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CRUMBS BATH + BRISTOL NO.90 JULY 2019

A lile slice of foodie heaven

GRKILELRS S’sEtEhe Crumbs It

BBQnza! o B na

Weʼre reinventing the British barbie

What d’you call a deep chat between two artichokes? A heart to heart!

NO.90 JULY 2019

TRENDS WITH

INTO THE CIDER-VERSE How this West Country

BENEFITS The hip drinks you

tipple is gearing up for world domination

CRUMBS MAG.C OM

need to know this summer

All choked up Globe artichoke’s

the one true artichoke, its endless layers of meaty leaves hiding a delicious heart

HALL OF FLAME

DUDE , WHERE’S MY CARBS?

And secured top veggie recipes from her new BBQ book!

A CHOKE’S A CHOKE

d We onlyvwitaentgole an in AYLOR’S GENEVIErVbEecTue ba

tsidrdeencshfoarnce Ouer ga Be soaking up some rays

RIGHT HERE , AT OUR PICK OF LOCAL PASTA JOINTS

8RESSCUUMPMEERR I PES

from pro cotookps

Should the sun put his hat on, of course

PLUS ! Woky Ko: Kaiju & No 12 Easton


LeaF IT OUT BIT OF A looker, this month’s Hero is. Look at it, all green and purple with concentric rings of symmetrical leaves. A globe artichoke is a funny thing to prep and eat, though, and can be pretty time consuming – probably why it’s not a staple in home kitchens. The most prominent memory I have of this thistle is in the garden of a restaurant in late summer. My mate and I took our time plucking off each leaf, dunking it in an anchovy dip, then scraping off the flesh with our teeth, interspersing mouthfuls with glugs of wine. A scene I fully intend to repeat in the coming weeks while they’re back in season. This month has been a particularly busy one at Crumbs HQ; not only have we been working on this here issue (and a fine specimen it is too, I hope you’ll concur), but there’s been lots to do in order to get the Crumbs Awards train rolling once more. Yep, they’re back for 2019 and we cannot wait to unearth all the awesome stories of our local food scene from the past 12 months. Find all the info you need to get your entry sorted in our Starters pages. Elsewhere this issue, queen of the grill Genevieve Taylor got me over to her gaff (I was surprised to receive a repeat invitation, truth be told, after my hound jumped in her pond and soaked all the guests at her last get-together), and cooked up loads of recipes from her brand new vegetarian barbecue cookbook, Charred. I’ve already recreated her butternut squash, pomegranate, feta and yoghurt stacks at home on my own barbie – and have shared the recipe so you can, too. You’re welcome.

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

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TABLE OF CONTENTs

ISSUE 90 JULY 2019 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk ART DIRECTOR

TREVOR GILHAM ADVERTISING MANAGER

JON HORWOOD jon.horwood@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

ALISTAIR TAYLOR alistair.taylor@mediaclash.co.uk ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE

NATALIE BRERETON natalie.brereton@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER

GEMMA SCRINE gemma.scrine@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk

large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 mediaclash.co.uk large version

© All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we tried out the new Seven Lucky Gods at Wapping Wharf, had lunch with Sabrina Ghayour at The Bird in Bath, and have supped a lot of cider in the sun – purely for research purposes, you understand

STARTERS 08 HERO In a chokehold

60 Sticky butternut squash, by Genevieve Taylor

14 OPENINGS ETC The foodie talk of the town

85 Ethiopian berbere curry, by Rupy Aujla

CHEF!

WHAT SUP?

MAINS 71 GO OUTDOORS Top alfresco spots for summer 82 GRILLED Dr Rupy Aujla on the medicinal powers of food

26 Pea samosas, by Anna Shepherd

37 THE DRIP FEED This month’s drink update

29 Soba noodles, by Vic and Guy Siddall

38 SIPS AHOY! Drinks trends to partake of this summer

90 Woky Ko: Kaiju 93 Tivoli 96 No 12 Easton

30 Breakfast hash, by Vicki and Alan Mowart

41 CIDER-FECTS A look at the changing face of the West Country’s most famous drink

PLUS!

ADDITIONAL RECIPES

KITCHEN ARMOURY

12 Artichoke a la barigoule, by Freddy Bird 23 Clams with chorizo, by José Pizarro 56 Jerk-spiced kebabs, by Genevieve Taylor

53 THE SUPPER CLUB A barbecue with a rather delicious difference 62 THE WANT LIST Killer kit for cooking over fire

AFTERS

98 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Our Natalie Brereton shares her favourite eats and drinks in Bath and Bristol


START E Rs

INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY ASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES 14-16 JUNE BATH BOULES

●This annual charity bash will see Bath’s Queen Square closed to traffic as food and drink vendors set up shop to feed all those hungry boules players and spectators – as well as peckish passers-by. Expect to see the likes of The Scallop Shell, Comptoir and Cuisine, Desy Thai and Swoon Gelato serving up the goods, while the obligatory Pimm’s bar will take care of the lubrication. Free entry for spectators. bathboules.com

21-23 JUNE PUB IN THE PARK

●Tom Kerridge’s festival is back in Bath’s Royal Victoria Park, and is bringing with it kitchen teams from the likes of The Hand and Flowers, The Pony and Trap and The Hardwick to cook up some refined festival snacks. There’ll be a food-focused ‘shopping village’, as well as bars aplenty and music performances from Will Young, Gabrielle and Basement Jaxx. Adult tickets from £32.10. pubintheparkuk.com

22 AND 23 JUNE LONGLEAT FOOD AND DRINK FESTIVAL

●MasterChef’s John Torode will be in attendance at this safari park food festival – he’ll be demoing in The Longhouse while sausages sizzle on the Outback Garden barbecue and afternoon teas take place in the fancy Great Hall. You’ll have access to all the usual Longleat attractions, too. Tickets start at £29.70 for adults. longleat.co.uk

OOF! WE LOVE FESTIVAL SEASON, AND IT’S IN FULL SWING NOW WITH THESE FOOD-FILLED OUTDOOR CELEBRATIONS...

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GET FESTIVE CRUMBSMAG.COM

MA R K BE NH A M

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●This is a brand new (and free!) barbecue festival coming to the Tobacco Factory, curated by the guys at Smoke Catering. The likes of Asado, Tasty Ragga and Bun Fiction will be there getting their grill on as punters tuck into smoked brisket, eight-hour beef short ribs, pulled pork and smoked sausages, as well as loads of veggie options. Live music and bourbon cocktails will up the party vibes, too. tobaccofactory.com


GLOBe aRTIChOKe FEW SUMMER TREATS ARE QUITE AS MAGNIFICENT AS THE MIGHTY GLOBE ARTICHOKE, THE WORLD’S BEST (AND CERTAINLY TASTIEST) THISTLE

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astringent way) they are, and how much fun they are to scoff. Back in the day – by which we mean the 8th century BC – Homer enthused over the cardoon, from which the modern globe artichoke was cultivated, as a garden plant, and the ancient Greeks and Romans both gorged on ’em. Domestication improved the breed considerably over the centuries, not least during Spain’s medieval Muslim period – indeed, the name ‘artichoke’ can be traced back to the Arabic – and for a time they were considered a luxurious semi-aphrodisiac, ever-improving strains moving up Italy from Naples and eventually into France, becoming more mainstream as they went. By the 1500s the Dutch had brought them to England, and three hundred years later the French and Spanish would take artichokes to the Americas, where they thrived. Though most still come from around the Mediterranean – Spain, Egypt and especially Italy – it’s Castroville in Monterey County, California, that boldly proclaims itself ‘the artichoke capital of the world’.

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nlike the tuber-esque Jerusalem artichoke, with which it shares a name but little else, the globe is a ‘true’ artichoke, a distinctive, edible and over-sized member of the thistle family. These architectural giants, cultivated for their industrial-scale edible flower buds – to be plucked and eaten long before the flower comes into bloom, of course – are not just great to eat, they’re ornamental enough to take pride of place in the flower garden too. So why, with all this going for them, do we enjoy artichokes so rarely? One problem is that they look so intimidating: it’s not immediately obvious how you’d cook or prepare one, or even which bits you should eat. Another is that we throw so much of them away; it hardly seems frugal. Issues, for sure, but not very important ones – at least, not in the light of how delicious (in a subtle, mildly

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WANT TO GIVE them a go? Happily, picking a good artichoke is no great struggle: pert, crisp, tightly-packed leaves are what you want, in a rich green or purple with a slight bloom and no brown at the edges. At their freshest, artichokes seem heavy for their size – lighter ones are probably a little dried out – and, when you squeeze them, the leaves should squeak quietly. Somewhat counter-intuitive is that what looks like mild frost damage is actually okay: indeed, though less pretty, ‘frost-kissed’ examples are amongst the tastiest you can buy. Once you’ve got one home, it would be best to eat it right away, but it’ll happily sit in a perforated bag in the fridge for a day or two. If you want to grow your own, remember that the artichoke is a pretty hefty plant, often the height of a person, and though they’re not too fussy about their soil (as long as it’s decently fertile and well-drained) they are spectacularly hungry – so you’ll need lots of compost. Rooted offsets, planted mid-spring, are the easiest way to go – from these you’ll be able to


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harvest in June-July the following year, the plants becoming more prolific each summer until they eventually run out of steam. One good variety to try is the hardy French heirloom Vert de Laon, which has a particularly huge and delicious heart. Prepping globe artichokes is somewhat convoluted, but not hard once you’ve got the hang of it. First slice the base off, so it can sit upright, then trim off the pointed top and snip off the tough leaf tips with scissors. Pull out the pale central leaves, then scoop out the fuzzy, fibrous, inedible choke with a spoon, leaving the heart beneath undisturbed. Boiling takes 40 minutes or so – you’ll know it’s done when you can pull out the leaves easily – but steaming’s even better (there’s a danger boiling can waterlog an artichoke), and they’re made even more delicious by adding a bay leaf, garlic and lemon to the steaming water for a little infusion action. Now to eat! Equally yummy are both the tender bases of most leaves (and the entirety of those near the middle) and the base (or ‘heart’)

of the bud, but good luck with the unappetising outer leaves. The simplest way to go is simply to dip the leaves into something: melted butter (perhaps with lemon thyme or anchovy thrown in); hollandaise sauce; mayonnaise with a little balsamic; or perhaps a lemony, mustardy vinaigrette. Then simply draw the leaf through your teeth to get all the gloriously tender flesh, before scooping out the meaty heart. It’s one of the all-time great summer treats. Alternatively, expose the heart and stuff the whole thing with cheese, spicy sausage, chopped garlic, parmesan, parsley, breadcrumbs, chopped tomatoes, anchovies or pancetta – in whatever combination you have to hand – then drizzle in olive oil and bake for a quarter of an hour. Barbecuing and grilling also work, cut in half lengthwise – half an hour should do it. But that’s just the start of it! In Italy you’ll find small purple springtime artichoke heads that need very little trimming and are great to eat sliced razor thin and raw. (You can do the same with

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small, very fresh home-grown baby artichokes, perhaps smearing each raw leaf with a little salty butter or olive oil and lemon juice; you’ll get a slightly different taste, more nutty and astringent than with cooked artichoke.) Alternatively, try braising your artichoke with olive oil and summer vegetables like peas, broad beans, fennel and tomatoes; pop it into a salad or pasta; bake it with goat’s cheese; or purée it to eat with crostini. For a more North African take, try artichoke with spiced ground lamb, or go Spanish and serve it with rice in a paella. Prefer Italian? Try it with chorizo in a risotto, or go Mexican and pair with eggs in a tortilla. Other thoughts? Artichokes traditionally star as the ‘spring’ part of a Four Seasons pizza (alongside olives, mushrooms and prosciutto); go brilliantly with bacon, red pepper and cheese in tarts and pies; and are lovely deep fried whole, the Jewish way. Then there’s ‘artichokes city-style’, a hearty Greek stew of artichoke hearts, potatoes and carrots, and even drinks, from artichoke herbal tea – particularly

CRUMBSMAG.COM

popular in Romania, Mexico and Vietnam – to Campari’s bitter, 16.5% Italian liquor Cynar, flavoured with artichoke and often served as an aperitif; there’s a take on the Negroni called the Cin-Cyn that uses it winningly.

WE’VE ONE MORE thing to say: as well as being entertaining and kind of exciting, globe artichokes are properly good for you. Not just chemically – though they do contain phytonutrients with detoxifying properties, great for the liver, bladder, digestion and more – but emotionally too. You see, one of the joys of artichoke served the traditional way is that it forces you to be patient and eat slowly. As with lobster, you have to fish for every last morsel, nibbling away – you’ll get butter on your hands, guaranteed – but that’s part of the joy. In a world where we’re all trying to slow down – be more mindful and learn to savour things again – the artichoke might just be the perfect ingredient. Go on, have a heart.


R E C I P E

A TRADITIONAL FRENCH DISH GETS THE FREDDY BIRD TREATMENT

THIS IS A variation on artichokes à la barigoule. I love the simplicity of the dish but also love to add bolder flavours. Traditionally it’s just braised artichokes with carrot, onions, white wine, olive oil and a few aromatics, but here I have tweaked it slightly and added lots of herbs too. Sometimes I’ll serve it with a little aioli and toast or, as I have here, with a dollop of crème fraîche and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. This is a perfect dish on its own, but wouldn’t be out of place as a side with a barbecued leg of lamb or roast turbot. When choosing your artichokes, make sure they are super firm and the leaves nice and tight. Too often you’ll find them looking a bit tired in veg shops. For the very best artichokes, grow them yourself or have your veg shop order them in specially so you can be sure they are fresh. SERVES 2 ½ lemon, juice only 4 large globe artichokes extra virgin olive oil 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 1 onion, thinly sliced small bunch dill, leaves picked and roughly chopped small bunch tarragon, leaves picked and roughly chopped small bunch basil, leaves picked and roughly chopped small glass white wine 500ml chicken (or veg) stock 10 cherry tomatoes, each cut into 8 crème fraîche, to serve 1 First, add the lemon juice to a large bowl, then fill it with water. Now trim the artichokes – remove the outer leaves and peel the darker flesh away to expose the artichoke heart. Scoop out the fuzzy choke using a spoon and discard, placing the heart in the bowl of acidulated water while you prep the remaining artichokes (this prevents them from going brown). 2 Heat a generous splash of olive oil and gently fry the garlic until lightly golden. Add the onion and continue to cook until soft. 3 Drain the artichokes and cut them into wedges (about 6-8 wedges, depending on size), throw them into the pan and season with salt and black pepper. Cook for a few minutes until any of the water that made its way into the pan has evaporated. 4 Next add ½ the herbs and fry for a moment before adding the wine. Allow the wine to reduce by ⅔ before adding the stock. Barely cover the artichokes (you may not need all the stock) and place a lid on the pot, cooking for about 4-5 minutes. 5 Remove the lid, add the cherry tomatoes and reduce the liquid by ½ (2-3 minutes). By now, the artichokes should be tender. Add the remaining herbs and check the seasoning. 6 Serve immediately with a dollop of crème fraîche and a little extra virgin olive oil.

