Page 1

Mendip Times

Front cover designs:Layout 1

10/19/17

VOLUME 13 ISSUE 6

12:47 PM

Page 1

FREE

Celebrating life on the Mendips and surrounding areas

NOVEMBER 2017

IN THIS ISSUE: FOCUS ON CHEDDAR AND CHEW VALLEY • CARNIVAL TIME • CHRISTMAS IDEAS • FOOD & DRINK Local people, local history, local places, local events and local news


Greenspace ad:Layout 1

10/18/17

2:05 PM

Page 1


Contents page:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

2:53 PM

Page 1

Welcome

CHRISTMAS is coming and this month we start our previews of how communities across Mendip are gearing up to celebrate it. But let’s hope for an Indian summer before we get too involved in festive preparations. The long-distance path across Mendip has been re-branded the Mendip Way, with experts predicting it could bring £16million into the area. Right now it’s a good way to see the autumn colours, as is Sue Gearing’s walk which takes us around Nunney. The last month rounded off the farming year with the Mendip Ploughing Match and the Dairy Show – we have pictures from both, as well as from various other festivals and events across the area. Now we are into the carnival season and have pictures from Frome and Castle Cary. We will have more pictures next month. November is also a time for Remembrance and we hear how local cadets and students have made a poignant visit to 1st World War cemeteries around Ypres. We meet the schoolgirl who is already a shooting champion and the baby whose lightning birth left his parents to deliver their first child themselves. We also meet the man who has been researching the Mendip motor car industry – based at Chewton Mendip! With all of our regular contributors and features, let us keep you company this winter. December 2017 deadline: Friday, 17th November 2017. Published: Tuesday, 28th November 2017. Editorial: Steve Egginton steve@mendiptimes.co.uk Mark Adler mark@mendiptimes.co.uk Advertising: Ann Quinn advertising@mendiptimes.co.uk Rachael Abbott rachael@mendiptimes.co.uk Publisher: Mendip Times Limited Coombe Lodge, Blagdon, Somerset BS40 7RG Contacts: For all enquiries, telephone:

01761 463888

or: email news@mendiptimes.co.uk or: letters@mendiptimes.co.uk www.mendiptimes.co.uk Design and origination by: Steve Henderson Printed by: Precision Colour Printing, Haldane, Halesfield 1, Telford, Shropshire TF7 4QQ Copyright of editorial content held by Mendip Times Ltd. and its contributors. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the express permission of the Publisher. The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent those of the publisher or its associates. Front cover: Sienna and Zara at the Wells Food Festival. Photograph by Mark Adler. See page 19.

CONTENTS

Just champion – Dairy Show in pictures

12

59

Closer my God – Bruton’s charity church abseilers

117

72

Lest we forget – Somerset cadets at the Menin Gate

Joy of the Rovers – but their FA Cup dream is over

Plus all our regular features Environment ...................................6 Farming Mary James MBE ..........10 Food & Drink ...............................16 Arts & Antiques ...........................32 Internet and Crossword ..............36 Business.........................................38 Charities........................................54 Wildlife Chris Sperring MBE .......61 Walking Sue Gearing ....................62 Outdoors Les Davies MBE ..........64

Gardening Mary Payne MBE.......66 Property ........................................90 Health Dr Phil Hammond .............92 Community ...................................96 Homes and Interiors ..................102 Caving Phil Hendy ......................107 Music & Theatre ........................110 Riding Rachel Thompson MBE...112 Sport ............................................113 What’s On ...................................118 MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 3


Page 4 November:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:01 PM

Page 1

Bring this a d to our Halla trow shop for 20 % off before January 1, 2 018*


News page 5:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

2:56 PM

Page 1

Ted’s stamp is just grand

Ted receives his cheque from Oakfield Academy head teacher Emma Wilkes

New chairman for railway trust

NEWS

Coffee break: Councillor Beath with rail volunteers

A SCHOOLBOY from Frome whose design for a Royal Mail Christmas stamp won a national competition has received his £1,000 prize. Ted Lewis-Clark, aged 11, who attends Oakfield Academy will see his design on first class stamps sold from November 7th. His name will also feature on a special postmark. His design was one of two chosen by the Prince of Wales for this year’s first and second class stamps. Ted is due to meet the prince at a later date. The school also received a cheque for £1,000 as part of the competition.

RAF cadets get back together

Former squadron leaders (l:r) Steve Guy, Geoff Wilson and David Rolfe with some of the ex-cadets

MORE than 50 former air cadets from Shepton Mallet’s 1182 Squadron have gathered for their first official reunion. The cadets – from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s – came from all over the country for the event at the Thatched Cottage Inn in Shepton Mallet. The evening also raised funds for the present squadron, part of the Devon and Somerset Wing of the ATC.

THE Somerset and Dorset Railway Heritage Trust at Midsomer Norton has a new chairman – lifelong steam enthusiast Stephen Lacey. Stephen, 38, has been a life member of the trust since 1997 and a working member since 2014. He took over as chairman in time to welcome Cherry Beath, chair of Bath and North East Somerset Council, to the line. She said: “I know that this railway preservation started with just a few enthusiastic volunteers, but all their hard work has not only achieved a wonderful heritage centre but turned it into an excellent tourist venue for visitors to North East Somerset. Well done all.” Meanwhile, the trust is entering a new era with the extension of the railway towards Chilcompton. So-called “track bashes” will be held in November as part of the plan to get more track laid and in use by passenger trains by the middle of next year. Stephen said: “These are exciting times ahead. We are busy extending the line, laying sleepers and ballasting the track in preparation to re-open another section of this iconic railway for passenger trains. We are ever grateful to receive such positive support from local people and the local councils.” He added: “Volunteers at the station are already doing a tremendous job with renovations, maintenance and event organisation and we are now looking at getting more people involved to help us get one stage further.”

The track bash will aim to get the remaining sleepers and rails up the line before the laying down of ballast

For details about the line, visit: www.sdjr.co.uk

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 5


Environment section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:26 PM

Page 6

Inspired by nature

Walking festival success

Priddy pupils at Westhay with Simon King

PUPILS from Priddy School have a permanent reminder of a trip to Westhay Moor nature reserve on the Avalon Marshes. Somerset Wildlife Trust hosted a visit by the school to the reserve and asked the youngsters to draw pictures in response to something that had inspired them. The results have now been carved into wooden panels at the North Tower Hide and the children were invited to the unveiling of the project, where they met guests including Patricia Stainton, SWT chairman, Glastonbury Festival founder Michael Eavis and naturalist Simon King.

Hedge laying courses

MENDIP Society members and geocachers from all over the South West got together to enjoy a day of activities and voluntary work in the society’s Tania’s Wood, near Ubley. A long stretch of hedge was cleared of encroaching scrub and a row of hazel trees was coppiced. The resulting stack of wood products include a large number of stakes which will be used in November in the wood itself because the society has two more hedge laying tuition days planned. These will be on Sunday 19th and Monday 20th in the wood at Woodbridge Farm, Ubley, with tutors Tina Bath and Chris Claxton, both professional hedge layers. Both days will run from 10am to 3pm, for a maximum eight people, beginners or those with some knowledge. They are stand-alone days, costing £15 per day for one or both, including hot lunch and drinks. Details: 01275 874284 or email judith.tranter1@btinternet.com

PAGE 6 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

THE second Somer Valley Walking Festival was well supported, with a variety of walks taking in local viewpoints and beauty spots and exploring the area’s industrial heritage, including the Somerset Coal Canal. Amateur artists also participated in an Art Walk around Radstock and an innovation this year was an Introduction to Geocaching based on Peasedown St John. John Bull, chair of the steering committee, said: “It was good to see a healthy turn-out for our second festival. One of our purposes is to make the attractiveness and heritage of the Somer Valley better known and it was gratifying that some walkers came from outside the immediate area.”


Environment section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:26 PM

Page 7

ENVIRONMENT

G e o l o g y f e s t i v a l i s s o l i d ro c k THE annual Mendip Rocks! festival blasted off in style with a launch in Wells which attracted visitors of all ages. The month-long celebration of the 450million-year geological history of the Mendip Hills featured walks, talks, hands-on tasks in places ranging from Cheddar Gorge to Whatley Quarry. The festival is a collaboration between the Mendip Hills AONB, the Mendip Society, Somerset Earth Science Centre and Somerset Wildlife Trust. The event is due to end on Saturday, October 28th with a day of inspiring geology talks called “Making the Mendips – A Blast from the Past” at Wells and Mendip Museum.

The launch in front of the Bishop’s Palace in Wells

Nick Durnan, a freelance conservator and stone carver, demonstrates his art The Mendip Society hosted a guided walk on the coal mines and railways of Radstock and Kilmersdon

Matilda, a Mendip AONB young ranger, sports a dinosaur tattoo

Jaeden was one of the youngsters who enjoyed a family event – knitting and felting fossils – at the Somerset Earth Science Centre

For details, visit: http://www.mendiphillsaonb.org.uk/our-work/mendip-rocks/

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 7


(Photo courtesy of Guy Edwards/20-20 Vision)

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:26 PM

Page 8

Going bats in Somerset

Westhay Moor National Nature Reserve

SOMERSET Wildlife Trust has launched a £30,000 appeal to strength bat habitats in three key locations including its reserves on Mendip. Thanks to the county’s diversity of habitats, it is home to 16 out of the 17 breeding species of UK bat. On Mendip, the trust says it urgently need to secure the diminishing population of the greater horseshoe bat by managing species rich grassland habitats, grazed well by cattle and in some places, the extensive removal of scrub and bracken. Cattle grazing is critical as cattle dung attracts important food sources such as dung beetles – the larvae of which are particularly important for young bats that are making their first feeding flights. Trust also needs to improve hedgerows, which act as linear route maps, to enable greater horseshoe bats to hunt for food and urgently need to repair Wadbury Bat House – a critical roost for greater horseshoes in the area. The other projects are on the Blackdown Hills and in Taunton town centre. Michele Bowe, director of conservation said: “Because of their nocturnal nature and less than cuddly reputation, people don’t always realise that bats do have another role to play apart from being the focus of a Halloween party piece! “Bats are in fact great indicators of the state of our environment. They are top predators of nocturnal insect life – making them experts at natural pest control – and they’re very sensitive to changes in land use practices.” Meanwhile, WetlandLIFE, a nationwide, three-year, university-led project, funded by a number of UK research councils, has announced that it will be working in the Somerset Levels to carry out a range of ecological and cultural research which aims to support the development of better wetland assessment tools for use by wetland site managers across the country. Westhay Moor and Shapwick Heath have been chosen as study sites as they provide examples of land use change in a rural setting, having been reverted into wetlands from agriculture and peat extraction, as well as having a rich history and vibrant recreational use. The WetlandLIFE team will be working closely with site managers from Somerset Wildlife Trust and Natural England and communities around Shapwick Heath and Westhay Moor in a variety of ways. They will investigate the human side of living alongside wetlands as well the challenges that arise, producing locally-inspired stories, documentaries, artworks and photography exhibitions. There will also be more economic evaluation, social research and historical analysis to reveal the variety of values associated with wetlands, particularly their role in people’s health and wellbeing. For more information visit: www.somersetwildlife.org/savingsomersetsbats

PAGE 8 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Shearing record

ENVIRONMENT

A NEW British record has been set for blade-shearing sheep at Fernhill Farm above Compton Martin. A back-breaking 397 lambs were shorn in nine hours, roughly 1.4 sheep every minute by two Welsh shearers Gareth Owen and Clive Hamer. Blade shearing is a traditional method done without mechanical tools, only sharp blades pressed by hand movements that help to keep fleece in better condition when it's cut smoothly, leaving more wool covering and lanolin. Andy Wear, a blade shearer and owner of the farm, said: “Blade Shearing is an incredible skill to master and to supply Mendip sheep that were deemed ideal for a record attempt is a great shepherding achievement.”

Nature’s calling for reserves manager

Simon Clarke (right) with friends and colleagues at his farewell BBQ

AFTER ten years as reserve manager and senior manager at Shapwick National Nature Reserve on the Somerset Levels, Simon Clarke has moved on to a new position with

Natural England. Simon, who lives at Stoke St Michael, will have a more strategic role, looking at the future of NNRs throughout Somerset, Avon and Wiltshire. In his time at Shapwick, Simon contributed an enormous amount to the reserves, building volunteer groups, creating the footpath along the Sweet Track, finishing the Discovery Trail and crowd-funding the new Tower Hide. He has also been instrumental in driving the Avalon Marshes Landscape Partnership, including the mire restorations at the Ashcott Plot and the Canada Farm Lows. Simon said: “I just wanted to say a short but massive thank you to everyone I’ve met and worked with on the Somerset NNRs over the last ten years. It’s the local communities, volunteers, partners and staff that make the reserves work and I truly believe in Somerset we have some of the most wonderful reserves in the country.”

(Photo courtesy of Danielle Arundel)

Environment section:Layout 1


TR Hayes ad:Layout 1

10/18/17

12:23 PM

Page 1


Farming section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:19 PM

Page 10

Weather creates a nightmare harvest

WITH two ploughing matches cancelled because of the wet conditions, at least the Mendip Ploughing Match took place at the end of September. It was a great gathering of the farming community, with very interested visitors as well. The champion ploughman was Bill With MARY Tonkin from Crediton in Devon. JAMES MBE The farming community was well served with local markets years ago. They were great places for buying and selling as well as having a good chat and complaining about the weather! How times change. Living in our area the nearest markets are at Sedgemoor and Frome. It is not surprising therefore that a Great British Breakfast organised by the Addington Fund attracted many farmers and friends. Held at the Wellsway, East Harptree at the end of September it raised a substantial amount for the fund. The Dairy Show at the Bath and West Showground was brilliant and a great success despite the disparaging remarks of a columnist in a local paper which were quite uncalled for. There is another group which is gathering farmers and rural businesses together which is the North Somerset Rural Business Forum, meeting in the winter months at Mendip Spring Golf Club, Congresbury. Membership includes farmers, farm managers, those working in rural businesses, consultants, providers and managers of financial services, the supply trade as well as

YOUR MAIN KUBOTA DEALER FOR SOMERSET AND SOUTH GLOUCESTERSHIRE

Check out our new website: mowersandtrimmers.co.uk

PAGE 10 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Supporting the Addington Fund: (back left) Jonathan Cheal, a solicitor from Mogers Drewett, and James Stephen, a partner in Carter Jonas (back right), with breakfast host Maxine Gibbons and Ian Bell, chief executive of the Addington Fund. Other sponsors of the breakfast included Old Mill, Barclays, Framptons and the MidSomerset Agricultural Society

those with an interest in rural businesses. Email Richard Cooksley Richard@cooksleyandco.org for more info or phone 07801435772. There is an impressive line-up of speakers. The October one was the president of the NFU, which will have taken place by the time you read this, followed by Richard Williamson, managing director of Beeswax Dyson farming on November 16th. All meetings start at 7.30pm and there is supper which needs to be ordered in advance. Back to the weather. On the whole it has been a difficult soggy affair this year. If hay was made early at the end of May into June then it was a reasonable crop. Looking at the area overall and further afield other crops fared badly apart from early ripening winter barley which was harvested with little fuss and no drying costs which is most important I am told the harvesting of oilseed rape was a nightmare. It is important to get the crop dry enough before starting to cut. But with intermittent rain it meant taking a chance and perhaps incurring drying costs to bring moisture down from 12/13% to 9% as is required. Think about the huge cost of drying. The same thing happened with wheat as well as spring barley, beans and linseed. If you held on for a few fine days in succession another wet day or days came along and you waited again unless you set the expensive drier working. Therefore we had an extended nightmare harvest this year. A friend who was in Lancaster on September 17th tells me there were hundreds of acres of wheat still to be cut. I felt quite guilty singing “All is safely gathered in” at a service at the end of August.


Farming section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:19 PM

Page 11

FARMING

Lambing starts early at Langford

WHEN you picture lambs, most people see them tucked up amongst the spring flowers on a sunny April morning but for Langford Vets Farm Animal Practice lambing is happening now! Some Poll Dorset flocks lamb out of season, often from early November. Then it’s the pedigree Texels being born over Christmas, so from January onwards the early lambing ewes are snug in sheds with their lambs. By March the final year students are busy looking after the University of Bristol’s flock of Romneys; these are small tough ewes who tend to be good mothers but still keep the students busy. The extensive outdoor flocks start lambing in May and June and then it’s back to the Poll Dorsets in July. So, this seemingly seasonal activity ends up entertaining vets for most of the

year. With this is mind Langford Vets Farm Animal Practice is holding a practical course in November suitable for sheep, goat, llama and alpaca owners that will provide the opportunity to practice the key skills needed, from delivery to the care of fragile new-borns. This course will guide you through common problems

faced, equip you with a handy check list to prepare for the season and cover when it’s time to call the vet. Open to everyone, the course is suitable for experienced shepherds looking for a few extra tips to new owners with a few sheep in the back garden. The course is £90 per person but discounts are available for multiple bookings.

Details: www.langfordvets.co.uk or call 01934 852650

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 11


Dairy Show DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:06 PM

Page 12

Happy days at diary show

By Mark Adler

THERE was a lot of laughter – and a few tears of joy – at this year’s Dairy Show at the Royal Bath and West Showground at Shepton Mallet. As organisers welcomed Mary Prior, a former Lord Lieutenant of Bristol, on her first official engagement as society president, they were saying thank you to a couple of show stalwarts including Mike Lyons, who has retired after 51 years as a showground steward, and to Dairy Show chairman Richard Calver, standing down after eight years at the helm. But the biggest tears were of joy and they came from Anwen Thomas of E&C Thomas of Wales, whose Holstein cow, Noremead Baxter Kansas, a junior cow incalf, was named supreme champion.

Preparing to enter the judging ring

Reigning supreme – the champion animal

Show society president Mary Prior presents David Melleney with the trophy for the Dairy Industry Vet of the Future Award. David, a University of Cambridge graduate, works in Yorkshire

Richard Calver, of Milton Clevedon near Evercreech, is standing down after eight years as show chairman PAGE 12 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Camera shy or just hungry? This Jersey calf from Chloe Peach’s Moonlight Herd from Sherborne clearly decided to eat every last morsel in the bucket


Dairy Show DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:06 PM

Page 13

The annual Dairy Industry award was presented posthumously to farmer Derek Mead, of Puxton, a long-standing supporter of the show. His son Alastair (centre) is pictured receiving the award from David Cotton, the new chairman of the Dairy Show, and society president Mary Prior

Victoria Dimond, from Sherborne, was showing a Brown Swiss heifer Kedar Blooming Clementine

NFU dairy board chairman Michael Oakes was on the panel at a Farmers Guardian Q&A session with Farmers For Action chairman David Handley and John Allen, from Kite Consulting

DAIRY SHOW 2017

Brothers in arms: the well-known Lyons family, of Binegar, celebrates as Mike holds aloft a gift from the Royal Bath and West of England Society after he called time on 51 years as a show event steward. Pictured with him are (l:r) Richard, Phillip – who lives in California – and Alan, head of shows

Julia Banwell, a director of Old Mill accountants in Wells, presents the award for the best pair of animals in the interbreed pairs championship to Phil Arrell and Anwen Thomas

More than 6,000 visitors attended the show

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 13


Events feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:14 PM

Page 14

EVENTS

Priddy village fun day

The Priddy slipway

Adult tug o' war

How many children can you get in an ancient Fiat? The answer was 14. PAGE 14 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Junior tug o' war

Izzy, Frankie and Jasmine learn dry stone walling

Preparing for the junior "gymkhana"

Adult competitors Charlotte Cambridge and Bill Thorpe


Higos ad:Layout 1

10/18/17

12:24 PM

Page 1


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 16

Comfort food for colder nights

THE clocks go back on Sunday, October 29th and the nights will be getting darker and colder. I love this time of year with its colours and cosiness. Suddenly soup is a brilliant idea, thick and warming, with croutons for crunch. A dish of roast pork with juicy With JUNE pumpkin and apple is filling and fresh, MACFARLANE followed by lovely local pears doused in a sweetly sticky sauce.

This pumpkin soup freezes well

ROAST PORK FILLET WITH SQUASH AND APPLES

There are still loads of squash and apples around and they go so well with pork. A pork fillet or tenderloin has no waste and cooks quickly. This is an easy midweek meal that would be great at the weekend too.

INGREDIENTS

A simple but delicious mid-week meal

(For four) 1 pork fillet olive oil 2 large apples, peeled, cored and quartered 2 medium squash, peeled, deseeded and quartered 250ml apple juice

PUMPKIN, CARROT AND APPLE SOUP WITH PANCETTA AND CROUTONS

METHOD Preheat the oven to 180°C. Dry the meat. Slice along its length not quite through. Season the inside of the meat. Slice one apple quarter thinly and line the incision. Tie up meat with butcher’s twine. Place in roasting tin. Surround with apple and squash. Season and splash with olive oil. Pour apple juice into tin. Roast for 30-40 mins until meat is well coloured. Allow to rest before serving.

Sounds gorgeous, yes? And it is. Thick and unctuous, a soup to warm your heart. Make loads and freeze it. METHOD Preheat oven to 160°C. Line a baking sheet with foil. Peel, deseed and quarter the pumpkin. Toss in oil and season lightly. Roast until soft. Set aside. In a very big pot fry the onion until soft, then add carrots, apples and garlic. Stir and cook for about 10 mins. Add pumpkin and stock and simmer until all is tender. Allow to cool a little then blend completely. Serve with optional crisped pancetta and croutons.

PEDRO XIMENEZ BAKED PEARS INGREDIENTS

(For four) 4 firm ripe pears 250ml PX sherry 1 tbsp honey 50g brown sugar

This is a recipe that usually calls for Marsala, but I use Pedro Ximenez (PX) sherry, tasting of raisins and Christmas. It makes a wonderful dish. Local pear varieties include Conference, Concorde and Comice.

METHOD Preheat oven to 190°C. Remove a thin slice from the bottom of the pears so they sit flat. Fit all the pears closely into a rimmed baking dish. Pour the sherry over them, drizzle with the honey and scatter over the sugar. Bake, basting frequently, until a skewer inserted meets no resistance, about 40-50 mins but check. Remove from oven and continue to baste as they cool. Serve warm, or at room temperature, with crème fraiche or ice cream and the remaining sauce. PAGE 16 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Sherry-baked pears – try to use local varieties

INGREDIENTS

(For four) 1 medium pumpkin or squash Olive oil 6 large carrots, roughly chopped 1 red onion, chopped 2 large apples, peeled, cored and chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1 litre chicken stock


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

What’s new from

Myrtle Farm

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 17

FOOD & DRINK

A round-up of events from Thatchers Cider in Sandford

Bringing in the apples

WITH the weather conditions here in Somerset providing a perfect climate for apple growing, this year has been no exception, and we’ve been busy out in the orchards bringing in the apples. “We had cold temperatures during winter to allow the trees a sufficient dormant period,” explains Meet Kevin, Chris and Harry, part of our orchard team our farm manager Chris working around the clock to harvest our apples. Muntz-Torres. “Sun and warmth during the spring helped the blossom and encouraged pollination by our bees, which in turn helped the fruit to set; while the wet weather in August – while not popular with humans – was just what the apples needed to swell up.” This year we started harvesting around a week earlier than in recent years. With practically perfect conditions we’re expecting a crop of exceptional quality this year with our preferred balance of tannin, sweetness and acidity. “The quality of the fruit is vital to producing the tastiest cider,” adds Martin Thatcher, “which is why we go to great lengths to ensure that our harvest is carried out with as much care and attention as we make our ciders.”

Tales from the orchard

WE really enjoyed welcoming pupils from Sandford School to the farm for an Autumn guided tour through our orchards. Farm manager Chris talked to the pupils about the life cycle of the apple trees, and the different types of apple that we grow at Myrtle Farm. The pupils even got the chance to taste the apples straight from the tree. “It was a real treat for the children to be able to walk through the orchards at this time of year,“ Mrs Lin Williams, Executive Head at Sandford School told us. “For many it was their first experience of enjoying an orchard at harvest time, and picking apples straight from the tree. They all certainly enjoyed their time, and learned a lot – from talking about pollination through to harvest.”

Cheers from us all at Myrtle Farm

What’s on at The Railway Inn

REMEMBER Remember the 5th of November! Coming up soon is our Fireworks Night celebrations at The Railway Inn. There’ll be fireworks (of course), a bonfire, BBQ and mulled cider! It’s a free entry event for the whole family, starting at 5.30. We hope to see you there. Full details of our Christmas menu and New Year’s Eve celebrations are available at www.therailwayinn.com

Are you ready for Christmas shopping?

WE’RE ready and stocked up at the Cider Shop at Myrtle Farm. As well as gift packs and hampers, we have gift vouchers, and of course, our full range of ciders. Try Family Reserve for a special celebration, or our Cider Barn Redstreak, recently voted the World’s Best Sparkling Cider.

www.thatcherscider.co.uk • Don’t forget you can also follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook Thatchers Cider, Myrtle Farm, Sandford, Somerset, BS25 5RA

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 17


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 18

Bread & Beyond TEA ROOMS AND PROVISIONS

Delicious food for eating in or to take away • Organic free trade coffee Cream Teas • Afternoon Tea (booking only) Home-made tarts, pies, cakes and bread • Local milk, cheeses and eggs Beautiful china from Burgess and Leigh. Lovely cards from local artists. Vintage gifts and original paintings by noted artists from Andelli Home and Andelli Art.

Taste of Timsbury

The Conygre Hall was busy and there were numerous stalls outside

Cyclists, walkers and dogs very welcome Open: Monday to Friday: 7am - 4.30pm Saturday: 7.30am - 3pm

Bread & Beyond

High Street, Chewton Mendip, BA3 4LJ

01761 240820 email: breadandbeyond@outlook.com

Miranda, Hayley and Liz from the Hen Welfare Trust with Harvey and Hoppy the hen

PAGE 18 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Bini Ludlow's demonstrations were popular


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 19

FOOD & DRINK

A l l s m i l e s a t We l l s F o o d F e s t i v a l VISITORS, stallholders and organisers were all smiles at this year’s Wells Food Festival. The biggest crowd in the event’s five-year history was believed to have turned out in glorious autumn sunshine for the celebration of food and drink. Festival director Paddy O’Hagan said around one third of stallholders had booked already for next year. He added: “It was an astonishing day and everyone was absolutely delighted. “It’s also a tribute to what a group of dedicated volunteers can achieve in Wells.”

The festival filled the Market Square with many more stalls around the Bishop’s Palace moat and on the Recreation Ground

Monika Kajabova (left) and Jemma Allen on the Jon Thorner stand in the Market Square Sienna, aged two and sister Zara, aged six, with pumpkins from the Charlton Orchards stand

Festival director Paddy O’Hagan (right) is served tea by Simon Collins, at the festival for the first time to launch the High Tea brand he runs with wife Christine

Food writer and Masterchef regular William Sitwell gave a talk at the Bishop’s Palace about his latest book Eggs or Anarchy, telling the story of Lord Woolton, minister for food in the Second World War. The audience was treated to Woolton Pie, the war ration staple, recreated by the Unusual Pork Pie Company

Simon and Neville from Wakey Cakey Kitchen

William and Thomas tuck in after visiting the Somerset Youth Volunteer Network stand

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 19


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 20

N ew I nn k ee p s i t i n t h e f a m i l y ROGER and Jackie Owen have left the New Inn in Blagdon after 11 years – and handed it over to their daughter Lynda and her partner Ian Webb. Ian was previously head chef at the Spotted Cow in Bristol, while Lynda worked in accounts in the city and did bar work before that. Both have relished the move back to the country, which means their son, Eddison, aged five, can attend the village school. Roger and Jackie, who previously had the Ring O’ Bells in Compton Martin for nearly 20 years, are now taking on stints as relief managers, their first was in a village near Banbury. Lynda said: “It’s been really nice. I miss the city a little bit but like being in the country. You can see the stars, which is magical.” Lynda and Ian took over on September 5th and outwardly things have stayed pretty much the same from the customers’ point of view. The cosy log fire and fabulous lake view from the garden will never change. But Ian has completely re-done the

lunch and evening menus, including a new sandwich range. As you would expect, being above Blagdon Lake, trout features prominently, but now comes with a poached egg and parsley butter. Sunday roasts are still very popular and are served from 12noon-5pm.

The couple aim to make the pub more child friendly and are busy organising a children’s Hallowe’en party and bonfire night celebration. The traditional wassail will take place in January. Roger and Jackie are now living at Redhill, safe in the knowledge they have left their old pub in good hands.

THE NEW INN CASK ALES ✧ HOME MADE FOOD ✧ STUNNING VIEWS

CHRISTMAS ORDERS NOW BEING TAKEN POP IN TO PICK UP A MENU BAR AND KITCHEN STAFF REQUIRED Park Lane, Off Church Street, Blagdon BS40 7SB Tel: 01761 462475 Email: newinnblagdon@btconnect.com

PAGE 20 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 21

GARDEN FOOD

Go Mexican

THIS is the time of year when I have to deal with all the green tomatoes left over from the year's crop. I can't say I am the world's biggest fan of chutney – nice though it is, one year's batch usually lasts me several. So I look to other ways to preserve the crop. With JAKE One dish that I've particularly enjoyed WHITSON making this year has been a Mexican mole verde, also known as mole pipian. Look for recipes online and you'll find all kinds of variations, because this was always a dish made with the green things Mexican housewives had to hand and any given time of year. With this in mind here's how I make my version – bear in mind that Mexican cooking works from a different rule book, so the process might seem a little odd at first! First take a white onion, peeled and quartered, and throw it into a dry skillet over a medium heat. Add to this a few peeled garlic cloves, a couple of whole jalapenos (or other green chillies), and a couple of handfuls of green tomatoes. Toast all of this slowly without oil so they develop browned or blackened patches on all sides, then remove them to a bowl. Toast a teaspoon of cumin seeds, and a couple of handfuls of pumpkin seeds, and add to the mix. Add one or two roughly chopped courgettes, along with a little oil, and cook for a few minutes so that they are half cooked, half raw, then add these to the bowl. Now add as much coriander as you can lay your hands on (a couple of handfuls is good – I add a Mexican herb called pepiche too, if you have it!), the juice of three limes, and a little water or chicken stock if you have it. Blend it all to a puree. At this point, it is worth noting, the sauce freezes very well – I always make too much and then freeze what I won't eat immediately. To make the finished dish, saute some fresh vegetables (squash and green beans is nice), or pieces of chicken, pork, rabbit or even beef, until almost cooked, then add the sauce and allow to simmer for a few minutes. Serve with white rice and more chopped coriander and lime wedges on the side.

