from Israeli bombing raids. Stephen Orlov and Samah Sabawiare are speaking at the following Melbourne events. The Australian Jewish Democratic Society and the Side Door Present When: June 4, 7pm-9pm Where: Side Door, St. John's Uniting Church, 567 Glen Huntly Road, Elsternwick Bookings: Free event, no bookings required. Gold coin donation accepted at door. Readings When: June 5, 6:30pm Where: Readings St Kilda, 112 Acland St, St Kilda, Booking: Free event, bookings suggested via https:// www.readings.com.au/event/double-exposure - Cheryl Threadgold

■ Outer Urban Projects present Poetic License A double bill with ‘The HaBiBis’ at fortyfivedownstairs from June 20 - 24. Poetic License takes Aristophanes’ ancient Greek comic masterpiece The Frogs as its inspiration to ask and debate the timeless question – can the spoken word really move and inspire? Can it change anything? Poetic License integrates text, music and poetry to create a performance work that crosses generations and is of its time. Following sell out seasons during Melbourne Writers Festival (2014) and at Darebin Arts (2015), Poetic License returns under the direction of Irine Vela. Underscored by harpist Genevieve Fry, Poetic License features 15 year-old poet Dante Sofra who must hold his own with wordsmiths and performers who span seven decades, including pioneer of Australian comedy and social activist Rod Quantock; singer, writer, weaver and orator Grace Vanilau; speed rapper and beat box champion Kevin Nugara (aka Spitfire); alternative jazz vocalist and neobeat poet Ileini Kabalan; a poet performer of freefalling and confronting emotion, Koraly Dimitriadis; and the understated but infectious, indefatigable hip hop artist Mahmoud Samoun (aka Babz). The evening shows will also feature guest performances by ARIAAward winners the haBiBis, with traditional and contemporary music from Greece, Anatolia, Balkans and the Eastern Mediterranean. This season of Poetic License will launch the Outer Urban Projects 2017-2018 artistic program. Season 20 – 24 June (Opening Night Wed 21 Jun) Times 11am Tue, 11am and 7pm Wed – Fri, 7pm Sat Artist Q&A following 11am shows The haBiBis perform following the 7pm shows Venue fortyfivedownstairs, 45 Flinders Lane, Melbourne Tickets $35 Full, $25 Concession,$12 11am matinee shows Bookings 9662 9966 or fortyfivedownstairs.com - Cheryl Threadgold

● Galit Klas ■ The Kadimah Jewish Cultural Centre and the neighbouring Jewish Holocaust Centre are joining forces to present A Night to Remember – The Ghetto Cabaret, which will run for eight performances from Thursday June 15 – Sunday June 25 at the Kadimah’s Elsternwick centre. Award-winning scriptwriter and actor, Galit Klas, is the show’s creator and director. The script is in English and incorporates 13 Yiddish songs penned and performed in World War 11 ghettos of Europe, many unheard for 70 years. Klas says her ambition was to bring to life the irrepressible spirit and culture that brought joy, dignity and resilience in the worst of times. “In every wartime ghetto, whether it was Warsaw, Vilna, Lodz or Theresienstadt, Jews continued their rich cultural life, despite the constant fear, the threat of deportation, hunger and disease. “Music, theatre and cabaret were part of everyday life with hundreds of new songs composed, a testament to the resilience and resistance of the performers and writers,” Klas said. “Cabaret and reviews were particularly popular. Artists wrote songs, sketches and plays which were performed to full houses. As I researched, I was inspired by the bravery expressed in the songs such as ‘Hang in There’ and ‘Moments of Certainty’. The songs I uncovered are not just ballads and marches that people would recognise, but tangos, Broadway-style numbers and jazz, choral, and classical.” Klas, like many of the cast, is the descendant of Holocaust survivors. Her father’s family didn’t even make it to the ghetto – they were shot in their house in Vilna, now Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. However, Klas stresses. A Night to Remember, is not about remembering the atrocities. “A Night to Remember is set in a nameless ghetto in 1941 and there’s not a Nazi in sight. I want to show that Jews were not passive victims. Cabaret was a form of resistance – about life in the face of death, humanity in the face of humiliation,” she said. “Songs like ‘Moments of Certainty’ basically tell the Nazis to go to hell. Many of the songs are upbeat. Often the Jews are poking fun at each other – Poles versus Germans versus Austrians – or they’re pointing out the corruption of the Jewish Council,” she said. The songs will be sung in both English and Yiddish. One called, “Hush, hush, the dead are growing” was written by an eleven-year old boy for a competition in the ghetto. Some songs will be performed a cappella but most will be accompanied by a three-piece band led by popular pianist, Tomi Kalinski. Dancers Paul Zaidman, from Dancing with Stars, and Anna Selleck, partner in life and in the ballroom, are the choreographers. Veteran comedian and actor, Evelyn Krape, is the show’s dramaturg. The cast includes Klas’s sister, Dana Klas, another pair of sisters, Elisa and Michelle Gray, Max Gettler, Yuliya Mik and Joshua Reuben. Most of the performers are in their twenties and it’s their first time working in Yiddish theatre. Tickets: $50 general, $40 Kadimah and JHC members/concession; $25 full-time students for matinees only. Dates: Thursday 15 June – Sunday 25 June (8 shows – 7.30pm Thursdays & Saturdays; 2.00pm and 7.30pm Sundays) Q&A with writer/director Galit Klas to follow show on Thursday 22 June. Bookings: https://www.trybooking.com/OVIB Venue: The Kadimah Jewish Cultural Centre & National Library, 7 Selwyn St., Elsternwick - Cheryl Threadgold

Les Miserables From Page One Special mention should be made of the commendable versatility of Melanie Ott as Madame Thénardier, Scott Hili’s roguish Thénardier, the poignant performance of India Morris (Eponine), the delightful romantic chemistry between Emily Morris (Cosette) and Daniel Mottau (Marius), and the stellar performances of the children. The stirring, beautifully evocative music rendered by musical director Andy McCalman’s orchestra, Chris Bradtke’s expert direction, the ingenious set designed by Brenton Staples which facilitates 12 seamless scene changes, choreographed movement by Wendy Belli, Brad Alcock’s lighting, Marcello Lo Ricco’s sound design, and Victoria Horne’s costume design, all make significant contributions to achieving this high quality production. CLOC’s well-presented, front-of-house team should be mentioned too, for their friendly welcome to audiences and efficient operation. This top show is a theatre experience not to be missed. Congratulations CLOC Musical Theatre. Performance Season: Until May 27 Venue: National Theatre, St Kilda - Review by Cheryl Threadgold