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Openings etc S T A R T E R S

LEGS ELEVEN

Bristol-born café brand Friska is opening a new venue by the harbourside this month. It’ll be the ethical outfit’s 11th site – its eighth in the city. Sitting on the corner of Queen Square and Prince Street, it’s to serve all the fresh lunches, breakfasts and top-notch coffees that have made the brand such a success. Although it’s sat on a popular pedestrian commuter route, this isn’t just a Monday to Friday offering – the café will be open seven days a week and cater just as well for leisurely eat-in meals as it does speedy grab-and-go options. Expect to see the likes of burritos, pho noodles and hotpots on the menu, as well as sarnies, wraps and fresh salads. friskafood.com

RIGHT, DEN

Bristol has got itself a new restaurant, bar, music venue and work studio right on the harbourside. The Den, Dockside opens at 7am serving morning coffees, smoothies and snacks to go, with a focus on the organic. Its restaurant, steered by Rebecca Du Plessis (of the awardwinning plant-based Beets ’n’ Roots) will kick in from lunchtime and stay open through dinner. Expect a juice bar and cocktail bar, too. Set on Princes Street, it hosts live musicians, DJs and other artists throughout the day and night, making it a welcome addition to both the local food and music scenes. thedendockside.com

EDGE OF GLORY

It’s that time of year again – entries to the 2019 Crumbs Awards are officially open! Set up in 2017 to celebrate and champion all corners of Bath and Bristol’s diverse, exciting and forward-thinking food scene, the awards recognise everyone from chefs to event planners, producers to front-of-house stars, as well as all those heroes and projects working hard to make culinary waves in the community. Our aim is to throw the spotlight on some of the best places to eat out, causes to support and produce to cook with, while also causing sparks to fly – in a good way! – between all those working in the industry. So, if you’re involved with a food or drink business on this patch, get your entry started. And if you’re not, make sure you nag your favourite outfits and hangouts to throw their names into the hat. Entries will be open for a few weeks, with the closing date announced soon. crumbsmagawards.com

ACTIVITY SPIKE Spike Island in Bristol has a brand new food offering. Bowl of Plenty launched there in May, offering filling, nutritious bowls as well as breakfasts, focaccia sandwiches and toasties. The launch comes from a larger independent outfit, headed up by Liz Haughton – also responsible for the caffs at the Bristol Folk House and Colston Hall, as well as a private catering business. The brand is focused not only on cooking hearty food, full of goodness, but doing so while maintaining fierce ethical principles and providing a welcoming setting for the whole community to enjoy. bowlofplenty.co.uk

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Q& A

aSK YOUR BaRTeNdeR MEET JACK STEWARD, GENERAL MANAGER AT KINKAJOU

HEY, GOOD COOKIN’

A new café has launched in Bath – and it’s been giving us serious style goals. That’s unsurprising, really, seeing as it’s been launched by interiors brand, Neptune. The Provenist is far from style over substance, though; we swung by for lunch recently and were properly into the spicy Asian bowl we tried, which saw tender strips of beef fillet – marinated in spices and soy – scattered over a tangle of dressed carrot, cucumber and courgette laces, with locally grown quinoa from Bath Farm Girls. In fact, as you might have guessed from the name, this place is all about provenance, with one of its suppliers located literally just over the road. Elsewhere on the menu are breakfasts ranging from porridge to pancakes, as well as colourful salads and hearty, vegpacked bowls for lunch. Plenty of sweet stuff and boozy stuff is also amongst the tempting line up. theprovenist.com

So, Jack – worked here long? About four months now.

to either be birthday parties or corporate events.

And what were you up to before then? I actually flew back from Las Vegas to start the job; I had been out there for six months playing poker. Before that I was an assistant general manager at Tape nightclub in Mayfair.

How are you seeing our habits as bar-goers change? I think people are far more discerning. Generally, they tend to go out far less frequently, but are much less tolerant of poor products and service when they do.

How long have you been in the bar industry, all in all, then? Eight years, give or take.

Which are your favourite local drinks producers? Since starting at Kinkajou I’ve spent a lot of time working with the guys at 6 O’Clock Gin, who are great. If you like a peppery gin their Brunel Edition is second to none.

What was your first job in hospitality? I started off behind the bar in Po Na Na in Bath. What do you like most about working in the industry? I’ve never been a morning person, so not having to start work at the crack of dawn has always appealed to me! And the toughest part? Missing out on a lot of social occasions, simply because you work every weekend – which is when people tend to hold all their gatherings.

SMOKIN’ ACES

What skills have you learnt since arriving at Kinkajou? I think I’ve developed a pretty strong jet washing game! (I’ve been making the terrace out the front more presentable – which has meant hours and hours of jet washing.)

After two years of ongoing refurbishment work, the restaurant at Bristol’s Aztec Hotel and Spa has begun a fresh chapter by relaunching with a new name, concept and menu. The idea for The Curious Kitchen was developed by executive head chef Marc Payne and, we’re told, is all about throwing the spotlight on traditional food prep methods that developed in domestic kitchens, such as pickling, curing and smoking, while giving them a fine-dining edge and using local produce. Butter is homemade, onions are pickled in-house, and ox heart is smoked by the team. Along with the launch come plans for regular events such as wine dinners and tasting evenings too, out at this Almondsbury hotel. aztechotelbristol.co.uk

What sort of customers do you get here? A full range, really – from couples to hen dos and a lot of private bookings, which tend

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What’s your favourite cocktail  ingredient to work with?  Whole eggs for sure. (Flips are so underrated.) What’s your bestselling cocktail at the moment? Our house signature is our most popular by far – The Honey Bear (which is the kinkajou’s nickname). It’s made with peanut Cachaca, Jack Daniel’s Honey Whiskey and pineapple juice, topped with honey foam. And how about your own personal favourite?  Thanks to The Big Lebowski, I’ve always had a mild addiction to White Russians… Finally, where do you like to drink on your days off? The Dark Horse and Hideout in Bath. Cracking drinks, cracking bar staff and cracking service. kinkajoubar.co.uk


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In the Larder 1

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5

ALL FIREd uP 4 BEFORE YOU LIGHT THAT BARBIE AND GET YOUR MATES OVER, MAKE SURE YOU’VE STOCKED UP ON THIS LOT FOR THE OCCASION... 1 Belazu Rose Harissa Pesto, £2.85/165g Rose Harissa is cropping up much more of late – it features in recipe books by everyone from Ottolenghi to Elly Curshen – and Belazu’s version is often cited as the version of choice by those pros. Here it’s blended with tomato pesto for a condiment that’s a great all-rounder for seafood, meat and veg on that barbie. Buy it online. belazu.com 2 Abunoor Pittas, circa £1.20/pack of 5 This Middle Eastern bakery in Bristol has been creating fresh pittas and flatbreads since 2006. Soft and fluffy inside, they char a charm on the grill and are much more substantial than similar breads from the supermarket. Get your burgers inside ’em, or use them to transport dips into gobs. Find

them at Wild Oats, Bristol Sweet Mart, Better Food and others. abunoorpittafactory.com 3 Tomato Stall Tomato and Chilli Jam, £3.85/220g The Tomato Stall is based on the Isle of Wight and is responsible for some of the sweetest, tastiest tomatoes grown in the UK. This sticky jam has rich, fresh tomatoey flavour, which is spiked with the heat of chilli to make for a moreish condiment that’s desperate to get involved with that barbecue feast. Find it at Brockley Stores and The Deli at Sandy Park. thetomatostall.co.uk 4 Homewood Hello Ewe, from £5/250g Halloumi is a 21st-century barbecue staple – the semi-hard sheep’s cheese is given

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a whole new dimension once it’s had some time over the grill. We’re pretty lucky to have this here local version at our disposal, fresh-tasting with a lovely salty hit and handmade in small batches. Find it at Bristol Cheesemonger and Newton Farm Shop, amongst others. homewoodcheeses.co.uk 5 Thatchers Rosé, £2.20/500ml If you have a sweet tooth, this blushing pink cider might just be your drink of choice this summer. Take a gulp and, when the wave of bubbles subsides, there’s a hint of sweet red apple. A good shout for washing down that hot and spicy barbecue food, then. Find it at Thatchers Cider Shop in Sandford and Lye Cross Farm Shop, Redhill. thatcherscider.co.uk


NOW OPEN We look forward to welcoming you to the new look Pelican in Chew Magna.

Sign up to Butcombe Loyalty and get ÂŁ5 off your first purchase on joining butcombeloyaltyclub.com

pelicanchewmagna.co.uk /pelicaninnchewmagna

the_pelly

10 South Parade, Chew Magna, Bristol BS40 8SL T. 01275 331 777 E. pelican@butcombepubs.com


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3

Trio

YOUR TO-dOUGh LIST

PASTA IS THE ONE, RIGHT? REGARDLESS OF SHAPE, COLOUR OR TOPPINGS, IT’S A FIRM FAVOURITE WHEN IT COMES TO SOURCES OF CARB. HERE ARE THREE LOCAL JOINTS WHERE YOU’LL FIND SOME CRACKING PASTA DISHES TO TUCK INTO THIS MONTH…

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1 PASTA LOCO

These guys are killing it right now, having just opened a third business, La Sorella, which comes about a year after the launch of their second site, Pasta Ripiena. Getting a table at this flagship joint requires some serious planning ahead – its great food, full of flavour and fun, is hardly a secret. What’s more, the pasta is freshly made in-house and the service is always on fire. Pictured here is its take on the carbonara, which may well be the most decadent pasta dish on our turf right now, coming with a hunk of soft pork belly and a poached egg wrapped in pancetta. The linguine is slicked in a lightly creamy sauce and the whole lot is topped off with a more-than-generous grating of parmesan. If you feel like going all out, do it here, with this mountainous, indulgent assembly. pastaloco.co.uk

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2 BOMBOLONI

This Gloucester Road restaurant is Italian in style and Italian in hospitality – which means really hearty portions. The ox cheek ragu (pictured) is a staple dish here, and one we hope sticks around for a long time to come. The deeply flavoured, meaty sauce has a base of onion, carrot, celery and thyme, while red wine and hunks of ox cheek – complete with lovely flavoursome fat – bring richness, along with the dried porcini mushrooms. It’s slow-cooked (we’re talking between eight and ten hours) to really let those flavours meld and get the meat as meltingly tender as possible. It’s finished with butter and fresh tomato sauce, before being tossed through flat ribbons of tagliatelle pasta, cooked until just al dente. Dreamy. bomboloni.net

3 ROSEMARINO

A mainstay of the Bristol dining scene, Rosemarino is known for great brunches and imaginative, skilled Italian food. There’s always a selection of pasta dishes on the menu, including three daily lunchtime specials. The dinner menu changes regularly too, and features dishes like paccheri alfredo (pictured). Paccheri pasta – wide, flat tubes – originates from Campania in the south of Italy, the team tell us. (The name is said to come from the word ‘paccheria’, which translates to ‘slaps’ – referring to the sound it makes when you eat it.) You’d usually see this pasta shape paired with seafood, but here it’s starring in a vegetarian dish with a blue cheese bechamel sauce, char-grilled broccoli, toasted walnuts, purple heritage potatoes and purple basil. Bit of a looker, isn’t it? rosemarino.co.uk


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INSTA FEEd

@mulebird hints at what’s to come in its imminent Bristol pop-ups

HIP SHOPS

ThE

Dom and Lara know how to party – and it’s with plenty of beer and cheese

TwO BeLLY WHAT: CHEESE AND BEER (AND CIDER, AND WINE) WHERE: 116 WHITELADIES ROAD, BRISTOL BS8 2RP WHEN: TUES-FRI 11AM-8PM; SAT 10AM-8PM; SUN 11AM-5PM

@shonette_ goes all out with the tasting menu @adelinayard

@richlorri gets his oyster on @rootbristol YOUR PIC COULD BE HERE! Just use #CrumbsSnaps on your foodie Insta posts and we might just print one of yours next issue

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wo Belly is the result of Lara Issa and Dom Pulsford’s shared love of good food – and great drinks to wash it down with. It stocks a hefty rage of artisanal cheese and beers from around the globe. “We’re particularly huge on Belgian beer,” says Lara, showing us the wide-ranging selection they stock. “Belgium treats beer like France treats wine; they barrel-age, bottle condition, blend…” Indeed, a decent amount of fridge space is given over to the contemporary, experimental brews from this Western European country. You’ll find beers from Bristol and the rest of the globe too, though; it’s less about geography and more about showcasing the most exciting, best-quality products they can find. That same principle applies to the cider collection, too; the new cider fridge displays traditional West Country varieties as well as intriguing, less familiar creations from elsewhere, like Estonia and Wales. There are wines, as well, which come from Billings and Briggs – an award-winning supplier that’s all about natural, organic and biodynamic vino. But wait right there – liquid refreshments are only half the story at Two Belly. “The business idea started as a bottle shop, but we wanted it to be more than that – there’s so much more to beer – so the cheese element just came organically,” says Lara. Before opening the business, Dom spent a few months at Neal’s Yard Dairy – and the

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shop nods graciously to the London outfit’s style in its range. On the counter at any one time you’ll find between 18 and 22 cheeses, mostly from the UK – give or take an Italian pecorino here or a French Comté there. Lots of them rotate to keep the offering exciting, and many are made with unpasteurised milk. “We want to champion raw milk as a safe and great way to make cheese,” says Dom. “When you pasteurise milk you strip everything out of it – the idea being that it makes it safer. But what if you know the herd and what you’re putting into them, know the farmer, trust the source? Why would you strip everything out when you already know it’s safe? Leaving the milk unpasteurised really enriches the curds.” Telling the difference when eating cheese that’s been made with raw versus heattreated milk is tricky, though, as you don’t get like-for-like cheeses to compare. “Perhaps the closest comparison would be our blue cheese, Stichelton,” says Lara. “It’s Stilton in style, but the cheesemaker believes that pasteurising the milk is detrimental to the cheesemaking process, so he doesn’t – when you taste it I really think it is richer and more complex. Many of our customers come back to it as their preferred blue cheese.” Everything here is available to take away, or enjoy in the light and airy shop. Evening tasting events are a regular occurrence, too – keep your eye on the website for new dates. twobelly.co.uk


BOOK OF THE MONTH

FROM TRADITIONAL, AUTHENTIC FOOD TO 21ST-CENTURY MEALS, IT’S ALL COVERED IN OUR NEWEST BATCH OF COOKBOOKS

GREEN

ANDALUSIA

José Pizarro (Hardie Grant, £26)

CALIFORNIA: LIVING AND EATING

● This book is stuffed with more than 100 vegan and vegetarian recipes for quick weeknight dinners and leisurely weekend meals. So far, so commonplace in 2019. Where Elly’s book differs – and differ it does – is in its practical and modern-day approach, its versatility and its resonance with contemporary audiences. There are one-pan meals, 20-minute recipes (I’ve already made the veggie udon noodles oodles of times) and, perhaps most ingeniously, recipes to batch-cook, freeze and bring back to life in different ways. For instance, rose-harissa chickpeas can be served with gremolata on toast or with za’atar-baked feta and lemony herb salad. Elsewhere are brekkies and seasonal dinners (stuffed spiral filo pie, and almond, lemon and raspberry jam cake), as well as prep-ahead recipes for work lunches, snacks and condiments (pickled tomatoes, and sesame-roasted tofu), and even menu ideas. This book isn’t just a collection of recipes – it’s a how-to guide for eating well with a modern lifestyle. JESSICA CARTER

● Just the briefest of flicks through this sunshine-filled book will have you desperate to hop on a plane. Andalusia is Spain’s most southern autonomous region and is certainly rich in food culture. José’s regional research has resulted in a spectrum of dishes that bounce from slow-cooked pork cheek with sherry to smoked sardines with salmorejo (think no-cook tomato soup) to roast chicken with orange, cumin and apricot rice. The book reflects the way locals eat, meaning there’s lots of meat and fish, although vegetarian meals are not forgotten (the chickpea and spinach stew and strawberry gazpacho are just a couple of highlights). A generous portion of supertempting desserts (we’re looking at you, walnut, sherry and honey semifreddo) are included too, and there are helpful menu ideas and tips in the back. The photography is rustic and mouth-watering, and José’s passion and in-depth research are apparent in the anecdotes and stories of history and tradition that accompany each recipe.