Jacob is a former chef turned food writer, smallholder and mycologist. He divides his time between the Mendips and his nine-acre forest garden project in Pembrokeshire. Details: www.chaosfungorum.co.uk

FOOD & DRINK

WILD FOOD

What’s in your soup?

I HAVE to admit this month’s column has taken more care and thought (or is that prevarication?) than any has in a while. A simple walk in the woods has led to this and whilst I’m not encouraging putting one’s head above the parapet, I do feel it’s worth raising the following issue and for everyone With ADRIAN to bear it in mind. BOOTS Recently I witnessed groups of people picking mushrooms in woodland. No big deal in itself except there was quite a few of them and it clearly was not part of an organised foray. Unbeknown to them the site is actually a former lead mine and any fungi taken are at a much higher risk of being contaminated with lead. Of course they may have been picking for their own consumption, but equally they might sell them at market or to pubs or restaurants for public consumption. Next thing you know it’s in your wild mushroom soup starter which neither you or the person who created the soup has any idea of its provenance. Provenance of ingredients, specifically an understanding of where it has come from, how it got to you and how it has been processed is important. There are potential health risks from eating food from contaminated land and contaminants can be anything from dog waste to washing out of paint brushes to heavy metals from industry to over exuberant use of slug pellets in the garden – all of these have an impact on our land, water and food supplies. I have often warned of picking poisonous mushrooms but it’s equally important that edible ones are not collected from an area where there is no clear understanding of its historical and current land use. Fungi have a talent for building into their structure elements from the soil. Indeed they are used in bioremediation of contaminated land and have been very successful at it thanks very much. After all they perform one of nature’s many wonders, decomposition. Of course I do not want people to stop enjoying the fruits of the wild but I think it is worth asking yourself or indeed the person giving you the soup where the ingredients come from. This is true for all food and will become a much more important issue in the years to come and is a discussion for another time. If they cannot answer you or the response is unsatisfactory then I would recommend changing the order! If they don’t know where and who it is from then how can they guarantee that the identification is also correct? Scary! To cheer everyone up, here is a close-up photo of a beautiful Meadow Waxcap in the act of bioremediation (which one could argue they do all the time anyway) before it was collected from a pristine meadow, cleaned and cooked into a delicious dish. Just remember to ask what’s in your soup? Adrian Boots is a Landscape Ecologist, Wild Food Forager and Adventure Activity provider. You can visit his website: www.gowildactivities.co.uk to learn more about wild food foraging and activities you can do with him on the Mendip Hills.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 21


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 22

Personalised Christmas Hampers

In large, medium or small sizes. Filled with our locally-sourced, quality range of mince pies, mulled wines, sloe gin, luxury cakes, crackers and biscuits, jams, chutneys, sauces, olives, deli cheeses, fine teas and coffees, chocolate and confectionery.* * Subject to availability

PAGE 22 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 23

FOOD & DRINK

Village orchard bears fruit

Locally-made cider and apple juice were on offer

VILLAGERS and visitors gathered in a small orchard in Stoney Stratton, near Evercreech, to celebrate Apple Day with juice and cider made from local fruit. The celebration was held in Neill’s Orchard and featured other apple-themed foodie treats such as apple cake and pork and apple burgers. Orchard owner Jane Neill said: “We had a break last year and there have been plenty of apples this time; it’s a real community event and very Lesley and Jonathan Middleton relax with family good for a small village.” pets Betty and Ollie

Choosing a piece of fruit to throw in the village’s apple version of a coconut shy

Apple crushing underway

FARMBOROUGH’S Big Family Apple Day has raised more than £300 in support of plans for a new community shop in the village. The shop will be built on land behind the village hall. Groundworks were due to start at the end of October with a scheduled opening for next spring. So far, around £40,000 of the £50,000 target for funding by the community has been raised. A £83,000 grant has also been awarded from the LEADER Tim Roberts pressing juice programme.

Families from around Farmborough came with apples and pears galore

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 23

(Photographs courtesy of Sam Ross)

Farmborough’s big family apple day


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 24

Christmas at Jon Thorner’s

Come in and enjoy Blagdon’s traditional little country pub. enjoy Lunch or Dinner with us. note 80% menu is gluten-free. Booking highly recommended. in season: Trout • Pheasant • Venison gOOD fOOD, gOOD frienDS, gOOD TiMeS

www.queenadelaideblagdon.co.uk • 01761 463926

Mendip Times reduces travel costs

100,000 potential customers within a short distance of your business

N O V E M B E R D AT E S A l l m a r ke t s 9 a m - 1 p m u n l e s s o t h e r wi s e m a r ke d *

SAT 4th Axbridge & Midsomer Norton SUN 5th SFM @ Frome Independent SAT 11th Keynsham and Frome (C&G Market Hall) SAT 18th Crewkerne FRI 24th Burnham-on-Sea SAT 25th Glastonbury* (9am-2pm)

JON Thorner’s incredibly popular Christmas open evening is back – and it is starting earlier so you won’t miss out, on Friday December 8th, 4pm-8pm. Discover foods to spark your imagination and tantalise your taste buds, with the chance to win one of three hampers, worth a total of £95 – just enter the free draw and you could win! Jon Thorner’s is also putting on an early Christmas Preview day on Saturday November 25th, 10am-6pm. The Christmas themed day in the Pylle farm shop, will have a selection of tastings and all things festive. It is the perfect opportunity to take some time and speak to their butchers about what to choose for your Christmas dinner this year. Plus, the children can take part in their festive lucky dip! Join them at Bridge Farm Shop, Pylle, Shepton Mallet BA4 6TA.

Somerset wine tasting

WRINGTON Vale Rotary welcomed Sandy Luck and Luke Ford for a joint presentation about the development of wine growing in Somerset, hearing how Aldwick Court Farm and Sutton Ridge Farm, came to produce wines. The evening involved wine tasting from both vineyards and, needless to say, was much appreciated by the members!

Food and drink sector to benefit from new centre

PAGE 24 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

WORK is well underway to create a state-of-the-art rural enterprise and innovation centre at the Royal Bath and West Showground at Shepton Mallet. Due to be opened in January, the centre will focus on the latest developments in the agri-tech and food sectors. The centre is part of a £550,000 refurbishment of the show society’s former offices and has been funded by the its charitable reserves and a £42,000 grant from the South West Growth Fund. A society spokesman said: “Education, knowledge transfer and business growth is at the heart of the centre, and the facility will provide the perfect venue for farmers undertaking knowledge transfer projects, higher education graduates undertaking research projects, further education students gaining farming knowledge and skills, rural workforce gaining vocational skills to increase their employability and micro food and drink businesses looking to expand and grow.”


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 25

FOOD & DRINK

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 25


Food & Drink section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:46 PM

Page 26

Christmas Parties

Two courses £23.95 Three courses £29.95 (Table decorations and Christmas crackers included)

Christmas Eve Quiz night and social Tickets available £15 per person (including chef’s basket supper)

New Year’s Eve Masquerade Party!

Fabulous Frocks and Marvellous Masks. Tickets £65 Enjoy a delicious three course a la carte dinner followed by a DJ and dancefloor Glass of Champagne at Midnight

FOOD & DRINK

More awards for The Holcombe Inn

The Roost – the luxury cabin is a fabulous romantic hideaway

CHRISTMAS has arrived early at the Holcombe Inn in the guise of yet more awards for the quality of their food and accommodation. Owner Jules Berry and her dedicated team have received two rosettes from the AA for “culinary excellence” along with five stars for accommodation and a special breakfast award. It rounds off a highly successful year for the inn, which has received impressive reviews for The Roost, a detached, luxury cabin in the Tranquility Garden, which offers stunning views of the surrounding countryside. Now thoughts at the Holcombe Inn are turning to the festive season, which kicks off with a delicious two- or three-course menu for parties and another get-in-the-mood Christmas Eve fun night with a quiz night and social (including chef’s basket supper) for £15 per person. Tickets are now on sale (£65 per person) for the inn’s New Year’s Eve party which is always a stylish occasion. This year’s theme is Masquerade. Musicians from the Rural Music Network charity – run by the Somerset Rural Youth Project – will entertain diners with acoustic sounds before there is a chance to take to the dancefloor with a DJ until midnight when there’ll be a glass of champagne to see in the New Year.

All menus on our website or call for information

A warm festive welcome awaits at the Holcombe Inn PAGE 26 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Page 27 November:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:01 PM

Page 1

Tel: 0800 097 8611

www.johnhodge.co.uk | e-mail: mailbox@johnhodge.co.uk

WESTON-SUPER-MARE | BRISTOL | CLEVEDON | YATTON | WEDMORE


News page 28:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

2:57 PM

Page 26

Joined up thinking to boost tourism

Teamwork: (l:r) Andy Webb, head of Mendip Tourism Ltd., Damon Willcox, from walking holiday specialists Encounter Walking, John Turner, CEO of Visit Somerset and Andy Mallinder, from the AONB outside the Cheese and Grain

THE Mendip Way walking route has been relaunched as part of a new drive to attract domestic and overseas visitors to the area. Until now, the 49-mile route from Uphill to Frome has been known as the West Mendip Way and the East Mendip Way, with different way-markers. The relaunch took place during the first Mendip Visitor Economy conference, organised by Visit Somerset, the official destination management organisation for the county. The Mendip Visitor Economy team is made up of Frome Town Council, Visit Somerset, Mendip Tourism Ltd and the Mendip Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The organisation says the renamed route has the potential to bring more than £16 million into the regional economy. John Turner, CEO of Visit Somerset, said: “This new walking route development is just another great reason to visit the county and could generate a further £16 million of annual income for the regional economy. We know according to walking tour businesses in the South West that Devon and Cornwall walks are now nearly at capacity, being able to feature new walking opportunities is good news for our county.” Andy Mallinder, from the AONB said: “Our team of staff and volunteers have worked hard to make sure the route is well way-marked and easy to follow and developed new resources to market the route. We're delighted to be part of promoting the

David Warburton, MP for Somerton and Frome, addressed concerns about the county’s infrastructure needs PAGE 28 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Councillor Clare Aparicio Paul, junior cabinet member for resources and economic development at Somerset County Council, addresses the conference

Mendip Way so more visitors can experience the Mendip Hills while supporting local communities and businesses." Jean Boulton, deputy leader of Frome Town Council said: “The formal launch of the Mendip Way is particularly exciting given that Frome is already a hub for walkers and cyclists that wish to explore the Mendips. Improving the facilities for this group of visitors is an important part of our strategy.” The conference – held at the Cheese and Grain – also heard about plans by the government and Somerset County Council to improve infrastructure in the county, from improved road and rail connections to superfast broadband.

Delegates included Janet Bell, director of Glastonbury Abbey (second left) with Visit Somerset CEO John Turner, Cheese and Grain director Steve Macarthur, Jean Boulton, from Frome Town Council and Peter Wheelhouse, the council’s economic development and regeneration manager


News page 29:Layout 1

10/19/17

2:58 PM

Page 1

(Photograph courtesy of Jacinth Latta)

Choristers for the day

Evensong in the cathedral

WELLS Cathedral has hosted a free “behind the scenes” day, where children were able to experience the life of a cathedral chorister. A total of 41 girls and boys, aged between seven and ten, came from schools across Somerset and beyond for the annual event where they met the cathedral choristers and participated in singing workshops. The day culminated in singing choral evensong in the Quire of the Cathedral with the award-winning and world-renowned choir when the children performed the Anthem Love Divine by Howard Goodall, helped the choir lead the two hymns in the service and learnt to process in and out.

Panto time in Compton Martin

THE Sword of the Valley is a new pantomime being performed by Compton Martin Players. It’s been written by Drew Forsyth, while Paul and Rachel Branston have written much of the music. Both families live in Compton Martin. The Players say they are very excited to have a truly locally produced pantomime, which has a baddy who is mean, a very funny dame, a hero who’s a girl - and a talking duck! It promises to be great fun for all the family. The pantomime is being performed in the Compton Martin village hall on Thursday November 23rd and Friday November 24th, with two shows on the Saturday. Tickets can be obtained from the post office.

Silver service for farmers

THE Inner Wheel Club of Frome celebrated their 25th year of their farmers harvest Thanksgiving Service and Auction with a record attendance at Standerwick Conference Centre. The service was taken by Father Clive Fairclough, the market chaplain, and rotarian Kim Hyde accompanied the hymns. The chosen charity to benefit this year was Fairfield Farm College for Special Needs in Dilton Marsh. Debbie Hughes, the charity’s fundraising manager, gave an insight into the activities of the college and how they were fundraising for a new £150,000 equestrian centre.

Legacy of culture bid discussed

NEWS

John Glen (fourth from left) with members of the bid teams

MEMBERS of the team behind the City of Culture bid in Wells have met with the government to discuss the possible legacies of the application. Along with representatives from the cities of Hereford, St David’s and Perth, they held talks with John Glen, the Minister for Culture and Tourism. Andy Webb, from the Wells team, said: “The minister had been struck by the ambition of the four smaller cities entering the City of Culture 2021 Competition and invited us to discuss how our ideas might be progressed, even though none of these cities had been shortlisted for the next phase of the competition. “Phil Redmond, the chair of the UK City of Culture Independent Advisory Panel, also joined the round-table discussion and he and the minister were clearly struck by the fact that the proposals from these four cities were attempting to address similar challenges and needs within their communities. “John Glen is MP for Salisbury, with a personal understanding of the character of a cathedral city in a rural setting, and undertook to consider the ideas presented and to continue the discussion with another meeting towards the end of the year.” The Cultural Forum in Wells is to regroup later this year to discuss how initiatives can be progressed. The forum remains keen to hear from anyone with ideas about the way forward: info@wellscityofculture.com

School expands

A NEW, two classroom teaching block has been opened at St Mary’s C of E Primary School in Writhlington. The classrooms were required to enable the school to meet the growing demand for places in the area. It has expanded from 140 to 210 places. Councillor Cherry Beath, chair of Bath and North East Somerset Council, and the Hon. Andrew Jolliffe performed a ribbon cutting ceremony followed by a tour of the new facilities. A dance performed by pupils of the school’s dance club, singing and a cream tea added to the celebrations. Staff and children moved into the new £700,000 classroom block at the start of the autumn term. Lord Hylton, owner of part of the school site, kindly gifted a piece of land to allow the new classroom block to be built. The project was funded by B&NES.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 29


Events feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:16 PM

Page 16

Carnival colour in Frome

Frome mayor Sheila Gore (2nd left) with fellow collectors in the colours of the rainbow

FROM little green men (and women) from Mars to salsa dancers and charity collectors in rainbow colours, this year’s Frome Carnival was once again a vibrant celebration of imagination. The carnival – beginning with the children’s procession in the afternoon followed by the main evening cavalcade – is unique in that it raises money for the town’s own carnival charity, supporting local organisations and individuals in need. And it was the first time that organisers abandoned the traditional carnival royalty in favour of “ambassadors”.

Trailblazing: the first carnival ambassadors

PAGE 30 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Is there life on Mars? Pepperbox Nursery took first prize for their costumes

Luke Bennett, from Inferno CC and their Dead Dapper entry

Swans and Cygnets School of Samba ahead of the evening procession


Events feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:16 PM

Page 17

FROME CARNIVAL

Howdy! Girl guides in Frome create a posse Just super – Mary Poppins in flight

Lauren as Groot from Guardians of the Galaxy

Frome’s Jamma Samba hit the streets

Norty, but nice – one of the cast of Shepton Mallet’s Highwayman CC entry

Magnum Carnival Club’s tableau cart

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 31


Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

Art at the abbey

Stag, by George Hilder, in recycled steel: one of the sculptures on show over the summer

3:50 PM

Page 32

THREE Somerset artists who have been inspired by Glastonbury Abbey have joined forces for a new exhibition there. Quilted hangings by Alicia Merrett, mosaic sculptures by Kate Rattray and ceramics by Hiro Takahashi are on show under the title Traces Revealed until January 28th next year. The exhibition follows the success of a sculpture trail featuring the work of 17 West Country artists which ran for three months.

Church House Designs

Wednesday – Friday 10am – 5pm Saturday 10am-2pm (or by appointment) Broad Street, Congresbury, Bristol BS49 5DG Telephone 01934 833660 www.churchhousedesigns.co.uk PAGE 32 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Kate, Hiro and Alicia are exhibiting in the abbey Sophie Courtiour’s Monks in willow


Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:50 PM

Page 33

Rare bibles attract overseas interest THE Mendip Auction Rooms’ team have seen an influx of bibles offered selling to advantage. At their October Antiques Sale, Killens offered a 16th century Matthews bible printed by John Daye dated 1549. This met with strong internet interest, particularly from potential buyers from the US and Canada with the bible eventually selling for £1,900. At the sale, there was a variety of antiques and collectables with something for everyone. Also selling to advantage were a pair of 19th century Chinese hardwood chairs £3,000 as well as a signed book by Robert BadenPowell dating from 1908 that achieved £1,600. An entry of 19th century Coalport Parian busts, including Nelson, met with keen interest. Pictures of quality were also wanted with new buyers in attendance with a Still Life by Maxwell Armfield selling for £850.

ARTS & ANTIQUES

Victorian and Later Effect sales were in abundance during October with two sales held offering a variety of items including furniture, ceramics, glassware, pictures and household items. These attract an excellent number of buyers and provide an opportunity for homes to be furnished at low cost. The team from the auction rooms were delighted to stage a “Treasure or Trash” valuation day at the Somer Centre in Midsomer Norton on October 21st in aid of the Radstock Museum. Experts, including national experts, were in attendance valuing all types of antiques. This attracted treasure hunters from far and wide and some items of treasure were indeed found. A jewellery valuation day will be held at the Wells office of Killens on November 1st, 10am-1pm. The next sale will be of Antiques and Collectables on November 4th and A Victorian and Later Effects sale will be held on November 14th. Entries are invited.

Valuation days at the auction rooms are held every weekday from 9am – 1pm or a member would be delighted to visit you at home free of charge. For further details, contact the auction rooms on 01749 840770.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 33


Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:50 PM

Page 34

Artists in the soup

Woodturner Stephen Stokes, who lives near Shepton Mallet, was one of artists in residence during SAW.

NO dragons were in sight, but a group of artists faced one of their more unusual challenges during Somerset Art Weeks – preparing soup whilst they worked. A total of 14 different artists took turns “in residence” at The Soup Kitchen of Love in Bruton. It was the idea of Bruton Art Factory which hosted the official SAW festival club. Each artist had to provide a different soup each day to offer to visitors.

Memories hinge on craftsmanship

FRAMING medals and other military memorabilia has become something of a specialist subject at Swan Artworks in Tony with the hinged frame housing the Suez Paulton – no collection two collections are ever the same, so they all require individual attention. One recent example is of a client’s Suez collection. The items have been float mounted over the (reprinted) map of the region. It has also been made with a hinged top frame so he can open it up to read the service records. Another challenge for Carrie and Tony Osborne, who run Swan Artworks was to frame artefacts about a Spitfire pilot who failed to return from combat over Biggin Hill in 1940. The site of the crash was dug up in 1970 and parts of the aircraft were recovered. ● Carrie and Tony will donate 10% of any medal framing orders booked in during November to the Poppy Appeal.

The Artist’s Gallery www.tag.uk.net

4 Borough Mews The Borough Yard, Wedmore Somerset BS28 4EB info@tag.uk.net 01934 713295 Opening times: Wednesday 2pm–5pm Thursday, Friday and Saturday 10am–5pm

PAGE 34 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:50 PM

Page 35

ARTS AND ANTIQUES

Valuation day pulls in people from far and wide CLEVEDON Salerooms’ recent specialist jewellery, watch, silver and gold valuation day held in the council chamber at Wells Town Hall was a sparkling success. A stream of visitors from Wells, but also as far afield as Frome, Burnham-onSea and the Quantocks had a free verbal appraisal of their items and the salerooms’ three specialist valuers dealt with a continuous flow of customers from 10am– 4pm. Many visitors consigned jewellery on the day in time for the November 16th specialist sale, including the owner of the impressive diamond ring featured in the advert below. The

day after the Wells valuations, Clevedon Salerooms held another such event at the salerooms where the owner of this charming ruby and diamond ring consigned it for the specialist sale. The November sale also includes over 50 bottles of vintage Champagne and port which if previous bidding is

anything to go by will end up going to bidders located around the globe. The sale also includes a number of signed T.S. Lowry prints including The Lonely House, estimated at £800 – £1,200. The illustrated online catalogue will be available from November 4th.

Details: www.clevedon-salerooms.com

Every lot in every auction, illustrated and sold with live internet bidding Krug & Co Champagne 1949 £250 - £350

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers

FREE ANTIQUE VALUATION DAYS

Diamond ring £2,000 - £3,000

20 21 22 November

9.30am–1pm and 2pm–5pm Held at the salerooms – no appointment necessary Antiques, Interiors, Collectables & Jewellery Thursday, 30th November

Sale starts at 10am On view day before 10am – 6.30pm

Tel: 01934 830111 or 0117 325 6789

The Auction Centre, Kenn Road, Kenn, Clevedon, Bristol BS21 6TT www.clevedon-salerooms.com

Edward Bird – Oil on canvas -The Card Game £1,000 - £1,500

Quarterly Specialist Sale Thursday 16th November at 10.30am

Viewing Days: 14th November – 2pm – 5.30pm and 15th November – 10am – 6.30pm On line catalogue available from 4th November MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 35


Crossword page:Layout 1

10/19/17

2:55 PM

Page 1

INTERNET

iPad tips

HOW to change the wallpaper (picture behind the icons both on the lock screen and home screen) on your iPad: Simply tap Settings, tap 'Wallpaper' and then tap 'Choose a New Wallpaper'. You can browse from a selection of Apple's own wallpapers, with 'Dynamic' wallpapers moving slowly in the background, or if you want to add a personal photo, just browse for a photo from your photo library or camera roll. Mac iOS storage space isn't expandable, so if you are getting messages saying you can’t download something, it's important to keep an eye what's using the available gigabytes on your device. Go to General > Storage & iCloud Usage > Manage Storage in Settings, and wait for a moment or three as iOS calculates which apps are using the most space internally and in iCloud. Often, Music and Photos & Camera are the two biggest offenders. If you use a service like Apple Music or Spotify, you can safely delete the Music cache on your device to free up space. If you back up photos and videos to your PC or Mac, you can delete them too. Get your iPad to do some of the work for you! Your iPad can read text to you; Go to Settings > General > Accessibility. Scroll down to Speak Selection, and tap to turn it on. You can also adjust the speaking rate, choose from a wide variety of voices and highlight words as they are spoken. Now, go into any app that lets you highlight text. Your options include Mail, as well as Safari, Notes and a fair few others. Select (tap and hold and drag out the ends) some text, and you'll see a new option appear in the contextual menu (you may have to tap the right arrow to view more options). Tap the Speak command, and your iOS device will start reading the text aloud. This feature has improved a great deal, so should be very helpful. Back to the top of a web page. If you're halfway down a web page in Safari, tap the top bar (very top of screen) to jump back to the top of the page. Try it in other apps too – lots of them, third-party apps included, use this navigational trick. You might need to tap again on some. Submitted by IT for the Terrified : Now using Cheddar Village Hall, Church St, Cheddar BS27 3RF 01934 741751 (usually goes to answer phone) www.itfortheterrified.co.uk itfortheterrified@btconnect.com I.T. for the Terrified – for all your computer training needs. A skill-sharing, community project. Run by a Committee – Staffed by Volunteers Registered Charity No. 1130308 : Company No. 06779600 This article is for guidance only, and the opinion of the writer. For more in depth information, please contact us. We offer individual training, at a pace to suit you. We can cover a range of subjects – including absolute basics; photo management; shopping online; emailing; Word processing, spreadsheets; basic web design; etc. on a range of devices, including Windows: Macs: Tablets: iPads: smartphones.

PAGE 36 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

CROSSWORD

The Mendip Mindbender

This month’s Mindbender is themed all things Halloween

ACROSS 2 Jack _________, the Irish version of a carved vegetable lamp, usually illuminated (1,7) 6 John _________, director of the film Halloween (9) 7 Soul _____, traditionally given to the needy at Halloween (5) 9 & 17A Children’s game often played on October 31st (5,7) 11 Evil spirits usually depicted in popular fancy dress costumes (6) 14 Harry _______, escapologist who died on October 31st, 1926 (7) 15 & 1D Character from Irish folklore who purportedly cheated the devil (6,4) 17 See 9 across 18 See 5 down and 19 across 19 See 5 down and 18 across 20 _______ End, an archaic name for Halloween (7)

DOWN 1 See 15 across 3 The original vegetable used for making a 2 across (7) 4 ______ Witch, a character from Wizard of Oz who regularly makes a fancy dress appearance on October 31st (6) 5 18A & 19A Popular children’s activity on Halloween (5,2,5) 8 Gaelic festival thought to be the precursor of Halloween (7) 9, 15D & 13D Religious celebration following Halloween on November 1st (3,6,3) 10 See 14 down 12 Vegetables most associated with Halloween (8) 14 & 10D All _______ ___, the original name for Halloween (7,3) 15 See 9 down 16 Supposedly, spirits of the dead portrayed in fancy dress at Halloween (6)

Answers on page 122


Page 37 November:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:03 PM

Page 1

VISIT OUR SHOWROOM TO SEE HOW WE CAN HELP

FARM LANDSCAPE GARDEN

Our fully stocked showroom offers a wide range of tools, spares, accessories, clothing and merchandise to help you and your machinery operate at peak performance.

H. Curtis & Sons Ltd. Stanton Wick Farm, Stanton Wick, Pensford, Bristol BS39 4DB

01761 490372 sales@hcurtis.co.uk • www.hcurtis.co.uk

Hudson s Supplies and Service Heating, Plumbing

Bristol Drains Ltd Camera Surveys, Blo cked Drains, Jetting & Septic Tanks

For a genuine plumbing, heating or drain enquiry, a 24 hour call-out service is available 365 days a year. Please feel free to call us for a highly competitive quotation at fixed hourly rates.

HUDSON PLUMBING AND HEATING SERVICES LIMITED

BRISTOL DRAINS LIMITED

Tel: 0117 902 5820 • Fax: 0117 964 4666 Email: info@hudsonplumbing.co.uk Hudson Plumbing & Heating Services is a well-established local business located in the Bristol area. With over 20 years experience, we have built up an enviable reputation for quality workmanship, high levels of customer care, reliability and value for money.

Tel: 0117 940 0074 • Fax: 0117 964 4666 Email: info@bristoldrains.com At Bristol Drains, you can be assured of first-class work carried out by our own experienced and professional engineers. Whether you have a blocked drain at your home or office or if you require a buried drain traced/detected – CALL US NOW – no job too small.

• Boiler Repairs • Boiler Servicing • Boiler Upgrades • System Upgrades • Power Flushing/System Cleansing • New Radiators • System Overhaul • Leaks • Bathroom Installations • Wetroom Specialists • Bespoke Adaptions for Disabilities.

• Waste Pipes • Toilets/Sinks/Baths • Water Jetting • Septic Tanks • Drain Repairs and Replacements • Gully Emptying • Camera Surveying and Reports • Domestic Drain and Pipe Cleaning • Sewer Cleaning

Units 5a & 5b, 75 Whitchurch Lane, Bishopsworth, Bristol BS13 7TE (Entrance in Cater Road) A C C R E D I T A T I O N S


Business section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:01 PM

Page 38

Outdoor Clothing, Footwear and Accessories

FREE BAGLETT!

David James merger

DAVID James & Partners and Newland Rennie have merged to create a new group with nine offices and 70 staff. The two firms will continue to trade as DJ&P and DJ&P Newland Rennie in their existing areas, covering Gloucestershire, Somerset and Monmouthshire, including Newport County and Torfaen. By joining forces, they say they will be able to enhance the services they offer to their rural client base, covering all aspects of property agency. This includes auctions and lettings through their residential, rural and commercial sectors.

P & C Logs

FREE BAGLETT (worth £18)

WITH EVERY HEALTHY BACK BAG PURCHASED IN NOVEMBER

Broad Street • Congresbury • BS49 5DG (opposite Ship & Castle)

01934 877333 www.countryinnovation.co.uk

C al l P h i l o n 0 7 7 3 4 0 9 8 3 2 3 , o r C o l l ee n o n 0 7 7 8 5 2 5 0 0 3 3 o r o n E v e n in g s 0 1 9 3 4 7 4 1 9 4 1 Friendly prompt service from Phil & Colleen at their farm in Charterhouse Quality seasoned beech and ash hardwood, chopped and split into a variety of load options (with free delivery).

