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CRUMBS BATH & BRISTOL NO.77 JULY 2018

A little slice

of foodie heaven

Crumbs Awards are back!

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BAT H & BRISTO L

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NO.77 JULY 2018

Crumbs Awards are back!

Who’s the world’s cleverest pig?

77

#

CRUM BSMAG.COM

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chefs

ISSUE 77 JULY 2018 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk ART DIRECTOR

TREVOR GILHAM ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk

NOTORIOUS P.I.G.

DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE

ALISTAIR TAYLOR alistair.taylor@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER

GEMMA SCRINE gemma.scrine@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we got to snoop around the brand new Pigsty on Gloucester Road (and eat all the pork), tried out Belazu’s new ingredients in a meal at Wellbourne, and went bottomless brunchin’ at Pieminister.

large version

THAT TITLE (which, fine, I might have borrowed from a certain late hip hop artist) is a well-earned one for these mud-wallowing truffle-hunters; they’re properly intelligent and super sociable beasts, and have a first-rate sense of smell (hence those truffles). It’s especially sad, then, that they’re also one of the world’s worst treated animals. Welfare charity Compassion in World Farming estimates that at least half of the earth’s pigs live in intensive farming conditions, in really cramped, stressful environments, where they’re taken away from their mums (who are often confined to crates) early and fed on cereals to get them to grow as quickly as possible. This happens all over the world – including right here in Britain, so it’s worth remembering that pork that’s labelled as British isn’t necessarily adhering to the ethical standards that you might hope. If you can, get your pork from a butcher who can tell you where it comes from and how it was reared. Then you’re far more likely to get meat that’s not only produced with a conscience, but also of a better quality, as the texture and taste is far better in meat of animals that have grown slowly and naturally, and have better-developed muscles from roaming around freely. Another creature possessing (okay, probably just two of) a pig’s three valuable traits is that basset hound of mine up top. Prudence has perhaps one of the best social lives of all the local hounds, and often comes with me to check out foodie hotspots. In fact, she came along to two notable dinners of late, both of which you can read about in the last few pages of this issue. But woah there, don’t skip straight to the back; we’ve got tonnes of great stuff for you to get through in the front and middle, too.

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

Did you know we have an app? You can read both editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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Ravello

Italian Restaurant

At Ravello, we offer fine Italian dining and the opportunity to relax in a friendly atmosphere with an attentive and personal service. We have created a menu with traditional Italian influences, using fine local produce with classic techniques, to tempt and delight anyone looking for fantastic food.

1-2 St Margaret’s St, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1DA Ravello on Avon is situated only 10-15 minutes from the city of Bath and 40 minutes from the centre of Bristol.

Opening Hours Monday - Saturday 12 NOON - 2.30 PM // 5.00 PM - 10.30 PM Sunday 12.00 NOON - 9.00 PM

01225 781 666 // www.ravelloonavon.co.uk


TABLE OF CONTENTs NO.77 JULY 2018

STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENTS Kind of a pig deal 14 OPENINGS ETC Hot gossip 29 ASK THE EXPERT Red hot chilli peppers CHEF! Amazing recipes from the region’s top kitchens 44 Almond and tomato hummus with roast veg, by Christian Wragg 47 Butternut squash gnocchi, by Lee Bloomfield 50 Pig head terrine, by Nick Hutchings 52 Chip shop curry sauce, by Josh Eggleton 56 Asparagus with gnocchi and Cheddar custard, by Ron Faulkner ADDITIONAL RECIPES

12 Jamon butter, by Freddy Bird 36 Chicken stew, by Genevieve Taylor KITCHEN ARMOURY 67 HOUSE CALL Gemma Thorogood’s kitchen 76 THE WANT LIST Alfresco for the win! MAINS 84 THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE Learn the stories of great drink producers in Bath and Bristol 95 SO OUT THERE Top spots for feasting alfresco AFTERS New and notable restaurants, cafés, bars 112 The Arts House Café 117 The White Hart 120 The Victoria Park PLUS! 122 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Author Nikesh Shukla reveals his favourite local eats


STARTERs heRe COMeS ThE SUN GOT THOSE SUMMERY FEELS? HEAD OUT THIS MONTH TO ONE OF THESE LOCAL SUMMER-THEMED FOOD EVENTS…

30 JUNE SMOKED AND UNCUT

The Pig near Bath is taking the party outside with this year’s Smoked and Uncut festival. There’ll be live music, feasts by Mark Hix and Angela Hartnett, street food stalls, and outdoor bars throughout its pretty English country gardens. Tickets are £39.50. smokedanduncut.com

1 JULY SUMMER BEATS

The restaurant at Bristol’s Harvey Nichols is launching a brand new summer brunch menu in style. Guests will be treated to a three-course brunch with a flight of super ’grammable mini cocktails, and music from a live DJ. Tickets are £30 (£20 without the cocktail flight), and can be booked in store, by phone, or via eventbrite. harveynichols.com

4 JULY SUMMER SOIRÉE

Promising a chilled afternoon of music and food at The Bath Priory, this event will kick off in the gardens with canapés, drinks and live jazz, before moving into the restaurant for a three-course lunch with wine and petit fours. Tickets are £55 and can be bought from the hotel by phone or email. thebathpriory.co.uk

14 JULY VIVA CITY: THE ETHICAL LIFE FESTIVAL

Taking place in City Hall and across College Green, this ethical festival is all about plant-based eating. Expect lots of producers and street food vendors, as well as cookery demos. Not only aimed at vegans, it’s is just as much for curious carnivores. Tickets £5. viva.org.uk/festivals

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INNOVATION REVELATIONSS, AND TA AMUSE-BOUSTCY HES


PIG 0088

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THERE’S AN ALTERNATIVE UNIVERSE WHERE DOMESTICATED PIGS ARE LIKE DOGS, AND NO HOME IS COMPLETE WITHOUT ONE. (GEORGE CLOONEY USED TO FAMOUSLY LIVE THERE.) IN OUR UNIVERSE, HOWEVER, THEY’RE SIMPLY THE MOST AMAZING – AND AMAZINGLY DELICIOUS – MEAT SOURCE KNOWN TO MAN… WE’VE BEEN EATING semi-domesticated pigs since perhaps as early as 9000BC, when Britain was still attached to Europe, and animal husbandry more or less began – a time when the human population of the world was fewer than we’ve currently got in London. Big in both the West and the Far East – it’s actually the world’s most popular meat – it gets a trickier ride where those two worlds meet, as Islam, Judaism and some Christian sects forbid us from eating it. Indeed, pork’s virtually impossible to find, and even illegal, across much of the Middle East. Blame strangely specific passages from Leviticus and Deuteronomy, referring to the impure combination of “split hooves” and “not bringing up its cud”, for the Jewish (and some Christian) distaste – this means camels are also not kosher, but sheep and cows are – and more specific pork-naming passages in the Quran for the Islamic rejection of pig meat. The first domestic pigs? Probably tamed Chinese wild boar, which were soon found to be adaptable, clever (more so than the average dog), usefully omnivorous (pigs made for good early rubbish disposal units, keeping settlements clean and producing useful fertiliser as they did so) and of reasonably manageable size, making them much easier to domesticate than more unwieldy rivals like cattle. The beauty of the pig, of course, is not just that it tastes delicious, but that every part of the beast can be eaten, from the nose to the ears, the belly to the loin, the trotters to the tail (there’s not much meat in those curly little fellas, in fairness, but they’re nice and crisp when roasted or fried, and have a particularly strong flavour). And it doesn’t end there, for pig hide makes for good shoes (or shields), their bones can be turned into tools (or weapons) – and even their bristles make for decent brushes. Early man was in hog heaven with these things. And, in time, we even learned that the way pigs snuffle around searching for edible roots can be useful too, churning up the ground for easier ploughing, and uncovering the odd delicious truffle en route. Though a year-round ingredient these days, pork was – for much of British history – a cold weather dish, pigs being born in the spring, growing in summer, and ready for slaughter at the end of the year. It’s one reason why apples, another autumn crop, were not only a traditional pig fattening food, but also became a classic culinary pairing with fresh pork, from apple sauce to simply sticking one in a suckling pig’s gob – thus, in slightly macabre fashion, your porker is eating its symbiotic food in both life and death. WHEN BUYING PORK, you generally want neat, moist, deep-pink cuts – nothing too clammy or oily, or grey or red come to that. In the main, the longer, more interesting life a pig has led, the deeper pink the flesh will be, and the tastier. Rare breed pigs carry more fat (which keeps the meat succulent in cooking), take longer to mature than commercial types, and are mostly better cared for, too. Big lumps of pork store well in the coldest part of the fridge – think up to five days – while mince and smaller cuts are better eaten more or less straight away. This said, pork is also happy to be frozen.

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And then there’s cooking the thing. There are two basic ways to roast your pig: slowly at low heat, or fast at a higher one. Stewing or casseroling works – not least on the tougher cuts like shoulder, which are rendered rich and tender – and pork also responds well to grilling, barbecuing, spitroasting, frying and stir-frying, where strips of pork cook lickety-split. Basically, if it heats the meat, it’ll work with pig.

BUT THERE’S MORE to pigs than just pork. Take, for instance, charcuterie – ‘cooked flesh’ in French – which revolves around prepared meat products. Think ham, think sausages, think bacon, think terrines, think pâtés and think endless variations on the cured meat theme – most of them originally ways to keep the flesh edible before we had refrigeration, but now prized for their flavours and textures. Ham, for instance, is pork preserved through salting, smoking or wet curing – and, originally, specifically referred to the meat from a pig’s hind leg (‘ham’ is derived from the Old English term for the bend of the knee). It’s especially delicious paired with cheese, perhaps as a pizza topping or in a croque-monsieur. Bacon, meanwhile, is cured pork from side, back or belly cuts – either smoked or unsmoked – often sold in thin slices, or ‘rashers’, for frying or grilling. And sausages, with their endless variations, are usually cylinders

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of ground pork with salt, spices and breadcrumbs in a thin, edible casing of intestine or similar – far more delicious, of course, than it sounds. Originally a way of using up less-than-appetising fat, blood, organs and meat scraps, they’re one of the oldest prepared foods, referenced in Homer’s Odyssey – and virtually every culture has generated its own variations, from the Spanish chorizo to the Italian salami, the German blutwurst to the Polish kielbasa.

SO, WHAT’S THE health situation like? Well, there’s no shortage of both good and bad, it seems. Though it’s leaner than most red meats, pork is still high in cholesterol and saturated fat – but there’s plenty of protein in it too (and zinc, plus assorted B vitamins, like thiamine), making it good for energy production. And studies appear to show that while too much plain, unmarinated pork might be a bad idea, marinating (and other traditional prep methods, as you’d find in ‘uncured’ bacon and hams) seems to alleviate most issues. All things in moderation then, we’d say. Look at the famously longlived Okinawans – these guys, from one of the southwest Japanese islands, outlast everybody, and supplement their largely vegetarian diets with a reasonable amount of fish and (marinated) pork. You could do a lot worse, we reckon, than follow their lead.

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INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND RUN • SOUTH BRISTOL’S BEST STEAKHOUSE

Home to Bristol’s infamous 96oz steak challenge, as seen on LADbible

The Ashville Steakhouse, 15 Leigh Street, Bristol BS3 1SN • Tel: 0117 939 6897 • Email: info@theashvillesteakhouse.co.uk

www.theashvillesteakhouse.co.uk


R E C I P E

JAMON BUTTER wITh JOHN DORY

THIS LOOKS LIKE A FISH DISH TO US – WHAT’S THE PIG IDEA, FREDDY BIRD?  PIG HAS TO BE my desert island animal. There are so many cuts and ways of preparing it; from snout (in a salade museau, which I had at Rungis Market) to tail (which I ate on the roadside in St Lucia in a stew with dumplings) and all the other delicious cuts in between. There is never a day that goes by at the Lidos when we don’t cook pork – it’s such a staple feature on every Spanish menu. I love the days that Mary Holbrook drops off her pigs with inch-deep fat on the loins (it’s got such a sweet, buttery flavour), and I can’t get enough of the exquisitely marbled acorn-fed iberico secreto imported from Spain, either. What I always look for in pork, whatever pig it comes from, is a fabulous fat content; not just on the outside but, like beef, with marbling as well. So, pork fat is what this recipe is all about, in the form of jamon ‘butter’. Incredibly versatile, you can serve this on bread as a snack, use it for roasting your potatoes, slather it over scallops with grated hazelnuts... Fellow Crumbs columnist Andy Clarke even suggested filling his hot tub with it to me recently! In this case, I’ve used it with a whole grilled John Dory, but any flatfish, hake, or monkfish would also be delicious. I love to cook the fish over fire where possible (the smokiness is a great addition), but it’s equally great simply roasted in the oven. Lido, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 933 9530; lidobristol.com

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(SERVES 2-3, WITH LEFTOVER JAMON BUTTER) 100g dry knuckle ends of pata negra ham (ask in your local deli for these bits) 200g cured iberico pork fat 2 garlic cloves, crushed to a smooth paste with a little Maldon salt 2 springs rosemary, finely chopped 1 whole John Dory (approx. 700g-1kg) handful breadcrumbs, toasted handful parsley leaves, chopped 1 Preheat the oven to 220C/425F/gas mark 7. 2 Chop the fat and ham in to small pieces, keeping them separate. Blitz the ham, garlic and rosemary in a food processor to a rough paste. Remove and set aside. 3 Next, blitz the fat until smooth and then mix thoroughly with the coarsely blitzed ham. Keep at room temperature while you cook the fish. 4 Deeply score the John Dory and roast in the oven for 12-15 minutes (or grill for the same amount of time over hot coals). 5 When the fish is cooked, generously rub the jamon butter over it. Sprinkle with the toasted breadcrumbs and finely chopped parsley. Serve with lots of boiled or roasted asparagus, drizzled with arbequina olive oil and salt.

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Openings etc

K IRSTIE YO U N G

S T A R T E R S

YOU’D BETTER BAO-LIEVE IT

KI R S TI E YOUNG

Woky Ko now has a little sister – or should we say big sister? See, Larkin Cen’s new restaurant – which just opened in May – might be the youngest in the family, but it easily outsizes his cool and compact joint at Cargo. Woky Ko: Kauto is on Queens Road, looking out onto the Wills Memorial Building. Spread over two floors, it has an understated industrial style and an open kitchen lined with bar stools, meaning guests can sit close to the action. The menu builds on that of its Cargo sibling; those ace baos sit on the bill of fare alongside new dishes like clams with wild prawns, vermicelli noodles and tom yum broth. The range of cocktails, meanwhile, has been developed by Woky Ko’s neighbour, Little Victories. wokyko.com

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HOUSE PARTY

A new multi-use food venue has opened on Gloucester Road. The Bristol Cookhouse is a canteen, supper club space and food studio, dreamed up by chef and nutritionist Sam Waterhouse. During the daytime, punters can wander in for brunch, lunch or coffee; the likes of sweet potato pancakes with honey and sesame brittle, and braised duck leg curry with pickled cabbage and herby grains are on the concise menus. After 5pm, the canteen turns into a supper club, hosting ticketed events with guest chefs in the kitchen. Meanwhile, the food studio is used for workshops, demos and cookery classes, as well as filming and photography, and is available to rent. thebristolcookhouse.co.uk

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NEW KID ON THE BLOCK FOUR SURE

Spanish tapas joint Bar 44 is opening its first gaff outside of Wales. The chosen location? Clifton Village. The business was established by brothers Tom and Owen Morgan 16 years ago, and now has restaurants across South Wales in Cardiff, Cowbridge and Penarth. The new site on Regent Street is undergoing a total redesign before opening in mid-July, as a casual, family friendly tapas bar with contemporary Spanish style. Food is made from top Spanish and native ingredients, and takes the form of seasonal meat, fish and vegetable small plates. Drinks are Spanish through and through; Owen is a real sherry pro and will be offering a sizable list of variations, as well as wines and cocktails from the region. bar44.co.uk

LOOK HERE, IT’S ANDY ROBSON, HEAD CHEF AT THE NEW FLORIST IN BRISTOL

Kick us off with the fondest foodie memories from your childhood. Baking cakes with mam in Newcastle.

How often will you be changing up the dishes? We’ll have a new menu every season; our next one will be for autumn.

What first inspired you to cook professionally? As cheesy as it sounds, watching Gordon Ramsay! As a youngster I was impressed with the control he had over a kitchen.

What are your favourite ingredients at the moment? Polenta; we use it in lots of different ways throughout the menu, including in our polenta chips with vegan truffle mayo, and our lemon polenta cake with mulberry sorbet, toasted coconut and black pepper.

What’s the toughest job you’ve tackled so far? Consecutively opening four new venues last year for the New World Trading Company (parent of The Florist). Proudest career achievement? Being selected this year, at 24, as head chef to open The Florist, the business’ first unique concept brand. What attracted you to The Florist? Firstly, Bristol as a city has a lot of appeal. But The Florist also has such a fresh, varied menu, and I wanted to keep challenging myself as a chef.

NEWTRITION

A new wellbeing café is being launched in Clevedon this month. Health and nutrition pro Pauline Cox is one of the brains behind the new food biz, which aims to offer hearty, nourishing, inclusive grub, suitable for all kinds of lifestyles and dietary requirements. There will be plenty of plant-based options as well as grass-fed meats, and everything is gluten-free. It’s all about culinary TLC here, and fuelling up with food to make your body happy. sowandarrow.com

How many of you are there in the kitchen team? We’ve got 14. How have you approached the menu?  The food is very prep-heavy and based on fresh ingredients, so it’s important you tackle it with a strong team of chefs. What’s your favourite dish currently on offer here? The lamb rump has to be my technical favourite, although the base ingredient simply speaks for itself.

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Which piece of kitchen equipment couldn’t you live without? My junior sous, Martynas, who has been with me for three years – and can prep 200 Sunday roasts! Where was the best meal you’ve eaten? Peace and Loaf in Newcastle – it just has the best seasonal produce. Favourite cookery book? Either Morito by Sam and Sam Clark, or Planted by Chantelle Nicholson. How about foodie heroes? Calum Franklin – he creates the most colourful, Instagrammable dishes at Holborn Dining Room, London. What kind of food do you cook for yourself at home? I love making Thai or Spanish food, or anything with a fusion of flavours that is fun to cook.

theflorist.uk.com


S T A R T E R S

THIS IS JULIA MALTBY, BAR MANAGER AT CIRCO How long have you been mixing cocktails, then? Seven or eight years. And at Circo? 10 months. What’s the best thing about your job? Training staff to find their own style with their cocktails and creativity.  And the most challenging part? Explaining that bartending is a respectable career; even with the hours we do, and the time it takes to learn how to perfect a balanced cocktail, it’s hard to be recognised. Instead, the job gets labelled as a stopgap or one for party people – when, in reality, we are working while most people party! How many cocktails do you know how to make by heart, do you think? About 150 to 200, I’d say. Which of your cocktails are most popular right now? Our BFG (sloe gin cocktail) and Espresso Martini. Tell us about the kind of food you serve. Bar snacks and meat boards – great to snack on with some drinks. If you were a customer today, what would order? If it was another bar it would be a classic Daiquiri, but here at Circo it would be a Bannarama, our pineapple rum cocktail. What makes Circo a special place to visit, would you say? We really do use quality spirits and are not afraid to change up our drinks for different tastes. We also have the Rum Bar: every great story starts with rum, so coming to Circo is the start of a great story! What do you think makes great customer service? Being able to tailor cocktails to customers, and give them some interesting knowledge to take away. Where have you visited locally where the customer service was excellent? The Hide Out and The Locksbrook. circobar.co.uk

DOUBLE TROUBLE

Two of our favourite local food and cookery figures have joined forces to create a brand new venture: Food Fire Earth events. Jo Ingleby, chef, cookery tutor and former BBC Food and Farming Awards Food Hero, and food stylist, writer, cookery book author and fire obsessive Genevieve Taylor are launching with a debut event on 30 June at Windmill Hill City Farm. The onsite café and outdoor oven will be in their control for one night only, as they cook a homegrown, wood-fired feast of epic proportions for guests. Tickets are available online now. Can’t make it? Keep your eye on their Twitter account for the next big date for the diary! twitter.com/foodfireearth

TOUR, BLIMEY!