● Though by no means a California native, Eleanor Maidment is a lover of the Golden State, and especially of its vibrant, healthy, produce-led food scene. This handsome book, with its arty shots of surf and sky and lonely desert roads, mixes its 80-something recipes with handy tips (the best ways to cook each style of eggs, say), unexpected recommendations (the chicken sausage), and plenty of shout-outs to the greats of the West Coast food scene, like Alice Waters, who pioneered the farm-to-table movement, and Roy Choi, of KoreanMexican hybrid Kogi BBQ Taco Truck who started the food truck movement. Most of all, the recipes – Americana meets classic European meets Asian meets Hispanic – are tempting and healthy-looking. From simple poached tomatoes with Parmesan and basil ricotta to maple bacon cornbread with poached eggs and pickled jalapeño, fresh coconut salad with green beans to Baja fish tacos, this is summery eating at its best.

Elly Curshen (Edbury Press, £22)

JESSICA CARTER

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Eleanor Maidment (Hardie Grant, £22)

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S T A R T E R S

VEGAN ONE POUND MEALS

Miguel Barclay (Headline Home, £16.99) l This is a fourth ‘One Pound’ book by Miguel Barclay – minor chef, but major hit on the shelves of Waterstones – and sticks to the winning formula rigidly: lots of recipes (almost 90), not many ingredients (most dishes have about six, plus oil and seasoning), methods that look like no effort at all, and each serving – all recipes are for one – coming in at under a quid. The cost thing we’ll have to take his word for, though it seems more or less credible, but it would be hard to quibble about this near-endless selection of healthy, delicious-looking midweek meals. There’s baked fennel (sort of like a gratin, but using tomatoes instead of cream); Mexican kidney bean salad; sweet carrot dal; aubergine and cauliflower stack; potatoes arrabbiata, and more. Creative, fun and accessible, many recipes take a meat-based standard and offer an irreverent twist: vegan mac and cheese, for instance, or mushroom, spinach and pine nut Wellington. Two myths busted, then: vegan cooking doesn’t have to be po-faced, nor does it have to be expensive. MATT BIELBY

BAZAAR

Sabrina Ghayor (Mitchell Beasley, £26) l This celebrated cook has come up trumps with another collection of imaginative and happily approachable recipes. Whether or not you’re a meat eater, practised cook or on a budget, there’s plenty of mealtime inspiration here. These fun vegetarian recipes blend Western concepts with Sabrina’s Anglo-Persian style. Meat, as she points out from the start, is a huge part of Middle Eastern food culture, and meals without this element are often considered wanting. There’s nothing lacking in the fiesta of colour and texture that we see in this tome, though – apart from, perhaps, excessive effort in the methods. There are loads of dishes here that involve just a large handful of ingredients – often ones that you’ll already have in, too – like the butternut, feta and chilli rolls; turmeric, spinach and sweet potato fritters; stuffed courgettes with pine nuts; and smokey black-eyed bean and tomato stew. Sides are abundant (and include some impressive rices) as are bite-sized eats, meaning you can craft quite the multi-dish veggie feast with this guide. JESSICA CARTER

CLAMS WITH CHORIZO From Andalusia by Jose Pizzaro (Hardie Grant, £26); photography © Emma Lee I LOVE CLAMS, whether served with jamón or just on their own with a splash of sherry or white wine. I always thought that chorizo would overpower the delicate sweetness of the clams, but to my delight, I was wrong – this is a must-try. The crispy chorizo adds a lovely texture and the smoky flavour from the pimentón de la Vera is a perfect match for fino sherry. SERVES 4 1kg clams 75g chorizo picante, chopped into 1 cm (½ in) cubes 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 small onion, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, finely chopped large sprig thyme 100ml fino sherry crusty bread, to serve

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1 Place the clams in a bowl under cold running water for 5 minutes. Discard any that won’t close. 2 In a lidded saucepan over a high heat, cook the chorizo in a little olive oil for 6 minutes, until caramelised. Using a slotted spoon, remove the chorizo from the pan and place in a bowl. 3 Add the onion, garlic and thyme sprig to the chorizo fat in the pan and fry for 10 minutes, or until the onion has softened. 4 Increase the heat, add the clams and chorizo back to the pan, pour in the sherry, then cover with a lid. Cook for 3 minutes, or until all the clams have steamed open, discarding any that haven’t. 5 Tip the contents of the pan into a large bowl and serve with crusty bread to mop up the juices.


CHEF!

DIRECT WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKERITITE –FO ODIES FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOU

HIGHLIGHTS

26 IF YOU PEAS

SUMMERY SAMOSAS FULL OF PEAS AND LOVE

29 INSTANT NOODLES

QUICK, FRESH AND FUSS-FREE JAPANESE NOODLEs

30 ON THE HASH

A BANG IN-SEASON BREKKIE WITH SWEET ASPARAGUS 025

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Get some spicy, smoky chorizo involved in a satisfying breakfast this month


E M L I B E N D I XO N

Anna is a recipe developer and food stylist living in Bristol – she works on vegetarian and vegan recipes for cookbooks and food brands around the UK, and often collaborates with photographer Kasia Kiliszec as Cook and Capture. “British peas are just coming into season and there’s something so meditative about popping them out of their pods before cooking with them,” says Anna. “These little pea and mint samosas are vegan and show off the best of what’s in season in early summer. Serve them with drinks or as a sophisticated starter with chutneys. The construction sounds a bit fiddly, but they’re so easy once you get the knack after folding the first samosa. I often make a double batch and freeze half for a later date.”

ThaT’S a wRaP!

THESE GET BUSY FOLDING FILO TO MAKE ERD EPH SH NA AN ACE SAMOSAS BY

BAKED PEA AND HERB SAMOSAS MAKES 16-18 For the cucumber raita: ½ cucumber, grated ½ tsp fine sea salt 125g coconut yoghurt ½ unwaxed lemon, juice and zest For the samosas: 1 medium floury potato (about 200g) 3 tbsps coconut oil 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped thumb-sized piece ginger, peeled and grated 1 tsp garam masala 1 tsp turmeric 100g peas (fresh or frozen) small bunch coriander, leaves picked and chopped small bunch mint, leaves picked and chopped 6 sheets filo pastry 1 tsp nigella seeds (optional) pinch chilli flakes (optional) mango chutney, to serve

1 Toss the grated cucumber with the salt and place in a sieve suspended over a bowl or the sink while you make the samosas. 2 Scrub the potato and, leaving the skin on, place in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Cover the pan with a lid and bring to the boil. Simmer the potato over a medium heat for 20 minutes, or until a sharp knife passes through easily. Remove from the pan and set aside to cool. 3 While the potato is cooking, melt 2 tbsp of the coconut oil in a frying pan over a medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring regularly for 8 minutes, until the onion is soft. Stir in the garlic, ginger and spices and cook for a couple minutes more. Finally, add the peas and cook for 3 minutes, until just bright green. Set the pan aside to cool slightly. 4 By now the potato should be cool enough to handle. Slip the skin off the potato and discard. Roughly chop the flesh. Place the chopped potato in a mixing bowl and mash with a fork until smooth. Add the chopped herbs and the pea mixture from the pan and mix to combine. 5 Heat the remaining oil in another saucepan or in the microwave. Unroll the pastry and use a sharp knife to slice each sheet it into 3

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equal lengths, about 6cm x 15cm, giving you 18 long strips of filo. Cover with a clean, damp tea towel. 6 Heat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 7 Take one strip of filo (keeping the rest covered) and brush with the melted oil. Take a spoonful of the pea filling and place at one end of the filo strip, leaving a couple of centimetres around the sides. Lift one corner of the pastry up and over the filling to make a triangular edge. Continue to fold to make a triangle until you’ve folded up to the other end. Brush the top with melted oil and sprinkle with nigella seeds and chilli, if using. Repeat with the remaining pastry and pea mixture until it’s all used up. Place in the centre of the hot oven for 15-18 minutes, until golden and crisp all over. 8 While the samosas are in the oven, squeeze as much moisture from the cucumber as you can before mixing it with the yoghurt and lemon. Taste and adjust the seasoning as required. 9 Serve the samosas with the raita and mango chutney alongside.

annashepherdfood.com; cookandcapture.ucraft.net


C H E F !

K ASIA KILISZEK

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NEW CLIFTON SEAFOOD SHOP AT CARGO 2, WAPPING WHARF, BRISTOL We have daily deliveries from the South Coast and beyond. We sell Oysters, Mussels, Squid, Sashimi, Tuna, Salmon, Mackerel, Sea Bass, Scallops, Lemon Sole, Monkfish and lots more! Come along and visit us at, you can also pre-order and pick up your order from the shop.

Cargo 2, Museum Street, Wapping Wharf, Bristol, BS1 6WE Rozzy: +44 (0) 7399 549295 Sam: +44 (0) 7794 480833 cliftonseafoodcompany.com

f

a @brockleystores

Brockley Stores, Main Road, Brockley, North Somerset BS48 3AT


C H E F !

SOBA NOODLE SALAD SERVES 4 AS A SIDE 300g dried soba noodles 15ml sesame oil, plus a dash extra 20g sesame seeds 35ml light soy sauce 45g clear honey 15ml yuzu juice (or lemon juice) 1 spring onion handful green shiso (or coriander) 100g edamame, shelled

SeNd NOOds A LIGHT AND FRESH SUMMER SIDE BY THE STREET FOOD GENIUSES THAT ARE GUY AND VICTORIA SIDDALL, CREATORS OF EATCHU

“Zaru soba – soba noodles served chilled with a kaeshi dipping sauce – is a favourite way to beat the heat during a hot and humid Tokyo summer,” says Guy. “At Eatchu we’re feeling optimistic about the summertime and sunshine here in Bristol, so we’ll be putting our own refreshing soba noodle salad on the menu until the autumn. “Soba are made of a flavourful combination of buckwheat and wheat, which is great as you don’t need to add much to them to create a tasty dish. You can buy packs of soba from our shop on Exchange Avenue – these are made with 80 percent buckwheat and contain green tea (known as cha soba). If you would prefer gluten-free versions, 100-percent buckwheat soba can be found in shops or, more likely, online. “All the other ingredients used here are readily available in your local Asian grocer; however, if you’d like to get extra fancy with the yuzu juice and shiso, we recommend heading to thewasabicompany.co.uk.”

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1 Cook the soba according to the packet instructions, using plenty of boiling water in a large pan to allow the noodles to separate and move around. 2 When they’re cooked, drain the noodles in a colander and then rinse under cold water until completely cooled. (This step is important, as you are rinsing off the starch as well as stopping them from cooking.) Once cool, add a small dash of sesame oil and work it through with your hands. Transfer the noodles into a salad bowl and place in the fridge for a minimum of 10 minutes. 3 Toast the sesame seeds in a dry pan over a medium heat until golden brown, then set aside to cool. 4 Combine the sesame oil, soy sauce, honey and yuzu (or lemon) juice with 20ml water to create a dressing. Have a taste and adjust the flavours as necessary. 5 Cut the spring onion lengthwise then finely chop, using the whole thing except the roots, then add to the noodles in the salad bowl. Roughly tear the shiso (or coriander) and add that too, along with the dressing. Toss everything together with ½ the sesame seeds and serve into 4 noodle bowls. 6 Top each bowl with the shelled edamame and remaining sesame seeds. Eatchu, The Old Mess Room, Exchange Avenue, Bristol BS1 1JQ; eatchu.co.uk


C H E F !

NEW POTATO AND CHORIZO HASH WITH ASPARAGUS AND EGG SERVES 2 600g new potatoes, scrubbed sunflower oil (or vegetable oil) 250g asparagus spears, trimmed splash sherry vinegar (or red wine vinegar) ½ tsp smoked paprika 1 red onion, finely diced 2 cooking chorizo (approx. 200g), skinned handful parsley leaves, finely chopped splash white wine vinegar (or cider vinegar) 2 eggs

haSh OFFeR BRUNCH, LUNCH OR SUPPER – THIS VERSATILE MEAL WORKS FOR ALL THREE, SAY ALAN AND VICKI MOWAT

Vicki and Alan are Bath’s Riverford reps. They’re loving all the seasonal veg that’s being harvested right now and are sharing this Riverford recipe to help us put it to good use. “Asparagus is surely the vegetable which sparks the most joy when it comes into season – it’s so delicious and so quintessentially British,” says Vicki. “The season is short, so we make the most of it while we can. Often

that simply means steaming the delicate spears briefly, then serving with a little butter, or dipping them into a soft-boiled egg. But if you have a little more time, this hash makes a fantastic lunch or light supper. “You can fry your eggs instead of poaching, but if you do poach, then use the freshest eggs, so the white seals around the yolks (adding vinegar helps with this too).”

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1 Heat the oven to 220C/425F/gas mark 7. 2 Cut the potatoes in half (or quarters if they’re large), then place in a pan of salted water. Bring to a boil and cook for 12-15 minutes, until tender. Drain and lightly crush with a potato masher or fork. 3 While the potatoes are cooking, put another pan of water on the heat and bring to a bare simmer (no bubbles). 4 Toss the asparagus in 1 tbsp of oil in a baking dish. Add a splash of sherry or red wine vinegar and the smoked paprika, and season with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 8-12 minutes (depending on the thickness), until tender. 5 Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a frying pan. Add the onion and cook slowly for 10 minutes to soften without colouring. If it starts to catch, add a splash of water and reduce the heat. Crumble in the chorizo and increase the heat slightly. Fry for 4-5 minutes to cook the chorizo through, then stir in the potatoes and warm through. Add the parsley and season to taste. 6 Add a good splash of vinegar to the simmering pan of water. Crack the eggs into individual ramekins or small bowls. Use a spoon to swirl the water so it looks like a whirlpool and gently drop the eggs into the centre, one at a time, and poach for 3 minutes, then remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. Sprinkle the eggs with a little salt before serving them on top of the potatoes and asparagus. riverford.co.uk/recipes


## LOVE2SHARE Welcome to Koocha, a friendly, cosy escape that brings a taste of Persia to Bristol. Experience plant powered food as you never have before. Vegan or not, you’ll love our fresh, colourful and creative dishes. Step inside for a taste of mouth-watering Persian mezze and a signature gin cocktail. Serving lunch and dinner and everything in between, come visit us for good times and great food!

