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ISSUE 76 JUNE 2018 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk ART DIRECTOR

TREVOR GILHAM ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk

YOu’Re SO veIN

DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE

ALISTAIR TAYLOR alistair.taylor@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER

GEMMA SCRINE gemma.scrine@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we had a full on feed at Dela, celebrated St George’s Day at The Bank Tavern with English whisky, went for a nosey at new bar, The Lost and Found, and made Negronis at Pi Shop.

large version

MY FAMILY HAS this weird gene. It’s not, as yet, been scientifically identified, but it’s definitely there – every living generation of us has it. It’s a gene that causes us to kill plants. (Hey, this is no joke; I recently killed a succulent. And no, I didn’t over-water it – this time.) So, it’s with pretty heavy apprehension that I’ve been engaging in trowelbased activities lately, to ready my garden for planting fruit and veg. (If I can’t mother a cactus, how am I to be expected to raise peas, for crying out loud?) Doing my research on gooseberries for this issue, though, has given me a ray of hope... They’re a bit funny looking, these veiny, hairy spheres. It’s perhaps their odd appearance, along with their sharp, tart flavour, that’s been the cause of our fall-out with this British fruit. There’s so little demand for the fellas, in fact, that in 2015 there was just a handful of producers left, and the green globes have all but disappeared from the shops too – you might struggle to find them on shelves even when they’re in season. Gooseberries are, though, more popular among gardeners, mainly thanks to the fact they’re rather low-maintenance. This make them an ideal crop for less-than-greenfingered home-growers like me; they’re fine with most kinds of soil, don’t need too much sun, and can largely be left to get on with their business alone. Win. Speaking of growing, that photo up there was taken at the Batad rice terraces in the Philippines, where I quickly popped to (only took about 40 hours to get there) in between magazine issues. In June, all those pond-like paddies you can see (that I maybe fell in once – told you I’m not plant-friendly) will be harvested by hand with knives. Made me think a little differently about those little grains when I next cooked them.

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

Did you know we have an app? You can read both editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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TABLE OF CONTENTs NO.76 JUNE 2018

STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT Berried treasure 12 OPENINGS ETC The foodie 411 CHEF! Amazing recipes from the region’s top kitchens 26 Chorizo burger, by Rory Perriment 29 Shakshuka, by Willow Reed 32 Lemon sole, by Jethro Lawrence 35 Fillet of bream, by Matt Gibbs 38 Pork with gooseberries, by Gelf Alderson ADDITIONAL RECIPES

10 Gooseberry crumble, by Freddy Bird 22 Prawn tacos, by DJ BBQ KITCHEN ARMOURY 44 HOUSE CALL Montpelier maison 52 WANT LIST Plastic-free pieces MAINS 61 STAY AWAY Inspiration for foodie breaks across the South West 72 GIVE US A HAND The movie that’s exposing the effect of politics on our food production AFTERS New and notable restaurants, cafés, bars 82 Noya’s Kitchen 84 Folk House Café 86 Under the Stars 89 Green Bird Café PLUS! 90 LITTLE BLACK BOOK We reveal where Bristol Old Vic’s Emma Stenning hangs out


STARTERs

INNOVATION REVELATIONSS, AND TA AMUSE-BOUSTCY HES

11-17 JUNE BRISTOL FOOD CONNECTIONS

Following its break last year, this collaborative, citywide food festival is back. There are expected to be more than 100 events happening all over Bristol, from pop-up supper clubs and foodie walking tours to cookery workshops, tastings and kids’ events. Check out the website for more info. bristolfoodconnections.com

hEY, JUNE

THERE ARE PLENTY OF TASTY GOINGS ON THIS MONTH – TUCK IN, WHY DON’T YOU?

