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CRUMBS BATH & BRISTOL NO.79 AUGUST 2018

Crumbs Awards are back!

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AUGUST 2018

A little slice of foodie heaven What do you call a bee that’s having a bad hair day? A frisbee!

E a t b i g ! Sweetes 9 neat recipes Eat on atur

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carreepastry chefst?a thing of the pas

Can’t stand the hWeoat…? rking a

your fGreaetegrtub!

to grab & go

y e n Ho , y e n Ho

hot stove at Bristol’s

Too Many Critics TAKE ThE hONEY AND RUN!

Plus!

From top local foodies

Honest Burgers Holy Cow Hop Pole

(Ideal for busy bees!)

MasterChef's

George Kallias

on his favourite haunts

how ylomue thrThiislissue, we put our hounrey where o e mouths ar


ISSUE 79 AUGUST 2018 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk CONTRIBUTOR

AEMILIA SMITH ART DIRECTOR

TREVOR GILHAM

hONeY ON mY mINd

ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE

ALISTAIR TAYLOR alistair.taylor@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER

GEMMA SCRINE gemma.scrine@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we went to Poco’s first Meet the Producer event and tucked into a vegan feast of Community Farm produce

large version

IT’S BEEN A full-on week at Crumbs HQ; not only have we been busy finishing off this fine specimen of a magazine, but things have been ramping right up in the Crumbs Awards stakes, too. We had hundreds of entries sent in for this year’s awards, which will be our second, following the awesome shindig that went on at The Bristol Old Vic last October. The standard is, once again, right up there by all accounts, illustrating what a varied and exciting food scene we have on our patch. And I’m not only talking about great places to eat and drink, but also trailblazing initiatives, pioneering producers, and a host of food and drink focused events. A huge thank you goes to every single business and individual who’s got involved and shared their story. Now that we have our shortlist (check out crumbsmagawards.com to see who made it!), it’s onwards with the judging process. Our fresh panel of industry pros (including Romy Gill MBE, co-owner of Poco Jennifer Best, Sharpham Park’s Roger Saul, and The Bath Pub Company founder Joe Cussens) will have quite the task on their hands, deciding who will take home those hefty trophies this year. Back to the matter at hand, though (i.e. this here bit o’ reading material): you may well notice a theme running throughout the pages. Our fascinating Hero Ingredient, honey, has properly captured our imaginations, so as well as a big three-pager on the lovely stuff itself, you’ll find locally available honey products, bee-inspired kitchen and homeware, and recipes involving the gloriously golden goo – just look out for the Mo’ Honey badge. Right, I’m buzzing off (genuinely sorry for that one), so you can tuck in.

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

Did you know we have an app? You can read both editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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TABLE OF CONTENTs

Lucknam Park’s desserts are pretty spesh, we think...

NO.79 AUGUST 2018

STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT Honey sweet 14 OPENINGS ETC News, updated 22 SIX PACK Must-try Indian dishes 24 ASK THE EXPERT We grill the founder of Bristol Drum Smokers CHEF! Amazing recipes from the region’s top kitchens and cooks 35 Bath Gin-cured salmon, by Mark Pearson 36 Jackfruit balls with sofrito sauce, by Babs Greaves 38 Slow-cooked hogget with relish, by Jo and Pete Cranston

40 Fig and honey clafoutis, by Genevieve Taylor 43 Prawn malai curry, by Romy Gill ADDITIONAL RECIPES

12 Sobrasada with honey and walnut, by Freddy Bird 27 Barbecue chicken wings with spice rub, by Danny Hawke 30 Fig and feta pide, by Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich 54 Aubergine rolls, by Jessica Carter KITCHEN ARMOURY 50 SUPPER CLUB Too Many Critics lands in Bristol 56 THE WANT LIST The bee’s knees

MAINS 63 GO TIME Great local feeds to enjoy on the hoof 70 DESSERT ISLAND What’s going on with the pastry chef industry? AFTERS New and notable restaurants, cafés and bars 76 Honest Burgers 79 The Holy Cow Café 80 The Hop Pole PLUS! 82 LITTLE BLACK BOOK MasterChef’s George Kallias makes his local picks


STARTERs

INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

StILL GOinG strONG

NOT READY FOR THE WARM SEASON TO END YET? HERE ARE SOME OF ITS LAST FOODIE EVENTS; GET INVOLVED AND SOAK UP THOSE SUMMER VIBES WHILE YOU STILL CAN… 10-12 AUGUST COCK AND BULL FESTIVAL

7-8 SEPTEMBER THE COFFEE HOUSE PROJECT

26 AUGUST TIMBRELL’S GATHERING 2.0

8 SEPTEMBER WHISKY UNDERGROUND

Taking place near Bath – the exact location is all hush-hush – this foodie family festival aims to be one ‘for the mind, body and soul’, promising a fun-packed programme. Expect over 50 music acts on six mini stages, farmyard antics and activities, and home-grown food from Jamie’s Farm. All the proceeds from the festival go to the Jamie’s Farm Charity, so you’ll be doing a good deed as you party. Tickets are available online and start at £50 for an adult day pass. cockandbullfestival.co.uk

Following the huge success of this event last year, Timbrell’s Yard in Bradford-on-Avon is bringing back its Gathering for 2018. On the Sunday of the August Bank Holiday, its spacious courtyard will be filled with pop-up bars, music and street food from exec chef Tom Blake, formerly of River Cottage. The fun kicks off at this riverside pub at 4.30pm, and will go on until late. timbrellsyard.com

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Promising to make caffeinated dreams come true, The Coffee House Project is the first coffee festival to hit Bristol. Taking over the Passenger Shed, it will involve talks, tastings and workshops, with up to 50 exhibitors contributing to the caffeine-fuelled fun. And it wouldn’t be a Bristol festival without gourmet street food, right? Here it’ll come from the likes of Pinkmans and Swoon. Tickets are available online now, and start from £14. thecoffeehouseproject.co.uk

Whether you are a whisky expert or enthusiastic novice, you’ll heart this unique event held in the underground tunnels at the Loco Klub. The festival will shine the spotlight on over 200 whiskies, from major brands to the locally loved and independently made varieties. Creative master classes, collaborations with local bars and experts, music, and top Bristol street food all combine to make this a great day out for those who are partial to a dram. Tickets are available online at £35 (plus fee). whiskybristol.co.uk

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MHONEY

HONEY WHETHER IT’S GIVING A GLORIOUS GLAZE TO PORK OR ADDING A BUZZ TO YOUR BREKKIE, HEAVENLY HONEY KEEPS ON GIVING. A NECTAR THAT’S SWEETER THAN SUGAR YET HEAVING WITH HEALTH BENEFITS, IT CAN’T HELP BUT TURN MEALS INTO MASTERPIECES

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S T A R T E R S

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hick and gooey, golden and fragrant, and sweet – above all, sweet – honey always seems indulgent. Perhaps because of that, it feels like it should be a health horror story of epic proportions. But wait! Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, this stuff is somehow, amazingly, good for us too – a fact sweet-toothed humans have known for centuries, wrestling prehistoric bears for it back in the Stone Age and creating Spanish cave paintings to celebrate it 8,000 years ago. Back then we’d eat the stuff, make it central to our medicine, and even use the leftover beeswax to waterproof our pots and bowls. As it resists microorganisms so effectively, sealed honey won’t spoil – not for thousands of years, anyway, and other foods immersed in it get preserved for centuries too. The ancient Egyptians offered honey to the gods and used it both to embalm the dead and sweeten their biscuits; the Greeks and Romans knew it worked wonders on fevers and wounds; and its spiritual applications were legion in ancient India and China. The Bible and Qur’an are full of references to honey, while – in the Jewish tradition – honey is considered kosher even though it’s produced by flying insects, distinctly non-kosher creatures. Why? Tradition, mainly – it’s been part of Jewish life since at least the 10th century BC – and because it’s so blooming delicious, of course. But where does honey come from? Part of the joy of it is that it’s specifically designed to be food; a sweet, viscous gloop created by bees and their near relatives (including, yes, some wasps) using floral nectar, that sugary secretion of plants, and stored in wax structures called honeycombs. Each bee will make about half a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime, though the way they do this isn’t always pretty (regurgitation features heavily). Almost all the honey we eat is created by the small, not particularly exciting-looking honey bee (or Apis mellifera) – the fatter, prettier bumblebee doesn’t bother making any, because they’re resigned to dying each winter, while honey bee colonies live on, and so require winter stores. Each hive will have a single female queen bee, plenty of male drones to fertilise her, and up to 40,000 female worker bees. And yes, that means every bee you see flying around is a girl. The honey we eat is either collected from wild colonies, or from the hives of domesticated bees. Basically, we make them a nice home, with the deal being that we’ll steal loads of the food they make in return, leaving them just enough to live on. It didn’t always used to be this way, though, and before the invention of removable frames, bee colonies were often decimated each harvest, then replaced from scratch next spring. (Rude, quite frankly.) Honey predates refined sugar, so for centuries was a vital sweetening agent. And even today, honey lovers treat it with the same reverence as Winnie the Pooh once did, claiming miraculous healing properties for the runny stuff ranging from keeping a lid on cancer and heart disease to reducing ulcers, easing

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digestive problems, sorting out tickly coughs, healing wounds, and even making us better athletes. It’s an almost miraculous list, but how many of these qualities are verifiable? Amazingly, it seems like quite a lot. Of course, not all honey is equal – we sometimes worry about pesticides contaminating it, for instance – but even the lesser stuff is heavy in vitamins and minerals (vitamins A and C, calcium and iron being the big ones), and its antibacterial properties are undisputed. Indeed, honey has been proven effective against everything from E. coli to salmonella; thank the fact that it’s naturally acidic, and that bees leave it full of hydrogen peroxide as they synthesise flower pollen. This may be how honey helps speed up wound healing too, and study after study has shown how well it copes with ulcers, burns and the like – even those that shrug off antibiotics. It can be used on everything from diabetic foot ulcers to haemorrhoids, while its anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and antioxidant properties mean it’s been used with success to treat dandruff – and even, some claim, hair loss. What else? Well, honey helps digest the fat stored in your body, aiding weight loss. And athletes love the way it helps maintain blood sugar levels and restores glycogen after a workout, as well as regulates the amount of insulin in the body.

taste. (It’s made from tree sap as opposed to nectar, which is eaten by small insects called aphids – greenflies and the like – then pooed out on the bark of the tree; bees then collect this, instead of their favoured nectar, and turn it into honey.) Some of our favourites include English clover honey, Scottish heather honey, French lavender honey and American orange blossom honey, but there are dozens more – some swear by the strongly flavoured honey from the flowers of New Zealand’s manuka tree, for instance. Mostly, we choose by flavour and consistency, but keep in mind that heating honey changes its chemical composition and greatly reduces its benefits, meaning unprocessed raw honey – which hasn’t been heated, pasteurised, clarified or filtered – is best. Much of what’s good about honey is down to the pollen present within, so beware the cheap stuff that looks too transparent and clear, as it probably been ultra-filtered to the point where there’s little left but a boring glucose-fructose solution. Basically, there are various ways manufacturers can ruin this glorious food – so it’s always worth studying the small print on the jar.

Of course, what we’re really interested in is honey’s use as food, mostly in baking, though it has savoury applications too, and makes a great sweetener in teas and sauces, and as a spread for toast. Because it’s almost twice as sweet as sugar, you generally need to use less of it in any given recipe, too. Honey mustard chicken is a classic, and it also loves making a sticky marinade for pork, sausages, or root veggies like parsnips. It goes well with robust fish like salmon or mackerel, too. Honey makes a great dressing for salads, adores milk products like cheeses, and chums up with berries and yoghurt in breakfast fare, whether that involves pancakes and crumpets or fruit salads and granola. And then, of course, there are the desserts – flapjacks and muffins, pastries and cakes – perhaps to be washed down with the honey wine known as mead, one of the world’s oldest fermented beverages, dating back maybe 9,000 years. What sort of honey should you buy? Regular jars come in various types. There’s blended supermarket honey, often a mixture of whatever is cheapest from several countries, and probably either heat-processed and finely filtered to help it stay liquid, or deliberately crystallised and sold as ‘set honey’, the kind that you spread with a knife. Then there are the specialist honeys, which come from bees that have harvested nectar of a particular type, which is then simply warmed and gently filtered, allowing more of the taste and nutritional goodness to stay in the jar. Wildflower honey is made from the nectar of many types of flower; monofloral honey is mostly one type of flower; and then there’s the rarer honeydew honey, which is dark, not as sweet, and generally a specialist

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R E C I P E

MHONEY THIS NO-PREP RECIPE BY FREDDY BIRD IS GREAT FOR A GROUP AND INVOLVES ZERO EFFORT…

PURISTS WILL TELL you that raw honey is the only honey to eat. It’s true; it’s better for you (containing more beneficial enzymes and antioxidants) and has many health benefits. The flavour is also much better. I’ve used both raw and regular for this recipe before, and both are delicious, but raw really is superior in every way. It’s not cheap, but you only need a little drizzle! I probably eat more honey with savoury foods than with sweet. Oatcakes with a thick layer of salted butter and honey is a favourite snack with a cup of tea, and a chunk of honeycomb with pecorino is a regular on my lunch table at home. This recipe is often on our tapas menu at both Lidos. The slightly sour tang to the sobrasada (a raw, cured sausage from the Balearic islands, which I’ve seen increasingly in our supermarkets) is perfect with a drizzle of sweet honey, while the walnuts lend a creamy bitterness and added crunch. Occasionally I add a bit of goat’s cheese to the recipe below, but I think I prefer it in this simple manner. As always with simple recipes, quality is key. Buy the best and you’ll rarely be disappointed. When my herbs are flowering I often replace the thyme with thyme flowers; the dish is more beautiful and the flowers taste great.

SOBRASADA WITH HONEY, WALNUTS, THYME AND SOURDOUGH TOAST SERVES 4 sourdough bread, sliced sobrasada (preferably Iberico) few sprigs thyme (and flowers, if available) 1 jar raw honey handful walnuts (I use Perigord), slightly crushed into pieces This is great with an aperitif. Just toast the bread, bung all the ingredients on a wooden board and let everyone help themselves. Smear the sobrasada onto the toast, drizzle with honey and sprinkle over the walnuts and thyme – now all that’s left is to tuck in!

Lido, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 933 9530; lidobristol.com

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...together we can find your dream job.

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£28,000 - 2AA Rosette Award Winning Restaurant

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C&B Supervisor

£10p/hr - Sociable Working Hours

Newbury

Head Chef

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Stourbridge

Exec Head Chef

£45,000 - Iconic Bristol Hotel

Bristol

Restaurant Supervisor

£20,000 - Independent Boutique Hotel In Spa Town

Worcestershire

Recruitment Consultant

£25,000 - Join The Legendary CSI Team!

Bath/Bristol

Head Chef

£35,000 - Daytime Hours Only!