Walk ins are always welcome, but we recommend booking a table for groups of 6 or more.

10 Zetland Road, Redland, Bristol BS6 7AD koochamezzebar.com | 0117 9241301


Discover one of Bath’s best kept secrets, Alfresco Afternoon Tea at the Villa … A delightfully delicious afternoon tea brimming with homemade treats. Warm scones, sandwiches made from home-baked bread and moreish indulgent cakes. Everything is made by our own fabulous baker, with a new selection of cakes every day of the week.

Cream tea £10.50 per person Full afternoon tea £25.00 per person Prosecco afternoon tea £31.00 per person Served every day from 1pm – 6pm in our sunny dining room or garden terrace. Pre-booking is required.

01225 466329 • reception.trvb@roseatehotels.com • www.roseatehotels.com/bath/theroseatevilla


S T A R T E R S

WHAT SUP?

look!!

IT’S SECTION,ODUERDNICEAWTE TO ALL THINGS D SUPPABLE

I DRINK, THEREFORE I AM

SOUR TRIP

JACK ADAIR BEVAN IS ALL ABOUT THE VERMOUTH – AND HE’S GEEKED OUT ABOUT IT FOR 300-ODD PAGES IN HIS NEW BOOK...

DRINKS AND COCKTAIL pro Jack co-founded The Ethicurean in Wrington and also helped developed The Collector vermouth. He’s won industry awards for his libation-led endeavours and has been drafted in to join judging panels, too. Now, he’s penned a book – his first – on all things vermouth. After delving into the history, character and uses of this aromatised wine, he offers plenty of inspiration on how to drink it – of which this recipe is a great example. Inspired by the infamous Negroni, this sour recipe is lighter on the gin, in favour of Rosso vermouth and Campari, writes Jack. In place of agar syrup I use a teaspoon of Seville orange marmalade. The result is a moreish velvet-textured drink with a finish of bitter grapefruit. Some like to serve this drink in a rocks glass over a big clear ice cube – it’s equally good in a coupe straight up.

NEGRONI MARMALADE SOUR MAKES 1

20ml Sipsmith London dry gin 20ml Sacred English spiced vermouth 10ml Campari 25ml fresh lemon juice dash Angostura bitters 1 tsp Seville orange marmalade 1 free-range egg white ice cubes Put all of the ingredients in a cocktail shaker and give them a dry shake, then add ice and shake again, hard, for around 10 seconds. Doublestrain into your chosen chilled glass.

BE N PRYOR

Recipe taken from A Spirited Guide to Vermouth by Jack Adair Bevan (Headline Home, £16.99)

BEER + COFFEE + WINES + SPIRITS + MORE

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W H A T

S U P ?

ThE dRIP RIP FEEd NEWS, BREWS, BARS AND TRENDS

LAW OF FIZZICS

NIGHT FEVER

Fever Tree has launched a gin pop-up at the new Bar and Block on King Street on Bristol, don’t cha know? The restaurant’s alfresco area has had a treehouse-inspired makeover and is dressed in ivy with lots of plants and climbers, while festoon lighting hangs overhead and herb gardens encourage guests to garnish their own drinks. Punters can soak up the sun amongst the abundant foliage while sipping on top gins paired with Fever Tree’s flavoured mixers – how does rhubarb gin with ginger ale sound, for instance? While they’re here, the guys at Fever Tree are running a couple of gin masterclasses too, on 13 and 27 June. Make sure you visit sooner rather than later, mind, because the pop-up is only around until 6 July. barandblock.co.uk

Q& A

MY L OC A L

Drinks expert Olly Smith – who you may well know from his appearances on Saturday Kitchen and Radio 2 – has just published Fizz (Ebury Press, £12.99), a book packed with cocktail recipes that are all about the bubble. The collection ranges from Port and Pineapple aperitif and Champagne Birthday Punch to the booze-free Nothing But a Butter Beer and ginger kombucha. Champers, cava, beer and soda are just some of the bubble-giving ingredients used in the accessible and sippable concoctions, while there are recipes for syrups and reductions, too. Try the Pastis Goes Pop, made from 30ml pastis and 10ml lemon juice, topped up with crémant sparking wine and finished with 20ml crème de cassis and a garnish of lemon peel.

BRISTOL FOOD PHOTOGRAPHER AND (PROFESSIONAL) BEER FANATIC NICCI PEET TELLS US WHY HER LOCAL IS NOT TO BE SNUFFED AT... My local is Snuffy Jack’s, in Fishponds. The vibe here in three words is friendly, relaxed and welcoming. I’m drinking something pale and local, usually.

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BEER TODAY

Bristol Food Connections has collaborated with local brewery Butcombe to create a limited edition brew for the summer. Joined at the Hops – which we got to try at its launch at St Nick’s Night Market – is a session ale that’s spot-on for summer. It’s a light and nicely balanced beer, with a nudge of maltiness and refreshingly easygoing ABV of 3.8%. It’s available in Butcombe’s Bristol pubs, as well as Colston Hall (where heaps of Food Connections events are taking place in June) and other watering holes across the city. And – bonus – 10p from the sale of every pint will be donated to the annual event and its on-going work in the city’s communities. bristolfoodconnections.com

And to nibble on I’ll have a pickled egg. Got to love a pub classic. You’ll find me sitting anywhere near a dog. This place also has great staff. It’s a small team, but you’ll generally find Leanne, the owner, behind the bar. She is fantastic and really welcoming. Even though Snuffy’s is generally full of regulars and locals, intimidation is something you’ll never feel here. Everyone’s welcome.

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The crowd is a real mixed bag but all really friendly.  Something I really covet here is the art on the walls. Basically, you should try my local because it’s one of the best beer pubs outside the city centre and one of only five micropubs in Bristol. They know how to look after their real ale, but also have keg lines. Although Snuffy’s really supports local breweries, you can find some interesting beer from further afield as well.  facebook.com/sjalehouse


sUmmeRTIme sUPPING Sips Ahoy! ANGELA MOUNT’S BEEN AT IT AGAIN – RAIDING GREAT WESTERN WINE FOR SEASONAL SIP-SPIRATION...

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S I P S

n

ow that those winter coats and boots are packed away for the summer, I’ve been on the hunt for the coolest drinks trends for the new season. Already, it seems, we’re all embracing the relaxed culture of alfresco sipping. One of the most enduring trends is drinking less but better, and lighter thirstquenchers (in terms of booze content and taste) from across the spectrum are on the rise – think long mixer drinks, lower ABV craft beers and ciders, and fresher, less hefty styles of wine. All perfect for summer. Let’s start with wine. Gruner Veltliner – a grape variety whose home is Austria but now has a highly successful outpost in New Zealand – has been inching its way up the popularity charts for a few years. Try Pfaffl Zeisen (£15.75). Subtle and understated yet drenched with aromatic stone fruit and spice, it’s dry, but with a hint of the exotic. It’s a wonderfully versatile white and a real go-to for any dish vaguely fruity or spiced. Rosé, in particular Côtes de Provence, will inevitably be the hit of the season again – but look out for some cheeky, gossamer-light alternatives as wine producers leap on the bandwagon to make delicate, peachy pale Provence-style pinks. Get one step ahead and grab yourself a bottle of the Sicilian Planeta Rosé (£12.95), with its fragrant rosehip and wild strawberry style, glossed over with a streak of Sicilian lemons. Also, simply one of the very top-notch rosés – but well worth splashing out on – is Ramon Bilbao Rioja Rosado Lalomba (£23.50). Ethereal yet full of character and showing the ripest of red fruit, it’s dusted with spice and is supremely elegant in looks and taste. You’ll always find a bottle of light red wine chilling in my fridge over summer; the aromas and flavours of these styles will both intensify when chilled – plus they’re lovely and cooling and will work with fish and salads. From Italy, Bardolino Bertani (£12.95) is bursting with cherry fruit, while the Loire Valley Gamay de Touraine, Domaine St Pierre (£12.95) is fresh as a daisy and packed with a mass of juicy berry fruit. Another slowly-burgeoning trend is that we are drinking more sherry – of the bonedry Fino and Manzanilla varieties. With the

A H O Y !

continued rise of tapas bars, these simply delicious, lip-smackingly dry wines are the business with a bowl of salted almonds, the freshest of prawns and platters of jamón. Lustau Manzanilla Papirusa (£18.50), with its nutty, dry edge, sea salt tang and bracing acidity, served very chilled, is a great place to start and will transport you to the heat of southern Spain. Spirit trends are established by clever bartenders and mixologists – tequila and mezcal being their new darlings. What’s the difference? Both are from Mexico and made from the agave plant, but that’s where the similarities end. Tequila is made from only the blue agave, in the Tequila region, while mezcal can be made anywhere in the country from over 30 types of agave, and has a smokier, sweeter taste, which works perfectly in whisky-based cocktails. Try the pungent, aniseed and sweet vanilla-tinged Montelobos Mezcal (£50) and get mixing. For classic margaritas, give the peppery, citrus-soaked Cabeza Tequila (£36) a whirl. For a refreshing new take, try a Paloma, mixing tequila with grapefruit juice, soda and lime juice. Gin still continues its dominance of the spirits market, becoming increasingly artisanal at every turn and growing exponentially. It’s the creativity and innovation in the minds of the gin producers, together with almost total freedom of choice and lack of rules, that makes this favourite so exciting. Infused gins are storming through now, made using just about every fruit under the sun. Spit Roasted Pineapple Gin (£30) is rich and seductive, and Cornish artisan producer Tarquins’ Brilliant British Blackberry Gin (£35) is impressive, crafted with English blackberries, exotic spices and finished with a drift of local wildflower honey and violets. Fragrant and evocative, bursting with the fresh sweetness of red berries, it’s mesmerising and charming. Definitely a summer staple.

All the drinks mentioned here are available from Great Western Wine in Bath; greatwesternwine.co.uk

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BIT ON The

CIdeR

SHH – CAN YOU HEAR THAT? IT’S THE SOUND OF THE CIDER SCENE BUBBLING AWAY – AND IT’S ABOUT TO REACH BOILING POINT. JESSICA CARTER INVESTIGATES THE CHANGING FACE OF THIS HISTORICAL WEST COUNTRY DRINK...

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DRINK UP ThY ZIdER SOME OF OUR FAVOURITE LOCAL FERMENTED JUICES TO GET YOU STARTED Development ed Matt says, “Now this is a dangerous one: a pale, lightly sparkling perry, not too sweet, definitely refreshing and easily quaffable – and 7.5% ABV! It’s rather lovely, something of a cult favourite, but handle with care."

LILLEY’S CIDER BEE STING PERRY

This Frome cidermaker is run by father and son Chris and Marc Lilley, whose family has a history with pubs (er, running them, that is). The pair have grown the businesses swiftly – as we’ll hear later, the market for fruit cider is strong, and Lilley’s makes these popular varieties to a high spec. The team have released three new flavours this year already: cherries and berries, pineapple and chocolate apple. Available in bag-in-box as well as by the bottle; find the whole range at Lilley’s Brewery’s on-site shop and online.

Ed Jess says, “A lovely medium cider with a soft, natural fizz. There’s a tartness here, and a murmur of refreshing citrus and caramel-esque notes. Drink it at the source this summer, while the pretty cider barn is open.”

BARLEY WOOD ORCHARD CIDER

This tiny outfit is located in the Barley Wood Walled Garden – which The Ethicurean also calls home – in a wooden roundhouse that looks like it’s fresh from a fairytale. (It’s open for visitors right now, too, serving its drinks to enjoy in the pretty surroundings.) The cider is made using an old-school manual press along with apples grown on-site (they also put fruit from neighbour’s gardens to work, swapping it for juice and cider). Drink it onsite, at Café Kino or The Ethicurean, or buy it from Better Foods andThe Mall Deli among others.

Online ed Dan says, “This is the Thierry Henry of cider – a real smooth character. There’s a tartness that coats your mouth, but the bubbles wash through with juicy sweetness to round it off.”

GANLEY AND NAISH DABINETT

Having begun as two mates making homebrew from leftover apples in their back garden in Totterdown, Ganley and Naish has become a well-loved cider brand. Within four years, production had outgrown its home and moved to Kenn, in North Somerset. The new residence is within spitting distance of some world-class cider orchards, which happen to have been planted by Andy’s great grandfather – this number is crafted solely from Dabinett apples. Find it at Corks on North Street and Brockley Stores.

Ed Jess says, “This freshtasting thirst quencher has a light and fine fizz and a crisp character which elevates its refreshingness. Nicely balanced flavour and a well-pitched level of sweetness. A grown-up summer cider”

IFORD CIDER PETO PRESS

Iford Cider was born when Joe Abbott met Will Cartwright-Hignett (owner of 950-acre estate Iford Manor) and discovered he had a stash of old apple orchards. Iford’s drinks are made from fresh-pressed West Country apples and are fermented and bottled in small batches. It has three varieties of cider, each with distinct character but all with a sessionable, easy-drinking style. We’ve been quenching that thirst with the Peto Press. Find it in Independent Spirit, BeerCraft, Wolf Wine and local farm shops. 

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Ed Jess says, “The ginger beer and cider mellow each other out really nicely. You get the ginger first, which melts away into juiciness for a well-balanced mouthful. This would be a great shout if cider’s not usually your thing.”

HONEY’S CIDER STONEY BONK

In 2002 the Honey family decided to revive some old orchards on their Somerset farm just outside of Bath and have subsequently developed some award-winning ciders. They use traditional methods to ferment West Country apple varieties. The flagship medium-dry still cider is joined by sparking numbers – one filtered for a bright mediumdry result and one left unrefined for a light haze. We glugged the Stoney Bonk while barbecuing in the sun this month, which blends ginger beer with straight up cider. Find it at Bristol Cider Shop. Online ed Dan says, “A lovely balanced cider with all the natural flavours of the apple upfront. It has a medium sweetness – there’s still a touch of dryness thanks to the tannins – and lingering tones of honey and caramel.”

SHEPPY’S 200 SPECIAL EDITION CIDER

This is the oldest cidermaking outfit in Somerset, with a history going back to 1816. More than 200 years later (and still run by the same family) Sheppy’s manages 90 acres of orchards, grows more than 30 types of apple and uses the same traditional production methods – albeit with the enhancement of modern tech. Try out its cider down at the HQ – in a 100-year old, dried out vat, no less – or buy it from Bristol Cider Shop or Williams Supermarket in Somerton.


Ed Jess says, “This has a real natural flavour to it, easy on acidity with the gently sweet character of the apples rounded off by a lovely earthiness for a dry finish. I love the modern, high-end branding, which has a classy wine-like feel.”