23 AND 24 JUNE LONGLEAT FOOD AND DRINK FESTIVAL

This event returns for the second year, promising two days of celeb chef demos, a bustling street food market, outdoor bars and live music, all within the grounds of the famous Wiltshire safari park. longleat.co.uk

24 JUNE TOO MANY CRITICS

After plans for the original event were scuppered by the snow back in March, this charity dinner is finally happening – hurrah! Ticket holders can expect a four-course feast, cooked by the area’s best-known food and restaurant writers, all to raise funds for Action Against Hunger. Tickets are £45 and include a welcome cocktail. actionagainsthunger.org.uk

30 JUNE AND 1 JULY GRILLSTOCK

Expect plenty of fire, meat and music at the biggest barbecue festival in the land. The King of the Grill barbecuing competition and the hotly (ahem) contested chilli eating competition are back, and there will of course be plenty of street food, and live music across two stages. Tickets from £27, online. grillstock.co.uk

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GOOSebeRRY

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WE BRITS HOLD THE TART, HAIRY LITTLE GOOSEGOG CLOSE TO OUR HEARTS. AND THEY’RE SURPRISINGLY VERSATILE TOO…

he whole world associates the gooseberry with British cuisine – and some recipes, like the gooseberry fool, we’re right to be proud of – though these juicy, sour, full-flavoured little berries probably didn’t originate here at all. Instead, they arrived long ago from the Caucasus, that chilly, mountainous region on the European-Asian border that gave us everything from wine making to leather shoes. Not that it matters, for this punchy, podgy relative of the blackcurrant suits these isles down to the ground, and thrives in our maritime climate. There are many strains of goosegog, but only two main types – the familiar early green varieties, which look like veined, hairy grapes and are best when cooked, and the later dessert versions, which are softer, plumper, come in shades of yellow and red, and can be eaten straight from the bush. (This said, many gooseberry varieties can serve double duty, especially if you grow your own – simply pick before they’re fully mature for a crumble or pie, or leave to grow longer to enjoy their Muscat-like flavours, eu natural.) Gooseberries first crop up in British life around the 16th century, when they were used medicinally – feverish London plague victims took them

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for the cooling properties of their acidic juice – but they soon became a kitchen regular. Indeed, the 19th century saw what can only be described as gooseberrymania taking off, with hundreds of keen amateur gooseberry clubs, mainly across the north of England, competing eagerly to grow the biggest and tastiest fruit, some ending up the size of a hen’s egg. Many new varieties were created during this period, but things collapsed in 1905 rather, when a new strain of mildew disease, accidentally brought across from America, wiped out the entire crop. The day was saved by crossing European strains with mildew-resistant American gooseberries, but enthusiasm for the fruit never quite reached the same pitch again. These days, wild bushes can be found all over – often in hedgerows or ruins – but just 20 or 30 strains are actively grown in any numbers, and far fewer commercially. In some places, though, the love still runs deep. Yorkshire’s Egton Bridge Old Gooseberry Society, for instance, has been holding its annual Gooseberry Show on the first Tuesday of each August since 1800 – and they’re still breaking world records. Indeed, as recently as 2009, visitors were stunned by a Guinness-troubling 62g berry.