Rob Foenander’s country music column - Page 37


Page 36 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

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Wages of Fear

■ Metanoia Theatre presents the thriller Wages of Fear at the Brunswick Mechanics Institute from June 22 - 29. This stage adaptation of George Arnaud's 1950 novel tells of two men living lives of bleak despair in a slowly dying outback town who are offered an irresistible pay-day by an unscrupulous oil company. All they must do is transport a load of deadly nitroglycerine on a perilous journey fraught with obstacles and pitfalls, to a destination that remains ever out of reach. The stage will be dominated by the hulking monolith of the play’s protagonist—the truck—which plays its own menacing role throughout the unfolding tale. Amusical score, along with emotive sound and lighting design, bring this provocative, volatile, exercise in dramatic tension to life. Metanoia is currently celebrating their fourth year as a theatre company by taking their unique brand of diverse theatre performances out on the road with the goal of reaching out to new audiences by staging works at venues and sites in and around Melbourne and beyond. Performance Details: Opening night Thursday June 22. Season Tuesday June 20—Thursday 29 June Playing Tues—Sun nights at 7pm Full $25, Concession $20 Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/ book/event?eid=253902

Fairytale Lives

■ Once upon a time, as all good fairy tales should start, a not so little girl headed into the wild world, to return to post-Soviet Russia in fact, to reconnect with her roots. ‘Sleep with one eye open, Annie,’ her mother warns her, ‘those witches is crazy bitches!’ In particular, Baba Yaga, whose house is mounted on giant chicken legs and who flies around in a mortar and pestle looking for innocents to fatten up for the kill, roasting and chewing on their stringy bones with her iron teeth. Telling tall tales of super models, Russian bears and vodka, The Fairytale Lives of Russian girls, is a strange, surreal re-working of Little Red Riding Hood where evil stepmothers compete with designer handbags and luxe fur coats. Erica Field as Annie is wide-eyed, and wondering what she’s landed herself in. Felicity Steel plays Auntie with lots of surprises, not least her amazing acrobatics when the audience least expects it. Cazz Bainbridge (Masha), Laila Thaker (Katya), Lucinda Barrett (Nastya) play three ‘devotchkas’ making the most of Moscow’s newly-discovered wealth. Linda Cookson is hilarious as Annie’s mother Olga sending her daughter out into the wild wood that is Putin’s Moscow. Directed by Elizabeth Millington, the performances are occasionally patchy possibly due to the sometimes confusing narrative which seems to move in and out of focus as it tries to connect the many separate tales. However, Saran Jones and Nick Casey’s inventive set really makes this play. With great lighting by Justin Hayes, the city comes alive at night; a bear’s lair and a witch’s oven by day. Performance Season: Until May 27, Tues - Sat at 8pm Venue: St Martins Youth Arts Centre (Irene Mitchell Studio), 28 St Martins Lane, South Yarra Tickets: $32 Full, $28 Concession, $25 Grps 6+ Bookings: online only at www.boutiquetheatre.com.au Enquiries: 0403 937 529 or boxoffice@boutiquetheatre.com.au www.boutiquetheatre.com.au - Review by Kathryn Keeble

Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 37

TV, Radio, Theatre Latest Melbourne show business news - without fear or favour

Big year for MYO

■ This year Melbourne Youth Orchestras (MYO) celebrates a milestone fiftieth birthday with its premiere ensemble, Melbourne Youth Orchestra, presenting a concert, New Worlds, at Melbourne Recital Centre on Sunday, 2 July.. New Worlds features Dvorák’s New World Symphony, Lovelock’s Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra, Glinka’s Overture to Ruslan and Ludmilla and a new commission by renowned Australian composer Graeme Koehne. Directed by Melbourne Youth Orchestra Chief Conductor Steven Hillinger, the New Worlds concert opens with Glinka’s Overture to opera Ruslan and Ludmilla, an energetic, vibrant and technically challenging work, followed by the world premiere of Koehne’s Song of the Open Road, commissioned for Melbourne Youth Orchestra’s fiftieth birthday with the support of the Australia Council for the Arts. MYO Chief Executive Officer, Dorian Jones, explains that Song of the Open Road has been especially designed for youth orchestras and will be made available to Australian school orchestras following its premiere, “We’ve also been able to provide complimentary tickets for disadvantaged young people from ages 11 to 18 to attend New Worlds through the generous support of the Newsboys Foundation,” says Jones. Featuring soloist and Melbourne Youth Orchestra alumnus Josh Rogan, New Worlds will continue with William Lovelock’s Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra (originally written in 1968 for Australian trumpet player John Robertson). After two years with Melbourne Youth Orchestra (2009 – 2011), Rogan has performed with internationally recognised ensembles, including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony Orchestra and as Principal Brass of the New York Philharmonic. Closing the concert will be Dvorák’s triumphant Symphony No. 9 From the New World, which incorporates influences from AfricanAmerican spirituals and American landscapes, and also rhythms from Dvorák’s native Bohemia. Melbourne Youth Orchestras presents New Worlds Date and time Sunday, July 2 at 2.30pm Venue Melbourne Recital Centre, 31 Sturt Street, Southbank Tickets $22 – $29 (booking fees apply) Bookings 9699 3333 or melbourne recital.com.au Information myo.org.au - Cheryl Threadgold

Country Crossroads

By Rob Foenander info@countrycrossroads.com.au

At the Vale ■ The June music line up for the Pascoe Vale RSL will include Friday June 2: Palace Gypsies; Friday June 9: The Sandie Dodd Revue; Friday June 16: The Rip Rawers. Friday June 23: Danny Stain Band; and Friday June 30: Honkytonk Rockers.od Fridaal.

Jen: all is well ■ Melbourne singer songwriter Jenny Taylor has released her debut CD All Is Well. At the age of 55, and after 30 years as a working musician, Jenny says "it took a while to find the sounds and words I was happy to live with" The 11-track album is described as having a folk art element to it and features work with highly respected indigenous artist Kutcha Edwards and ABC afternoon presenter Clare Bowditch. More info at www.jonpelianmusic.com

Gaz on a rtoll

■ Gary Ellis is set to release his new album This ones just for you in the coming weeks. The veteran country music singer has been busy over the past months putting together a track list of easy listening tunes. There seems to be no stopping the Narre Warren singer who was earlier this year inducted into the Australian Country Music Hands of Fame in Tamworth. - Rob Foenander