WILDING CIDER BABOUCHE

Wilding Cider is what Beccy and Sam Leach left their beloved restaurant Birch to work on – and have since been busier than ever on their traditional, unsprayed orchard. They pick their fallen cider apples from the ground – mostly vintage varieties – and, after hand pressing them, they fermented them slowly with wild yeasts. Babouche is a blend of four apple varieties and is dry with soft tannins. Maker Beccy says to look out for aromas of orange flesh, leather, spice and orchard floor. Find it at Corks, West Street Kitchen and Bertha’s Pizza. Development ed Matt says, “This fruity, bittersweet, lightly sparkling cider balances the mild sweetness of the apples with the tart astringency of the added quince nicely. Very drinkable, but don’t expect to actually taste the quince, as such.”

PILTON CIDER POMME POMME

This Somerset artisan cidermaker uses apples from long-established orchards in and around Pilton in Somerset, turning them into whole-juice cider by way of a six-month fermentation process. Founder Martin Berkeley co-organises the annual Bristol Cider Salon, too. There are eight drinks in his range these days, including dessert ciders, an oaked-barrelled cider and this quincepimped number. Find it at Bristol’s Two Belly and Bristol Cider Shop.

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irst off, I’m going to let you in on something: cider is about to have what you might call ‘a moment’. That’s right: bored of being the overshadowed sibling at the bar taps, constantly battling fruitlessly for the attentions of the crowd who flock to its cooler-looking and better-understood sister, beer, it’s reinventing itself. No longer will it be pigeon-holed as a refreshment solely for hot days, dehydrated festival goers or West Country traditionalists. Cider is reimagining itself as a sophisticated, premium drink, as fit for a drinks flight at a swanky restaurant as for popping the cork on for a night of quality time with the telly. But let’s take a deep breath before we get overexcited, and cover some cider basics. In case you were under any illusion (past experiences may have led you to believe otherwise) this centuries-old sip is but fermented apple juice – simple as. Well, that is, in some cases, at least. See, not all cider is straightforward. The government, for regulation and duty purposes, defines cider as being at least 35% juice – and a lot of what is sold on these isles is barely more than that. On the other end of the spectrum, the Small Independent Cidermakers’ Association (SICA) has created a National Quality Mark for what they deem to be the best cider, obtainable only for varieties made with at least 90% juice. That’s, of course, not to say that both kinds of drink

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aren’t relevant and well-liked, just that they’re rather different beasts.

WEST FRIENDS Cider is very much the official drink of the West Country and has roots here going back almost a millennia – as Ciderology author, and co-organizer of the Bristol Cider Salon, Gabe Cook tells us. “It is fair to say that the proud heritage of West Country cider-making is based upon apple varieties that were brought over from France nearly 1,000 years ago,” he says. “These tannic, bitter, inedible apples didn’t find a home in the apple-growing area of the South East of England, where all efforts were dedicated towards growing fruit for the table market in London. Instead, they found a home in another great growing region: the West Country. So, it was here that the proud tradition of British cider making first established itself. “Cider’s zenith comes in the 17th century. During this period, Britain is almost permanently at war with its various European neighbours, France, The Netherlands and Spain – often all at once. As well as putting a financial burden upon the nation, this starved off the supply of wine, which the British aristocracy was devouring in great quantities, so there was an imperative to create an indigenous drink that could match the quality and appeal of wine.


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“To the fore comes Viscount Scudamore, Ambassador to France, who returned back to Holme Lacy House in Herefordshire armed with a number of seedling of unnamed French cider apple varieties. He planted them on his estate and one – subsequently named the Herefordshire Redstreak – was a resounding success, producing the most amazing cider. “During the same period, Sir Kenelm Digby was to make an equally telling contribution,” Gabe continues. “He

TASTE LIKE A PRO Top tasting tips from Chris Rouse of CAMRA’s Cider and Perry Campaigns Committee

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Don’t taste with your nose. In other words, don’t let a strong aroma put you off.  

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When you take a sip, look for attributes like sharpness (from malic acid), tannins, fruitiness, and sherbet (citric acid). You may also want to consider such attributes as winelike or cask matured. 

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Notice the mouth-feel – clear ciders are crisp and smooth, while cloudy ciders feel thick and rough.

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Finally, think about the level of sweetness you can detect.

established a glass furnace in the Forest of Dean to manufacture wine bottles which were stronger and more stable than any other in their day. These enabled a second fermentation to be undertaken within the bottle, ensuring that the cider was kept free from spoilage and, most importantly, adding a light, natural sparkle. What we are talking about is the first steps of the Champagne process. Indeed, Digby’s exploits were being undertaken before Champagne pioneer and Benedictine Monk, Dom Perignon, was even born.” Learn something new every day, eh? Comments from Gabe Cook amended from his book, Ciderology (Spruce, £16.99)

APPLE WATCH Keen-eyed cider drinkers may well have noticed things beginning to shift in the market for this historical and regional speciality. Pete Snowman, founder of The Bristol Cider Shop, sure has, telling us that the cider sphere is a totally different space to what it was eight years ago when he started the business. Now, in a way not dissimilar to the trend for natural wine, the bar is being raised significantly when it comes to everyone’s favourite apple-based drink. “A lot of producers are going in the highend direction, focusing on what they can make with amazing apple varieties,” he says. “Whether the consumer trends are

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following – I don’t know. I don’t think it’s filtered down to the wider market just yet.” When it comes to those consumers, fruit varieties are super-popular – always selling out first on a sunny day at the shop, Pete tells us. That said, a growing number of people are taking more of an interest in artisanal, high-juice-volume, craft ciders. These kinds of production principles have been part of the strict set of criteria that Pete’s shop has adhered to since opening in 2011. And while this is still very much its ethos, the cider market has changed so much that this cider pro has revamped his concept. “We always sold cider within a 50-mile radius. That was it. Cider had to have that heritage, connection to traditions and its history. The thing is, people have been making cider here in the West Country for centuries – generations – and have largely made up their mind as to what cider is and should be, so there’s really not much room for innovation.” In the last few years, though, there’s been a massive surge in interest in cider in places like America and New Zealand, with interesting varieties also cropping up in Sweden and other countries in Europe. These areas don’t have any history of cider making and have been experimenting, borrowing ideas from other industries like brewing – Americans have invented hop cider, for instance – and are reshaping this historic drink. There are more small, innovative producers cropping up across the UK too (including here in the South West), experimenting with production methods and apple varieties, with many even managing their own orchards. All this means that the shop’s 50-mile radius rule just isn’t relevant anymore, so Pete decided to totally change its focus, in order to explore the whole world of cider that’s available in 2019. “We want to get people learning the story of cider. Get them involved in the experience, and join us in the discovery of global cider,” he says. (Also new, by the way, is the online retail focus, with the shop having been converted to a tasting room – now with more of a bar feel, it showcases a regularly rotating range from the website.) “Cider is changing,” he says. “I think it’s going to start snowballing – and I don’t think I would have said that five years ago. Cider Salon, Gabe appearing on Sunday Brunch... People can’t ignore cider now. A lot of beer writers are starting to write


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about it now, when they wouldn’t ever have considered it before – any sense of snobbery there was is melting away. A lot of this stuff wouldn’t have happened five years ago. When we started this shop it was like we were in on this premium cider secret that we wanted to tell people – now, I think, the secret is out and people are trying to catch up.” It’s tough to tell what’s coming first: the supply, from these new and exciting producers, or the demand, from consumers interested in quality, low-intervention products with a focus on provenance (which cider has in spades, thanks to its base ingredient being an abundant British crop). Either way, there’s a bit of a sticky issue when it comes to this new-wave of high-end drinks: there’s no way to tell, by looking at the label alone, if it’s a small-batch, 100% juice cider, or a mass-produced drink made from concentrate and with additives. “I’ve always been keen on the idea of a legally required distinction being made between craft cider and mass-produced cider,” says Pete, “but maybe that’s a slightly negative way of looking at things. I suppose it’s just about cider getting the recognition it deserves – and people knowing enough about it to make an informed choice. We need to change the way we’re presenting cider to people, and how we champion it.” Speaking of which, we’re not seeing more interesting and high-end ciders in mainstream bars and pubs just yet. While there’s perhaps a willingness among publicans to up their cider game – encouraged by demand from consumers

KNOW YOUR JUICE PERRY: cider, but made with pears instead of apples KEEVED CIDER: a naturally effervescent cider, where the fermentation is slowed so the yeast doesn’t get to process all the apples’ sugar, leaving a natural sweetness ICE CIDER: cider made with frozen apples for an intensified, sweeter flavour and higher ABV WEST COUNTRY CIDER: fermented apple juice made with varieties of apples grown specifically for making cider – this is as opposed to ‘Easternstyle’ cider, made with cooking and eating apples

– many perhaps aren’t sure where to start. Hence, you get pubs where killer ranges of experimental craft beers sit next to comparably cheap, commercial, homogenized apple-based drinks. Good job, then, that we have some serious cider specialists on the local pub scene...

HOLY TAP! These parts are blessed with a smattering of cider pubs – albeit fewer than there once were – which see to it that they have an assortment of cider that’s of the size and quality that we’d have of beer at a regular bar. The Apple on Welsh Back in Bristol is one of the best known, along with The Orchard Inn, just off the harbourside. This free house has been on the receiving end of several accolades from CAMRA for its ciderchampioning efforts over the years and, having changed management at the end of last year, is keeping its apple-led traditions alive. Well, for the most part. “Cider has been sold on these premises for over 180 years,” says The Orchard Inn’s Steph Iles. “We believe at one point in its history, the pub only sold cider, and it was available to buy to take away in bottle and jug via a window at the end of the bar.” While you can no longer take your own pitcher along for replenishment (soz) and, sure, there are some beers on the go now too, the focus is still fiercely fixed on cider. Traditional cider pubs like this one, guided

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more by fruit than hops, are enjoying the drink’s resurgence and making the most out of the developing offering. “While the craft cider industry still has a way to go to catch up with the craft beer scene, it’s doing so in leaps and bounds,” notes Steph. As with craft beers (and by ‘craft’, we mean made in small batches by indie producers, usually using traditional methods), this style of cider often packs a boozy punch, with ABVs tipping the 6% mark. But sessionable varieties, ideal for drinking on long afternoons while catching up with mates at the pub, are emerging now too. “When it comes to cider, I would class anything 5% ABV and below as sessionable, but that rules out a big percentage of farmhouse ciders,” Steph says. “We have recently started selling a 4% ABV by Hecks, aptly named Somerset Session, for that very reason. The fermented cider is blended with their pure apple juice, making it a lighter, more easygoing drink.”   The Orchard Inn is among the (somewhat-dwindling) number of free houses on our turf, meaning – amongst other things – it’s not tied to any breweries so can shape its stock to suit customer preferences and trends. Selling well right now, we’re told, is the uber-dry Mendip Hills from Worley’s in Shepton Mallet and Janet’s Jungle Juice, from Westcroft in Highbridge. About time, then, we reckon, we all took a fresh look at this centuries-old bev.


A TASTE OF SUMMER Beer gardens and courtyards in the City and beyond! Butcombe pubs and inns have Summer covered with outside dining areas, pop up BBQs, gin gardens and more. Whether it’s a trip to your local or exploring somewhere new there’s a pub garden for everyone with Butcombe...

From the relaxing Methuen Arms in Corsham to the lively Pig and Fiddle in Bath, the spectacular view of the Quarrymans Arms to the new-look Pelican in Chew Magna. Make the most of the weather and join us for a spot of al fresco this Summer.

The Ostrich, Bristol 0117 927 6411 ostrich@butcombepubs.com

The Cottage, Bristol 01179 215256 cottage@butcombepubs.com

The Pelican, Chew Magna 01275 331777 pelican@butcombepubs.com

The Pig & Fiddle, Bath 0122 546 0868 pigandfiddle@butcombepubs.com

The Quarrymans Arms, Corsham 01225 743569 quarrymansarms@butcombepubs.com

The Methuen Arms, Corsham 01249 717060 methuen@butcombepubs.com

Visit butcombe.com for a full list of all our pubs


Family or friends staying? Why not make the visit extra special and stay over at an OHH Pub. Save £10 when you book direct. Just visit www.ohhpubs.co.uk and at the point of reservation use this Promo Code: SAVE10

Tuesday night is Steak night Enjoy a mouth watering steak and homemade chips for just £10. Wash it all down with a fine bottle of House red wine for just £12. Served every Tuesday at all OHH Pubs 5pm - 9.30pm

Thursday night is Burger Night Choose from a selection of Chefs’ own burgers and homemade chips. All just £10. Served every Thursday at all OHH Pubs 5pm - 9.30pm

The Old House at Home: Near Castle Combe - 01454 218227 The Bear and Swan: Chew Magna - 01275 331100 The Rising Sun: Backwell - 01275 462215 The Northey Arms: Box - 01225 742333

www.ohhpubs.co.uk


OUR WEA CHOOSE Y

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RISTEhE OF hINES MAC

EEVES’ R IN L OMA JOHN TELBY R O T N VE T BI NTRY, INN, SAYS MAT E S I F ISC SEE E SOMEYOU’VE EVER IK L N E ARD ING YOUR G IS LIKE NOTH IN The entire set-up sounds a bit like one of G LURKIN BARBECUE those small-scale sports car makers you H get on industrial estates up and down it, Welsh inventor John Tomalin-Reeves, has HI-TEC Bloomin’ ’eck! What’s that? Some sort of weird robot or something? Of course not, silly. It’s an oven. You’re sure about that? Sure I’m sure. We’ve seen barbecues shaped like flying saucers and record players, dustbins and ‘big green eggs’ – though that’s a bit of a lie; they’re actually more like giant avocados. Well, now here’s one that looks like a refugee from Terminator or RoboCop – as if the son of ED-209, that hopelessly homicidal lawenforcement droid, had decided to rebel against his father and go into the dude food business. It certainly looks to have a sort of… ruthless efficiency to it. Not surprising, considering the guy behind

been called ‘the Dyson of barbecues’, and his Halo outfit has already had a hit with one called the Cooltouch – a stylish and efficient charcoal barbecue with an inner and outer skin, meaning it’s cold to the touch and so kid (and idiot) friendly. (That one looked like a War of the Worlds tripod or Star Wars Imperial Drone.) And now he’s come up with this thing, the charcoal and wood-powered ZIGZAG outdoor oven, with its innovative floating baking stone.

Eh? What’s that? Basically, it allows the flames to heat the food from beneath as well as from above, speeding up cooking time and – John says – adding flavour. The whole thing’s being made by a family-run company of steel fabricators in Wales, not far from where he lives in Penarth, and gets hot enough to cook pizza in 90 seconds.

the country. Yeah, maybe – and John actually says he’s taken cues from the automotive world. “New cars, especially supercars, are all about strong lines and big statements,” he says. “The silhouette is vital, and I didn’t want this to be just another dome-shaped oven. I wanted people to look at it and think, ‘What the hell is that?’” Job done, I’d say. Reckon so. And as it’s smaller and lighter than it looks, it actually makes a good travelling oven – while enabling you to terrorise the kids at the campsite.