CAMELEY LODGE LAUNDRY

Duvets & Bedspreads washed & dried Sheets and Duvet covers washed and pressed Professional efficient service Collection & delivery service in the Chew Valley

PAGE 38 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Tel 01761 451787

www.cameleylodgelaundry.co.uk

LECATCHER MO

NO MOLE NO FEE Telephone 01275 332966 www.mendipmolecatcher.co.uk


Business section:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:01 PM

Page 39

BUSINESS

Take care granting a power of attorney – here is our advice GRANTING power of attorney gives a nominated person, the attorney, control over your financial and healthcare affairs if you become mentally incapable. The old “enduring” power of attorney system was replaced with “lasting” power of attorney in 2007 over concerns that the system was too easy to abuse. However notwithstanding these reforms there is still the capacity for abuse to take place. It is not uncommon where siblings or multiple people act as attorneys for the arrangement to be set up on a “joint and several” basis. This means that any one of the attorneys can make a decision without the need to approve it with anyone else. On the other hand if the attorneys are appointed “jointly” they must all agree before an action is taken. It is, for instance, possible to instruct solicitors to appoint attorneys jointly

for property matters, but jointly and severally for health and welfare questions. So an appointment of attorneys on a “joint and several” basis can allow one of the attorneys to undertake a transaction without the knowledge or consent of any of the other attorneys. Sadly there is evidence of an increasing tendency for abuse to take place. So for instance an elderly person goes into a care home and the attorney sells that person’s property and pockets the money rather than apply it towards the care home fees and/or any other needs of the person concerned. The majority of attorneys are friends or family but if there is a risk of disagreement over the selection of an attorney an independent person (usually a solicitor) can be appointed. Although there have been suggestions of reforms to the system to provide for the auditing of attorneys this would be a disproportionately expensive exercise

for the majority of estates. So people would be well advised to think carefully about the selection of their attorneys and perhaps only appoint them “jointly” where that is practicable so that all the attorneys can approve any transactions and therefore limit the risk of abuse. Edward Lyons (Solicitor)

Email: enquiries@lyonslaw.co.uk Website: www.lyonslaw.co.uk Telephone: 01275 332168 An established and progressive law firm providing a personal and cost-effective legal service for commercial and individual clients. ● Family & Divorce Law ● Co-habitation disputes ● Inheritance disputes ● Wills and Living Wills ● Powers of Attorney ● Administration of Trusts ● Property – sales and purchases OFFICES AT: Chew Magna 01275 332168

Westbury-on-Trym 0117 950 6506

Kingswood 0117 967 5252 MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 39


Business section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:01 PM

Page 40

School recruits governors OVER the present academic year Keinton Mandeville Primary School will be losing a number of long-term and experienced governors, due, for example, to children moving on in their academic careers. They are therefore looking to recruit new, enthusiastic governors to join the board

WANTED School Governors

If you are interested in finding out more about this role please contact the school office by phone 01458 223452 or email: keintonmandeville @educ.somerset.gov.uk Keinton Mandeville Primary School Chistles Lane • Keinton Mandeville Somerset TA11 6ES Tel: 01458 223452 Fax: 01458 224028

of this exceptional primary school. Their school governing board is made up of co-opted staff, parent and local authority governors. Their governors have a range of different backgrounds, skills and experiences, but they are all volunteers who work together for the benefit of the school. The school has recently completed a highly successful OFSTED which resulted in them remaining a “Good” school with some strong praise for many of their practises and the leadership team. However, never wanting to rest on their laurels, they have plenty of plans to keep the school strong and relevant in this changing world, whilst keeping the children at the heart of everything they do.

TOPSOIL AND STONE SUPPLIES Dry high quality screened or unscreened Topsoil. Recycled aggregates and quarry stone supplies, road planings and building stone.

DEMOLITION AND STRIP OUT All types of demolition works. From small household to main contractor projects, including rail, schools and city centre redevelopments. Complete range of specialist equipment and services available.

ASBESTOS Asbestos removal and collection. Roof sheets, tiles and guttering. Call for information.

TRANSPORT 4,6 and 8 wheeled tipper Lorries for hire and muck away. Low loader, beaver tail and road brush hire.

PLANT HIRE Wide range of plant. 360 excavators, Dumpers, Bulldozers and Crushers.

EXCAVATIONS Large and small excavations. Specialist works include Equestrian all weather surfaces, drainage and bulk excavations.

PAGE 40 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Truespeed doubles speed

TRUESPEED say they are thrilled to announce their base product has now been increased to 200 Mb/s! Amplifying their already ultrafast 100 Mb/s base product, a revolutionary scheme from their CEO Evan Wienburg has been initiated, where every TrueSpeed customer will have their internet speeds doubled to 200 Mb/s. With currently connected customers, those signed already and awaiting service and anyone on the cusp of taking service, an enormous 200 Mb/s is on its way. Communities where TrueSpeed is currently live such as Priston and Burnett, were the first to receive the doubled speeds, with absolutely no disruption to their lines or engineering work having to take place. The "speed dials" connecting their properties were simply turned up via TrueSpeed’s remote server and the additional megabits seamlessly flowed through. On top of this, one of the most important aspects of the initiative is the remarkable speed increase comes at no extra cost. No customer will be paying more for the additional service levels, and no hidden costs will be sprung upon recipients further down the line. It is simply an initiative to benefit customers by providing truly reliable, gigabit capable, future-proof broadband throughout the South West. The full fibre cable that is installed directly into each property guarantees speeds without the worry of dropping off during peak times and boasts symmetrical upload and download speeds of 200 Mb/s. A connection of this magnitude allows the people of the South West to finally use the internet with the freedom and flexibility they need. The increase in speeds has been implemented across all their products including the ‘Home Office’ package which has jumped from 150 Mb/s to 250 Mb/s. With ultrafast and reliable speeds of this magnitude, it provides the long-awaited opportunity to work from home and run businesses remotely across the Chew Valley. With TrueSpeed steadily growing, plans to roll out their full fibre, gigabit capable broadband across the South West are well underway, and your community could be next.


Business section:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:01 PM

Page 41

BUSINESS

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 41


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:13 PM

Page 42

Library’s open day

CHEDDAR Library held an open day and celebrated the occasion with a range of activities for both children and adults. These included board games, craft sessions, music workshops and poetry and storytelling.

Martin Kay and Jackie Evans come to grips with the game of Tsuro

Children's craft activity corner

butChers * fishmonGers * deliCatessen Children's poet Becki Nagle with Maximus and mum Emily

Christmas orders now being taken Gift hampers and vouchers open: tuesday – saturday 7am-6pm sunday 10am-4pm • Closed monday e Cross, union street, Cheddar, somerset bs27 3na 01934 742521 • email cobbsofcheddar@outlook.com PAGE 42 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

A game of Mah Jong in the adult’s games corner


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:13 PM

Page 43

Cheddar Festive Night

FOCUS ON CHEDDAR

1

December

CHEDDAR’S party of the year, Cheddar Festive Night, kicks off at 6pm on Friday December 1st, when the road through the village and gorge will be closed for a night of shopping and enjoyment. The evening starts with a service at St. Andrew’s Church, after which a rocket is fired from the church tower. There will be choirs and bands dotted around the village, candlelit tours of the caves, with the Lower Gorge and much of the village decked out with Christmas trees and lights. There are normally pig roasts, a market and a prize draw. Santa usually puts in an appearance too! Why not go along in fancy dress, with candles and torches?

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 43


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:14 PM

MENDIP TIMES

Page 44

Cheddar fashion

WITH autumn upon us it's time to dig out your winter clothes. Does your wardrobe look a little tired and dull? Need a little brightening up? Look no further than Katie-Boo your familyrun clothing and accessories shop in Cheddar. This season you won't be disappointed with rich vibrant colour palettes: berry blends with pink and lime, toned with smoke grey, fresh and bright yet beautifully sophisticated. What more could you want? Mixed with gorgeous scarves and bags, not forgetting their very popular bamboo socks – why not start your Xmas shopping early? They look forward to welcoming you into their gorgeous shop in the heart of Cheddar.

New club in Cheddar

Cheddar Karate Club members with instructors Ninth Dan Diago Giardina and Third Dan Gerald Filer (centre)

Ladies Fashion and Accessories Shop 2, Dorchester House Union Street, Cheddar Somerset BS27 3NB Proprietor John Denbee FRICS

01934 741899 Email: karen@katie-boo.com

katie-boo.com

CHEDDAR NURSERY For Christ mas t re e s a n d w re a t hs

Sharpham Road, Cheddar BS27 3DR 01934 742135

Cheddar Motors Ltd. Full garage services MOTs and servicing Repairs and diagnostics Cars • Vans Motorcycles • Scooters Motorcycle MOTs Wheel alignment Tweentown, Cheddar, Somerset BS27 3JE Tel 01934 742955 Email: cheddarmotors@gmail.com PAGE 44 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

A NEW karate club has recently been launched in Cheddar by Ria Karate Giardina, who already run clubs in Axbridge, Wrington and the Bristol area. The Cheddar club will be run in St Andrew’s church rooms every Thursday evening between 7.15 and 8.15pm. Details: Anne Smith 07843 946949.

New speed limit

AFTER years of campaigning, a 30mph speed limit has been imposed on Cheddar Gorge. The hope is it will deter “boy racers” who have plagued the gorge for years. Parts of the gorge previously had a 60mph limit. It’s also hoped the new limit will improve safety for cyclists and walkers.

RADFORD’S TILE SHOWROOM

OPEN TO RETAIL & TRADE Exclusive ranges available in: Ceramic Tiles • Porcelain • Mosaics • Slate • Natural Stone Stockists of: Adhesives • Tools • Grouts Professional design and advice service available We offer a comprehensive fixing service

01934 744814

Free Parking. Open Mon–Fri 7.30am–5pm; Sat 8.30am–1pm Mendip House, Unit 7, Valley Line Industrial Estate, Wedmore Road, Cheddar BS27 3EE (Next to Travis Perkins)

www.radfordstiles.co.uk


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:14 PM

Page 45

Another new business

FOCUS ON CHEDDAR

On target with Brook Bank

BROOK Bank shooting ground is one of the UK's leading shooting grounds and is a member of the CPSA (Clay Pigeon Shooting Association) – the governing body of clay target shooting. Located at the foot of the Mendip Hills it is set in beautiful grounds with stunning views of the surrounding countryside. Owned by Alison and Wesley Hann since 1982 – although previously known as Cheddar Valley Gun Club – shooting on the site started in the early 1960s. Brook Bank offers a variety of targets, from simulated game/sporting, as well as all trap and skeet disciplines, with challenges to suit all levels of ability.

BEV Hemmings opened her salon, Rebel, in June after 30 years in the hairdressing business. She was working in Katie-Boo, as well as running a mobile hair service, when the chance to open her own salon next door came up. She offers hairdressing for both ladies and gents, as well as a nail arts service. She specialises in long hair styling including weddings and proms and has worked on quite a few photoshoots doing anything from avant garde to vintage styling and last year did hair for a short film (period drama) which was shown at a few film festivals internationally. She also has a special interest in creative colouring and colour correction. Bev and husband, Richard, moved to Cheddar ten years ago and their son Blake, aged 13, goes to Kings of Wessex and daughter, Georgia, goes to Fairlands. Bev said: “We really love it here.”

CHEDDAR

Specialist in long hair styling, cutting and colouring. Individual Wedding and Prom packages available including hair, make-up and nails. Union Street, Cheddar Call Bev on 01934 744913 Opening times Monday 9am – 4pm Tuesday 9am – 5.30pm Wednesday 9am – 5.30pm Thursday 10am – 8pm Friday 9am – 5.30pm Saturday 9am – 3pm Sunday Closed

● Extensive range of quality greetings cards ● Stationery and office supplies ● Foreign currency ● Photo booth and passport check and send service

TEL: 01934 741022

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 45


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:14 PM

Page 46

CAFÉ GORGE CHEDDAR GORGE BS27 3QE 01934 741985

Redcliffe Court, 3 Redcliffe Street, Cheddar, Somerset. email: cheddardistrictfunerals@outlook.com www.cheddardistrictfunerals.co.uk

Consult the local experts for all of your insurance requirements Contact: Chris Tony or Paul on 01934 742550 For all your insurance needs Bath Street, Cheddar, Somerset BS27 3AA Tel: (01934) 742550 Fax: (01934) 744559 Email: quotes@woodburyinsurance.co.uk

Ruth and the team would like to wish their customers a very happy Christmas

PAGE 46 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Ten facts about Bouquet Florist

IT’S a family affair with owners Carol Willcox (mum), and Claire Willcox (daughter) also working alongside Julie Andrews (auntie) and Lindsey Baker (cousin). The shop and base of the business is located on the corner of Cliff Street and Redcliffe Street in Cheddar in first floor premises. They sell a selection of gifts for under £10. Why not pop in and view their selection of plants or maybe a £5 jam jar arrangement complete with free gift card? Bouquet Florist deliver flowers for every occasion, indoor and outdoor plants, helium balloons, chocolates and hampers within a 15-mile radius of Cheddar (Glastonbury, Weston, Burnham, Wells, Street, Congresbury to name a few!) from as little as £2.50. Their wedding calendar is already filling for 2019, so they highly recommend contacting them for a free consultation to discuss ideas and availability. Visit www.bouquetweddings.co.uk to view the wedding guide price list and portfolio of wedding flowers. If you’re looking for a bespoke funeral tribute or sympathy flowers, they will deliver to any funeral directors within their delivery area for free. Want to learn some floristry yourself? Bouquet Florist hold regular workshops such as Christmas wreath making which includes refreshments, demonstration, all materials included and goodie bag. It has been so popular that the three 2017 workshop dates are already fully booked. So booking early for 2018 is really advised to avoid disappointment. Bouquet Florist offer 10% discount to all flowers bought for church flower arranging. Pre-ordering for larger events such as Easter, harvest and Christmas is recommended. You can order flowers online at www.bouquetflorist.co.uk Use discount code “MENDIPTIMES” to receive a 10% discount (ends Jan 1st 2018). Also like them on Facebook to keep up to date with all the latest Bouquet Florist news. Post a photo of this page on Facebook and tag us to be in with a chance of winning a free bouquet. If you run a business within their delivery area, why not open an account for all your staff birthday bouquets, thank you gifts and front of house or office arrangements? If you are attending the Cheddar Festive Night on Friday December 1st keep an eye out for the Bouquet Florist team who will be giving away free gift-wrapped single flowers.


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:14 PM

Page 47

Kings Fitness invests for the future IT has been only five years since Kings Fitness & Leisure made the big change from small studio gym to the impressive set-up that is now in place. Although Kings are proud that they offer one of the best facilities in the region, they are not complacent about just maintaining this proud record. The result of their ambition is about to be realised in December when most of the existing kit will be replaced with state-of-the art equipment. Exciting new equipment will include the addition of an extra Cross trainer, and two Power Mills to add to the brand new range of Cardio machines. There will be 23 new Indoor cycling bikes as well eight treadmills, giving Kings an enviable number of cardio options. There will be new free weights as well as new plate loaded machines and these will be on new flooring designed to protect both members and equipment. The Synergy 360 training zone is being upgraded with new addons, with the entire area on new rubber flooring plus an Astro turf strip. The Studios are not being ignored, and Studio 2 will have a brand new sound system. The really exciting aspect of the new equipment is the technology. Members will soon be able to track all their activities in the centre with their Smart devices, with 160 different devices being able to log on. This includes smart

FOCUS ON CHEDDAR

phone apps, Fitbit type equipment, specialist equipment like Strava, Garmin and the like. Kings Fitness members will all be able to access the cycle, the cross trainer or whatever piece of equipment that they are exercising on and record directly onto their own system, as well as be able to log their swims, the intensive exercise classes or any activity in the gym as they wish. This will allow them to not only record their training, but also to have the ability to work with the gym instructors to possibly enhance their training schedules if they so wish.

Thursday 7th December 4pm until late MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 47


MENDIP TIMES

Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:14 PM

Page 48

Cheddar’s Tree of Light on the move

CHEDDAR Vale Lions’ Tree of Light, now in its fifth year, will be lit at Cheddar Garden Centre on Thursday December 7th, at 6.30pm. Christmas is often a time of reflection and members of Cheddar Vale Lions are inviting people to remember loved ones by sponsoring the tree and attending the lighting ceremony. The minimum donation asked is £5 and all the money raised goes back into the Cheddar Valley community. The late Glyn John was the man behind the Tree of Light, a project that has now been adopted by Lions Clubs across the country. It’s raised tens of thousands of pounds for charities and local organisations.

PERFECT PAVE

Details: www.cheddarvalelions.org.uk or through Facebook @cheddarvalelions.

Perfect Pave, based on the Valley Line industrial estate, in Cheddar, has built an enviable reputation over the last 16 years for the quality of its work installing block paving and other landscaping products. Now founders Alex Howley and Simon Bethell have set up a new service run by James Starmer supplying these products to both the trade and public, as well as continuing to expand their installation team. e company now has contracts all over the South West and offers a wide choice of projects. Now supplying – as well as installing – landscaping products to the commercial and domestic trade Wider range and cheaper prices than builders’ merchants or garden centres

Showroom open 8am-5pm Mon-Fri 8am-12noon Sat

Details: www.cheddarwalking.org.uk

PAGE 48 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:14 PM

FOCUS ON CHEDDAR

Page 49

Office move is a big hit

THE decision by Bartlett, Gooding and Weelen solicitors to relocate to new, purpose-built offices in the centre of Cheddar has been welcomed by staff and clients alike. The move, from Church Street to Bath Street Chambers (next to the Post Office) was completed in August and the new location offers the firm a much more visible presence in the village, along with plenty of parking close by. The offices were, in fact, the former flat for the village postmaster working below. Gareth Reynolds, the BGW director in charge of the Cheddar office, said: “The opportunity arose to move to more modern premises and we are now more visible and there is more footfall in the area.” The office offers plenty of room for Gareth, licensed conveyancers Vicky Hoskins and Natalie Barker, secretaries Sarah Millard and Kelly Charles and secretary/receptionist Katie Ellis. The team has been joined recently by trainee solicitor Joe Barrow. Gareth, a solicitor in Cheddar since

Gareth (back, second right) with some of the team at their new offices in Cheddar

1983, said regular and new clients appreciated the new location as did the team: “There is a very good ambience here. We have received very good feedback from our clients and the team is incredibly happy to be working in a modern environment.” The Cheddar office is one of four operated by BGW with the others in

our services include: Commercial and residential Property Wills and Probate litigation and Personal injury Criminal and family law agricultural, business and Commercial employment shepton mallet: 57 high street, shepton mallet, somerset, ba4 5aQ. tel: 01749 330330

Glastonbury: 11 Chilkwell street, Glastonbury, somerset, ba6 8dl. tel: 01458 832510

Shepton Mallet, Glastonbury and Castle Cary. They were formed almost 20 years ago as a result of a merger between Bartlett and Co (established in Shepton Mallet in 1958), Austin and Bath (established in Glastonbury in the 19th century and owned at the time by Nick Gooding) and Robin Weelen and Co (established in Castle Cary in 1978).

We appreciate that all Mendip Times readers will have eagerly turned to this page to find out which team won the BGW Quiz! Sorry to disappoint, but the date had to be put back by a couple of weeks and it will not take place until after this edition has gone to print. We will let you know next month! This month we are revisiting a familiar theme which is the preparation of Wills. We speak to so many people who tell us that they really must make a Will and will be in touch after they have moved house, retired, completed the charity bungee jump that they are organising etc. etc. …the list is endless. Many people don’t make a Will because they believe that they have many years left before they need to think about it. Hopefully, that will be true and, in most cases it is, but none of us ever really knows how much longer we have. One shocking statistic is that 73% of 16-54 year-olds don’t have a Will. Apparently, the majority of these are men (who on average die younger!). The intestacy rules (which apply if you die without making a Will) may not always achieve the desired result and could fuel dispute or even litigation. Failing to amend a Will which is out of date can be worse than having no Will at all. Wills are relatively inexpensive. If you have not made one or think that you may need to change your Will please contact any of our offices for advice. Castle Cary: old bank house, high street, Castle Cary, somerset, ba7 7aW. tel: 01963 350888

Cheddar: bath street Chambers, bath street, Cheddar, somerset, bs27 3aa. tel: 01934 745400

Website: www.bgw-solicitors.co.uk MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 49


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:14 PM

Page 50

Cheddar’s beauty specialist

FULLY qualified with over 25 years’ experience including Harrods and salons in Windsor and Paris, Cheryl opened Childs Cheryl Beauty in the summer of 2015. Situated on the edge of Cheddar and only 15 minutes from Wells, Cheryl Childs Beauty is home-based though totally independent from the house with the added convenience of ease of parking. Offering no obligation consultations, Cheryl treats a select few clients a day allowing time between appointments to ensure that clients are able to discuss their requirements and never feel hurried. Cheryl specialises in the multi award winning CACI antiageing system including the CACI Eye-Revive treatments. CACI features a range of therapies for younger people, from lip to acne treatments as well as helping to slow the advancing years. Cheryl also offers organic waxing and hand, feet and eye treatments, as well as a range of facials utilising Katherine Daniels, the fastest growing skin-care system in the UK today. Clients spending £40 on a Katherine Daniels facial can receive a free Katherine Daniels lip colour enhance balm worth £20. Cheryl always features a range of special offers including introductory discounts and also gift vouchers that can be for particular treatments, or for a specified value, and make perfect Christmas presents. Details: 01934 744384 or go to: www.cherylchilds.co.uk

Christmas crafts are coming to Cheddar library THE Craft and Sewing Group at Cheddar Library offers a chance to try a variety of crafts and meet new friends in its autumn programme. It meets on Friday afternoons at 2.30pm upstairs in the library on the first and third Fridays of the month. On November 3rd the

theme will be making Christmas cards with rubber stamps, including an introduction if this is new to you. On November 17th there will be a "Bring Your Own Craft and Chat" session. Looking ahead, on December 1st they will try "Decopatch", which includes a small box, shape or book to cover, and decopatch papers, at a cost of £2 per person. On December 15th there will be a "Bring your own craft and Christmas Social". At any session you can join in the activities or take your own craft to do, as you wish. They are a friendly group and new members are very welcome. Details: Cheddar Library

PAGE 50 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:14 PM

Page 51

FOCUS ON CHEDDAR

We understand that the next steps for your Post-16 education are important. THE Kings of Wessex Academy is a large and vibrant Sixth Form and is an exciting and popular place to study where learning is stimulating and fun. The Academy is forward-thinking, proud of traditional values, committed to academic success, with a reputation as a centre of excellence for study at Level 3 (A Level/BTEC/Cambridge Technical). But it is also much more. As Kings is a place for your child to grow into young adulthood, as we care and love the whole child. Kings’ motto is ‘To get the best out of everyone’ and students can choose from a wide range of subjects at A Level and BTEC to find a course of study that is challenging, but stimulating too. Examination results are consistently very good and many of Kings’ Sixth Form students chose to go to university, including Oxbridge. The Academy is also a centre for an exciting HE+ initiative developed by the University of Cambridge to inspire the brightest students across Somerset. Independent learning is encouraged and nurtured and students gain extra UCAS points by undertaking the respected Extended Project Qualification, a student-led dissertation style piece of work. During the year, students also attend Higher Education and apprenticeship conferences, visit universities and benefit from mock interview practice and specialist careers guidance. Students enjoy lots of exciting enrichment activities that enliven learning, with a flourishing arts programme of termly music concerts and annual Drama and Performing Arts productions to showcase students’ musical and thespian talents. Other skills for life comprise a Year 12 Work Experience placement, and many other meaningful voluntary and

leadership opportunities; such as peer mentoring, including paired reading with Lower School students here in school. Many Sixth Form students undertake the prized Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme; Year 12’s learn more about driving safely and competition is fierce for a student to be selected as our ‘Gabbler’ in the annual public speaking competition! An exhilarating highlight and grand Kings’ tradition is the successful and sensational annual Charities Week organised by the Senior Student Team, leading fun-fundraising for local, national, international charities with a host of exhilarating and exciting events held at break and lunchtime. A must for all Sixth Form students! Kings students benefit from fantastic facilities. Specialist classrooms are equipped with state-of-the-art IT, the Kings Theatre is a purpose-built Theatre and Drama Studio, Apple computers in Art, a photography infinity curve, an excellent Learning Resource Centre, designated study room and common room, the Kings Café – a lovely, dedicated dining area and an onsite Leisure Centre for Sixth Form that students can benefit from for healthy living. We know that the positive approach of our students, great teaching and facilities, exciting opportunities beyond the classroom all make Kings a special place to study.

But, don’t take our word for it, come and find out for yourself! You can read more on our academy website at www.kowessex.co.uk and call us to arrange a visit. We look forward to meeting you and welcoming you to our Academy. Believe and succeed!

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 51


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:14 PM

Page 52

School goes global

For Christmas We have small toys . . . . . . as well as big ones! Pupils representing Spain and Egypt

Come and see what we have in store

Winchester Farm, Draycott, Cheddar BS27 3RP

01934 741166 www.smartagservices.co.uk

NATUROPATHIC AND HERBAL MEDICINE

Naturopathy Herbal Medicine Osteopathy Ecological Medicine Nutritional Medicine Aromatherapy Massage Ozone Therapy Spa Treatments

01934 733040 www.rosamedicaclinic.co.uk email: info@rosamedica.com PAGE 52 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

PUPILS at Fairlands Middle School, in Cheddar celebrated International Languages Week by researching various countries and then trying out their cuisine – and costumes.

Clinic treats a range of conditions

ROSA Medica Clinic in Cheddar is owned by Rosalind Blackwell who moved her naturopathic and herbal medicine practice there three years ago from her previous location. She has completely refurbished the premises located on the whole of the ground floor of Corner House offices at the bottom of Lower North Street and now has many treatments available. Rosalind’s main interest is in the treatment of chronic health conditions using an integrative approach, including functional, nutritional and herbal medicine. She has been in practice for 30 years. Rosalind has recently been joined by Dr May Lynn Yeap, an experienced medical doctor, who has studied integrative and ecological medicine over many years. Dr Yeap is also a qualified paediatrician so she will be ideal also for young patients with health issues. For people with back problems Rosalind does naturopathic manipulation and remedial and relaxing massage and ultrasound treatments. Jon Muscaty has an osteopathic clinic on alternate Fridays. Traditional methods are also utilised in the clinic with special diets, colonics or ozone steam saunas and therapeutic massage. Spa therapies that can aid well-being are also offered. Although they mostly deal with chronic conditions they can help with simple ailments too. People can book a short consultation to see if a supplement or herbal medicine might help them.


Cheddar feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:14 PM

Page 53

Court House is a home from home COURT House is a family-run business and has been since it was started 31 years ago, by Pearl and Brian Dando. The aim was to create somewhere with a homely atmosphere and everyone that visits agrees that this is still the case. It is now ran by the next generation, sons Christopher and James, who continue with the same ethos and values. Residents all bring their own furniture, staff don’t wear uniforms and the walls are not covered in notice boards. There are three different areas to Court House, all with a different feel. The main Georgian House has a grand entrance hall and drawing room. The purpose-built courtyard is built in a Mediterranean

FOCUS ON CHEDDAR

style. These rooms have their own kitchenette. The peaceful Cottage has bags of character. All of the rooms are en-suite and have telephone and television points as well as a nurse call system. There are activities laid on such as a pianist that plays regularly, themed suppers arranged and visits to the local pub for lunch. Residents are by no means expected to join in, they have the choice which is also the case with all aspects of their daily living. The superb location of Court House means that residents have wonderful views over the Mendip Hills and are also able to enjoy its village location meaning that they can continue to be part of the local community which we actively encourage.

COURT HOUSE A beautiful Georgian Retirement Home set in the lovely village of Cheddar, Somerset. You can live your life to the full and choice is our favourite word

The Manager – Chris Dando 01934 742131 chriscourthouse@gmail.com Court House Retirement Home, Church Street, Cheddar, Somerset BS27 3RA MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 53


Charity section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:10 PM

Page 54

Inner Wheel meeting is pants!

Freemasons back charity

Jessie May nurse Helen Williams with Sophie

Club president Jackie Emm (left) with Julie Harris

MEMBERS of Midsomer Norton and Radstock Inner Wheel were asked to bring along some unusual items to a recent meeting – underwear. The garments were donated to a charity called Ugandaid which works with girls in the Masese township who are too poor to buy knickers. Julie Harris spoke to the meeting about her work in the township to provide underwear and sanitary wear. The Knickers to Uganda project has donated more than 2,000 pairs and now the community has its own sanitary wear production line. She told the meeting: "We go to enable, not to impose. She was thanked by Linda Tanner and given a donation towards the project plus lots of knickers that members had collected. The club is now looking forward to a visit from district chairman Lynn Evans and to its 60th anniversary charter night at the Swan Hotel in Wells on Saturday, October 28th. New members are always welcome.

Support group expands

WECIL's Disabled Persons' Peer Support Service in North Somerset is growing and becoming more established throughout the area. Anyone with any type of disability or long-term condition over the age of 18 is welcome at their friendly, welcoming and supportive groups, either on their own or with carer/support worker. Activities include wheelchair yoga at Backwell Parish Hall, Nailsea craft group, photo-montage sessions at FAHLC Westonsuper-Mare and pub meet-up groups at The Glassmaker in Nailsea monthly, with similar groups soon in the Weston/Worle area. A spokesman said: “If you know someone who would like to come along to anyone of our drop-in peer support groups or attend any of our events please do spread the word to them or feel free to pass on our newsletter.” Details: www.wecil.co.uk or email peersupport@wecil.co.uk

PAGE 54 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

LOCAL charity Jessie May is celebrating after receiving a £15,000 Community Award from the Freemasons following a public vote. The charity appealed to friends, supporters and service users to vote online and help them win a slice of the £3million up for grabs as part of Freemasonry’s 300th anniversary celebrations. The charity, which provides care within the home for terminally ill children in Bristol, Bath, North Somerset, South Gloucestershire and Wiltshire, needs around £1.4million every year to provide vital support for families. Julian Withers, head of fundraising at Jessie May, said: “Every year our costs are going up as we take on different regional areas and expand our services to the children, their parents and siblings, so a substantial grant like this is great news.” Details: www.jessiemay.org.uk

Hospice seeks volunteers

ST. MARGARET’S Somerset Hospice will be welcoming Glastonbury and Street residents over coffee and cakes on Thursday November 2nd, 10.30, at the Morland Room, Red Brick Building, Morland Road BA6 9FT, at 10.30am. Local community fundraiser, Victoria Poole, and volunteer co-ordinator, Susan Bickle, will be there to welcome them and let residents know about the work that the hospice carries out in Somerset. Residents will also hear first-hand from a guest speaker who has direct experience of the hospice and the service it provides to patients, their families and friends. Susan, who recently joined the hospice fundraising team, said: “Without our army of dedicated volunteers St. Margaret’s Hospice could not survive – volunteers are embedded in every area of the hospice, from reception staff to gardening, and everything in between, including animals such as ponies and dogs – we even have a hospice cat. “However we do need more volunteers – If people can offer their time – even as little as an hour a month – I will have a volunteer role that will suit them. We are also hoping that people may volunteer to set up a fundraising group in the Glastonbury and Street area with our help.” Details: www.somerset-hospice.org.uk


Charity section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:10 PM

Page 55

CHARITIES

Care home has a ball

A MASQUERADE ball at Bath Assembly rooms has raised more than £9,000 for Leonard Cheshire Disability’s Greenhill House at Timsbury. Guests enjoyed the company of Olympic gold medal winning athlete Jason Gardener MBE, multi-medal winning Paralympian Ben Rushgrove, Paralympic Boccia player Nigel Murray MBE and Invictus Athlete Alastair “AJ” Pingram. Greenhill House has a large sporting offer for the disabled adults it supports and is looking to expand this so residents can enjoy even more of the health and well-being benefits of sport. The care home’s Boccia team has competed in the Boccia England National league since 2014. Boccia features on the paralympic programme and was developed as an inclusive version of bowls to be played by people with a wide range of impairment. One resident, John Burrows, aged 50, said: “Boccia has provided the opportunity for individual and team development. Players’ skills are improving all the time.” The ball was part of Leonard Cheshire Disability’s centenary celebrations to mark 100 years since its founder Group Captain Leonard Cheshire was born.