There’s a new vegan food tour in Bath, unearthing the best plant-based treats the city has to offer. It’s certainly not exclusively for vegans, though; the whole point of this fun new business is to show how varied and exciting vegan food can be. It’s founded by Jenni Tame, who wants to let people know just how much plant-based grub is out there for the eating, and takes her guests to munch their way through eight samples on each tour, trying both savoury and sweet foods made across central Bath. theherbitour.co.uk

GREEN GIANT

Eat Your Greens has taken over the former Eating Room in Bristol. Behind it is Babs Greaves, formerly of Café Kino, who serves properly inclusive, plant-based food. The cool, chilled out space comes complete with retro furniture and a good peppering of greenery. On the menus (daytime and evening) are local, organic ingredients and plenty of gluten-free options. The dinnertime offering might feature chickpea, banana blossom and coriander cakes, and pilaf with samphire, while plant-based roasts are served on Sundays. Local beers and great wines are on the go, too. It’s a wee little space, this, so best to book if you’re planning a visit. facebook.com/eatyourgreensbristol

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S T A R T E R S

@corner77 takes a break for a lunchtime toastie

You might well have driven past Rob and his grocery shop before...

BROCKLEY STORES

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WHAT: LOCAL FOOD AND GROCERIES WHERE: MAIN ROAD, BRISTOL BS48 3AT WHEN: MON-SAT 8AM-6PM; SUN 9AM-5.30PM

@kymgrimshaw snaps some dishes in gorgeous light at Henry’s in Bath

@grace_and_clover have some serious game when it comes to cake Your pic could be here! Just use #CrumbsSnaps on your foodie Insta posts and we might print one of yours next issue...

here’s been some kind of foodie pit stop on this site – on the edge of the A370, just outside Bristol – for around a century. Two years ago it was reincarnated once again, when Rob Hagen took over with a very specific idea of what he wanted it to become. And that – in short – is a shop that’s as convenient as the supermarket, but with the ethics and quality of a farmers’ market. “I don’t really call it a farm shop,” he tells us. “It’s just a place to do a quick, convenient shop. But people can call it what they like!” Convenience is key for the ever-more demanding shopper – but Rob’s punters also really care about provenance, quality and ethics, so he’s aimed to create a shop that delivers on all fronts. After all, changing people’s shopping habits ain’t easy: “Retail is really tough,” he says. “To me, the biggest competitors are supermarkets – not other farm shops. After all, all my customers shop in supermarkets as well as here.” This shop might be compact, but it’s chocca with local food (around 80 percent comes from within about 40 miles) and, stocking just one good version of everything, no space is wasted. (And there’s no standing in front of eight different types of passata, wondering what the difference could possibly be, either.) That is, apart from when it comes to beer. “We need lots of beer!” laughs Rob, who’s just started stocking Lost and Grounded’s lager Keller Pils, and tells us about Ganley and Naish, a family with a 200-year history of cider making. Having lived all over the world and worked as a consultant for supermarkets, Rob decided to move back to the West Country to do something he really believed in. And what he believes in is local, sustainable, quality food. He likes to stock producers that you don’t usually get from wholesalers, so you won’t see ’em everywhere else. He finds lots of them out and about at markets, while others come into the shop and approach him. Coffee comes from Extract, apple juice from Barley Wood Orchard, condiments from Rose Farm and Ginger Beard Preserves, meat from The Story Organic, and lots of what’s in the colourful fresh fruit and veg display is courtesy of local growers. Plenty of products are made onsite here, too; a new kitchen has been added and is staffed with full-time cooks. They knock up lots of great food to eat on the go or to take home (expect this range to grow in the coming months) and, thanks to the new picnic area, you can chill out and tuck in while you’re there. The quiches are especially popular, with hundreds made here every day; try the chilli and chorizo number, it’s a badly kept secret... brockleystores.co.uk

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SNACK ATTACK

SOMETIMES, THAT STOMACH GETS A-RUMBLIN’ (OR THROAT A-GASPIN’) AT INCONVENIENT TIMES; HERE ARE THE LOCAL, ON-THE-GO REMEDIES WE’VE BEEN USING THIS MONTH 1. Propercorn Chocolate Popcorn, £80p/26g Adding to its already varied portfolio of flavours, Propercorn has just launched this new chocolaty variety. Made by combining Fairtrade Peruvian cocoa with the producer’s signature hand-popped corn, it hits the mid-afternoon sweet spot, without being sickly or heavy. A snack that won’t hinder the afternoon’s work, but also won’t have you reaching for the biscuit tin in five minutes, either. Find it Waitrose in Bath; propercorn.com 2. Seed and Bean Mini Bars, £1.20/25g This award-winning, ethically focused chocolate biz has just launched miniature versions of its chocolate bars. Seed and Bean takes good quality choc and pimps it with English botanicals: think the sweet and freshly herby orange and thyme, and the dark and indulgent espresso. The bars are an ideal size for snacking on, and are all organic, Fairtrade and vegan. Find them in Wild Oats in Bristol and Harvest in Bath; seedandbean.co.uk 3. Sulis lager, £6/6x330ml The ale end of the beer spectrum gets plenty of attention these days, thanks to the craft movement, while lagers have been a bit left behind. It’s good to hear that a brand new lager has been released by Bath Ales then, hey? This light, easydrinking session brew is the producer’s first lager, and is fresh and crisp, with a faint whisper of a fruitiness. Coming in 330ml cans (and at 4.4% ABV), it’s great as a swift refreshment when the mood takes you. Find it at the Bath Ales brewery shop; bathales.com 4. Boundless Activated Nuts and Seeds, £2.20/30g When you soak nuts or seeds they start to wake up and germinate – which means they release lots of nutritious value that we can benefit from. That’s exactly the treatment that this local business (based near Bath) gives theirs before baking gently with natural flavours. There are four varieties in the range – all come in handy little pouches – and we’ve been tucking into the moreish tamari and Aleppo flavour. Find them in Bakesmiths in Bristol and Herbert’s Café in Bath; weareboundless.co.uk 5. Mr Lee’s Noodles, £2.99/62g Sure, these are noodles in a pot – but Pot Noddles they ain’t. South West-based Mr Lee’s uses real Vietnamese noodles and freeze-dried (as opposed to dehydrated) ingredients, meaning they have more goodness, better texture, and fresher taste. With none of those added undesirables, they come in a variety of Asian-inspired flavours; we’ve been lunching aldesco on the hot and sour dragon fire noodles – make sure you stir ’em up really well to get all those spices involved. Find them online at Ocado; mrleesnoodles.com.

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Magnificent Seven

ICE, ICE BABY WITH DESSERT BARS TAKING THE UK BY STORM, AND MORE ARTISAN ICE CREAM MAKERS ON OUR PATCH THAN EVER, OUR SIX PACK HAS BEEN SUPERSIZED THIS MONTH, TO CRAM IN EVEN MORE OF THE GOOD STUFF (AND REVEAL THE FASCINATING STORIES BEHIND IT)...

SWOON

Having launched two and a half years ago in Bristol, and having just celebrated the Bath branch’s first birthday, Swoon has quickly become a year-round destination. Brother and sister founders Bruno Forte and Pat Powell come from Italian stock; their family hail from Monforte – between Rome and Naples – and their grandfather actually had an ice cream parlour himself. The business is centred on fresh, authentic-style gelato that’s flavoured with real, natural ingredients, and made in the parlours in view of punters. It was Bruno’s idea originally; he took himself off to Bologna to the Carpigiani Gelato University (legit) to lean how its done, before coming back to pitch the idea to Pat. It was at the university that he met gelato pro Luisa Fontana, who now heads up the kitchens in both Swoon sites and the (shh – soon to come) events arm. The offering always rotates, but the pistachio and tiramisu are on point, we reckon, so look out for those. There are fun and novel flavours to try as well, though, like the current pineapple and basil sorbet. Talk about fresh. swoononaspoon.co.uk

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MARSHFIELD FARM More than 30 years ago, Will Hawking came back to the family dairy farm fresh from agricultural studies and with a new idea for how to make more from the herd’s milk. (By using it in ice cream, in case you hadn’t quite caught on there.) It all started very small (with the first deliveries made by strapping a chest freezer to a van!) and has grown into something really special, now running with state-of-the-art equipment. Will still farms here (with his family), and along with his wife, Dawn, he manages the ice cream biz too. The cows are milked literally metres from where the ice cream is made, meaning their organic milk (which makes up 55 percent of each scoop) is super-fresh and carries zero food miles. This is a real family outfit, with everyone in the small team pitching in with both farming and ice cream-making duties, as needed. You might even see Dawn scooping in the farm’s 17th-century barn-turned-ice cream parlour, which is open to visitors on Saturdays. There are over 30 flavours made by these guys, including the new rhubarb and custard. marshfield-icecream.co.uk

LUSCIOUS The newest outfit in this compilation, Luscious was established just last year by organic farmer Doug Whitelaw and branding and design expert Kate Clark. Their mission was to create a business that didn’t only produce something properly delicious, but that also functioned in a sustainable, ethical manner. So, they set up The Organic Dairy near Corsham, with a herd of Jersey cows, and were soon making fresh, velvety, organic ice cream from the rich and creamy milk they collected. The production all happens in the farm’s former dairy building, which has been converted into an all-purpose production unit. It’s here that they make, package and label all their ice cream themselves, by hand. In these little pots of joy, the farm’s own milk is joined by the locally produced Ivy House Jersey cream and other certified organic ingredients for flavouring; think Madagascan vanilla and Sicilian hazelnuts. Devotees of organic food and farming, Kate and Doug sell their top-drawer ice cream in local, independent stores, such as Neston and Whiterow farm shops. lusciousorganics.co.uk

OLIVER’S ICE CREAM David and Fran Jutsum spent most of their career in the printing business, before packing it all in to make ice cream. Well, gelato, actually. Inspired by the mindblowing stuff they tasted on a family holiday, the couple took themselves off to Italy to get trained up by pro gelato chefs and opened Oliver’s in Farrington Gurney in 2013, relocating to the new Cargo development at Wapping Wharf last year. These guys have around 60 super scoopable flavours among their portfolio: all about the experimentation, they make everything from staples such as salted caramel and toffee honeycomb, to the more unusual likes of chai, cardamom, and cinnamon (which is Fran’s fave). That also includes 16 sorbets that are totally natural and 50 percent fruit (well most are, ’part from the chocolate and Thatcher’s Gold flavours, obvs); smooth and creamy, you’d never guess they were dairy free. The shipping container parlour, where it’s all made, is the only place you can buy this icy goodness (in cones, pots and large tubs, as well as on waffles and in cakes). Check out the impressive rotating ice cream bar while you’re there! oliversicecream.co.uk

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LACOCK DAIRY For the three mates behind this gelato business, small is mighty. They have no ambition for world domination – no matter how much demand there might be for their product. The magic for them, instead, is in creating an artisanal ice cream that’s rooted in the local area – and, by that, we mean supporting neighbouring businesses and that’s sold nearby. Made in tiny batches, this gelato uses milk from one of the co-founder’s herd – his family have been farming in Lacock for four generations – and is made on the very same land the cows roam in. Inside the production unit, right next to the milk tanks, is some fancy Italian Carpigiani ice cream making equipment, and it’s this kit which is largely to thank for the luxuriously smooth texture of the end product. In terms of flavours, the team look further afield to get the right ingredients – think wild strawberries and cherries from northern Italy, Belgian chocolate, and natural vanilla from Madagascar – to make sure they’re top notch, and are lovely and natural. Give the gorgeous stem ginger flavour a whirl. lacockdairy.co.uk

CHEW MOOS Suzanne Parfitt came up with the idea for Chew

GRANNY GOTHARDS It was a new challenge that Amanda Stansfield was after when she set up Granny Gothards back in 2012. A farm in the lush Somerset levels is where this business calls home, allowing the team to collect the milk fresh and take it from pasture to pot in mere hours. They have a whopping 130 flavours on their books; all are made by hand, free of additives, and as natural as you can get. As well as that raw milk, each tub contains South West double cream, fresh egg yolk and real flavourings – think fruit and Belgian chocolate as well as local ingredients like Somerset cider brandy. On top of their own range, these guys also make bespoke varieties for chefs and restaurants – it seems they like to be kept on their toes then, hey? Find this Somerset ice cream and sorbet in retail outlets, as well as attractions and restaurants. Or go for a day out in Dorset and visit the parlour at West Bay, perhaps. grannygothards.co.uk

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Moos when she realised the family dairy business – which was started by her great grandparents –  needed to diversify or sell up, thanks to plummeting dairy prices. After visiting local restaurants and farm shops to gauge interest, she bit the bullet, bought in an ice cream chef to show her the ropes, and launched the new business. Now, the Gurnsey herd’s special a2 type milk (free from the common a1 protein that some are intolerant to) is carried over to the small on-site production space to become ice cream. Suzanne runs this outfit with her brother, and the pair do everything themselves, from making to scooping – both in the parlour and at events. During the last six years, they’ve built up an impressive contact book and are now stocked at 40 local joints – including the Michelin-starred Pony and Trap, which was one of the first to get on board. Look out for fun flavours such as banoffee, lemon crumble and Turkish delight, as well as Suzanne’s fave – toffee fudge. chewmoos.co.uk


Ask the Expert

WHAT T H E CHILLI FANATIC KNOWs IT’S RIGHT ABOUT NOW THAT THE FIRST OF THE YEAR’S CHILLIES ARE READY FOR PICKIN’, SO WE’VE CAUGHT UP WITH JAY WEBLEY, FOUNDER OF THE BRISTOL-BASED CHILLI ALCHEMIST AND ALL-ROUND PEPPER BUFF, TO GET ANSWERS TO ALL THOSE BURNING QUESTIONS WE KNOW YOU HAVE ABOUT THE HOT STUFF...

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Right then, Jay, let’s start with your credentials: tell us what makes you such a chilli expert. Obsession isn’t enough, huh? I’ve always been interested in why some foods makes us react as they do, and would read molecular books on food, and actively seek out dishes that would provide more than just sustenance. Once I was old enough, I travelled a lot, making sure I learnt directly from cultures that have embraced chilli for hundreds – if not thousands – of years. (Did you know that Atzec folk used to use chilli as a form of currency. to pay their taxes to emperors?) I set up a chilli sauce company six years ago, have won awards, and provide educational talks and demonstrations at festivals and events. In short: my whole life has been shaped by a passion for the fiery fruit! When was the last day that you didn’t eat any chilli? Oh my, now there’s a question! I genuinely can’t remember. A day without chilli is like a day without sunshine. I spent a few days in hospital back in the mid ’90s, and it might have been then. These days, I carry chilli powder in a vial on my car keys, just in case of food emergencies! Okay, vetting over. First things first: what exactly is a chilli? Firstly, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable. It belongs to the Capsicum genus of plants, which are members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. They are related to bell peppers, tomatoes and potatoes. Can we eat any other part of the plant, other than the fruit? You sure can – the leaves are edible, too. I’m quite partial to the thinner, narrower leaves, such as those found on bird’s eye plants (Capsicum annuum). They can be wilted in a curry or even quickly deep fried for an earthy, crispy garnish. You can also eat them raw. However, don’t try eating leaves from other members of the nightshade family, as some are poisonous to us humans. And how many kinds of chilli are there? Thousands! As they can be crossbred with relative ease, there are new varieties appearing all the time. There are 14 known families of chillies, but each of these have their own array of fruits. Where does chilli come from originally? Not the UK sadly, as we don’t have the best climate for them. Most stem from Central and South America, and Asia – countries with hotter climates. Many chillies get their name from their origin; Cayenne chillies come from the Cayenne region of French Guiana, and jalapeños come from Jalap in Mexico, for instance. Pfft. Does that mean we can’t grow them here, then? Not at all – they can be grown in the UK with ease, if you know what to do. In general, they need a lot of light and heat. We germinate in heated propagators in early January, and then use artificial light when the first leaves (cotyledons) start to show. Ultimately, they move into a polytunnel so that summer can do its work. Whilst we have some gear that helps us encourage good and quick growth, it’s possible to grow a good chilli plant just by your kitchen window. What is it that gives chilli its heat (and gives us the sweats)? Most chillies produce an oil called capsaicin, which is an irritant to humans and mammals, and is the source of the heat. (It’s a common misconception that it’s the seeds that are hot – they don’t actually

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produce any capsaicin. It’s, in fact, the white pith of the inner wall – where the seeds are attached – that has the highest concentration of it.) There is an evolutionary theory that chillies have created this defense mechanism to stop mammals eating them, as they want to be eaten by birds instead, who can’t detect capsaicin. The seed doesn’t digest easily and, when a bird deposits the seed after digestion, the chances are it will be far away, therefore spreading the plant and providing continuation of the species. Clever little fellas, then. But let’s talk more about that fiery feeling: it’s all in our head, right? Thankfully, yes. Capsaicin is a neurotoxin: it sends a false signal to our brain, telling us that we are burning. although nothing is really happening. If you burn yourself on an iron, say, you might get a blister along with the pain, but the pain experienced from chilli consumption doesn’t leave a blister or physical scars. Your brain is being tricked by nature. So, chilli can’t actually do us any harm? Well, no and yes. There is no recorded case of chilli eating ever killing someone. That said, if you have certain pre-existing medical conditions then chilli can aggravate them and possibly cause harm – for example, stomach ulcers and chillies don’t mix. It has been calculated, though, that if a person was able to eat around a kilogram of dried and ground ghost pepper (naga jolokia) powder, they could possibly die. However, this would be some feat, as the body would most likely reject it before it could be fully digested. Thankfully, no one has tried! But then how come it has such visible effects on the body? When your brain believes that you are experiencing heat, it puts