The Halo ZIGZAG costs £495; for more, go to haloproduct.com

THIS MONTH TOP TECH + FIRE STARTER + LICENCE TO GRILL

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The Supper Club

FLame ChaNGeR IN HER NEW BOOK, CHARRED, GENEVIEVE TAYLOR HAS GIVEN THE BRITISH BARBECUE A MUCH NEEDED UPDATE – SHE INVITED US TO HER LATEST DINNER PARTY TO SEE (YEP, AND TASTE) THE RESULTS FOR OURSELVES... WORDS BY JESSICA CARTER PHOTOS BY KIRSTIE YOUNG

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n the spirit of being upfront, I’m going to disclose to you right now that you will neither see nor read about a shred of meat on the following seven pages – despite said seven being dedicated to barbecuing. Gasp. Over it? Good. Our collective interest in steering our diets away from meat and more towards plants is resulting in some seriously colourful and imaginative recipes doing the rounds in recent months. And these aren’t aimed just at vegetarians, either – surely it’s we omnivores, who often rely on meat, who are most wanting for veggie inspiration, no? Indeed, Genevieve Taylor – food writer, stylist, awards judge, cookbook author and Guild of Food Writers chair – isn’t averse to a decent bit of well-sourced brisket, slow-cooked over hot coal, yet her most recent recipe book, Charred, is all about vegetarian barbecuing. But stop right there: banish those images of sorry-for-themselves veggie burgers, squeaky, over-charred slices of halloumi and halfarsed, sloppy salads (I’m looking at you, artery-clogging, mayobound coleslaw) that are assembling in your mind as we speak, ’cause there is no place for them here. Instead, picture roasted cauliflower coated in spiced butter; butternut squash, sticky with a glaze of pomegranate molasses; and grilled red pepper halves, stuffed with a muddle of olive, tomato and chickpea. Decided to stick around? Yeah, you ought to. I’m the first to arrive at Genevieve’s (eager, much?) on a recent Friday evening, but already she’s juggling three fires – soon to become four – over two coal-fuelled barbecues and a fire bowl

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JERK-SPICED PLANTAIN, SHALLOT AND HALLOUMI KEBABS

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often make my own jerk spice paste, as I like the extra flavour and chilli heat you get from mixing it fresh, but you can very easily substitute a ready-blended spice mix. In which case use around 2-3 tablespoons of jerk spice seasoning, blended to a paste with olive oil. If you have a plancha, this is an ideal time to use it, as these kebabs can stick a little. If not, never mind: just oil the grill bars or griddle with a little vegetable oil before setting the kebabs on top, and be prepared to ease them off with a fish slice. They will still taste fabulous. MAKES 6-8 2 large ripe plantain, each cut into 9 slices 2 x 250g packs of halloumi, each cut into 9 cubes 3 large banana shallots, sliced into 1cm-thick rings

For the jerk spice paste: 2½cm pieces of root ginger, finely grated 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1-2 Scotch bonnet chillies, finely chopped (seeds removed for less heat), to taste 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp ground allspice 1 tbsp ground cinnamon 1 tbsp paprika (unsmoked) few sprigs thyme, leaves picked and chopped 1 tbsp soft brown sugar

of kiln-dried beech and oak, suspended in a tripod. A whole golden cauli sits over the latter, having been roasting slowly for hours in one of those barbecues. Gen slathers spiced garlic butter – pimpled with cumin, chipotle chilli and oregano – over its curves, before lighting another batch of coal in her chimney starter. “I could rant about charcoal all day,” she says. “People talk about it causing pollution and wasting energy, but good, sustainably made charcoal has loads of benefits for the environment – for instance, it’s great for the rural economy. And woodland counteracts the pollution – it soaks up about a fifth – so to have more trees to make charcoal out of is only a good thing.” Other guests are arriving now – Gen’s neighbours – and begin passing around glasses of wine (don’t mind if I do) as our host moves swiftly from fire to fire. She’ll be doing the same but on a much larger scale this summer, with all the food festivals she’s booked to demo at – think Taste of London Regent’s Park, Port Eliot, The Big Grill, Black Deer, Shambala Abergavenny, Ludlow, Dartmouth...

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To serve: handful fresh thyme, leaves picked from stalks 1 lime, cut into wedges 1 To make the jerk spice paste, put the ginger, garlic, chillies and olive oil into a large mixing bowl and stir together. Add the allspice, cinnamon, paprika, thyme, sugar and some salt and pepper, and stir well to mix. 2 Add the plantain, halloumi and shallots to the spice paste and gently toss together so everything is evenly coated. Thread everything alternately onto skewers, setting them on a plate as you go. Ideally, set aside for an hour or so to marinate. 3 Once you are ready to cook, fire up the barbecue for direct grilling or preheat a griddle pan on the hob. 4 Grill the kebabs for a few minutes each side, until the halloumi is crisp and everything is nicely browned. Sprinkle over the thyme leaves and squeeze over a little lime juice before serving.


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I help bring some serving plates out from the kitchen, a couple of which are Gen’s own (yeah, she makes pottery too – god knows when she fits that in). Beautifully delicate and minimalist, the white glazed, textured pieces make a great canvas for vibrant orange carrots, caramelised at the edges, which get piled on and dressed with toasted pecans, sliced spring onion, fresh coriander, dollops of ricotta and a drizzle of olive oil. A pewter plate, found at a flea market in Paris, takes receipt of a mound of kebabs – spiced plantain, halloumi and shallot lined up on the metal skewers. “This is one of my favourite recipes from the book,” Gen says, squeezing lime quarters over them and finishing with a scattering of thyme flowers. Everyone takes their seats as the two family dogs look on wistfully – I can only assume knowing full well that there will be not a crumb that escapes into their territory below. The sticky glazed butternut squash’s sweetness is an ideal foil to the feta’s salty tang, while the baba ganoush – made with aubergines that had been blackened on the grill – is characterfully smoky and the hasselback potatoes have beautiful looking, shrivelled and golden, crisped-up skins. I leave with renewed excitement for the summer barbecues ahead, as well as plenty of inspiration for outdoor eating that won’t require a trip to the butchers.

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STICKY BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND FETA WITH POMEGRANATE SALSA AND GARLIC YOGHURT

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utternut squash grills a treat. I often leave the skin on when I cook squash, born from a combination of loving the chewy texture and being too lazy to peel them. Choose a good, evenly-shaped squash, so all your slices are of a similar diameter. The slices that have a hole in the middle where the seeds were will make the perfect receptacle for the pomegranate salsa. Almost as if they were designed for that very purpose . . .

SERVES 4 1 butternut squash (approx. 1.3kg) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp pomegranate molasses 200g feta, crumbled 2 tsp Aleppo pepper flakes, or more to taste (or use regular chilli flakes) 4 pitta breads, toasted and cut into strips, to serve For the salsa: 1 large pomegranate, seeds picked 3 spring onions, finely chopped 1 tbsp pomegranate molasses small bunch flat-leaf parsley, chopped few sprigs mint, leaves picked and chopped

Charred by Genevieve Taylor (Quadrille, £16.99); photography ©Jason Ingram

For the garlic yoghurt sauce: 5 tbsp Greek yoghurt 1 garlic clove, crushed 1-2 medium-hot red chillies, finely chopped

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1 Fire up the barbecue ready for direct and indirect cooking, or set a griddle pan over a medium heat to get hot. 2 Cut the butternut squash into 8 x 2½cm-thick slices and discard the seeds. Brush the slices with a little olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Arrange them on the barbecue so they are slightly off to the side of the fire. (If you are cooking on a griddle, lower the heat a little.) Cook for about 30 minutes, turning them over halfway, or until tender when pierced with the tip of a knife. 3 Brush the pomegranate molasses all over both sides and cook for a few minutes on one side until sticky and caramelised. Turn the squash over and top 4 slices with the crumbled feta, avoiding the slices with the hole so it doesn’t fall through! Sprinkle on the Aleppo pepper or chilli flakes and leave to cook for another couple of minutes, until the cheese begins to melt. Shut the barbecue lid or loosely cover the griddle with foil to help. 4 While the squash is cooking, make the pomegranate salsa by mixing together the pomegranate seeds, spring onions, pomegranate molasses, parsley and mint. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Make the yoghurt sauce by mixing the yoghurt, garlic and chilli with a little salt and pepper. 5 To serve, layer up 2 pieces of squash, starting with a feta-topped piece. Spoon over a little of the pomegranate salsa and the yoghurt sauce and serve with the pitta strips alongside.


Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday: 09:00 - 15:00, 18:00 - 22:00 | Sunday to Monday: 09:00 - 15:00


K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List 1

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GEN’S FLAMEFUELLED DINNER PARTY HAD US HANKERING FOR ALL THE FIRE COOKING KIT...

1 Skillet, £27.50 Hardy and rustic, this cast iron skillet by Ooni can easily take the heat of your campfire or barbecue. Find it at Lakeland in Bath and Bristol; lakeland.co.uk 2 Rapidfire Chimney Starter, £20.99 This bit o’ kit from Weber will get your charcoal glowing and ready to cook in no time – no nursing those briquettes for hours. Find it at John Lewis in Bristol; johnlewis.com 3 Spatula, £13 Hardy enough for using over fire, this spatula has an in-built bottle opener, too (grilling is thirsty work). From South West online retailer, Farrer and Tanner; farrar-tanner.co.uk 4 Kebab Skewers (set of five), £30 Spice Kitchen supports local charity Frank Water and supplies barbecuing tools to boot. Buy these skewers online; spicekitchenuk.com 5 Barbecue Mitt, £10 Love barbies, hate burnsies. Stay protected with this super-thick glove from Kitchens Cookshop in Bath and Bristol; steamertrading.co.uk

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Welcome to Mantra, an Indian Restaurant in the heart of Bath, that specialises in serving progressive Indian food. Mantra is a family run authentic Indian restaurant. Our dishes are healthily packed with flavour, crunch, punch and zing offering plenty of choice to vegetarians and vegans.Inspired by seasonal ingredients, our food contains only the freshest produce prepared in a way that captures the amazing diversity of India’s regional cuisines and childhood street food memories. 5, Bladud Buildings, The Paragon, Bath BA1 5LS Tel: 01225 446 332 Email: info@mantraofbath.co.uk | www.mantraofbath.co.uk


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e recently shuffled our way to beautiful Bath to catch up with Hugh Padfield at The Bath Soft Cheese Co. and to meet his heavenly herd. Of course, we had to eat some cheese (be rude not to) and see how it’s all done on picturesque Park Farm. “Life is normally a joy on the farm,” says Hugh. His family have farmed here for four generations; his grandfather, Edward Ernest Padfield, began with the original 240 acres of Park Farm sometime in August of 1914. His wife made Cheddar in one building, with the milking parlour (where the cows were milked by hand; no fancy machinery back then) just across the yard. Then, in the ’90s, Graham (Hugh’s dad) started to make cheese again. He was able to use the very same buildings his grandmother had made her Cheddar in almost 80 years before. Nowadays, things have

moved a little bit with the milking parlour even closer (less than 50 yards) to where the award-winning cheeses are made. As the farm is organic, there’s not a whiff of fungicides, pesticides or artificial fertilisers. The team use real manure and compost so the land, environment and waterways are uncontaminated. The milk for their exceptional cheese comes from a small organic herd of 160 (mainly) Holstein Friesian cows. The taste of the cheese reflects how much the grass changes, depending on the season. Wyfe of Bath Cheese Back in 2000, Graham Padfield created the Wyfe of Bath cheese, a nutty sweet semi-hard cheese inspired by The Canterbury Tales. It’s made by placing the curd in cloth-lined baskets. The cheese retains the basket shape and Hugh describes it as like “a taste of old England.”

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Bath Soft Cheese This is the cheese that started it all. The local Bath cheese was known in the 18th and 19th centuries and Admiral Lord Nelson himself was a huge fan. This was good enough for Graham Padfield, who found the recipe in an old grocer’s book. He discovered the cheese must be made with a full cream milk, with salt hand-sprinkled and then evenly distributed with the help of a feather (it’s all in the detail), yielding a soft cheese with a white mould. When we at Abel & Cole first tried their cheese all those years ago, we knew we had to spread the word beyond Bath. Everyone should experience this traditional treasure.

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SOON AS THE SUN APPEARS WE'LL BE RACING YOU TO ONE OF THESE ALFRESCO SPOTS

82 THROUGH THE STOMACH

DOCTOR RUPY AUJLA SAYS IT 'S THE BEST WAY TO THE HEART (WHEN IT COMES TO KEEPING IT HEALTHY)

INCLUDING!

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GARDENS, COURTYARDS AND TERRACES TO VISIT THIS SUMMER

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GaRdeN SMaRTY

DON’T BE A FOOL – GET YOUR TO-VISIT PUB GARDEN LIST COLLATED STAT, SO YOU CAN BE PRIMED AND READY FOR THE SUN’S NEXT HOTLY ANTICIPATED (AHEM) APPEARANCE...

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Abbey Hotel

Bath Every summer this central Bath hotel gets its terrace on the go. This is the first year that Pierre Koffmann and Marco Pierre White’s joint has been the flagship food offering here and it’s keeping with seasonal tradition with a new terrace menu, featuring the likes of sharing boards, Buddha bowls and wagyu hot dogs. The terrace bar has drinks covered, too – its flavoured gins (sloe and mulberry, for instance) will make great refreshments while watching the crowds stroll by in the sun.  

Alma Tavern

Bristol A secluded little suntrap, the hidden walled courtyard garden at this pub-cum-theatre in Clifton is all wooden decking, pretty greenery and strings of twinkling lights. Peckish? The chicken wings with spiced peanuts, blackcurrant ketchup and chilli is great to share. And, to drink, you could do a lot worse than the in-house favourite of William Chase Pink Grapefruit and Pomelo gin with Fever Tree tonic, garnished with a wedge of fresh grapefruit.

Bambalan

Bristol This city centre bar is all about the roof terrace in summer, where you’ll find an outdoor bar, plenty of seating, a ping pong table and DJs every weekend (keep an eye out for the occasional big name behind the decks at special ‘Summer Sessions’, like garage DJ and former radio presenter DJ Spoony, who will be in charge of the tunes on August Bank Holiday Sunday). Colourful Mediterranean-inspired food for summer includes fresh salads, mouthwatering mezze dishes and the signature ’babs.

Corkage, Chapel Row

Does drinking gin while working on our tans count as multi-tasking?

Bath This Mediterranean-style wine bar is hiding a rather sweet little garden at the rear. Sit amongst grapevines as you sip on a glass of something crisp and well-chilled – the staff are more than willing to help you pick your tipple from the extensive range of vinos (there are heaps available by the glass). And to eat? Small plates change up regularly but are always full of sunshine flavours – we loved the whole roasted globe artichoke on our last visit.

The Duck and Willow

Bristol This Downend pub will be making the most of its good-sized, family friendly alfresco space this summer by firing up the barbecue on the regular. A particularly special outdoor event is happening on 29 June too, to celebrate the new garden’s first birthday. Expect the festivities to include live music, a barbecue and a spritz bar – all of which will be going on throughout the afternoon and into the evening.

Hare and Hounds

Bath No round-up of local alfresco spots is complete without this popular pub; its huge

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garden is a destination in itself, complete with casual picnic benches on the grass and slightly more formal terrace dining above. There’s a play area to keep the little ’uns occupied and a boules pitch for the bigger ones. Being on the hillside means that this garden has some killer views spanning 10 miles – perfect for enjoying alongside a chargrilled tuna steak with toasted sesame, ginger and lime dressing.