Olympic gold medal winning athlete Jason Gardener enjoying the ball with Jason Gould

Quilters support charity

Greenhill House residents arrive at the celebrations

Party-goers donned their masks

DRAYCOTT Quilters are having an exhibition of their work in aid of the Teenage Cancer Trust. It will be held on Saturday November 11th at Draycott Memorial Hall, BS27 3UE, from 10am until 4pm, admission £3.50, which includes tea and home-made cake. The exhibition will include an auction for this quilted, double-sided (reversible) quilt made from beautiful batik fabrics in inky blues and glowing autumnal hues. The reserve price is £100. The quilt can be viewed at the show or you can place a bid on their website. The quilters meet once a week to exchange ideas and sew. They work on projects to make joint quilts for charity and individual quilts for themselves. Their work involves various techniques of machine and hand-piecing (occasionally applique) and machine and hand quilting.

Details: www.draycottquilters.co.uk MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 55


Charity section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:10 PM

Page 56

Cancer charity goes back to its roots

A SENIOR executive from Macmillan Cancer Support has made a special visit to Castle Cary to discover more about the birthplace of the organisation’s founder. In 1911, Douglas Macmillan watched his father, William, die of cancer. His father's pain and suffering moved Douglas so much that he founded the Society for the Prevention and Relief of Cancer. Douglas, born in 1884, wanted advice and information to be provided to all people with cancer, homes for patients at low or no cost, and voluntary nurses to attend to patients in their own homes. A few days before his father’s death, Douglas had received a birthday gift of £10 which he made the first donation to what he called the fight against the “cancer scourge”, founding the charity that now bears his name. The first annual general meeting of the National Society for the Prevention and Relief of Cancer was held in 1912 at the Macmillans’ house in London. Douglas Macmillan retired from the society in 1963 at the age of 79 and died of cancer six years later, having returned to live in Castle Cary. The first world’s Biggest Coffee Morning fundraising event was in 1991. Castle Cary resident David Gee, who wrote a book about Douglas Macmillan, was amongst the people to meet the charity bosses. A display about the philanthropist’s life in Castle Cary can be seen in the town’s museum. David said: “It seems the charity wants to reacquaint itself with its history.”

SHEPTON MALLET

Coffee time at Castle Cary Market House

WELLS

The offices of a firm of funeral directors in Wells was one of the more unusual venues. Owner Danny Unwin (third left) is pictured with staff and guests who raised £300

Tesco in Shepton hosted 27 guests for the coffee morning attempt

The team behind the Shepton Mallet bid: (l:r) Deborah Towner, Becky Ware, store manager Mike Dennett, Jess Ingram and Jake Morgan PAGE 56 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

John North, the mayor of Wells, was amongst the guests


Charity section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:10 PM

Page 57

CHARITIES

Back in time for charity

GUESTS at a dinner in Wells will step back in time in aid of Macmillan Cancer Support and Wells and Mendip Museum. The gala event at the The hotel as it looked in Victorian times Swan Hotel in February will have a Victorian theme after the discovery by city archivist Dr Julia Wood of menu cards from the era when the annual Mayor’s Civic Dinner was held there. The menu cards show not only the menu but the wine list and the toasts drunk and alongside these were, written in calligraphic handwriting, the table plans for the dinner which the great and the good of Wells, though not women, attended. The hotel will recreate a typical dinner menu from the time for the event on Sunday, February 4th. John North, the mayor of Wells, is due to attend.

Janet Loe (right) has taken over the running of the Castle Cary and District branch of Macmillan Cancer Support with the help of Cas Sandy (left)

EMBOROUGH

Home-made cakes and other goodies were on the menu at the Macmillan coffee morning at the Old Down Inn, Emborough Diane was one of the winners of the raffle

Tickets are £30 each and are available from the Swan Hotel on 01749 836300 or email zoe@swanhotelwells.co.uk

PEASEDOWN ST. JOHN

LOCAL councillor Karen Walker opened up her home to the public to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Support in memory of her parents who both passed away after long battles with cancer. Those attending included representatives from local churches, Peasedown Primary School, the Lions Club, Curo Homes, and fellow councillors Sarah Bevan, David Walker and Nathan Hartley. The event raised £250.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 57


Charity section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:10 PM

Page 58

New helpline for youngsters

OFF the Record, which provides support for young people aged 10-25 in Bath and North East Somerset, has launched a new helpline. With a growing need for mental health and emotional wellbeing services, Off the Record supports many hundreds of young people face to face each year. Some 50% of those with lifelong mental health illness would have experienced symptoms by the age of 14. So far this year the service has delivered 3,229 sessions of listening support and counselling to young people aged 10 -25 across Bath and North East Somerset. Feedback from young people showed transport to their hubs can be a challenge, as well as overcoming barriers to have the confidence to visit an emotional wellbeing charity. Now a pilot telephone support line has now been set up with support from Midsomer Norton Town Council, The Ralph and Irma Sperring Charity, The Bridging Charitable Trust, Quartet Community Foundation, St John’s Foundation and fundraising by local people. During the initial trial, the line will be available 5pm8pm Monday and Wednesday and 4pm-7pm on Friday. The number, which is free to call from UK landline and mobile numbers is 0300 303 3661. Details: simonmartindale@offtherecord-banes.co.uk

A (six) grand morning out

MORE than 100 walkers, runners and cyclists took to the lanes and paths around Mells to raise more than £6,000 for charity. It was the fourth annual event in aid of CLIC Sargent and is held in memory of Ben Crutchley, who died of cancer aged ten in February 2012. The Mells 10K is organised by his parents Su and Nige. Su said: “It was a brilliant day again with over 100 participants and we raised over £6,000 which, with the gift aid, takes our total for Mells 10k over £50,000. Next year will be our 5th year and we intend to make it really special.”

Hospice celebrates

WESTON Hospicecare’s in-patient unit will be celebrating its 20th anniversary on Sunday November 5th. To mark the occasion, they will be holding a special open house event at Jackson-Barstow House, in Uphill, 11am-3pm, and all are welcome to join them.

Pop-up shop

BBC Points West presenter Imogen Sellers is pictured with Janice Bell and volunteers at the launch of the charity Pop-Up Shop at St John's Church, Frome.

Proud to wear their medals – runners at the end of the 10K

The warm-up routine underway

The 2018 10K will be on Saturday, October 13th. For details, visit: www.mells10k.com PAGE 58 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Charity section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:10 PM

Page 59

CHARITIES

Heroes with a head for heights HEAVEN’S above! These are some of the brave souls who took part in an abseil from the roof of the main tower of St Mary’s Church in Bruton in aid of charity. The weekend of mass descents was held in aid of SOS Africa, based in Shepton Mallet. Individuals and teams climbed the 100+ tower steps – passing the famous bells which were ringing out – before clambering over the buttresses to make their way down.

Stephen Roads, of Shepton Mallet, was one of those who overcame their fear of heights to take the challenge

Matt Crowcombe and Claudia Titley, from SOS Africa, with Ian Burton (kneeling) from Aardvark Adventures and abseiler Julie Huckle, of Shepton Mallet. Julie is a volunteer with SOS Africa, but was also raising money for the residents of Pullin Court in Shepton Mallet

It seems a long way down…

A view of Bruton looking north from the main tower

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 59


Mendip Society page:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:07 PM

Page 1

Showcasing what Mendip has to offer AS we approach November we are slipping into autumn, affecting both us and our surroundings. I think this is my favourite time of the year, being more suited to our temperate climate, waving goodbye to stuffy temperatures and bleached landscapes. Some of you might disagree, but that's democracy for you! It does sometimes make things a little uncomfortable though. The society shared a spot with the AONB at the recent National Trust Outdoor Festival in Cheddar when hundreds of energetic people of all ages ran and cycled over our wild hills trying to better their previous efforts. Despite the “damp” conditions, worsened by strong winds, it was very nice to see whole families competing in different sports proving that the Mendips are an ideal spot for these activities. But autumn is also the time of another milestone in the changing seasons – the harvest. In January this year, the community orchard of Rickford, replanted by the village in 2004, received the ministrations of master of ceremonies, our president Les Davies MBE, in a wassailing of the apple trees. With Somerset Wassail songs from the Barley Rye Choir, Wassail Queen Emily Routh blessed the trees with cider and exhorted them to do their best for a good crop this harvest. The huge crowd attending from the surrounding villages chased away the evil demons with Emily Routh apple pressing

THE MENDIP SOCIETY

loud noise and banging. And it really worked! On Saturday October 7th, a bumper crop was picked by the residents of Rickford, the orchard sheep helping to pick up the fallers! Rickford Association has made itself a press and bought a small pasteuriser; after the weekend of hard work there are now 240 bottles of juice for their own use. Wassail Queen Emily, without her robes and crown, demonstrates the use of the press. A trailer of fruit has also gone to a commercial bottler and there will be up to 500 bottles of “Rickford Apple Juice” for sale in November. Ring 07884 003183 for info. This will continue to keep the sheep flock and the orchard in good heart – a really sustainable venture. Oh, and there is also 125 litres of cider on the go! By the time you read this, the Mendip Rocks Festival will have just four days to go, with fossil tours at Moons Hill Quarry, art for children and adults in Fairy Cave quarry and fossily everything in Cheddar and Burnham libraries, with the Finale Day in Wells Museum on October 28th. With so many varied events there must surely have been something to interest everyone. The hard work by The Somerset Earth Science Centre, the AONB and ourselves as sponsors, highlighting the delights these hills are and have within them, will hopefully inspire many more people to go discovering for themselves. Go to www.mendiphillsaonb.org.uk for the detailed programme. The society continues to keep a close eye on the rapidly increasing planning applications for development being made in all parts of our area for often unwanted and unsuitable excessive housing – development which is being supported by national government. Together, and with expert help from the AONB and CPRE, we are endeavouring to curtail what we see as unreasonable, unnecessary and misguided future projections for “needed” housing in and between the settlements which surround the protected area of the Mendips. Opposing this is a time-consuming on-going task, and our small team of dedicated planning scrutinisers need all the assistance they can get. If you think you can help in any way, then please get in touch with us. Richard Frost & Judith Tranter

Details: www.themendipsociety.org.uk or ring 01275 874284/472797

PAGE 60 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

A bumper harvest


Wildlife page:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:08 PM

Page 40

WILDLIFE

T he s te a l t h o f a ch ee ta h I HAVE been pleased to welcome the return of a sparrowhawk to my garden recently. This is a spectacular bird, about the size of a By CHRIS woodpigeon, which SPERRING generally preys on MBE smaller birds, although can tackle birds up to its own size. It is the cheetah of the bird world, relying on stealth and speed to catch its quarry. It will often start the hunt in open country, where it will gently circle high up until it spots a group of small birds. Once a target has been spotted the hawk descends some distance away and uses an obstacle, such as a hedge, wall or fence, as a screen. It will fly low alongside the screen, gathering speed until it reaches the point where it had seen the birds. At the right moment it will dive over the screen with wings closed for maximum acceleration and scatter the surprised birds. The hawk will quickly choose the slowest to pursue, usually the weakest in a group; young, old or sick individuals, as it cannot chase for long distances, so needs to catch quickly or go hungry. The sparrowhawk is an important part of the British countryside, and can be a common sight in gardens. They do an important job removing sick and weak birds so that diseases don’t linger in populations and only healthy birds pass on their genes. Anyone who does feed birds in their garden regularly is likely to have an abnormally high number of small birds concentrated in one area, so at some point a sparrowhawk will naturally be attracted in. Some ways to keep your birds safe while feeding include hanging feeders in trees/bushes rather than poles so that the birds can dash into cover quickly and also placing obstacles such as bamboo poles around the feeders. Another predatory bird which can be attracted to gardens is the tawny owl. November tends to be the climax of their autumnal calling, so now is the time to go out after dark and listen for the iconic “tu-witt, tu-woo” song. Though still our commonest owl, numbers have taken a

A tawny owl

tumble in recent years, and it is now afforded Amber status (meaning a 25% decline) on the Birds of Conservation Concern List.

Sparrowhawk in flight – the cheetah of the skies

In response to this decline the Hawk and Owl Trust

are asking people to report calling tawny owls via their new Facebook page: www.facebook.com/AdoptABoxforBirdso fPrey/. While out listening at night, you might also like to listen for returning Redwings. These northerly breeding thrushes return to spend the winter months with us, and quite often move around at night whilst on migration or just passing through areas in search of places to stop and refuel. They can often be heard during the early evening as they utter their flight calls which sounds like a thin short sounding “Zeee”. You can help species like redwings by not cutting berry-laden hedges too early and leaving some fallen apples, as they are predominantly fruit feeders.

Redwings – don’t cut back berry-laden hedges too early

Chris Sperring is Conservation Officer for the Hawk and Owl Trust Contact him on 07799 413 918 or chris.sperring@btinternet.com

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 61


Walking DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:09 PM

Page 62

A ramble around Nunney HERE’S a circular ramble in East Mendip from picturesque Nunney village with its ruined castle – an ideal reasonable length walk before winter sets in and the days get even shorter. Follow the Macmillan Way and East Mendip Way going through dramatically named places such as Murder Combe and Bedlam. From Nunney, drop down to Nunney Combe and brook and later follow Fordbury Bottom to a pretty spot by the bridge at Great Elm. Continue along the brook and then Egford Brook before coming into open country. Walk through fields and the former golf course before coming back to Nunney village with a great pub and a cafe with muchpraised cream teas. There are no major hills and it is a good dog walk. Some paths are uneven and could be slippery. I’ve designed the walk in order to enjoy the castle and village at the end so start early giving yourself plenty of time. PARK: In Nunney village, a couple of miles SW of Frome. Find the spacious free Quarry Gardens car park in the village centre just above the castle. It has a restful garden and picnic area there in the old quarry. Note the closing time of the car park – 4.30pm in winter.

START: Enter the quarry garden through the gate at the back of the car park and go right along the fence, under the arch and

along by the adventure cycle track. Not far along, turn back sharply left. This path leads into fields. Bear ahead and then diagonally right down to Nunney Brook passing horse jumps. Cross on a bridge by the ford.

1. NUNNEY BROOK Turn left with the brook left, through a mix of open areas and woodland. It can be uneven and slippery under foot. Look out for otters, kingfishers, dippers and birds of prey. 2. FOOTBRIDGE Reach a track junction and go left over a footbridge, then up the track to the road. Cross to the footpath opposite. Follow the field edge and by a corner, turn right through a metal kissing gate and go up the left field edge climbing gently. Reach a footpath and stile left. But, don’t take it. Instead, stay in the field and bear 90 degrees right across to a house on the other side. Exit the field through a Bristol Gate (with pedestrian access built in) and out past a house – formerly the old Sun Inn – to the road in Whatley.

With Sue Gearing PAGE 62 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

3. WHATLEY Turn left and shortly, at the bend, go down right past the village notice board, then left between walls on the marked footpath. Just past Whatley Cottage, go through one of several wooden kissing gates installed by the Mendip Ramblers. Turn right on the drive and follow a

narrow footpath ahead at the side of a house. Cross into a very pleasant field. Turn right and go through another gate. In the field follow the right edge and go right through a gate and then left in the same direction as before following the hedge on your left. Continue all the way until you reach the road in Murder Combe. 4. MURDER COMBE Cross to follow the Macmillan Way in woodland above Fordbury Water on a good firm wide track. Stay up, ignoring side turns. Eventually at a junction go down left on a stony track and left down the road to Great Elm and the Mells Stream, a picturesque duck haunt.

5. GREAT ELM Just before the bridge, turn right through a gate on the East Mendip Way into Vallis Vale following the fast flowing water, once the source of so much industry along here with many mills harnessing the power of the brook. Go on under a rail bridge in an area known as Bedlam. 6. BEDLAM Keep on, going under a footbridge and then over a footbridge across the Mells Stream and continue with the water on your right. Pass a couple of lime kilns on the way. Stay close to the water and reach two footbridges. Take the second across the Mells Stream and now follow Egford Brook. Further on, leave the East Mendip Way which goes up left. Just stay along


Walking DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:09 PM

Page 63

the brook going through an area of old quarries. Cross a metal stile and follow a track up to a farm drive and parking layby.

WALKING

Les D

7. ROAD Continue to the road and keep straight on. Ignore a left turn. At a T-junction with a road, go ahead up the private road; then take the footpath which goes up left above the farm. Maintain direction through three fields, bending round to the gate at the end on to a road. It’s right now for two or three minutes. 8. GOLF CLUB Turn right towards Frome Golf Club entrance, crossing a stile right onto a footpath which goes left and joins the club drive. Go up to Critchill Farm. Turn left. Before the car park, turn right at the end of a corrugated barn on the marked path.

9. FIELDS Join a track along through fields. Reach a two-way marker signpost on a wooden stile. Here go ahead and left into the field at the side. Go right along the edge for a few yards and then strike up across the field diagonally to a gate near the top corner. Once through, go round the left edge of the field to gates at the end. Take the kissing gate and in the field follow the right edge. Go through another gate and on as before. A gate at the end leads onto a track. Follow this as it bends and goes through kissing gates and takes you down to Fulwell Lane and then into the road in Nunney. 10. NUNNEY Turn right, following the brook and reach the old cross and the area of the brook where the village women used to do the washing. The footbridge over the stream which leads directly to the castle will not reopen probably until next summer, so, for now, go on past the popular George Inn and take the first turn right over the bridge. Then reach a friendly cafe on the corner of Castle Steet, the Moat and Turret. As the name implies, Castle Street leads to the 14th century castle now in the care of English Heritage. It was besieged and damaged by the Parliamentarians in 1645, during the English Civil War. Though ruined, Nunney's dramatic great tower is very well preserved and atmospheric. Go back up Castle Street and turn right up the road to the car park.

7 miles, about 4 hours walking. OS Explorer, 142 Shepton Mallet & Mendip Hills East, grid ref: 735 457

The George Inn, Nunney, tel: 01373 836458 • The Moat and Turret, Nunney, tel: 01373 837361

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 63


Outdoors page:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:27 PM

Page 56

West Countryman’s diary

IT’S the November issue! We are getting into winter, but at the time of writing the sun is shining and a very fat wood pigeon is “waddling” around on top of my pergola in the garden. There is still so much food about that I don’t think the wild birds are too worried at the moment. With LES Winter will soon make itself felt and I have DAVIES MBE lit the fire for the first time. Bit of a mistake really because the room became so hot I had to open all the doors and nearly went to sit in the hallway wearing just my underclothes and that would not have been a pretty sight! The days are not that far off when I’ll be close to sitting on top of the fire. Time to fit the saw bench onto the tractor and get some firewood ready. It’s still mild and “Rumour Control” has it that we will see some good autumn colours at the end of October. The leaves are starting to turn now, but nothing like I would have expected at this time of the year. Great for weekend walks and now is the time to take advantage of every fine day that you can. A few words of warning though in regards to things that like to bite and sting. I’m told that the tick population is still very active. This time of year it’s less likely that people will be out walking in shorts and T-shirt, but please make sure you check for ticks on your clothing if you have been walking through bracken and rough grass. It’s a simple enough precaution – stop, check and brush off anything that has decided it wants to join you on your walk. At the end of the day do a body check when you shower, just to ensure you haven’t brought one home with you. Don't forget to check the dog, they are a favourite companion of the tick. If you need any further information, the Mendip Hills AONB can help. Check out their website page on: http://www.mendiphillaonb.org.uk/visiting-the-mendip-hills/walks/ or give them a call on 01761 462338. Remember it’s not a scare but be aware. What a great Mendip ploughing match again this year, with plenty of pictures in this edition of Mendip Times. Not even the weather could ruin the magic of the Mendip Ploughing Society’s 148th meeting. Held this year at Yeo Valley’s Priddy Hill Farm, the day attracted 106 ploughs, 16 hedge layers and three drystone wallers. The appearance of four steam ploughing engines owned by society president, Alan Sparkes, added another layer to the story of cultivation from horse power to brake horse power. When other meetings had been cancelled due to bad weather, Mendip was much luckier and even with the rain at the end of the day, everyone got away safely. You know when you have reached what is now termed “A certain age”. It’s when you can remember the equipment ploughing in the vintage class being at the cutting edge of agriculture in your youth.

OUTDOORS Every year I praise the work of the ladies’ team who give so much to making the day a success. This year was no exception, so look at this for a gargantuan achievement from a tent in the corner of a field on Mendip: they made 140 sandwiches which were delivered with a cup of tea to every competitor on the day; they provided 250 lunches for stewards, judges, society officials and visitors. There was an endless supply of cups of tea, slices of cake, bacon rolls and even somewhere to go and sit down when it got just too much! It’s always difficult to estimate numbers and there was no-one with a counter on the gate to give an accurate figure. Suffice to say we had a lot of people there on the day including 80 school children, who came to have a look at a very rural day out. There was a holiday feel to the whole day. The society committee are incredibly efficient, everyone knows what to do and just gets on with it. In today’s world of hi-tech communication and the global economy, it’s nice to take a look at something that made all of that possible – agriculture. Agriculture has been responsible for much of our heritage and for our survival. If there are two inventions, in my view, that we owe a debt of gratitude to, it’s the wheel and the mould board plough! We no longer have to be a “hunter gatherer” society. Farming delivers all our food needs and we can devote our lives to such activities as going into outer space, developing even great and faster means of communication and writing columns for the Mendip Times. Having a firework party this year? How they have changed over the years! It’s all so very expensive these days and there is no such thing as a “ten bob” box of fireworks. That, for those of you who did not gain any financial knowledge until after 1971, is 50 pence. Back then the box would contain at least one rocket, a Roman candle, jumping jack, Catherine wheel, the ubiquitous “banger” and many other items that once the blue touch paper had been lit, and only when you had retired immediately, would go whoosh, bang or whizz, if not all three. Those who were much better off could enjoy such pyrotechnic delights as the “Wakey-Wakey” a mortar of fearsome capability that lobbed exploding shots into the sky. Then there were the rockets to die for with sticks nearly three feet long, which, when they exploded on what at the time seemed like the very edge of space, would cascade a shower of crackling sparks and the spent stick back to earth. I used to go around the fields the following day collecting these wonderful bits of wood, left over from the very expensive parties thrown by the residents of Cadbury Camp Lane… ah, nostalgia isn’t what it used to be! Have a lovely time and stay safe, whatever you’re doing. This month’s background picture is of Black Down from Burrington Ham. Plenty of opportunity to explore now the bracken has been cleared, but be aware of unwanted hitch-hikers!

You can always contact me through my website: Westcountryman.co.uk PAGE 64 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Yeo Valley page:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:07 PM

Page 1

YEO VALLEY

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 65


Gardening section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:43 PM

Page 66

Putting the garden to bed

AS the last of the autumnal leaves fall and hedgehogs are looking for somewhere to hibernate, it is time to tidy up the garden in preparation for the winter months ahead. Fallen leaves on grass are most easily collected with a rotary mower which will With MARY conveniently chop them into smaller PAYNE MBE pieces, which makes composting much quicker, especially as the addition of grass clippings helps the process perfectly. I like to keep leaves in a separate heap and give them a couple of years to rot down into what we call “leaf mould”; a dark, friable substance that is perfect as a mulch, or even to mix with potting composts. Beech and oak leaves are the slowest to decay due to high tannin content which shows in their brown autumnal tints. If you are quick it is not too late to scarify your lawn and follow on with an autumn feed. Rake vigorously with a spring tined rake to remove “thatch” (dead grass debris), or better still get someone else to do it for you! An autumn feed contains a higher proportion of potassium than nitrogen and helps the lawn to toughen up for the winter ahead. Too much nitrogen now would encourage soft growth vulnerable to a variety of fungal diseases. Herbaceous plants, that have no value in their seed heads, can be cut to the ground. Others with more decorative seed pods can be left for both you and the birds to enjoy. The cut stems can be put in the compost heap, but will rot down faster if shredded first. The resultant shreddings can also be used as a mulch to protect slightly tender perennials such as agapanthus. Michaelmas daisies can be lifted and divided in the autumn or spring, and benefit from such treatment every couple of years. Sadly, the taxonomists have “got at” Aster naming, and our well-loved Michaelmas daisies are no longer Aster, they have become Symphiotrichum. They could at least have found something pronounceable! Ornamental grasses display some of their most valuable assets in the winter months. The flower stems of Miscanthus will remain all winter, while the foliage changes to buff shades, contrasting well with seed heads and the coloured stems of dogwoods. In the spring, deciduous grasses can be cut to the ground, while evergreen grasses can be raked through to remove the brown leaves. The popular Giant Oat Grass (Stipa gigantea) can be raked through, or more drastically, cut hard back well before the new flower stems emerge. Pruning of most woody plants is best left until the spring, except for very tall plants that flower late on current seasons wood, such as lavateras, buddlejas and tall roses like ‘Queen Elizabeth’. The top one third of these can be cut off to reduce the chance of damage by wind rock in the winter. Now is a good time to take hardwood cuttings of many deciduous shrubs. No sophisticated environment is required, just a patch of earth. Take long pieces of this year’s growth and discard the immature tip. Starting from the bottom of the shoot cut just below a bud, and then above a bud 150 – 300mm (6–12inches) further up. The ideal diameter should be not less than that of a pencil. PAGE 66 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Aster 'Little Carlow'

Several cuttings can be made from one long shoot. Make a slit in the ground with a spade and inset the cuttings so only the top one third is showing. Firm them in lightly and label. They can stay there until next autumn when they can be lifted and transplanted – plants for free! Buddleja, Forsythia, roses, Philadelphus, Abelia, Ribes, dogwoods, willow as well as black, red and white currants and gooseberries can all be done in this way. It is not too late to sow a green manure on vacant vegetable plots. This will help protect the soil structure as well as adding valuable organic matter when dug in in the spring. Grazing rye (Secale cereal) would be suitable, but don’t delay sowing. Broad beans sown in November will give an earlier crop than spring sown ones, but it is important to use a hardy variety such as Aquadulce Claudia. Well-rotted compost can be spread on the surface of raised beds and let the worms do the job of “digging” it in for you. There is no need to dig if you have not compacted the soil by trampling on it. Plants in pots and containers, especially evergreens, are vulnerable during the winter months as severe frost can freeze the compost making water uptake impossible so move these to a sheltered place or protect the pots with bubble wrap. It is worth spraying box hedges with a protective spray against box blight. The fungicide Fungus Fighter is remarkably effective against this problematic and devastating disease. Sweet pea enthusiasts will be sowing their seeds for an early crop next year, but watch out for mice who are very partial to a few seeds for supper. If you have not already done it, the greenhouse glass should be cleaned, and the inside given a good clear-out ready for overwintering all those tender plants and cuttings. Lining with bubble wrap will help insulate and reduce heating bills. Alternatively, horticultural fleece can be laid over the plants during periods of freezing weather and is easy to remove on bright sunny days. Heater thermostats should be checked for accurate functioning. Keep watering to a minimum during the winter months. Plants can stand the cold better if they are drier at the roots than if they are wet and if you do need to water do it in the morning so the foliage has a chance to dry. Finally, declare war on autumn germinating weed seeds. The ubiquitous goose grass or cleavers gets ahead by germinating in the autumn. They are easily identified by that tell-tale whorl of leaves above the seed leaves.


Gardening section:Layout 1

• •

• • • • • • • •

10/19/17

3:43 PM

Page 67

NOVEMBER GARDEN TIPS

GARDENING

If you are not planting up your tubs and hanging baskets for winter and spring colour, take them down, empty them out and put them away for winter. Move plants in pots together so that they protect one another in cold weather. Remove saucers from underneath them to ensure excess water can get away through the drainage holes in the base by unblocking them and standing pots on pot feet. If you haven’t done it already, trim the dead flower heads off summer and autumn flowering heathers. If the soil is not too wet or actually frozen it’s still a good time for planting of hardy plants. Fork over borders and work into the soil a slow release feed such as fish, blood and bonemeal. Plant tulip bulbs, if not done already, urgently plant any other bulbs. Insulate greenhouses with bubble polythene. A layer of this can lift the temperature by a few critical degrees to keep frost out of an unheated house but could save up to a third of heating costs in a heated greenhouse. Attach sticky glue band traps to the trunks of fruit trees. These will trap the winter moth on its way up the trunk to lay its eggs. Do the stake too! Plant cherries, plums, pears, vines, figs, medlar, quince, blackberries, loganberries and lots of other fruits. Complete autumn digging in the veg patch, leave the ground rough and let the frost and rain break it up. Courtesy Cleeve Nursery

ROCKY MOUNTAIN NURSERY MASBURY, NR. WELLS, SOMERSET BA5 3HA TEL: 01749 841014 FAX: 01749 841055 www.rockymountainnurseries.co.uk COME & SEE OUR FINE RANGE OF FRUIT TREES, SHRUBS, GERANIUMS & FUCHSIAS

Visit our MASBURY’S CAFE

Serving breakfast, lunch & afternoon tea Delicious homemade meals. Sunday Roasts, Outside catering, buffet lunches delivered, themed cuisine events. Telephone 01749 841155 for further details.