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Chilli expert Jay has even filmed with the BBC for a food science programme BOTH PHOTOS BY CLIFTON CHILLI CLUB

natural countermeasures in place. For instance, sweating when eating hot chillies is your body’s way of trying to cool you down. Okay, but what about the way it makes our nose run so much? (Er, asking for a friend.) Once again, it’s the pesky capsaicin that causes it. When your mucous membranes experience it they become inflamed and switch into defense mode, producing mucous to trap undesirables (like the capsaicin) and keep them out of your respiratory system by removing them via the nasal passage. I use very hot chillies when I have a cold, as it helps me to breathe through my nose! And when we accidently rub our eyes after touching chilli – is that the capsaicin that causes the burn? Yep – your eyes have vanilloid receptors, so rubbing them after handling chilli is a big no-no. In fact, our bodies are covered in them, so thoroughly washing your hands after touching a chilli is an absolute must. Better still, wear gloves. I once ruined a date from this faux pas, but that’s another story… Way to make us wince, there! So, how might one measure the heat of a chilli – there’s a special scale, isn’t there? In 1912 an American pharmacist named Wilbur Scoville developed the Scoville Organoleptic Test, in order to determine the heat of a chilli. These days this test is now standardised as the Scoville Scale, and chillies are measured in Scoville heat units (SHU). In simple terms, Scoville’s scale was based on the number of parts of sugared water to one part chilli that was required before the heat was no longer detected. Therefore, the hotter the chilli, the more sugared water

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required. Green jalapeño chillies are around 3,000-5,000 SHU, which means 3,000-5,000 parts water to one part chilli is required for the heat to no longer be detectible. Modern science has allowed for this measurement to be more accurate and less subjective. And is this the same kind of fieriness as you get in, say, horseradish and wasabi? No; horseradish and wasabi contain a volatile compound called allyl isothiocyanate. Unlike capsaicin, this is unstable and vaporises at a low temperature of approximately 25C. As most adult mouths sit at a higher temperature of 37C, our bodies activate the volatile allyl isothiocyanate, which then becomes a gas that rises upwards and agitates the mucus membranes in our noses. It’s technically not a ‘heat’, just an agitation. Is it true that you can build up a tolerance to chilli? (Sure, we might be interested in upping our chilli game. And what?) Yes. Much like with athletics, though, if you stop exercising you lose your strength. So if you want to increase your tolerance, try to introduce chilli more regularly into your diet. Over time, you’ll likely become accustomed to the heat and can then look to introduce hotter chillies. I’m a big believer that you should always be comfortable when eating chilli, and enjoy its flavour; if you are fighting to find flavour because all you can focus on is heat, you’ve gone too far out of your comfort zone. But if someone (that friend of ours, say) did go too far and was really feeling the fire, what will cool that burning tongue down? There are a number of things that can help alleviate the burn of chilli. Most commonly, people reach for milk. This

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S T A R T E R S Jay makes a range of chilli sauces, designed to show off the fruit’s flavour as well as heat...

apples. Chillies are similar in that they all have an underlying capsicum (bell pepper) flavour at their core, but their individual profiles vary tremendously. I’m partial to South American aji chillies, which belong to the Capsicum baccatum family: whilst each plant within this family varies, many offer up a strong citrus note with tropical hints. Scotch bonnets (Capsicum chinense) have more of a stone fruit flavor with a slight musk and spice. And my personal favourite, the naga jolokia, has a big red berry fruit note and is sweet – albeit really rather spicy.

is because it contains casein, which binds with the fiery capsaicin oil and helps wash it away. Whole milk is best – or even cream! Personally, I prefer vodka; not to drink (you’d be moving the burn to the stomach), but to use as a mouth wash. Capsaicin is soluble in alcohol, so high ABV spirits can help with the burn. Others claim that bread, peanut butter and lime can all help, too. Once you get a taste for chilli, it’s pretty addictive; what causes those cravings? It’s all about the endorphins. When your brain is tricked to believe you are in pain, it releases a natural pain killer. We all like to feel good, so this is how we can become addicted! What’s the hottest chilli in the world right now, and does it have a close rival? Officially, as recognized by Guinness World Records, the hottest chilli is the Carolina reaper. It measures an eye watering 1,641,183 SHU. That’s over 400 times hotter than a jalapeño! The nearest rival is the previous record holder, the Trinidad moruga scorpion, which is around 200,000 SHU milder. Personally, I prefer the taste of the scorpion. Is there a way to make a chilli pepper less or more hot, once it’s been picked? It’ll be less hot if you pick it early; for example, if you pick a jalapeño when it’s green, it will be around 3,000-5,000 SHU, whereas if you pick it when it has ripened to red, it can measure around 8,000-10,000 SHU. A chilli won’t get hotter once it has been picked from the plant, even if you pick it green and ripen it to red by the window – only the plant can determine the heat. You can also reduce the heat of any picked chilli by slicing it lengthways and scraping off the white pith and seeds. This also removes some of the oil (capsaicin) and the membrane. Okay, heat aside for a sec, talk to us about the flavour of chilli, and how it differs between varieties. Imagine you are blindfolded and given two apples – a sharp and acidic Granny Smith, and a soft, sweet Pink Lady – to taste, but not told what they are. You might not be able to name the variety, but would know that they are both

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Any advice as to how can we can cook with chilli in ways that will take advantage of its flavour, as opposed to heat? Treat chillies like bay leaves: pop them in the pot whole and remove before serving. They will infuse their flavour into the liquid they’re in, but most of the heat will remain within the pod. (Piercing the pod with a pin first can also help reduce the risk of the fruit bursting in the pot.) Also, some of the larger chillies (which tend to be a lot milder) roast well, and will have a large enough cavity to allow them to be stuffed; try stuffing a poblano with a mix of cream cheese, apricots, pistachio nuts, sesame seeds, tarragon and lemon juice, then roast in the oven. We just might do that! So, as chilli is a fruit (see, we were listening), we assume it’s is pretty good for us, then? Yep, there are lots of benefits – when eaten in moderation! Studies show chilli can improve heart health, boost circulation, help protect against strokes, lower blood sugar levels, provide pain relief, act as a therapeutic and relaxant, help clear congestion, limit spreading of prostrate cancer, lower the risk of stomach cancer, help burn fat and provide vitamins. Not bad, huh? Not bad indeed! Is it true that chilli can helps us feel full, too? They can aid digestion and are a thermogenic food, which means they cause the body to burn off energy when we eat it. And by triggering the pain pathways in the stomach and intestines, chillies make us feel fuller sooner and can suppress appetite. And to finish then, how about a little anecdote, hey? Tell us about a time when you’ve taken on a super hot chilli. I’ve been knocked sideways many times, thanks to my own curiosity! I was at a hot sauce expo in New York a few years ago, and ate concentrated capsaicin extract, which was around nine times hotter than the world’s hottest chilli. It truly brought me to my knees – I was in a dreadful mess. I couldn’t talk, I was salivating uncontrollably, I felt sick, I thought I was going to pass out... I was out of action for a good couple of hours! More recently, I ate a 6,000,000 SHU burger in Prague and that put me out of action (and into the bathroom) for 12 hours. Never again. Well, until next time... chillialchemist.co.uk

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WHETHER YOU’RE WANTING TO GET OUTSIDE, EAT MORE PLANT-BASED GRUB, OR JUST MAKE MORE TIME FOR COOKING FROM SCRATCH, WE’VE GOT THE BOOK FOR YOU

BERBER & Q: THE COOKBOOK Josh Katz (Ebury Press, £25) The story of Berber & Q, a barbecue specialist based in an East London railway arch, is a real celebration of our cultural melting pot – it is, after all, run by Jewish Londoners and an Italian Catholic, cooking American dude food with a heavy North African and Middle Eastern influence. Chef and founder Josh Katz is an entertaining writer (“sub standard tomatoes are only good for sauces, stews, and throwing at neighbours you don’t like”) and enthusiasm bubbles through on every page. Josh is a fan of both the US and Arabic approaches to cooking cheap meat, but also devotes chapters to fish, veggies, desserts and sides. Best recipes? Go basic with a lamb cis kebab or smoked chicken thighs, or ambitious (barbecued whole lobster and crawfish boil with turmeric butter, burnt bread, potatoes and merguez), then thrillingly off-piste (grilled nectarine with amba dressing and harissaglazed peanuts). Matt Bielby THE ULTIMATE WOOD FIRED OVEN COOKBOOK Genevieve Taylor (Quadrille, £15) About a year ago, food stylist and author Genevieve built a wood fired oven in the garden of her Bristol home – and we’re pretty confident she’s not cooked a meal in her kitchen since. “Throwing off the shackles of technology, embracing a bit of culinary adventure, and getting back to basics with the most primal of elements, fire,” as she puts it, is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the draws of a wood fired oven. As such, then, readers can expect a wide and exciting spectrum of recipes. Pizza, of course, is a given, and gets deserved attention, but beyond that there are recipes for roasting and grilling (wood roast paella); baking (all kinds of breads and cakes); and slow-cooking with the dying embers (lamb shoulder with fennel and garlic, and chicken biryani). This book won’t just help you get to grips with how to use an outdoor oven, but, crucially why to use one. Jessica Carter

pictures of landscapes, livestock, and its author – statuesque grandmother Carole Bamford, owner of Daylesford Farm – wandering through greenhouses and meadows. This is very much a coffee table piece then, and if not always as easy to read as you might like – there are perhaps too many handwritten fonts for that – it’s actually full of interesting history and lifestyle advice. Carole talks about the seasons, rare breed beasts, her favourite cheeses, and gives us a peek of her properties in Provence and the Peak District, too. Oh, and there are recipes – we counted almost 60 –

NURTURE: NOTES AND RECIPES FROM DAYLESFORD FARM Carole Bamford (Square Peg, £35) Now here’s a beautiful book: Nurture is bound in linen, and packed with gorgeous

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ranging from healthy broths and juices through simple snacks and lunches (dressed crab with shaved asparagus, say) to proper meals (leg of hogget with parsley crust, greens and buttered potatoes) and puds (egg custard tart with clementines, ginger and pecans). It’s all very enviable and inspiring then – like a great Instagram account – but there’s utility to this book too. Matt Bielby HELLO FRESH: RECIPES THAT WORK Patrick Drake (Mitchel Beazley, £20) One of the founders of meal kit biz Hello Fresh, Drake has spent the last six years developing not only recipes, but also an optimum userfriendly format to write them in. The aim was – and still is, as is very apparent in this book – to make cooking from scratch everyday as simple and attainable as possible for us all, be you time-poor, inspiration-dry, inexperienced or lacking confidence. The book opens with helpful information on equipment, store cupboard staples, preparation techniques and such, before diving into the recipes. They range from the speedy (like the king prawn linguine with sundried tomato) to the more lengthily, but still doable, midweek options (Greek lentil and lamb ragu), with sections for vegetarian, chicken, red meat, seafood and weekend dishes. Handy step-by-step photography guides you visually, while the comfortingly clear and straightforward methods leave practically no room for error. Jessica Carter COOK SHARE EAT VEGAN Áine Carlin (Mitchell Beazley, £20) If the photos of the healthy looking and effortlessly stylish Carlin throughout this book weren’t encouraging enough, Cook Share Eat Vegan goes a step further to make vegan food look fun and achievable, not worthy or a chore. The Irish cook (the UK’s best-selling vegan author) brings plenty of elements from her homeland – lots of soups and potatoes – to the table, alongside influences from her times in London (‘chip shop’ vegetable curry), Chicago (griddled Cobb-style salad) and Cornwall (curried chickpea and pine nut pasties), where she currently lives. Although not afraid to throw in curveball dishes (coconut-crusted spuds; a bizarre cake that’s actually a watermelon covered in icing), most of the book contains sensible, achievable dishes for everything from light lunches to dinner parties. Though there are over 125 tempting plant-based recipes here, the book wears its veganism lightly, being full of practical tips, light on hard-to-source ingredients, and perfect for those of us who’d simply like to introduce more plant-based meals into our weekly routines. We’re going to start with the quinoa-stuffed tomatoes, and take it from there. Matt Bielby

From The Ultimate Wood Fired Oven Cookbook, by Genevieve Taylor (photography by Jason Ingram)

GARLIC CHICKEN STEW WITH BLACK OLIVES AND BASIL DUMPLINGS THIS CHICKEN STEW is packed full of Mediterranean flavours, thanks to a heady combination of wine, olives, orange and basil. The hearty dumplings mean that all you really need to serve alongside is something crisp and green – some buttery, dark green cabbage or kale, or maybe a big bowl of green salad, would be perfect. This is a recipe for cooking in the dying embers of a wood fired oven; you’ll need the temperature to be at 180C (350F). SERVES 4-6

For the stew: 1-1.2kg chicken thighs, skin on, bone in 1 tbsp plain flour 1 tbsp olive oil good handful Kalamata olives 6 fat garlic cloves, bruised and peeled 3 wide strips of orange zest, pared with a vegetable peeler 200ml white wine 200ml chicken stock For the dumplings: 200g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting 100g vegetable or beef suet large bunch of fresh basil 1 Lay out the chicken on a plate and sprinkle over the flour. Season with a little salt and pepper and toss the chicken about a bit, so it’s evenly coated. 2 Put the oil into a wide, heavy-bottomed casserole dish (cast iron or sturdy terracotta is perfect). Ideally, you want the chicken to fit in it in a single layer. Slide it into the oven for a couple of minutes to get hot. 3 Remove it from the oven and add the chicken, skin side down, then slide back in for 30 minutes to allow the chicken to brown a little. Don’t worry, it won’t get really brown and crisp at this stage – but by the time it’s finished cooking it will be. 4 Remove the dish from the oven and turn the chicken skin side up. Scatter the olives and bruised garlic cloves around, and tuck in the orange peel. Pour in the wine and stock, and season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Slide back into the oven, shut the door and cook uncovered for 1 hour. The chicken will be starting to get lovely and crisp where the skin is above the liquid. 5 Meanwhile, make the dumplings. Stir together the flour and suet in a mixing bowl, seasoning well with salt and pepper. Finely chop two-thirds of the basil, reserving the rest for the garnish, using the leaves and the tender stalks as well. Add to the bowl and stir well to combine. Add just enough cold water to bring the dumplings together as a stiff but elastic dough, about 7-8 tbsp. Tip onto a lightly floured worktop and knead briefly, then cut into 8 evenly sized pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and set aside on a lightly floured plate. 6 Once the chicken has had its hour, slide the dish out of the oven and arrange the dumplings on top. Slide back in and cook for another hour, after which time the dumplings should be crisp on top and cooked through, and the chicken so tender it’s falling off the bone. Scatter over the rest of the basil, roughly chopped, just before serving.

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• Best Regional Wine Merchant for 4 Years Running • Large selection of Magnums, Fine Wines & Craft Beer

• Home to over 800 wines and 150 Gins • Free Riedel Glass Loan • Sale or Return service

01225 322810 | www.greatwesternwine.co.uk Great Western Wine, Wells Road, Bath, BA2 3AP

Breakfast, lunch and supper

“GREAT LITTLE GEM OF A CAFÉ IN BRISTOL” (FIT FOR A QUEEN) 99 QUEENS ROAD, CLIFTON BS8 1LW

01173 179806

f 99Queens


( adverti sing feature )

SAY HELLO TO THE STABLES Karen Stallabrass, owner of THE STABLES RESTAURANT @ VAYRE HOUSE has realised her vision of opening a stylish and unique restaurant in her home’s outbuildings...

T

he Stables Restaurant opened its doors for the first time on 13 May. It is situated behind Vayre House in what was once old stables and a Blacksmith’s. The buildings have been sympathetically restored and maintain many original features, including an oak and elm vaulted ceiling and blacksmith’s fireplace. The floors are a mixture of flagstone and wood, and there’s vintagestyle lighting designed to enhance the bespoke copper bar. The restaurant is furnished with shabby chic tables and chairs in mellow greys and browns, as well as luxurious, comfortable lounge furniture near the log burner.

The kitchen makes the most of both modern technology and traditional cooking methods. There is a very strong team of professionals in the brigade, led by head chef Kai Taylor. Meanwhile, Karen Stallabrass looks after front of house, and is supported by an experienced team. A manicured garden and handy car park completes this new Chipping Sodbury venue. The restaurant offers predominately British inspired dishes, with an emphasis on quality local ingredients, all cooked on the premises. There is a pre-order vegan and vegetarian menu for those who

have special dietary requirements and want a better choice of dishes. (Sample menus and opening times are available online). For the bar, the team have chosen drinks from small, local suppliers, making sure there’s plenty to match the menu. Look out for special events here, including wine tastings. In addition, there will be lunches and craft days; have a look online for the regular pottery classes and future vegan cookery demonstrations. “It is a dream come true for me to finally breathe life into a once well used building that was, and will be again, an integral part of Chipping Sodbury,” says Karen.

The Stables @ Vayre House Vayre House, Hatters Lane, Chipping Sodbury, Bristol BS37 6AA; enquiries@thestables.restaurant; 01454 322195; thestables.restaurant f stablesinsodbury Opening Hours Thursday: 6pm – 11pm Friday & Saturday: 12 Noon – 11pm Sunday 12noon – 4pm

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CHEF! D HOW N A E K A M O T WHAT CT FROM E R I D – T I E K TO MA HENS OF OUR THE KITC E FOODIES FAVOURIT

The first of the season’s beetroot is almost ready for harvest

HIGHLIGHTS

GIVING YOU STIitChKa

Poshed up cruditéms wus crackin’ hum PLAYING SQUASlliHng, PAGE 44 Learn to make a beist-dise h meat-free gnocchsquashsh wit butternut PIG APPET PAGE 47 I TE Make the m beast and c ost of the whole ook this ter rine PA GE 50

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PLUS!

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The Wine Guy is back on home turf – and he’s hungry...


ROASTED BEETROOT AND CARROTS ON ALMOND AND TOMATO HUMMUS SERVES 2 3 garlic cloves 1 x 400g tin chickpeas, drained 1 tbsp tahini 1 lemon (juice and zest) ½ tsp ground cumin ½ tsp paprika, plus extra to serve 150ml olive oil, plus extra for roasting 100g almond flakes, toasted 2 tbsp passata 1 carrot 1 pre-cooked beetroot 1 tbsp broad beans, skinned 1 radish, very finely sliced pea shoots, to garnish extra virgin olive oil, to serve

BIG dIPPeR

CHRISTIAN WRAGG GIVES CLASSIC CRUDITÉS SOME PROPER SWAG, TO MAKE A DISH THAT’LL BE A HIT AT SUMMER PARTIES

Having headed up well-known kitchens across Bristol, like that of the Bristol Harbour Hotel and of Goldbrick House – as well as larger outfits such as the local Iconic Bar Company, which has several sites in the city – Christian sure knows his way around the local food scene. Now, he’s taken the helm at The Carpenters Arms, a traditional and relaxed pub in Stanton Wick. Here he aims to deliver that classic, restaurant-style food that is expected from a dining pub, as well as some more novel and casual dishes. “The menu is designed in keeping with the seasons and local produce – which is delivered daily and prepared and cooked by my team of skilled chefs,” he tells us. “I focus on keeping the food simple and familiar to accommodate all tastes. “This light and pleasant dish is a little play on the famous party snack of crudités and hummus. It’s perfect for a summer’s evening with a glass of Chardonnay – and it’s vegan friendly.”