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£30,000 - Five Star Property

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Hotel Manager

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£22,000 – Independent Spa Hotel - Live In Available

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£Expenses paid – Salary For Charity – Luxury Safari Lodge

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Temporary chefs, waiting & bar staff permanently required! www.cateringinternational.co.uk

Email: info@catserv.co.uk - Bath 01225 480240 - Bristol 0117 929 4777 BATH | BRIGHTON | BRISTOL | CARDIFF | CHELTENHAM | COVENTRY | LONDON | SOUTHAMPTON | SWINDON


Openings etc DREAM TEAM

What do Pierre Koffmann and Marco Pierre White have in common? Well, loads, duh: they’re both hugely celebrated chefs with styles rooted in classical French cooking, and have been the recipients of several Michelin stars over the years. They also worked together at Koffmann’s La Tante Claire in London. It’s just been revealed, though, that they now share even more: a Bath restaurant. Their new brasserie-style venue, named Koffmann and Mr White’s, will be located in the centre of the city at The Abbey Hotel, with the launch planned for early October. Guests can expect the classic English and French food that both these names are so well known for. Having been recently taken over, The Abbey Hotel is embarking upon a bit of a shake up and this new eatery, which will replace Allium, is the first step of the process. abbeyhotelbath.co.uk

FED ALERT

A new café has opened on Bristol’s Gloucester Road, and by golly does it look like a good ’un. Immediately inside the floor-to-ceiling windows, purpose built shelving sits overhead, heaving with plants; weathered, vintage-look tiles and bare brickwork draw your eye in further; and, at the back, slate-blue coloured walls have the menu chalked directly onto them. Fed is the creation of Charlotte Hawes and Ross Rawlings, who both have long hospitality careers (Charlotte actually used to manage the neighbouring Boston Tea Party). Simple, fresh and very carefully considered dishes are the order of the day: think lemon chicken and salsa verde toastie, and organic overnight oats with roasted fruit, yoghurt and almonds, for instance. They’re both cooks as well as trained baristas and front of house pros, so you can expect great coffee (house espresso comes from Yallah) and on-it service, as well as local food. facebook.com/fed303

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NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK SUN, SAND AND SPRITZ

Take a seat, grab a drink, and feel the sand between your toes this summer. No, we’re not talking about a trip to the seaside, just a visit to the new incarnation of Bath’s County Hotel, which has launched with a real beach bar (yup, complete with actual sand). To eat, the likes of pizzas and super food salads are available, as well as barbecued dishes and vegan options, which you can tuck into out on the sand, or inside under shelter. But first, libations (’cause it’s super important to keep hydrated, guys): favourites like Aperol Spritz, Mojitos and the house’s own take on a Pina Colada are among the list of concoctions. We also like the look of the Venice Beach, featuring Champagne with Chambord and lemon sorbet. thecountyhotelbath.co.uk

CIDER SENSES

Barley Wood cider makers have opened up their pretty walled garden for the summer, allowing guests to kick back with one of their apple-based thirst quenchers amongst the trees they came from. Cider fans can check out the set up of the gorgeous wooden roundhouse, stroll through the orchards and enjoy a cold pint or two of the hand-pressed cider that their apples are destined to become. It’s located in Wrington, on the same site as an organic vegetable garden and the award-winning Ethicurian restaurant. Still and sparkling sips are available at prices starting from £2.50 a pint, and there’s also handmade apple juice, light snacks and bottled beer. The grounds will be open to visitors until September. facebook.com/ barleywoodorchard

LOOK, IT’S OLIVER GOODHEW AND BEN NASH, FROM NEW CATERING BIZ, HEARTH DINING

So, Oliver, what was your very first job in the industry? As commis in a country pub in Surrey when I was 17; four years later I was running the kitchen. I learnt a lot, but it was time to move on. What’s the toughest job you’ve tackled so far?  Working in five star luxury chalets in the Alps – you had to be able to adapt to clients’ wishes and produce interesting and exciting menus every day. How long has Hearth Dining been going for? Having talked about creating something new for a couple of years, we finally started the business at the beginning of 2018. And what’s the concept? Bringing restaurant quality food to the comfort of your home. We’re very proud of the product we offer, and have really focused on the details. Okay, over to you, Ben. Where might we know you from?  The Ox, Clifton – I was head chef. Give us your fondest foodie memories from your childhood.  My mum’s coffee cake – it’s a game changer! Proudest career achievement?  Starting Hearth Dining. We’ve both worked in a number of very diverse

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roles within the industry, and it’s amazing to now be able to put all the knowledge we’ve gained into practice working for ourselves. What made you set up the new business? Looking for a new challenge that combines our love of great food paired with attentive service. So, guys, tell us about the styles of menus you create. We have a sharing-style menu of beautiful platters, a four-course option with a variety of choices, and a luxurious seven-course tasting menu in which we showcase the finest ingredients. We’re constantly evolving all of these menus with the seasons. Which piece of kitchen equipment couldn’t you live without?  Our smoker. It’s such a great way to elevate flavour. What’s your current favourite flavour combination? Elderflower and olive oil. We served it at a recent pop-up event and it went down a treat. Finally, guys, which local restaurants do you like to eat in?  We’re spoilt for choice in Bristol! But we both love Tare, The Lock Up, Woky Ko and, of course, The Ox. hearthdining.com


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LAGER THAN LIFE

IT’S WILLIAM THOMAS, MANAGER AT THE LOCK UP How long have you worked here? Four months now. Might we know you from anywhere else? Locally, I’ve worked in Quartier Vert, Bordeaux Quay, Brace and Browns, and Wilks. Been in hospitality a while, then? Yes – 22 years. And why do you enjoy it? I love food and wine! Also, because of the people whom I work with and the many people I get to meet – customers and suppliers. What’s the best thing about your current job, then? The team I work with. I have known Aidan (chef-owner) for a number of years, and he has built an amazing team. Also, in an independent restaurant the evolution of the menus – both food and drink – is always interesting. And the most challenging part? Tough question. Either the margins, or the power of social media and review sites. Tell us one thing you’re responsible for that we might not know about. Continually searching for the best prices for all of our utilities, consumables and renewables. To keep the perception of value for money, we have to look at every aspect of cost savings all the time. What’s popular on the menu right now? The lamb rump with sweet potato purée, rainbow chard, salsa verde and crispy onions is going down a treat. And what are people are drinking? Cocktails. We are a haven in Redfield amongst all the pubs and cafés, so our cocktail menu is a real draw for the locals. What makes The Lock Up a special place to visit? I think we differ locally, as we change from a brunch menu in the day into a classic dinner menu in the evening. Where have you visited locally where the customer service was excellent? Bakers and Co. They are really attentive! And they know they have a great product, so are always happy to put stuff in front of you. thelockupbristol.com

We’ve certainly had a lot of lager weather recently; hot, sunny days call for cold, light and refreshing sips. So the new lager from local brewery Moor Beer has landed just in time. Simpils (so named as it’s a single infusion mash pilsner) is the brewery’s first ever lager, and was created in collaboration with Italian pils brewer Agostino Arioli. It takes 10 weeks to make and uses traditional British and German brewing methods, with Moor’s head brewer Justin Hawke having been inspired by Germany’s world-class lager – especially the unfiltered, hazy versions. Hawke describes the new drink as “one of my most anticipated additions to the Moor Beer line up in years.” We’re suddenly in the mood for a pint. moorbeer.co.uk

BAKE IT OFF

Joe’s Bakery, which has been trading at the top of Gloucester Road for an impressive 30 years, has taken over a second site. Expansion was far from the minds of owners Jane and Martin Hunt, but when they heard about the impending closure of The Bread Store just down the street they knew they wanted to grab it, and ensure this popular road of independent businesses didn’t lose a valued bakery. It’s stocked with almost the full Joe’s Bakery range (which is pretty darn sizable), made at the original site, meaning Jane and Martin are hatching plans for how to use of the old bakery space at The Bread Store. As well as the award-wining Joe’s Bakery’s signatures, you’ll find some Bread Store staples here too, like its city loaf, linseed loaf and pizza dough. Keep your eye on this refreshed shop as it evolves under the reign of one of Bristol’s longest-standing bakeries. joesbakery.co.uk

BUNCH TIME

It’s all change at Bradford-on-Avon’s Bunch of Grapes, which has just been taken over by Toney Casey. The team have moved away from their old French inspired food towards a more modern British and European style; the bar menu has classics such as fish and chips and steaks, while the a la carte is based around seasonal, local produce with creative touches (think rack of lamb with Jersey Royals, tomato dressing, broad beans and mint jelly). There’s a tasting menu too (available when booked in advance), and roasts on Sundays. At the bar, cocktails and local craft beers are still very much on offer, and the wine list now encompasses varieties from all over the world. Tony has become well-known on our patch for his cooking over the years, having previously headed up the kitchens of The Pump House in Bristol, The Chequers in Bath and The Redan, Chilcompton. thebunchofgrapes.com

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Serving the Finest Authentic Indian Cuisine in Bristol, Avon

Something for everyone... By having such a varied and diverse menu, we make sure that every visitor to Urban Kohinoor finds a dish that they fall in love with. From a variety of traditional options to impressive specials, our food menu is filled with meals that offer a mixture of sensational tastes and flavours. Our diverse menu has something for everyone, covering old favourites, traditional dishes, and vegetarian options.

Fresh ingredients ď Ľ No artificial colours ď Ľ Less oil

Contact us today to book a table and sample our unforgettable Indian food.

OPENING HOURS

Monday Closed Tuesday - Sunday 5:30 PM - 10:45 PM www.urban-kohinoor.com

Urban Kohinoor

211 Whiteladies Road, Bristol, Avon, BS8 2XS Tel: 0117 973 1313 / 07576 804136 Email: info@urban-kohinoor.com


S T A R T E R S

Whether you’re looking to make booze or drink it (or both!), Brewers Droop is well worth checking out...

@charlievivante has brekkie in the sunshine

BREWERS DROOP What: Brewing supplies and booze Where: 36 Gloucester Road, Bristol BS7 8AR When: Mon-Thurs 10am-6pm; Fri 11am-7pm; Sat 10am-6pm 

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his little shop, up the top end of Gloucester Road, is 34 years old. Still a popular spot for brewers and drinkers, it draws a really wide range of punters in: while we’re there quizzing Lee Apeira about the business, people come in not only for supplies, but also for advice and, well, a bit of a natter, really. It’s Mike Ross who founded the shop in ’84, and he still owns the business. Both these guys have witnessed the particularly intriguing development of the beer market, and the corner of the shop dedicated to these brews is packed with interesting local brands like Incredible Brewing Co, Kettlesmith, and Good Chemistry, to name (literally) only a fraction. While, obviously, interest in craft beer has been booming, most people seem to be more into drinking it than making it. “Youngs, one of our suppliers, said they’ve seen a drop in sales of brewing supplies,” says Lee, “but that may just be because there are more suppliers out there now. There are some really big online retailers.” Despite the challenges, from where these guys are standing the home brewing market is still strong, and there’s plenty of demand for kit. Want to get in on the action, but have no idea what you’re doing? Lee – who is a keen home

brewer himself – has plenty of tips to help get you going. “Start with the kits, which you dilute. That’ll get you used to the fermenting process, controlling the temperature, and keeping everything clean. The kits have basically done all the hard work – so you just have to ferment and manage your brew. “Then the next step would be to start at the stage before that, buying the sugar extract and boiling it with hops – you have more control over the end result that way. Then the most scientific bit, taking it back a step even further, would be extracting the sugars yourself to start with, but you’ll need more equipment for that.” In terms of the readymade refreshments that these guys sell, there are countless brands of beer – ranging from the familiar to the lesser known, including Evil Twin porter, made, get this, with doughnuts – of which many are in cans. This kind of packaging has really kicked off in the last couple of years – it wasn’t long ago that no one wanted beer in a can, Lee tells us. There’s homebrew on draught too, for filling up flagons, and plenty of ciders and fruit wines. Some lesser-spotted meads from Devon’s Lyme Bay are on the shelves too. The mead market is enjoying a particular surge in popularity, with new rhubarb, chilli and black cherry varieties being released – all of which you can spot in this Aladdin’s Cave of all things booze. brewers-droop.com

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@wiiiilllllsss tucks into this colourful tomato dish @adelinayard

@redbirdmakes checks out the new @fed.303 Your pic could be here! Just use #CrumbsSnaps on your foodie Insta posts and we might print one of yours next issue...


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In the Larder MHON

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Oh, BEE-hAVE!

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE HONEY MAKERS THIS MONTH... 1. Southville Honey, £6.99/225g This local honey is harvested from the roof of the Tobacco Factory. The beehives are maintained by Tim Myers, who recently relocated his beekeeping activities here from his Southville home. Down below, out in the Yard, can be found lots of the kind of flowers that bees love, to help keep these ever-rarer creatures happy. Find it at Better Foods in Bristol; betterfood.co.uk 2. Rose Farm Honey and Mustard Dressing, £2.87/260g We’ve been getting this dressing involved with big bowls of salads, as well as just drizzling it over fresh, crisp leaves. Its balance of sweet honey with fiery mustard would make a great glaze for ham, too. Available from Fresh Range; fresh-range.com 3. Cazcabel Honey Tequila Liqueur, £31.95/70cl Forget the stuff you used to shot at the local bar back in the day; this is a very different beast. The Cazcabel distillery is out in Mexico, and uses the blue agave that grows nearby to make its premium tequila. That’s what goes into this golden sip, which, at 34% AVB, is classed as a liqueur and has the natural sweetness and golden colour of honey. Find it in Independent Spirit; independentspiritofbath.co.uk 4. Lacock Dairy Honeycomb Crunch Ice Cream, £1.99/120ml This producer shares a farm with the cows whose milk it uses in its Italian-style ice cream. It all happens over in Wiltshire, in the little village of Lacock. The ice cream made in small batches with the best ingredients the team can get their hands on, meaning it tastes natural and not too sweet. Our attention is on the honeycomb crunch number right now, complete with chewy bits. Find it in Widcombe Deli, Whitehall Garden Centre in Lacock, and Toby Haynes Family Butcher in Corsham; lacockdairy.co.uk

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Clockwise from left: paner butter masala, nadan curry and pastry-topped biryani

Six Pack

SUBcoNTIneNTaL ScRaN

HOW MANY OF THESE POPULAR DISHES FROM LOCAL INDIAN RESTAURANTS HAVE YOU TRIED?

NUTMEG’S BIRYANI

This is a bit of a four-in-one, as Nutmeg have a handful of Biryanis, each inspired by a different area of the Subcontinent. There’s a lamb version from Andhra Pradesh, a chicken number from Lucknow, a Keralan king prawn creation, and a Gujarati-style vegetarian one (pictured). Inside the pot, which is sealed with a pastry lid, are slow-cooked vegetables with basmati rice in masala and saffron water. nutmeg.com

URBAN KOHINOOR’S SAFRONI NIHARI GOSHT

Sibling to the popular Urban Tandoor, Urban Kohinoor is on Whiteladies Road, up at the Redland end. This is one of their most popular specials: a lamb shank, slow-cooked with spices, and finished with saffron and kewra water. It comes with rice and a garlic and coriander kulcha – a tandoorbaked flatbread, similar to naan. urban-kohinoor.com

THALI’S SMOKY TANDOORI CHICKEN WINGS

This Bristol-born restaurant group is well known for its Thali dishes (obviously), but did you know that the Southville site has a new bar menu? It features these wings, cooked on the restaurant’s ‘roadside grill’; lovely and smoky and with a gentle kick, the meat’s sticky and tender, and comes with chilli sauce. With the highest rating from the Sustainable Restaurant Association, Thali is great for an ethically sound Indian feed. thethalirestaurant.co.uk

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CHAI WALLA’S ONION BHAJI WRAP

It might be tiny, but Chai Walla’s lunchtime queues make it easily identifiable in the centre of Bath. Knocking out vegetarian Indian street food, it’s become a popular to-go spot since opening a couple of years ago. The best seller? The onion bhaji wrap; think fresh bhaji – homemade on site and still warm – on a bed of mango chutney and crunchy fresh veg, all rolled up for your snacking convenience. facebook.com/chaiwallabath

MINT ROOM BRISTOL’S KOZHI NADAN CURRY

This is the most popular dish on the menu at Bristol’s well-established Mint Room restaurant, known for its elegant food. It originates from Kerala, in the south of India, and sees chicken bathe in a rich sauce of caramelised onion, tomato and coconut milk. Aromatic with fennel, star anise, and curry leaf, it’s a definite must try here. mintroombristol.co.uk

INDIAN TEMPTATION’S PANEER BUTTER MASALA

The paneer is homemade at this vegetarian Indian restaurant in central Bath, and here comes in a flavour-layered sauce of tomato, onion and chilli. Cashews give the dish a subtle sweetness and creamy texture to round off any heat and richness, too. There might be zero meat on the menu at this joint, but we bet you won’t miss it. indiantemptation.com

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The Hop Pole, Bath pub, garden & kitchen

OPENING HOURS Drinking

Monday to Thursday: Noon - 11pm Friday to Saturday: Noon - 12pm Sunday: Noon - 10pm Food

Monday to Saturday: Noon - 2.30pm / 6pm - 9pm Sunday: Noon - 4pm / BBQ from 4pm to 8pm from late June until late September

fa 7 Albion buildings, Upper Bristol Road, Bath, BA1 3AR 01225 446 327 www.thehoppolebath.co.uk info@thehoppolebath.co.uk


Ask the Expert

WHAT THE GRILL MAKER KNOWS... THIS, FRIENDS, IS DANNY HAWKE. FOUNDER OF BRISTOL DRUM SMOKERS, HE BUILDS THESE BEASTS HIMSELF, AND IS ABOUT TO SHARE THE GOLDEN RULES FOR ACHIEVING GRILLING GREATNESS...