Locksbrook Inn

Bath There’s a really generously sized courtyard here, with seats for 120 and an outdoor bar, complete with draught beer. The garden backs onto the canalside towpath, meaning you can while away whole afternoons watching boats and cyclists glide up and down the scenic backdrop from your bench or sofa. Perhaps while filling up on a homemade salami, rocket and parmesan-topped pizza, or grazing on one of the sharing boards? Just an idea.

Mud Dock

Bristol This industrial red-brick building, sat right on Bristol’s riverside, is celebrating its 25th anniversary as a cool café, bar, restaurant and bike shop. It’s in a prime position for summer, too: the balcony has elevated views across the floating harbour and is handily south-facing, making it a great place to squeeze as much of the sunshine out of the day as possible. The salads will go down a treat this season – the warm new potato, asparagus, halloumi, harissa, tahini and pine nut number is already proving a winner. Bristol Did you know that this joint has a roof terrace? Bedecked with obligatory greenery and festoon lights, it’s a great spot to chill out on long summer days with something from the new evening sharing menu. Try the heritage tomatoes with Laverstoke mozzarella and herbs along with a glass of the locally made Dunleavy rosé (ideal on a hot afternoon). And if the weather gods aren’t smiling on you? Just grab a seat under the canopy for some protection from the elements.

The Olive Shed

Bristol This Mediterranean mainstay has sat on the harbourside near the historic cranes for nearly 20 years. There’s plenty of seating at the front of the restaurant, looking over the old train tracks and across the river. On a warm day, grab a table out here, pick a bottle of vino from the organic and biodynamic-dominated list, and make like you’re on holiday. (The wild Atlantic prawns in garlic and olive oil are a great shout if you’re peckish, too.)

The Ostrich

Bristol Having recently reopened after a pretty substantial update, this pub – famous for its

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RO B CA RM IE R

Old Market Assembly

Not only can you enjoy some fresh air in these great gardens, but there are some ace views to make the most of, too


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sprawling outdoor seating area right on the edge of the river – is looking better than ever. Benches and striped deckchairs are partitioned by wooden planters, while squares of turf lay underfoot, adding to the colourful setting. An outdoor bar is in operation for drinks and an Airstream trailer is manned with chefs cooking American-style eats like burgers, corn dogs and loaded fries.

The Pony and Trap

Bristol This Michelin-starred pub has a mean garden, with views across the Chew Valley. It now includes an orchard, poly-tunnel and no-dig veg patches, too, which the kitchen will be getting much of its produce from this season (and guests are more than welcome to wander around). Don’t worry, though – there’s still plenty of room for alfresco dining, and the a la carte, pub classics and chef’s menus can be served out here. (Check out our review on the website for more on the latter!)

Roseate Villa

Bath This hotel – formed of two Victorian houses – has a small but well-maintained garden that’s in colourful bloom right about now and would make a great setting for a spot of afternoon tea. We’re thinking crustless finger sandwiches, still-warm, freshly baked scones (piled with jam and cream, natch), and homemade cakes and pastries washed down with chilled Prosecco, all enjoyed under dappled sunlight on a warm, lazy afternoon...

Salt and Malt, Chew Valley

From waterside terraces in the city to rural gardens, there are some lush alfresco spots to discover on our patch this summer

Bristol Killer fish and chips is the name of the game here, and there’s a great outdoor space to enjoy it in too, right on the edge of the lake. It’s recently seen the addition of a kiosk bar, which serves coffee and cake as well as boozier refreshments (three words: fish, chips, Prosecco), so look out for the little hatch. The full menu is served outside and is enjoyed picnic-style by people lazing on the grass, as well at the tables.

The Spotted Cow

Bristol The default beer garden for Bedminster residents, this is a really sizable outdoor space for the centre of the city and gets the sun all day. If the picnic tables and seats under the covered area are all full, then just plonk yourself down on the grass, as lots do when the sun’s out and empty chairs are like gold dust. Decent beers and wines are on the go here, as is a daily changing menu of pub grub with a bit of extra finesse.

Where’s your favourite spot for eating and drinking alfresco? Tweet us @crumbsmag!

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BATH’S BEST BUTCHER

The quality of the beef at Larkhall butchers is without doubt the best in Bristol and Bath. The steak from the dry ager is just ace. William – Larkhall customer

1 Lambridge Buildings, Bath BA1 6RS 01225 313 987 | info@larkhallbutchers.co.uk larkhallbutchers.co.uk


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RUPY AUJLA

NHS DOCTOR, PODCAST HOST, COOKERY BOOK AUTHOR (TWICE OVER) AND THE FOUNDER OF THE COUNTRY’S FIRST CULINARY MEDICINE COURSE FOR HEALTH PROS: THIS SURE IS A GUY ON A MISSION, FINDS JESSICA CARTER

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his face is no stranger to our local patch. In fact, Rupy’s enviously healthy looking and ever-smiley mug can often be spotted in Bristol, his culinary medicine course running at the university. Rupy is a practising NHS doctor with an obsession with food. Over the last few years he’s begun to formally turn his attention to the subject of diet, and it is, in fact, his studies for his masters in nutritional medicine that I interrupt (the things I do for you, dear reader) to interview him ahead of his most recent trip West, to appear at the Cheltenham Literary Festival. As he wrote in his first book, The Doctor’s Kitchen, his interest in the medicinal qualities of food began as a result of him starting to suffer from atrial fibrillation back in 2011 – a condition that causes the heart to beat irregularly. Faced with the decision of taking life-long medication or undergoing a risky operation, Rupy decided to focus on his eating habits and lifestyle while he weighed up those less-than-attractive options. He absorbed as much information as he could and read heaps of relevant research papers while relearning how to cook and overhauling his diet (which, as you can imagine with his job as a chaotically busy junior doctor, working long and irregular shifts, was less than perfect). Eventually, his heart condition excused itself and his symptoms dissolved. No wonder, then, that he developed something of an interest in food’s medicinal value, right? Thing is, by solely being ‘healthy’, most foods will never harness much popularity. We eat, fundamentally, to keep ourselves alive,

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sure, but that basic need is buried beneath more conscious layers of enjoyment, satisfaction and excitement. Most of us eat, a lot of the time at least, because we like to. “If you label something as ‘healthy’, you probably influence the mind to believe it’s not going to be tasty,” Rupy says. “That’s why I just like to talk about food, rather than ‘healthy food’ or ‘unhealthy food’.” Variety, plants and flavour are all motifs of this GP’s cookery, which aims to keep the joy of eating very much intact. After all, he appreciates a bloody good dinner as much as the rest of us. “My mum was an amazing cook,” he says. “She would make everything from Italian to Indian to Chinese... She taught me how to cook before I went to medical school – and it shows in how I like to combine healthy eating with culturally diverse meals.” Both his books feature colourful dishes from all over the globe (there’s everything from Ethiopian curry to Malaysian salad and Spanish chickpea stew in his latest release, Eat to Beat Illness, which came out in March). He makes use of culturally traditional herbs, spices and aromatics to make sure his recipes marry up nutritional value with flavour. “I think the most delicious food is fresh, seasonal, local, vibrant – it’s certainly the most tasty, where I get the most of that raw pleasure of eating – and I think that’s something we need to appreciate more. But, at the same time, there’s sometimes nothing more delicious than a warm doughnut – and I think we should be able to enjoy that. Healthy eating very much encompasses indulgence [knew it!] appropriately.” If you think he’s bluffing – a bit all-talk, no treats – he reaffirms the point when we talk about the Mediterranean diet that he champions so much on his podcast. “The diet’s key characteristics are legumes, beans, pulses – basically protein and fibre from those sorts of sources. It’s plant-focused so it’s limiting things like red meat, while oily fish certainly is something to be encouraged, at least two portions a week. Wine every now and then, red wine [see, told you], nuts and seeds for quality fats, and more from extra virgin olive oil, and plenty of colourful vegetables. Pretty much the principles of healthy eating which I talk about in Eat to Beat Illness.”

CRUMBSMAG.COM


G R I L L E D

ETHIOPIAN BERBERE CURRY THIS DELICIOUS CURRY is inspired by Ethiopian cuisine and uses a spice blend called berbere. I would describe it as a spicy masala – it has a fantastic heat to it. It tastes phenomenal with the mangetout and greens, but you could use any vegetables you have to hand. I learnt the trick of adding nut butter to rice from a young Zimbabwean chef who told me it was a staple in their cuisine. It adds protein to the wholegrain rice and tastes wonderful with this curry.

Plant-led cooking is a major theme in both of Rupy’s books – although there is a small smattering of meaty meals among the pages – and is a concept we’re hardly unacquainted with, following recent years’ revelations about the detrimental effects of our excessive meat industry. Rupy is coming less from the environmental angle in his arguments, though, and very much more from a health perspective. “The evidence base behind plant-focused eating is pretty much undeniable. That’s why I can put it in black and white, on paper, and why I talk about it as much as possible. When you look at Mediterranean diets, when you look at long cohort studies, you can see why it’s so important. Plant-focussed eating really is the way forward from a health and wellbeing perspective.” I ask him about those research papers, as there must be infinite amounts of information on food and diet to wade through. “You’re right,” he says, “there are endless clinical and nutritional research papers. So, it’s a combination of looking at reviews, mechanisms, pathogenesis behind why particular diets work etcetera: those are things that I focus on.” His work in medicine – along with his own personal experiences – has totally changed the way Rupy thinks about food. And it works both ways, he says. “Food has completely changed the way I think about medicine and health. Not only have I had the anecdotal experience myself, but having open and honest conversations with my patients has influenced my practice. Seeing the benefits of dietary change on people, as well as lifestyle change, is something that is very hard to ignore. This gives me even more reason to think about food in a medicinal context. There is no separating the two.” If food can have such a dramatic and holistic effect on our health (and I’m including mental health Recipe from The Doctor’s there, too, which is something Kitchen: Eat to Beat Illness, Rupy delves into a bit more in by Rupy Aujla (Harper his new book), it’s a wonder that Thorstons, £16.99)

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SERVES 4 2 tbsp coconut oil 2 red onions, thinly sliced into half-moons 3 tsp berbere spice blend 100g baby tomatoes, halved 100g peas (fresh or thawed) 200g mangetout 150g broccoli, florets broken into 3cm pieces TIP! 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes You can find 1 x 400g tin coconut milk berbere spice 250g red Camargue rice, soaked in water blend in most for at least 20 minutes, then drained supermarkets, 350ml vegetable stock but Jamaican Jerk 1 tbsp peanut butter (smooth or crunchy) can work well as 25g fresh coriander, finely chopped a substitute 1 Melt the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat then add the onions with the spice blend and cook for 2 minutes, stirring. Add the baby tomatoes and cook for a further minute. Toss in the peas, mangetout and broccoli florets, stirring to coat them in the spices, then add the chopped tomatoes and coconut milk. Bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes while you cook the rice. 2 Tip the rice into a dry saucepan over a medium heat. Cook the grains for 1-2 minutes until they are dry and smell toasted, then add the vegetable stock and peanut butter. Stir, cover and simmer for 15 minutes until the rice has absorbed the water and the grains are cooked. 3 Fold most of the coriander into the curry and scatter the rest on top of the rice as a garnish, then serve.

we’ve forgotten that connection and find ourselves in a place where medicine and food are totally siloed from each other. “I think it’s probably because of the rise of relying on pharmaceuticals as cure-alls for everything, and that’s just simply not the case – you can’t rely on simple molecules having dramatic impacts on the complex physiology of our bodies and our minds. I think now we’re realising just how much of an impact lifestyle medicine has, and why it’s so important.” The ever-increasing demand for convenience has played its part too. The 21st century has seen our lives become busier than ever, so preparing meals with a variety of fresh ingredients, from scratch, seems like too much of an undertaking, simply becoming the thing that sits between us and whatever it is we want to do in the evening after work (Netflix, making my dog pull amusing faces and falling down Wikipedia rabbit holes, in case you were interested). But this is something it’s imperative that we work around, thinks Rupy. And, fair play, if he’s pulled it off as an NHS doctor, then our own excuses seem pretty feeble. “My mum was a lawyer and worked as a graphic designer and did a whole bunch of other things – she was still able to put delicious food on the table. Rather than food preparation being a chore, it’s a very important facet of life – that’s the philosophy I grew up with.”

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AFTERS

NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM HIGHLIGHTS

Woky Ko: Kaiju is all about the robata grill, so expect some serious char

90 GRILL OUT

CARGO'S NEWT JAPANESE JOINIJU WOKY KO: KAE IS ON FIR

93 PICTURE PERFECT? TIVOLI

INCLUDING

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NEW DOES BATH'S IV IN THE CINEMA DEL AER MENT? FOOD DEP RT

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96 CAFÉ CULTURE NEW 'S NO 12 EASTONVICE DINNER SER

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F GLASSES OED IN P VINO, SUBPRISTOL AN EAST FF CA


K I R S T I E YO U N G

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J A PA N E S E J O I N T S

WOKY KO: KAIJU THIS IS AN ON-THE-MONEY ADDITION TO WAPPING WHARF BY BRISTOL HERO LARKIN CEN, WRITES CHARLIE LYON

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t was a bit like a kid’s marble painting, the effect that the kamo dango (that’s duck meatball to you and I) had created, having rolled around the inside of my rucksack, smearing its contents with gleaming cerise-coloured plum ketchup. It had escaped from my cardboard takeaway box, you see, which contained the leftovers from my first meal at Woky Ko: Kaiju. That duck ball was a salvaged treasure – with a beautiful crust on the outer and a juicy, melty middle, it was lightly spiced and smokeinfused from the Japanese robata grill it had been cooked over. We’d been served three on a skewer (£6) alongside a bright and tangy fermented plum sauce – a pairing that’s up there with the best in the city. I told myself it was more illustrative of my waste reduction efforts than shameful greed when I asked our server to box up the scraps I was too full to finish. You have to do it at Woky Ko: Kaiju, though; every bite is so layered with flavour, so carefully thought out, that it’s a crime to leave even a crumb. Also in that box (these, luckily, had stayed put) were a few cubes of raw salmon from a generous bowl of super-fresh fish (£8.50) coated with a tangy yuzu and shallot dressing. The soft pink cubes were swathed in fronds of herby dill, juicy, salty emerald-coloured wakame and peppy spring onion. The bright pink and green melange not only looked spectacular but had really memorable flavour. But would you expect anything less from Larkin Cen? After launching Woky Ko: Kauto last year, the Bristol food hero (sure, technically he’s from Cardiff, but he’s lived here since 2010 and has had restaurants in the city for the last three years – so I’m claiming him as our own) opened his third local venture in March. Kaiju, an izakaya-style joint (basically the cool, Japanese equivalent of a pub), is housed in a couple of


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shipping containers sat above Meatbox and Squeezed at Cargo. This light-filled space has floor-to-ceiling glass on one side and a first-floor outdoor terrace, promising top alfresco dining potential. Making it even more spot-on for summer is its focus on Japanese coal-fired cuisine (i.e. a blooming decent barbecue); the subtle and moreish char of my duck balls was imparted by speciality Binchotan briquettes. Chef John Watson, formerly of Redland restaurant No Man’s Grace, has been brought onboard to head up the kitchen, which has yakitori (grilled skewers) at its core. There’s ramen too, with toppings from that grill. The rich, deeply flavoured tantanmen number (£12.95) is a touch heavier and richer than your regular ramen, deliciously garlicky and gingery, with moist ground pork and a good helping of greens and beansprouts to add crunch. The pork floats atop an almost creamy, nutty soup – warming and comforting but still fresh and flavoursome. How did we ever do without this kind of food in Bristol? (Seriously, what did we eat 10 years ago?) And it’s not just meat that’s given the rotaba treatment. The shiitake mushrooms (£3) have an amazing roasted garlic and soy flavour, the umami deepened with the smoke. On the day we went for our feed, there was a brand new veg dish on the menu too – cauliflower, fried in a light batter with lemongrass Sriracha mayo and killer

kimchi sesame seeds (£6.50). See what we mean about the detail? Cen’s signature dessert – the ice cream bao bun – is noticeably absent from the Kaiju menu, but (stay with me, folks), there are two puds that are even better. Contentious, I know. First of all, the miso marshmallow (£4) is everything that’s right about the combo of sweet and savoury – the airy, vanillary ’mallow had been skewered then covered with miso and charred on the grill, giving it a crisp and salty, savoury skin. The lemon and ginger cream (£4) is similar in effect – a cool, thick and tangy cream with heaps of sesame grains, which bring this posset-like dish into the 21st century. All in all, it’s another triumph – an exciting concept with cutting-edge food that’s perfectly executed – and yet another Cargo venue to add to your ‘must-visit’ list. Just don’t forget your takeaway box. And remember to close the lid properly on the way home.