BROWSE AROUND JAMES STORE SEE OUR WEBS ITE FOR MORE DETAILS WWW.ROCKYMOUNTAINNURSERIES.CO.UK

ALL YOUR GARDENING NEEDS – SET IN 12 WONDERFUL ACRES –

Timberwork Buildings Bespoke buildings to suit you

We specialise in the manufacture of quality standard and bespoke garden buildings to suit your individual needs including:-

WORKSHOPS/GARAGES GARDEN SHEDS SHELTERS & STABLES PLAYHOUSES Let our dedicated team assist you in your choice whatever your budget . . . Full design, installation and delivery service available – customise your shed to suit your needs

We also do: Chicken Houses Dog Kennels • Bin & Log Stores

YOU ARE WELCOME TO VISIT US AND SEE OUR SHOW MODELS – OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

THE TIMBERYARD • SHUTE SHELVE • CROSS • NEAR AXBRIDGE Tel: 01934 732 396 • www.timberworkbuildings.co.uk e.mail: timberbuildings@aol.com

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 67


Gardening section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:43 PM

Page 68

NAILSEA PATIO SUPPLIES

Locally grown Christmas Trees on sale from Nov 30th

GARDENING

Blooming marvellous

TOWNS and villages throughout the area have been celebrating success in the South West in Bloom competition. There were golds for Hutton, Keynsham, Bath, Wells and Street, with silver gilts for Glastonbury, Radstock and Paulton. There were special celebrations in Peasedown St. John, which entered for the first time and was awarded silver. The awards were presented by Lord and Lady Fellowes, patrons of South West in Bloom. Jon Wheatley, chair of RHS South West in Bloom said: "We are very proud of Somerset’s entries this year. Bloom is making a real difference in the Somerset region, thank you to the many volunteers that make it all happen on behalf of the RHS South West in Bloom.”

The ultimate one-stop Garden Shop

Large Autumn Sale – Crazy Prices Over 50% off certain items Paving slabs, stepping stones, edging and ornaments Coal, logs and gas available 7 days a week Calor gas 7 days a week

Nailsea Patio Supplies are proud to support

The Coalyard, Station Close, Backwell, BS48 1TJ Contact us – Tel: 01275 851706

Now’s the perfect time to get your garden ready for the weather ahead. I’ve wasted countless days and a small fortune, maintaining tired wooden fences that looked dreadful and always need more work. Discovering Colourfence has changed things forever! It’s scientifically tested and rated to ensure when professionally installed it withstands gusts of up to 130mph. Colourfence won’t

The Peasedown award was presented by South West in Bloom Secretary Denise James. The village also won Best New Entry

rot and it resists weather that damages wooden fences, it has none of the drawbacks of wood but plenty of added benefits and it’s better value too! The materials and fitting are so good that Colourfence is guaranteed† for 25 years. To find out how Colourfence might benefit you, arrange a free no obligation quote by calling the numbers below to arrange a FREE no obligation site visit.

Bristol South District Tel. 0117 214 1201 Clevedon, Tickenham, Portishead, Nailsea, Backwell, Long Ashton, Pill, Failand Tel. 01275 277211 Shepton Mallet, Wells Tel. 01749 321066 Weston Super Mare, Yatton, Congresbury, Cheddar, Axbridge Tel. 01934 235591 Temple Cloud, Blagdon Tel. 01761 202411 PAGE 68 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


News page 69:Layout 1

10/19/17

2:59 PM

Page 26

Lit Fest launch in style

(l:r) Sue Rye, from the festival’s education group, John Cryer, past chairman, Louise Lappin-Cook, from Plays in the Playground, and Richard Manning, chairman

THE 25th anniversary of the Wells Festival of Literature was launched in style in a marquee in the grounds of the Bishop’s Palace. The marquee was the main venue for the eight-day festival which featured The festival launch in the speakers ranging Chubb Bulleid marquee from politician Nick Clegg to chef Rowley Leigh. And the festival launched a new event for lesser-known local writers and performers: Write Up, Speak Up!

Road safety concerns raised at meeting

WELLS MP James Heappey has continued his support for Meare and Westhay residents in their ongoing campaign for better road safety in their villages by organising and chairing a public meeting at Meare Primary School. It follows concerns raised by an application – since withdrawn – by South West Wood Products to change its environmental permit. The company specialises in the shredding of redundant pallets and other waste wood into wood fibre. Nearly 150 residents attended; also in attendance were representatives from the council, Natural England, the RSPB and local businesses.The MP said: “This was a great chance for people to understand more about this issue, but also for the Environment Agency and Somerset County Council to hear just how strong the opinions are of residents of the village.” He added: “Many constituents have contacted me about this important issue and their anger is very clear. Much of the meeting was dominated by concern over the licensing and planning processes connected to South West Wood Products (SWWP), but also real concerns were raised about other aspects of road safety in the village. “I will continue to work with the Environment Agency and the County Council to ensure residents’ voices are heard in these processes. I will also work with SWWP in the hope we can find a solution which works for them as a business and works for residents.”

Memorial to Acker

NEWS

Pictured (l to r back row) George Tyler, who made the bench, Publow parish council chairwoman Janette Stephenson and Pensford, Publow and Stantons Community Trust member Sue Osborne, front row Cllr Tim Warren and Pensford, Publow and Stantons Community Trust member Andrew Hillman.

A BENCH in memory of one of Somerset's favourite musicians, Acker Bilk, has been unveiled in his home village, Pensford. It stands in pride of place by Pensford lock-up and sports a plaque showing a bowler hat and clarinet. In a moving ceremony, the seat was unveiled by local ward councillor, Paul May, and B&NES leader Cllr Tim Warren, after which composer and musician Jolyon Laycock of Woollard played Acker's Stranger on the Shore. After the ceremony everyone retired to the Rising Sun where they could stop and share their memories of the great musician, who sadly died in November 2014. The granite bench was designed and made by local craftsman and stone mason, George Tyler, and was funded through donations from Pensford, Publow and the Stantons Community Trust, Publow and Pensford Parish Council, the Pensford Music Festival, Pensford Miners Welfare and also John Tyler. George said: “I feel privileged to have been commissioned for this special piece of work. It was a great honour.”

Members of Pensford Music Festival committee (l to r back row) Alan Ford, Simon King, Mike Daniels and Dave Parnell, front row Jane Clouting, Paul Hunt and Guilly Jones.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 69


Mendip Ploughing DPS:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:04 PM

Page 70

Straight and narrow

Waiting for the results to be announced – the awards ceremony was held inside the marquee as rain fell at the end of the match

The ladies who did lunch

Mendip ploughboys

The heavy horses were impressive

PAGE 70 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

The hedging competition


Mendip Ploughing DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:04 PM

Page 71

MENDIP PLOUGHING MATCH 2017 Pupils from Croscombe C of E Primary School enjoyed their day out

Maggie Hughes, from Winscombe, got a lesson in hand ploughing from Brian Reynolds

Tractor heaven

Dry stone wallers (l tor) Simon Bethell, Sam Wedmore and Paul Trippick

Ploughman Mike Brockway, of Coleford, receives his trophy from Garth Clark, MD of Yeo Valley's Holt Farms, which hosted the match at Priddy Hill Farm Walking the dog – Mendip style

Dry stone waller Simon Bethell, of Axbridge, was crowned champion of champions for collecting the most awards on the day

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 71


Remembrance DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:05 PM

Page 72

A poignant lesson in history

A PARTY of Frome College students have visited the battlefields of Belgium and France, including Tyne Cot cemetery and the Menin Gate. Initially they searched and found their “birthday soldier” gravestone and placed a poem they had written about the war at the soldier’s side. They then investigated the ages, ranks, regiments and nationalities of the many and various soldiers who were killed to try and make sense of the slaughter that took place. One of the 54,000 names of the missing etched into the stone is that of George Isabel Hanney and Rebecca Harrington

Stanner Price Hanney of 12, The Butts, Frome. Isabel Hanney and Rebecca Harrington, both cousins, had a quiet moment to remember their great, great uncle. History teacher, Roland Hurrell, who led the tour, said: “On our return to the Belgian coast, where we were all staying, we visited another area of battle and a cemetery where one of our students had a relative recognised. “The battle was the 1915 Battle of Loos. The cemetery was called Dud Corner Cemetery. The soldier was called Henry Ernest Cleave. The student who was

PAGE 72 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

paying her respects to her great great uncle was called Iris Shulman. “We arrived there as the sun was going down. The sky was deep blue and flecked with orange scudding clouds and a honeyed light resonated from the Portland stone that formed the gravestones and walls of this place. “Standing on high there in the setting sun surrounded by such scenery and such a beautiful formed graveyard with a warm wind willowing was one of the most moving and special experiences I have had on what must be my 25th First World War Battlefields experience.”


Remembrance DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:05 PM

Page 73

REMEMBRANCE DAY

Cadets honour the fallen THE jewel in Somerset Army Cadets' crown, the Silver Bugles Band, had the honour of performing the Last Post ceremony at the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing in Ypres. Led by Bugle Major Libby Bunker and commanded by Capt (BM) Scott Bunker, seven adult instructors and 21 cadets from Uphill and Frome Platoons performed a long and complicated display after the Last Post ceremony, with surrounding

restaurants emptying as customers flocked to see the nightly routine. The Last Post, the traditional final salute to the fallen, has been played daily since the gate opened in 1927 by buglers from the Sapeurs Pompier (the local fire brigade) in honour of the memory of the soldiers of the former British Empire and its allies who died in the Ypres Salient during the First World War. The gate records the names of more than 54,000 soldiers whose bodies were never found. The Silver Bugles were invited by the town’s mayor.

Village pilgrimage

At dusk the band formed up in the Grote Markt under the eyes of thousands of onlookers and marched at the Light Divison 140 paces a minute along Menenstraat to the Menin Gate, passing under the imposing arch before countermarching and halting on the far side. After the impressive ceremony the band marched back down Menenstraat to a reception hosted by The Rifles and Light Infantry Association, Somerset, where many old friends and supporters were there to greet them. Brigadier John Hemsley, Lady Gass (representing the Somerset ACF Trust), Lieutenant Colonel Mike Motum, Colonels David Farrant and Paul Richardson (both former Somerset Commandants) and many other wellwishers provided drinks, nibbles and words of encouragement for tired cadets before the band formed up outside the floodlit Cloth Hall for their final display of the evening. Before the ceremony the band members travelled on a pilgrimage to three historically important local sites, the foremost being Tyne Cot Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery and Memorial to the Missing outside Passchendaele, near Zonnebeke.

TO commemorate the centenary of the Battle of Passchendaele, 16 members of Compton Martin village have made a five-day pilgrimage to Belgium visiting the First World War battlefields and cemeteries of the Ypres Salient. Andrew and Sue Owst (left) laid a wreath at Tyne Cot cemetery on behalf of the people of Compton Martin. Tyne Cot is the largest war cemetery in the world, where 11,952 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War are buried or commemorated, of which 8,365 are unidentified.

Poster at Tyne Cot MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 73


Christmas feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:04 PM

Page 74

Christmas market in Shipham THE popular Shipham Christmas Market and Food Hall returns to the village hall on Saturday, November 25th. Running from 3-pm, it offers a fantastic opportunity to get your Christmas shopping done in a festive atmosphere. There will be a bar selling Old Jollop Cider

Gifts, Crafts, Food and Much More

Rebecca Faith Photography Admission: £1 for adults/free for children.

Kindly sponsored by Ian Studley Cars, Shipham

and mulled wine and food from The Jerk Yard kitchen and pulled pork rolls from Hansfords. As well as all the traditional Christmas stalls, Rebecca Faith Photography will be available to take pictures of your children in time for Christmas, so make sure everyone is dressed in their favourite festive outfits. There will be around 30 stalls packed with gifts, delicious Christmas food and drink, crafts, jewellery, candles and much more. Children can also be entertained in the "Elf Zone" with pottery painting, crafts and Christmas cards to make. Sponsored by Ian Studley Cars, entrance will be £1 for adults and free for children. To pre-book a photography slot please contact rebecca@rebeccafaithphoto.com

FLY A GLIDER! THE IDEAL GIFT!

Mendip Gliding Club is located near Cheddar and offers a variety of Glider Flying packages including Introductory Flight Vouchers (from £40), or regular membership and “Fixed Price To Solo” options. Club is open all year on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. Suitable for aged 12 upwards – no upper limit! Fly with BGA-rated instructors in dual control gliders. For further information, please visit our website at:

www.mendipgliding.co.uk or contact Penny Broad 01275 340827 (Marketing)

PAGE 74 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Mendip Christmas Fair

FOR its 26th year Mendip Christmas Fair will be hosting an even wider range of stalls, with wares ranging from stocking fillers, fragranced candles, lovely linens and leather goods, toys for boys and gorgeous gifts for girls all chosen for their quality, variety and value for money. Many of the stall holders represent family businesses local to the South West and some have links to charities and fair trade organisations overseas. Profits go to the Guild of Friends of Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and Children’s Hospice South West. The fair will be held at Aldwick Court Farm on Saturday, November 4th, 10am-5pm and Sunday November 5th, 10am3.30pm. Entrance is £4, children free and there is free parking. Details: www.mendipchristmasfair.org or on Facebook

Freedom of the air

CONTRARY to popular belief, gliding is not a rich man's sport. To keep it affordable, Mendip Gliding Club keeps costs down by running the airfield and club on a voluntary basis. The exhilaration of soaring flight has to be experienced to appreciate the sense of freedom, satisfaction and achievement that it gives. Add to this the team-work and friendliness of a small club and you have the essence of the sport. There is always something new to learn, fresh goals to achieve and no two flights are ever the same. Mendip Gliding Club is located near Cheddar and offers a variety of membership packages including Fixed Priced to Solo and Flying Start Schemes. They fly all year round on Thursdays and weekends. All are welcome, with ages from 12 years upwards, with introductory flight vouchers available and free instruction by BGA rated instructors. Details: Penny Broad, marketing, 01275 340827 www.mendipgliding.co.uk

Unique Christmas experience

KATE Westcott’s home in Timsbury becomes The Little Christmas Pop-up Shop for the first three days of December. For the third year, spread throughout three rooms, local artwork and creations are displayed against hand-painted walls, wooden panelling and hand-printed wall coverings. All are affordable, distinctive and locally made – perfect for Christmas presents. Kate said: “Throughout the year we look out for new artists and makers whose work will meet the high quality of our current collection. This year we are delighted to welcome a number of new participants.” The shop will be in The Avenue, Timsbury BA2 0HU, December 1st-3rd, 10am-5pm. Details: www.thelittlechristmaspopupshop.com


Christmas feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:04 PM

Page 75

Christmas in Mells

CHRISTMAS in the Country returns to the Tithe Barn, Mells for the weekend of November 25th and 26th, being held for two days thanks to the popularity of last year’s event. Once again you’ll be able to choose from 20 carefully selected and high quality local artisans. There will be edible gifts, silver jewellery, pottery, ceramics, mosaics, felted items, table linens, wreaths, Christmas decorations, knitwear and much more, all beautifully hand-crafted. New to the market this year are leather work, a soap maker, paper craft, hand-made chocolate, specialist cheeses and the opportunity to put together a bespoke Christmas hamper filled with festive treats. Freshly prepared food and refreshments will be available all day and you’ll be able to browse whilst supping mulled wine and mince pies. Entry is free, parking available nearby and they’ll be open from 10am-5pm on Saturday 25th, and 10am-4pm on Sunday 26th. November. See you there!

Christmas at Rose Crafts

ROSE Crafts is a family-run business established in 1987, situated on the High Street next to the River Somer in Midsomer Norton. It stocks items from haberdashery, ribbons and buttons to embroidery and tapestry kits, artist materials, craft equipment and knitting yarns. Upstairs you will find a large selection of dress and craft fabric with a great choice of curtain fabric. They have a curtain making service and also a sewing machine repair service. Their experienced staff are always available to provide expert advice and there is free parking nearby.

Mendip Times reduces travel costs 100,000 potential customers within a short distance of your business

Rose Craſts

Large selection of Christmas fabrics, ribbons and workboxes Also stocking knitting wool, haberdashery, trims, tapestry, embroidery and artists materials, dress and curtain fabric

123 High Street Midsomer Norton

01761 414390 MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 75


Christmas feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

4:05 PM

Page 76

A holy thorn for Christmas

LEGEND has it that following the crucifixion of Christ, his uncle, Joseph of Arimathea, arrived in Glastonbury with his 12 companions. Having climbed Wearyall Hill, whose name is said to derive from his proclaiming “we are weary all” he planted his staff in the ground whilst he rested. The following morning the staff had taken root and is said to have grown into the miraculous thorn tree. This time of year is the best time of year to plant Glastonbury thorn trees. Supplied by specialist licensed nurseries, Four Seasons, on Glastonbury High Street, currently have a limited stock of young trees available.

THE IDEAL CHRISTMAS PRESENT

llllllllllllllllllllllllll

A GLASTONBURY HOLY THORN TREE Crataegus Monogyna Biflora – It’s The Real Thing!!!

Available from Malcolm Slocombe Four Seasons 16 High Street, Glastonbury, Somerset BA6 9DU Telephone No: 01458 832061 Now available in Patio size

llllllllllllllllllllllllll

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

Mendip Times VOLUME 13

ISSUE 4

Mendip Times

SEPTEMBER

2017

FREE g life on

Celebratin the Mendips ands surrounding area IC

• MUS2017 K • EDUCATIONOCTOBEREVEN TS • : FOOD & DRIN • WHAT’S ON I N T HI S I S S U E • FROME SHOW

13 ISSUE 5ANTIQUES VOLUMEA RTS &

FREE

on Celebrating life the Mendips ands surrounding area

Local people,

local history, local

s and local news

places, local event

FREE g life on atin

Celebr TS • SPORT and EVEN dips MenMN G • AUTU INthe FO C U S O N R I D COMMUN s ITY UES •area IN THIS ISSUE: S & ANTIQding • MUSIC • ARTsurroun news • G A R DE N I N G s and local2017 , local event NOVEMBER

VOLUME 13

Local people,

ISSUE 6

local history, local

places

ONE of the most popular community events in Shepton Mallet will return in December with the annual lantern festival and procession. This year organisers are increasing the number of lantern-making workshops to cope with demand from families wanting to take part. They will be held at the Paul Street Community Centre from 10am to 4pm on December 2nd, 3rd, 9th, 10th, 16th and 17th, with the eighth parade taking place on Saturday, December 23rd, with everyone gathering at 6pm There will be more lantern- in Collett Park. making workshops this There will be more food and year drink outlets in the Market Place to keep the good cheer going at the end of the procession. As usual the parade will be accompanied by the energetic and joyous sounds of Jamme de Samba and The Little Big Horns. For details, visit: www.sheptonlanternfestival.org.uk

GUARANTEE YOUR COPY – SUBSCRIBE TODAY! SUBSCRIPTION FORM

Please complete and return payment to: Mendip Times, Coombe Lodge, Blagdon, Somerset BS40 7RG. Telephone: 01761 463888 • www.mendiptimes.co.uk Your Details:

Mendip Times

Light up Shepton for Christmas

Title:

(Complete in clear capital letters please)

First name:

If a gift, recipient details: Title:

Name:

Address:

Surname: Address:

Postcode: Title: Postcode:

Name:

Address: Postcode:

Telephone (in case of query):

IDEAL XMAS GIFT!

VALLEY DAR AND CHEW : FOCUS ON CHED OD & D R I N K I N T HI S I S S U E AS IDEAS • FO ME • CHRISTM s and local news • CARNIVAL TI Local people,

local history, local

places, local event

£30

for 12 issues delivered to your door

Email address (in case of query):

Signature:

I enclose a cheque (made payable to Mendip Times Limited) to the value of: £

PAGE 76 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

subscriptions @ £30.00 each.

Please telephone to pay by credit card.

Date:


Christmas feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

4:05 PM

Page 77

A winter wonderland

Pictured (l to r) Phil Payne, Alistair Mead, Grace Smith and Kay Tidmarsh

A TOPPING out ceremony has been held at Puxton Park to celebrate the construction phase of a £30,000 events barn. The festive Cosy Cottage is being created as part of its Winter Wonderland events, running from November 25th to December 24th. It will feature a folly to accommodate Puxton’s reindeer and donkeys, an elves’ workshop under the watchful eye of Mrs Claus, arts and crafts activities, a traditional fireplace and grotto. The new barn is part of Puxton’s on-going expansion of facilities on offer for visitors, and follows its recently refurbished farmshop and new Shake Shack that is being added. TV celebrity, John Altman, who played Eastenders’ “Nasty” Nick Cotton, will conduct an official opening of the Cosy Cottage on December 2nd. The Winter Wonderland will also give children the chance to have supper with Santa from December 19th22nd. Alistair Mead, Puxton managing director, said: “We are delighted that work has got underway and we look forward to hosting a fantastic Winter Wonderland this year.” ● Puxton Park is looking for a Mrs Claus to work in the new barn. The job has been advertised in the local press and job centres, saying applicants must be jolly, have a warm traditional manner and be great with children. Auditions will take place at Puxton Park on Wednesday November 1st, at 10am. Alistair Mead said: “We are looking to fill the role as soon as possible but want to ensure the applicant captures the magic of Christmas. “It would be great to see applicants arrive for audition dressed ready for duty.” Details: www.puxton.co.uk

Gift Vouchers for Wild Food Forays with Adrian Boots

Join me on a fantastic wild food foray. Enjoy the best wild edibles the spring, summer and autumn seasons has to offer!

C h r i s t m a s , B i r t h d ay s , C e l e b r a t i o n , Fa m i ly a n d f r i e n d s

Please call 01761 462162 to book your place or for more info visit: www.gowildactivities.co.uk

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 77


Castle Cary Carnival DPS:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:03 PM

Page 78

Carnival’s ruby celebrations

On the road again – Cary Comedians arrive back in their home town with their Christmas spoof

CASTLE Cary Carnival has celebrated its 40th anniversary in style – with two processions, live music and other entertainment. Carnival in Cary began with the children’s procession on Saturday, October 7th, followed by the main evening procession a week later. Thanks to Arts Council funding, this year also saw the return of the town’s own Cary Comedians to a cart of their own and entries were up on last year.

A breath of hot air

Sensational costumes all the way from Notting Hill Carnival, courtesy of Mahogany Design

Carnival dates

HERE are the dates for this year’s largest Somerset carnival processions: Saturday, November 4th: Bridgwater (7pm) Monday, November 6th: Highbridge and Burnham-on-Sea (7.30pm) Friday, November 10th: Westonsuper-Mare (7.15pm) Saturday, November 11th: North Petherton (7pm) Monday, November 13th: Midsomer Norton (7.30pm) Wednesday, November 15th: Shepton Mallet (7.30pm) Friday, November 17th: Wells (7pm) Saturday, November 18th: Glastonbury (7pm) For details, visit: www.somersetcarnivals.co.uk

PAGE 78 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Children and staff from Castle Cary Primary School worked with costume designers from the Notting Hill Carnival


Castle Cary Carnival DPS:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:04 PM

Page 79

CASTLE CARY CARNIVAL 2017

One of the junior feature carts

Inca, by Hot Rock Carnival Club “Evacuees” – children from Castle Cary Beavers

Marilyn Pullen, from Castle Cary Scouts, was one of the volunteers selling official merchandise. Carnivals across Somerset have joined forces to persuade spectators to buy from them rather than peddlars

Give us a squid! Collectors from Brue Valley Rotary Club with rotarian Nicky Creed in an octopus outfit

The children’s procession passes the Market House

Angry Birds, by members of the Wixey and Frapple families

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 79


Chew Valley feature:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:53 PM

Page 80

Medical acupuncture in the Chew Valley

DR GEORGINA Jefferies, a retired consultant anaesthetist with a special interest in pain relief, is a well-established medical acupuncturist in the Chew Valley and Bristol. As well as helping with pain relief for chronic conditions such as arthritis, medical acupuncture is useful in the treatment of sports injuries and migraine. It is also beneficial for hormonal imbalances such as hot flushes and morning sickness in pregnancy.

Commercial Landscape Maintenance Ltd Specialising in commercial work across the whole of the south west of England.

£10m site insurance – safe contractor registered

07831 825527 peterbattltd@hotmail.co.uk

PAGE 80 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Christmas celebration in Chew Magna

2

December

MAGIC and merriment are returning to Chew Magna village this December as the Chew Magna Society and village primary school join forces to host a festive event on Saturday December 2nd, 3pm-7pm. The Christmas Fayre will play host to a seasonal mix of activities and entertainment for all ages, including Christmas shopping, Santa’s grotto, mulled wine, raffle and tombola, hot festive foods, kids’ crafts and competitions, a snow machine as well as a line-up of local choirs and a brass band to charm the crowds. The magic will be set inside the beautiful Old School Rooms and Millennium Hall, spilling down the High Street to the grand turning on of the village Christmas lights. Chew Magna’s shops, traders and pubs will also be hosting special festive events. By popular request, Christmas trees will be on sale! For information and to pre-order, please contact the school on 01275 332409 (pre-ordering is highly recommended). Not to be missed is the “reindeer food” craft stand to add some sparkle to Rudolf’s midnight snack on Christmas Eve. Details: lizeastwood1@hotmail.com


Chew Valley feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:53 PM

Page 81

Lindsay appeal keeps growing

FOCUS ON CHEW VALLEY

Some of the coffee serving team (l to r) Hazel Wedlake, Claire Jameson, Maggie Bone, Mel Jameson and Anne Summers

A STAGGERING £1,380 was raised in just two hours at Lindsay Game’s Pink Coffee Morning at Chew Stoke. Her appeal for The Forever Friends Appeal for the new cancer treatment centre at the RUH, Bath has now raised £15,887.38. Lindsay passed away in June. Nigel, her Nigel Game with Alix Ramelli, who is widower, has donor care assistant with Bath Royal been invited to a United Hospital's Forever Friends Appeal presentation on Thursday November 23rd at the hospital to receive an award to mark their achievements in fundraising.

Scary bunch

THIS bunch of scarecrows turned up in Regil, as part of the scarecrow trail in memory of Harvey Hext, raising funds for the charity A Sibling’s Wish.

Pictured (l to r) Judith Longhurst, Hilary Padfield and Val Knight, with Mike Murrant, who was selling raffle tickets, and Peter Wring.

Details: www.justgiving.com/Lindsay-Game

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 81


Chew Valley feature:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:53 PM

Page 82

Charity says thanks to Chew Valley 10k organisers MENDIP-BASED charity NICU Support recently said “thank you” to the Chew Valley 10K committee, as once again a proportion of their fundraising went towards NICU Support's insurance, fuel and running costs again this year. NICU Supports’ primary role is to collect and deliver donor breast milk for babies in neonatal intensive care units. Founder, Mike Burns, said: “I am so pleased that the Chew Valley 10k cover our running costs each year, we are very privileged to have their help and support and it is great to see that the funds raised by local people at the 10K in Chew Valley go back into the local community, by helping mums and babies throughout the region." Denise Mellersh, CV10k committee chairman said: “In addition to contributing to sports equipment/training and fundraising projects at local schools, we are also delighted to be able to support the families of premature babies across the

South West at a critical point in their lives through NICU Support. “The work that Mike Burns and his team of volunteers do is amazing and it good to such a positive impact for all

High Class Family Butcher

Quality you can trust

Traditional service Meat and produce from local farms

High Street, Chew Magna Tel: 01275 332417

Orchard House Chew Stoke

Comfortable self-catering and bed & breakfast accommodation

Ann Hollomon

01275 333143

orchardhse@ukgateway.net www.orchardhouse-chewstoke.co.uk PAGE 82 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Order Now for Christmas

those they have helped.’ Next year’s Chew Valley 10k & 1k will be on Sunday June 10th with online entries from December 2nd.

Transport review begins

BATH and North East Somerset Council is seeking people’s views on its new draft Transport Strategies for the Chew Valley. It follows previous consultations where residents of the communities gave their opinions on existing transport issues and priorities. The strategy covers Norton Malreward, Publow, Stanton Drew, Chew Magna, Chew Stoke, Nempnet Thrubwell, Ubley, Compton Martin, West Harptree, East Harptree, Hinton Blewett, Cameley, Clutton and Stowey Sutton and the surrounding areas. A drop-in event will be held on November 8th at Chew Valley Secondary School (4-8pm). The closing dates for comments is November 30th.


Chew Valley feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:53 PM

Page 83

Chew Valley art on show

Sue Martini (left) and organiser Sandy Bell, Chew Stoke

CHEW VALLEY ARTS TRAIL

(l to r) Margaret Avery, Suzanne Bowerman, Chris Burton, Christopher Wilkins, Blagdon Sally Weatherall, Litton

Emma Taylor and Drew Forsyth, Breach Hill

Lisa Stevens, Winford

John Darvill, East Harptree

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 83


Chew Valley feature:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES

10/19/17

3:53 PM

Page 84

Festival success

THIS year's Autumn Fringe Festival, organised by Valley Arts, has been a fantastic success, says its slightly-exhausted chair Geraldine Hill-Male. After a trial “mini-fest” last year, eight events over three weeks this autumn drew together hundreds of people around the Chew Valley, from children and tiny tots yelling at shows by Brave Bold Drama and DragonBird in Chew Magna, to mellow-music-fans singing along with Kate Dimbleby and Keith Warmington in Ubley. Young mums laughed to weeping in Compton Martin at the hilarious Scummy Mummies. Adventurous jazz aficionados foottapped to the Blazing Flame Quintet in Chew Magna. And dance music-enthusiasts got more energetic at an evening of swing and jazz at Chew Valley School, and properly sweaty at the packed-out Packhouse Ceilidh at the Community Farm. The final event was a morning of free performance workshops for all ages, having a go at drumming, drama, dance, storytelling and playing the ukulele. Geraldine said: "The aim of the festival has been to publicise our drive to build a

performing arts centre for the Chew Valley, and raise some funds to get us to the next project stage. "It also showed audiences around the valley the kind of events we could be enjoying on a regular basis if we had our own purpose-built centre which could host touring companies as well as our own home-grown productions. "It's great that some of the people who've enjoyed the shows want to get involved with the energy we're creating. We're always ready to welcome more people on board: just contact us via the website.” All Chew Valley residents are invited to have their say, hear about the progress of the project, and discuss the direction for next year at a public meeting/AGM on Tuesday November 21st, 7.30pm, in Chew Valley School library.