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1 Peel and crush the garlic cloves and add to a food processor. Add the chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice and zest, cumin and paprika, and blend until you have a chunky paste, adding the oil, a little at a time, until the desired consistency is achieved. 2 Add the almonds and passata. Purée for 10 more seconds so as not to completely pulverise the almonds. Season to taste and set aside. 3 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 4 Chop the carrot into bite-sized pieces and boil in salted water until tender but still with a little crunch. 5 Slice the beetroot into bite-sized chunks and place on a roasting tray with the carrots. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for 6 minutes. 6 Plate up the hummous, and arrange the roasted vegetables on top with the beans, sliced radish, and pea shoots. Finish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and sea salt flakes.


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The Carpenters Arms, Stanton Wick, Somerset BS39 4BX; 01761 490202; the-carpenters-arms.co.uk

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Oh MY SQUASh! LEE BLOOMFIELD REVEALS HOW TO MAKE ONE OF HIS BEST-SELLING DISHES...

Lee cooks at Muiño, on Cotham Hill in Bristol. This friendly little family-run restaurant gets its inspiration from the Galicia region in northwest Spain, and its ingredients from right here in the West Country. As a result, it’s a chilled out spot for weekend breakfasts, lazy lunches and dinnertime feasts. You’ll find food from all over the world throughout the selection of small and large plates on the a la carte, meaning you can mix and match, share, or hog a main all to yourself if you’re not the kind to go halvsies. This dish is one of the restaurant’s most popular, and we’re about to find out how to make it...

BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND BURNT BUTTER GNOCCHI SERVES 4 For the gnocchi: 500g potato 110g ‘00’ pasta flour 1 egg yolk For the butternut purée: 100g butter 1 shallot, finely diced 2 garlic cloves 400g butternut squash, diced dash of double cream To garnish: 50g butter 100g pine nuts 10g fresh oregano, chopped Manchego, to garnish rocket leaves, to garnish

1 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 2 Roast the potatoes for 1 hour. Once cooked, allow to cool just slightly (they should still be quite hot, though), cut each in half and scoop the flesh out of the skins. 3 Pass the flesh through a ricer (or mash thoroughly). Add to a bowl with the pasta flour and egg yolk, and season. Combine to create the gnocchi mixture. 4 Once the mix is smooth, take it out of the bowl. Roll it into two 10cm-long cylinders, then cut each into 5. 5 Blanch the gnocchi in boiling salted water until it floats to the top, then strain and refresh in ice water. 6 For the butternut squash purée, gently melt the butter in a pan. Add the garlic and shallot, and cook until softened. 7 Add the diced butternut squash, and cook gently until soft. Then blend, adding a dash of cream to achieve a thick, silky purée consistency. Season to taste and keep warm. 8 To finish, melt 50g of butter on high heat. Add the gnocchi, pine nuts and oregano, and cook until the gnocchi has warmed through and the butter has turned golden brown. 9 To plate, spread a dollop of the purée on each plate. On top of that, pour the gnocchi, butter, herbs and pine nuts. Garnish with shavings of Manchego and rocket.

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Muiño, 32 Cotham Hill, Bristol BS6 6LA; 0117 907 7112; muinobristol.com


WH I T EH ALL GARD EN CEN TRE , LAC OC K , I S PROUD TO BECOME TH E LATEST O FFI C IAL W EBER WORLD STORE CO M E INSTO RE TO DISCOVER OUR EXT EN S IV E RA N GE O F BB Q’ S TO M AK E FULL USE OF YOUR GAR D EN T HI S S UMMER

E XP E RT STAFF

EXT EN S IVE RAN GE

REGUL A R C O O KI N G D EMO S

O u r e x p e r t s are on h an d t o of f er you f ri e n d l y an d kn ow l e d ge ab l e ad v i ce, an d h elp you ch oos e t he b arb e cu e an d acce ss ori e s t h at are ri ght f or yo u.

Webe r Wo r ld St o re s h ave t h e f ull ra nge of ba r be c ue s a n d a c c esso r ies o n display plus e xc lusive pro duct s in c luding t h e Sum m it C h a rc o a l a n d G a s g r ill ser ies.

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W W W.W H I T E H A L L G A R D E N C E N T R E . C O . U K


2 golden beetroots 1 cucumber 2 peppers For the terrine: 4 medium carrots 1 large onion 1 leek 1 pig’s head (alternatively you can use 3 jowls and 1 trotter) 1 ltr dry cider 2 banana shallots 4 tbsp capers 1 bunch parsley For the black sesame: 100g black sesame seeds 1 tbsp honey watercress, to serve

PIG LOve

NICK HUTCHINGS IS ALL ABOUT THE NOSE-TO-TAIL COOKING – IN THIS CASE, THOUGH, THE NOSE IS OF PARTICULAR IMPORTANCE... Originally from Devon, Nick moved to Bristol four years ago. And when an opening came up in the kitchen of The Bank Tavern – which is known for its local, seasonal food and imaginative use of ingredients – he jumped aboard. Now head chef there, he’s enjoying lots of experimentation with new ingredients. As a result, you’ll find a good balance of prime cuts and offal on his menus – he and the team focus on making the most of each beast and minimising waste – as well as some thoughtful veggie dishes. The Bank Tavern is a proper boozer, hidden down the backstreets of the city centre. You’ll find locals propping up the bar, resident pooch Charlie doing the rounds, and a menu of really great quality British pub food, served from noon ’til 4pm.

PIG HEAD TERRINE, MUSTARD PICKLES AND BLACK SESAME

The Bank Tavern, 8 John Street, Bristol BS1 2HR; 0117 930 4691; banktavern.com

SERVES 10 AS A STARTER For the mustard pickles: 400ml cider vinegar 100g sugar 30g salt 5g coriander seed 5g turmeric 2 tbsp English mustard 200ml water 1 cauliflower

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1 Start by making the pickle liquor. Add the vinegar, sugar, salt and coriander to a saucepan and bring to a gentle simmer. Add the turmeric and mustard and stir until the sugar and salt have dissolved. Then add the cold water and leave to cool. 2 Meanwhile, trim the cauliflower into small florets, peel and dice the beetroots to 1cm cubes, and deseed and dice the cucumber and peppers to a similar size. Blanch the beetroot cubes in salted water for 15 minutes, or until just soft, then blanch the cauliflower for about 5 minutes, until just soft. 3 When the pickling liquid has cooled, pour it into a sterilised jar or container and add all the diced ingredients. Refrigerate for at least 24 hours to let the flavours penetrate the vegetables. 4 For the terrine, roughly chop 2 of the carrots, the onion and the leek. Add to a very large, heavy bottomed pan with 1 tbsp of oil. Place over a high heat. 5 Make sure the pig head has been cleaned and the hairs removed (if needed this can be done with a blowtorch, razor or sharp knife). Add the head to the pan and top up with the cider and enough cold water just cover. Season. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and simmer for around 4 hours, or until the meat can be picked off with a fork. 6 Remove the head from the pot, reserving the liquid. Shred as much meat as possible and chop the softened skin, fat and ears – this will give the terrine great contrasting textures. 7 Finely dice the remaining carrots and shallots, and mix them, the capers and the parsley into the meat. Season with salt and pepper. 8 Line a deep, suitably sized dish with a few layers of cling film before adding the meat and vegetable mix, and pat down gently until it is even all over. 9 Strain the cooking liquid through a fine sieve and pour it over the meat until it is just visible above the top. (You won’t need all the liquid.) Leave in the fridge to set for at least 6 hours, or overnight. 10 Boil the kettle and add the sesame seeds and honey to a blender. While blending, slowly add hot water from the kettle until it begins to form a loose paste. Refrigerate until ready to eat. 11 To plate, unwrap the terrine and portion up. Spoon the mustard pickle onto each dish, and add dollops of the black sesame paste. Finish with a drizzle of olive oil and some watercress. We top our terrine with a quenelle of horseradish cream.


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BORN ChIPPIE

JOSH EGGLETON HAS THE CONDIMENT THAT’S BEEN MISSING FROM YOUR FRY-DAY DINNERS...

You know that face, right? It’s Josh Eggleton, co-founder of fish and chip gaff Salt and Malt (in Chew Valley and Wapping Wharf). As 1 June was National Fish and Chip Day (which we trust you celebrated in style), we were inspired to bring you a proper chippiestyle recipe. And it comes in the form of that curry sauce: pour it over your fish dinner, have a dip, drink it straight from the pan – we’re not here to judge.

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CHIP SHOP CURRY SAUCE MAKES 500ML 250g carrot, diced 250g onion, sliced 1 small garlic clove 8g garam masala 25g mild curry powder ¹∕₅ block of creamed coconut 300ml water 1 Add all the ingredients to a large saucepan. 2 Place over a medium-high heat, and bring to the boil. Turn the heat down to low, and let the pan simmer gently for 1 ½-2 hours, or until the carrots are soft. 3 Once ready, using a blender, whizz the mixture up until smooth, and season to taste. 4 Serve with chippie-style fish and chips. Salt and Malt, Chew Valley Lake, Walley Lane, Bristol BS40 8XS; 01275 333345; saltmalt.com


The Hop Pole, Bath pub, garden & kitchen

OPENING HOURS Drinking

Monday to Thursday: Noon - 11pm Friday to Saturday: Noon - 12pm Sunday: Noon - 10pm Food

Monday to Saturday: Noon - 2.30pm / 6pm - 9pm Sunday: Noon - 4pm / BBQ from 4pm to 8pm from late June until late September

fa 7 Albion buildings, Upper Bristol Road, Bath, BA1 3AR 01225 446 327 www.thehoppolebath.co.uk info@thehoppolebath.co.uk


THE WINE GUY

hOmeTOwN GLORY

G

ANDY CLARKE LOOKS TO THE AREA HE GREW UP IN FOR PERFECTLY PAIRED FOOD AND DRINK THIS MONTH…

rowing up in Thornbury was great. I could walk and cycle everywhere, and I was never too far from produce for sale at the front gates of people’s homes. As a foodie family who grew a lot of our own fruit and veg, my lot loved to see what other people had grown, and sample their hard work. But, when it came to eating out, I don’t remember there being a lot of choice; a decent celebratory meal meant a trip into Bristol or Bath. But that’s not the case today: the choice of eateries has certainly grown a little since the 1980s! The first time I became aware that change was afoot was in 2007, when my brother told me about a new restaurant opening in town called Ronnie’s of Thornbury. A fine dining restaurant, you

say? Modern food? In Thornbury? Turns out he was right, and Ron Faulkner and his team are still going strong there today. It was 11 years ago that I first stepped into the restaurant after its transformation from a cookery shop, and I remember that strange feeling of going out for dinner in my own town for the first time – it was odd. Was I going to be served by someone I knew? Was I going to bump into a teacher? Who knew! It’s easy, living in the restaurant-rich West Country, to be lured by the bright lights of new openings and forget the old favourites, so I felt it was time to revisit Ronnie’s and see what’s been going on of late. Talking to Ron at the beginning of asparagus season meant that his excitement for the green spear was in full swing, and he let me

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taste an amazing dish that takes this celebrated veg to another level. Ron cleverly complemented Wye Valley asparagus with unctuous homemade parmesan gnocchi, jewels of fermented garlic and moreish Montgomery Cheddar custard to create a celebration of this shortseasoned star of the vegetable world. Keeping it local, I’ve had real fun trying to come up with drinks matches for this dish, and I was keen to not just make it all about the wine – especially seeing as I’ve recently jumped on the vermouth bandwagon. It might be retro, but this glitzy drink hasn’t lost any of its cheeky excitement and, I swear, it’s getting more popular by the day. If you’re a novice to this vivacious tipple, there’s a local star you have to try; the clever and passionate Thornbury-based drinksmiths at Bramley and Gage (most famous for 6 O’clock Gin) are making an exquisite dry vermouth on the very same industrial estate that my dad rode his milk float out of when he was the fastest milkman in the West. This vermouth is made with wormwood and 12 specially selected botanicals, fruits and spices. The result is a delicately golden drink that is perfect over a little ice. The nose gives you a pinch of white pepper and a whiff of garden herbs. On the palate, there’s a green olive streak which balances the asparagus perfectly and cuts through the custard, along with a candied lemon rind finish, which is a delight with the fermented garlic. But if you think vermouth is a bit left field for your dinner table, I have a great local white wine for you. Colleridge Hill White is a stunner from Three Choirs Vineyards, based just up the road in Newent, Gloucestershire. A blend of five different grape varieties, this wine is incredibly refreshing and crisp, but also has a herbaceous nose with hints of beautiful Gloucestershire hedgerows. It’s the perfect example of how English wine is progressing: there’s so much more to it than the appley nature of old. There’s a touch of elderflower, which pairs nicely with the fermented garlic, a grassy note that loves the asparagus, and a pear-like texture that partners with the Montgomery custard and gnocchi perfectly. The rounded flavour Bramley and Gage Dry Vermouth, £20, online and and fruity ripeness at independent retailers; m a ke i t i d e a l f o r bramleyandgage.com summer. So, if you see those Three Choirs Colleridge Hill last remaining spears White Wine, £8.99, Waitrose, online, and in specialist farm of the season, grab ’em shops and delis; three-choirswhile you can – and eat vineyards.co.uk them with one of these local sips.

SHOP TO IT!

Andy has helped craft a food and drink evening with Bramley and Gage at Ronnie’s of Thornbury for 21 June (visit the website for more info), and will be taking part in charity dinner Too Many Critics with Crumbs editor Jessica Carter on 24 June (tickets from getawriggleon.com)

WYE VALLEY ASPARAGUS WITH GNOCCHI, FERMENTED GARLIC AND MONTGOMERY CHEDDAR CUSTARD SERVES 4 1 large waxy potato 2 tsp parmesan, grated 75g flour 50ml whole milk 50ml water 75g Montgomery Cheddar, grated 2 eggs 16 spears Wye Valley asparagus 1 tbsp of Pedro Ximenez vinegar 75ml extra virgin olive oil 8 fermented (black) garlic cloves 1 punnet pea shoots 500g clarified butter 1 tbsp unsalted butter 1 Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. 2 Bake the potato for 40 minutes until cooked through. When slightly cool, cut it in half, scoop out the flesh and push through a sieve or ricer. Combine the potato, parmesan, and ½ the flour with a pinch of salt, and knead gently. Add more flour if needed to form a dough that is not sticky, but pliable. The trick is to add as little flour as possible. 3 Dust the work surfaces with flour and roll the dough into 1 ½ cm thick cylinders, then cut into 2cm long pieces. Place the gnocchi on a tray dusted with flour, and freeze. 4 For the custard, put the milk, water and Cheddar into a heavy bottomed pan over a medium heat. Stir constantly until the Cheddar has dissolved and the liquid comes to a gentle simmer. Add the eggs and stir vigorously until incorporated. Continue to cook until the eggs curdle (start to form lumps), then remove from the heat. Transfer onto a metal tray and refrigerate.

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5 Once the custard is cold, place in a blender and liquidise until it is smooth and creamy. Pour the custard into a disposable piping bag, seal it and place in the fridge (it will thicken to a piping consistency when it is cold). 6 Snap off the bases of the asparagus spears. Peel the stems of 12, then blanch in boiling salted water until tender, and refresh in ice water. Shave the remaining 4 spears as finely as possible on a mandolin, place in a tub and cover with water. Cut the pea shoots and wash thoroughly. 7 Whisk the vinegar and olive oil together to make a vinaigrette. 8 Cut the cloves of garlic in half and place them between two sheets of oiled parchment paper. Gently push them flat with your thumb into small discs, about the size of a 50p piece. 9 To serve, heat the clarified butter to 160C in a pan. Place the frozen gnocchi in carefully and cook ’til golden brown. Meanwhile reheat the asparagus spears in boiling, salted water. 10 Transfer the gnocchi and asparagus into a saucepan with the regular butter and keep warm. In a bowl, toss together the shaved asparagus, pea shoots, and vinaigrette. 11 Arrange the gnocchi and asparagus spears on the plates, pipe on the custard in four or five dollops. Divide the fermented garlic around each plate and top each dish with the shaved asparagus and pea shoot salad. (The dish works particularly well when garnished with wild garlic flowers, too.) Serve immediately. ronnies-restaurant.co.uk


The

New Inn

Cask ales • homemade food • stunning views Park Lane, Blagdon, BS40 7SB | Tel: 01761 462 475 | www.newinnblagdon.co.uk


Welcome to

The Crown

Enjoy the Summer season and dine alfresco in our picturesque garden area. Booking essential

01225 872728

The Crown, 500 Bath Road, Saltford, Bristol, BS31 3HJ

f

@thecrowninsaltford


NEW PICNIC AREA • Awesome coffee Delicious local food • World famous quiche

Brockley Stores, Main Road, Brockley, North Somerset BS48 3AT Just 15 minutes south of Bristol on the road to Weston-super-Mare

• T: 01275 462 753 f

a @brockleystores

www.brockleystores.co.uk

HOURS Tuesday to Saturday 10am - 10pm Sunday 10am - 4pm FIND US 225 Gloucester Road, Bristol,BS7 8NR. Telephone: 0117 239 6506

www.bomboloni.net


Bristol’s new small plates restaurant, championing the incredible vegetable, with meat on the side. Mon - Sat | CARGO |Wapping Wharf www.eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk/root root@eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk |0117 930 0260

The Catherine Wheel, Marshfield. A 17th century country pub with real ales, great food and accommodation. The southern gateway to the Cotswold hills, designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Marshfield, Bath SN14 8LR | 01225 892220 roo@thecatherinewheel.co.uk | www.thecatherinewheel.co.uk


( advertising feature )

Your OHH Pub’s Bespoke Events! Keep an eye out for our Pub’s bespoke events! The last Wednesday of every month will see all OHH Pubs simultaneously host their own Event day or evening. Stay updated on our website and why not choose the monthly event that suits your mood.

OHH Brunch Social Just £17.50 per person for 90 minutes of Bottomless Brunch with unlimited tea or coffee to accompany. Line the stomach with pastries on arrival and choose from an array of Breakfast and Brunch dishes to continue. Reservations only. Why not Fizz up the experience and enjoy 40% off a glass of Mimosa or Prosecco. Visit any OHH Pub on the first Saturday of every month. Reservations from 9.00am to 10.30am.

Coffee & Cake Social Enjoy a mug of tea or freshly ground coffee with a slab of homemade cake for just £3.50. Available at any OHH Pub weekdays until 5pm

Tuesday night is Steak night Enjoy a mouth watering steak and homemade chips for just £10. Wash it all down with a fine bottle of House red wine for just £12. Served every Tuesday at all OHH Pubs 5pm - 9.30pm

Fizz Thursdays Come and relax with a glass or bottle of Prosecco. 40% off Prosecco all day and evening every Thursday. Available at all OHH Pubs every Thursday throughout the day, from lunch to dinner.

Come and visit our pubs or take a look at www.ohhpubs.co.uk

ELDERFLOWER POWER It’s not just refreshing pressés that elderflower’s good for – it also makes a rather splendid cider!