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GOOseberry seasOn rather depends on the weather, but tends to peak in June, just before strawberries arrive. Though we mostly use them in sweet treats – tarts and crumbles, jams and flans, sorbets and meringues – the name probably comes from gooseberry’s traditional use in a herby sauce to accompany goose, and it’s true that the tart taste cuts through the fattiness of everything from pork to lamb with alacrity. (In this, it’s not unlike apple, that other great British cooking fruit.) And gooseberry sauce goes well with a surprising number of fish, too – think trout, salmon, tuna... (No wonder gooseberry’s French name is actually groseille à maquereau, or ‘currant for mackerel’.) Their tartness makes them an excellent chutney ingredient as well – mix ’em with coconut, chillies and curry leaves, say, for a great sweet and spicy combo. But mostly, of course, it’s about the puddings. Eliza Acton and Mrs Beaton – those giants of the 19th-century cookbook – rammed their works with gooseberry recipes, simple dishes from the days where sweetness came secondary to richness of flavour. They knew that the complexity of the gooseberry is liberated by adding just the right amount of sugar, though quite how much is a bit of a guessing game – try a little to start with, but always be prepared to add more. When cooking, just 10-15 minutes of poaching or simmering in very little water should do it; once they collapse you’re ready to embark on the full range of meringues, crumbles and tarts. And then there’s the gooseberry fool, which is just goosegogs cooked and mashed with sugar, then combined with yoghurt (and/or cold custard and whipped cream). Simple, sure, but the result is one of the all-time great summer puds. ThOUGh GOOseberries are low in energy – they contain very little sugar – they’ve a reasonable amount of dietary fibre and useful amounts of Vitamin C, making them popular in virtuous desserts for slimmers, or diabetics swerving the sweet. All of this makes it perhaps surprising that their popularity has waned in recent years – we’re blaming the slight perceived faff of topping and tailing them; the nation’s increasingly sweet tooth; and the reluctance of supermarkets to stock anything with such a short season – though we’re confident of a revival any time now. After all, there’s a complexity to the gooseberry’s flavour that few fruit can match. In the meantime, though, why not try growing your own? It’s easy, it turns out, as gooseberries are happy-go-lucky little things, their spiky, five-foot tall bushes thriving in most soils, surviving partial shade, and even keen on cool conditions, so they do well in gardens where other soft fruit may struggle. You’ll find it difficult to kill them off whatever you do, and with a bit of space and love – and, ideally, some net to keep the birds off – you should be enjoying your first fruits in May. (Smart growers plant early-, midand late-season varieties alongside each other, so they reap the rewards in June, July and August, too.) Varieties to try? Perhaps consider Invicta (especially resistant to insects and mildew), May Duke (which moves from early cooking gooseberry to late red dessert gooseberry as summer wears on), and the fat, tasty, largely hair-free Leveller, and experiment from there. When picking, be sure to remove each gooseberry with the little bit of stem that holds it to the plant still attached; the skin will tear if you simply rip them off, and they won’t last nearly as long. Regular gooseberries are happy for a week or so in the fridge, while dessert varieties are at their very best picked minutes before you eat them. Handily, gluts of both are ideal for freezing (yes, they’ll wilt on defrosting, but that doesn’t really matter if you’re planning to cook them). Oh, and remember that old answer to the question about where babies come from – that they can be ‘found under a gooseberry bush’? It doesn’t make much sense, does it, until you’re told that ‘gooseberry bush’ was actually 19th century slang for another type of bush entirely…

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R E C I P E

OUR FREDDY BIRD – CONTROVERSIALLY –  ISN’T THE BIGGEST FAN OF GOOSEBERRIES, BUT ALL BETS ARE OFF WHEN THEY COME IN THIS BANGING CRUMBLE...

IF I’M COMPLETELY HONEST, I find it hard to get excited about those strange little sour, hairy orbs. They’re great for jams and jellies, but that doesn’t really do it for me. What I can get on board with, though, is a bloody good gooseberry crumble! The juxtaposition of the tart gooseberries against the sweet, chewy, crunchy crumble and custard (it must be custard – none of that cream or ice cream nonsense) is spot on. I always use a mix of dark muscovado sugar and caster sugar for a crumble, and I try and keep the muscovado in chunks rather than break it up. It turns all chewy that way and, where it catches and burns during cooking, lends character to the pud. I don’t think I have ever weighed the ingredients for a crumble, so these quantities are a rough guideline. Have a go by yourself – you’ll find it hard to go wrong. Lido, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 933 9530; lidobristol.com

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GOOSEBERRY CRUMBLE SERVES 4 (ish) 150g plain flour (or gluten-free flour) large handful flaked almonds large handful jumbo oats 40g caster sugar, plus extra to sweeten the gooseberries 40g dark muscovado sugar 150g unsalted butter, grated (cold) gooseberries (enough to cover the bottom of your dish) 1 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 2 Combine the flour, almonds, oats and sugar in a bowl with a pinch of salt. Mix well without breaking up the muscovado too much. 3 Rub in the grated butter, keeping a rough texture – the lumpier this mix is, the better. If it ends up too even, wet your hands with a little cold water and squeeze your own lumps in. Add a little more muscovado if necessary. 4 Pile the gooseberries in a deep oven-proof dish, and add sugar to taste (I only use a little, as I like them tart). 5 Arrange the topping evenly over the gooseberries; equal quantities of fruit to crumble is about right in my house. 6 Bake in the oven for 30 minutes, or until it’s golden and bubbling. Serve with plenty of custard!

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Castle Bow Restaurant offers a fine dining experience in a relaxed setting and is perfect for any occasion. Head Chef, Liam Finnegan is passionate about using fresh, local ingredients, and his modern British classics are constantly evolving. Our menu is created to fully embrace each season, and it is this quality and care that transforms every meal into a true West Country experience.