Details: www.valleyarts.co.uk

PAGE 84 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Chew Valley feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:53 PM

Page 85

Santa arrives early

THE first Chew Valley Santa Scramble will take place on Sunday December 3rd on a 5k route in fields and lanes around Chew Valley School. There will also be a 1k Mini Santa Scramble for children in the school grounds. Organised by the Chew Valley 10k team and Chew Valley School, the concept is simple – everyone wears a Santa suit, included in the entry fee (£12 for the 5k scramble and £6 for the kids’ scramble) and everyone is welcome – run, walk, skip, bring the dog – just join in and have some fun! All funds raised will be divided between Chew Valley School, who are fundraising to provide two undercover tennis courts, and the Langford-based charity, Mend The Gap, which works with communities in Africa (www.mendthegap.org.uk). Chew Valley School is linked to a school in Kenya via this charity. There is car parking, changing, showers, toilets, bag storage and a Santa Sleigh thrown in for free. Hot festive refreshments will be provided along with a few extra surprises – dogs on leads also welcome!

FOCUS ON CHEW VALLEY

Tony Hucker TV Service – Sales – Rental

• • • • • •

Satellite Installations Aerial Systems TV wall mounting Custom Installations Networking Signal Solutions

01275 332888 www.tonyhuckertv.co.uk Email: tony@tonyhuckertv.co.uk Unit 4, Fairseat Workshops, Chew Stoke BS40 8XF Open: Mon – Thurs 9.00am – 6.00pm Fri – 9.00am – 5.30pm

Details: www.chewvalleysantascramble.co.uk Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 85


Events feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:15 PM

Page 15

EVENTS

A x b r id g e B la c k b e r r y C a r n iv a l

Sarah Stocks

Friends of Axbridge

Axbridge Ladies Group

Princess Summer Smith, Queen Ayesha Farim and Princess Emily Adams Axbridge guides entry

PAGE 86 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Axbridge Chamber of Commerce


History feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:39 PM

Page 82

H i s to r y s o ci et y ce l eb ra t es 2 0 y e a rs

HISTORY

Harptree History Society is celebrating its 20th anniversary with a free exhibition celebrating more than 1,000 years of local history. Gill Hogarth reports on the society’s achievements.

AS the Millennium beckoned, attention turned not only to what might happen to all the computers in the world (remember our fears?), but also to the past. The Harptrees were no exception and in 1999 Jon Budd and founder members of the new society wrote a book about East Harptree called Times Remembered Times Forgotten. The society originally concentrated on oral history, recording people’s memories and collecting an archive of old photographs. A slim volume about Bishop Sutton entitled Millennium Memories (2001), was followed by the publication of Before the Lake in 2004 – a history of the valley before the Chew Valley Lake. Over time, members have pursued their individual interests and the research group has moved on to studying the early roots of East and West Harptree through documentary research and archaeological explorations – field walking, test pits and geophysical surveys – aided along our way by the likes of Mick Aston (archaeologist on Channel Four’s Time Team) and English Heritage. We produce an annual journal, The Harptreenian. While much has been achieved, there is always more to be discovered and we would welcome anyone who would like to become involved, occasionally or on a regular basis.

Early cricket in East Harptree

For those who like to hear a live talk, we hold monthly meetings, with a wide range of guest and local speakers. This year’s subjects include the Royal Palaces of Cheddar and the Bristol Riots of 1831. During the summer months we arrange visits to places of local historic interest.

Last year Radstock Museum invited us to produce an exhibition of the Harptrees, as part of their Village Histories series. The excellent feedback we received from the Museum included an invitation for us to write a couple of articles for their Five Arches Journal. This year, to celebrate our 20th anniversary, we are holding our own Digging a test pit

exhibition on Sunday November 12th, 11.30am-5pm and Monday November 13th, 3.30pm-6.30pm in East Harptree Theatre. It features our extensive (and everpopular) archive of old photos of the Harptrees, Bishop Sutton, and the Chew Valley before the lake; display boards and archaeological artefacts; DVD show and a digital mapping talk; WWI Display – including a section about the Women’s Institute; selection of local history books available for purchase. There will be representatives from Weston and District Family History Society to assist with family history research. We will be running workshops for the pupils of the local primary school on the Monday and afterwards visitors to the exhibition will have the chance to see some of the children’s work. This friendly history society meets on the last Wednesday of the month in West Harptree hall at 7.30pm. A charabanc outing

Details: If you would like to learn more about the society meetings or this exhibition please call Lesley Ross 01761 221758 or Andrew Sandon 01761 221941.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 87


History feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:40 PM

Page 80

Wheels of history keep on turning

HERITAGE enthusiasts turned back the clock to stage a magnificent display of historic vehicles, traditional country crafts and more at Frome Showground. The annual Somerset’s Festival of Transport was held at the showground at West Woodlands for the first time and it proved to be a popular location with visitors and exhibitors.

Fuel can collector Jim Doggrell, from Marnhull

Jayne Evans, from Paulton, takes time to relax on her 4” scale traction engine

Strolling past some of the HGVs on show PAGE 88 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Some of the vehicles on show later took centre stage at the Frome Carnival evening procession.

Rambling on my mind: this engine hails from Wincanton


History feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:40 PM

Page 81

HISTORY

(Left): Flintknapper and bricklayer Ron Loader at work on a model of a cottage near his home in Wiltshire and (above): he has spent 2017 working on the model at various shows

A sign on a transport lorry

Beanie and Barney, rescue greyhounds promoting the work of Bristol charity DAWG: www.dawhg.org.uk

Not every exhibit was in pristine condition…

Steve Rodd (left) and Bill Burden with a 4 1/2” scale Foden wagon

A family affair: the Woods family, from Beckington, with their 1917 Mann patching roller

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 89


Property section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:54 PM

Page 90

Innovative sustainable homes in trendy Bruton ACORN Property Group, in partnership with artist-designer Mark Merer, will be unveiling plans for a unique collection of highly innovative homes featuring striking sustainable designs in Bruton. Cubis Bruton will feature bold architecture and energy efficient designs using sustainable resilient materials. The first phase of the development consisting of 28, three- and fourbedroom houses will be launched at an exclusive event at The Chapel in Bruton in November. New buyers will have the opportunity to see Acorn Bristol’s plans for the contemporary houses and those that reserve early will be able to choose from a host of carefully designed interior finishes and flexible layout options, allowing them to create a home to suit their lifestyle. Robin Squire, Regional Managing Director of the Acorn Bristol office, commented: “We are delighted to be delivering such an exciting and distinctive development in Bruton. Acorn is renowned for delivering innovative projects in urban settings and we are looking forward to bringing this design ethos to such a beautiful country setting.” The scheme was developed after a significant housing need was identified in Bruton. The developers and designers have worked closely with local stakeholders and South Somerset District Council. Mark Merer commented: “Our aim with Cubis Bruton is to create an alternative model for how we design and build. The development is intended to be an exemplar of a sustainable residential community,

PAGE 90 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Buyers invited to reserve early at innovative new development launch event

architecturally innovative, delivering a high level of thermal efficiency, integrated into the landscape and enhancing the quality of life for the occupants.” Acorn Bristol will be marketing the new houses with local agents Lodestone. Sue Macey, Managing Partner of Lodestone Property said: “Excitement and anticipation has been building about Cubis Bruton for a while, so we are delighted to be marketing these unique, innovative houses.” ● With high demand expected, secure your invite to the launch by registering your interest with Lodestone Property now on 01749 605099.


Property section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:54 PM

Page 91

PROPERTY

Sunnyside has an interesting history SUNNYSIDE has come onto the market with DJ&P (David James & Partners) at Wrington for the first time in many years. It was constructed by joining two small cottages, one of which was a small shop, and adding an extension to the south in the 1800s. Sunnyside was purchased by the seller’s grandparents in 1920, when they moved from White Cross Farm in West Harptree. Renting land from VC Payne the local shopkeeper they established a farm by building the cattle building to the east of Sunnyside. Cows were milked and the milk

was sold around the village. This was delivered in the early days using a horse and cart (see photo) and after the war a small Ford van was used. The railings on the front wall are no longer there as they were removed by government officials during the Second World War to help with the shortage of steel. The gate however is still the original. Before the war the telephone came to West Harptree and the first manual telephone exchange was located in the smaller front room with the switchboard up to six lines. This was powered by a number of accumulators (wet lead acid batteries) which were stored in the battery shed, now the stone outbuilding, which will be coming to the market later in the year. It was not long before demand exceeded six lines and therefore the automatic exchange was constructed in Ridge Lane! Time marched on and the family lived in the property until father was 97 years old.

Sunnyside is now a substantial detached stone property, which now has vehicular access from East Harptree down a long drive to a private parking area and garden. The house is substantial with two good reception rooms, a large kitchen with utility/boot room beyond with cloakroom. On the first floor are three bedrooms, two of which are large double rooms and there is a bathroom with bath and separate shower. It has a stone outbuilding in the cottage garden on the south and east side of the house and more adjoining land can be available if required. Some modernisation is required and the house is being offered at a guide price of £395,000 at auction, unless sold prior.

Details: Sharon Everett at DJ&P in Wrington 01934 864300.

Guide Price £395,000

WEST HARPTREE Chew Valley FOR SALE BY AUCTION (unless sold prior) A substan%al detached Edwardian house located in the centre of the village with plenty of scope for modernisa%on/extension (subject to pp) offered with three bedrooms, two recep%ons, large kitchen and outbuilding. Long drive approach and walled gardens. LAND available by separate nego%a%on. EPC F. Ref: 25420

Guide Price £385,000

HINTON BLEWETT Chew Valley 4 BEDROOM DETACHED HOUSE IN RURAL VILLAGE Excellent value! Equidistant Bristol and Bath in quiet village in Chew Valley School catchment. A detached four bedroom house. Si&ng room, dining room, kitchen, conservatory, bathroom, cloaks and en suite. Former double garage and parking, sheltered secure garden. Some upda%ng required. EPC:D Ref: 25415

Guide Price £725,000

EASTON Near Wells A TRULY BEAUTIFUL LARGE FAMILY HOME WITH 3.78 ACRES A stunning detached house finished to the highest of standards! Combines contemporary living in a rural loca%on just 2 miles from Wells. Four double bedrooms, 2 en suites, open plan kitchen/dining/living room, separate drawing room, garden room, u%lity & cloaks. Drive, Parking and 3.78 acres of paddock & garden. EPC C. Ref: 25313

Guide Price £235,000

CHEDDAR Somerset FOR SALE BY AUCTION (unless sold prior) 28th November 2017, Mendip Springs Golf Club A detached 2 bedroom bungalow requiring modernisa%on with new windows and doors in culde-sac loca%on close to the centre of Cheddar. Good size rear garden, garage and parking. EPC: D Ref: 25333

Wrington 01934 864300 MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 91


Health section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:56 PM

Page 92

Being part of something

A RECENT study found that being in a good mood for your flu jab boosts its effectiveness. Researchers measured negative mood, positive mood, physical activity, diet and sleep three times a week over a six-week period in a group of 138 older people due to have their flu jab. Then they tested how well the jab was working By Dr PHIL by measuring influenza antibody in the blood at HAMMOND four weeks and 16 weeks after the vaccination. Other studies have found that optimistic, cheerful people tend to have better functioning immune systems, and hence better antibody responses to vaccination. So it’s perhaps not surprising that those with a positive mood over the six-week observational period had a better jab response. Less expected was that being in a good mood on the day of vaccination itself may have accounted for 8-14% of the increase in antibody levels. I should have brought some flu jabs along to my home-coming gig in Bishop Sutton village hall. The audience was cheerful enough without me and the hall had that buzz of a happy, supportive community getting together for a good cause (in this case to raise funds for the excellent pre-school we have in the village). Sutton Spice laid on the curries, I laid on the gags and a whole host of volunteers served and fetched. I met Eric who was born and bred in Sutton and, in his mid-70s, mingled with all the young interlopers who have settled here and love it. “The pre-school has a woodland club – how amazing is that?” marvelled an escapee from London. Village life is great because people mix between generations and look out for each other. Had Jen (baby due any minute) gone into labour during my show, Eric would have been first in line with warm towels and string. We can’t all feel optimistic and happy all the time, and we can’t turn it on and off for a flu jab. I go all over the UK and interlope into other great communities for one night only. But the biggest indicator of contentment is feeling part of your own community, engaged and involved in what’s going on. Thanks to Bishop Sutton for reminding me of that.

Dr Phil’s fifth book, Staying Alive, is out now PAGE 92 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Plop the Raindrop

I’VE got a bit of a headache today. A little while ago I was minding my own business sleeping in an apple when it was squished and we all got turned into cider, which is apple juice for grown-ups. We water droplets are forever being warned not to get drunk and I always thought that meant not being swallowed by a tadpole, monkey or anything else. Now I know it’s got another meaning. Do your mum and dad ever get silly and giggly during lunch or dinner, when they have a drink with their food? Some people might say they get a little bit merry. We might just say they were a little bit drunk. I don’t recommend it. So last year once the apples were crushed, the juice was poured into enormous oak vats, where we stayed happily asleep for quite a long time. When I woke up, I’d turned into a lovely golden colour and the air was full of the most wonderful smell of fermenting fruit. Then we all got poured into cans and bottles, ready for the next stage of our adventure. Did you know there’s water in just about everything you eat and drink? In the past I’ve wobbled in jelly, waded through ice cream and got evaporated from toast. The worst thing is getting stuck in stew or porridge. Eventually a lot of us ended up at a big party called a harvest home, where hundreds of people get together to celebrate the harvest and get very, very merry. This is known as an ancient tradition and involves eating tons and tons of food and drinking loads and loads of cider. What happened next is still a bit blurry. I remember being poured into a glass and hearing a lot of singing and dancing. The glass was sloshing from side to side, throwing us backwards and forwards. Do you remember the huge beard that Father Christmas has? Well that’s where I’m stuck right now, in the huge beard of a man with a rosy red nose and cheeks. I think he made the mistake of singing and drinking at the same time and didn’t quite get the glass to his mouth in time. So now I suppose I’m stuck here until he decides to have a shower. But it could have been a lot worse. Imagine the state of his insides after all that feasting and drinking. I’m so glad I didn’t get drunk by him! MENDIP GRANDAD


Health section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:57 PM

Page 93

Express delivery takes couple by surprise!

HEALTH & FAMILY

CLARE and Alex Pickup’s firstborn proved to be a baby in a hurry. An hour after being reassured she was in early labour and being told to get some sleep, Clare gave birth in the bathroom of their home at Hollowbrook, near Chew Magna. Alex, a photographer, grabbed some duvets and was calling an ambulance when the baby arrived. He said: “I was told to tie the umbilical with string and dry him off.” Clare, a writer, said: “I’m told it’s rare for things to happen so quickly for a first baby. I was in labour from 9pm till about 4am but the second stage was very fast – he arrived after just a few contractions. “He was alert and cried so I wasn’t too worried. It was very special but we were really lucky that there were no problems.” The couple, who moved to their new home from London in December, have named their 7lb 7oz son Oaklan.

Effective new treatment for golfer’s elbow

OVERUSE or an injury to the flexing muscles of the forearm or the muscles used for gripping can lead to the pain that is known as golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis). It affects the inner side of the elbow and can sometimes be combined with tennis elbow, which afflicts the outer side. Whether this condition is focused at the elbow or extends to the surrounding forearm and towards the wrist, it’s painful and debilitating. Conventionally, treatment has involved steroid injections but there is a danger in long-term steroid use. Acupuncture, physiotherapy exercises, osteopathy and chiropractic have also been shown to improve the condition. Now, there is a new, state-of-the-art treatment option available locally – Shockwave therapy. This fast, effective process sends mechanical pulses deep into the problem area to stimulate healing. Assessment is free and just five treatments can make a big difference.

Suffering from a sports injury? . . . we can help you!

Approved

Do you suffer from; • Painful tendons and soft tissue problems? • Foot and ankle pain? • Shoulder or hip problems? • Tennis elbow or golfers elbow? Shockwave therapy is a revolutionary new approach to treating difficult and long-standing tendon related pain.

Contact us for your free assessment 01458 836152 - 9am-5pm appointments 01458 860392 – 24 hour hotline info@somersetshockwave.co.uk • somersetshockwave.co.uk Glastonbury Surgery Feversham Lane Glastonbury Somerset BA6 9LP MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 93


Health section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:57 PM

Page 94

• Rented self contained, en suite accommodation for the active elderly • A home cooked 3 course mid-day meal • 24 hour emergency cover • Lift to first floor & sitting room • Independent living within private community • Close to the centre of a thriving, picturesque village • Spacious landscaped gardens • Friendly, home from home • Activities and outings • Guest accommodation • Views of the Mendip Hills • Welcome to people of any faith or none • Charges are fully inclusive For news on current vacancies please contact the Resident Warden 01934 843746 • warden.sewell@btconnect.com Sewell House, Belmont Road Winscombe BS25 1LQ www.sewellhouse.org.uk

Sewell House is managed by Sidcot Friends Housing Society Ltd – a not-for-profit organisation

PAGE 94 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Your feet in good hands – Anna will come to you CONSIDERING how much we rely on our feet we really do need to take care of them, and foot treatments are therapuetic – great for relaxing and helping to heal the spirit as well as the body. Distance is no problem for registered nurse Anna Rhys,

Three Counties Foot Care F o o t H e a l t h P r a c t i on e r & R e g i s t e r e d N ur s e

Mrs Anna Rhys Dip FH, MCFHP, MAFHP, RGN

07811 612957

anna.rhys@yahoo.co.uk

who has 29 years’ experience in a number of specialities such as intensive care, medical and surgical nursing. She lives in South Somerset with husband Robert and their two teenage children. She travels all three counties (Somerset, Dorset and Wiltshire) providing foot care and treatments for her clients in their own home including nail cutting, care of the high risk and diabetic foot, foot wound dressing, corns and calluses, long thickened or ingrowing nails, fungal nails/athletes foot, cracked heels or hard dry skin, verruca treatment, medical referral and liaison. Just give her a call! Details: Anna on 07811 612957


Health section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:57 PM

Page 95

HEALTH & FAMILY

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 95


Community section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:11 PM

Page 96

Silver celebrations for village hall

Lord Hylton prepares to cut the birthday cake as Lady Hylton and members of the village hall committee look on

TEA and cakes were an appropriate way for residents of Kilmersdon to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the opening of their village hall. It was over tea and cake that the idea of getting community groups in the village to combine their fundraising efforts was first formed. That was the brainchild of Lord Hylton, of Ammerdown, who hosted the gathering. Lord Hylton told guests at the anniversary celebrations: “That was the beginning of Kilmersdon Village Day and we were able to raise enough money to put down a deposit to draw in other funds.” Martin Horler, a former chairman of the village hall committee, said the eventual cost of the hall was £132,000. He was a member of the village’s amateur dramatic society The Kilmersdon Players which insisted the plans should include a stage and green room. Today the hall is home to village groups including Kilmersdon WI, Kilmersdon Gardeners and Kilmerdon Gardeners as well as the church.

Current hall chairman Valerie Candy with Colin Gibbs, the first chairman. Colin was the leader of the village youth club and sat on the steering committee which oversaw the fundraising efforts

PAGE 96 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Westfield in focus

Michael Eavis with councillor Eleanor Jackson, who represents Westfield on Bath and North East Somerset Council and Geoff Fuller, chair of Westfield Parish Council

GLASTONBURY Festival founder Michael Eavis was the guest of honour at the opening of an exhibition about the community and industrial history of Westfield. A separate parish in its own right, the area between Midsomer Norton and Radstock.can trace its origins to the Roman-built Fosse Way. Residents have donated photographs and other memorabilia for the exhibition at Somerset Coalfield Life at Radstock Museum. The exhibition is the fifth in the museum’s series called Communities and Villages series and runs until November 29th.

Emergency kit stolen

THIEVES have stolen the equipment from the defibrillator outside the Co-op store in Coleford. The kit, which can be vital in treating heart attack victims, was originally paid for and installed by the Somer Valley Rotary Club. The club has now replaced it, with the help of a £500 donation from Radstock Co-operative Society. Club president, Sunder Ganapathy, said: "We are delighted to be able to assist with the replacement of the defibrillator. This is just the sort of project we like to support. We want to continue to be able to help our local community but are in need of new members. “If you are interested and want to find out more please contact our membership officer, Phil Edmonds, on 01761 750463 or phil.e@somer-rotary.org.uk." He’s pictured receiving the cheque from Radstock Co-op’s, Vice President, Graham Jeffery, outside the Coleford store.


Community section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:11 PM

Page 97

COMMUNITY

At home – and abroad

RECENT fundraising initiatives by members of the Rotary Club of Glastonbury and Street have helped organisations working at home and abroad. Firstly, club member Peter Davey enabled Dorset and Somerset Air Ambulance to have a stand at this year’s MidSomerset Agricultural Show in Shepton Mallet, where they were able to promote the charity’s own lottery. Then club members ran a fundraising stall in the Lidl store in Glastonbury as part of the Hurricane Irma appeal. They collected more than £300 which has paid for the cost of two Water Survival Boxes – a scheme run by the Rotary Club of Chelwood Bridge. Future charity events include a concert by the Royal Marines Concert Band in February then a concert by the Glastonbury Male Voice Choir in April.

Collecting in Lidl

The air ambulance stall at the Mid-Somerset Show

Revived hall prepares for winter

CAMERTON Community Hall is gearing up for a busy winter after a very successful summer, since a new committee started working overtime to make this valuable village asset profitable again. Regular bookings are up with many new classes for the locals to attend like Zumba, dog training and rhythm and dance. There are now four football teams using the playing field and recently refurbished dressing rooms on Saturdays and Sundays. All the effort now is to raise money for improvements to make the hall even better. To that end there are events organised throughout the winter to help reach the sum needed. In October there was a Bric and Brac sale and the first of the Camerton Winter Talks, with Andrew Linham on “Memories of the S & D Railway”. Coming up, on Tuesday October 31st everyone will be

A recent hog roast

dressed up for the village Hallowe’en Party from 5pm to 8pm. On Friday November 17th the film “Somerset Mining Memories” will be shown and it’s hoped some of the men featured in it will be able to attend. On Friday, December 15th there will be a real treat, when Ian Caskie from the SS Great Britain will give his talk on “The Launch and Relaunch of the SS Great Britain”. The hall is available to hire for parties, dances, classes etc.

Details: 01761 471350 www.camertoncommunityhall.co.uk

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 97


Community section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:11 PM

Page 98

Villagers support church bells

Comfort break

Pictured (l to r) James Holmes, Josh, and Paul Holmes letting the ducks go

THE people of Woollard, near Pensford organised a fundraising duck race and cream tea after hearing that the bells in All Saints’ Church in Publow were in need of renovation. The event at Bell Farm raised £523. The bells, often referred to as one of the best peal of six bells out of over 300 towers in Somerset, are showing signs of wear and tear according to the parish church committee. The last major work carried out on the bells was over 30 years ago when the main bearings were replaced. Tower captain, Stephen Rogers, said: “What we are hoping to achieve with this renovation is to upgrade all the bell fittings, many of which are over 110 years old. This will enable the bells to ring out well into the future. “The estimate we have received for this work is £30,000.”

THREE members of the Inner Wheel Club of Chelwood Bridge went along to the Children’s Centre at Chew Valley School, to help make cushions for the Village Agents. Quite a few of the chairs are wooden and cushions were required to make them more comfortable. The agents started their “Well Being” days at the centre in October. Pictured (l to r) are Mary Smith, Linda Quinn and Marjorie Robinson.

Harvest helps the needy

Pictured (l to r) Linda Quinn, Maureen Nethway and Pru Witter about to serve supper

Restoration of the bells in 1905

PAGE 98 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

FOOD banks, young carers and water survival boxes have benefited from a “frugal harvest supper” held by the Inner Wheel District 20 committee in Compton Dundon, near Somerton. The district has 26 clubs covering Somerset, and parts of Wiltshire and Dorset. Everyone enjoyed their meal, prepared by the district executive committee and served by Maureen Nethaway, Pru Witter, Linda Quinn and Ann Adams. Afterwards Andy Jeffery from Farrington’s Farm Shop talked about his life on the farm, growing and harvesting vegetables, and how the shop works in the community. Each club took home a bag for the members to fill with food items which were then to be donated to their local food banks. Proceeds from the evening were divided between the Water Survival Box charity and Young Carers which is one on the Inner Wheel ongoing charities.


Community section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:11 PM

Page 99

Knit and Chat are on the move

Hard at work knitting snowdrops for the town’s first snowdrop festival – for 2018 the group will be sponsoring a £100 prize

SHEPTON Mallet’s popular Knit and Chat weekly social group is moving to a new venue – and a new day – in November. For the last 11 years the knitters have met on Wednesday mornings, but from Monday, November 6th they will get together on Mondays. The times – 10.30am-midday – remain the same but the venue will be the South West Eating Disorders office in Park Road. A spokeswoman said: “After a happy four years at The Dusthole we have been offered a new venue which is easier for some of our members to access and nearer for most of them. We would like to send a hearty thank you to Tony Cockayne for allowing us to meet at The Dusthole and for putting up with us for so long.” The Tuesday night “Wobbly Knitters” are already at SWEDA and would welcome anyone who wishes to pop in and join them between 7-9pm. Any ability and form of needlecraft are welcomed at both meetings and members continue to use their talents to raise money for charity. For further details either visit their Facebook page – KNIT & CHAT, Shepton Mallet – email Eileen ogee.sez@uwclub.net or Cathy cmk2001.ck@gmail.com

Susanne’s award

STOWEY Sutton parish council has presented Susanne Green with a certificate of recognition awarded by the Rotary Community to mark the significant contribution she has made to Bishop Sutton and Stowey and all the parishioners. She voluntarily picks litter up from the village through all winds and weathers making the streets and lanes much more pleasurable to walk down.

COMMUNITY

Honour for Jim King

JIM King has notched up 50 years as secretary of the Mendip Ploughing Society and at its annual dinner Mervyn Vowles presented him with four engraved Dartington glasses and a jug on behalf of the committee. The society held another very successful ploughing match on September 27th at Priddy Hill Farm with 106 ploughmen, 16 hedgers and three stone wallers and a farm produce show. See page 70.

Local planning review

SOUTH Somerset District Council is reviewing the Local Plan that was adopted for the area in March 2015. Local plans set out a vision and framework for the future development of the area, addressing needs and opportunities in relation to housing, the economy, community facilities and infrastructure – as well as a basis for safeguarding the environment, adapting to climate change and securing good design. The first stage of the review is to start consultation on the issues and options. A paper was due to be published on Thursday, October 26th before a series of drop-in meetings up to January 11th. Amongst the venues will be the Edgar Community Hall in Somerton (November 1st) and the Market House in Castle Cary (November 7th). Ric Pallister, Leader of South Somerset District Council, said: “This consultation is a genuine exercise to take account of the views and opinions of residents and businesses alike, before a revised plan is produced. “Shaping the future of the area – the countryside, the economy and our towns and villages – is important and everyone should have a chance to contribute. The Issues and Options document and questionnaire is just the start and should help us all to focus on the issues that are most important to the communities in our district.” ● The review will cover the period up to 2034. The discussion paper will be available online, in libraries and the main council offices.

Party people

PEASEDOWN’S Party in the Park has raised nearly £80,000 since it was launched in 2008 and now attracts around 2,500 visitors each year. Some £11,000 has been donated to local organisations. The next event will be on June 9th.

Details: www.peasedownpartyinthepark.org.uk

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 99


Community section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:11 PM

Page 100

Library open day

TV and film make up artist Chrissie Bricknell with some of her young fans displaying their gory injuries

SHEPTON Mallet library threw open its doors for an open day to celebrate National Library Week. Among the activities on offer were several craft workshops, a play corner, storytelling, a popular gory film make-up corner and a pop up café with soft drinks and cakes.

500 and counting

AN arts student has become the 500th member of Frome’s Cheese and Grain not-for-profit community organisation. Izzy Brewster, aged 18 and who studies at Wiltshire College, joins other shareholders who don’t receive a dividend but have a vote on how the venue is run as a social enterprise. The building itself is owned by Mendip District Council. Izzy said: “I had no idea that the Cheese and Grain had so many members. I joined because I don’t think we shouldn’t take this wonderful facility for granted and I Arts student Izzy Brewster wanted to give it my support.” The charity’s board of trustees is elected by the members. Director Steve Macarthur said that membership “isn’t about coming to and using the Cheese and Grain: everyone is welcome.” Membership, Steve said, “is about the Cheese and Grain being accountable to the community it serves. The members are like shareholders, but in our case the shares are free and can’t be sold and no dividend is paid, but the shareholders still own the enterprise and get a vote at the annual general meeting. It not the building they own, that’s owned by Mendip District Council, it’s the social business they own.” Anyone who lives or works in Frome and its surrounding villages can join for free. For details about the venue, visit: www.cheeseandgrain.com

PAGE 100 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Dine in style

THE annual charity Axbridge Progressive Supper will be held on Saturday, November 18th, with money raised going towards staging the next Axbridge Pageant in 2020. The pageant is held every ten years and involves more than 250 people. The dress code for the supper is black tie and “dress to impress”. For those new to the event it’s a great way to meet lots of new people at three different dinner tables across the town with a starter, a main and a sweet at different addresses. Travellers pay £25 per head for the three courses which includes wine and drinks. The cost for participating couples who provide starters and sweets is £10, while those couples providing a main course don’t pay since their course is the most expensive. Details: 07789 864769 or email progressivesupper@yahoo.com

Another helping of SOUP

Wells SOUP with Dougal Mackay, who bangs his gong if they exceed their four-minute limit for speeches, and master of ceremonies, Simon Lawder

WELLS Bipolar Group came away with a cheque for £350 following the latest SOUP fundraising lunch organised by Wells Independents. Three other organisations – Wells City Carnival, Wells Macular Group and the Wells Home Library Group – shared a further £350.

The next Wells SOUP will take place on Saturday, January 13th at Seager Hall.