E

lderflower seems to be all the rage these days. Right about now, the Ashridge team are out in the hedgerows gathering this year’s flowers; you must have seen the huge, creamy blooms in the hedges recently? They’ve battled with pigs, nettles, brambles, curious cows and horse flies to get their mitts on them, picking when the sun’s at its best so they capture the full fragrance of an English summer’s day. Tanks of cordial follow, as do many sticky days syphoning, filtering and pasteurising the results. All for an excellent cause of course, since the results are what give their Elderflower drinks the upper hand. There’s bottled Artisan Elderflower Cider (Gold award winner at Taste of the West 2017); the bagin-box Devon Bloom (their most popular craft cider); and, last but not least, the Organic Sparkling Elderflower Pressé (another Gold award winner at Taste of the West 2017, and great mixed with gin or vodka!).

ashridgecider.co.uk; @AshridgeCider; 01364 654749


CAFE KITCHEN Welcome to our award-winning café - providing young people with special needs a unique opportunity to gain work experience and training. We are working with the local community and employers to develop work experience opportunities after students have worked in 3 Cafe Kitchen.

Spring/Summer menu now available! Enjoy delicious food and soak up the sun in our outdoor seating area. Sandwiches • Quiche • Jacket Potatoes Open Monday to Friday 8am–4pm | Saturday 8am–12pm Available for private hire. Please call Amelia on 01225 838070 or email amelia.hartley@threeways.co.uk Located @ 180 Frome Road, Odd Down, BA2 5RF


Imagined in the 19th Century, Established in the 21st

Each cocktail has a story to tell ...will you be there to hear them? ARNOS VALE, BRISTOL, OPPORTUNITY

CATERING PARTNER REQUIRED Set within 45 acres of stunning green woodland ecosystem, Arnos Vale Cemetery is a national heritage site located in the heart of Bristol. Arnos Vale is home to an established café and events business featuring three venues onsite, also hosting regular weddings. Arnos Vale Cemetery Trust is inviting proposals from experienced event caterers and café operators interested in working in partnership to manage and develop their growing café and catering event services.

To express an interest in this opportunity and receive further details including full brief and requirements, please contact Paul Smith at Montfort Catering Consultants paul@montfortconsultants.com. The closing date for the return of proposals is 29th June 2018

Now available for venue hire and spirit and cocktail Masterclasses. Get 10% off your booking when you quote the code: Crumbs10 16 St. Stephens Street Bristol, BS1 1JR 0117 927 6869 theclockworkrose.com thecaptain@theclockworkrose.com


Avenue Café has been at the forefront of the café scene in Bristol since 2000. We are more than just a coffee shop, offering great food, amazing products and friendly, efficient customer service. We are a family orientated café and we take great care in the service and food provided.

0117 305 0505 f Avenue Café a AvenueCafe1 www.avenue-cafe.com St. Luke’s House, Emerson’s Green, Bristol BS16 7AR

DID YOU KNOW? We reward our loyal customers with free coffee & money off coupons. Our customers’ satisfaction is at the heart of our success. We also come alive at night! Visit us on a Friday and Saturday till 11:30pm. See in store for details.


ARMOURY

CHOOSE YOUR WEAPONS

GReat eat eGG-speCtatiOns eeGG-speC -spe tatiOns

DO YOU LIKE ‘FRYING SOLO’? WE DO, SAYS MATT BIELBY BIELBY, AND THIS HOT NEW ALESSI EGG PAN HELPS YOU DO SO IN STYLE… Whatever you’ve got there, it’s certainly the winner of the wibbly-wobbly handle award. Egg-sactly! That’s just a bit of fun, designed to reflect the shape of a fried egg maybe – this is an Alessi product, after all – but it’s a practical (and rather clever) piece of kitchenware too. The Tegamino egg pan saves on washing up (you cook ’em in the pan, then eat ’em straight out of it too), and works just as well whether you want to scramble, fry or poach. So the question, of course, is how do you like your eggs in the morning? With a kiss, obviously. Though – no disrespect intended – perhaps not from you. None taken! (In fact, my relief is palpable.) Alessi works with plenty of top designers, and Tegamino is the creation of Alessandro Mendini – a key figure in the Italian design

revolution of the ’80s, contributing everything from world-famous theatres and museums to lamps and chairs. He’s a self-confessed rubbish cook, but a dab hand at creating items that are desirable and intriguing – and that work. And to make sure Tegamino does just that, he buddied up with top food consultant Alberto Gozzi, who happens to also be head chef at the Quirinale Palace, on top of the highest of Rome’s seven hills, which has been home to 30 popes, four Italian kings and 12 presidents. (Napoleon once planned to move in too, but then – oops – Waterloo happened.) ‘Tegamino’ means ‘fried’ in Italian, right? Just so! Mendini reckons he and Gozzi studied the history of cooking eggs “from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance to the 1700s, then from Art Nouveau to fascism to the present day” –

which perhaps sounds a tad excessive – but, if it makes for the perfect fried egg, might well be worth it. They looked at different metals (going for stainless steel in the end) and their thicknesses; cooking times and how distance from a flame impacts them; and lid design and dimensions, too. (Apparently the lid is particularly crucial – who knew?) Pfff! Really? They’ve over-egged that a bit, surely? Maybe a little, but then breakfast is – they say – the most important meal of the day, and if they’ve managed to add a bit of theatre to it, while making sure the results are nothing less than delicious, they’ve got eggs cracked, in my opinion. Tegamino egg pan by Alessandro Mendini for Alessi, £79, alessi.com; available from Quadri

THIS MONTH • FRY DAY • COMPACT KITCHENS • LET’S GO OUTSIDE

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AS PART OF THE CREATIVE TEAM FOR THIS YEAR’S BRISTOL FOOD CONNECTIONS, GEMMA THOROGOOD’S SCHEDULE WAS PRETTY HECTIC LAST MONTH, BUT SHE MADE TIME FOR A CUPPA WITH US IN HER LITTLE BRISTOL KITCHEN... Words by JESSICA CARTER Photography by NICCI PEET

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et just off Cheltenham Road, Gemma’s flat has a location that any food-loving Bristolian would kill for, surrounded by the many and varied indie shops of Stokes Croft and Gloucester Road. She’s been here for a year, having moved from Easton – and while she may miss her East Bristol ’hood, there’s more than enough surrounding her new digs to keep her content. When we turn up early one mid-week morning, Gemma is lugging an old flour mill up the stairs to her first floor flat, explaining how she’s just come back from a Shambala team outing (she’s involved with several festivals all over the country, as well as Food Connections) where they were milling their own flour to make sourdough starters. “We’re setting up a bread bar there this year,” she explains. “It’ll be a bar, with beer on tap, and people can come along, sit down, and get given some sourdough starter, so they can learn to how make their own bread. You know, a sort of bread therapy. Then they’ll put their initials on their loaf, and pay it forward into a feast.” Setting the mill down in her kitchen, Gemma grabs a Kilner jar of her sourdough starter from the fridge, and gives it a mix. “So, all the team have some of this,” she says. “Now I’m just trying to keep it alive!” Bringing out a set of scales she weighs out Dove’s Farm flour and water, before feeding the culture with it. “These scales were my nanna’s – Nanna Potts! – and I use them every day. I was actually given some digital scales for Christmas, and I was like, no way.”

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Taking a look around Gemma’s kitchen, we notice more vintage bits and pieces, including a selection of old pots (turns out she’s a bit of a collector). All of her favouite things in this room have been passed down from family, given by friends, or were stumbled upon in unlikely places. The dining table, for instance, Gemma picked up from the side of the road; the pasta maker comes from a charity shop; a patterned garlic pot was brought home from a beach in Sri Lanka; and a colourful geometric print by David David hangs on the wall, given to her boyfriend by his mate, who’s behind the brand. As she zips around the kitchen making coffee (we notice her beans come from the locally based Girls who Grind Coffee) and putting ingredients away, Gemma certainly gives the impression of being a properly busy bee at the minute. And, as we’re here during the final days of the lead up to Food Connections, it’s unsurprising. This year’s event is particularly exciting for Gemma, as it’s “come from the city”, as she puts it – meaning that her role, this time around, has been encouraging locals to put on events, and offering support for development and execution. “We’ve had some amazing ideas this year, and what feels really great is that it genuinely has come from the city,” she says. “It’s all people’s own ideas. There’s been a really good reaction – there are 118 events up online right now, with more to come.” But this festival is not just about the one week of events in mid-June – the whole aim is to help develop the city’s food landscape, and residents’ connection to it, year round. So what does Gemma want to see happen, once her job is done this year? “I hope we’ll have springboarded more food activity around the city, and helped start ongoing activities that wouldn’t have been able to begin otherwise. It’s all about connecting people to food projects and other people that they just didn’t know were there.”

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KITChEN CONFIdENTIAL Name: Gemma Thorogood. Hometown: Bristol. Occupations: Creative development producer for Bristol Food Connections, and food and wellbeing event producer. Must-have kitchen item: A super sharp knife. Most prized item: Nanna Potts’ kitchen scales. They’re over 100 years old but still work brilliantly. Favourite kitchen hack: Lea and Perrins in spag bol.  Coffee or tea? Good coffee. Go-to recipe: I love to make a proper fish pie using the fishmonger’s ends and sneaky hard-boiled eggs inside. Guilty pleasure (we’re not here to judge!): Kettle chips. With aioli. I love garlic. A food you couldn't live without: Eggs. They’re amazing.  Favourite condiment: Smoked paprika. Five people you’d invite to your dinner party, dead or alive: Family. Some who have passed away and some I don’t get to spend enough time with. Any time with my family is bonus time these days.  The style of your kitchen in three words:  Small. Handy. Easy. Your kitchen is awesome because... It’s right next to my bedroom, which means my other half has no excuse not to make me a cup of tea each morning.  I love the balcony too, for the morning sun. If you could change one thing about it, it would be… It really is small; I’d love to have enough room for a big old table to go in the centre that you could chop and chat on with a glass of wine… What are you going to rustle up this weekend? I’m going to my friend’s Culture Kitchen down in Sussex. He’s Nigerian so it’s a fully outdoor affair, cooking over fire. We’ll make a big pot together and chop and chat for hours amongst people with different dishes to share…   Unexpected item in your kitchen cupboard: An awesome old pasta machine.   I don’t use it much, but when we do it’s really fun – I made spaghetti with a seven-yearold friend recently, and had pasta strings hanging over everything! I found it in a charity shop; it just makes me happy that it’s being used again. One thing your kitchen is used for that doesn't involve cooking or eating: Working… But I love my work, so that’s okay!

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HARRY’S CIDER COMPANY Littlefield Farm, Long Sutton, Langport, Somerset, TA10 9NS

01458 241 324 sales@harryscidercompany.co.uk www.harryscidercompany.co.uk

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Farm Shop & Cider Tours


Open on the ground floor from 9am everyday until late. Serving sumptuousServing brunches, fantastic coffee excellent food. Open on the sumptuous Liveand Music & DJ events ground floor from brunches, fantastic throughout the week Live Music & DJ eventscoffee throughout the weekinina aunique unique&&funky funky 9am everyday and setting full of character. until late. excellent food. setting full of character.

Great Cocktails, Timeless Music Hits, Friendly & Warm Service.

Great Cocktails, Timeless Music Hits, Friendly & Warm Service.

| Monday - Friday: HAPPYHAPPY HOURHOUR | Monday - Friday: 5-7pm5-7pm

HALF PRICE on selected cocktails, spirits and wines. HALF PRICE on selected cocktails, spirits and wines.

AFTERNOON TEA | Monday - Saturday: AFTERNOON TEA | Monday - Saturday: 3-5pm3-5pm

Variety of teas, scones & cakes, dainty sandwiches and champagne. Variety of teas, scones, dainty sandwiches and champagne. SUNDAY ROAST A OF TRIO OF MUSIC LIVE MUSIC SUNDAY ROAST WITH WITH A TRIO LIVE (JAZZ, BLUES AND MORE) (JAZZ, BLUES AND MORE) Enjoy half price wine by the glass or a draft beer with your roast. Enjoy half price wine by the glass or a draft beer with your roast. LAST SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH: IT'S A SUNDAY TING! LAST SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH: IT'S A SUNDAY TING! Enjoy your Sunday roast to sweet reggae beats by our DJ. Enjoy your Sunday roast to sweet reggae beats by our DJ.


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The Want Wa List

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DECK OUT THE GARDEN IN STYLE FOR ALFRESCO FEASTING APLENTY THIS SUMMER

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1. Meri Meri Dipped Tassel Garland £25 Add a bit of colour and sense of occasion to your outdoor decor. Available from Mon Pote in Bristol. monpote.co.uk 2. Acrylic Wine Glass £6.95 From the Danish designers at Rice, this acrylic embossed wine glass will bring pizzazz to your picnic. Find it at Fig 1 in Bristol. fig1.co.uk

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3. Peccioli Melamine Side Plates £32 Coming in a set of four, these have to be some of the most stylish melamine plates we’ve seen, with their distressed style and cracked glaze finish. From Oka in Bath. oka.com

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4. Dawson Indoor/Outdoor Rug from £68 Who needs garden furniture? Just park yerself on this cool, colourful rug – available in three sizes. Get it online from Anthropologie. anthropologie.com

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5. Orla Kiely Bamboo Bowl £8 This bowl, with its classic Orla Kiely print, is part of a big eco-friendly bamboo range by the well-known designer, and can be picked up from Rossiters in Bath. rossitersofbath.com


Discover one of Bath’s best kept secrets, Alfresco Afternoon Tea at the Villa … A delightfully delicious afternoon tea brimming with homemade treats. Warm scones, sandwiches made from home-baked bread and moreish indulgent cakes. Everything is made by our own fabulous baker, with a new selection of cakes every day of the week.

Cream tea £10.50 per person Full afternoon tea £21.00 per person Prosecco afternoon tea £27.00 per person Served every day from 1pm – 6pm in our sunny dining room or garden terrace. Pre-booking is required.

01225 466329 • reception.trvb@roseatehotels.com • www.roseatevillabath.com


WHITEHART • w i d c o m b e •

Mediterranean inspired walled garden Live Jazz during the summer with drinks served from our garden bar

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Fresh and seasonal food

Beef

Open 7 days (closed Sunday evenings) The White Hart | Widcombe | Bath | BA2 6AA T 01225 338053 | www.whitehartbath.co.uk

as it should be From the Farmer Of all our British native cattle breeds, grass-fed Red Ruby Devon beef reigns supreme.

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Winn e The T r of imes Foo Awar die ds 20 17 Best Beef

£200 of grass-fed Red Ruby Devon Beef

Just visit redrubydevon-beef.co.uk to enter and win £200 of grass-fed Red Ruby Devon beef direct from the farm.

High in Omega-3! DEVON CATTLE BREEDERS’ SOCIETY, BLACKLAKE FARM, EAST HILL, OTTERY ST MARY, DEVON, EX11 1QA 01404 812800 | hello@redrubydevon-beef.co.uk www.redrubydevon-beef.co.uk


400km Our cycle challenge entails six days of cycling over a distance of approximately 400kms. The journey spans mountain tops to valley bottoms, coastal climbs to inland flats, with breath-taking views throughout. The ride will be challenging, but achievable with training in advance, and friendship and cameraderie made along the way.

ED LIMIT S E PLAC LE! LAB AVAI ow ter n Regis 250 for £

25th October 4th November 2018

CYCLE FOR SAFE WATER Like adventure? Looking for the trip of a lifetime? Join FRANK Water, Expedia and Authentica in the first ever Cycle for Safe Water Challenge! Discover some of India’s most beautiful and least visited regions, see firsthand how safe drinking water changes lives and raise money to help FRANK Water reach more of India’s most marginalised communities. All on two wheels!

If you have any questions, would like to discuss the trip or find out more: email: Amanda@frankwater.com telephone: 0117 329 4846 www.frankwater.com | Registered charity no. 1121273


Indian Dining Arguably Bath and Bristol’s best and most modern Indian restaurants with great cocktails and refined and flavoursome cooking. Sunday Brunch coming soon at our Bath site.

Riverstation sits majestically on the harbourside as it has done for the last 20 years. Our iconic building boasts one of the best sunshine locations in Bristol and offers al fresco dining in abundance. You can dock on the pontoon from the ferry and enjoy the whole day in this wonderful setting. The newly refitted restaurant offers fantastic views across the water and delivers monthly rotating seasonal menus. Balcony seating also allows you to leisurely watch life go by. The up-beat ground floor hosts a large sunshine terrace so you can while away a summer’s night with cocktails, or enjoy a bottle from our extensive wine selection. We proudly support local Bristol breweries, as well as offering our flagship Young’s ales on tap. Be sure not to miss out on our great Summer events hosted in proper Bristol fashion. Follow our social networks for updates.

We’re now taking bookings over the Summer months, including for Graduation.

Piper Heidsieck Rooftop Champagne Bar Now Open at Our Bath Restaurant 12-16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 01173 291300 Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB Tel: 01225 446656 Email: info@themintroom.co.uk www.themintroom.co.uk

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The Grove, Bristol BS1 4RB; 0117 914 4434 riverstation@youngs.co.uk www.riverstation.co.uk

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Nestled in 36 acres of beautiful West Country parkland, Ston Easton Park is unique; the hotel is adorned with original antique furniture, sumptuous fabrics and glistening chandeliers, yet the warm welcome and homely atmosphere prevails, creating an idyllic home-away-from-home. One of the most luxurious pet-friendly country house Hotels in Somerset with an award-winning ďŹ ne dining restaurant and kitchen garden. Our Head Chef is passionate about developing menus that use fresh, locally-sourced ingredients; he works closely with local suppliers and the hotel garden team, sourcing almost 60% of the fresh produce used in the menus from the hotel’s Victorian kitchen gardens. As well as offering the perfect destination for a luxury hotel break, the house is open daily to non-residents for morning coffee, lunch and light snacks, traditional afternoon tea and dinner. Located just 12 miles from Bristol and 11.9 miles from Bath.