Wild Bore at Malthouse

■ There are many ways that dialogue can be projected from the stage and the creators of Wild Bore chose to use their raw buttocks facing the audience. \ The three cheeky well rounded buttocks appeared just above a trestle table top with projected voices as if coming from between their cheeks. Well that was the start and the rest is history with creators and performers Ursula Martinez, Zoe Coombs Marr and Adrienne Truscott making it quite clear they thrived on bad bad reviews world over. So does that make the job of reviewing easier? The performance flourished on recalling all the bad reviews they had had, not all dialogue came from between their cheeks as they often stood and turned around and seated giving us their torrent of fury, aimed at baffling us, with their radical interpretation of Facebook arguments, comment threads, nasty tweets of collected texts from the plethora of theatrical critique. Multi-talented Ursula Martinez commanded great presence and versatility in her delivery

and timing, creating spontaneous audience reaction. Support from Adrienne Truscott while cheeky was a steadying influence while a younger Zoe Coombs Marr with her laconic stares stole some of the limelight. It is fast moving, ever changing landscape, costumes and props, not forgetting the cheeks that were hosts to receiving a cigarette, a pencil, assorted food and two eyes slapped, one the left and one on the right buttock - whose is that face? In closing an unannounced Krishna Istha, appeared as a male cast member to sum up the performance - but he/she might not be? To end we had all four cast gyrating with a provocative and syncopated naked dance with transgender Krishna Istha, smiling and quizzically asking us "Are there any questions?" They would be very disappointed if I as a critic didn't say, it was a dreadful performance, not really, but judge for yourself. Venue: Malthouse Theatre, 113 Sturt St; Southbank Season: To June 6 Information and Bookings: www.malthousetheatre.com.au - Review by Graeme McCoubrie

Spencer ■ Marilyn (Jane Clifton) loves her footy. She loves her kids, but Scotty, the baby, is special. An AFL rookie, Scotty has just found out that he is a father and is awaiting the arrival of his two-year-old son, Spencer, on an access visit. Director Sharon Davis gets the most out of a great cast in this terrific comedy-drama. Clifton excels as Marilyn, the matriarch of the Prior family; belligerent one minute, funny another, enlightened in the final moments. Lyall Brooks (Ben) brings a sensitivity to a character that could so easily have become caricature. Jamieson Caldwell (Scotty) and Fiona Harris (Jules) equally bring real depth to their characters. Roger Oakley is also good as Ian, the long-lost father who throws a spanner in the works by arriving on their doorstep on the big day. Written by playwright Katy Warner, what is really clever about this new play is that it presents issues of intergenerational change and a contemporary debate and makes these both funny and heart-rending. Matriarch Marilyn, ironically represents old ideas of male entitlement. The male-dominated, macho footy world of flexing muscles, pack mentality and reminding women where their place is, is mythologised and then cut down in the same way Lawler’s Summer of the Seventeenth Doll cut down the image of the tough, hard-working outback hero. And it does so with real pathos. ‘Mate,’ Scotty confesses to Ben about the mother of the child he will soon meet, ‘I can’t even remember what she looked like – I laughed at her. Who does that?’ Just like the iconic film, The Castle, the play is touching and funny and truly Australian. Performance Details: Until May 28, 7pm Wed – Sat, 2pm Sun Venue: Chapel off Chapel Tickets: , $39 Full, $34 Concession/Group 6+, $29 Under 30 (+transaction fee)Duration: 90 minutes (No interval) Please note if you exit the theatre during the performance you will not be allowed back in. Bookings: www.chapeloffchapel.com.au - Kathryn Keeble

Movie: Baywatch

■ Having never watched an episode of the series I was not sure what I would think of the movie Baywatch. I knew to expect scantily dressed women running in ‘slow –mo’ along the beach, and that was about that. The trailer for the movie promised a spoof with lots of laughs, it delivered, this is a funny movie. A very muscular Dwayne Johnson plays Mitch- the lieutenant on the Baywatch squad (named after his mentor Mitch - David Hasselhoff of the series fame who also makes a cameo in the movie.) Mitch is serious about his protection of beach goers, stopping crime and saving lives on his beach. Along comes a new recruit, two time disgraced Olympic gold medalist Matt Brody(an also very muscular) Zac Efron. He wants in to the squad without having to prove his worth and believes lifeguard are there to save lives in the water and leave the crime fighting to the police. Hence the rivalry between the two begins along with some very funny one-liners and observations. The cast is perfect. Good acting from all helping to make the unbelievable believable. Young attractive, intelligent women, a goofy ‘side kick’ and plenty of rivals. Mitch does not have an easy time as a crime fighter, but as this is a US spoof ‘all’s well that ends well’. The first half of the film is where any originality and most of the humour falls. It later feels like a second rate crime film as the jokes and plot become repetitive and predictable with fewer laughs. A long film, with lots of laughs and probably most appealing to fans of the original series. - Review by Elizabeth Semmel


Page 38 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Observer Showbiz What’s Hot and What’s Not in Blu-Rays and DVDs

● Mahershala Ali gives an outstanding Oscar winning performance in the 2017 Best Picture Oscar winning Moonlight. FILM: MOONLIGHT: Genre: Drama. Cast: Mahershala Ali (Juan), Alex Hibbert (Little-Chiron), Ashton Sanders (Teenage Chiron), Trevante Rhodes (Adult Chiron), and Naomie Harris as the Mother. Year: 2016. Rating: TBC. Length: 118 Minutes. Stars: **** Verdict: Gripping and bittersweet story that chronicles the life of a young black man across three time periods, from childhood, midteens to adulthood, as he struggles to find his place in the world while growing up in a rough neighbourhood of Miami. Ambitious in overall scope, yet powerfully intimate and restrained, this simple and hugely intelligent story is driven by a big, big heart .... all at once both painfully thrilling and overflowing with heartfelt poignancy, a remarkable journey filled with characters that are handled with great care and sensitivity, and who with leave the viewer with lots to think about long after it's over. Stars Mahershala Ali (Juan), Alex Hibbert (Little-Chiron), Ashton Sanders (Teenage Chiron), Trevante Rhodes (Adult Chiron), and Naomie Harris in a startling Oscar nominated performance as the emotionally abusive Mother. . FILM: NOCTURNAL ANIMALS: Genre: Drama/Thriller. Cast: Amy Adams, Jake Gyllenhaal, Michael Shannon, Aaron Taylor-Johnson. Year: 2016. Rating: MA15+ Length: 116 Minutes. Stars: **** Verdict: A "story inside a story," which the follows a wealthy art gallery owner who receives a book manuscript from her ex-husband, asking for her opinion. The book, called "Nocturnal Animals," revolves around a man whose family vacation turns violent and deadly, and she soon interprets it as a symbolic revenge tale and finding herself recalling some dark truths about herself. Impressively ambitious and terrifically intoxicating thriller of which past and present, and fact and fiction clash head on with nail-biting punch. Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal shine in their respective roles, however, it is Michael Shannon (Elvis & Nixon, Midnight Special) as the Texas Sheriff that is the standout for every moment of his screen time. Superbly crafted by writer-director, Tom Ford, and beautifully filmed by Seamus McGarvey (The Hours, The Avengers), this is an intelligent, compelling, stylish and haunting psychological thrill ride that ranks alongside "Hell Or High Water" and "Manchester By The Sea" as one of the most gripping and thought provoking films in recent memory. FILM: THE FOUNDER: Genre: Biographical-Drama. Cast: Michael Keaton, John Carroll Lynch, Laura Dern. Year: 2016. Rating: M. Length: 115 Minutes. Stars: **** Verdict: The fascinating story of Ray Kroc, the pioneering salesman who in 1954 went from milk-shake machine salesman, to turning two brothers' innovative California based fast food eatery, McDonald's, into one of the biggest fast food restaurant chains in the world. Michael Keaton dominates the screen with a compelling performance in this extraordinary story of ambition, persistence, ruthlessness and unprecedented global impact and success. Helmed by John Lee Hancock (Saving Mr. Banks/The Blind Side), and written for the screen by Robert Siegel (The Wrestler), period detail and production design are all on the mark. The outstanding supporting cast all deliver, most notably John Carroll Lynch and Nick Offerman as Mac and Dick McDonald, but it is Keaton who has all the right ingredients in place in a saucy performance, one of his best, that has enough tang in its taste to satisfy any craving palate, just like ordering McDonalds for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Movies, DVDs