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Woky Ko: Kaiju, Unit 25, Cargo 2, Wapping Wharf, Bristol BS1 6ZA; wokyko.com


AV SA AI LT LA M BL A E RSH EN D LA O M F B JU NE

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MOLESWORTHS

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101 Henleaze Road, Bristol BS9 4JP. Henleaze 0117 962 1095 | Frampton 01454 777 337 www.henleazebutchers.co.uk

Hondo Sushi and Japanese fine dining restaurant

Freshly prepared food using the best quality produce 2 floors of dining and takeaways available

Sushi — Bentos — Donburi Bao buns — Katsu currys

8-9 St James's Parade, Bath

T: 01225 920420


A F T E R S

UNIQUE VENUES

TIVOLI

WATCHING FILMS IS HUNGRY WORK – LUCKILY FOR SAMUEL GOLDSMITH, THIS BATH NEWCOMER DELIVERS ON FOOD AS WELL AS ENTERTAINMENT

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ath’s newest cinema experience is the first of its kind to open in the UK and, along with four screens, has brought with it a new café and bar. Described in its promo material as a “brand-new boutique cinema concept”, it does actually live up to the hype – and is probably the most handsome venue to be crafted in Bath since the 18th-century landscaped gardens of Prior Park. Okay, that might be an overstatement, but it has been beautifully designed – arriving at the firstfloor bar isn’t unlike walking onto the set of The Great Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan not included, sorry). You can eat in the auditorium if you like – there’s something a little thrilling about being served food and drinks to your sofa (über comfortable, by the way, and complete with side-table and lamp) whilst watching the latest flick – but we opted to tuck in, post-screening, in the stylish surroundings of the bar and restaurant. (If you’re confident enough that you can eat in dim lighting while also watching a film without spilling a fair proportion of the meal down you, then make sure you arrive in plenty of time to pre-order. Basically, don’t try and skip the trailers if you want to be treated like royalty.) The lounge is a thing of beauty, expertly devised by London-based agency Run For The Hills. It shows definite influence from the Art Deco movement but has been given an urban twist (urban-deco, as it’s known by the kids). There are plush soft furnishings – think lots of cushions and velvet – as well


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as more formal seating, suitable for sit-down meals. They’ve managed to fit a lot into the space but it doesn’t feel cramped, with the large windows letting in plenty of light. There’s even a fireplace at the back, which lends that area a cosy, lounge-type feel. It’s an inviting space that’s great for cocktails, coffee or a bite to eat, whether you plan to catch a film or not. Speaking of which, considering that the Tivoli is, first and foremost, a cinema, the menu is pretty impressive. To drink there are cocktails – many with a cinematic spin, like the Popcorn Espresso Martini – as well as wines, spirits and beers (draught and bottles). The food ranges from nachos and hot dogs – as you’d expect at your local picture house, albeit minus the addition of wild boar meat, perhaps – to stonebaked pizzas and small plates, of which I can vouch for the salt and pepper squid (£5.90), with its crisp batter and tender meat. But let’s return to that cinema staple for a minute – the hot dog (£6.90). Here you can have it in ‘chilli dog’ form with sriracha mayo or, as we did, made from wild boar meat. For around £1.50 more than the usual chain cinema offerings, this is a triumph, with good flavour and a pretty juicy texture. An onion jam offers a nicely sticky sweetness and gherkins lay on top to cut through the rich meat. And – as is so often not the case anymore – a side of skin-on fries is included as standard (with an option to upgrade to sweet potato fries for a quid). If you’re not feeling particularly hungry or fancy more of a grazing session, the range of small plates is ideal, as are the cheese, continental meat, and mezze boards. The latter (£11 for one, £21 for two) comes with pea and mint falafel, marinated olives, roasted peppers, houmous, tzatziki and flatbread. Those falafels were particularly good; fresh, bright green peas that hold their flavour well – a sure sign they have been prepared in-house (or scratch-cooked,

as the venue calls it). The only slight disappointments were the duck croquettes with plum sauce (£5.80), which just didn’t do it for me, and the salted caramel sundae (£5), being heavy on the cream and light on texture and flavour. Staff are friendly and polite without being over familiar, and even on the weekday afternoon we visited there were a few other tables in – freelancers and students drinking coffee and grazing as they worked on their laptops. The most impressive thing about the food experience here for me, though, is the prices – especially considering the quality you get. (I can’t speak for the popcorn, though – have you ever been to a cinema where that’s reasonably priced? Didn’t think so).

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Tovoli, 6-8 Dorchester Street, Southgate, Bath BA1 1SS; tivolicinemas.com


NEIGHBOURHOOD GEMS

NO 12 EASTON HAVING RECENTLY LAUNCHED AN EVENING A LA CARTE MENU, THIS POPULAR LITTLE CAFÉ HAS DOUBLED ITS APPEAL, THINKS JESSICA CARTER

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ables covered in chequered linen, flickering tea lights, and soft, bubbly jazz music floating from the speakers is the setting I find myself returning to, the arrival of my wine having snapped me out of the people-watching trance I’d slipped into while staring onto the still-sunny street. No 12 Easton perches on a corner of the High Street, with little bistro tables and chairs sat out on the pavement in front of its windowed facade. Inside is a small, unfussy dining area, with wooden shelving displaying a few trailing plants and vintage knickknacks as well as coffee beans and keep cups to buy. Metro tiles and blackboards cover the back wall behind the counter, and adjacent is a wall of wine, where bottles (to drink in or take away) line up neatly, with uniform brown labels hanging from their necks. This is a casual, multi-purpose space (the glass food counters and collection of children’s books being two of the biggest nods to its daytime guise), which acts as a daytime café, wine and beer shop and, as of last March, on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings, a relaxed little bistro of sorts. It was founded in 2013 by Chris Williams (also of No 25a Old Market) and about a year ago was taken on by Madeleine Andrews, the pair having met when she co-hosted a pop-up dinner here. Having worked as a wine and beer buyer, she’s well clued-up in that area, hence the addition of the bottle shop, fully stocked beer fridge, carefully considered list of wines on the evening menu, and my declining to choose from it in favour of her kindly doing the honours. A glass of Fontaréche Corbieres rosé from France is deposited on the table in front of me. All pale pink and Provance in looks, it promises a crisp, strawberry-laced mouthful. It’s been chosen to match


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my starter of honey roasted carrots with crumbs of feta and a scattering of toasted flaked almonds (£5.95). Lightly dressed salad leaves mingle with the multicoloured carrots, which have been cooked until they’re slightly shrivelled and almost concentrated. The first mouthful is aromatic with honey, the hint of sweetness rounded by the gently salty cheese. Across the table are fat, lightly charred spears of in-season asparagus, served on a really nicely done aioli – of which there is a vegan option, should you want it – and fresh lemon (£4.95). There are, of course, meatier ways to start your meal if you’d prefer, by way of chorizo cooked in cider (£6.95) or smoked mackerel (£5.96). For mains, the lamb with salsa verde, greens and potatoes (£14.95) just about wins out in my panic ordering over the identically priced Portuguese seafood stew with sourdough. The meat is sliced to reveal a very pale pink middle, while a chunky salsa verde is heaped on top, crisp with tiny cubes of fresh apple. Its sharpness is well-judged and the coarse texture a bonus. Vibrant green, the veg is cooked ideally, retaining its bite and nutrition, and sautéed potatoes are welcome, golden little hits of carb. Underneath all that lurks a swipe of zesty aioli – a nice touch that adds an extra layer of flavour (as does the light and easy Californian red I’m washing it all down with).

The vegan bean ball stew (£11.95) sees beans and nuts bound together to form a meaty texture, the balls slathered in a rich and fresh-tasting Italian-style tomato sauce and resting on a generous bed of fluffy couscous. Both plates are all but licked clean before the desserts arrive – a sweet-savoury chocolate brownie with peanut butter and salted caramel ice cream, and a light and fresh, almond-topped lemon posset with cardamon shortbread (both £4.95). This evening is a quiet one, with just another table of two inside and one more out in the revamped courtyard, with the odd customer popping in for wine or beer. (I’ve a feeling quiet evenings might become rarities, though.) While the food prices may be a whisper more than you’d expect in the setting (wines, as it goes, are super reasonable, with glasses from £4 and bottles from £14 to drink in), portions are hearty and the quality is good. If an outright bargain is what you’re after, visit on a Wednesday evening when you can get a main and a glass of wine for a tenner.

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No 12 Easton, 12 High Street, Bristol BS5 6DL; 0117 951 4524; no12easton.com


L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

NaTaLIe BReReTON

THE BRISTOL BLOGGER, BURGER HUNTER, NEGRONI SIPPER AND MEMBER OF TEAM CRUMBS SHARES HER FAVOURITE LOCAL HANGOUTS

Quick! Now add this little lot to your contacts book... The Volunteer Tavern, Bristol BS2 9DX; volunteertavern.co.uk Her Majesty’s Secret Service, Bristol BS8 2PH; hmssbristol.com 25a Old Market, Bristol BS2 0HB; instagram.com/25a_oldmarket Wilsons, Bristol BS6 6PF; wilsonsrestaurant.co.uk Squeezed, Bristol BS1 6WE; facebook.com/bristolsqueezed For Mice and Men; formiceandmen.com Broken Dock, Bristol BS1 5SY; brokendock.co.uk Beckford Bottle Shop, Bath BA1 2QP; beckfordbottleshop.com Pasta Loco, Bristol BS6 6JY; pastaloco.co.uk The Pony and Trap, Chew Magna BS40 8TQ; theponyandtrap.co.uk The Bank Tavern, Bristol BS1 2HR; banktavern.com Brunel’s Buttery, Bristol BS1 6UD; 0117 929 1696 The Clove, Bristol BS3 3EL; thecloverestaurant.co.uk The Gallimaufry, Bristol BS7 8AL; thegallimaufry.co.uk Zanky’s, Bristol BS7 0PA; zankysbristol.co.uk

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QUICK PINT? The Volunteer Tavern. Admittedly, it’s only about 20 steps from my front door, but this lush little pub has a great beer garden and cosy, friendly atmosphere which makes it a lovely place for a swift one. They have pub dogs, too. CHEEKY COCKTAIL? Head to Her Majesty’s Secret Service for the imaginative cocktails, thumping playlists and some of the nicest chaps you’ll ever meet. Grab a stool at the bar, get a game of Jenga on the go and order the Greenhouse Project cocktail. BEST BREW? 25a Old Market. Owner Chris will greet you as if he has known you forever and the café has delicious cakes and savouries to eat with your cuppa. Settle down and relax while the hip-hop playlist provides the perfect soundtrack to your sipping.  POSH NOSH? Wilsons. Owner Jan would probably kill me if he heard me say his food is ‘posh’, but dining here is truly an exquisite experience with some incredible cooking. Completely laid-back and unstuffy, this restaurant never fails to impress me and it’s always my first choice when I want adventurous and delicious food.  COMFORT FOOD? Squeezed. There is nothing a burger from Alex (recently named Burger Chef of the Year at the National Burger Awards) can’t fix – my favourite is the St Werburger. He makes all his own sauces and flavoured lemonades, as well. STREET FOOD? For Mice and Men. Firstly because I love cheese, and secondly ’cause I love sandwiches. Choose from a selection of local cheeses, meats and fresh vegetables to have grilled on two slabs of sourdough from Mark’s Bread with homemade sauces.  ALFRESCO FEASTING? When the sun comes out, I head to Broken Dock – its outside seating gets sunshine all day long and has views across the harbour. There’s a great selection of cocktails and the food is always wonderful.   HIDDEN GEM? Beckford Bottle Shop. From the outside it looks like somewhere to just pick up a fantastic bottle of plonk, but step inside and there’s a bar to enjoy wines by the glass, and a relaxed restaurant serving up seasonal sharing plates. WITH FRIENDS? Pasta Loco – where else? The front of house team make you feel as though you are the only people in the restaurant, the food is consistently excellent, and having a good time is encouraged as much as possible. If it’s on the menu, order the carbonara.   WITH FAMILY? The Pony and Trap. This cosy pub with gorgeous views serves pub classics, seasonal dishes and tasting menus. The relaxed atmosphere makes it perfect for whiling away the afternoon, and going is a great excuse to get everyone together.  SUNDAY LUNCH? It has to be The Bank Tavern. Heading to this great Bristol boozer for a roast is like going home to your parents’ house; hearty food which always hits the spot. (The only difference being in that you can drink as much wine as you like with lunch without being told off.) BREAKFAST? I’m often a little too fragile on weekend mornings to enjoy breakfast; however, a walk around the docks and a bacon sarnie from Brunel’s Buttery always goes down a treat. Sometimes, the simplest things can be the most delicious.  BEST CURRY? The Clove in Bedminster. My go-to order is chicken chaat followed by jalfrezi with a side of sag paneer. I never manage to eat it all, but I definitely enjoy trying, and it tastes great the next day. BEST ATMOSPHERE? The Gallimaufry. It’s always buzzing with locals and has such a nice vibe, which I love whether I am there to eat, having a quick drink, or coming for the evening. It’s a really friendly venue and I’m always recommending it to people. MOST UNDERRATED? Zanky’s. This intimate, family-run Italian is totally fantastic. The food is fresh and delicious, and the passion is evident from the family that run it. Order the Sicilian wine to go with your meal, and the ragu if it’s on the menu.

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Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 90  

Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 90  

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