Ston Easton, Nr Bath, Somerset BA3 4DF To book, call 01761 241631 or email reception@stoneaston.co.uk

www.stoneaston.co.uk

SPECIAL OFFER

Complimentary glass of Prosecco to all joining us for Afternoon Tea. QUOTE SCMB01 (Offer valid until 06/07/18)


MAINS

The Cross Guns in Avonciff is sister venue to both The Old Crown at Kelston and The Inn at Freshford; all have top gardens for alfresco feasting

TOP CULINARY CAUSES, INSIDER KNOWLEDGE AND FOOD PIONEERs

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AT THIRST SIGHT

Meet the local produ cers behind these beautiful be vvies PAGE 84

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Using local and British ingredients wherever they can, they’re currently working on reducing the sugar in their sips to make them more virtuous, but with no detriment to the flavour. After all, they want these thirst-quenchers to be enjoyed freely. “We believe our drinks are uplifting – they boost the spirits,” Victoria says. “We think products made with love and care do that for you.” Wanting to get veg involved in her drinks as well as fruit, Emma Frampton set up The Juice Collective in 2016. It’s all about balance for this Bath-based biz, looking after your body and fuelling it well, while living a fast-paced life. These juices are cold pressed, meaning fruit and veg is ground into a pulp and then squeezed with crazy mounts of pressure to extract the juice. It’s a surefire way to get as much of the raw ingredients’ nutrients into the resulting juice as possible, and RECENTLY, WE SHARED THE STORIES OF SOME OF OUR these guys say they’re the only ones doing PATCH’S TOP FOOD PRODUCERS – SO WE THOUGHT IT things this way in the whole South West. ONLY FAIR WE SHARE THE SAME LOVE WITH THOSE MAKING Expect lots of greens, fresh root veg like THE STUFF WE WASH EVERYTHING DOWN WITH. THERE carrot and beetroot, and crisp British ARE HEAPS OF AWESOME DRINKS BEING MADE AROUND apples in their drinks. Look out for the BATH AND BRISTOL – MANY OF WHICH WE’LL NO DOUBT BE new and improved Yellow 01, with apple, SUPPING ON THIS SUMMER – AND HERE ARE THE STORIES pineapple, ginger and lemon, and the allOF SOME OF THEIR CREATORS... new health shots. Also over in Bath is chai syrup maker, Henny and Joe’s. This outfit was born in 2013, shaped around core focuses of ethics and sustainability. “We wanted to make a difference,” says founder Ash Bailey. “To this day we still bottle our chai in glass bottles, we use cardboard packaging with no plastic in sight, all our waste materials are re-used or recycled, fter selling his tech biz in that London, and nothing goes to landfill.” Miles Bradley moved to Somerset. He Even the leftover spices – which you’d think would started out here selling veg boxes with be pretty useless – aren’t wasted, and go to companies fresh juice inside, but so well-received were making soap and potpourri, for example. his drinks that the business soon shifted There are now three syrups in the range – original, to apple juice production. Eventually, chocolate, and the brand new golden turmeric number Bradley’s Drinks was born. Now making a host of – and you’ll only find them served and sold in indie different soft drinks (and Bradders cider) on Miles’ outlets. All natural and vegan, they’re great with hot Somerset farm, the business only uses totally natural milk, or even just hot water, for comforting chai lattes. ingredients, and things are all done by hand; the team And while we’re talking of hotties, we can’t not press their own apples and mill the root ginger, even. mention huge Bristol-born tea biz, Pukka. Born in Because of this, you can expect natural flavours that 2001, it was the result of herbalist Sebastian Pole and aren’t too sweet or sickly. The elderflower and strawberry Tim Westwell’s friendship. Seb had studied ayurvedic, number comes into its own in summer, while the lime Chinese and Western herbal medicine, and wanted a and ginger (while great on its own) almost cries out to be way to champion the benefits of organic herbs. mixed with a dash of rum, we reckon. Pukka makes 40 blends of herbal, fruit and green teas, And plenty more local fruity sips come courtesy of which it believes support wellbeing, be that by aiding Lovely Drinks – a producer that started out thanks to relaxation, encouraging concentration, strengthening an abundance of elderflower in Rick Freeman’s garden joints, boosting metabolisms or aiding digestion. one summer. Putting it to the best use he could think of, The team use organic, medicinal grade, Fair Wild he made cordials and presses in his shed and took them and Fair for Life ingredients, and work to strong ethical to local events to sell. Nowadays, along with co-founder principles. This summer try brewing your tea with Victoria, he’s responsible for a spectrum of softies that boiling water, leaving to cool, and serving over ice, for a include raspberry lemonade, ginger beer, dandelion chilled version of these nutritional bevvies. and burdock, and sour cherry cola. 

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Escape the City. Day or N ight. R E T R E AT T O O N E O F O U R AWA R D W I N N I N G G A R D E N S S E T I N S P E C TAC U L A R LO C AT I O N S.

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kay, so they may not technically be booze, but the natural tasting, quality products made by Bristol Syrup Company are destined to be buddied up with booze in cocktails. Made by bartenders for bartenders (including those whose bar is simply the kitchen counter at home), they were developed by mixology pros Dee Davies and Danny Walker, and come in 14 varieties, from classics like grenadine and elderflower, to the sharp, well-balanced raspberry shrub. (Try mixing 20ml of this with 50ml gin and 10ml lemon juice, and serving it in a tall glass with ice, topped with soda. You’re so welcome.) Each syrup flavour, which has been tested in cocktails and tweaked and developed until it’s spot on (tough work, right?), is made in small batches at HQ in Ashton Vale. The base of each is, of course, sugar and water, and then real fruit juices, natural flavourings, cider vinegar and good quality extracts are added to make the freshest and most naturally tasting syrups around. Also using natural ingredients to make juicy, boozy thirst quenchers in Bristol is Espensen Spirit. Sam Espensen had been making infused spirits for about 15 years, but took the leap and turned it into a business, along with mate Phil Gilliesin, in 2015. That was followed a couple of years later by a bar, Bristol Spirit: their equivalent of a taproom. Sam makes all her drinks herself, using base spirits and adding spring water, and infusing them with fruits, herbs, spices and other botanicals. Most of her products are in the making for about two weeks, but some take up to two years, and there’s now word of a whisky – which will, obvs, take even longer. Sam does everything by hand here, including the bottling and labelling, and uses straight up ingredients – most of which are British, and all are as locally sourced and fresh as possible. Try Pump Up the Jam – a raspberry gin – and the seasonal Queen of Summer gooseberry vodka, which will be available as of July. If you’re looking to take things down a notch or two when it comes to ABV (as many of us are lately – the trend for low-alcohol drinks is very much on the up), then let us introduce you to Silver Swift. Born just last year in the little village of Nettleton in Wiltshire, this outfit makes low-alcohol cocktails (about 5% ABV); there’s gin with raspberry, blackberry and rose extract, and vodka with gooseberry, elderflower and Earl Grey, for instance. The ingredients all come from carefully chosen British suppliers – from the spirits to the fruits – to keep food (and drink) miles, and carbon footprints, low. Okay, so ready-to-drink cocktails don’t have the best rep, but these guys are out to prove they’ve come up with an altogether different beast. No sickly sweet, syrupy liquids here; the drinks taste fresh and are all completely natural, with no nasties added, and are also bottled in glass for easy recycling. And, cranking the alcohol by volume percentage back up again, meet Bristolians Danny Walker and Liam Hirt. After five years making gin as a hobby, they turned their extra curricular activities into a business in 2014, founding Psychopomp. They now have their own microdistillery-cum-gin bar on St Michael’s Hill, and became owners of one of the very first Crumbs Awards trophies last year.

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Jekka McVicar (middle) has teamed up with Six O’clock Gin to make a special new spirit; the Psychopomp team (bottom) turned their hobby into a business four years ago

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New 3 Course Children’s Menu just £7.50 and includes a drink Top Lane, Whitley, Wiltshire SN12 8QX T f @peartreewhitley 01225 704966

www.peartreewhitley.co.uk


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Having begun with their flagship gin Woden, the small team now create around 30 products, including seasonally changing gins (look out for Hathor this summer, distilled with heather flower, pomegranate seed and fig leaf ), aquvavit, absinthe, a coffee digestif and a bottled Negroni. That’s on top of 20 bespoke gins that they make for local indie bars and restaurants, too. “We are still pretty small, which allows us the freedom to be really creative,” says Danny. “Making bespoke gins for people in really small batches means we are always working on new projects. We have a pretty great day job!” Also making gin in Bristol is Bramley and Gage, responsible for Six O’clock Gin. It began life nearly 30 years ago, when Edward Kain and his wife Penny began to look for ways to use up the surplus goods from their fruit farm. They started fruity liqueurs, and were quick to see them take off. Eventually, the family’s first gin recipe was born, and used for a new sloe gin. Their children, Michael and Felicity, took over the business some years later, and made it their mission to perfect the gin recipe, eventually creating their London dry-style spirit that we’re familiar with today. This is a carbon neutral outfit, offsetting its energy use with the solar electricity they produce. Fruit is sourced locally, and waste products go to a local bio gas plant. And – this is properly hot off the press – the team have just launched a brand new gin, made in collaboration with internationally known herb pro, Jekka McVicar. Six O’clock London Dry Gin: Jekka’s Edition is being made in small batches with freshly picked herbs coming from Jekka’s farm. Delivered in the morning, these botanicals go into the stills on the same day, to create a gin that’s aromatic and as herbaceous as you could hope. Yep, we’re getting pretty thirsty too...

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ath-based Electric Bear is all about constant reimagining and experimenting, seemingly knocking out a constant stream of exciting new releases. (“New beer is what we do,” founder Chris Lewis tells us.) Most recently, these guys launched the Big Up pale ale, a single-hop brew, and we can now look forward to Big Up El Dorado, Big Up Dr Rudi, Big Up Mosaic and more, with a new release due every month. They’re also pretty worked up about a new sour beer that’ll be on the go over the coming weeks. Having left the world of IT to make beer instead, Chris signed the lease for his brewery site in 2015, and it was only four months before the first beer was being enjoyed by thirsty locals. Drinking at the bar at his Brassmill Lane base, surrounded by giant silvery tanks, is a real treat, and – given his love of the new –it’s unsurprising there’s quite a range available now: “We brew craft ales, stouts, sours and a pilsner, ranging from a 3.3% ABV Micro IPA through to barrel-aged imperial stouts at 10% ABV or thereabouts, and lots of beers in between.”

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Another forward thinking brewery can be found in the form of Bristol’s The Incredible Brewing Company. “We began production in September 2013, aiming to create bold, adventurous beers, free of additives and finings, and to challenge the cultural norms of the drinks industry,” founder Stephen Hall tells us. And the team still mean to push those boundaries, and question convention, five years later. They also still brew using traditional methods with no additives, despite having scaled up twice since launch, thanks to demand. “In my core range I produce hoppy pales and IPAs, and have now started kegging the beer using sustainable reusable kegs,” says Stephen. “The Summer range is my personal favourite, and includes nettle beer, elderflower ale and raspberry wheat beer.” Sounds good, right? Stephen is big on food matching too; the coriander and lime beer is a great example of how the range is made with mealtimes in mind (it’s a dream with seafood and Thai dishes). Devitera is a really small microbrewery in rural Wiltshire, not far from Devizes, which was set up by Glen Upward. The idea is beer that’s inspired by the surroundings its created in – for instance, a lot of the barley in it is actually grown in Wiltshire fields, then is floor

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We’ll drink to that! Fierce and Noble is a young brewery doing big things...

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malted in the good old fashioned way nearby in Warminster, before being delivered to the brewery. A real labour of love for Glen, these brews are all made carefully by hand, and are kept au naturel, being totally vegan and naturally carbonated. And the exciting small-scale breweries keep on coming: Fierce and Noble is a small but perfectly formed business, which has only been going for about 18 months. “Two people in a shed making beer” is actually how head brewer Ollie Dent describes the outfit. Said two (and their shed) are located in the collaborative St Werburghs. “This area has an incredible community that we feel blessed to serve,” says taproom manager Fabio Roberts. “We are lucky enough to be supported by local businesses, such as Popti and Beast, who have been using our Black IPA to make the best bacon jam in existence! At some point we will experiment more with other ingredients, such as sourcing amazing coffee from Extract, just up the road.” There’s no messing about with the beers here – they’re simply malt, hops and yeast – and are designed to be accessible, unpretentious and just downright great tasting, so that everyone can enjoy them (you don’t need to be a bonafide beer buff to appreciate these, happily). And from the new to the old: it was way back in 1999 that Dipam Patel and Nick Desai had the idea of brewing up super fresh beer inspired by styles from around the world, eventually founding the Zero Degrees microbreweries. Almost 20 years later, the staples are still going strong – there’s the Bohemian Czech pilsner, American Downtown pale, The Beast Black lager, Hazy Days Belgian witbier and a Mango beer – but they’ve also added small batch beers, employing their brewers’ expertise and creative flair to produce over 100 styles, with another 36 seasonal brews planned for this year. Keep your eye out for the Blonde Ale with lavender, Steam Beer (a German-style gose with peaches) and an American sour ale this summer. Staying true to their original intensions, these guys still only brew ‘fresh beer’ – beer that’s unpasteurised and unfiltered, and served newly brewed, direct from the tanks. “This preserves everything that makes the beer special and gives it a fuller flavour,” says Dipam. Moving onto our region’s famous apple-based bevvies, Harry’s Cider is based on Harry Fry’s farm on the edge of the Somerset Levels. The warm, damp environment there, along with the soil type found underfoot, is spot on for cider apple trees. It’s a family business, this, with real West Country roots – Harry’s lot has farmed in Somerset for five generations. It was just over a decade ago that Mr Fry decided to try his hand at cider making, though, shifting from dairy farming. As it happens, they already had some solid orchard action on the go, growing apples for other makers. Now, Harry’s Cider keeps all them apples for itself, to go in its six award-winning varieties of craft drinks. Among them is single variety cider Dabinett, which just earned itself a silver at the International Cider Challenge, and is also the reigning champion of the Arthur Davies Cup at the British Cider Championships – and Scrummage farmhouse cider, unfiltered and matured for six months, which has just been named the best cider in Britain at CAMRA’s National Cider and Perry Championships. Honey’s Cider is another local family affair. Founder Bob Honey rounded up some family and friends to help collect a heap of apples to test out an antique cider press that he’d stumbled upon. Now, the family biz makes both the classic Somerset-style still cider, as well as some sparkling bottled numbers. Most recently they launched Stoney Bonk, which is based on an old local recipe of cider and ginger beer. Everything is made on the farm just outside of Bath, using traditional methods for a proper authentic West Country result. Proper job.

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Perfect for all your Summer dishes CHECK THE WEBSITE TO FIND YOUR LOCAL STOCKIST

www.healthyrecipes.uk.com

182 Church Rd, Redfield, Bristol BS5 9HX Opened in 2016, The Lock Up is an independent, family-run restaurant in the heart of Redfield, Bristol.

Brunch: Treat yourself to a tasty brunch with a fine cup of Wogan coffee. Served 10am-3pm Tuesday to Saturday. Dinner: Served from 6pm. Our food is cooked to order by Aidan and his team of fine chefs. Our ingredients are locally sourced and from independent suppliers where possible. On the middle Wednesday of each month we are preparing a special tasting menu. Find out more at: a thelockupuk f x thelockupbristol Roasts served every Sunday, 12pm until 4.30pm. Fancy a drink or two? Classic & House cocktails 2 for £10 Tuesday to Saturday & Bloody Marys 2 for £10 all day Sunday!

PRIVATE DINING ROOM AVAILABLE WITH ROOM FOR 22 GUESTS | BOOKING ALWAYS ADVISABLE

0117 329 0707 | info@thelockupbristol.com | www.thelockupbristol.com OPEN TUESDAY - SATURDAY 10am-11pm | SUNDAYS 12pm-6pm | BANK HOLIDAY MONDAYS 11am-5pm


BRUNCH • LUNCH • BREWS 45 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2LS

BREAKFAST | LUNCH | DINNER | COFFEE | DRINKS | CHILD & DOG FRIENDLY | FAMILY RUN

SUNDAY ROASTS SERVED 12-5PM (PUB CLASSICS 5PM-8PM)

NEW SPRING MENU LARGE SUN-FILLED GARDEN FAMILY FRIENDLY

PUB QUIZ EVERY TUESDAY STARTS AT 8PM

138-140 Kellaway Avenue, Horfield, Bristol BS6 7YQ | hello@theoldspotbristol.co.uk | Tel: 0117 924 7693

WWW.THEOLDSPOTBRISTOL.CO.UK


TAKE IT OUTSIDE

WHAT, PRAY TELL, IS THAT BIG GLOWING ORB IN THE SKY, DRAWING EVERYONE OUTDOORS, SQUINTY-EYED? OH YEAH, WE REMEMBER: IT’S THE SUN, AND IT’S HERE FOR ALFRESCO DINING SEASON, BABY! HERE ARE SOME LOCAL SPOTS TO ENJOY TOP FOOD AND DRINK WHILE YOU SOAK UP THAT VITAMIN D...

Green Bird Café has some bright, summery food to eat alfresco this season

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BRISTOL BAMBALAN

This roof terrace in the city centre is a no brainer when the sun’s got his hat on. It’s huge – there’s room for 100 – and on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays over the summer DJs will be joining the punters outdoors to soundtrack their evening. There’s even a bar out there too, so go on, order a Bam Summer Cup, made with Chase Fruit Cup, lemonade, cucumber, strawberries, orange and mint. The new menu has just been released too, offering the summery likes of the Po Boy Bab, with deep-fried king prawns, chilli mayo, pickled jalapeño, ’slaw and freshly baked flatbread. bambalan.co.uk

BREW COFFEE CO.

This ace caff is sat on the edge of Whiteladies Road, with bistro-style seating out on the decking. It’s a proper little suntrap, bordered by wooden planters that heave with herbs for the kitchen. Come thirsty, and let the homemade strawberry and basil lemonade work its refreshing magic. To eat, the brunches are banging: try the new Turkish eggs, which sees poached eggs, rosehip harissa, labneh, seasonal greens and onion seeds piled atop sourdough. Lunch is ace too, mind; check out the counter displays of salads, frittatas and quiches.