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With Jim Sherlock and Aaron Rourke

Rourke’s Reviews: John Wick

● Keanu Reeves returns as the titular hitman in the stunning sequel John Wick Chapter 2, now showing. ■ John Wick (MA). 101 minutes. knowing script and bring it to excitNow available on DVD and Blu- ing, exuberant life, producing the kind of film action fans have been Ray. What initially looked like just an- craving for. RATING - **** other generic action film from the Hollywood assembly line, turned ■ John Wick Chapter 2 (MA). 122 into the surprise hit of 2014, deliv- minutes. Now showing in cinemas. The intimidating John Wick is ering the kind of old-school mayhem that has been missing from back, and even though it has taken many big screen outings in recent a long time to reach Australian shores (after doing strong business years. Keanu Reeves plays the title at the US box-office), the wait is character, a renowned hitman who definitely worth it, as this elaborate was able to retire from the busi- follow-up doesn't just equal the ness when he found love with Helen original, it surpasses it. This time Wick (Keanu Reeves) (Bridget Moynahan). Tragically Helen is struck down has to travel to Rome in order to with cancer, and passes away soon fulfil a blood pact he made with Italian gangster Santino D'Antonio after. Afterwards, a secret letter ar- (Ricardo Scamarcio) years before, rives on Wick's doorstep from a pact that allowed the hitman to Helen, telling him to move on with retire from the violent world to settle the help of a new addition to the down with Helen (Bridget household; an adorable puppy. Moynahan). Preparing for his mission, Wick While refuelling at a local petrol station one day, Wick encounters has to visit Winston (Ian Iosef Tarasov (Alfie Allen), who McShane) once more, this time at offers to buy his classic '69 Mus- the group's Italian branch. But the dangerous assassin soon tang. When Wick declines, Tarasov finds out that nothing will go and his cronies visit his house that smoothly. John Wick Chapter 2 oozes with night, beating Wick unconscious, taking his vehicle, and killing his style and confidence, with returning director Chad Stahelski referdog. When the battered ex-hitman encing a number of action films, comes to and sees what has hap- especially those from Europe durpened, he goes on the warpath, ing the 1970s. There is a level of detail, colour, even when he finds out that Iosef is the son of ruthless Russian gang- and composition that is extraordister Viggo (Michael Nyqvist), who nary to watch, and along with Derek is fully aware of Wick's terrifying Kolstad's cleverly expanded screenplay, shows that this is no reputation. John Wick goes back to basics, quick, lazy cash-in. Even the tribute to Buster stripping its story down to the bare essentials, never bogging down with Keaton and his peers at the beginunnecessary sub-plots or charac- ning indicates the level of wild mayhem which will follow, staging ters. Highly influenced by the films action and stunts that will leave of Walter Hill (The Driver, 48 Hrs, audiences breathless and exhilaSouthern Comfort), this is stylish, rated. The cast all acquit themselves exciting stuff, never wasting a second as it hurtles towards its action- well, with the exception of Ruby packed finale (there is even an ap- Rose, who is sorely miscast as a pearance by Hill regular David rival assassin, never once coming across as menacing or threatening. Patrick Kelly). John Wick Chapter 2, like its preReeves is a perfect fit for the role, and his actual martial arts training decessor, is a welcome surprise, allows scenes to be staged and ex- and its wonderfully open-ended fiecuted with the actor openly in- nale has one already looking forvolved in many of the brutal set- ward to the next adventure of Mr. Wick. pieces. RATING - ****½ Directors Chad Stahelski and - Aaron Rourke David Leitch take Derek Kolstad's

Top 10 Lists MAY 21 to MAY 27 THE AUSTRALIAN BOX OFFICE TOP TEN: 1. ALIEN: COVENANT. 2. SNATCHED. 3. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2. 4. A DOG'S PURPOSE. 5. GET OUT. 6. THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS. 7. GOING IN STYLE. 8. LAHORIYE. 9. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (LIVE ACTION). 10. THE ZOOKEEPER'S WIFE. NEW RELEASES AND COMING SOON TO CINEMAS AROUND AUSTRALIA: MAY 18: AFTER THE STORM, DON'T TELL, FAIRY TALE: DRAGON CRY, JOHN WICK: CHAPTER TWO, KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD, THE OSIRIS CHILD: SCIENCE FICTION VOLUME ONE, VICEROY'S HOUSE, WHAT A WONDERFUL FAMILY. MAY 25: 29+1, HANDSOME DEVIL, NERUDA, NORMAN: THE MODERATE RISE AND TRAGIC FALL OF A NEW YORK FIXER, PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES, SACHIN: A BILLION DREAMS, THE SENSE OF AN ENDING, THE SHACK, WILSON. THE DVD AND BLU-RAY TOP RENTALS & SALES: 1. MANCHESTER BY THE SEA [Drama/Casey Affleck, Kyle Chandler, Michelle Williams]. 2. LION: 2 Disc Extended Australian Edition [Drama/Dev Patel, Nicole Kidman, Rooney Mara]. 3. FENCES [Drama/Denzel Washington, Viola Davis]. 4. RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER [Fantasy/Action/Horror/Milla Jovoich]. 5. PATRIOT'S DAY [Drama/Mark Wahlberg, Kevin Bacon, John Goodman, J.K. Simmons]. 6. SPLIT [Thriller/Horror/James McAvoy, Haley Lu Richardson - Dir: M. Night Shyamalan]. 7. A STREET CAT NAMED BOB [Dram/Comedy/Luke Treadaway, Bob the Cat]. 8. LA LA LAND [Musical/Romance/Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone]. 9. A UNITED KINGDOM [Drama/Rosamund Pike, David Oyelowo]. Also: ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY, LIVE BY NIGHT, COLLATERAL BEAUTY, JACKIE, PASSENGERS, ASSASSINS CREED, ALLIED, THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN, WHY HIM? THE FOUNDER. NEW RELEASE HIGHLIGHTS ON DVD THIS WEEK: XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE [Action/ Vin Diesel, Toni Collette]. FIFTY SHADES DARKER [Drama/Romance/ Jamie Dornan, Dakota Johnson, Kim Basinger]. SLEEPLESS [Action/Jamie Foxx, Michelle Monaghan]. AQUARIUS [Drama/Sonia Braga, Maeve Jinkings]. NEW RELEASE HIGHLIGHTS ON BLU-RAY THIS WEEK: XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE [Action/ Vin Diesel, Toni Collette]. FIFTY SHADES DARKER [Drama/Romance/ Jamie Dornan, Dakota Johnson, Kim Basinger]. SLEEPLESS [Action/Jamie Foxx, Michelle Monaghan]. NEW & RE-RELEASE AND CLASSIC MOVIES ON DVD HIGHLIGHTS: XXX, XXX: State of the Union, XXX: Return of Xander Cage [Action/Vin Diesel]. NEW RELEASE TELEVISION, DOCUMENTARY AND MUSIC DVD HIGHLIGHTS: BLACK SAILS: Season 4. STEVEN UNIVERSE: Season 2. WALKING THE HIMALAYES. CLASSROOM CRISIS: The Complete Series. - James Sherlock