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So, Danny, give us a bit of context to start with. What’s your background in the food industry? I’m just a very enthusiastic cook, really, and love experimenting and learning new techniques. As well as making drum smokers, I’m a development chef for Oowee Diner. And how long have you been building those smokers? I started the business in October 2015, having just made my first one. The business has been growing at a steady pace since. What inspired you to make that very first smoker, then? Well, I bought a second-hand one from Gumtree, thinking it was going to be amazing... Turned out it was really poor quality, and I realised I needed to look for something more reliable. I started researching smokers, and decided to go down the self-build route, as I couldn’t find anybody making good-looking ones. I managed to source some really cool burnt copper metallic paint, as well as all the parts I needed, and got building. As soon as I posted the results online I has lots of interest from people in barbecuing forums. I bought enough hardware to make five smokers and sold them all that day, which isn’t bad considering it was in October! The rest is history… Let’s back up just a second: what exactly is a drum smoker? It’s a form of smoker made with a 55-gallon steel drum. It has a set of air intakes, usually at the bottom, in order to control the temperature, a basket inside that holds your charcoal, cooking grates for food, and an exhaust on the lid. Most have a thermometer, too. We’ve seen grilling done in drums before, but with the drum on its side; is that the same thing? No, not as such. A lot of the horizontal drum barbecues are mainly used for standard grilling; they’re great for jerk chicken and classic grilled food like that, but not so good for indirect cooking over long periods of time. Okay, what can do you with a drum smoker? They are usually used for cooking food low and slow. Ours are slightly more versatile, so you can also use them for roasting, direct and indirect grilling, and as a standard barbecue also. What are direct and indirect cooking methods, please, and what are they used for? Direct cooking is a term usually associated with grilling food directly over the heat source – which is great for thin, tender cuts of meat. Steaks, burgers, fish, chicken breasts and vegetables are all great cooked this way. Indirect cooking is used for large and tough cuts of meat that require longer cooking times, and sees the heat source placed away from the food you are cooking. If large cuts of meat are cooked directly over the charcoal, the outside will burn before the inside cooks. This gentle method of indirect cooking is perfect for ribs, briskets, whole chickens and pork shoulders, for example. Tell us about hot smoking; how does that cook food, and what is the end result? Hot smoking is generally done at very low temperatures (around 110C), using a mix of charcoal and hard wood. You get the best results from this style of cooking when using nice big fatty cuts of meat, as they can stay moist over a long period of time. If cooked well, the end results can be amazing, really juicy with the hint of the smoke from the wood and a nice bark (crust) on the meat. Won’t it just taste really smoky, though? It will if you use too much wood – or the wrong sort. I also tell my customers to use

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wood just as a seasoning; piling loads on with the charcoal will result in pretty horrible tasting food! Proper fire management is very important when cooking, too; you want nice clean smoke coming out of the exhaust of the smoker. What’s your favourite food to hot smoke, then? The point end of a brisket, which is the part of the brisket that has more fat content. It’s very rich, full of flavour and beats any sort of fancy steak if cooked properly. It’s always a hit with our guests when entertaining. Cor, sounds a bit of alright, that. So, how about cold smoking – can you do that in one of these bad boys, too? You can indeed! There are various methods you can use. Try making a little cold smoking unit that holds the wood dust you use for cold smoking, or you can buy them ready made. Then you simply put the unit in the bottom of the smoker and light it – it just generates smoke from the slow burning wood dust with no heat. This is ideal for cheese and home-cured bacon. It’s too hot to be cold smoking at this time of year though, so best to wait until winter. What fuel do you use for grilling outdoors, then? We recommend a good quality restaurant-grade charcoal; the cheap stuff is a false economy really, as it burns too hot and too quickly. There is no point in investing in a good quality smoker and paying for high

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quality meat when you’re going to use a bag of charcoal you picked up at your local garage! I personally like the flavour from lump wood charcoal, so have always stuck with it. There are also some good quality briquettes on the market, though; if you decide to go down that route, make sure they only contain natural binders. Some contain nasty chemicals and can taint your food with unpleasant flavours. And how much does it need? Will we be using a small forest for each brisket we cook? Not if your smoker retains heat well. A few kilos of good quality charcoal will burn for around 15 hours, if set up correctly without any issues. The cheaper smokers don’t hold heat well at all; it means you need to keep topping them up throughout your cook, which can get expensive – and annoying. I like the set and forget approach, personally! Noted. Right, does the kind of wood you use genuinely alter the end result? Yes, it does! Fruit wood tends to give a much more mellow flavour and is good for pork and poultry, whereas woods like oak and hickory have a much stronger flavour, and match very well with beef. Where do you get your fuel from? I like to use Resilient Woodlands charcoal, which is all sourced and produced in the Forest of Dean. And the smoking wood chunks I use and sell are all sourced locally, too. Oxford Charcoal also has a great selection of lump wood fuel to choose from. Okay, fire starter: give us your top tips for getting those flames going, please. I recommend using a chimney starter; they get your fuel going super quick. It’s simply a case of filling the chimney up with unlit charcoal, and putting a natural fire lighter or paper towel light under the chimney starter. That way you can get everything burning and ready to cook in 10-15 minutes, which is great. Chimney starters are available from most garden centres and barbecue stores at this time of year – it’s well worth investing in one. And how do you control the temperature in there? On our smokers we have sliding vents and a lid exhaust, which all help control the temperature: if you want the smoker hotter, then open them up; if you want to bring it down, you close them off a little. It’s very simple when you get the hang of it. Is it possible to make your own smoker? Of course! And many people do – there are plenty of online guides and ways to do this. Google is your friend. What’s the most ambitious meal you’ve cooked in a drum smoker, then? Probably the candied pecan and salted caramel New York style cheesecake I did for the Chef’s Choice round at Grillstock in 2017. There is a recipe on my website for this, which is worth checking out if you are feeling adventurous! It was a hard dish to get right, but I got it tasting pretty good after a few attempts. Got a (more attainable) recipe for us to try on our grill at home? I really like this rub recipe, as you can either use it dry or make it into a really nice wet marinade by adding olive or rapeseed oil – two for the price of one! It’s great for chicken and pork, but will go with just about anything. This recipe uses it on chicken wings. bristoldrumsmokers.co.uk

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Danny has been making drum smokers since 2015, having strugged to find a great quality one that also really looked the part...

CHICKEN WINGS WITH BRISTOL DRUM SMOKERS RUB 150g light brown sugar 200g salt 6 tbsp good quality paprika 2 tbsp mixed peppercorns, freshly ground 4 tsp garlic granules 3 tsp onion granules 1 tsp chipotle powder 6 tbsp mild chilli powder 2 tbsp cumin seeds, freshly ground chicken wings 1 Put all the ingredients, except the wings, in a spice grinder and pulse until it becomes a fine powder, then refrigerate in an air-tight container. This rub will keep indefinitely, but is best used within a couple of months. 2 Prepare the wings by removing the tips with a sharp knife and spreading the wing out to allow it to cook evenly. Then toss them in rapeseed oil and apply a liberal coating of the rub you prepared previously. Leave to marinade for at least 2 hours. 3 When ready to cook, prepare the smoker or barbecue for indirect cooking (if using a kettle barbecue, put all the coals to one side). Bring the temperature up to 120-125C/250-260F and add a small amount your chosen fruit wood chunks or chips. 4 Place the chicken wings on the barbecue or smoker on the opposite side to the heat source below, and close the lid. Cook for around 1 hour, after which the wings should be nice and tender. 5 Then simply finish them off over the direct charcoal until they crisp up. Or, if you prefer, coat them in barbecue sauce to create a nice glaze and cook for a further 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

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Avenue Café has been at the forefront of the café scene in Bristol since 2000. We are more than just a coffee shop, offering great food, amazing products and friendly, efficient customer service. We are a family orientated café and we take great care in the service and food provided.

0117 305 0505 f Avenue Café a AvenueCafe1 www.avenue-cafe.com St. Luke’s House, Emerson’s Green, Bristol BS16 7AR

DID YOU KNOW? We’re now open on Friday and Saturday evenings till 11.30pm! Dine from our delicious menu or enjoy a drink from our very tempting list of gin cocktails.

EAT LOCAL THIS SUMMER LOCAL BREADS, CHEESES, ANTIPASTI, VEG AND MUCH MORE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

ORDER NOW ON FRESH-RANGE.COM t @freshrange

f freshrangeUK

" 0117 332 2813


S T A R T E R S

FIVE RECIPE BOOKS WITH FIVE VERY DIFFERENT INSPIRATIONS...

MADE IN LONDON Leah Hyslop (Absolute Press, £26) When London-born food writer Leah Hyslop walks around the crowded streets of the capital, she sees a city whose foundations are built on food. From the Romans to Tudor monarchs and the post-war influx of Vietnamese, there are countless cultures, groups and industries to thank for London’s thriving and exceptionally diverse food scene, as she shows. The book maps out London’s food culture in sections like Afternoon Tea, Lon-dinner, and Late Night London, stopping every now and again to look more closely at a specific custom, story or era, or give recommendations for places to check out. As such, thumbing through these pages can teach you everything from the role the Thames has played in London’s culinary history to how to make a Brick Lane-style curry, and what to do with your haul from Billingsgate. The homemade doner kebabs, up-to-date coronation chicken and golden syrup and apple steamed pud are going straight on our to-cook list. Jessica Carter SUPER EASY ONE POUND MEALS Miguel Barclay (Headline Home, £16.99) He had the best selling debut cookbook of 2017, and now Miguel is back with another volume, filled with more dishes that can be made for £1 a portion. The recipes here are designed to be small on hassle (and washing up), but big on flavour, and as they’re all one portion, they’re really simple to scale up as you need. As well as coming up with brand new, no-fuss creations, Miguel has also taken classic, time consuming dishes and reinvented them as low-maintenance dinners: think one-pot lasagna, and ‘faux gnocchi’. We’re proper keen on the chorizo barbecue beans on toast as an easy weekend brekkie and the stuffed conchiglioni bake as a speedy weeknight dinner. Ingredients lists are minimal, and there’s no need for lengthy instructions either, making the recipes even more approachable for home cooks of any level. Jessica Carter MEXICANA! Esther Clark (HarperCollins, £14.99) You might think Mexican food is all tacos and nachos, and from the looks of this book you’d be right. There are over a

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dozen versions of each here, plus quesadillas, empanadas and tostadas, making it the perfect companion for a party, but not so much – you might think – for everyday cooking. But wait! It’s rather more versatile than you might think; there are breakfast tacos here, and sweet treats like tres leches cake and churros, plus Mexican drinks – from Margaritas to licuados. This is the first book from Leith’s graduate Esther Clark, and though it may not be an especially distinctive read, it’s certainly bright and cheery and gets the mouth watering: recipes like barbecue jackfruit and rainbow ’slaw nachos, or watermelon wedges with lime and pink peppercorn salt, will raise intrigued eyebrows, while staples like guacamole and salsas mean you’ll never buy the pre-made stuff again. Matt Bielby

From Honey & Co. At Home: Middle Eastern Recipes from our Kitchen by Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich (Pavilion Books, £26); photography by Patricia Niven

HONEY AND CO: AT HOME Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich (Pavilion Books, £26) Sarit and Itamar moved to London from Israel 14 years ago, and curbed their homesickness with the Middle Eastern comfort food they’d grown up with. They opened a restaurant of their own in 2012, and this is their third book – the first to focus on the food they cook off-duty. Recipes are organised by occasion – For Us Two, For Friends, and so on – and there’s also a section for pickles, sauces et al that are handy to keep in the kitchen. The homeliness of the recipes is heightened by the personal, emotive anecdotes they’re interspersed with. Potato and feta fritters, for instance, are described as “something simple for someone special”, while Turkish yoghurt bread has the couple writing about “that special warmth that a fresh loaf radiates as you hold it in your hands.” This sure is a cookery book with soul. Jessica Carter

FIG AND FETA PIDE WE ALL HAVE our little milestones in the year, those recurring events that make us pause and think, ‘This time last year…’ or ‘This time next year…’. The Proms, the first magnolia tree blooming, fireworks on Guy Fawkes’ night. For us it’s always autumn, and it is always flavoured with figs. It is when the Jewish year starts; it is when the Day of Atonement falls; it is when we got married. All those sweet and serious life moments are connected by the honeyed sweetness, the resiny undertone, the giving flesh and the crunch of seeds in a fig. MAKES 6

For the dough: 300g flour 1 tsp sugar 1 tsp salt ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 tbsp nigella seeds pinch cayenne pepper 15g fresh yeast (or 1 x 7g sachet dried active yeast) 1 tsp honey 150g yoghurt

THE GREEN ROASTING TIN Rukmini Iyer (Square Peg, £16.99) Coming from a South Indian family, Rukmini was brought up on vegetarian food, full of colour and texture. There’s not often the time to make the kind of spread that her mother used to put on for the family dinner, though, so she took her knowledge of cooking and used it to come up with simple, one-pan vegan and vegetarian tray bakes. Some are super speedy (the tomato and bay orzo takes 30 minutes), while some are nice and slow – like the butterroasted leek and beetroot with bulgur wheat and feta, which is ready in just over an hour. In all cases, though, the majority of the time and work is in the hands of the oven as opposed to the cook, with prep largely taking only around 10-15 minutes. Rukmini has carefully considered tastes and textures in her assembly of clever, low-maintenance, all-in-one meals. Jessica Carter

For the filling: 100g feta 50g yoghurt ½ tsp dried oregano ½ tsp sumac (or zest of 1 lemon) For the topping: 1 green chilli 3 tbsp olive oil 6-8 figs (depending on size) 1 small bag baby spinach, washed few sprigs fresh thyme (or pinch of dried oregano)

1 Place the flour, sugar, salt, black pepper, nigella seeds and cayenne pepper in a large mixing bowl. Dissolve the yeast in 100ml water and stir in the honey, then add this, along with the yoghurt, to the dry ingredients. Knead together to form a nice, supple dough (you can use a mixer with a dough hook if you wish, but it is really easy to mix by hand). Cover the bowl with a cloth or cling film, set in a warm place and allow the dough to double in size. It will take about 1 hour in a warm room, slightly longer if it’s cold. 2 Make the filling by crumbling the feta into a small bowl and mixing with the yoghurt, oregano and sumac to create a paste. 3 For the topping, slice the green chilli into rounds, place in a small dish and cover with the olive oil. Cut the figs into 4-5 slices. 4 Once the dough has proved, divide it into 6 evenly sized lumps. Roughly stretch each piece into an oval boat-shape measuring around 20cm long and 8cm wide. Put 1 tbsp of the feta filling on each, spreading it over the centre. Add a handful of baby spinach, then slices of fig. Top with the chilli slices and the oil, using it all up. Season with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with some leaves from the sprigs of thyme or dried oregano. 5 Pinch the sides of the dough up around the edges, then pinch each end of the oval into a point to create a pide boat. Leave to prove again and, while you are waiting, heat your oven to 220C/425F/gas mark 7. By the time the oven is up to temperature, the boats will be ready to pop in. Bake for 10-12 minutes until beautifully golden. Serve warm.