Located in the centre of Taunton, just under the archway in Castle Bow. Open for dinner Wednesday - Saturday from 6.30pm. Advance booking recommended. Tel: 01823 328328 | www.castlebow.com | f a @CastleBow


S T A R T E R S

Openings Etc GORDON BENNETT!

We’ve got two exciting pieces of news from the Crumbs camp this month (it’s all kicking off here at HQ). To start, we can reveal that we’re teaming up with a renowned, award-winning chef to put on an epic supper in Bath’s Queen Square. It’s a one-night-only kind of gig, with a limited number of tickets, and is taking place as part of this year’s Bath Boules bash. The menu is 100 percent under wraps for now – honestly, even to us (despite our team having employed all their powers of persuasion). Intrigued? Check out page 40 to find out who we’re on about, and for all the other information that we can disclose! crumbsmag.link/mgj

WASTE AWAY

Bristol-born café group Boston Tea Party is banning single-use takeaway cups across all its sites, as of 1 June. It’s a pretty bold move (after crunching the numbers, the team estimate this will lose them around a million quid in revenue a year), but is an undeniably positive one, especially in the face of the current waste issues surrounding single-use packaging. As you might remember, we reported last issue that it’s thought as little as one in 400 disposable cups are recycled, with the rest becoming litter. BTP hopes that this move will not only encourage customers to bring in their own reusable cups for their takeaway brews (the baristas will even wash yours out for you), but also pave the way for other businesses to follow. Nice one. bostonteaparty.co.uk

INCOMING CARGO

The team behind Cargo Cantina, Bravas and Bakers and Co will open another restaurant this June. Gambas is a Spanish tapas and paella bar with a focus on seafood, and inspired by the team’s research trips to Valencia. Taking over the former Spuntino, it will have one of the best spots at Wapping Wharf, with views over the water and a first-floor outside terrace. Gambas will also feature a seafood counter where shoppers can buy fresh produce to take home and cook themselves. facebook.com/gambasbristol

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Q&A

THIS IS MICHAEL BALL, AND HE’S THE NEW HEAD CHEF AT HOMEWOOD PARK

WE’RE BACK, BABY!

We are super chuffed to announce that the mighty Crumbs Awards will return to the Bristol Old Vic on 14 October 2018. Now in its second year, these awards set out to recognise the best, most ethical and successful food and drink pros on our patch, and highlight the great work that is being done to help develop and progress our food economy. There are new categories this year too, like Revolutionary Tech, Industry Services, and Best Chef. Stay up to date with news on our website, and if you want more info on how to be in with a chance of picking up one of those epic trophies, visit the website below. crumbsmagawards.com

What was your first chef job? Commis chef when I was 16. Before that I’d been working as a kitchen porter and waiter; the head chef used to let me make the staff food, and this developed into a role within the kitchen brigade.

And how have you approached the menu in your new role? With dishes that I enjoy to cook – ones that excite the palate and that I believe will appeal to our customers while delivering the standard they expect.

Where might we know you from? I have previously been at Careys Manor Hotel in the New Forest, Macdonald Frimley Hall, Macdonald Bath Spa, and Thornbury Castle.

What’s your favourite dish on the menu right now? The duck, as it involves many ingredients that I am passionate about, such as Yorkshire forced rhubarb and celeriac.

What attracted you to Homewood Park? The property: it is a beautiful 21-bedroom 13th-century building, and there’s real scope and freedom to put my mark on it.

Speaking of ingredients, what are your favourites to work with at the moment? Aside from Yorkshire forced rhubarb, it’s wild garlic – which we can pick ourselves just yards from the property.

Toughest job you’ve tackled so far? Starting as head chef at Frimley Hall. I had many challenges, such as building a team and changing the whole food ethos of the business. But it was also one of the most rewarding experiences. Proudest achievement? Going to work every day with it not feeling like a job – I’m sure not many people can say that! How would you describe your style of cooking, then?   It changes and evolves, but I like to create reinterpretations of classic dishes. I guess if you had to label it, you’d call it modern British.