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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 39

Observer Showbiz The Vandal

● Helen Ellis in The Vandal. Photo : Dave Swan. ■ American Playwright Hamish Linklater’s’ debut play “The Vandal” has had its Australian debut by Tangled Web Theatre to an attentive audience. A carefully crafted work by Linklater known more for his vast acting repertoire than playwriting, three souls cross paths tentatively at first before throwing open their lives to each other. Director Michelle Swann cast well in having a 17yo boy played by Sean Paisley Collins waiting for a bus on a cold and bleak night in Kingston N.Y when a the 35-yearold plus woman played by Hellen Ellis arrives taking a seat at the other end of the bench. Nothing is said but for furtive stares and look back by the boy of what appears to be an unsettled woman, despondent and wary of strangers. This passage of play was decisive as an introduction with perfect timing by both actors, the Boy wanting to be genial keeping at the Woman in encouraging her to be responsive to his inquisitive and probing questions. Collins was high powered and energy sapping in a luminous exchange. Ellis too was at her best as we know her to be, calculating and timely in her responses as the Boy delved a little too close and at times intimately into her life. And as I saw it she realised she needed to tell all to someone, even if it wasn’t all true. With the Woman finally accepting the Boy’s overture’s she agrees to buy him a Bud six pack at the liquor store opposite the bus stop and it is here that she meets the Liquor Shopkeeper played by Warren Pryor. Her purchase gets complicated, borrowed credit card, no formal ID and to make matters worse the storekeeper is the Boy’s father. Pryor plays the Storekeepers part well, laconic, down to earth, safeguarding the validity of the financial transaction, and realising that she was buying on his son’s behalf. All of this revealed subtly in the script, one which all would enjoy and certainly with the high powered performances by a welldirected Director. The Vandal was presented at the Brunswick Mechanics Institute. - Review by Graeme McCoubrie

Local Theatre With Cheryl Threadgold

12 Angry Men SHOWS

SHOWS

■ Frankston Theatre Group: Twelve Angry Men (by Reginald Rose), May 24 - June 3 at the Frankston Mechanics Institute, 1A Plowman Place, Frankston. Seating in the round. Director: Connor McRae. Bookings:www.trybooking.com/OXMT ■ CLOC Musical Theatre: Les Miserables Until May 27 at the National Theatre, St Kilda. Bookings: www.cloc.org.au ■ Torquay Theatre Troupe: The Laramie Project (by Moises Kaufman) Until May 27 at 16 Price St., Torquay. Director: Zina Carman. Bookings: www.trybooking.com ■ Brighton Theatre Company: Hats Off! (by Alison Campbell-Rate) Until June 3 at Bayside Cultural Centre, Cnr. Wilson and Carpenter Sts., Brighton. Director: Denise Wellington. Bookings: 1300 752 126. ■ MLOC Productions: Footloose Until May 27 at the Shirley Burke Theatre, 64 Parkers Rd., Parkdale. Bookings: www.mloc.org.au ■ Nova Music Theatre: Godspell Until May 27 at The Whitehorse Centre, Nunawading. Bookings: 1300 304433. ■ The Basin Theatre Group: Forget Me Knot (by David Tristram) Until June 10 at The Basin Theatre, Doongalla Rd., The Basin. Director: Gregor McGibbon. Bookings: 1300 784 668. ■ Strathmore Theatrical Arts Group (STAG): The Dixie Swim Club(by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and Jamie Wooten) May 25 - June 4 at Strathmore Community Theatre, Cnr. Loeman and Napier Sts., Strathmore. Bookings: 9382 6284 or www.stagtheatre.org ■ Lilydale Athenaeum Theatre: One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest (by Dale Wasserman) May 25 - June 10 at the Lilydale Athenaeum

Theatre, 39-41 Castella St., Lilydale. Director: Catherine Garside. Bookings:9735 1777. ■ Cathouse Players: Steel Magnolias (by Robert Harling) May 26 - June 3 at Kyneton Masonic Centre, 7-9 Yaldwyn St. West, Kyneton. Director: Bette Sartore. Bookings: www.trybooking.com/book/event?eid=249841. ■ The Mount Players: True West (by Sam Shepard) May 26 - June 10) at The Mountview Theatre, 56 Smith St., Mt Macedon. Director: Travis Handcock. Bookings: www.themountplayers.com or 5426 1892. ■ TSLAMS: Broadway Roulette May 26 June 3 at the Knox Community centre, Cnr Mountain Highway and Scoresby Rd., Bayswater. Table seating, bYO food only, drinks available at bar. Tickets: $25/$15. Bookings: 0720 3205 https://www.trybooking.com/245860

AUDITIONS ■ The 1812 Theatre: Never the Sinner May 28 at 7.00pm aat 3 Rose St., Upper Ferntree Gully. Director: Geoff Hickey. Audition bookings: 9874 1571. ■ Strathmore Theatrical Arts Group (STAG): The Female of the Species (by Joanna MurraySmith) May 28, 29 at Strathmore Community Theatre, Cnr. Loeman and Napier Sts., Strathmore. Director: Kris Weber. Details: www.stagtheatre.org ■ PEP Productions: Caravan (by Donald McDonald) May 28 10.00am-4.00pm at Wantirna Primary School, 120 Mountain Highway, Wantirna. Director: Lorraine Millar. Audition bookings: contact@pepproductions.org.au