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The Jetty offers a vibrant yet relaxed atmosphere and a fantastic seafood dining Experience in the heart of the city. We use locally sourced and sustainable fresh ingredients for our stunning and creatively devised menus. Treat yourself to Octopus Carpaccio, Whole Spider Crab, Fruits de Mer, Chateaubriand, Veal Milanese, Oysters and Cocktails; there truly is something for everyone. New A La Carte and Express menus are now here! The Jetty is not just a restaurant, it’s an Experience.

49 – 55 Corn Street, Bristol BS1 1HT T: 0117 203 4445 E: bristol.jetty@harbourhotels.co.uk www.bristol-harbour-hotel.co.uk


THURSDAY SUPPER CLUB The last Thursday of the month. 4 courses | £25

Bar • Kitchen Dining

ALL THINGS FRENCH 30th Aug | A homage to French Cooking and Chef Elizabeth David.

Open da il from 9:3 y 0a for break m fast coffee an , d homema de cakes.

Classic French Onion soup with a Gruyere glaze. Terrine of chicken and ham, with pickled vegetables and tarragon mayonnaise. Elizabeth David’s Salmon in pastry with currants and ginger, sauce Messine. Creme aux Fraises, a rich strawberry cream.

EMBRACE THE NEW SEASON 27th Sept | As the air becomes crisp and the sun sets earlier look forward to more than a cosy evening with good food. Carpaccio of beef, classic dressing, Parmesan, rocket and truffle oil. Double baked Parmesan and truffle souffle with a leek and Gruyere fondue glaze. Pan roasted Gressingham duck breast with vanilla dauphinoise, sauteed spinach, green beans, leeks, little gem and peas, with a damson port jus. Pears poached in damson syrup and blackberry sorbet. Set lunch Monday to Friday | 2 courses £15.95 - 3 courses £17.95 Wednesday Midweek Madness | Supper for two | £34 Whole home apple wood smoked chicken, french fries, apple and carrot remoulade, sriracha mayonnaise, 1/2 wine.

TO BOOK CALL

01225 865650

67 Woolley St, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1AQ • info@thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk • thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk


CHEF!

WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

Fresh, vibrant green lovage is great in summery dishes, and is used this month in a raita to accompany hogget

HIGHLIGHTS

THE CURE

THIS GIN-CUR SALMON MAKESED ELEGANT STARTERAN

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OH, BALL

VEGAN MEATBALLS, S YOU WE’RE GAME SAY?

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PLUS!

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FIG LOVE

BRANDY-SO ED FIGS REPLACE CHERRIAKES IN THIS FINE CLAFOUTIS

THE WINE GUY IS BACK WITH AN ABER-INSPIRED WINE MATCH

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PUMP IT UP

MARK PEARSON USES LOCAL GIN TO CURE HIS SALMON FOR THIS SIMPLE BUT IMPRESSIVE STARTER...

The Pump Room in the centre of Bath is a popular attraction, not only for its gorgeous Georgian architecture and Bath Spa water, but also its restaurant, where guests can tuck into a great meal over live music (which happens throughout the day and evening in the summer months). The food comes courtesy of catering business Searcys, which has been around since 1847. Head chef Mark Pearson is born and bred in Bath, and has been in the kitchen team of The Pump Room since 1986, working his way up the ranks to head chef of the Assembly Rooms, and adding head chef of The Pump Room to his role as well in 1997. During his first few years he worked on some pretty hefty events, including the Queen’s 80th birthday. He also worked on the BBC’s Great British Menu. The Pump Room has seen a change in menus this summer, with the addition of a new salmon starter. The fish, which comes from Cornwall, is cured with Bath Gin and served with crème fraîche from Dorset. Sounds good, right? Luckily, we’ve secured the recipe for you...

BATH GIN CURED SALMON SERVES 4 50g sea salt 50g caster sugar large pinch juniper berries large pinch ground cardamom large pinch fennel seeds 250g salmon fillet, scaled and pin boned 50g rocket 50g extra virgin rapeseed oil 30ml Bath Gin 1 beef tomato crème fraîché, to serve handful chives, finely chopped ½ lemon (juice only) 8 thin slices of rye bread 100g fennel, thinly shaved

1 Mix together the salt, sugar, juniper and spices. Coat the salmon with the mixture, then wrap it up in cling film and leave in the fridge for 12 hours. 2 Make the rocket oil by blanching the leaves in boiling water for 2 seconds, then refreshing in ice water. Drain well and blend in a processor with the rapeseed oil. Season with a touch of salt and pepper. 3 After 12 hours wash off the salt and sugar thoroughly and dry the fish. Pour the gin and 70ml of the rocket oil into a container, and submerge the fish in the liquid. Leave for 12 hours, pressed gently with some weights. 4 For the tomato concasse, peel the tomato (blanching in boiling water for a few seconds then refreshing in cold water usually helps with this) and scoop all the seeds out. Finely dice the flesh. 5 Mix the crème fraîche with the chopped chives and a squeeze of lemon juice, and toast the rye bread. 6 When the salmon is ready, remove from the mixture and thinly slice (aim for approximately 60g per portion). Serve with the toasted bread, a spoonful of the crème fraîche mixture, fennel shavings and tomato concasse. The Pump Room, Abbey Chambers, Church Street, Bath BA1 1LZ; 01225 444477; romanbaths.co.uk

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C H E F !

JACKFRUIT BALLS WITH SOFRITO SAUCE AND VEGAN PARMESAN SERVES 3 AS A SMALL PLATE 2 x 400g tins jackfruit in brine 3 tbsp gram flour 1 tsp garam masala 1 tsp paprika 2 tbsp coriander, finely chopped 1 tbsp dried oregano 2 garlic cloves, crushed (or 2 tsp powdered garlic) 1 tbsp ginger, grated (or 1 tsp ground ginger) vegetable oil, for deep frying vegan parmesan pinch parsley, finely chopped pinch basil, finely chopped For the sofrito sauce: 2 small carrots, roughly chopped 1 onion, roughly chopped 3 garlic cloves, chopped 2 celery sticks, roughly chopped 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes 2 tsp thyme (fresh or dried) 2 tsp oregano (fresh or dried) 1 ½ tsp sweet paprika 6 tbsp oil

JUMPING JACK

THIS VEGAN RECIPE BY BABS GREAVES PUTS TINNED JACKFRUIT TO GOOD WORK...

Eat Your Greens is a café and restaurant perched on Wells Road in Totterdown. The food here is completely plant-based – from the brunches to evening meals and even the Sunday roasts. Owner and chef Babs opened the restaurant in early summer, having cooked at the likes of Café Kino and Nourish in the past. This is a popular dish from a recent menu; thanks to Babs, we can now tuck into it whenever we fancy. “You can make your own parmesan or use a decent shop-bought one like Violife – this one is particularly good,” says Babs. “As for the jackfruit, make sure you use the stuff in brine, not syrup; Bristol’s Essential Trading does a great version.”

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1 Empty the tins of jackfruit into a pan, add water until just covered, and bring to the boil. Simmer for 10 minutes. Drain and leave to cool in a sieve. 2 Make the sofrito sauce. Place the carrot, onion, garlic and celery in a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add the tomatoes and pulse until combined. Put the oil in a saucepan over a medium heat, and add the mix and herbs. Simmer on a low heat for 30 minutes until the acidity of the tomatoes has mellowed and the herbs have released their aromas. Add water if the sauce becomes too thick. Season. 3 When the jackfruit is cool, crush the segments with your fingers to divide the fibres – get rid of any hard bits or seeds which you can’t easily break up with your fingertips. Place it into a bowl and add the flour, spices, herbs, garlic and ginger, and mix well. Add more gram flour if needed; the mixture should bind easily. 4 With oiled hands, roll the mixture into ping pongsized balls. 5 In a deep pan, pour enough vegetable oil to submerge the balls, and heat it to 170C. Deep fry the balls for 4 minutes – the outside should be golden brown and the inside still tender. 6 Remove from the fryer and place in a small bowl. Heap the hot sofrito on top and, using the finest side of the grater, grate over a generous sprinkling of the parmesan. Finally, add the parsley and basil, and a pinch of pepper. Eat Your Greens, 156 Wells Road, Bristol BS4 2AG; 0117 239 8704; facebook.com/eatyourgreensbristol


C H E F !

SLOW-COOKED HOGGET WITH LOVAGE RAITA AND SPICED PLUM AND HONEY RELISH

SheeP ThRILLS JO AND PETE CRANSTON KNOW HOW TO PUT ON A SHARING SPREAD THAT NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO KEEP THEIR HANDS OFF...

Jo and Pete own catering business Queen and Whippet. They create celebratory sharing feasts for weddings and all kinds of events. While a lot of their food is vegan and vegetarian, these guys do use meat; just sparingly, and only from trusted, great quality producers. This dish is all about hogget, which is a sheep slightly older (therefore a little more richly flavoured) than lamb, but younger and milder than more intensely flavoured mutton. “Our hogget is sourced from the ancient pastures of Fernhill Farm, a wedding venue and eco-farm in the Mendips,” they tell us. “As meat from a more mature animal, hogget has a greater complexity of flavour than lamb, but lamb can be used for this recipe. Or try it with mutton from your local butcher and cook it for longer – at least 18 hours. “This recipe, like much of our catering menu, is designed to be passed around, talked about and enjoyed with your favourite people”

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SERVES 8 For the hogget: 1 boneless hogget shoulder (or lamb or mutton) 4-5 large garlic cloves, crushed, skins reserved 2 large sprigs rosemary, leaves picked, stalks reserved cold-pressed rapeseed oil For the raita:  250ml Greek yoghurt 1 cucumber, skinned, de-seeded and finely diced handful lovage leaves (or flat leaf parsley), finely chopped 2 spring onions, finely sliced 1 tsp celery salt 1 tsp asafoetida (optional)   For the spiced plum and honey relish: 1 large red onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 medium red chilli, finely chopped ½ tsp brown mustard seeds 1kg plums (or damsons), stoned and quartered 100ml red wine vinegar 2 tsp honey 1 Preheat the oven to 70C/160F (fan). Spread the hogget skin side down and place the crushed garlic and rosemary leaves on top. Drizzle over some oil and season with salt and pepper. 2 Roll the meat up loosely and place in a deep oven tray. Pour over a little more oil and lightly season again. Place the garlic skins and rosemary stems alongside the meat, cover the whole thing with greaseproof paper and tightly seal the tray with foil. Cook for at least 12 hours; up to 18 is fine. Then remove the foil and paper and allow it to cool to handling temperature. 3 For the lovage raita, mix all the ingredients together and chill in the fridge for at least 1 hour to allow the flavours to develop. 4 For the spiced plum and honey relish, sweat the onion, garlic and chilli with some oil in a pan over a low heat until soft. Then add the mustard seeds and wait until they start to pop. Add the plums and mix well, then cook until soft. Finally, add the vinegar and honey and bring briefly to boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes until the mix has a jam-like consistency. Season with salt to taste. 5 Slice the meat and serve on big boards with the relish and raita. We love this with pearl barley tabbouleh and salad of ribboned carrot, cucumber and caraway. queenandwhippet.com


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C H E F !

FIG, HONEY AND BRANDY CLAFOUTIS SERVES ABOUT 6 60g melted butter 8 large ripe figs 3 tbsp brandy 75g plain flour 3 eggs 250ml milk 100ml double cream 4 tbsp runny honey 1 tsp vanilla extract icing sugar, to dust

J E N I N OT T

FIG ShOT M HONEY

GENEVIEVE TAYLOR LENDS US A RECIPE FROM HER ULTIMATE WOOD FIRED OVEN COOKBOOK, MAKING GREAT USE OF IN-COMING FIGS AND OUR HERO INGREDIENT... Clafoutis is a creamy, dreamy pudding with a tongue-twister of name, writes Genevieve in her latest book. It’s like a dense egg custard crossed with a sweet Yorkshire pudding, managing at the same time to be unctuous in the middle and puffy as a cloud at the edges. Traditionally made with cherries – and indeed this is lovely too (see the flavour variations) – here I have made it with plump, fresh figs that have been liberally doused in brandy. You could serve it with a drizzle of thick cream, but I think it’s pretty much perfect just as it is. If you don’t have a wood-fired oven, fear not; Gen says you can make this in your regular oven, too. Just adjust the temperature as stated.

1 The wood-fired oven needs to be running at a hot baking temperature of about 220-240C/425-460F (or 180C/350F/gas mark 4 for a regular oven) with no live flame, so you can shut the door. 2 Brush a little of the melted butter around the inside of a 25-26cm wide round ovenproof dish, tin or pan, and reserve the rest for the batter. 3 Slice the figs through in a cross shape, cutting from the top about three-quarters of the way down to the base. Squeeze the figs a little to open them out, and arrange them in the pan, well spaced out. Drizzle the brandy into the cuts in the figs and set aside. 4 Put the flour into a mixing bowl. Make a well in the middle and crack in the eggs. Gently pour in the milk, followed by the cream and reserved melted butter, whisking all the time to make a smooth batter. 5 Add the honey and vanilla and whisk once more until combined. Set aside to rest for a few minutes, or up to 1-2 hours in the fridge. 6 When you are ready to cook, give the batter a little whisk to mix it once more, then pour it around the brandy-soaked figs. Slide the dish into the oven, shut the door, and bake for about 25-35 minutes, depending on the heat. The clafoutis is ready when it’s puffed up and golden, with just a little bit of a wobble in the centre. If it starts to colour too much on top, move it to a cooler part of the oven, or cover loosely with foil. 7 Leave the clafoutis to cool to the warm side of room temperature (it will deflate and settle a little), and dust with icing sugar just before serving. Serve scooped into bowls, with a little cream poured over if you fancy. AND ANOTHER THING… – Any stone fruits – quartered plums, apricots, greengages – are great too. Use slightly more than the weight of the figs, to take account for the stones that need removing. – Blackberries, raspberries and blueberries are all lovely too – try matching the fruit to liqueurs, or simply omit the booze for a child-friendly version. Recipe from The Ultimate Wood-Fired Oven Cookbook by Genevieve Taylor (Quadrille, £15) Photography © Jason Ingram

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THE WINE GUY

AbeR Bit Of this!