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What makes the local foodie scene so ace, d’ya think? Bath has many great restaurants, with a wide variety of cuisines. And, with such fantastic produce available in the area, it is understandable why. Foodie heroes? I have so many! If I had to name one, though, I would say Sat Bains; I like his style and ethos, as well as his unique combinations and ideas. homewoodpark.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

ASK YOUR WAITER

Q&A

LOOK! IT’S DAN WIDE FROM RYE BAKERY How long have you worked here? Since September 2017. And where did you work before?  Sam’s Kitchen in Frome.  What do you like most about working in hospitality? Catching up with our regulars, and meeting new and interesting people. What’s the best thing about your job at Rye Bakery? I love the emphasis on reducing food waste and encouraging local produce; I think it’s so important. And the most challenging part? Making sure the children are safe at all times is something you have to pay special attention to; we have a play space in our café, so you always need to be mindful.   What sort of customers do you get?  They’re the best. A lot of them are local so I’ve known them for years, but there’s also been an influx of people moving to Frome from all around, so it’s lovely talking to them about what the town has to offer.  What are the bestselling dishes? The pizza – always the pizza! It’s so good we’ve dedicated Thursday nights to it. If you were a customer today, what would you order? An Oatly flat white and venison pepperoni pizza. What do you think makes great customer service? A friendly attitude, and a willingness to accommodate everyone. Where have you visited locally where the customer service was excellent?  The staff at High Pavement are lovely. They really know their menu, and can suggest drinks to complement your food. You feel taken care of. Where do you eat on your days off? My favourite spot is Thai Kitchen in town. I always feel welcome. What do you cook at home? I definitely can’t say my culinary talents are as good as those of the chefs at work! It’s usually scrambled eggs in the morning, and whatever’s in the pantry at night.

BREWTY

We’re buzzing – and it’s not just because we’ve had too much caffeine today. It’s all to do with the announcement of Bristol’s first coffee festival, The Coffee House Project. This will see up to 50 exhibitors pile into the rather huge Passenger Shed next to Bristol Temple Meads, and aims to throw the spotlight on the best speciality roasters, retailers and baristas in the area. It’ll all kick off on Friday 7 September, with a programme of workshops, talks and barista competitions hosted by the Speciality Coffee Association. Street food will be served up by top independent vendors, and entertainment will come in the form of live music. Tickets are on sale now, so snap ’em up while you can! thecoffeehouseproject.co.uk

TAP IN

The former Polpo site on Whiteladies Road in Bristol has new residents, folks. Tapas and sherry bar Pintxo has just opened there, almost a year to the day since launching its Bath gaff. Inspired by the Basque region in Spain, the menu features lots of hot and cold small plates, including the likes of spicy meatballs, croquetas, stuffed piquillo peppers, and Manchego with blossom honey. It’s not just about the grub, though; there’s a real focus on the wine and sherry, with owners Mark and Theresa Mentzel hoping that customers will enjoy trying out some new and unusual varities. There are 75 covers inside, and an additional 25 seats out on the pavement: sherry in the sun, anyone? pintxobath.co.uk

THINK SLICE

You can now get pizza by the slice in Bath, thanks to the most recent opening from the team behind The Oven. The Slice opened in mid-April on New Bond Street (just at the bottom of Milsom Street, in the former Dolce café), and is all about Italian-style street food. The pizza is Rome-style – square and sturdy, it’s made specifically for eating on the go – and there are a number of varieties at any one time to choose from. You’ll find other Italian-style takeaway food here too, though; think arancini balls, pasta and pastries. Swing by on your break to check out the special lunch deal. facebook.com/thesliceuk

facebook.com/ryebakeryfrome

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S T A R T E R S

THE INSTA FEED

@branwenedenvegan visits Bristol’s @beetsnrootscafe

Left to right: Tom, David and Leon have great taste in aprons...

HIP SHOPS

@arnolfinicafe’s leek and mushroom risotto special

@charlievivante is chuffed with her meal @thegrace197 Your pic could be here! Just use #CrumbsSnaps on your foodie Insta posts and we might print one of yours next issue...