Forget Me Knot ■ The Basin Theatre presents the comedy Forget-Me-Knot until June 10 in Doongalla Rd., The Basin. Written by David Tristram and directed by Gregor McGibbon, the story tells of a man who may or may not be Robert Zeinfeld, found wandering the streets claiming to be suffering from amnesia. Detective Inspector Monroe is the man charged with working out who this mystery man is, with the help – or rather hindrance – of Mrs Zeinfeld and his own wife Samantha. The play is billed as having “more twists than a buckled slinky” and said to be quite safe from prosecution under the Trade Descriptions Act’.. Performance details: Until June 10 Venue: The Basin Theatre, ● Elise D’amico, Stephen Barber, Kendall Brown and Doongalla Rd., The Basin Tina Bono. Photo: Michael Papier Tickets: $27 Group Disthe 12 jury members must de- ics Institute, 1A Plowman 1A counts also apply. liberate with a guilty verdict Plowman Place, Frankston B o o k i n g s : www.thebasintheatre.org.au or meaning death for the accused, Seating in the round an inner-city teen. Tickets $25 - concessions phone 1300 784 668. As the jury tries to reach a available unanimous decision while seBookings: www.trybooking questered in a room, one juror .com casts considerable doubt on elements of the case. Personal ■ Frankston Theatre Group issues soon rise to the surface, presents Twelve Angry Men and conflict threatens to derail from May 26 to June 3 at the the delicate process that will Frankston Mechanics Institute. decide one boy’s fate. Performances: 8pm - Fri 26, Written by Reginald Rose and directed by Connor McRae, the Sat 27 May, Fri 2 and Sat 3 June story tells of following the clos- , Matinee 2pm - Sun 28 May ● Twelve Angry Men Venue: Frankston Mechan-

Melbourne

Observer THERESE RAQUIN

■ Over 150 years after it was written, Émile Zola’s story of murderous star-crossed lovers is a carnal, cruel and corset-filled masterpiece of French realism. Gary Abraham’s stage adaption of Thérèse Raquin opens at the National Theatre Wednesday 31 May – Thursday 1 June.. Set in the notoriously dingy backstreets of Paris in the late 1800s, Thérèse lives a life of servitude and desperation. After being married off to her sickly cousin in an arranged marriage, Thérèse’s melancholy is marred by the arrival of Laurent, her husband’s friend, with whom she begins an illicit affair. Dangerously in love, their selfish passions unite in a hatred for Thérèse’s husband, which eventuates his cruel and brutal murder at the hands of damaged lovers. Causing great controversy when first published – it was labelled as “obscene” by many – Thérèse Raquin is a superb examination of corrupted morals and turns the city of love into the sinister setting for murder. Written and directed by Gary Abrahams (after Emile Zola) featuring Jessica Clarke as Thérèse, Andre Jewson as Camille, Marta Kaczmarek as Madame Raquin, Emily Milledge as Suzanne, James O’Connell as Laurent, David Ross Paterson as Michaud and Mark Wilson as Grivet. Set by Jacob Battista, Costumes by Chloe Greaves, Lighting by Katie Sfetkidis, Composition and Music by Christopher De Groot. Originally commissioned by Simon Philips for MTC before his departure, Gary Abrahams’ adaptation has reinvigorated the text’s shocking power, re-created the visual splendour of 1800s Paris with its set and costumes, and created a terrifying mood with an original piano composition performed live by Christopher De Groot. It premiered in Melbourne at Theatre Works in 2014. Performance Season : May 31 – June 1 Venue: National Theatre, 20 Carlisle St., St Kilda Bookings: www.nationaltheatre.org.au or 9525 4611.

FREEDOM OF THE CITY ■ Eltham Little Theatre presented a successful season of the classic tale, Freedom of the City, presented at their Performing Arts Centre in Research. Facts surrounding the story are that on 30 January 1972 the British 1st Battalion Parachute Regiment opened fire on protesters at a civil rights demonstration in County Derry, Northern Ireland. They killed thirteen unarmed protestors. The author, Brian Friel, participated in the demonstration. An early form of the play, having been started approximately ten months prior to Bloody Sunday, was modified following the events of the day to entail certain links to the events. The story tells of Lily, Michael and Skinner, three strangers who are forced to take refuge when a civil rights protest march turns violent. Unwittingly they find themselves trapped inside the Mayor's parlour. The Freedom of the City is a powerful and touching story of three very different people thrown together by fate and the world's reaction to their untimely deaths.

Twelve Angry Men

● James Martin (Michael), Ben Mitchell (Skinner) and Jeanne Snider (Lily) in Freedom of the City. Photo: Ian Clark


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Page 40 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 g y, g , Melbourne

Observer

Lovatts Crossword No 11 Across

1. More droopy 6. Dig 11. Legendary gold city (2,6) 15. Having a poor ear for pitch (4-4) 20. Relations 21. Undue speed 22. Pen name, ... de plume 23. Gleefully chuckles 24. Tent supports (3,5) 25. Jesus' home town 27. Singing with trills 28. Prima donna 29. Writer, ... Thomas 31. The O of PTO 32. A wolf in ... clothing (5'1) 36. ANC hero, Nelson ... 37. Within house 38. Lovely 41. Dutch centre of govt, The ... 44. Fishing-line fibre 45. Sample 48. Way of life 49. Very busy 52. Goose & ... 56. Out-of-vogue star (3-4) 57. Small stone 58. Most uptight 61. Arduous experience 62. Foretold 63. West African nation, Sierra ... 64. Warms 65. Fools 66. Cleaver 67. Without artifice 71. Toadstools 73. Silly 75. Catastrophes 80. Ignore 82. Ice-cream desserts 83. Globes 85. Acting as go-between 86. Treat cruelly (3-3) 88. African disease fly 90. Nourishing drinks (3,5) 91. Bible song 93. Current flow rating 94. Interjectors 95. Ski headwear accessory 96. Military flying facility (3,4) 97. No part 99. Burial vault 100. Removed from power 104. Hoist (flag) 105. Cat cry 106. Of sheep 107. Leaseholders 111. Slightly wet 113. Crab's pinch 114. Have 115. Wrath 117. Pitch tent 118. Should, ... to 121. Tribal post, ... pole 122. Moved slowly 125. Field 126. Jump high 127. The ... of Capri 129. Assistant 131. Opposed to 132. Releases grip (4,2) 135. Among 136. Emerald Isle 139. Hordes 140. Scolded 144. Eagle's nest 145. Chick's call 146. Aimed 147. Disengage (train carriages) 148. Splendid (mansion)