OUR ANDY CLARKE, ALONG WITH SOME OTHER LOCAL FAMILIAR FACES, IS TAKING PART IN ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING FOOD FESTIVALS IN THE UK…

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s I write, it’s hotter than the Mediterranean in the UK, and festival season is in full swing, with every music fan, foodie and travel junkie clambering to get into a multitude of sun-drenched events. Don’t jinx it, I hear you cry! And I hope I haven’t: especially as we’re all gearing up for that annual trip over the bridge to Wales’ culinary capital for Abergavenny’s famous food fest. This September sees the 20th edition of the event, which was set up by two farmers in 1999 in response to the BSE crisis. Now, in 2018, Abergavenny Food Festival is bigger, brighter and better than ever.

This Monmouthshire market town has quite a weekend planned in mid-September: there will be a fire-cooking area set among castle ruins; a drinks theatre where some very professional lushes will be sharing their favourite wine, beer, spirit and cocktail ideas; a cookery school with classes for both adults and kids; a host of amazing chef demos; and a foodie night market. But before I get to my pick of the best events (and I promise they’re not just the ones I’m involved in), I wanted to use the festival as an excuse to celebrate the best of the West who are travelling to Abergavenny to spread the culinary love.

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Yes, there is a lot of home-grown South Wales talent on the books, as well as chefs and contributors from all over the world, but most interestingly of all (for us) are the Bristolian foodie glitterati, heading over for a weekend on the edge of the glorious Brecon Beacons. Among them are Freddy Bird from Lido, food and wine writer Fiona Beckett, fire-loving cook Genevieve Taylor, food TV producer Pete Lawrence, restaurant scene veteran and drinks guru Kate Hawkings, food writer Xanthe Clay, gin master Danny Walker and Pear Café legend Elly Curshen. Gwinllan Conwy 2017 Another Bristol pro Solaris is priced at £18 involved in the festival is per bottle and is Romy Gill MBE, and it is available from her unique Indian cookery I gwinllanconwy.co.uk wanted to share with you on Montgomery Rosé 2017 the run up to the festival. is £20 and available from Romy is the owner and Montgomery Vineyard. head chef at Romy’s Kitchen, More information a restaurant which opened can be found at in September 2013 on montgomeryvineyard.co.uk Castle Street in my home town of Thornbury. But my association with Romy goes back further than that; it was while I was producing Saturday Kitchen Live that Romy and I first met by email. Romy introduced herself to me as a chef ahead of opening her restaurant. We connected over a love of good food and the fact that she and her family lived in the town where I was born and raised. Small world, hey? Romy invited me to her restaurant launch, and the rest is history. I’ve hosted many a wine night at Romy’s Kitchen since, recommending wines to sip with her fantastic dishes that always combine flavours from her Indian roots with seasonal West Country ingredients. It just so happens that one of Romy’s latest creations goes perfectly with a Welsh wine that I’ll be featuring in one of my events at Abergavenny. (Just look how that worked out.) The dish is prawn malai curry and involves juicy tiger prawns cooked in coconut milk with a host of Indian spices and aromats. And the wine? Gwinllan Conwy 2017. The vines at the North Wales vineyard were first planted in 2012 by wine enthusiasts Colin and Charlotte Bennett, and they produce the little-known Solaris grape. The wine has a grassy nose and a bold streak of citrus acidity when you taste it; the grapefruit edge will stand up well to the green chilli, tamarind chutney and the tomato purée. The texture of the wine works with the curry leaves, ginger, garlic and coconut milk, and although it’s a dry wine there’s a slight elderflower fragrance that will complement the mustard seeds and spices. And if, during this hot weather, rosé is your lubrication of choice, Montgomery Rosé 2017 from Powys is a real Welsh delight. Made from Pinot Noir and Solaris, the wine has hints of a typical Provençale rosé but with a delicate charm. There’s a whiff of wild strawberries on the nose which continues on the palate. It might not stand up to the power of Romy’s dish, but it will go well with simply cooked prawns. A great summer tipple.

DRINK UP!

PRAWN MALAI CURRY   SERVES 4 30 raw tiger prawns, shelled ½ lime (juice only) 1 tsp ground turmeric 60g ginger  12 garlic cloves  6 green chillies, chopped  5 tsp desiccated coconut  6 tsp extra virgin rapeseed oil  1 tsp black mustard seeds 12 curry leaves  1 tsp salt  2 tsp ground coriander  2 tsp tamarind chutney  5 tsp tomato purée  1 tin coconut milk 200ml water  1 Mix the prawns with the lime juice and turmeric in a bowl, and allow to marinade. 2 In a blender, add the ginger, garlic, green chillies and coconut. Add some water and blend to a smooth, thick paste. 3 In a frying pan, add 1 tsp of the oil and fry the prawns for around 1 minute on each side. When they start to colour remove from the pan and put them on a plate lined with kitchen roll to drain the excess oil. 4 Heat a non-stick pan on a high heat. Once hot, add the remaining oil, mustard seeds and curry leaves, and let them sizzle. Add the garlic and ginger paste and fry on a medium heat for 5-6 minutes, stirring occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan.  5 Add the salt, ground coriander, tamarind chutney, tomato purée and mix well. Cook for another 2 minutes.  6 Pour in the coconut milk and water. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the prawns and simmer for 5-8 minutes. Garnish with curry leaves and serve with plain boiled rice. romyskitchen.co.uk

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M A I N S

Andy’s

AbeRGavenny hiGhLIGhts! Clockwise from top: Genevieve Taylor (by Jeni Nott); Zoe Adjonyoh (by Oliver Ajkovic); Freddy Bird, José Pizarro, Sybil Kapoor and Andy Clarke (by Tom Gold)

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bergavenny Food Festival has come a long way since it started in 1999, but passion for good local produce is still at its heart. Yes, you can come and buy preserves and brownies to take home (and let’s face it, Gower Cottage Brownies are among the best in the UK, let alone Wales), but thanks to the events going on, there’s so much more to enjoy. First off, there are going to be feasts aplenty. The legendary Skye Gyngell will be bringing her ground-breaking Scratch menu to the festival on the Saturday evening, with the aim of providing an amazing meal using ingredients that are often overlooked. Think along the lines of carrot tops, potato skins and pasta offcuts. And if you want the ultimate celebration of local seasonal food, Wright’s Food Emporium in Llanarthney will be teaming up with Pembrokeshire based chef and forager Matt Powell to create a locally sourced feast for Sunday lunch. I’m really excited about the drinks theatre (obvs), and not just because I will be there hosting events with Fiona Beckett and Melissa Cole, but because of the diversity of the sessions. There’s a gin workshop with Bristol based distiller Danny Walker of Psychopomp fame, and there’s a celebration of cider (hurrah!) with Pete Brown, one of the UK’s leading beer and cider writers. And if you’re a fan of whisky, the fabulous Rachel McCormack will be teaming up with professors Barry Smith and Charles Spence for a unique sensory overload entitled The Science and the Dram, which looks into how your enjoyment of the drink is not only down to your senses, but also your environment and memory. And if you fancy exploring the grounds of the castle ruins, go to the open fire cookery demos where you’ll get the opportunity to see how you can make your outdoor cooking even more awesome. Genevieve Taylor will host a demo there following the success of her fab new release The Ultimate Wood Fired Oven Cookbook, and

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if homemade kebabs are your thing, rugged kitchen rascal Freddy Bird will be getting his wood fired up for you in the name of mezze. As well as the after hours events, including music and night markets, there are some fantastic talks and debates going on at the festival, too. Radio 4’s Sheila Dillon will be hosting 100 Years of Women in Food – an event exploring the historical role of women in the industry over the last century. The incredible line-up for that features food writers, cooks and chefs Sybil Kapoor, Jane Baxter, Zoe Adjonyoh, and Romy Gill. And if you want to get inspired with Spanish cooking, join the gorgeously talented José Pizarro (officially one of the nicest guys in the business) as he talks about his life in food to Tony Gallagher at the Borough Theatre. And perhaps the most exciting element of all are the tutored tastings, which are hosted by farmers and chefs. These illustrate what is at the core of the festival: getting people thinking about how different methods of food production affect the end result. My pick would be the mutton tasting compered by my mate, chef Cyrus Todiwala: grass-fed, organic, rare-breed mutton from sheep on Nick Miller and Sarah Dickins’ small, traditional farm just outside Abergavenny will be cooked by Jane Baxter. And just a little note from me to you – your wristband will let you appreciate a load of great food and drink-fuelled fun, but lots of the events within the festival are ticketed, so make sure you check the website to avoid disappointment. Abergavenny Food Festival returns on 15 and 16 September, and Andy is hosting Exploring Welsh Wines with Fiona Beckett at 6pm on Saturday, and Cocktails and Cures for the Morning After the Night Before at midday on Sunday with Melissa Cole. Both events are ticketed and are in The Drinks Theatre. For more information and tickets, visit abergavennyfoodfestival.com

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ARMOURY UR

CHOOSE YOUR WEAPONS

StACK-A-snACK StACK St ACK-A-snACK ACK

A HEALTHY LUNCH IS A GREAT THING, MADE EVEN BETTER BY A HEALTHY CONTAINER TO CARRY IT IN, RECKONS MATT BIELBY It’s a lunch box! Just like I used to take to school everyday, but metal like a tiffin tin. I’ve seen these before. Not quite like this, you haven’t. (Though yes, these are also from India.) Crucially, they’re made entirely of stainless steel – no plastics at all – but with more of a lunchbox feel than standard tiffin tins. And they come in a number of different shapes and sizes – not just round, but rectangular too – meaning they’ll pop into your work bag that little bit easier. Sounds good! The range is called My Cleverbox, and it’s the brainchild of Bristol lass Jyoti Shaw, who runs an online outfit called Eqo Living. (Yeah, like ‘ego’ but with a Q.) These guys are all about cool, ethical jewellery and beauty products, with a sideline in bags and lunch-on-the-go items – they already carry the LunchBots range of metal

lunch boxes, for instance – but now she’s come up with her own version. So far there’s a two-tier rectangular stacked set (with a little mini-box to go inside or carry separately, designed for condiments or a tiny pud); a three-tier round set; and a ‘giant’ two-tier rectangular set, again with an accompanying mini box. They’re not crazy-expensive, either, at £20 for the cheapest set and £35 for the big one. And everything’s stainless steel? Yep, the lot. Glass is too heavy and impractical for lunch containers, and plastic is, well, plastic – and if 2018 is about anything, it’s about trying to avoid using it. These boxes are made by a family-run business in India with good ethics, says Jyoti, and use high quality food-grade stainless steel 201, containing around 18 percent chromium (needed to avoid corrosion,

and ensure a long life). “Stainless steel doesn’t harm people during its production or use,” she says, “and has a very low emission footprint. And eventually it can be recycled into another steel product, which will be just as good.” I’m sold. Me too, and I don’t think Jyoti is going to stop here. The My Cleverbox website is full of tips on how to live a plasticfree life – cook from scratch, get your milk in reusable glass bottles, buy washing powder in cardboard boxes – and she’s already adding to the range with smaller, non-stacking snack containers (£7, whether round or rectangular), and even reusable stainless steel straws, either straight or with a kink in them (also £7, for a set of four). My Cleverbox lunch box sets from £30; available from mycleverbox.co.uk

THIS MONTH • STEEL THE SHOW • FEEL THE HEAT • HONEY TALKS

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The Supper Club

pRESSURe COOkinG

CHOPPING INSTEAD OF TYPING, COOKING INSTEAD OF EATING; SOME OF BRISTOL’S FOOD WRITERS WERE TAKEN WELL OUT OF THEIR COMFORT ZONE RECENTLY TO PUT ON A PRETTY SPECIAL SUPPER CLUB. CUE SOME RATHER SHAKY HANDS... WORDS BY JESSICA CARTER PHOTOS BY KIRSTIE YOUNG

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Opposite page: Jess and Andy arm themselves; Tim wields his greens; Natalie stirs up her panna cotta; and Martin hydrates in the hot kitchen

S

ure, there are times as the editor of a food rag when you stop, look around and think, ‘cor, this is a great gig.’ But there are also plenty of occasions when pausing to take stock only makes you go, ‘how exactly did I get myself so far up the creek?’ The latter expression popped up in my head at multiple points on one particular day recently. Namely: 24 June, the date of Bristol’s first Too Many Critics dinner. A group of local food writers, including yours truly, had been herded up by Action Against Hunger (with the help of Steve Ashworth, former South West Chef of the Year winner) to leave their desks and spend the day behind the pass instead. Their task? To cook up a four-course dinner for some of the city’s best chefs and hospitality pros, as well as (the equally discerning – let’s face it) members of the local public. Too Many Critics was first held in London in 2001, and spin-off events have since happened in Manchester and Brighton. Now it was coming to Bristol. Bambalan on Colston Avenue, to be precise, the open kitchen there being perfect for allowing the guests to see exactly how these amateur cooks would fair in the heat of a real dinner service. It was all to raise funds for Action Against Hunger, which fights the causes and effects of hunger in 50 countries across the globe. Proceeds from the tickets and games on the night were all to go straight to the charity – so we had to pull a blinder if we were to get some dough rolling in. Bleary-eyed and with a hangover fog slowly rolling into our brains (okay, speaking for myself, there), we stumbled into

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T H E

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C L U B

Bottom: Jess and Nat have a quick pre-service nap Left: Nat gets Todd to try her punchy gin jelly

Bambalan at 9am on a sunny Sunday morning to get cracking: 50 people would be rocking up that evening looking for a feed, and right now all we had were a few boxes of ingredients and mildly panicked expressions on our faces. Everyone had worked together with Hyde and Co’s exec chef Todd Francis to come up with a dish fit for the event. The meal would be kicking off with a mezze board by Crumbs’ own Andy Clarke et moi: his popcorn broccoli and my feta-stuffed aubergine rolls being joined by a romesco sauce and garlic flatbreads with dukka. The fish course came in the form of Martin Booth’s grilled mackerel taco, while Tim Hayward’s slowcooked lamb with spiced cassoulet formed the main, and Natalie Brereton’s rosewater panna cotta was to finish. What could possibly go wrong? Nine hours and goodness knows how many litres of water lost from my body later (flame grilling on the hottest day of the year so far, with a broken extraction system and a rather nervous temperament, will give you serious sweats), the guests started to turn up. Some familiar supportive faces came first, followed by real life punters and finally real life Michelin-starred chefs. The latter took the table right in front of the pass; no wonder my hands had a mild shake on when I was drizzling that balsamic. The guests ate together, as the cooks formed production lines to ready each plate for service. Chat, games and much, much eating went on until late into the evening, with plates coming back clear and punters looking, dare I say it, rather happy. Pretty much KO’d, I stumbled out of Bambalan in an even worse state that I stumbled in 13 hours before, but this time I had a silly little grin on my face and feet covered in blisters.