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POPTI AND BEAST

when we drop in) sources his meat from local he guys behind this cool butcher organic producers such as Stream Farm and and bakery joint in St Werburghs Brown Cow. You’ll find all kinds of top-notch sure have previous on the local food joints on the counter, and in the chiller are and drink scene; Leon Hughes, for handmade cured meats (think air-dried goat instance, originally founded the leg, for example) from Devon’s Rusty Pig. Bristol-famous Magic Roll, back in 2004 on They sit alongside a variety of cheeses, and the Triangle. He met butcher Tom Beswick jars of kimchi and curtido, made locally by and his business partner Aaron Ward while Every Good Thing. You can also pick up doing restaurant consultancy work, and the Extract coffee here, as well as a range of trio decided to team up and open Popti and Ginger Beard and own branded, homemade Beast last October. preserves and condiments. The bakery and butchery are run as two We were just wondering what else we separate businesses here, with chef Leon could possibly need when Leon mentioned having retrained himself: “I obviously had the obvious: “We are getting some knowledge of baking, candlesticks done!” he says but it’s a very different trade to What: Butchers with a laugh. “The maker is just being a chef!” and bakery perfecting them, and we’ll have As well as the house white Where: 94 Mina Road, them as soon as they’re ready.” and brown breads, he, along Bristol BS2 9XW; Also incoming are more with baker David Grundey, 0117 955 6688 baked treats, and breakfasts knocks out rye and When: Tues-Sat are on the horizon too. They’ve wholemeal sourdoughs, as 7am-6pm; recently started opening on well as brownies and banana Sun 10am-5pm Saturday nights as well, bread (which sounds alternating between sourdough particularly awesome; they pizza from the bakery – which roast the ripe bananas first, to we can personally give the thumbs up to – bring out their natural sweetness). They even and posh kebabs from the butchery. Oh, and make their own butter – and use the then there’s the little matter of the takeaway resulting buttermilk to make brioche. roast lunches that Tom whips up of a Sunday Much of what you’ll find in this joint is too… We think it’s spelt K-E-E-N. organic – and not just in the bakery. Tom facebook.com/poptibeast (who is busy butchering some hefty cuts

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S T A R T E R S

In the Larder 5

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the thirst rule

ALL THIS TALK OF SUMMER HAS GOT US FEELING PARCHED. HERE ARE THE TOP TIPPLES – BOOZY AND SOFT – THAT WE’VE BEEN REMEDYING THE SITUATION WITH... 1. Box Steam Brewery Pony Truck, £2.50/330ml This is one of two new drinks from the Wiltshire brewer, perhaps best known for its caskconditioned beer. Developed to reflect modern tastes and make good use of the ingredients now available in the brewing world, it’s light, refreshing and fruity. A great low ABV (3.8%), easy-drinking craft beer for the summer. Available at White Row Farm Shop and Bathford Village Shop; boxsteambrewery.com 2. Aldwick Court Farm and Vineyard Finbarr 2015, £10.95/75cl You can’t go wrong with a glass of well-chilled, top-notch white in the sun, right? If you agree, then this clean, pale and subtly citrusy number from local vineyard Aldwick will be right up your street. Serve it with a light alfresco lunch, or just quaff it on its own – it’s pretty agreeable either way, we’ve found. Available from the vineyard shop and online; aldwickcourtfarm.co.uk 3. Small Beer Brew Co Lager, £2.85/35cl These two new ethically focused lagers – inspired by the ‘small beer’ brewed in the 18th century as a safe alternative to dirty drinking water – are big on flavour but low on ABV, with the original coming in at 2.1%, and the dark at 1%. Fizzy and refreshing, they pair well with food: think fresh, spicy grub like curry or aromatic Thai dishes for the original, and rich, meaty dishes like pie and punchy cheese for the dark. Spot on for mid-week or lunchtime drinking. Available from Majestic or online through The Whiskey Exchange; theoriginalsmallbeer.com 4. Equinox Kombucha, £1.80/275ml These award-winning fermented drinks are made with spring water and green tea, to which a live kombucha culture is added, along with different flavourings. Certified organic by the Soil Association, they come in four varieties: raspberry and elderflower, wild berry, ginger and original. It’s thought that ’bucha, like other fermented food and drink, is great for your gut, being packed with probiotics. Available at Wild Oats and Radford Mill Farm Shop in Bristol; equinoxkombucha.com 5. Firefly Drinks, £1.79/330ml Developed with a professional herbalist, these botanical thirst-quenchers keep things as natural as possible, from their honest ingredients to recyclable packaging. Flavours are fresh and take their sweetness from the hero ingredients – there’s no added sugar here. We’ve been getting in the mood for summer by slurping on the pomegranate and elderflower number. Available at Waitrose in Bath and Bristol; fireflydrinks.com

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EXCEPTIONAL EVENTS fostersevents.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

IT’S HOTTING UP IN THE KITCHEN, JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER... BOSH!