Bambalan’s roof terrace is always a lively hangout spot in the sun

brewcoffeecompany.co.uk

THE GLOUCESTER OLD SPOT

There’s a massive back garden at this lovely, family friendly pub, with space for 150 to eat and drink out on the lawn, and even more on the covered terrace. Work is underway on the front garden as well, which is a great spot for getting the last of that evening sun. You know what we like to sip on in the summer heat? A gin and tonic – and these guys happen to have just launched a new gin menu. Happy days! Look out for the pub’s birthday party on 22 September, too; expect a barbecue, live music, and lots of merriment. theoldspotbristol.co.uk

GRAIN BARGE

As the sun comes out, people flock to the riverside – but you don’t have to stay on the sidelines. Hop aboard this repurposed barge and enjoy belting views, stretching out from Underfall Yard to the ss Great Britain, from the river itself. The top deck is where to head in the sun: new out here for this summer are cool sail-esque shades and a drum barbecue, serving its own menu on Fridays and Saturdays (think dishes like lamb koftas with cucumber salad and super grains). You can catch the river ferry straight here, or moor up and climb on if you’re, like, well fancy, and arrive in your own boat. grainbarge.com

Look out for The Gloucester Old Spot’s annual outdoor party

RIVERSTATION

This mainstay of the Bristol restaurant scene sits on the bank of the the river, and comes complete with its own pontoon for river ferry drop offs. Its south-facing alfresco tables, spread across a ground floor terrace and first floor balcony, get the sun all day and look out over the water. Don your sunnies and order a cocktail – maybe the Club of 1955, with gin, dry vermouth, and clementine and rosemary syrup. Downstairs, the casual Bar and Kitchen serves brunch, lunch, and dinner while, upstairs, the recently redesigned Restaurant is all about the fine dining. riverstation.co.uk

99 QUEENS

There’s a nice decked terrace at this newly revamped bar and café on the wide, leafy Queens Road. But that’s only part of what makes it a great pit stop while you’re strolling through Clifton – the food and drink play their part, too. “This summer we’ve extended our drinks

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Dinner with a side of river views at Riverstation

CRUMBSMAG.COM


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menu, adding a range of Columbian iced coffees, Meantime’s Helles on draught, and several cocktails. Our favourite is a Mexican twist on the classic Tom Collins: Sènor Collins!” says owner Richard. To eat, the salads are super popular – try the Queens garden salad, or maybe the tuna niçoise. facebook.com/99queens

B A T H ABBEY HOTEL

Corkage has a hidden garden out the back of its city centre bar

The terrace, at the front of this cool central hotel, is back in action again for the summer. If you swing by for a feed, get in the summertime mood with a sharing board, starring barbecue-glazed ribs, jerk chicken, frankfurter, potato salad, corn on the cob and coleslaw. Look out for the Terrace Takeovers too, when the alfresco space plays host to special guests, visiting to put on their own food and drink events and masterclasses. abbeyhotelbath.co.uk

CORKAGE (CHAPEL ROW)

In the heart of a busy city, this little small-plates restaurant and wine bar has a quiet little garden that’s ideal for escaping to. There’s a raised deck especially for alfresco dining, as well as a lower walled courtyard for those just after a drink and perhaps a couple of nibbles. Guests can soak up the sun over dishes like chargrilled English asparagus with beurre blanc, rosemary panko and chervil, maybe washed down with an English sparking rosé from Henners. corkagebath.com

GRAZE

The unique alfresco area here is set adjacent to the canopy of Bath’s primary railway station, built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Almost 200 years old, it’s Grade II* listed and has all the handsome architecture you’d expect from a building so prominent and with such hefty history. The restaurant and microbrewery has a range of Bath Ales beers available, including Platform 3, which is actually brewed on site. And to eat, the River Fowey mussels in a saffron and cider cream sauce are spot on for a feed in the sun. bathales.com

GREEN BIRD CAFÉ Green Bird café has a prime people-watching location

This little lunchtime hangout, down a pedestrianised street lined with indie shops and eateries, has bistro seating out the front, but also a tiny, quaint walled courtyard (one of said walls having been part of St Margaret’s Chapel, bombed in the Bath Blitz) hidden around the back. Wherever you pull up a pew, though, you can enjoy top West Country drinks from the likes of The Juice Collective and Psychopomp (who you’ll remember from the previous pages, right?), and fresh, imaginative food such as Vietnamese rice noodle salad with chicken, lime, mint and pickled carrot. greenbirdcafe.co.uk

HARE AND HOUNDS

Known for its top-drawer alfresco area and awesome views, this pub has two outdoor dining options. Guests can enjoy table service from up on the sun terrace, or grab a picnic bench below on the lawn and chill out with a drink as the kids entertain themselves in the nearby play area. See if you can spot any action on the boules court, too. The brand new mocktail list is sure to be a hit this season, with concoctions like the fresh and tangy Raspberry Soda. hareandhoundsbath.com

THE HOP POLE Hare and Hounds’ alfresco game is up there with the best in Bath

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This pub, looking out onto Royal Victoria Park, has been treated to ongoing refurbishments since it was taken over in January. New life has been breathed into the well-known venue and its great

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WELCOME TO THE PORT OF CALL Dating back to the 1700’s the Port of Call is tucked away at the top of Whiteladies Road and is well worth finding. It’s suntrap hidden garden is an oasis away from the bustle of the main road and offers stunning views over Clifton. We have an eclectic, home-made menu, a great range of ales and a well chosen wine list. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Monday 4pm – 11pm Tuesday to Saturday 12 – 11pm Sunday 12 – 10.30pm 3 York Street, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2YE 0117 973 0926 portofcallbristol.com

GREAT FOOD AND WINE • REAL ALES FANTASTIC GARDENS • FAMOUS PUB DOGS

Monday 5pm – 11pm Tuesday to Saturday 12 – 11pm Sunday 12 – 8pm The White Horse, Bristol Road, Hambrook, Bristol, BS16 1RY 0117 957 0671 whitehorsehambrook.com


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south facing garden, which is comfortably big enough for 70 to eat in. Expect to see some barbecuing action over the summer, as well as the pizza oven being made great use of. Order the new Bath Ales lager Sulis from the outside bar – it’s light and fresh, and brewed just six miles from the pub. thehoppolebath.co.uk

KING WILLIAM INN

Out the back of this Tunley pub you’ll find a pretty little courtyard garden with round tables and parasols. There’s space for around 30 out there, so grab a seat when you see one free. Wet that whistle with a Kir Royal, made with Prosecco and Chambord with fresh raspberries. Well, it is summer, and that’s reason enough to celebrate with something sparkly, we think. To eat, how about the ham hock potato cakes with asparagus and hollandaise, or minute lamb steak with a fresh-tasting mint and tomato salsa? kingwilliaminn.co.uk It’s all about the canal-side dining at The Locksbrook

THE LOCKSBROOK INN

This pub’s big courtyard garden backs right onto the canal, with plenty of picnic benches and garden sofas to seat the crowds that turn up at the first sight of sun. Catching those rays for the majority of the day, the garden also has its own alfresco bar, serving draught beer, wine and cocktails. A sunny afternoon spent here calls for a Summer Cup, we reckon, with Hendricks gin, St Germain elderflower liqueur, Aperol, and Fever Tree ginger ale. Sweet, refreshing and with just a little bit of a kick. thelocksbrookinn.com

MINT ROOM

Alfresco dining here comes courtesy of a rooftop terrace, furnished with comfortable garden sofas and chairs. The rooftop bar is fully stocked with wines, beers and spirits – the latter often employed in cocktails such as the East Indian Gimlet (gin, lime cordial, celery bitters and black pepper). Sit in the sun for a pre-dinner drink, or have your whole meal out there, and keep your eyes peeled for some barbecues that are in the planning, too. mintroombath.co.uk

THE ROYAL CRESCENT HOTEL Did you know Bath’s Mint Room has a rooftop terrace?

There’s a whole acre of preened garden to sit out in at this historic hotel; carpeted by a lush green lawn and lined by carefully tended flowerbeds, it even has a few sculptures dotted about. Sit in the sun or take shade under a parasol and ask for the new alfresco sharing menu – it’s got some great little single-serve nibbles to fill up on while you quench that thirst (check out crumbsmag.com for more on this new menu!). If you’re after more of a fill, though, go for an afternoon tea – or check out the all day dining options. royalcrescent.co.uk

THE SCALLOP SHELL

The first floor walled terrace of this ever-popular restaurant is decked out in style with plenty of greenery and nautical flourishes (think fishing net fairy lights, a ship’s wheel, and themed table settings). It launched in March, so this is the first summer that we can take full advantage of it. And – superb timing – the team has just introduced a weekly-changing cocktail to their drinks list, too. Once you’re lubricated with that, tuck into a shellfish plate: changing daily, it might feature crab, mussels, oysters and langoustines. thescallopshell.co.uk

OUT OF TOWN CHEW KITCHEN Pretend you’re on holiday with a shellfish plate in the sun at The Scallop Shell

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This café’s alfresco area doubles up as a growing space; an old cattle trough is used for salad leaves and there is a range of tomatoes

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A country pub in the time-honoured tradition; a place to eat, drink and sleep.

STEAK NIGHT Two Steaks, Skinny Chips, Peppercorn Sauce, Watercress Salad & a Bottle of White or Red Wine £32

PIZZA WEDNESDAYS

Tuesdays 6.30pm – 8.30pm

*weather permitting

Wood Fired Pizzas Wednesdays 5.30pm – 7.30pm*

NEW! GLAMPING Enjoy the great outdoors in style Contact us to find out more about booking

The Wheatsheaf, Combe Hay, Bath BA2 7EG 01225 833504 | info@wheatsheafcombehay.com | www.wheatsheafcombehay.com

Behind its grandly imposing Victorian frontage at the top of Blackboy Hill, The Kings Arms offers a wonderfully diverse experience. With its café bar, dining rooms and lounges spread over several levels, there is room for everyone – even a Party Hall for those special occasions.

The sun-trap terrace is a firm favourite in the summer, with views over Clifton and all-day sunshine. Enjoy an ice-cold lager or plate of tapas under the watchful gaze of the giant flamingo, voted one of the top 10 murals in Bristol!

The emphasis on the menu is home-made. Using genuinely sourced ingredients from local producers – including the family farm – it ranges from great pub classics to tasty tapas. Weekly specials use the best of what is seasonal and the burgers are legendary, with the chutneys and smoked cheeses all prepared in the Kings Arms kitchen.

The Sunday roasts are extremely popular, so booking is advisable, and the affordable wine list has something to suit every palette. Carefully made cocktails are available for the more adventurous – try the ‘Giddy Henry’, the House cocktail served in a tea-cup!

The Kings Arms, 168 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2XZ Telephone: 0117 973 5922 Email: info:kingsarmsbristol.com

www.kingsarmsbristol.com


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and cucumbers on the go, too. With seating out the front and back, you’re bound to be able to catch some decent rays, whatever the time of day. While you’re collecting that vitamin D, get busy with a pulled pork burger with sweetcorn fritter, sweet potato fries and ’slaw, or maybe the peri peri chicken, with mango and chilli salsa. chew.kitchen

THE CROWN

This Saltford pub, sat on the Bath Road, launched its new garden just over a year ago, and it’s been made excellent use of ever since. The large outdoor space has seating for 90, and is made up of a little courtyard as well as the lawn. Casual and chilled out, this place specialises in pub grub, done well; alongside the classics like pies and fish and chips, visitors will see the likes of fig, feta and walnut salad among the specials this summer. The team host barbecues in the garden every Friday from 5pm, too – weather permitting. Relaxed vibes and plenty of space for soaking up the sun at The Crown

thecrowninsaltford.com

HARTLEY FARM SHOP AND KITCHEN

Run by fifth generation farmers, this place is 150 acres, and home to a herd of Aberdeen Angus cattle, as well as lots of fruit, veg and plants that are grown by the onsite gardener. Such a lovely open space is great for getting some proper fresh air while you fill up (much of what’s served here is made with the farm’s own ingredients), not to mention letting the kids run around and expel come energy. Keep your eye out for the upcoming Tea in the Garden event: there will be Pimm’s, live music and a picnic-style afternoon tea spread. hartley-farm.co.uk

HOLY COW CAFÉ

Holy Cow Café is overlooked by the historic village church

This cool little caff is plonked on the centuries-old Manor Farm in Somerset – so you know you’re guaranteed some lush green views from its garden. As well as the farmhouse, which dates back to the 1600s, you can also spot the Grade II listed village church among the scenery. Over the summer, these guys have some great iced coffees to cool you down while delivering a good old caffeine hit, and they’re bringing back their Pimm’s pitchers, too. To eat (you’ll be wanting something light and fresh in the sun, right?) are lots of homemade salads, as well as the likes of quiche, Vietnamese spring rolls, and the courgette and halloumi burger. theholycowchilcompton.co.uk

THE INN AT FRESHFORD

There’s a new summer menu here, packed with the likes of Cornish mussels steamed in garlic and white wine; rainbow salad of seasonal veg; and house-smoked half chicken (they have their own smoke house on site, don’t cha know) with spiced skinny fries. Wash it down with a Freshford Fizz, featuring lemon and thyme infused vodka, as you chill out in the sizable garden, furnished with rustic wood and lit by festoon lights. There’s not the faintest whiff of the bustling city to be found in this lovely rural setting. theinnatfreshford.com

LUCKNAM PARK

Lucknam Park’s Brasserie backs onto the pretty English country garden

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The all-day dining Brasserie at this luxury hotel spills out onto a pretty alfresco terrace, overlooking the walled garden. It’s set within 500 acres of landscaped gardens and parkland, which guests are free to explore; there’s a play area for kids, and you can even go introduce yourself to the horses at the equestrian centre. If you manage to bag yourself a seat outdoors, we’d recommend kicking off proceedings with the hotel’s signature summer cocktail, the Lucknam French Martini, and maybe following with the ‘egg and soldiers’, with newseason asparagus and Burford Brown egg. lucknampark.co.uk

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A L F R E S C O

NESTON FARM SHOP AND KITCHEN

There’s a spanking new kids’ play area here, so the little ’uns can tire themselves out while the big ’uns (that’s you) do a proper chill, maybe with a nice cold glass of Pino Grigio rosé, or a fresh fruit smoothie if you’re feeling a bit more virtuous. There’s plenty of room for alfresco feasting at this farm, and the new summer menu is in full swing. We’ve had a tip off about the vegan falafel flatbread: homemade, it’s nice and light, full of vibrant veggies. Alternatively, check out the salads, which are made from what’s grown right here on the farm. nestonfarmshop.co.uk

THE OLD CROWN AT KELSTON

This rural pub, just outside Bath, has some hefty garden action going on, with enough space for 150 sun seekers. The slushy machine will be earning its keep over the summer, making frozen Margaritas and Daiquiris; there’s half price Prosecco on a Tuesday; and you’ll find an outside bar serving draught beers, too. To earn that drink, go take a hike up Kelston Roundhill; it’s right behind the pub and promises some pretty ace views from the top. There’s a menu of good pub grub here, and occasional outdoor events, too. oldcrownkelston.com

See what the team at Lucknam have some up with for their summer menu

PEAR TREE INN

This garden wraps around the entire pub – with space for more than 100 – meaning its guests have a choice of alfresco areas to make themselves comfortable in. A new wine bottle path leads from the garden dining room to the rear of the alfresco space, where you’ll find a cool greenhouse made from old reclaimed windows, and raised beds growing produce for the farmhouse kitchen. Speaking of which, it’s been knocking out the likes of hake with king prawns, late spring vegetables, Jersey Royals and pea shoots lately. peartreewhitley.co.uk

SIGN OF THE ANGEL

The pretty country garden here has just a light peppering of tables and benches – there is (intentionally) seating for only around 30, to keep the space calm and tranquil. And a relaxing space it sure is, with a flowing stream, colourful flowers and a canopy of trees offering some shade from the sun. A great spot, we think you’ll agree, for a glass of Cotes de Provence rosé, Le Village, or maybe a cream tea of classic scones with cream and jam (or cheese scones with apple conserve and chive cream, if you fancy going off-piste). signoftheangel.co.uk

Visit Bradford-on-Avon for alfresco action at Timbrell’s Yard

TIMBRELL’S YARD

There’s space for 80 among all the greenery in the rustic-style courtyard here, and the whole family is welcome, including the pooch. Check out the views of the River Avon and the medieval arched bridge, as well as Holy Trinity Church and honey coloured buildings – perhaps as you crack open a bottle of something chilled, sparkly and Portuguese (the Vinho Verde is great here, we’re told). To eat, summertime treats include the likes of bream ceviche with chilli, radicchio and radish salad to start, and mains such as spring green and potato dumplings with Wye Valley asparagus, romesco and baked ricotta.  timbrellsyard.com

What’s your favourite local alfresco spot? Tweet us @crumbsmag! There’s a chilled, quiet garden for relaxing in at Sign of the Angel

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Just 20 minutes drive from both Bath & Bristol lies the tiny Hamlet of Stanton Wick, home to The Carpenters Arms. A traditional inn

Serving great food in a relaxed environment in the country. Plenty of parking available. Private Room Perfect for relaxed private dining & small conferences. Great packages available.

Stanton Wick, Nr. Pensford North Somerset, BS39 4BX

tHIRTEEN en-suite bedrooms These delightful rooms offer king sized beds, digital flat screen televisions & superfast fibre optic internet, all in a contemporary styled room.

01761 490202 www.the-carpenters-arms.co.uk


THE TERRACE

Sit Back, Relax and Let Us Serve You Open every day, for everyone, from May to September. Parasols for the sunshine, patio heaters for the cooler evenings. Morning Coffee | Lite Bites & Lunch | Cocktails Evening nibbles | Wines & Champagnes North Parade, Bath, Somerset, BA1 1LF | 01225 461603 | abbeyhotelbath.co.uk


Check out the Stoney Bonk Cocktail bar at Bath Boules www.honeyscider.co.uk


• Contemporary menu for brunch and dinner • Locally roasted coffee • Fully licensed

REAL ALES, SEASONAL SPECIALS, PUB CLASSICS, SUNDAY ROASTS. Breakfast menu coming soon.... 35 Market St, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1LL 01225 863 433 info@thedandylionboa.co.uk www.thedandylionboa.co.uk

• Art gallery • Live music • Event space

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP 108 Stokes Croft, Bristol, BS1 3RU 0117 923 2858 - info@theartshousecafe.co.uk


The Malago The Greenhouse Restaurant at Wadswick Green is a stylish and relaxed all day dining destination. Located in an elegant and modern setting, with beautiful views across the Wiltshire countryside. Meet friends and unwind after work, enjoy a leisurely breakfast or meet the family for a Sunday roast. The perfect place for any occasion.

Take a look at what’s on offer at The Greenhouse

Father’s Day

MON - SAT: BRUNCH/LUNCH: 9AM - 3PM • DINNER: 5.30PM - 9.30PM SUNDAY: BRUNCH/LUNCH: 9AM - 12PM • ROASTS: 12:30PM - 7PM

www.themalago.club • eatout@themalago.club 220 North Street, Southville, BS3 1JD • 0117 963 9044

Sunday 17th June 2 courses £20 | 3 courses £25 Celebrate with your family in style and enjoy a delicious Father’s Day menu. Booking essential.

2 for 1 Pizza

Available all day Friday noon - 9pm

BREAKFAST MENU 7 days a week 9:30am - 11am

ROASTS

Sunday Roast 12 - 3pm

The Greenhouse Restaurant is open Mon-Sat from 9am-11pm and Sun 9am-4pm. You can reserve a table at any time by calling us on 01225 585880 or book online at www.thegreenhousewg.co.uk THE GREENHOUSE RESTAURANT, THE PAVILION, WADSWICK GREEN, CORSHAM SN13 9RD WWW.WADSWICKGREEN.CO.UK


Step into a sensory world and discover an arrangement of culinary delights, fragrant cocktails and the art of live music… 69 Park St, Bristol BS1 5PB ~ 0117 2034284 www.theflorist.uk.com ~ TheFloristUK

INTHEBOWL RAMEN JOINT More than just your average ramen bar...

OPENING TIMES MON - THURS: 12pm - 3PM / 5:30PM - 10:30pm fri - sat: 12pm - 10:30pm SUNday: CLOSED

0117 329 3460

inthebowl.co.uk 48-52 Baldwin Street Bristol, BS1 1QB inthebowl.ramenjoint@gmail.com a ramenjoint


AFTERS NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

There’s some great alfresco action going on at The White Hart

HIGHLIGHTTS

ART ATTACK The Arts Café serveHs ouupse a proper surprise PAGE 112

HART OF GOLD Widcombe has a ge in The White Hartm PAGE 117

Dining pPuAbRThK LIFE e

sure knows goVoicd togrria Park ub PA GE 120

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the biddestone arms THE FIRST AND LAST PUB IN THE COTSWOLDS

A traditional Cotswolds pub with a beautiful garden Local beers • Full wine list • Excellent menu Biddestone Arms, The Green, Biddestone, Nr Chippenham, Wiltshire, SN14 7DG Tel: 01249 716481

Boules piste now open

Start and finish of Le Tour des Cotswolds

100% vegan products and meal boxes delivered to your door orders £5 off h 30 wit over £ Code: t n Discou BS5 CRUM

We de li ever yw ver here in the UK! Peanut Butter: we have been asked repeatedly for this flavour and have spent a bit of time finding a great recipe. A super smooth gelato (less air and less fat than traditional ice cream) made with the sweet fresh milk from the Lacock Dairy herd, lightly roasted peanuts ground into a rough crunchy texture and a little sea salt.

FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OVER £50

Find us at glofoods.co.uk

Available from the specialist wholesaler Lovejoys, Whitehall Garden Centre, Bailbrook House Hotel, Widcombe Deli, Allington Farm Shop, Planks Farm Shop, Whiterow Farm Shop, Walter Rose & Son and other independent outlets.

info@lacockdairy.co.uk | www.lacockdairy.co.uk

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N U EN M LE B ER A M IL M VA SU A W EW O N

Café | Bistro | Catering

B AT H ’ S B E S T B R E A K FA S T

Breakfast • Lunch • Coffee • Cake • Wine

DELICIOUS & FRESH Freshly designed specials board everyday using local suppliers. Draft Ale, Cider and Lager available which can be enjoyed in our sun trap garden. Outside catering for any events, including bespoke planning service. Open daily for Breakfast (except Sunday) and Lunch.

Proud winner of

11 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath, BA1 2LP 01225 487846 www.greenbirdcafe.co.uk

Open Wednesday - Saturday for Dinner. Special 2 and 3 course menu on Wednesday evenings. 01275 332933 • hello@chew.kitchen • www.chew.kitchen • f chew.kitchen Chew Lane, Chew Stoke, Bristol BS40 8UE (opposite the medical surgery).


A F T E R S

( U N D E R R AT E D G E M S )

 

THE ARTS HOUSE CAFÉ

       

JESSICA CARTER LOVES SURPRISES – ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY COME IN THE FORM OF FOOD LIKE THIS …   

O

kay, I don’t need to tell you that being a food editor comes with its perks – but the best of said perks might not be the one you’d expect. It’s not all about the actual stuffing of the face (honestly); what lots of us get the biggest kick out of is the places it takes you to, and the people you meet there.   Case in point: had K and I been in the market for some Thursday night dinner without being nudged in any particular direction, the chances of us ending up at The Arts House Café are pretty much zero. Not, though, for any real reason; it’s just that we had no idea about what’s being knocked up in the kitchen here. As it happens, however, we found ourselves bound for the place in the name of this here magazine, with not much idea of what to expect.  Right on the corner of Stokes Croft and Ashley Road, this place is easily recognisable, with its bright red frontage and floor-toceiling windows. You know the one, don’t you?  

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It was taken over back in February by mates Giles Coram, who you’ll find front of house,  and Craig  Summers, who heads up the kitchen. The pair met while working at Wallfish Bistro in Clifton, and jumped at the chance to do something of their own when this busy café came up for grabs.   They’ve given it a fresh look inside, turning it into a bright and airy space. The whitewashed panelled walls are lit up by the buckets of sunlight that pour in through those windows and a large skylight at the back. Strings of festoon lights zig-zag across the ceiling, local art hangs on the walls, and a mix of wooden chairs and tables fill the floor space. The  result is  cool and  pared back, with a super chilled but buzzy  atmosphere  which attracts all kinds of punters – from coffee-drinking students to more seasoned visitors after a decent glass of vino. They – and numerous others – were all in for the evening when we rocked up, securing ourselves a perfect people-watching spot in the window.   Brunch finishes at 4pm each day, then at 5pm, Monday to Saturday, the dinner menu is brought out. It’s made up of a selection of sharing dishes that are  perhaps a bit bigger than most  small plates, but smaller than full-on mains.  The menu reads well – the options are big in variety but small in number – with each plate made up of just a few ingredients.  The heritage tomatoes with goat’s cheese and tomato essence (£5) was first out, the tomatoes coming in different shapes, sizes and hues, and offsetting the hunks of creamy, salty cheese perfectly with their ripe sweetness. Nope, we had not expected this.   Butterbean and blue cheese hummus (£4) was scooped up with  thin, crisp slices of  home-baked  sourdough, while a dish of  cured  hake (£6), served in delicate,  translucent discs,  had us in real summer spirits with  its  freshness, which was given  a  further nudge by the flavours of raw pea, mint and yoghurt.   The roast  hispi  with  nutty romesco  (£6) was as gorgeous to look at as it was to chew  on, and  came topped with a fried duck egg, the  bright yolk of which spilled its silky  gooeyness  onto the soft  cabbage. Meanwhile, a radish, fennel and gem lettuce salad (£3) was lightly dressed, crunchy, and happily uncomplicated.   Last  came the  hanger steak (£8), served in deep pink slices and coated in a decadent chorizo and butter sauce, which was mopped up greedily with truffle chips (£3).  There was just as much A-game going on in the dessert section, too. The elderflower jelly (£5) was elegant and subtle and had us forgetting the flaws of the English summer. The delicately floral jelly melted in the mouth, and came  surrounded  by  sweet, soft strawberries, bathing in their poaching liquor and topped with tiny springs of micro basil. A scoop of tart and smooth blackberry sorbet (£3) may not have been strictly necessary, but we didn’t regret a thing.   We took our time with all that – and a couple of glasses of the really decent house white –  as the  evening light  turned  from  yellow to orange, and finally began to fade completely.   Casually  understated, this food  shows  real  style  and lightness of touch. And it’s great value; you can get three dishes for £12, or three dishes and a glass of wine for £14. Go. Seriously.

The Arts House Café, 108A Stokes Croft, Bristol BS1 3RU;  0117 923 2858; theartshousecafe.co.uk 

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LOCAL, ORGANIC, SUSTAINABLE, ETHICAL, DELICIOUS With a wealth of experience behind us we can cater any event, bringing our ethos and values to everything we do. GET IN TOUCH TO HEAR HOW WE COULD CATER FOR YOUR EVENT

0117 954 4030 or 0117 908 5035 admin@cookingco.co.uk – www.cookingco.co.uk


Changing perceptions of Ice Cream

Granny Gothards impressive flavours are only limited by imagination ...... Call for details of our bespoke service 01823 491591 • www.grannygothards.co.uk

THE

CAKERY ARTISAN COFFEE CUSTOM MADE CAKES FRESH BREAD

Gluten free, dairy free and vegan options available 21 Claverton buildings, Bath BA2 4LD tel 07891 211852 email thecakery-@hotmail.com b The Cakery  @TheCakeryBath  thecakerybath www.thecakerybath.co.uk


We are a friendly, family owned inn offering hearty home cooked food, in a small country village setting. Whether you are local or travelling from further afield, you are guaranteed a warm welcome. PUB • RESTAURANT • FUNCTION ROOM • ACCOMMODATION

Monday - Tuesday Brunch: 10am - 12pm Lunch: 12pm - 3pm Drinks: 10am - 5pm Wednesday - Saturday Brunch: 10am - 12pm Lunch: 12pm - 3pm Dinner: 6pm - 9pm Drinks: 10am - 11pm Sunday Brunch: 10am - 12pm Lunch: 12pm - 4pm Drinks: 10am - 5pm

3 Bridge Yard, Kingston Mills, Bradford-on-Avon, BA15 1EJ 01225 866519 / reservations@weaving-shed.co.uk / weaving-shed.co.uk

f a TheWeavingShed

the_weaving_shed

60 wines by the glass, over 140 by the bottle lunch & pre theatre menus wine tastings & food events wine shop - free local delivery - please call for more information

5 Chapel Row, Bath, BA1 1HN

132A Walcot St, Bath, BA1 5BG

chapelrow@corkagebath.com

walcot@corkagebath.com

01225 423417

01225 422577

open for lunch – weds - sat

open for lunch – fri - sat

open for dinner – mon - sat

open for dinner – weds - sat

Tunley Road, Tunley BA2 0EB • 01761 470408 Email: info@kingwilliaminn.co.uk • f T @kingwilliam84 www.kingwilliaminn.co.uk

THE DARK HORSE

A COUNTRY PUB IN TOWN

kitchen open from 5.30

wild corkage - 23rd june tickets available now “if i lived in bath i’d be here a lot” - jay rayner

bath life restaurant of the year winner 2017 sunday times top 25 wine bars good food guide 2017/18

24 varieties of local cider | Craft ales | Real ale on Stillage (gravity led) Organic Sunday lunch £12 | New Saturday brunch menu (11-5pm) Music | Very dog friendly | Log fire

Tel: 0117 955 5725 172-174 Church Rd, Redfield, Bristol BS5 9HX


( G R E AT G A S T R O P U B S )

THE WHITE HART DAN IZZARD TAKES A BREAK FROM HIS USUAL CITY CENTRE HANGOUTS TO TRY A MORE RURAL-FEELING PUB – BUT DOESN’T HAVE TO STRAY VERY FAR TO FIND IT...

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f The White Hart was a hairstyle it would be a mullet: business at the front, party at the back. Think a traditional Bath stone façade, set against the village-like-setting of Widcombe, but with a Mediterranean oasis-style courtyard round the other side, which is quite the hotspot on a sunny day. I’m not sure if it was the sun, or the fact that I’d been hanging out at a fishmonger’s earlier in the day, but Widcombe seemed to have a cheerful, seaside vibe (complete with lack of parking spaces); we happily ambled the short distance there from Bath Spa station. Making our way through the bar area, glass of Picpoul de Pinet in hand, we joined our fellow punters – who were also chasing the early evening sunlight – in the courtyard garden. Filled with pots, flowerbeds, herbs and friendly dogs (who actually did look a bit like their owners), it was a nice change from the brushed aluminium and granite of my usual, more urban watering holes. Eventually dragging ourselves away from the garden, we weaved through the back of the building to our table for two. Here, we found traditional pub decor, a buzzing bar filled with the sounds of ‘go on then, make it a large glass’, and a dining area with just enough mismatched furniture to qualify as appealingly quirky, but not try hard. I took a seat on a reclaimed church pew, hoping I would not have to repent for any culinary sins by the end of the meal. The food here matches the casual atmosphere. First, fresh crab (£7.50) came mounded on toast with a wedge of lemon and dressed salad. The meat was mixed with a generous amount of coriander and chilli, properly waking my tastebuds up. Across the table, strong nutty English asparagus (£7.80) was being dipped in the vibrant yellow yolk of a soft-boiled pheasant egg. Spots of balsamic glaze added a touch of sweetness to the simple but handsome starter. The very precisely priced duck breast with pea and bacon risotto (£17.85) was my main of choice before the specials board was popped on the table. I don’t normally go for a T-bone, but this wasn’t beef: this was a pork T-bone (£18.50). It came served with braised little gem, peas, spring onion, and an anchovy and rosemary butter that had been liberally applied to just about everything (which I was definitely okay with). It really was (sorry in advance) top of the chops; primarily juicy loin meat, it had a smaller strip of tenderloin, both sides benefitting from being cooked on the bone. I’ve always been very much of the opinion that chorizo can better almost any meal, and the hake and chickpea special (£18) did nothing to prove otherwise. There were only a few small cubes, but that was all that was needed for the chorizo to impart its wonderful smoky flavour on the chickpeas. The meaty hake had a layer of crispy skin and, on top of that, a dollop of saffron aioli was a great excuse to order a side of fries. Immediately heading in for a second dipped chip, I was shooed away back to my T-bone. Which was a good job really, as I had plenty to get through myself. The Prosecco jelly (£6.50), very subtle in booziness, embodied The White Hart’s fun character, but the cheeseboard (£7.50) was more my own style, featuring a creamy Godminster organic Cheddar, gooey Bath Soft Cheese and a rather nice Black Sticks blue. Assembled on a cracker with a dollop of beetroot chutney, it was a little bit of me. The White Hart seems to have several rules of success. Use great quality ingredients, don’t mess around with them. Add a bit more butter, and serve in generous portions. I heard it described as “our local diner” by another table, casually, and was instantly jealous.

The White Hart, Widcombe Hill, Bath BA2 6AA; 01225 338053; whitehartbath.co.uk

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AV SA AI LT LA M BL A E RSH EN D LA O M F B JU NE

RD LL E ER TT Church CO at N w TO P no M A FR

MOLESWORTHS

The BBQ Specialists -Prize winning sausages MOLESWORTHS -Tasty 8 week matured T Bones The BBQ Specialists -Gower Salt Marsh Lamb Koftas -Free range Chinese pork ribs -Gluten free range -Butterflied legs of lamb BBQ BOXES and more Add us for special offers and seasonal recipes ba

101 Henleaze Road, Bristol BS9 4JP. Henleaze 0117 962 1095 | Frampton 01454 777 337 www.henleazebutchers.co.uk


( F A B F O O D I E P U B S )

 

THE VICTORIA PARK   JESSICA CARTER TAKES THE HOUND FOR A FULL-ON THREE-COURSER AT THEIR LOCAL PUB

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A F T E R S

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alling a pub your local isn’t purely a geographical reference, is it? I mean, I’ve lived 30 seconds away from a pub before, but never referred to it as my local (far too much karaoke for someone who seizes up from acute awkwardness around social singing). The Victoria Park, though, is my local in both senses of the word. (And it became even more local after I recently realised I’d been walking the long route there for a year, happily discovering a way to shave valuable seconds off the three-and-a-half minute walk.) Previously The Raymend, it was taken over by three mates in 2010, and refurbed again a couple of years ago. It’s now cool and cosy, with rustic floorboards, metro-style tiling behind the bar, wall lamps with bulbs caged in wire shades, and dark painted walls. Glass bifold doors at the back of the building show off the lovely sloping garden, as well as a cracking view out across Bedminster (which elicits comments from anyone I bring here for the first time). Our honorary four-legged Crumb Prudence is a regular here, and always makes a furry friend or two (as well as many human ones, thanks to those eyes of hers). And you’ll often find families here, especially on a Sunday. It’s got that chilled-out, everyone-welcome kind of vibe to it. The back bar is well stocked, and there are some top brands on the pumps – local and international. The food comes in the form of revamped pub classics from about £12 (beer battered fish with handcut chips and herby peas, and steak burger with local Brie, sweet onion jam and house pickles, for instance) as well as more restaurantesque dishes. There’s stone baked pizza too (from about £8), cooked in the outdoor pizza oven, which is often the go-to for a weeknight dinner with a pint and a couple of mates, and can also be ordered to take away. It felt like more of a dry, crisp rosé and a la carte kind of evening when I most recently went, though. I chose to take K, a firsttime visitor along, to offset my pre-established affection for the place. The punchy lemon and coriander hummus (£6) came with more than enough slices of chewy flatbread (okay, it didn’t seem the freshest, but it definitely did the job) to share between two,

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but was outshone by the great arancini (£7). Balls of roasted vine tomato risotto were soft and moist inside – the rice happily pump and really flavoursome – and wore crisp, breadcrumb coats. The three golden orbs were sat in a red pepper and tomato sauce (light and fresh with a really nice sharpness), with dollops of punchy pesto. A parmesan crisp and tangle of rocket leaves crowned the goodlooking plate. I’ve told you before, I know, but I really don’t order chicken often (apart from when it comes buttermilk fried in the middle of a bun, of course), thanks to a few too many dry, lacklustre experiences in the past. And I didn’t here, either – but K did, and much to my approval too, as I had been eyeing it up. It came (for £17) pan-fried, with black garlic kale, celeriac bread sauce, and rosemary and mustard sweet potato. The meat was in pearly white, super soft slices, with no dry, chewy textures in sight. I managed to swipe a mouthful just before it disappeared entirely. Nice one. My lamb ragu (£14) was generous in portion and came boldly seasoned, with a coating of finely grated parmesan and herby gremolata. The fat tubes of rigatoni pasta (which were perhaps without that al dente bite I usually like in pasta) hid lean hunks of flaky, slow-cooked lamb. Rich and salty, it was a hearty, comforting dish that I spied another table polishing off with enthusiasm, too. Dessert here is always the same for me; despite the adventurous options of chocolate and lime trifle, and bread pudding with tea ice cream, there was no getting past the sticky toffee pud (£6). The VP’s is one of my favourite versions around: steeped in toffee sauce, it’s dense and moist (I’m aware that’s my second use of the M-word, but sometimes it’s just the only adjective that’ll do) and comes with supersilky ice cream and a crunchy crumb. As a regular, I might have made no revelations about how great this place is during the meal, but K certainly did, and hopefully, if you’ve not been before, you will soon too.

The Victoria Park, 66 Raymend Road, Bristol BS3 4QW;  0117 330 6043; thevictoriapark.co.uk 

CRUMBSMAG.COM


L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

Nikesh Shukla

THIS BRISTOL-BASED AUTHOR SHARES SOME OF HIS FAVOURITE FOODIE HOTSPOTS… BREAKFAST? Rana’s Dhaba Junction outside Primark does the best aloo paratha and omelette in Bristol. BEST BREW? I really love the Aeropress house blends you can get at Small Street Espresso, and they’re perfectly complemented by the chocolate chip banana loaf and a novel. SUNDAY LUNCH? I’ll get the samosas from Bristol Sweet Mart, you get the empanadas from La Ruca on Gloucester Road, someone else bring the sausage rolls from Hart’s Bakery, and I’ll see you in the park. QUICK PINT? My quick pints are almost exclusively at Watershed, ’cause I have a writing space in the studio at the back. POSH NOSH? Bell’s Diner is always delicious, and there’s something cosy and intimate about it that I can't put my finger on. It feels like a good place to hunker down in. (I do really miss The Runcible Spoon on Nine Tree Hill, though – that was my go-to.) ALFRESCO FEASTING? I like the dumplings you can get from Momo Bar that’s at the Harbourside Market on Thursdays and Corn Street on Fridays. The chicken ones are the best. HIDDEN GEM? Fi Real in Old Market does vegan Caribbean food, and its jerk tofu is some of the most ridiculously delicious I’ve ever tasted.

QUICK! Now add this little lot to your contact book... Rana’s Dhaba Junction, Bristol BS1 3LR; 0117 927 9683 Small Street Espresso, Bristol BS1 1DW; smallstreetespresso.co.uk Bristol Sweet Mart, Bristol BS5 6JH; sweetmart.co.uk La Ruca, Bristol BS7 8AS; laruca.co.uk Hart’s Bakery, Bristol BS1 6QS; hartsbakery.co.uk Watershed, Bristol BS1 5TX; watershed.co.uk Bell’s Diner, Bristol BS6 5QB; bellsdiner.com Momo Bar; momo-bar.co.uk Fi Real, Bristol BS2 0BZ; fireal.co.uk Sholay Indian Kitchen, Bristol BS1 6ZA; sholayindiankitchen.com Tiffins, Bristol BS2 8DB; tiffins-bristol.com Spicer and Cole, Bristol; spicerandcole.co.uk Burger Theory, Bristol BS1 1JX; burgertheory.co.uk Jamaica Street Stores, Bristol BS2 8JP; jamaicastreetstores.com

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ONE TO WATCH? Sholay in Whapping Wharf: it does a mean array of small plates. COMFORT FOOD? Tiffins in Kingsdown. They make food that tastes just like my mum used to make. Especially the khichdi. CHILD FRIENDLY? The staff at Spicer and Cole are super friendly and are always patient dealing with the many parents who use their space. BELTING BURGER? For me, it has to be a good ol’ Burger Theory burger. NEXT ON THE HIT LIST? Jamaica Street Stores sounds delicious. nikesh-shukla.com

CRUMBSMAG.COM


Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 77  
Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 77  
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