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T H E

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The team tucks into bacon butties for breakfast, to fuel them up for a long day of cooking...

jess’ AubeRGine ROLLs stuffed with maRinated feta and candied waLnut

1 The night before serving, marinate the feta. In a food processor, blend a small handful of thyme leaves with 2 garlic cloves and the oil. Place the block of feta in a small container, and pour over the oil. Cover and refrigerate. Be sure to bring it out of the fridge before you need it on the day, as the oil will probably have solidified so will need time to come up to temperature and turn back into liquid. 2 For the candied walnuts, put the sugar in a pan with 300ml water. Heat gently until the sugar has dissolved, then bring the syrup to the boil. Add the walnuts and simmer for around 15 minutes, or until they’re cooked and soft all the way through, then remove, being very careful with the hot sugar syrup. 3 Pour vegetable oil into a deep pan, until it’s about 3cm deep, and heat it to 170C. Carefully drop in the walnuts, and fry for a minute or 2 until they turn golden brown. Then carefully remove from the oil with a slotted spoon and lay on a plate. As they cool, they should turn shiny and hard. 4 Cut the aubergine into 1cm thick slices. Drizzle them with olive oil and season. Rub the oil and seasoning in so they’re evenly coated on both sides. 5 Cook the slices over a flame grill or in a griddle pan until they have some nice dark char lines, but be careful not to take it too far. (It’s easier to do this in batches.) Leave to cool – they will have lost a lot of their bulk and moisture, so will be thinner and floppier. 6 Pick the leaves of the remaining thyme, and finely chop. Crumble the feta into a bowl, and add the thyme and ⅔ of the mint. Roughly chop the cooled walnuts, and add those in too, reserving some for garnish. Mix this all up until all the ingredients are equally dispersed – aim for about a 50:50 ratio of walnut to feta. 7 In a bowl, grate the remaining garlic clove into the yoghurt to taste, add a squeeze of lemon and season. 8 To assemble the rolls, take some of the feta mixture and form it into a little sausage, the same length as the width of the aubergine slice it's meant for. Roll it up in the aubergine, and lay the roll on a board with the loose end underneath. Repeat until you’re out of aubergine (you probably won’t be able to use the first and last slices). 9 Drizzle the yoghurt sauce over the rolls and the board, and repeat with the balsamic. Scatter over the remaining chopped candied walnuts and mint, and sprinkle on the pomegranate seeds.

SERVES 3-4 AS A STARTER

bunch thyme 3 garlic cloves 100ml olive oil, plus extra 100g feta 2 handfuls walnuts 300g caster sugar vegetable oil 1 aubergine large handful mint leaves ¼ lemon, juice only 100ml Greek yoghurt balsamic vinegar pomegranate seeds

actionagainsthunger.org.uk

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K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List MHON

EY

WE HIVE BEEN BUSY BEES (AHEM) HUNTING DOWN SOME TOP HONEY-THEMED GEMS 2

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1. Ecoffee Cup Entropy £9.95 Made from bamboo, these 400ml reusable coffee cups come in countless designs; we’re particularly into this one with its honeycomb-like pattern. Find it in Iota in Bristol. iotabristol.com 2. Sophie Allport Bee Jug £16 There’s a whole range of bee print tableware and textiles by this British designer; this pretty bone china jug can be found at The Pod Company in Clifton. thepodcompany.co.uk

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3. Woven Nest Lampshade from £59 Reminiscent of a traditional wicker bee skep or hanging hive, this artisan lampshade would look great dangling in the dining room. From Mon Pote in Bristol. monpote.co.uk

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4. Kitchen Craft Stainless Steel Honey Spoon £4.50 This cleverly designed spoon is made especially for balancing on the rims of honey jars, mugs and bowls, so it only drips where you want it to. Find it at Kitchens Cookshop in Bath and Bristol. steamer.co.uk

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5. Le Creuset Honey Pot £30 Made from stoneware and coming with a silicone dipper, this will keep your honey stash safe and bring a bit of sunshine to your kitchen. Get it online from Le Creuset. lecreuset.co.uk

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13/08/18 10/09/18 09/10/18

GEORGIA RUSSIA PALESTINE

07/11/18 05/12/18 07/01/19

ISRAEL FRANCE ALGERIA

04/02/19 BANGLADESH 06/03/19 CAMEROON 05/04/19 CHINA

www.newmoontapas.co.uk

05/05/19 USA 05/06/19 KOREA 02/07/19 SENEGAL

01/08/19 COSTA RICA 30/08/19 LEBANON


curry shack

VIBRANT, SEASONAL INDIAN STREET FOOD

Unit 2, Cargo 2, Wapping Wharf, Bristol BS1 6ZA Weddings | Parties | Private hire www.gopalscurryshack.co.uk

@gopalscurryshack

The

Guildhall Delicatessen

Situated in Bath’s famous indoor market

BUTTERMILK FRIED CHICKEN CRAFT BEER & COCKTAILS On the riverside, Taunton 01823 252466 | info@eatthebird.co.uk x eatthebird a tw_eatthebird

We stock a wide range of locally produced vegan, vegetarian and meat based products as well as delicious cakes and Bath Buns. Ideal for lunches or an any time snack. Come and order you food and collect it when you need it. We can even cater for small business lunches. Our range includes: Vegan, lamb or chicken samosas, veggie or meat pasties, bhajis, vegan or pork sausage rolls and veggie or pork scotch eggs. We also stock a range of speciality scotch eggs and pies. Why not add a Lovely juice drink, some Rose Farm preserves and chutneys or The Wiltshire Beekeeper’s honey to your shopping.

Open Mon - Sat, 9.30 - 17.00

8 Guildhall Market, Bath BA2 4AW • Tel: 01225 427195 email: guildhall-deli@hotmail.co.uk twitter: @GuildhallDeli


Nestled in 36 acres of beautiful West Country parkland, Ston Easton Park is unique; the hotel is adorned with original antique furniture, sumptuous fabrics and glistening chandeliers, yet the warm welcome and homely atmosphere prevails, creating an idyllic home-away-from-home.

ENJOY AN ALFRESCO AFTERNOON TEA Why not take a seat on our sunny terrace, where you can tuck into an array of sweet and savoury treats, served on beautiful tiered cakes stands. Alternatively you can enjoy afternoon tea inside in our stunning drawing rooms. Champagne afternoon teas and lighter cream teas are also available. Served from 12 noon | Early booking advised | Gift vouchers available

SPECIAL OFFER

Complimentary glass of Prosecco to all joining us for Afternoon Tea. QUOTE SCMB01 (Offer valid until 03/09/18) Ston Easton, Nr Bath, Somerset BA3 4DF To book, call 01761 241631 or email reception@stoneaston.co.uk

www.stoneaston.co.uk


This lovely looking creation comes from The Wheatsheaf Combe Hay

MAINs

TOP CULINARY CAUSES, INSIDER KNOWLEDGE AND FOOD PIONEERs

HIGHLIGHTS

RUN FOR YOUR LIFE GRAB-AND-GO MEALS TO ENJOY ON THE RUN PAGE 63

SUGAR RUSH

ARE WE SEEING TH OF THE DESSERE DEMISE T? PAGE 70

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PLUS!

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LOCAL PUDS TO TRY, BY SUPERSTAR PASTRY CHEFS


THAI CORNER

TAKEA WAY COLLE C SERVIC TION E AVAILA NOW BLE!

OPENING HOURS

Mon: Closed Tues - Fri: 10am - 2:30pm, 4pm - 11pm Sat: 10am -11pm • Sun: 10am - 9:30pm 24 KELLAWAY AVENUE, REDLAND, BRISTOL BS6 7XR

0117 924 5450


LIFE ON THE RUN

YOU’RE HUNGRY – BUT THERE ARE THINGS TO DO AND PLACES GO. WELL, IN THE WISE WORDS OF THAT TIMELESS (RIGHT?) 5IVE TRACK: DON’T STOP MOVIN’, KEEP ON ROCKIN. THEY WERE ALWAYS TALKING ABOUT GRAB AND GO MEALS, OF COURSE – AND HERE ARE SOME LOCAL BELTERS...

CRUMBSMAG.COM

K I R S T I E YO UNG

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THE ATHENIAN (BRISTOL)

Souvlaki is one of the most popular foods to eat on the go in Greece, and thanks to the guys at The Athenian, it’s surely now up there with Bristolians’ faves, too. These wraps involve handmade pitta (imported ’specially from Athens) packed with marinated meats, salads and chips. The best seller right now is the chicken and halloumi number, but the hot-off-the-press new menu promises another surefire hit: vegan gyros. These come filled with shavings of organic seitan and feature vegan mayo, and we’re more than a little intrigued by ’em.

EATCHU (BRISTOL)

K I RST I E YOUN G

Tucked just inside St Nick’s Market in Bristol, this restaurant serves up Japanese street food in the form of gyoza. These little handmade dumplings are perfect for loading into your gob on the run, but they’re so good you’ll want to slow down to properly savour them. You get six gyozas in a portion and can choose your filling – free range pork and garlic chive, or mushroom and leek, perhaps – and add as many toppings and sauces as you dare.

red lentil and channa daal, basmati rice, crispy spiced chickpeas, ’slaw with mango and lime dressing, sweet potato crisps and pickles, while the Mumbai toastie sees masala spiced potato, mint and coriander chutney, onion, pepper, tomato, vegan cheese and garlic and chilli chutney sandwiched in Hobbs House bread and grilled. That should fuel you up for the afternoon.

FRISKA (BRISTOL)

GRILLSTOCK (BRISTOL)

This family of ethically focused cafés has sites across Bristol and serves food all day, so it’s super easy to drop in and pick up some proper sustenance. Fresh, colourful lunches include the likes of chicken and chorizo gumbo, Lebanese meatballs, and roast butternut and black bean dopiaza, as well as burritos and pho noodles. The Park Street café has a new brunch menu for weekends too, involving the likes of eggs Benedict with toppings such as smoked salmon, outdoor reared ham, or mushroom, tomato and spinach.

GOPAL’S CURRY SHACK (BRISTOL)

Based at Wapping Wharf but with a travelling kitchen that pops up at all kinds of markets and events, Gopal’s is all about meat-free Indian street food. The signature Buddha Box, for instance, is packed with

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The flames at this barbecue joint, founded in 2012 in the famous St Nicholas Market, are still going full force. The menu changes daily, but you’ll be in for the likes of mac ’n’ cheese with pulled pork, brisket sarnie with burnt ends, or cider-braised pig cheek sandwich if you swing by for a bite on the go. There are breakfasts on Fridays, too – egg, pork and cheese rolls. This tiny little stand in the food-packed glass arcade is a Bristol staple, and brought some of the first US, smokehouse-style grub to Bristolian punters.

MISSION BURRITO (BATH AND BRISTOL)

Need something quick but super filling? The team at Mission Burrito will be able to hook you up. Meats (beef, pork and chicken) are sourced from a local butchers and come cosied up with rice, beans, salad and

CRUMBSMAG.COM


M A I N S

From American-style loaded fries to Indian vegan street food and Mexican burritos, there’s loads you can get yer chops around while being very busy and important...

salsa, as well as a few optional extras. There are often specials on the go as well, like the black bean and butternut squash chipotle chilli number – which happens to be vegan and gluten free, as well as smoky and delicious – and the cochinita, starring achiote paste, orange juice and lime-marinated pork shoulder.

OOWEE DINER (BRISTOL)

It all kicked off when these guys opened their first takeout diner on Picton Street; it wasn’t long before word spread of their beastly burgers, and the queues got out of control. Now with its second site on North Street taking some of the weight, it’s much easier to get your hands on one of their monstrous creations. The Dirty Double, with two patties, American cheese, signature dirty sauce and fried onions is a great shout, as is the Saucy Bird, with buttermilk fried thigh, American and Swiss cheeses, and baconnaise. Don’t attempt eating these literally on the run, mind – you’ll get yourself into a right mess.

PHAT YAKS (BATH)

This Kingsmead Square café is from the team behind Yak Yeti Yak, and cooks up a menu of fresh, colourful Nepalese-inspired food. The build-your-own wraps are great one-handed lunches, and the pakora-

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filled versions go down a storm, with their crisp fritter filling rolled up in a soft wrap and topped with homemade sauces. The ‘curry in a hurry’ is becoming a winning pick, an’ all; choose from chicken or vegetable curry, and it’ll come with rice, daal, salad and chutney or raita. Even better: takeaway packaging is made from paper or bamboo, and the cutlery is compostable too.

THE PICKLED BRISKET (BRISTOL)

The stuff these guys are knocking up is surely as Bristolan as salt beef can get – and a proper labour of love it is, too. The meat is cured for a fortnight, before being slow-cooked for, well, ages. It’s served in locally baked bread with mustard made by Bristol’s Ginger Beard preserves, and gherkins. Go classic, or off-piste with one of the alternative creations, like the Bull Horn, also involving sauerkraut, pickled red cabbage and West Country Cheddar. (And what’s this? They’re now selling those fermented ’krauts and pickles to take home? It’s true: buy them from the Cargo diner.)

PIEMINISTER (BATH AND BRISTOL)

Everything on the menu here – which includes vegan and gluten-free options – is available to eat on the go. With all that choice, what

CRUMBSMAG.COM


TUCK INTO SOME AUTHENTIC GREEK SOUVLAKI AT THE ATHENIAN Having humble beginnings, we started from a small street food stall in a small market in London at the end of 2014 to our newly opened restaurant in Bristol in the spring of 2017.

for more: www.theathenian.co.uk hello@theathenian.co.uk

Here in the Athenian we ensure all our ingredients are imported from small independent Greek producers to stay true to authentic Greek cuisine. Many so-called Greek restaurants serve many dishes that are influenced by Turkish, Arabic, Mediterranean or Middle-Eastern cooking.

What is your proudest achievement ?

Our proudest achievement would have to be when our Bristol restaurant won the “Best Express/ Takeaway/Deli” award in Bristol’s Good Food Awards.

What’s on the menu? We’re launching a brand new menu this summer with an emphasis on meat free options. We’re introducing a delicious vegan gyros with vegan mayo that we expect to be an absolute hit with the crowds of Bristol! Of course our handmade meat skewers, chicken and pork gyros remain. We want our menu to be inclusive for everyone across

What makes the Athenian stand out from other Greek restaurants?

all different types of customers. Including vegans, vegetarians or simply people that want to try something new and exciting or perhaps eat less meat! Our vegan gyros is just as high in protein as chicken, and it looks and tastes like meat! There’s nothing quite like it on the market!

What are your future goals?

Being an environmentally conscious company, we try to have the least impact on the environment that we can. We currently use minimal single use plastic, but we are planning to move to 100% biodegradable alternatives soon!

@theathenianu k


M A I N S

Clockwise from left: British, Korean and Chinese food to go, from Pieminister, Tuk Tuk, and Woky Ko

to order? We say go the whole hog with the Mothership. That’s a pie with mash, gravy, minty mushy peas, cheese and crispy shallots (and yes, all that can come in vegan-friendly form, thanks to the new vegan pie, Kevin, and plant-based cheese). And if you can eat that quick enough, order one of the new ice creams for pud, which come in pie-crust-style cones. Just don’t let it melt while you’re busy with that pastry... 

THE SLICE (BATH)

The Slice, which opened on New Bond Street earlier this year, specialises in Italian street food. This means Roman-style pizzas with sturdy foccacia bases (to make them easy to eat on the move), topped with the likes of mozzarella with ’nduja and pepperoni, Slices start at just £2.50, and there are also fried treats on the go, like arancini, croquettes and fries.

SQUEEZED (BRISTOL)

The creation of long-time Bristol food pro Alex Hayes, this shipping container joint celebrated its first birthday this summer. Its offerings range from the well-known, locally inspired St Werburger (with confit shallots and a smoked bacon aioli) to the Reverse Cowgirl, featuring peanut chipotle barbecue sauce and charred scallion sour cream. There are hand-cut, skin-on fries too, and homemade lemonades; try the orange and thyme, or perhaps the watermelon and rosemary.

TUK TUK (BRISTOL)

This tiny little Asian restaurant is a go-to for not only low-key, great value meals to eat in, but also for grabbing some sustenance to eat on the run – from Korean-style sushi to Thai red curry and ramen. The Korean bibimbap rice bowls are particular faves, and come packed with crunchy veg. Everything on offer is takeaway-friendly (coming in robust containers with gochujang and soy sauces in separate pots), making this a great place for a fresh, nutritious feed on the go.