Community section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:11 PM

Page 101

COMMUNITY

Happiness is a café in Lympsham

A COMMUNITY café in Lympsham will celebrate its second birthday on November 14th. LEBE’s started in November 2015 and though many people supported the idea, most expected it to last just a few weeks. Now two years on the “pop up” café, run entirely by a great team of volunteers, is going from strength to strength. Some 60 to 80 people visit the café every Tuesday at Lympsham Sports Pavilion to enjoy delicious home-made cakes, lovely lunches and most importantly friendly company. LEBE stands for Lympsham, Eastertown, East Brent and Brent Knoll. One of the users, Bryon Jones from Burnhamon-Sea said: “My wife Rhona died two years and I started going to LEBE’s Community Café. It helped me cope with bereavement and as an ex-resident of Lympsham it was lovely to become part of the village community again.” To mark the occasion, LEBE’s is becoming a Happy Café,

Some of the volunteers

The youngest volunteer, Odin Ward, aged 14

Tea time

part of the international Action for Happiness movement. You only have to come to LEBE’s once to realise it’s a friendly place and good for the soul. There are over 20 Happy Cafés across the world, the nearest is in Exeter. It’s worth looking at the action for happiness website www.actionforhappiness for more information. Lynne Booth, LEBE’s Café coordinator said: “It was Pete Jarrett, a regular customer and volunteer, who introduced us to Action for Happiness as he felt LEBE’s was already a ‘Happy Café’.” Founder George Tuttiett, local farmer and parish councillor said: “I’ve always wanted to see the Lympsham sports pavilion used more for the benefit of the community. A spontaneous chat in a local lane led to the start of the café’, which has far exceeded my hopes and expectations.” Head chef, Ros Dark, has baked a special celebration cake which will be ceremonially cut by Janice Hannock and George Tuttiett on the anniversary. Janice has never missed a café’ day during the past two years. LEBE’s success is all down to the great team of volunteers – from cake makers, soup makers and chutney makers to waiters, waitresses and washer uppers! All the food is homemade and great value for money.

Andy Brueford washing up

Details: Lynne Booth 0791 4003323

The cake stall MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 101


Homes section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:37 PM

PAGE 102 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Page 102


Homes section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:37 PM

Page 103

Firenza celebrate five years

IN November, Firenza Kitchens, Bedrooms & Bathrooms will be celebrating five years of being in business. To mark the occasion, they are inviting customers, past, present and future, to join them in the showroom on Saturday November 4th for bubbles and nibbles. Firenza was set up by Andrew Stock who has over 30 years’ experience in designing, supplying and fitting within the industry. He said: “When I decided to open a showroom in Midsomer Norton, I wanted to create a business which would make choosing a new kitchen, bedroom or bathroom a stress-free process. We have a great team of friendly designers and tradesmen who help customers every step of the way, ensuring that the end result is the beautiful room they envisaged. “Being a small business in a competitive environment of large kitchen warehouses and online retailers can prove challenging, but we strive to provide competitive prices whenever possible and are proud of the personal service and high quality finish we deliver. “We'd like to thank all of our customers for supporting a local business by asking them to join us on the November 4th.” During the event, customers can sample delicious food created by NEFF Home Economist, Alison Haigh. From 11am, Alison will demonstrate how to create fantastic recipes, using innovative NEFF appliances such as their iconic Slide&Hide® oven and FlexInduction hob. Give Firenza a call to let them know you'll be joining them or just drop by.

HOMES & INTERIORS 01761 439300 • www.staircase-manufacturing.co.uk

Specialising in Oak staircases Free no obligation quotes Free measuring Free delivery

CELEBRATING 5 YEARS WITH BUBBLES, NIBBLES & A NEFF HOME ECONOMIST ON SATURDAY 4TH NOVEMBER AT 11AM Open: Mon 12 noon – 5 p.m. Tues – Fri 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sat 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Radstock Road, Midsomer Norton, Radstock BA3 2AD T: 01761 419114 • E: enquiries@firenzaltd.co.uk • W: www.firenzaltd.co.uk

The Staircase Manufacturing Company Limited, Wellsway Works, Wells Road, Radstock, Bath BA3 3RZ email: stairman@talktalk.net MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 103


Homes section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:37 PM

Page 104

Don’t let Santa get stuck in your chimney!

CHIMNEYS can come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Solid Fuel Installations can carry out chimney sweeping on open fires, woodburning stoves, multi-fuel stoves, range cookers and can also undertake core balling and unblock chimneys from birds nest and debris. Solid Fuel Installations can also supply and install an extensive range of superb wood burning stoves for that extra warm glow in your home this winter. Not only that but they believe that as it is such an important purchase that once they have installed your stove they will continue to be there to provide you with long-term advice or help. Contact them today for great advice on stove selection and installation on 01749 677440 – and get your chimney swept!

PAGE 104 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Homes section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:37 PM

Page 105

HOMES & INTERIORS

THE WAY THEY’RE MEANT TO BE #R9journey • High Security • Thermal Efficient • Alternave to Timber • Tradional Hardware Ideal for Conservaon Areas

40+ colour options available

www.residence9.co.uk

01275 342656 www.seal-lite.co.uk Unit 1, Tweed Road, Clevedon, North Somerset BS21 6RR

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 105


Homes section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:37 PM

Page 106

HOMES & INTERIORS

WOODBURNING & MULTI-FUEL STOVES

We are Main Dealers for the following manufacturers: STOVAX, HUNTER, YEOMAN Woodburning, multi-fuel, LPG & natural gas available from stock or can be ordered Over 25 stoves on show in our showroom including inset models. Stove spares & flue supplied, Door repairs undertaken Please call in to our showroom or phone for more details.

Behind Shell Garage Winterstoke Road, Weston-super-Mare, North Somerset BS23 2YS

Tel: 01934 626093/813261 www.westongarden.co.uk

PAGE 106 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Caving page:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:18 PM

Page 86

British cavers meet on Mendip

BRITISH cavers are controlled (if that is the word) by the British Caving Association and its scientific arm the British Cave Research Association. Since 1947, when its predecessor, the Cave Research Group, organised the first national caving conference, such an event is generally held annually, rotating With PHILIP around the main UK caving areas. HENDY Last year was an exception, as we hosted the International Caving Conference based in Yorkshire. These conferences give foreign cavers an opportunity to explore caves in the host country and, as well as in Yorkshire, Mendip held a preconference event, with many of our best caves available for exploration. The British meeting, called Hidden Earth since 1987, is a forum for talks and discussions, showcasing films and videos, as well as giving cavers the opportunity to examine the latest equipment, and examples of art and photography in the commercial hall. The event was last held on Mendip in 2015, but due to difficulties with the planned venue at Monmouth, it returned to us at the end of September. It was held at the tried and tested Churchill Academy, and largely organised by members of the Wessex Cave Club. A lot of technology is involved these days, but all went smoothly, and the weekend was filled with lectures and workshop sessions covering surveying, noxious gases in caves, bats and cave climate. Foreign caving was not forgotten and presentations were given on expeditions to India, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand and the Philippines, amongst others. The art and photography salons were crowded with exhibits, all of high quality, and some of the latest cave surveys were on display. Years ago these were painstakingly hand-drawn and annotated and produced as dyeline copies, but today laser surveying allows much greater accuracy and the use of colour, all digitally printed. Cavers could try the latest rope-climbing techniques and equipment and the hardy few were able to experience cave diving, albeit in the warm safety of the academy pool. The BCA president, Andy Eavis, welcomed everyone at the start of the session and handed over to Professor John Gunn, who made the case for increased research into caves and highlighted the availability of grants for this purpose. One incentive is the search for British caves affected in the past by the Ice Ages. Apparently, when a cave is affected by permafrost, the water turns to ice, precipitating minute crystals of calcite. Such crystals have recently been found in Wookey Hole, so the challenge is to find similar caves. The opening session concluded with a quirky video produced by Dudley Caving Club, showing some of the mad antics they get up to when not involved in serious caving. Two films deserve special mention. Andy and Antonia Freem of the South Wales Caving Club have produced a film highlighting the Dan yr Ogof showcave in the Brecon Beacons. The public only see a fraction of this long and beautiful cave and the film shows what can only be seen by cavers and divers, as well as describing the early exploration by the Morgan brothers, who were

CAVING

The trade hall

so unsure of what they might find that they took a revolver with them! The Beautiful Adventure is available from SWCC and at the showcave. On a local issue, Gavin Newman was invited by Wookey Hole Caves to record the process of blasting into Chamber Twenty, until 2016 only accessible to cave divers. With professional miners relying on a group of amateur cave divers and a ton of explosives, what could possibly go wrong! The divers invented underwater laser ping-pong and there is some spectacular footage of explosions – and the collateral damage. The Tunnel is a good hour’s entertainment, for caver and non-caver alike. For us local cavers, Mark Helmore’s Mendip Roundup was not to be missed, bringing us up-to-date with the latest discoveries on Mendip. At Sandford, Pearl Mine has been re-opened after being closed for 46 years. Already, another 300 metres of mined passage has been discovered and there is an aural connection with the shafts rising from Sandford Levvy at the foot of the hill and prospects for further discoveries look good. A new cave has been opened between Bleadon and Canada Caves at Hutton, but it is very unstable. Several leads are being followed, but no connection with the other caves is imminent. At Charterhouse, Grebe Swallet has yielded some tight passage beyond a very wet and squalid crawl, but the diggers are, as ever, optimistic. At Red Quar, digging above the rift which led down to Wigmore Swallet has revealed two extensions, The Bath and Far Side Gallery. Near the aptly-named Soggy Bottom, a narrow tube has been enlarged, and is being slowly extended. In Wigmore Swallet itself, Sump 10 has been passed to the inevitable Sump 11, but a possible bypass, Play Your Cards Right, is being pushed. Digging has recommenced in Gough’s Cave, in the Adventure Cave at the Far Rift Dig, otherwise known as Nathan’s Dungeon. Interest waned some years ago when a digger had to be rescued from thick mud in a constricted crawl, but the roof has now been raised so a hands-and-knees crawl allows access to a tight ascending rift with a small chamber at the top. Details of all of these digs are sparse, but we expect to learn more of them and others at the annual J-Rat Digging Award ceremony in November. Hidden Earth 2017 was, as usual, a very popular event, and cavers from across the country renewed old friendships and made new ones. Caving is not a sport much in the public eye, but its participants are a social and co-operative crowd and the conference is a great opportunity to meet and enjoy a beer served by cavers to cavers.

Phil has been caving for more than 50 years and is a member of the Wessex Cave Club. He has been involved in producing several caving publications and until his retirement was a caving instructor at Cheddar. His main interest is digging for new caves.

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 107


Motoring page:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:34 PM

Page 108

Mendip’s very own car

FOR the past 18 years, local historian Tom Randall has been fascinated by one of the lesser-known stories about Mendip – the area’s very own motor car production line. Finally, he has written about the history of the Mendip Motor Company, based in Chewton Mendip, in a carefullyresearched and documented book which The launch of the Mendip car

An advertisement for the car

will raise funds for Somerset Coalfield Live at Radstock Museum. Tom, of Welton, is one of the founding trustees of the museum and with a background in engineering, the story of the car’s design and development in the years before the First World War captured his imagination. Just one example of the car survives – in pieces in a barn on the Somerset Levels – after it was found rotting in a hedge in Buckinghamshire in 1967. Originally, it was brought back to Cheddar. Tom said: “In the 1980s I saw a postcard of the Mendip car and discovered that it had been built in Chewton Mendip. I thought ‘wow, this is incredible’ and set about tracing its

history.” The Mendip Engineering Company started life as Cutler’s Green Ironworks. Before WWI the company was run by C.W. Hughes who built steam lorries and then petrol engine vans before the Mendip motor car appeared. Tom says no-one is sure exactly how many Mendip cars were built – company records and recollections of staff there suggest between 200-500. The company moved to Southmead in Bristol after the war. The book includes a CD containing the memories of William Curtis, of Litton, who worked for the company. The original recordings were made by the BBC in 1956 but it appears they were never broadcast.

Tom in the museum shop

Mendip Engineering and the Motor Car an industrial revolution in Chewton Mendip by Tom Randall is priced £12.95 and is available from the museum shop. For details visit: www.radstockmuseum.co.uk PAGE 108 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Motoring page:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:34 PM

Page 109

Motorcyclists support air ambulance

2017 WCMC Group AGM

WELLS Classic Motorcycle Club held their 17th annual general meeting, presentations and social evening at the Britannia Inn, Wells. At the end of the meeting they were joined by marshals and helpers from the hugely successful seventh annual “Tortoise and Hare Run” to present Dorset and Somerset Air Ambulance with a donation of £4,500 from the club’s Tortoise and Hare fund. So far the event has raised £16,150. The next will be on Sunday June 3rd. Details: www.wellsclassicmotorcycleclub.co.uk

UBLEY MOTOR SERVICES MG ROVER & LAND ROVER SPECIALIST

Sales – Service – Parts – Repairs ALL MAKES SERVICING – VEHICLE DIAGNOSTICS, AIR CONDITIONING, MECHANICAL & BODY REPAIRS Collection/Loan Car by arrangement

MOT TESTING STATION COMPETITIVE PRICES ON TYRES, BATTERIES AND EXHAUSTS

ACCIDENT REPAIR CENTRE QUALITY USED CARS BREAKDOWN & RECOVERY SERVICE Your peace of mind is our priority

CLEEVE HILL, UBLEY BS40 6PG Telephone: 01761 462275 (24hrs) www.ubleymotors.co.uk

MOTORING

For servicing, repairs and sales of all makes of caravans and motorhomes

Bailey approved body shop and workshop

● Caravan Servicing ● Annual Habitation Checks ● Alu-Tech Bailey Approved Repairers ● Warranty Maintained ● Damp Repairs ● Accident Repairs ● Insurance Repairs ● Accessory Fitting

Our shop stocks a full range of accessories and equipment

BEFORE

AFTER

Open Monday - Friday 9am–5pm; Saturday 9am–12 noon Approved

Marchants Hill, Gurney Slade BA3 4TY Call: 01749 841051 Mob: 07778 465520 Email: sales@caravanrepairs-sw.co.uk MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 109


Music feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:12 PM

Page 110

Choir seeks new members

WINSCOMBE Community Singers sang their first public performance at the Winscombe Michaelmas Fair, having recently re-formed under their new choir director Rachel Mason.

They performed a variety of songs with two and three-part harmonies. They are looking for new members and currently meet at St James Church, Winscombe on Tuesdays from 7.30-9pm.

No auditions are necessary – they learn by ear and are a friendly group. Their Christmas concert will be held in St James Church on Tuesday December 12th.

Details: Simon Page 07900 693783 or Simon.page@eclipse.co.uk

Nailsea has a new conductor

FOLLOWING the retirement of their long-standing conductor, Bob Jenner, back in June, Nailsea Concert Orchestra has appointed a new conductor, Ben England. He studied music at the University of Bristol, specialising in conducting and composition. He has led ensembles in and around Bristol for over 20 years, including the Bristol Ensemble, Bristol Opera and the Bristol Cabot Choir and is musical director of the Bristol Gilbert and Sullivan Operatic Society, the Bristol and Thornbury Good Afternoon Choirs, and the Westbury

The wind section

Mendip Men with Newbridge Choir at Totland Church

PAGE 110 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Singers. Ben also works as creative producer for Bristol Plays Music in conjunction with (among others) UWE, University of Bristol, BBC Radio and TV, Aardman Animations and the Monteverdi Choir and Orchestra. Ben’s debut concert Ben England with the orchestra takes place on Saturday November 25th at St Francis of Assisi RC Church, Ash Hayes Road, Nailsea. The programme includes Mozart’s Symphony No. 40, Handel’s Music for the Royal Fireworks, Sullivan’s Iolanthe Overture, Rachmaninoff’s Vocalise, Faure’s Masques et Bergamasques and Lane’s Overture on Christmas Carols. The concert starts at 7.30pm and tickets priced £10 (under 16s £1) are available in advance from Nailsea Music Shop or at the door on the night.

Choir’s big date

THE Mendip Male Voice Choir visited the Isle of Wight to give three concerts to raise money for charities. Now it’s all systems go at Monday evening rehearsals preparing for the choir’s massive concert on Friday October 27th at Wells Cathedral with Glastonbury, Taunton and police male voice choirs, one of the biggest events the choir has been involved in. A spokesman said: “Any man who can hold a note is most welcome to join this wonderful bunch of men on a Monday at St Marys School Timsbury at 7pm.”


Music feature:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:12 PM

Page 111

MUSIC & THEATRE

Art and music bridge the gap between east and west MORE details have been announced of an ambitious arts project in Wells which aims to build bridges between the Arab and Western worlds. A three-month-long exhibition of paintings in the Bishop’s Palace – opening on Friday, October 28th – along with the launch of a book will be followed next spring with a concert in Wells Cathedral. The project is called Alcantara … Beyond the Wells and is the brainchild of Pilton-based painter Peter Lawrence, who lived and worked in the Middle East for many years and was inspired by his surroundings. Peter is working alongside Jordanian opera singer and friend Zeina Barhoum, Somerset-based writers and singer/composer Tim Angel. Zeina has also contributed paintings to the exhibition and the book. The exhibition will move to the cloisters of Wells Cathedral in March for two weeks before the concert when Zeina and other soloists will sing with a massed choir of Somerset schoolchildren and adults Zeina Barhoum: she’ll be plus an orchestra, performing visiting Somerset at the end of Faure’s Requiem and a range October to attend the opening of of music from the Levant the exhibition and to meet some of the schoolchildren taking part and the West including some of her operatic arias. Tim is in the concert

Television judge

Peter with some of the books he has published, including the new one, Impressions of Amman, which is linked to the exhibition and concert

arranging and composing some music. HRH Princess Muna (nee Tony Gardner who was King Hussein’s second wife and mother of King Abdullah) is patron of the project and concert which has won funding from the Arts Council of England. All royalties from the book will go to charities and arts projects working with refugees and displaced people in the UK, Jordan and Palestine. Last year, Zeina performed in the parish church in Pilton, raising £1,500 for a charity concert she will be giving in Lebanon in November, alongside refugee children. The concert is called “If Music be the food of Love” and is part of an awareness drive by the World Food Programme.

For details, visit Peter’s website www.peterlawrence.uk

RACHEL Mason, who is well known for teaching music and running choirs in our area, has been selected to be an expert judge for the brand new Sky1 show Sing: Ultimate a Cappella which started airing recently. The show stars Cat Deeley as the host and guest performers

have included The Vamps, Midge Ure and Gregory Porter. The show has already been nominated for a national television award. Rachel, who was brought up in Wrington and now lives in Yatton, has taught singing at local schools and worked with the local council and housing associations in the area to help the issue of loneliness among older Rachel Mason people in the community. One of her choirs, Euphoria, was invited to sing in Hollywood two years ago. She is also a songwriter and lyricist and contributed poems to an illustrated book about the Somerset countryside printed in 2012.

Details: www.rachelmasonmusic.com www.amplifychoir.co.uk

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 111


Riding section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:30 PM

Page 112

“Is my team ploughing, that I was used to drive?” *

PLOUGHING with a team of heavy horses demonstrates the enduring and rewarding partnership that can exist between man With RACHEL and his horses. THOMPSON An acre a day MBE ploughed in perfect harmony in the solitude of the countryside with only the horses, the following gulls and the lonely autumn sky for company. It has been said that there is something poetical about ploughing with a horse – lifting the soul as well as the soil. At the 148th Mendip Ploughing Match I watched enthralled as the wonderfully named Sam and Tilly (Shire horses), Merlin and Isaac (Suffolk Punch) and JD and Marcel (Shire and Percheron) were asked to bend their backs and their thoughts to ploughing straight furrows in uniform rows, ignoring the nearby clattering tractors and the usual Mendip “good day out” mix of every man and his dog spectating, eating, chattering and generally having a great time in a muddy field in the middle of nowhere. I have loved Shire horses ever since keeping my riding horse Morning at Luckington Manor Farm at Coleford, near Frome, the home of Shire horse

Rachel when she was a groom with Ken and Dollis

PAGE 112 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

RIDING

A scene from this year’s Mendip Ploughing Match

breeders, Ken and Kath Selway. Back then, 30 years ago, the survival of heavy working horse breeds was in serious doubt since the 20th century mechanisation of farming saw the wholescale slaughter of thousands of farm horses. Ken had a huge bay Shire stallion over-wintering in the old barn in the farm yard. During the great October storm of 1987 the roof blew off sending corrugated iron sheets swirling through the air, just missing Ken’s head by inches. The barn roof timbers fell in around the stallion’s head, threatening the breed survival even more, but happily he lived on, unharmed, to sire many beautiful foals. I remember summer evenings rolling along the nearby lanes with Ken and Kath in their smart yellow and red agricultural show cart pulled by Dollis,

the stunning grey Shire they showed locally and nationally. At Ken’s funeral the same agricultural cart travelled through the village, drawn by two beautiful chesnut Suffolk Punches, another endangered breed, bearing his coffin upon a couple of straw bales to arrive at Coleford church where they and he were welcomed by a tearful congregation. Thanks to the passion and commitment of Ken and Kath and others like them, these wonderful heavy horse breeds, have against all the odds survived finding worthwhile careers in showing, forestry, horticulture and agriculture and in many other activities. The English Shire horse is a descendent of the Great Horse used in medieval warfare, the Clydesdale is Scotland’s indigenous breed, the Suffolk Punch hails from the English Eastern Counties – our oldest breed with the longest unbroken 200 year written pedigree of any breed of horse and the French Percheron – one of the oldest draught breeds in the world dating back to AD732. How sad it would have been to have lost these noble gentle giants who have served mankind for centuries. Thanks to the inclusion of horse classes in local ploughing matches and the handlers who love and respect their horses the ancient art of horse ploughing lives on. To learn all about heavy horses go to the fabulous www.heavyhorses.org.uk website – it is truly one of the best horse websites I have ever seen. * “Is my team ploughing, that I was used to drive, and hear the harness jingle, when I was man alive”. A. E. Houseman –English poet 1859–1936.


Sport section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:13 PM

Page 113

Lizzy’s success

FOLLOWING the Somerset Ladies County Golf Association selection day at Farrington Park Golf Club, Lizzy Bryant from Frome College has been offered a place on the Somerset development squad. The team are based at Burnham and Berrow Golf Club. Lizzy, who is in Year 10, has already secured a fantastic handicap score of nine – perhaps a sign of things to come! Lizzy has been presented with a principal’s commendation by the college. Lizzy lives in Frome and plays at Farrington Park golf club.

F1 in Shepton Mallet . . .

… WELL, in miniature. Shepton Slot Car Club is on track to be awarded at least £1,000 from Tesco through their Bags of Help community grant scheme to build a new track. The club’s project was selected for in-store voting during September and October. It is one of three contenders for the top award of £4,000. The club meets every Wednesday at Shepton Mallet Leisure Centre and welcomes racers of any age. It currently has use of a track loaned by a club in Wiltshire but is planning a bespoke circuit which can be configured in 50 different ways. The club has a fleet of robust cars and controllers for beginners to borrow before, if they are bitten, moving on to buying their own cars. Classes include NASCAR, Group C, and Formula One. Club chairman, Graham Lane, said: “Slot car racing is a great sport for all ages. It's what I call a passive sport, as opposed to an active one like football or tennis. People who are unable to take part in active sports through illness, injury, age or disability can race alongside others in a hugely competitive sport with many facets. “I'm delighted that Shepton Mallet Leisure Centre has recognised this and provided us with a superb room for the club.” Graham has been racing slot cars for more than 60 years, both in the UK and in Italy, where he has lived for the past 17 years. He recently moved back to Shepton Mallet but he still retains a home in Italy. He added: “I feel it's important to get people off the computer games and into a social environment where they can learn real skills – such as choosing tyre compounds and changing gear ratios, painting car bodies and adding decals, electrical skills with motors and controllers. Even computer programming with the race control system. And not forgetting that all important 'life skill' of winning and losing!” For details, visit: www.sheptonslotcarclub.com

Chloe aims high Chloe Applin

SPORT CHLOE Applin, aged 15, is a rising star in the world of clay target shooting. Twice she’s been a winner with the Somerset ladies’ team and she came third in the Colts ladies at the British open. Now she has her sights set on winning a place in the national

team before too long. She got the bug from dad, Ian, and started shooting at Brace’s in Norton Malreward four years ago and is coached and mentored by former champion, John Pool, and only started entering competitions a year ago. She has shown such promise that three members of Ian’s shooting syndicate are now sponsoring her. They are Richard Hooper of the Electric Gate Company, in Cheddar, Brian Sage from Carpets and Fabrics Direct, Paulton and Mark Vear from Vears Builders in Winford. With cartridge costs rising, travel costs and entry fees, taking part in competitions across the South West is expensive. And if she makes the national squad, Chloe will be travelling around the world. She’s currently in Year 11 at Chew Valley School and lives in Stowey with dad, Ian and mum, Sue, who have older children, Emma, aged 30, and Sam, aged 28. Chloe said: “I love the challenge of it. Conditions can be different every time you shoot.” Coach, John Pool, said: “She’s very good and very calm. I can see her shooting for England if she keeps going like this.”

Chloe with (l to r) dad Ian, Richard Hooper, Mark Vear, Brian Sage and John Pool MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 113


Sport section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:13 PM

Page 114

Lions and cheetahs take to the hills

WITH a backdrop of stunning scenery and challenging climbs, Mendip attracted a number of late season events. The Cotswold CYCLING Cycling League held with EDMUND their penultimate LODITE road race of the season “A Bridge Too Far” near Priddy. For the league riders there was a lot to be gained from a good finish in deciding overall positions for the year. But the added presence of nonCotswold league teams including Somerton based Team Tor 2000 threw in an extra dimension and created a

PAGE 114 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

race within a race. Although there were no bridges to cross, the 100km rolling course on top of the Mendips took eight laps of the popular Rifleman’s circuit, which proved to be one lap too many for a few of the riders! Despite crosswinds to contend with, the undulating course suited the sprinters – and in the end it came down to a bunch sprint with Joshua Croxton from Team Tor 2000 finishing first (although his early celebration approaching the line nearly cost him victory!) He said: “I'm always happy to sprint! I was unsure whose wheel to follow, but it all fell into place nicely – even if I did need to cancel the early celebration to Mendip wiggle

“Bridge Too Far” finish

finish the job!" Separately, two of the leading cycle retailers in the UK organised their own non-competitive sportives in Mendip. Both Wiggle and Evans Cycles promote their brands in the best locations across the country and they don’t get much better than Mendip. With plenty of hills to choose from, Burrington Combe always gets featured but it’s the iconic Cheddar Gorge that is the main attraction. It may not be the hardest in Mendip but is certainly the one most photographed and dramatic. After the short steep section in the lower half the gradient eases and then there’s plenty of time to recover and admire the scenery. The Wiggle sportive also included the much tougher climb of Ebbor Gorge, near Wells. Just as you think you’re doing well you hit a 20% gradient and it starts to hurt. Arriving breathless near the car park you’re rewarded with a stunning view back towards Glastonbury Tor, before heading back across the Mendips. Both sportives include many miles of quiet lanes and quaint villages, but it’s the climbs that are memorable and which continue to attract cyclists from across the country. There is a strange irony about cycling in that the best cycling routes involve hills. For those that like climbing – the harder the better. But then there are the sprinters where speed is the need – it all comes down to lions and cheetahs – and very few cyclists are both.


Sport section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:13 PM

Page 115

Rugby rivalry resumes

Norton (in red and white) bring a Wells attack to a halt

MIDSOMER Norton rugby club hosted local rivals Wells for the first league match between the senior sides in six years. Both clubs now play in the Tribute Western Counties North division and it was Norton who came out on top, winning 33-27. The return fixture is due to be held on Saturday, January 20th in Wells.

Aaron Cook goes over for Wells in the second half; the visitors had been leading 19-20 at the break

Scrum time. The sides were evenly matched, making it a thrilling contest for the large crowd

SPORT

Plenty of reasons to celebrate

Club president Ian MacDonald present Nick Pang, at the end of his first season as first XI captain, with the award for best batsman

WINNING the WEPL Bristol and North Somerset division gave an extra boost to Midsomer Norton Cricket Club’s presentation night celebrations at the Withies Lane clubhouse. And with the Sunday XI enjoying a Andrew Cox receives his bowling award successful campaign from president Ian Macdonald also, the evening capped an outstanding season for the club. The second and third XIs did not fare so well, being relegated. Club chairman Graeme King preceded the player presentations by thanking all those who help support the club in preparing pitches, making match day teas and refreshments, scoring and maintaining the club premises.

A new award in honour of the late Chris Tabb was made to mark an outstanding contribution to cricket at the club. The first recipient was Nick Potter, current director of cricket and long-time first XI skipper. Nick received his award from Chris’s brother, Kevin

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 115


Sport section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:13 PM

Page 116

Soccer shows its caring side

FOOTBALL chiefs in Somerset are supporting a £40,000 fundraising campaign by the family of a young player with cerebral palsy for lifechanging surgery. Jace Webberley, aged four and from Somerton, cannot walk or stand unaided without pain as his leg muscles Jace playing frame football are too stiff. That has not stopped him playing a unique form of football called frame football, developed by the Cerebral Palsy Society, in which players are supported by walking frames. Jace’s family have been told that he is eligible for Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy surgery, which involves severing a proportion of the nerves in the spine which have the most spasticity. The procedure is not available on the NHS. After the operation, Jace will undergo several years of physiotherapy to retrain and re-strengthen his back muscles, allowing him to walk unaided. Somerset Football Association has set up a special fundraising website for Jace, who plays football with Bristol Frame Football, which meets in Whitchurch. Jace’s family are aiming to raise these funds within two years, because as Jace gets older he would require multiple surgeries which can be avoided by having the SDR operation as soon as possible. Louisa, Jace’s mum said: “Football helps to compliment the work Jace does with his physio in a fun way, and allows him to do things other non-CP children do. It is easy to assume that children with cerebral palsy cannot do things, but I think that Jace and his teammates show us every week that they can! Jace is making amazing progress at football each week, which has helped him not just physically, but socially as well. “We heard about frame football through Jace's physio, we then joined the Bristol Frame Football Team in January 2017. Jace enjoys playing football with the team, although he is the youngest player and can be a little shy. “He has learnt to dribble the ball down the pitch and loves it when he scores a goal (he also enjoys stealing the coach's whistle and telling others what to do)! During our Saturday training session, he is taught to control the ball, to be able to move in between cones and run up and down the pitch without losing the ball." Follow Jace’s SDR Journey on Facebook and on Twitter @JacesSDRJourney or visit: https://just4children.org/children-helped2017/jaces-sdrjourney/

PAGE 116 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Tennis with a twist

The ladies who took part in the tournament

WELLS Tennis Club hosted the annual President's Ladies' Tournament with 16 women taking part in the fun doubles competition. The new format was a round robin format with a twist, as each pair had a joker to play in a round of their choice and this was key to the overall champions. Winners Linda (left) and Tasha

It was nip and tuck between the eight pairs the whole way but two were on equal scores going into the final round with Natasha Smith and Linda Lester eventually triumphing by one point from Linda Hall and Lucy Thomas. Organiser Julia Nest, the club’s ladies captain, said: "It was great to have so many members sign up for a fun and fast afternoon of tennis." Meanwhile, 20 members competed in the Chris Hicks Memorial Tournament, an annual event running since 2005. They played in mixed doubles in a rotation of partners; the winners (with the most games won) were Martyn Holliday and Sarah Townsend. Runners-up were Lorna Jenkins and Julia Nest (who tied for ladies) and Ray Brooks.