Across

Down

149. Public square 150. Lacking originality 152. Customary 154. Baton races 157. Flying saucers (1,1,2) 158. Blabs 162. Matching outfit 163. Meagre 166. Flag down (cab) 167. Speech defect 169. Butterfly catchers 171. Biblical you 172. US moon rocket 173. Composer, Andrew ... Webber 175. Cloth fold 176. Chock 179. Culminate in (4,2) 180. Wash lightly 182. Recline, ... down 183. Repetitive strain injury (1,1,1) 184. Grind (meat) 186. Powder, ... of Paris 189. Thread 190. Peace pact 191. Sense receptor 192. Said 196. Tenant's payment 197. Bellow 198. Vermouth cocktail 199. Remnants 201. Playing for time 202. Harvesters 203. Roof overhangs 204. Last Russian tsar 205. Entangle 208. To the rear 210. Bridge designer 211. Sector 212. Outdoors (4-3) 213. Sinks in middle 215. Unfavoured horses 219. Lead-in 221. Sunday joint 223. Not perfumed 227. Juvenile 228. Ambassador's office 230. Move with effort 231. Cut wildly 232. Pillages 233. Mutilate 234. Admire 238. Delighted 239. First 240. Meal 243. Approval 246. Loosen 247. Dough ingredient 250. Corn husks 251. Out of style 253. Laughing scavengers 256. Frequent visitor 257. Female betrothed 258. Cease 262. Spy, ... Hari 263. Steak cut (1-4) 266. Ark builder 268. WA wine-growing region, ... River 269. Business income 270. Artist's medium (3,5) 271. Sewer coverings 272. Born as 273. Man-made fabric 274. Raises (the ante) 275. Climbs down 276. London/Edinburgh express, Flying ... 277. Lacy robe 278. Roomy

1. Confronts 2. Holed atmosphere layer 3. Erect (3,2) 4. ... out a living 5. Coming up (of sun) 7. Red pepper spice 8. Brutal 9. Michael Flatley's Lord of ... (3,5) 10. Simple 11. Famous volcano 12. Inclinations 13. Continually (2,3,2) 14. Phenomenal 15. Turrets 16. Actor, ... Sharif 17. Fire fragment 18. Remove from home 19. Misty 24. Pastime 26. Multitude 30. Lounges about 33. Barn dance 34. Distinguished 35. Actor, Sam ... 38. Ringing (of bell) 39. Nudged 40. Drama venue 42. Afresh 43. Unties 46. Junkies 47. Compared to 49. Cooperative 50. Top of head 51. List down 53. Non-believer in God 54. Roman moon goddess 55. Staff schedules 59. Proximity 60. Able to be rubbed out 67. Uncared-for 68. Traffic jam (5-2) 69. Undoes (envelope) 70. Sly suggestion 72. Opening 74. Telling 76. Debatable 77. Energies 78. Copy 79. Siblings 81. Until now 84. Mattress frame 87. Paint thinners 89. Called 91. Autocue 92. Insane lady 98. Fireplace shelf 101. TV host, ... Dingo 102. Egg shapes 103. Give work to 108. Stoat 109. Colloquial language 110. Inspire 112. Inventiveness 116. Feared Mongolian ruler (7,4) 119. Inattentive 120. Grotesquely 123. Small coffee cup 124. Welcoming 128. Clinging gastropods 130. Hero-worship

Down 132. Feebler 133. Fish commercially 134. Survive (3,2) 137. Turn out 138. Disgust 141. Granny Smith fruit 142. Cogwheel set 143. Personal memoirs 151. On dry land 153. Lucky charm 155. Dismiss (from college) 156. Map book 159. Desire for food 160. Tethered (4,2) 161. Pleads 164. Swiftly 165. Fluid unit 168. Laziness 170. Glimmers 173. Unused portion 174. Public referee 177. Filth 178. Coming into view 181. Water (pasture) 185. River flows 186. Allspice 187. Orange/pink shade 188. Libya's capital 193. Afternoon break 194. Vote back into office (2-5) 195. Wanted 200. Uniformity 201. Divide 206. Not either 207. Car horns 208. Takes into custody 209. Type of spanner 211. Appoints 214. Sultan's wife 216. Sissy 217. Austere 218. Disappoints 220. Hobo 222. Conscious (of fact) 224. Held tenderly 225. Subtleties of meaning 226. Infinite 229. Famous US university 232. Army dining room 235. And so forth (2,6) 236. Greek philosopher 237. Coffee drug 241. Legal trade ban 242. Lawsuits 244. Surgical blade 245. Kissing & cuddling 248. Eases off 249. Which 251. Repressed, ... up 252. Postage stickers 253. Hot & damp 254. Gains 255. Proverb 259. Moral principle 260. Eskimo hut 261. Cricket matches 262. Fix 264. Roughage 265. Midday 267. Padlock clasp


Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 41

Solution on Page 33

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Page 42 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Observer Victorian Sport Melbourne

Stradbroke scenario ■ Early nominations for the Stradbroke Handicap to be run over 1400 metres at Eagle Farm, has attracted some of our best in early nominations for the classic race, to be run on Saturday ,June 10. The ruling favourite in the opening market is the former Western Australianstar, Black Heart Bart, of course now with leading trainer Darren Weir. He is being quoted in early markets at just under double figure odds. At the time of going to press he was competing in the Goodwood Handicap in South Australia. On the second line in the Stradbroke is the good galloper, Clearly Innocent, who has great form to his credit in the care of top Sydney trainer Kris Lees. He is being quoted at two points longer than Black Heart Bart. On the next line is the possible front runner ihf he goes around, Fabrizio, prepared by leading trainer, Gai Waterhouse and Andrew Bott. Then Counter Attack; a good second behind the flying, Redzel, in the Doomben 10,000 over 1200 metres. He is in the powerful Chris Waller stable at Rosehill and is starting to show his early potential. Next is another Waller entry, Macintosh, smart on his day, but the others might be a bit nippy. Of the others Derryn in the Hayes-Dabernig yard, ran a good third in the Doomben 10,000, while English, the Gai Waterhouse-Andrew Bott sprinting mare, is good on her day.

Star jockey

■ Former leading rider Darren Gauci was the guest speaker at our Victorian Media Racing Association big day at the Emerald Hotel and was a hit from the start as to be expected. One of the best guys in racing, the ‘Gauch' as he became known, was a hit straight away going back to the early days of his riding career. Something that I and many others didn't know was that before joining the Sport of Kings he was a top junior soccer player at which he won the Victorian Best and Fairest in the junior comp. He felt is stature wasn't helping in his early days. He touched bases with one of Victoria's leading riders, Geoff Bamford in the early days and joined the stables leading apprentice mentor, the late Frank King, the doyen of trainers of apprentices. Earlier when he joined the stable and one of his first memories was falling off a pony of Frank's. In his early teens he attended Caulfield Grammar and after being up at 3.30am to feed the horses he would rush home to get ready for school. From there not only did he become a good rider but won the Victorian Jockey's Premiership as an apprentice beating some of the class senior riders around at the time. He was indentured to Frank King at Caulfield and was quick to learn. He said the best horse he had ever ridden was the mighty miler, Super Impose, a winner of two Epsoms, a Doncaster, second in a Melbourne Cup and won a Cox Plate. Darren was a bit unlucky in the 2005 Melbourne Cup, the third of Makybe Diva’s three Cups. He was on the Darren Weir trained-On A Jeune, and he told us in the run he was to follow Makybe Diva and coming to the home turn was within about four lengths, when Makybe hit top gear and she had a powerful sprint. By the time that Darren revved upOn a Jeune, Makybe was gone, but a big run going down by just over a length. Throughout his star studded career, Darren was unable to win a Caulfield or Melbourne Cup coming close on Chagemar in the Caulfield Cup, and Super Impose and On a Jeune, in the Melbourne Cup. He related how he rode one of Bart