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THE WHOLE BAGEL (BATH)

Just off the main drag in central Bath, this little bagel shop and café is ideal if you’re on a lunch break or need some speedy sustenance as you dart around the city. Fresh bagels, baked on site, come in seven flavours, ranging from sundried tomato and olive to multi-seed and cinnamon and raisin, and as your order is freshly prepared in front of you, you can have it exactly how you want it. The Wholey Cheese is a great all-rounder, with Swiss cheese, tomato chutney, mayo and leaves, and the New Yorker, featuring pastrami, red onion, tomato, mustard, and dill pickles is another solid choice.

WOKY KO (BRISTOL)

You can grab and go not only at Woky Ko: Cargo, but also the cool new Woky Ko: Kauto on Queens Road, don’t you know? Almost everything on the menu of contemporary Asian snacks and meals is available to take out, served in boxes. The baos are super transportable little fistfuls of joy, with fillings like ox cheek with daikon and bulgogi, and aubergine and kimchi served in the pillowy-soft steamed buns. There are also noodle salads, rice-based dishes and curries being knocked up between the two sites, if you need something that bit more substantial. Bit better than a soggy take out sarnie, right?

Where do you head to for a food fix on the go? Tweet us @crumbsmag!

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We're on the hunt for bright sparks looking to forge careers in media sales. If you’re passionate about food and drink, and have love for our local independent businesses, then we may have the job for you. It’s all about working with clients to curate, pitch and deliver advertising campaigns across our pretty awesome food magazines and digital channels. Sound like your cup of tea? Email your CV to Kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk or give us a call on 01225 475800 for a chat.

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The encore. The last-minute plot twist. The hidden CD track (remember them?). The sweet course of a meal is surely at home among this list of things worth waiting for; just as set lists, album tracks and storylines are created to be enjoyed as cohesive wholes, so are many great restaurant menus. Sure, there are loads of people who will swear to you that they ‘really don’t do desserts,’ but I bet you’ve only heard them say it when they’re sat tucking into one. Am I right? Point is: desserts don’t solely exist to be a final flourish to the main meal, or to make sure sweet-toothed punters get their happy ending. A lot of the time, they’re intended to be part of the meal proper, and chefs take them really seriously: “We look at dessert as the last thing people are going to eat here, so it’s incredibly important to us,” says Jim Day, head chef at Casamia. Despite the sweet course being so integral to this famous Michelinstarred restaurant, though, there’s not actually a dedicated pastry chef there. However, as Jim explains, “There are still pastry chef roles out there in the bigger operations; it all just depends on the structure of the kitchen.” Hotels are among those “bigger operations” that often have chefs dedicated to pastry; there’s often call for baked specialities at all hours there. Abigail Dawson has been a pastry chef for nine years, and now works her sweet magic in the Mount Somerset Hotel’s kitchen. She has plenty to keep her busy on a daily basis. “I make bread, scones and cakes for afternoon tea,” she says, “plus desserts for the weekly menu and the al a carte menu, biscuits for the bedrooms, and petit fours.”

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SWEET TALKING DESSERT: A FINISHING TOUCH, UNNECESSARY TREAT OR AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE MENU? WHATEVER YOUR PREFERRED WAY TO END A MEAL, IT’S EVIDENT THAT THE PROPORTION OF RESTAURANTS EMPLOYING DEDICATED PASTRY CHEFS IS AT A LOW. SO WHAT’S GOING DOWN IN THE PASTRY SECTION?

CRUMBSMAG.COM

Wo r d s by J E S S I C A C A R T E R


M A I N S

Left to right: chocolate delice from The Bath Priory; Box E's famous panna cotta; an elderflower-garnished pud at Lucknam; a delicate creation from Mount Somerset Hotel

With all that needing to be done every day, it makes sense to have someone dedicated on the job. Of course, another reason that pastry is a specific speciality is that it’s such a science. Matthew Parsons, pastry chef at Bath hotel No.15 Great Pulteney, says, “Everything is measured, and has to be exact. I really enjoy the often intricate presentation of the dishes too. There’s less room for error, so you need to be on it all of the time.” To perfect really impressive, technical desserts, then, takes a hella lot of time and practice, meaning there’s an argument that allrounder chefs might not be able to reach the levels of those who can fully dedicate themselves to pastry all day, every day. Todd Francis, executive chef at the Hyde and Co group, would agree with this, and notes how a lack of dedicated pastry chefs can result in a loss of skills. “I know a handful of chefs who could tell me what a Paris-brest is,” he says, “and less who could make it from scratch. Compromise on variety is, to a degree, inevitable.”

SWEET GOODBYES?

So, given the above, how come so many local venues don’t seem to have pastry chefs any more? There are a few ideas kicking around. Firstly, might it not be entirely irrelevant that we have so many great artisan producers and bakeries on our doorstep these days? “I think more and more restaurants are buying in bread, ice creams and things,” says Lauren Deaker, pastry chef at The Wheatsheaf Combe Hay. “But although I believe in supporting local bakeries, I also believe it’s important for us to make everything ourselves.” Matthew Peters is at Lucknam Park, having left the main kitchen

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behind for pastry eight years ago. He agrees that lots of pastry foods are being bought in these days, but also notes a more obvious reason why restaurants might not take on pastry chefs. “Cost is a big factor,” he says, “as an experienced pastry chef can command high wages. Some restaurants or hotels just can’t match their demands.” Indeed, it’s no secret how tight restaurant margins are these days; the topic of no-shows is still as relevant as ever, with restaurants having spoken out about how badly they can affect takings, jeopardising the whole business. With that in mind, are pastry chefs a luxury that not many kitchens can afford? Ross Gibbens, co-head chef at Wellbourne, comments that it’s certainly not a position all restaurants can rationalise. “I think you can only justify the need for a separate pastry team if you have a revenue stream that directly results from that part of the kitchen,” he says. “Super-restaurants, like Hide in London, have an in-house bakery and pastry team, as they produce breakfast goods, afternoon teas and have two restaurants to produce for, seven days a week – and it’s the same with the big hotels. Some of the more highend fine dining restaurants can still justify it too, as a certain level of detail is expected from them.” It would be an oversight to not mention the change in our food culture too – Todd makes a good point about this. “With cuisine changing to more worldly options,” he says, “the highly specialised French fine dining pastry chef is not necessarily as relevant – a lot of cuisines do not have a dessert tradition. Add to that the influx of excellent bakeries, and restaurants will buy in bread that would have traditionally been the pastry chef’s job.”

CRUMBSMAG.COM


M A I N S

TRY THE PASTRY CHEFS' FAVOURITE PUDS!

With modern cost issues and contemporary style preferences, it’s unsurprising that kitchen teams look different today. Chef Elliott Lidstone owns shipping container restaurant Box E, with wife Tessa. Of course, with space at a minimum, there are only a certain number of bodies that can fit in the kitchen. However, space itself isn’t the only contributing factor in the decision to keep the team small – many bigger kitchens are going the same way. “Even in larger restaurants, kitchen brigades are not the size they once were,” says Elliott. “A pastry chef is quite a specific job and these days chefs have more general roles.” Just like Jim’s kitchen at Casamia, then, more and more teams are doing away with traditional structures and training their chefs in every discipline. And, of course, it makes sense to have a holistic view of the kitchen, whether you’re going to specialise in any one part of it or not. “During my time at L’Ortolan,” Elliott says, “my boss, Alan Murchison, could not over-emphasise the importance of spending time in each section of the kitchen. This very much included pastry. I make bread fresh every morning now, and my past experience of working in the pastry section has certainly helped with this.”

MATTHEW PETERS, Lucknam Park “We have just put on a chocolate dessert that features peanut butter mousse, raspberries and milk sorbet under a chocolate cage. You’ll have to come try it to see it!” ABIGAIL DAWSON, Mount Somerset Hotel “The Strawberry Pimm’s dessert consists of fresh orange, strawberries, cucumber, lemon sorbet, strawberry foam, and mint, and is served with a strawberry and Pimm’s soup.”

PUD NEWS

One thing we can be sure of, though, is that desserts themselves are still popular – and, even if it does look like there are fewer pastry chefs around, it ain’t ’cause no one’s eating pud. “Desserts are still very popular at the restaurant,” says Elliott. “The vast majority of our diners will stay for pudding or cheese – or a tea, coffee or disgestif, if not. It’s a nice chance to pause and relax at the end of the meal.” Ross Gibbens agrees that most people are still tucking into dessert after a meal, estimating that around 70 percent of customers will finish their meal with dessert during the week, with the figure climbing to the high 90s at the weekend. Chris Peers, pastry chef at The Pony and Trap, points out that it’s sort of unsurprising that desserts are so popular; they have a captive audience, after all. “Generally, going out to eat is a complete indulgence, and pudding is the extreme end of it. You wouldn’t always have pudding at home because it is a treat – that’s the best bit about pudding. Pastry is, in one sense, a complete luxury – but, for me, I think it’s a necessary one.” So the appetite for dessert seems very healthy, then. And that gives even more weight to the opinions of lots of pros who told us that pastry is most certainly not a declining trade. “It’s not dying out; it’s coming back, if anything,” says awardwinning, Michelin-starred chef-owner of Casamia, Pete SanchezIglesias. “But of course we’re talking about a certain size, scale and type of restaurant.” Important point there: rules and trends are not consistent across all styles of restaurant. As a pastry chef of 24 years, The Bath Priory’s Jonathan Blair comments that we may just have a skewed vision thanks to the rise of casual dining – especially on our patch. “It can be misleading to look at the number of pastry chefs in restaurants, as there are more restaurants and food outlets now than there have ever been. (Most of the top ones still have pastry chefs, although sometimes they are unsung heroes! ) The rise in popularity of gastropubs, for example, which offer a simpler style of cooking, means pastry can often be attached to another section of the kitchen.  But, when it comes to high end restaurants, I believe that pastry chefs still remain a popular appointment.” Popular, and often very necessary, thinks Matthew Peters: “ I feel very strongly that the pastry trade holds its place among restaurants

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LAUREN DEAKER, The Wheatsheaf Combe Hay “The treacle tart stays on the menu all year round, though I change the garnish regularly to keep it fresh and seasonal. We had a break from it for a couple weeks a few years ago, but the customers kept asking for it, so it will now stay on the menu indefinitely.” JONATHAN BLAIR, The Bath Priory “Our salted caramel fondant is particularly popular with our guests, but my current favourite dish is the dark chocolate sphere with mint yoghurt sorbet.” CHRIS PEERS, The Pony and Trap “We serve the lemon tart with some cultured cream and some fig leaf oil. It’s a delicious pudding.” MATTHEW PARSONS, No.15 Great Pulteney “Our Eton mess is a classic: surprisingly easy to get wrong, but divine when done properly. It’s all about the correct balance of cream to meringue and strawberries.”

up and down the country – and worldwide. I believe pastry is a lot more than just sweet desserts now, too – so many pastry practices and techniques make their way into savoury dishes.” As a patch that’s seen a massive boom in casual dining, then, we may not have the highest proportion of pastry chefs to restaurants. This, coupled with the restructuring and condensing of kitchen teams, may make it seem that pastry pros are a dying breed – but no! The specialism is actually alive and well. And from what we can see, there are fewer excuses than ever for passing up on pud.

CRUMBSMAG.COM


The Malago

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP • Contemporary menu for brunch and dinner • Locally roasted coffee • Fully licensed • Art gallery • Live music • Event space

108 Stokes Croft, Bristol, BS1 3RU 0117 923 2858 - info@theartshousecafe.co.uk

MON - SAT: BRUNCH/LUNCH: 9AM - 3PM • DINNER: 5.30PM - 9.30PM SUNDAY: BRUNCH/LUNCH: 9AM - 12PM • ROASTS: 12:30PM - 7PM

www.themalago.club • eatout@themalago.club 220 North Street, Southville, BS3 1JD • 0117 963 9044

We are a friendly, family owned inn offering hearty home cooked food, in a small country village setting. Whether you are local or travelling from further afield, you are guaranteed a warm welcome. PUB • RESTAURANT • FUNCTION ROOM • ACCOMMODATION

Tunley Road, Tunley BA2 0EB • 01761 470408 Email: info@kingwilliaminn.co.uk • f T @kingwilliam84 www.kingwilliaminn.co.uk


EARLYBIRD OFFER 3/5 SMALL PLATES FOR £16/£25* EVERY NIGHT UNTIL 7PM BRUNCH SERVED SAT & SUN 10 - 1 BOTTOMLESS BRUNCH AVAILABLE (BOOZY AND BOOZE FREE) *Some supplements apply

0117 9077112 32 COTHAM HILL, BS6 6LA WWW.MUINOBRISTOL.COM @MUINOBRISTOL


AFTERS

NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM HIGHLIGHTS

NO LIE

HONEST BURGERS LANDS IN BRISTOL WITH ITS HANDCHOPPED-BEEF PATTIES PAGE 76

COW-ABUNGA! LUNCH ON A FARM AT CHILCOMPTON'S HOLY COW CAFÉ PAGE 79

POLE POSITIO N

IT 'S OUT TO TH GARDEN WITH E BEER US AT BATH'S HOP PO LE PAGE 80

This cool, rustic café is set on a working farm, overlooking the village church

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CRUMBSMAG.COM


A F T E R S

(BANGIN’ BURGERS)

HONEST BURGERS AS ANOTHER LONDON RESTAURANT LANDS IN BRISTOL, JESSICA CARTER VISITS TO SEE IF IT HAS LOCAL STAYING POWER...

b

ristol is often spoken about as having the best food scene outside of London. That’s pretty flattering –  London’s restaurant game is off the chain, after all – and really positive  for the local  industry. But it doesn’t mean the two cities are similar. Bristol has its own character and way of doing things – it doesn’t jump on trends or replicate what’s going well elsewhere. And all of that goes for its punters, too.   Honest  Burgers seems to have grasped that, though, and – although a London-born group, with more than 20 branches in the Big Smoke alone – it’s taken some time to get to know us before moving in. As such, it’s got several Bristol producers on its books; gin comes from Psychopomp (which make the guys a bespoke spirit

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called Honest Gin), and beers from Good Chemistry and Moor. Pilton Cider and Westcombe Dairy’s famous Cheddar also make an appearance. Far from plopping a London restaurant into the middle of Bristol and expecting it to thrive, then, it looks like these guys have been a bit savvier.   Seeing as the sun was pelting down when I went for lunch, the Botanic Garden  cocktail (gin, iced  tea, apple  and lemon) was a no-brainer of a refreshment, and at £6 (that’s for a small; a large is £9), it was easily cheaper than the eye-watering parking  fee I incurred while I was enjoying it. (I’m over it, though. What? I am.) Over to the food menu: it’s all about the beef, save for one chicken and one veggie burger (a good-sounding spiced fritter). Indeed, so

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into their beef are these guys, that Honest now has its own butchery outfit. It uses chuck and rib cap cuts in its burgers, and the meat is hand chopped as opposed to minced – which you can notice pretty clearly when you’re chewing on it. The patties, which are flat (hurrah – just how I like ’em) and served pink, unless you want otherwise, hold together really well, and have a chunkier, coarser  texture – none of that crumbling business. Prices start at  £8.75 (or £7.95 for the veg option), and everything comes with chips as standard. There  are  a whole  load o’  sides too, though, if you think you can take on more.  Chicken wings (£4.75) come  crisp-skinned and slathered with generous amounts of barbecue sauce (there wasn’t an awful amount of meat on ours, but that’s most wings for you, really); onion rings (£3.95) are large, sans excessive grease, and coated with a very decent golden batter; and a coleslaw (£3.50) of red cabbage, apple and beetroot is light and crunchy, promising mouthfuls of relief from the meat and carb fest happening on your main plate. Never afraid of a cliché, I chose the Bristol burger, while my mate, who had dashed out of the office to spend his lunch hour filling face with me, went for the special Korea number (both £12.95). My poutine-inspired stack starred smoked Cheddar and cheese curds from Westcombe Dairy, a Pilton cider and bacon gravy, and crunchy shoestring fries –  as well as onion and pickles. It was a well-balanced burger with a good amount of filling, and could fit in my gob with ease (’cause if you’re forced to use the deconstruction technique, it kind of defeats the object, right?). Special mention for that gravy. It was layered with rich, meaty flavour for a pretty addictive result, and I could empathise with anyone who got themselves into a bit of a gravy habit because of it. Across the table, another patty was loaded with bulgogi barbecued bacon, American cheese, gohujang sauce and black sesame seeds. Kimchi also brought some great contrast in its tang and crunch. The chips were really good. Thick enough to be substantial, but skinny enough that you get a good outside-to-inside potatio (that’s potato ratio, duh), they came wearing golden, crisp jackets, and hid soft fluffiness inside. The real dealmaker was the seasoning, though; that rosemary salt will see you continue to pile them into your gob well after declaring yourself full. Despite this being the first week of service, staff seemed clued up and on it (although the restaurant was quite quiet, so they weren’t exactly rushed off their feet). Confident in their offering and armed with all the information their diners could ask for, they were also noticeably proud of the joint’s strong Bristolian edge. It looks like Honest Burgers has paid real attention to the peripheral details: initiating local collaborations, tailoring the offering and taking the time to train staff really well are all characteristics of a company that’s not about to take the appetites of Bristol punters for granted. Oh, and the burgers are good too, mind.