Henry Firth and Ian Theasby (HQ, £20) Bosh! is a fast-growing cookery channel on Facebook, where two pals cook simple recipes free of meat, eggs and dairy. They get over 25 million views each month online, and this cookbook has immediately become the fastest-selling of the year. This may not be a book to read for pleasure, as such (there! are! rather! too! many! exclamation! marks! for! that!), but it’s the perfect companion for those of us who simply want to cut our meat intake and introduce more plant-only meals to our diets. You can’t help but get caught up in the glee at how cheap, easy and exciting vegan food can be. Alongside risottos, curries and intriguing variations on mac ’n’ cheese, for instance, is the ‘creamy seaside pie’ which replaces the traditional fish with Japanese mushrooms and capers, and a hypnotically pretty ‘spiral tart’. Matt Bielby

THE CURRY GUY EASY

Dan Toombs (Quadrille, £12.99) Creating that British curry house effect at home isn’t easy, which is why Dan Toombs (AKA The Curry Guy) made it his mission to develop and perfect recipes to rival the dishes of our favourite Indian restaurants. Having researched the techniques of Indian chefs and gathered experience from curry house kitchens across the country, he’s compiled this brand new collection of straight-forward, no messing dishes, which follows his bestselling first book, released last year. Kicking off with some notes on ingredients and substitutes, the book then dives into starters (aloo tiki chaat, pan puri, and sweet and spicy chicken wings, for instance) before exploring a whole host of mains – from seafood to tandoori dishes, British curries to speedy vegetarian creations. This colourful book is surely as hungerinducing as the smells coming from your local Indian takeaway. Jessica Carter

FIRE FOOD: THE ULTIMATE BBQ COOKBOOK

DJ BBQ (Quadrille, £15) You might be feel a little bored of the beerswilling world of barbecued dude food – but then summer comes long and it all seems like just the thing again. YouTube star DJ BBQ (real name: Christian Stevenson) loves rocking out in skintight lycra while he heats up the charcoal to cook over fire, and his passion is infectious in this book.

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Fire Food makes light and entertaining work of the basic techniques, then ploughs into tempting and varied recipes. DJ BBQ is well connected (Jamie Oliver and Nathan Outlaw are fans) and well travelled, and his influences come from all over, meaning the cookbook features more than just the usual veggie burgers and pulled pork (though they’re here too). With loads of intriguing sides on offer (pickled watermelon rinds, anyone?), plus intriguing treats like butterflied venison haunch in oyster sauce and a very tempting tomato pie, this is a book to make you fall in love with your barbecue all over again. Matt Bielby

APERITIF

Kate Hawkings (Quadrille, £16.99) Bristol-based Kate Hawkings is a nationally known drinks writer, and this is her practical, characterful and entertaining guide to the all-important aperitif. In terms of recipes, there are 33 here (ranging from the many variations on the Martini to Fino and Fizz, and a handful of styles of Negroni), but this book is just as much – if not more – about the 87 pages that precede them. There, Hawkings takes us through the history and purpose of the aperitif with humour and authority, before looking in depth at the ingredients that star in them (vermouth and aromatised wines, amari, sherry, spirits bitters et al), as well as how best to serve your concoctions. Retrieving the aperitif from granny’s musky cabinet, Hawkings dusts it off and makes it new, championing its value and relevance to the 21st century drinker. Jessica Carter

THE HIDDEN HUT

Simon Stallard (Harper Collins, £20) The far South West is full of hidden foodie gems, but no ticket is hotter than that at Cornwall’s elusive Hidden Hut, chef-founder Simon Stallard’s cult outdoor restaurant, where fish is pulled straight from the sea and roasted over an open fire. Once a humble snack stand at Porthcurnick Beach – and still lacking road access or mobile signals – it’s been transformed over the last seven years into perhaps the UK’s most hard-to-get-atable joint. His dishes are not intimidating, though, and have here been adapted for home cooking. The Hidden Hut is divided into three times of day – Dawn (breakfasts), Noon (lunches), Dusk (dinners), plus Afters. Particularly tempting are the likes of Portscatho fish pie; scallop salad with hog’s pudding, gingered pear and watercress; and carrot fritters with minted honey yoghurt. There are intriguing variations of staples like rice pud and lemon tart, too. Matt Bielby