www.MelbourneObser ver.com.au

Showbiz Extra OK: John O’Keefe EXTRA WORKLOAD Seven presenter and reporter Emily Angwin has taken on extra work in addition to her tv duties. Emily has signed with 1116 SEN as the station’s sports and morning news reader. Emily has reported on many major sports events for Seven including the Australian Tennis Open and the 2016 Paralympics in Rio. ONE MAN PLAY One time pop idol, now a barrister - Mark Holden is well advanced in writing a oneman show based on his relos. Titled Holden Circus, the play traces the travels of the Holden Brothers Circus around the Bellarine, Victorian rural cities and even further afield into Far North Queensland. Mark will be star of the show. Apart from his legal work, Mark has released a tell all book My Idol Life. HANSON Time flies when you're the Hansons. It's been 25 years since the bubble gum trio caught our attention with the chart topper MMMBop. Still together and all grown up, the three brothers will perform in Melbourne at the Forum Theatre, June 18, 19 with a stack of new material.

● Darren Gauci Cummings top three year-olds Taj Eclipse, to win a big race, and prior to him mounting he was waiting for instructions on how Bart wanted ■ After the meeting at Caulfield recently a few him to ride Taj Eclipse. well fancied runners had excuses for their poor He was astounded when Bart just asked him runs. if he had a car yet and how were things going From the second on the card the well fancied and last, but not least, said "Now just go out and Spreadeagled, unplaced, was found to be sufwin". fering the thumps, a form of hiccups. I asked him who he thought was the toughest A post-race sample was taken for analysis, rider he had ridden against, not necessarily the and Stewards will follow the result with trainer, best and he said former Queenslander and Sydney rider, Mick Dittman, known when riding Rob Smerdon. In the third race the well backed Lee Freedas The Enforcer. The best or one the hardest beat, Damien man trained Extra Olives ran unplaced, with Oliver, he reads a race beautifully and had a her rider, apprentice Brooke Sweeney, saying happy knack of knowing when the runs are com- that she raced flat. A Ppst-race endoscopy detected a degree of ing. Funnily he said he thought he was race riding mucus/mucopus that may have affected her badly when he hung up his saddle, but with his performance. new position of looking after our budding apA vet clearance is required before she can prentices, he is quite happy to take a back seat. race again. Yes one of the best and I am proud I am a From the same race Classic Diva sustained a good friend of his family, Karen and the chil- wound to her off-hind and lost the hind plate. dren, his father Bill, and brothers David and Mick. A Vet clearance is required before she can race again. One of the biggest occurrences that happened on the day was that of well backed galloper Coram in race four A post- race examination, found the presence of blood from both nostrils. Coram cannot without permission from the Stewards: be trained, exercised or galloped on any racecourse for a period of two months, thereafter; start in any race for a period of three months, and then only after a satisfactory gallop of at least a 1000 metres in the presence of a steward. He also lost the hind plate during the race. The short-priced favorite in the Ladbrokes Handicap, Kenjorwood, appeared to race quite flat according his rider, apprentice, Ben Allen. A post-race examination found that the gelding was found to be lame in both forelegs. A vet certificate is required before he can race again. The biggest shock of the day was the poor running of the short-priced favourite in the next. The Darren Weir trained imported galloper, Mongolian Wolf, having his first run on the track, raced flat according to his young apprentice rider, Mitch Aitken. Weir couldn't explain the run and stewards have advised him that they would follow up proceedings. Another of apprentice Ben Allen's rides, Wise Hero, in race eight failed to flatter, and he thought he would be better suited on tracks with more give. A post-race vet check revealed a slower than normal recovery. - Ted Ryan

After the ball

Ted Ryan

TOMMY IN TOWN The one man Band in Tommy Emmanuel is back in good old Melbourne town for a one night stand on September 28 . Check ticket agencies for details. OVER AND OUT After 37 years service Peter Wilkins has handed in his mike after covering sports of all sorts on the ABC. During his journey Wilko won a Walkley for his book on the womens rowing drama at the Athens Olympics. In his retirement he intends completing the seven hole golf course he has built in the back garden of his 10ha property on NSW South Coast. WHOOPS The sacking of journalists in the print media has caused problems down the line in all departments. A suburban weekly recently reviewed a local band. Review raved about one band member quoting him' being on drugs' - should have read ' being on drums' Whoops, the proofreader got the push in the next round of dismissals. MANAGER MESS UP The music manager of Alanis Morissette is charged with ripping off the legendary artist to the tune of $ 7million. Most of the stolen money was allegedly spent on gambling. Reminds me of one of Australia's favourite rockers who was ripped off by his then manager The manager stole hard earned big bucks supposedly to pay for overseas air tickets. The artist later discovered the air fares were a no-charge-contra arrangement and the manager trousered the money. TOOTH FAIRY Dentists were the big winners after an accident on the Red Carpet at the Logies. A frocked up femme got too close to a microphone thrust in her face. The mike chipped two of her front teeth, but the interview still went ahead. That's dedication for you. RUMOUR MILL Harry Styles a one time member of all boy group One Direction is rumoured to play Mick Jagger in a upcoming film . According to Jagger, Styles has the perfect swagger for the part. Since splitting with One Direction Styles has performed in one other movie Dunkirk. HOUSE OF CARDS Strange coincidence that car manufacturer Hyundai was one of the major sponsors of Nine's telemovie House of Bond. As it happened Alan Bond was a major player in the consortium which introduced Hyundai to Australia back in the high-octane, free spending days.. Hyundai went onto to become a major seller of passenger cars, and Bond went to jail.


www.MelbourneObserver.com.au

Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 43

Horses

DRESSAGE

JUMP

SAFETY


Page 44 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Victorian Rural News

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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 45

Victorian Rural News

Call our friendly staff to ask any questions you have prior to making your decision to purchase Australia’s own Swing-Gate Operator in your D.I.Y. Kit.

The original and the best ... The XP Series, Australian-Made Gate Operators from SUN-POWER. Field-proven for over 25 years. Easy to install, reliable and remote controlled! 3 remote controls are standard in our kits but thanks to the bonus offer, that’s 5 remotes in total, 2 keypads (or push-buttons) and a mounting plate!


Page 46 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Victorian Rural News

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Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - Page 47


Page 48 - Melbourne Observer - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

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Melbourne Observer. May 24, 2017  

Melbourne Observer. May 24, 2017

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