Honest Burgers, 21 Clare Street, Bristol BS1 1XA; 0117 203 3648; honestburgers.co.uk

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Peanut Butter: we have been asked repeatedly for this flavour and have spent a bit of time finding a great recipe. A super smooth gelato (less air and less fat than traditional ice cream) made with the sweet fresh milk from the Lacock Dairy herd, lightly roasted peanuts ground into a rough crunchy texture and a little sea salt. Available from the specialist wholesaler Lovejoys, Whitehall Garden Centre, Bailbrook House Hotel, Widcombe Deli, Allington Farm Shop, Planks Farm Shop, Whiterow Farm Shop, Walter Rose & Son and other independent outlets.

info@lacockdairy.co.uk | www.lacockdairy.co.uk

CAFE KITCHEN Welcome to our award-winning café - providing young people with special needs a unique opportunity to gain work experience and training. We are working with the local community and employers to develop work experience opportunities after students have worked in 3 Cafe Kitchen.

Join us for Afternoon Tea

Booking required

Served from 1:30pm - 3:30pm £10 per person - minimum of 2 people £16 per person with Prosecco - minimum of 2 people

Pot of Everyday Clipper Tea • Finger Sandwiches Pate on our Homemade Toast • Raspberry Brownie Mini Cheese Scone with Cream Cheese & Homemade Chutney Mini Plain Scone with Tiptree Strawberry Jam & Clotted Cream Lemon & Seasonal Fruit Cupcake with Lemon Curd Mascarpone Icing Please be aware that all food is prepared in a kitchen where allergens are present, for any allergen enquiries please ask a member of staff. The school and café has a NUT FREE POLICY. Food is locally sourced and seasonal where possible.

Open Monday to Friday 8am–4pm | Saturday 8am–12pm Available for private hire. Please call 01225 830377 or email amelia.hartley@threeways.co.uk Located @ 180 Frome Road, Odd Down, BA2 5RF


A F T E R S

(COOL CAFÉS)

THE HOLY COW CAFÉ AN IMPRESSIVE CONTACTS BOOK OF LOCAL ARTISAN MAKERS IS KEPT AT THIS SWEET LITTLE COUNTRYSIDE CAFÉ, FINDS JESSICA CARTER

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osh, it’s nice to get out of the city sometimes, isn’t it? Negotiating those country roads (which was not helped by my mate’s “imagine if there was a car coming the other way now,” as we squeezed down a long and narrow, hedge-lined lane), is a price worth paying for a bit of a change of scene and a reminder that life exists outside of the urban chaos many of us call home. This little café might not be on your radar – but we’ll forgive you. Set on a centuries-old farm in the village of Chilcompton, it’s probably not widely known among city-dwellers. Locals, it seems, aren’t missing a trick, though. Family run, this place has a rustic farmhouse vibe, but with a wellbalanced contemporary edge; walls are covered in whitewashed wooden boards and low-hanging bulbs glow overhead. The focal piece is an illustrated cow on the far wall, sporting a halo and echoing the sense of fun and creativity that you can also spy in the food. Several big bowls of colourful homemade salads sit on the counter, alongside one heck of a collection of sweet bakes, both homemade and from nearby makers The Pudding Kitchen and Griffin’s Cakes. This is far from the only locally made produce you’ll spot here, though; bread comes from Hobbs House, sausage rolls from Little Jack Horners, and milk and cream from Midway Farm Dairy, just for instance. Breakfast includes everything from French toast with bacon and maple syrup to avo on toast, and even breakfast burgers, while

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lunch involves those fresh salads, homemade burgers and quiches, sarnies and a few specials. A glass of pale, crisp rosé (great news – they do booze too!) and an iced vanilla coffee were soon followed by a sausage roll with salads and the ‘deluxe’ burger (both £8.75). The chilli and pork-filled pastry had a lovely balance of sweetness and heat, and was joined by salads of cabbage cashew and mango; carrot tahini and hazelnut; cucumber and dill; and pasta, pumpkin and pesto. The cucumber and dill affair, with that tangy gherkin-like flavour, was especially good to cut through the rich pork, and the cabbage had a moreish savouriness thanks to the cashew. The burger, which arrived in a soft, toasted Hobbs brioche roll, was made with good-quality, lean beef (so I was told by my pal, anyway; I didn’t get a look in). A gorgeous-looking lime and coconut cake (£3.45 a slice), decorated by curls of coconut flakes, was light and zesty, while the Bruce Bogtrotter creation, topped with marshmallows, nuts and salted caramel (also £3.45), was as chocolatey and indulgent as Bruce’s original from Matilda – albeit far more handsome looking. Fresh, good-quality café food, friendly service and a pretty garden (overlooking a 15th century church) makes The Holy Cow a really good shout if you’re after a change of scene and some lovely lunchtime scran. The Holy Cow Café, Manor Farm, Church Lane, Chilcompton BA3 4HP; 01761 410497; theholycowchilcompton.co.uk

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( L O N G - S TA N D I N G L O C A L S )

THE HOP POLE AN AFTERNOON OF PROPER BEER GARDEN WEATHER SAW JESSICA CARTER STROLL DOWN TO THIS WELL-KNOWN BATH WATERING HOLE NEAR CRUMBS HQ FOR LUNCH…

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A F T E R S

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aken over in January by landlord Chris Hester, The Hop Pole has seen some changes recently. Things started to shift back when Bath Ales was taken over by St Austell Brewery two years ago, and although that’s not directly affected the pub itself for customers – apart from St Austell beers now being at the pumps – it kick-started a fresh chapter for this long-standing local. Chris brought with him some big ideas about what this pub could become with a little investment and TLC. Of course, as is always the case, the ball was slow to get rolling, but plans are really starting to take shape now – if you’ve passed by, you may well have noticed the new signage, for instance, painted in fresh racing green. What you won’t have noticed from the front of the pub, though, is that work’s been underway on the garden, too. Following a bit of a reshuffle and the arrival of some new furniture, it is soon to get an outdoor bar. And the function room? There are plans to make better use of that as a wine lounge, too. Sun shining, we headed straight out the back to the garden for a recent lunch. The no-nonsense, one-page menu lists dishes that are rooted in simple pub grub, but with some imaginative flourishes here and there. To start, the slow-cooked pork belly bites with mustard mayo (£6.75) were in the running for a while, but in the end I was served the calamari (£7). Dusted in spice, the rings had been deep-fried and arranged on rocket leaves coated in a moreish chilli and ginger dressing. A pot of roasted garlic aioli pleaded for the golden-coated meat to be dunked in its creaminess. Galician wood-fired peppers (£7) were confidently smoky in flavour, contrasting nicely with sweet tomato. Super fine shavings of creamy manchego lolled over the red fruits and the plate was finished off with a drizzle of oil. A fresh, simple dish, with plenty of summery, Mediterranean character. Main courses include the likes of burgers, fish and chips, and rump steak – but the list has been given a bit of a makeover for the

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hotter season, with lots of salads and lighter options now among the choices. The harissa chicken (£14) was noticeably freshly cooked; the half-bird was coated in spice and dunked in the fryer until the skin was golden but the flesh still plump and moist. Nice and juicy, the meat sat on a bed of tabbouleh – bulgur wheat flecked with finely chopped green herbs and topped with pomegranate seeds. Although a nice combination, it did have me craving a citrusy seasoning for lift – and a bit of tomato and onion in the mix, as is traditional, would have pimped it up further and given a bit more interest. Still, it was a generously portioned and well-cooked dish, and a thoughtful plate for the summer months. The salmon nicoise (£12) was a bit delayed, so my mate helped me out with the chicken while he waited – this didn’t stop him managing to finish his whole dish when it did arrive, though. The nicoise was colourful with green beans, tomatoes and olives, and finished with boiled egg, soft new potatoes and a well – albeit not perfectly – cooked piece of fish. Its recipient noted how a more distinctive dressing would have elevated this dish as well.  Desserts (all £6.50) were straightforward and classic – think sticky toffee pud and summer fruit crumble. Following a belting weekend of sun which sent people flocking to their nearest pub garden, the former was still off the menu – so the crumble it was. A topping of chunky crumb hid a claret-coloured mix of tart, sweet fruit underneath, making for a dessert that was exactly as advertised – no disappointments or surprises. This is a well liked, long established Bath Ales boozer with a proper rep for Sunday lunches. Well kept ales, chatty staff, a pretty beer garden and proximity to the playground in Victoria Park opposite makes it a good all-rounder for families, mates, dog walkers and locals on the hunt for refreshments and friendly faces.

The Hope Pole, 7 Albion Buildings, Upper Bristol Road, Bath BA1 3AR; 01225 446 327; thehoppolebath.co.uk

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L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

GeOrGe KaLLias

RECOGNISE THIS FACE? IT COULD BE FROM THIS YEAR’S SERIES OF MASTERCHEF, OR IT COULD BE FROM ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE LOCAL HANGOUTS… BREAKFAST? Brunel’s Buttery. One word: legendary. Bacon sarnie overlooking the harbourside on a Saturday morning? Yes please. GROCERY SHOP? Reg the Veg. I worked just off Boyces Avenue for years, and always felt lucky to have this place on my doorstep. The team has a real passion for, and knowledge of, the produce. SUNDAY LUNCH? The Kensington Arms. Luke and his guys give so much attention to the details – things like the extras and trimmings – that it really sets their roasts apart. QUICK PINT? The Bank Tavern. A proper boozer; it’s a firm favourite amongst me and my mates.   CHEEKY COCKTAIL? We’re spoilt for choice for cocktail bars in Bristol, but my favourite is Hyde and Co. It’s cool, the team know their stuff, and the cocktails are banging. My go-to is a Corpse Reviver No. 2.   POSH NOSH? I haven’t been to Casamia since it moved to The General, but I was lucky enough to go to their old gaff a few times. Since then Pete and the team have picked up countless national and local awards, so I can’t wait to go back for a posh night.   FOOD ON THE GO? Matina in St Nick’s Market does the best kebab going. I go for chicken and lamb with extra halloumi – always unwrapped, so I can tuck in immediately.   ALFRESCO? Rob and the team at Root are doing something special, creating amazing dishes whilst championing seasonal vegetables. The sharing-style menu is great eaten out on the decking overlooking the harbour. It’s one of my favourites!   HIDDEN GEM? Maybe not so hidden, but definitely a gem, Giuseppe’s has been smashing it for years. Italian classics with the best service – what more do you want? It’s a proper institution.    ONE TO WATCH? Pasta Ripiena. Pasta Loco is one of my Bristol favourites and its new sibling, Pasta Ripiena, is quite rightly going to be one of the most closely watched openings of the year. WITH FRIENDS? Bellita is perfect for groups; if there’s five or more of you, just order the whole menu, and maybe double up on your favourites. Goat with shawarma spices was a winner on my last visit.   COMFORT FOOD? Chinese is a go-to comfort food for me, and where else would I head to for it than the Mayflower? I’ve been going since I was a kid, and am still yet to make a real dent in the selection of dishes on offer. My favourites are the water cooked beef and the aubergine with fermented fish.

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WITH THE FAMILY? The Pony and Trap is the perfect spot for a big family celebration, as it’s unfussy yet we leave feeling spoilt rotten. The food is always faultless, and the service is great.   BEST CURRY? A friend introduced me to Devs Kerala years ago and I haven’t looked back. Their Malabar curry and masala dosa are must-haves, but I normally visit with a big group of mates and order most of the menu. Delicious, great atmosphere, and it’s BYO. Win!   BEST ATMOSPHERE? I’m a big fan of what Jan is doing at Wilsons. It’s hard to sum up an atmosphere, but generally there seems to be a natural buzz here. Love it.   SOMETHING SWEET? Swoon. I don’t have the sweetest tooth, but I am a sucker for ice cream, or – in this case – gelato. Pistachio is my favourite, but the dark chocolate is pretty naughty…   BEST VALUE? Dain Korea. Bibimbap, bulgogi, and BYOB. Winner.   NEXT ON THE HIT LIST? I’m still yet to sample Wellbourne’s infamous vol-au-vents, but I’ve only heard great things! Follow George on Twitter, @georgekallias

Quick! Now add this little lot to your contacts book... Brunel’s Buttery, Bristol BS1 6UF; 0117 929 1696 Reg the Veg, Bristol BS8 4AA; regtheveg.co.uk The Kensington Arms, Bristol BS6 6NP; thekensingtonarms.co.uk The Bank Tavern, Bristol BS1 2HR; banktavern.com Hyde and Co, Bristol BS8 1JY; hydeand.co Casamia, Bristol BS1 6FU; casamiarestaurant.co.uk Matina, Bristol BS1 1JQ Root, Bristol BS1 6WP; eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk Giuseppe’s, Bristol BS1 1QZ; giuseppesitalianrestaurant.co.uk Pasta Ripiena, Bristol BS1 1JX; pastaripiena.co.uk Bellita, Bristol BS6 6LA; bellita.co.uk Mayflower, Bristol BS1 3LN; mayflowerbristol.com The Pony and Trap, Chew Magna BS40 8TQ; theponyandtrap.co.uk Dev’s Kerala, Bristol BS7 8NU; devskeralabristol.com Wilsons, Bristol BS6 6PF; wilsonsrestaurant.co.uk Swoon, Bristol BS1 5TB; swoononaspoon.co.uk Dain Korea, Bristol BS7 8AA; 0117 942 5714 Wellbourne, Bristol BS8 4JG; wellbourne.restaurant

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Castle Bow Restaurant offers a fine dining experience in a relaxed setting and is perfect for any occasion. Head Chef, Liam Finnegan is passionate about using fresh, local ingredients, and his modern British classics are constantly evolving. Our menu is created to fully embrace each season, and it is this quality and care that transforms every meal into a true West Country experience.

Located in the centre of Taunton, just under the archway in Castle Bow. Open for dinner Wednesday - Saturday from 6.30pm. Advance booking recommended. Tel: 01823 328328 | www.castlebow.com | f a @CastleBow


Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 79  
Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 79  
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