Players in the Chris Hick Memorial tournament


Sport section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:13 PM

Page 117

Timsbury presentation night

The three Players of the Year Ashley Davis (3rds), Graeme Webb (1sts and Fastest Fifty), Nathan Hawkins (2nds)

THE clubroom of Timsbury Cricket Club was packed for the annual presentation evening with all three teams well represented. Club chairman Austin Sage said that there had been a gradual increase in participation and the welcome influx of new players to the club meant there had been no problems in filling the three club sides. The national All Stars initiative had seen some very successful sessions with the youngsters and the success of the U-19s who narrowly missed out on becoming county champions had been one of the highlights of the season. Sage paid tribute to the many people who had worked tirelessly for the club and in appreciation of their efforts flowers were presented to Ann Sage, Rita Day, Cheryl Bradley, Eve Bird and Claire Sage. For the second year running Sol Thompson won the award for the best performance by a junior, Joe Kinnear was the outstanding teenager and Josh Bond-Kendall the most improved junior. Ashley Davis was voted third team player of the year. Ben Hosford in his first year as second team captain led his side to the Bristol and District League Division IX title with plenty to spare. Nathan Hawkins was second team Player of the Year. First team captain Steve Clothier welcomed the introduction of new players to the team notably Graeme Webb, Kevin Sibley and Tom Clark who had all made sizeable contributions. Graeme Webb, after an outstanding debut year with the club, was voted First Team Player of the Year and also took the cup for the fastest 50. Dan Hill, another popular newcomer, won the cup for best performance of the year with his knock of 141 for the seconds against Westbury Old Bristolians. Roger and Eve Bird wanted their cup to recognise the Junior Club Person of the Year and the inaugural winner was Dan Nesbitt who was congratulated on his willingness to help in so many aspects of the club. There was a popular winner of the prestigious Club Person of the Year award which went to the chairman’s wife Ann Sage for her hard work throughout the club.

No return for Rovers

SPORT

By Mark Adler

Sutton fans celebrate as the visitors open the scoring after ten minutes

HOPES that the name of Paulton Rovers could once again feature in the first round proper of the Emirates FA Cup ended in disappointment with a 2-3 home loss to last season’s giantkillers Sutton United. There were no pasties on display – last year, Sutton’s then reserve goalkeeper Wayne Shaw was caught up in an alleged betting row after eating one during a cup match against Arsenal – but the visitor’s goalkeeper made a half-baked blunder in the second half to gift Paulton a goal that got them back in the game on front of a noisy 601-strong crowd. Sutton play in the National League, three divisions higher than Paulton who last reached the FA Cup first round in 2009 when they entertained Norwich City, losing 0-7.

Despair on the faces of Sutton players as Paulton equalise in the first half

Referee Simon Barrow intervenes as tempers flare in the first half

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 117


What's On section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:29 PM

Page 118

Abbey’s special visitor

SANTA is taking a break from the North Pole to visit Glastonbury Abbey on three consecutive Saturdays in December – the 2nd, 9th and 16th – between 11am and 2pm. You can book your slot to meet him in the Abbot’s Kitchen, listen to a festive story and give him your Christmas wishes. Afterwards you can also see his reindeer and have a photograph taken in his sleigh and enjoy all the abbey has to offer.

Reindeer ride again

For details and to book tickets, visit: www.glastonburyabbey.com

Wedding bells for cinema Becky

Aaron and Becky in the carnival coach with their parents (front l:r) Derek and June Cooper and Kay and Barry Collett

AN eye for showbusiness is never far from the family which is about to celebrate the 25th anniversary of opening Wells Film Centre – especially when it comes to a wedding! Cinema founder Derek Cooper arranged for the Wells Carnival Queen coach to take daughter Becky to Wookey Hole Church where she married Aaron Collett. Becky, who was twice Wells carnival queen, is the manager of the cinema, now run by sister Sally. They then travelled by the coach to the Swan Hotel in Wells for the reception. For details about the cinema’s 25th anniversary plans, visit: www.wellscinema.co.uk

Princes Road, Wells, BA5 1TD

Starts Friday 3rd November

Starts Friday 10th November Starts Friday 17th November Starts Friday 24th November

CELEBRATING OUR 25th ANNIVERSARY! Death Of Stalin (15) Murder On The Orient Express (cert tbc) Paddington 2 (cert tbc) • Marshall (cert 15) Justice League 3d/2d (cert tbc)

Event Cinema Frozen (Nov 25th And 26th)

The three events for our Birthday Weekend are:

Professor Marston & The Wonder Woman (15) The Last Of Mohicans (Nov 26th) Wonder (Nov 27th)

● Book in person ● Online 24/7 @www.wellsfilmcentre.co.uk ● Over the ’phone: 01749 673195

PAGE 118 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

Reindeer on the road again in Wells

REINDEER will be returning to the streets of Wells in December for the 11th annual Christmas parade. Last year’s event raised more than £2,500 for the Dorset and Somerset Air Ambulance and the Rotary Club of Wells, which organises the celebration, hopes to make this year even more successful. The parade, on Sunday, December 3rd, will open at 10.50am and there will be music by bands and choirs along with seasonal stalls, rides and other amusements. The parade itself will begin at midday.

Palace holds Christmas market

FOLLOWING the phenomenal success of last year’s event, The Bishop’s Palace in Wells will again be helping you to get your Christmas shopping started in style with their inspirational Christmas Artisan Markets. Taking place from Friday November 10th to Sunday November 12th, there will be a range of over 30 stalls of local, hand-made crafts and products to browse. They will include original art works, decoupage, Christmas decorations, chocolates, toys and games, quilting, embroidery, jewellery, woodwork, ceramics, stained glass, home furnishings, candles and many more. Soak up the festive atmosphere around this glorious medieval site, with seasonal food and drink, and music in the chapel. Tickets are available at a reduced price (£6 adult, children five-18 £3, under-fives and palace members free) and are available from the palace shop, by telephone 01749 988 111 or online www.bishopspalace.org.uk


What's On section:Layout 1

10/19/17

3:29 PM

Page 119

WHAT’S ON

Christmas at Haynes

THE Haynes International Motor Museum is always a great place for the whole family to visit and this Christmas there’s even more to do! For the youngsters between December 2nd and 23rd, Christmas at Haynes is taking place around the whole museum. Help Santa find his elves that have gone missing and receive a fantastic reward at the end. This activity is offered at no extra cost over the normal admissions price. Details: www.himm.co.uk

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 119


What's On section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

T h e

3:29 PM

Page 120

M e n d i p

Please send entries for these listings as a single paragraph of approximately 25 words. We’re happy to list entries for charities and voluntary groups free of charge – but please submit them in the format below. Commercial entries cost £25.

Monday October 30th Wessex Stationary Engine Club talk the engineer, John Padmore of Bath, by Tony Coverdale, 7.30pm, Old Down Inn, BS3 4SA, all welcome, free entry. Details: 01225 754374. Tuesday October 31st Camerton Community Hall Hallowe’en Family Party, spooky disco, fancy dress and scary food plus lots of fun games, 5-7pm. Details: www.camertoncommunityhall.co.uk Thursday November 2nd Congresbury Horticultural Society meeting, orchids, a practical demonstration by Ian Parsons, Congresbury Methodist Hall, 7.30pm, new members always welcome. West Mendip Walkers strenuous circular walk 8.5 miles from Monksilver, OS Map Ex OL9 ST073375, start 10am, park near Notley Arms. Details: Tony Strange Tel: 01934 733783/07415 517355 or anthonyestrange@gmail.com St Margaret’s Somerset Hospice information event coffee and cake to find out about their amazing services and how as little as an hour a month or less could help, Morland Room, Redbrick Building, Glastonbury , BA6 9FT, 10.30-12.30, all welcome. Friday November 3rd Redhill Club Open Mic Night (BS40 5SG), hosted by Jerry Blythe, starting at 8pm, join us and unwind with an evening of live music, acoustic singersongwriters at their very best. Details: Jerry 07900 587646. Pro-life Art Exhibition at 14th century church of St. Philip and St. James, Norton St. Philip, Nr. Bath, BA2 7LY, 10am-4pm, admission free. Chew Magna Society fireworks, Chew Valley Rugby Club, gates open at 7pm, display starts at 8pm, tickets £4, £2 for 5-11-year-olds, U5s free, bar, hot food, candyfloss , glow sticks for sale and a teacup ride for the little ones. Saturday November 4th and Sunday November 5th Cam Valley Arts Trail, fifth anniversary celebration, with 40 artists and crafts people, 11am-5pm. Details: www.camvalleyartstrail.co.uk Saturday November 4th and Sunday November 5th Mendip Christmas Fair, Aldwick Court Farm, Saturday, 10am-5pm, Sunday, 10am-3.30pm, entrance £4, children free, free parking. Details: www.mendipchristmasfair.org or on Facebook Saturday November 4th Mendip Society walk Ashton Court over the Suspension Bridge to Clifton, meet at 1.30pm in the Church Lodge car park (parking £1.20) off the B3128 near to The Ashton (BS41 9LX) ST 557 713, a fivemile walk of parkland, Georgian Clifton, the Downs and the Suspension Bridge. Details: Gill 01934 742508. Craft Fair, Chilcompton village hall in aid of St. John's Church, Chilcompton, 10am-4pm, a wide range of stalls offering beautiful hand-crafted goods perfect for Christmas gift ideas and delicious refreshments available throughout the day. Shepton Mallet Fireworks and Bonfire Night. Starts 7pm. Run by Rotary Club of Shepton Mallet. West Shepton Playing Fields. Kingfisher coffee and cake morning to raise money for Macmillan Nurses and Children’s Hospice South West, 9.30-12.30 at their East Brent showroom. Sunday November 5th Meningitis Now nearly new sale, Ubley Village Hall, BS40 6PN, 2pm-3.30pm, good quality baby and children’s clothes, equipment and toys, refreshments PAGE 120 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017

T i m e s

available. Details: Kate 01761 221444 or Sarah 01761 220063. Wednesday November 6th Knit and Chat. The Shepton Mallet group has a new date and a new venue: every Monday 10.30-12 at the SWEDA offices, Park Road, Shepton Mallet. All standards welcome. Ffi: visit Facebook (Knit & Chat, Shepton Mallet) or email Eileen (ogee.sez@uwclub.net) or Cathy (cmk2001.ck@gmail.com) Irish Square Dancing to traditional Irish music. With Maddy Knight, teacher/caller. Every Monday 7.309pm, The Granary, The George Hotel, Frome. £3 per Class. Ffi: https://sites.google.com/view/setdancefrome email: maddyknightdance@gmail.com or Tel: 07969 127435. Tuesday November 7th Congresbury Over-60’s Club social afternoon – meet up for a chat with friends, Congresbury War Memorial Hall, 2.30-4pm. Details: 01934 832004. The Arts Society Mendip Jane Austen; Letters, life and lesser known works by actor and writer Karin Fernald, Bath & West Bar & Restaurant, B & W Show Ground, Shepton Mallet BA4 6QN, 11am, guests welcome. Details www.theartssocietymendip.org.uk 01934 862435. Wednesday November 8th Nailsea Horticultural Society AGM Nailsea United Reformed Church Hall, 7.30pm, followed by a talk on Tickenham Violets by Joan Chapman. There is no admission fee and free refreshments will be available. All members and others will be made very welcome. Thursday November 9th West Mendip Walkers moderate circular walk 6.5 miles from Gooseham Mead, OS Map Ex 154 ST438639, start 12.30pm, park free CP. Details: Jenny Nicholas Tel: 01934 853639/07803 722878 or jennymr7@aol.com Wells Cathedral Vicars Choral commemoration concert, a candlelit concert featuring a selection of some of the finest cathedral music for men’s voices and arrangements of popular songs, 8pm-9.30pm, tickets £15 from 01749 672773, www.wellscathedral.org.uk Friday November 10th to Sunday November 12th Bishop’s Palace, Wells Christmas Artisan Markets, 10am-4pm. Details: www.bishopspalace.org.uk Friday November 10th Fashion Show, 7.30pm Cheddar village hall, tickets £5 from Katie-Boo (£6 on the night) to include a glass of wine, with stunning local models, craft stalls and beauty treatments to browse after the show, charity raffle lots of fantastic prizes. Saturday November 11th Wells Cathedral Act of Worship at the Clock for Remembrance Day, 11am-11.30am, all welcome. Details: www.wellscathedral.org.uk Trinity Singers concert in collaboration with Churchill Academy Chamber Choir, All Saints Church, All Saints Road, Weston-Super-Mare, BS23 2NL, 7pm, tickets £5.50 to £8.50 available from Positickets http://www.positickets.co.uk/ or on the night on the door. Mendip Society walk Yarley Hill and Fenny Castle, meet at 1.30pm at Henton Village Hall, on the B3139 (BA5 1PD) ST 496 453, a five-mile walk over Yarley and Bower Hills with views to the Mendips and Poldens. Details: Brian 01749 672457. Draycott Quilters Quilt Exhibition and sale of handmade gifts in aid of Teenage Cancer Trust, 10am4pm, Draycott Memorial Hall, Latches Lane, Draycott, BS27 3UE, admission £3.50 includes tea and homemade cake. Details: www.draycottquilters.co.uk Wells and Mendip Museum, learn to make paper, 10am to 4pm. £60, to include lunch, tutor Clare Colby, numbers limited. Details: 01749 671770.

W h a t ’ s

Blagdon Weston Hospicecare support group Christmas Fair, Blagdon Club. Details: Angela Smythe 01761 462601or Tina Smith waterdene@aol.com Congresbury Singers, Love’s Old Sweet Song, 7.30pm in the Old School Rooms, Congresbury, with many old favourites and the chance to join in some familiar choruses, tickets £8, including refreshments afterwards, available from the Post Office or on the door. Eat Cake by the Lake at the Somerset Earth Science Centre, Moons Hill Quarry, Stoke St Michael, BA3 5JU, 11am-3pm, cakes, refreshments, crafts, Teddy bears, cards and books, a great opportunity to visit the centre and raise money for Dorothy House Hospice. Details: Mary 01373 812655. Somerset Plant Heritage at Edington Village Hall TA7 9HA, 1.30pm members’ plant sale, 2pm, “Weeds and their Control” with Adrian Hutchinson, all welcome, visitors £4. Details: 01278 451631. Congresbury Book Sale 9am-1pm at War Memorial Hall, good quality books, jigsaw puzzles, dvds, cds and talking books. Two minutes silence outside the hall at 11am for Remembrance Day. Wells Cathedral Oratorio Society presents Bach's Magnificat, the Vivaldi Gloria and his Concerto in A minor for strings, Wells Cathedral, 7pm, tickets £10 £25, cathedral shop box office 01749 672 773. Sunday November 12th and Monday November 13th Harptree History Society free 20th anniversary exhibition celebrating more than 1,000 years of local history, East Harptree Theatre, Sunday 11.30am-5pm, Monday 3.30pm-6.30pm. Sunday November 12th Wells Cathedral Remembrance Sunday, Duruflé Requiem at Choral Evensong, Wells Cathedral, 3pm4pm, all welcome. Details: www.wellscathedral.org.uk or call 01749 674483. Monday November 13th Mendip Folk Dance Club meet at St James Church Hall Winscombe, BS25 1AQ, 8pm-10pm, no experience necessary, £3 on the door. Congresbury Memorial Hall Club friendship evening with a game of Bingo, non-members welcome, 8pm at Congresbury War Memorial Hall. Tuesday November 14th Clevedon Art Club Margaret Micklewright will present “Turning Point”, Clevedon School Sixth Form Centre, 7.30pm, non-members £3 at the door. Wednesday November 15th Wells Cathedral Modern Slavery “A Curse in our Age” free workshops and speakers exploring the challenges of modern slavery at a local level, 2pm4pm. Details: www.wellscathedral.org.uk or call 01749 674483. Langford Vets Farmers’ Meeting, practical lambing day for sheep, goat and alpaca owners, £90, 10am, Langford Vets, BS40 5DU. Details: www.langfordvets.co.uk Mendip Society work day, Sladers Leigh nature reserve, meet in National Trust car park BS25 1DH. Details: Judith 01725 87428. Thursday November 16th Taize’ vigil at St James’ Priory, Whitson Street, Bristol BS1 3NZ, with Brother Paolo of Taize’, song practice at 6.30pm, service starts at 7.30 pm. West Mendip Walkers moderate circular walk 10.8 miles from St Andrew’s Church, Backwell, OS Map Ex154 ST493683, start 10am, roadside parking near church. Details: Kimberley Myers 01934 734608/07809 433627 or myersfamily@btopenworld.com Wells Cathedral free Bach Complete Organ Works: Recital 18, 1.05pm-1.45pm. Details: www.wellscathedral.org.uk or call 01749 674483. Inner Wheel Club of Wrington Vale, Soup and Pud Lunch, followed by tea or coffee, St James` Hall,

O n


O n

10/19/17

G u i d e

3:29 PM

f o r

Winscombe, BS25 1AQ, £7 with raffle in aid of "Mercy Ships", 12-2pm. Details: Pauline 01934 852481. Friday November 17th Camerton Community Hall, S & D talks, Somerset Miners Memories Film, with some appearances of the men in the film, £5 includes tea/coffee and biscuits, 7pm. Details: www.camertoncommunityhall.co.uk Folk evening. Melrose Quartet, Headway Hall, Compton Funding, 8pm, Doors 7.30pm, £10, Details: Alan Riley 01458 447223 or email alanriley73@gmail.com Saturday November 18th St. Bridget’s Church, Chelvey Christmas Fair, 10am3pm, range of local artists and crafts people will be displaying original ideas for Christmas, with country market produce, refreshments and mulled cider, in aid of Caring at Christmas and church funds. Wells Cathedral Oratorio Society, Bach Magnificat and Vivaldi Gloria, Wells Cathedral, 7pm, Matthew Owens, conductor. Tickets £10-£25 www.wcos.org.uk Wells Cathedral box office 01749 672773 or on the door. Mendip Society walk Blagdon Lake, Nempnett Thrubwell and Butcombe, five miles, moderate, meet 1.30pm at the north end of Blagdon Lake dam BS40 7UN, ST504 603, park beside road. Contact: Richard 01275 852786. Charity Fair for Macmillan Cancer Support, 10am –1pm, St John’s Church Hall, Midsomer Norton, BA3 2HZ, craft stalls, coffee, cakes and plenty more. Christmas Fair St Leonards Church Rodney Stoke, 2-4pm, Bucklegrove Holiday Park, Rodney Stoke. Axbridge Progressive Supper. Three courses in three different venues, starting and ending at The Lamb. 6pm. Travellers pay £25 inc. food and drinks. Proceeds to 2020 Axbridge Pageant. Tickets and details available online via the Facebook page or through the Eventbrite booking system. Ffi: 07789 864769, or email progressivesupper@yahoo.com Sunday November 19th and Monday November 20th Mendip Society hedge laying course at Tania’s Wood, Ubley BS40 6PX ST 540 588 with Tina Bath and Chris Claxton, £15 per day inc of lunch and drinks. Details: Judith 01275 874284. Tuesday November 21st Midsomer Norton Townswomen's Guild, St John's Church Hall, BA3 2HX, 2pm, a talk by John Yeo, "The road to Frome – my life in stained glass". Details: Glen Hepworth 01761 413528. Congresbury Over-60’s Club entertainment provided by Mike and his Music, Congresbury War Memorial Hall, 2.30-4pm. Details: 01934 832004. Wednesday 22nd to Saturday 25th Pantomime. Coleford Theatre Group presents Jack and the Beanstalk. Coleford Royal British Legion Hall at 7.30pm with a matinee on Saturday at 2.30pm. Tickets, £7 adults and £4.50 children under 14, or £21.00 for a family ticket (two adults and two children under 14) can be booked by calling the box office on 01373 812137. Ffi: http://colefordctg.wixsite.com/colefordtheatregroup Thursday November 23rd West Mendip Walkers moderate circular walk 6.5 miles from Glastonbury Market Cross, OS Map Ex 141 ST498389, start 12.30pm, local car parks. Details: Carol Jackson 01934 733568/07979 354530 or caj7599@btinternet.com Wells Cathedral Military Wives concert as part of their “Home For Christmas” Tour 2017, 7.30pm9.30pm, tickets from £27.50 via Ticketmaster or the Cathedral Box Office 01749 672773 www.wellscathedral.org.uk Chew Valley Wildlife Group, The Avon Wildlife Trust illustrated talk about AWT’s work by Eric Heath & Joe McSorley in Chew Magna Millennium Hall, 7.45pm, admission £2.50, season available.

Page 121

N o v e m b e r

Saturday November 25th Shipham Christmas Market, Shipham Village Hall, BS25 1SG, festive stalls, Christmas music, carol singers and the very popular Christmas café, fundraiser for Shipham schools. Stoke St Michael Church, Taize chants, quiet reflection, meditation and prayer, 4pm, refreshments available afterwards, free entry but donations to the church are always appreciated. Details: Janet 01225 869337 or 07376 573093. Yatton Music Society piano recital by Natalia Williams-Wandoch at St Mary’s, Yatton, 7.30pm, tickets £8 members, £10 non-members including refreshments, from the church office or on the door on the night. Details: www.yms.org.uk or contact David Ford 01934 830255 or e-mail david.ford@yms.org.uk. Mendip Society walk Dundry Hill, easy 4.5 miles, meet at 1.30pm in the small car park in Downs Rd (BS41 8LR) ST565 668. Details: Clive 01275 848052. Redhill Club Quiz Night (BS40 5SG) 8pm start, suitable for teams with a max of six people or individuals. £1 entry per person, winning team takes the prize money, refreshments available during the break. Congresbury Book Sale 9am-1pm at War Memorial Hall, good quality books, jigsaw puzzles, dvds, cds and talking books. Christmas Gifts and More at St. Mary’s Church, Timsbury, BA2 0LG, 10am-4pm, gifts, decorations, jewellery, fashion, bric-a-brac and books, heavenly coffee, souper lunches and afternoon teas. Nailsea Concert Orchestra concert with new conductor Ben England St Francis of Assisi RC Church, Ash Hayes Road, Nailsea, 7.30pm, tickets £10, U16s £1. Chew Valley Choral Society concert themed around St Cecilia, the Patron Saint of music. St Andrew’s Church, Chew Magna, 7:30 pm. The concert features Gounod's tuneful and popular Mass for St Cecilia, Purcell's great 1692 Ode on St Cecilia's Day (Hail! bright Cecilia), and the tribute to St Cecilia written by the society's musical director, David Bednall. Details: www.chewvalleychoral.org.uk Sunday November 26th Redhill Christmas Fair (BS40 5SG), 1pm-4pm, featuring a wide range of stalls, free entry with ample parking, refreshments available including tea/coffee and mince pies, applications are still being accepted for those wishing to have a stall. Details: Hazel 01275 474973. St Benedict's Church, Glastonbury will be holding another of its popular 'Sunday Afternoon Free Concerts' 3pm-5pm, retiring collection which goes to the restoration fund for their Bechstein Grand Piano, refreshments available. Details: Sandra 01458 835067. Monday November 27th Mendip Folk Dance Club meet at St James Church Hall Winscombe BS25 1AQ, 8pm-10pm, no experience necessary, £3 on the door. Congresbury Memorial Hall Club friendship evening with a game of bingo, non-members welcome, 8pm at Congresbury War Memorial Hall. Mendip Male Voice Choir will be singing seasonal favourites from their exciting Christmas programme at St. Mary’s Church, Timsbury, BA2 0LG, from 7.30pm, light refreshments available. Green Gardeners Christmas Special with luxury chocolatiers, Gilbert and Swayne of Baltonsborough

WHAT’S ON

2 0 1 7

for a demo and tasting session, parish rooms, Somerton, 7.30pm, refreshments available, visitors very welcome, £3. Wednesday November 29th Backwell and Nailsea Macular Support Society, 1.30pm, Backwell W.I. Hall, speaker Brigadier Bruce Jackson on "The Gurkhas". Details: Sheila 01275 462107. Mendip Society work day, Sladers Leigh nature reserve, meet in National Trust car park BS25 1DH. Details: Judith 01725 87428. Thursday November 30th West Mendip Walkers moderate circular walk 10 miles from Herriot’s Bridge, OS Map Ex 141 ST573582, start 10am, park north end Herriot’s Bridge. Details: Vi Howley 07711 662993 or vihowley@me.com Friday December 1st-Sunday December 3rd Nativity, Angel and Star Festival, St Cuthberts Church, Wells, 10am-4.30pm Fri and Sat, 11.304.30pm Sun, music and Refreshments, free ntry. Friday December 1st Redhill Club Open Mic Night (BS40 5SG), hosted by Jerry Blythe, starting at 8pm, join us and unwind with an evening of live music, acoustic singersongwriters at their very best. Details: Jerry 07900 587646 for more information. Cheddar Festive Night – see page ??? Saturday December 2nd Chew Magna Christmas Fair – see page ??? Churchill Music! the Ellipsis Ensemble return for another Pre-Christmas evening of music, fine wines & canapes, 7.30pm-10pm (approx.) St. John's Church, Church Lane, Churchill BS25 5QW, tickets £18.50 champions; £22.50 non-champions. Details: www.churchillmusic.org.uk or Susannah Read 01934 844106 or on the door. Mendip Society walk Harptree Combe, five miles, possibly wet and muddy, meet 1.30pm at Herriots Bridge on the A368 on the southern end of Chew Valley Lake BS40 6HN ST 570 581. Details: Peter 01761 221 995. Christmas Artisan Market, Browne's Garden Centre, Wells. 10am to 3pm with over 20 local artisans: food, craft and gifts which include honey, homemade ginger bread houses, wooden boxes and gifts, locally grown seasonal produce, cakes, jams and more. Tuesday December 5th The Arts Society Mendip, Gods and Gardens: The wall paintings of Ancient Rome by Dr Angela Smith, to be followed by Christmas lunch, Bath & West Bar & Restaurant, B & W Show Ground, Shepton Mallet BA4 6QN, 11am, guests welcome. Details www.theartssocietymendip.org.uk 01934 862435. Saturday December 9th Mendip Society walk around Winscombe, meet 1.30pm in car park behind Woodborough Inn, Winscombe (BS25 1HD) ST 421 576, moderate four to five miles. Details: John 01934 842868. Friday December 8th Live music, Travelling Wilburys tribute band the Unravelling Wilburys. St. Thomas's Church, St. Thomas Street, Wells, starting 7.30pm. Organised by Wells Lions Club. All profits to support the work of Mendip YMCA. Tickets £10 in advance (£12 on the door), also available via on-line booking for £11. Call 01458 210926 or 01749 671596. For on-line sales visit www.cityofwellslions.org/tickets

MENDIP MINDBENDER ANSWERS FOR OCTOBER ACROSS: 2 O’Lantern, 6 Carpenter, 7 Cakes, 9 Apple, 11 Ghouls, 14 Houdini, 15 Stingy, 17 Bobbing, 18 Or, 19 Treat, 20 Summers. DOWN: 1 Jack, 3 Turnips, 4 Wicked, 5 Trick, 8 Samhain, 9 All, 10 Eve, 12 Pumpkins, 13 Day, 14 Hallows, 15 Saints, 16 Ghosts.

What's On section:Layout 1

MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017 • PAGE 121


What's On section:Layout 1

10/19/17

MENDIP TIMES

3:29 PM

Page 122

WHAT’S ON

All-star cast for Hipppodrome pantomime

BRISTOL Hippodrome’s pantomime Aladdin will star comedy legend Joe Pasquale, recording and musical theatre star Marti Pellow and Emmerdale and Coronation Street’s Hayley Tamaddon from Saturday December 9th. Comedian and star of ITV’s Dancing on Ice, Joe Pasquale stars as Wishee Washee. Well-known for being one of the hardest-working and top-selling live comedians in British comedy today, Joe has been delighting audiences for more than 20 years with his live stand-up tours and infectious sense of fun. The hugely talented performer Marti Pellow co-stars in the role of the evil sorcerer Abanazar. Achieving some of the UK’s biggest number one singles, Marti has regularly featured in the UK charts throughout his career, both as a solo artist and as the frontman to Wet Wet Wet.

Hayley Tamaddon joins them as Princess Jasmine, having played leading roles in Emmerdale as Del Dingle and in Coronation Street as Andrea Beckett. No stranger to the stage, Hayley starred as the Lady of the Lake in Spamalot and most recently completed a UK tour in the leading role of Roxie Hart in Chicago. This year’s Bristol Hippodrome pantomime will also include a magical 3D sequence, which will see audiences

transported to Old Peking on a sensational magical carpet ride adventure. Theatre director, Jenny Hutchinson, said: “We are so pleased to be working with QDOS again this year on Aladdin. With three of the UK’s most loved stars Joe, Marti and Hayley bringing something unique this year for Bristol audiences to enjoy, we anticipate yet another blockbuster family production!”

Details: www.atgtickets.com/bristol 0844 871 3012

PAGE 122 • MENDIP TIMES • NOVEMBER 2017


Clarks Village ad:Layout 1

10/18/17

12:22 PM

Page 1


Carpets & Fabrics ad:Layout 1

10/18/17

12:21 PM

Page 1

Profile for Media Fabrica

Issue 6 - Volume 13 - Mendip Times  

Celebrating life on the Mendips and surrounding areas

Issue 6 - Volume 13 - Mendip Times  

Celebrating life on the Mendips and surrounding areas