From Fire Food: The Ultimate BBQ Cookbook by DJ BBQ (Quadrille, £15) Photography © David Loftus

PRAWN TACOS WITH GRILLED WATERMELON SALSA WHO SAID you couldn’t grill watermelon? Well, pretty much everyone. But I started doing this recipe one summer and it became an instant hit. When I did a guest-chef stint at a friend’s taco joint called Bad Sports in London, this was the top selling taco of the night. Don’t be afraid if the watermelon gets a dark crust, it will disappear when you chop it up. SERVES 4-6

12 extra-large tiger prawns, head on, tail shell removed, deveined 1 green or red jalapeño chilli, sliced open lengthways and deseeded soft tortilla wraps For the salsa: 2 medium-sized watermelon slices 1 red onion, finely chopped handful of coriander leaves, chopped 1 green jalapeño chilli, deseeded and chopped 1 lemon, juice only 1 Remove the rind from the watermelon and grill the slices over direct heat until the dark char appears on the red fruit flesh. (You can do this with the rinds on, too, if you prefer.) Once both sides have a good colour, take them off to cool down. Don’t worry if bits of the fruit go black. It’s all flavour. 2 Prepare your salsa by mixing the red onion, coriander, chopped chilli and lemon juice in a bowl. When the watermelon has cooled down, give it a chop, add it to the bowl and mix again. 3 Rub the prawns with the opened chilli and some salt, and grill on the direct heat until cooked through, about 5 minutes or until the meat is opaque. 4 When cooked and a little cooled, take the heads off the prawns. Then suck the head juice out of the prawn. Yes! You are awesome! Love me some prawn head juice! 5 Toast the tortilla wraps on the grill. Now it’s time to assemble. Fill the wraps with the prawns and top with the salsa. Fold and consume. Then smile, but you don’t need to be told that because it will happen involuntarily.

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CHEF!

WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

This month’s Hero Ingredient is a big fan of pork; gooseberry’s acidity cuts through the lovely fatty meat, just like apple

HIGHLIGH TS

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How do weRACKIN’ li s haks hukak, e our eggs? In of cours e PAGE 29

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PLUS!

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Our Hernot I n g re d ie h e r t makes anonce! appeara


C H E F !

PORK ON BY

RORY PERRIMENT CATERS TO THE INDECISIVE WITH A RECIPE THAT CAN BE USED TO MAKE TWO VERY DIFFERENT DISHES... Burger Theory has just celebrated six years of burger flipping, don’t you know, having started out serving on the streets of Bristol before getting its own digs last August. “A burger that has stayed with us since day one is the Pork of The Town,” owner Rory tells us. “It consists of a chorizo pork patty with fresh Manchego and cashew nut pesto, sun blushed tomatoes and feta. This is great alternative to your standard barbecue burger, and real a crowd pleaser. You can also make a linguine dish from the same ingredients!” Fancy the pasta version? Just shape the patty ingredients into meatballs instead, and swap the burger buns for linguine. Oh, and leave out the mayo, obvs.

PORK OF THE TOWN (TWO WAYS) SERVES 4 For the meat: 600g free range pork mince 2 tbsp good red wine 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tbsp smoked paprika 1 tsp sea salt For the pesto: 1 bunch basil 1 garlic clove, crushed 50g cashew nuts 60g Manchego cheese, grated 8 tbps olive oil

El Mago Organic Garnacha £11.50, Great Western Wine “The juicy red berry fruit in this Spanish wine will go down a treat with this Mediterranean-inspired dish. It’s extremely moreish and great as a barbecue staple for the summer,” says Kate Robinson of Great Western Wine.

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Burger Theory, 37-38 St Stephen’s Street, Bristol BS1 1JX; 0117 929 7818; burgertheory.co.uk

To make burgers: 4 soft burger buns mayonnaise rocket leaves, to serve 1 tomato, sliced 1 red onion, sliced handful feta cheese, crumbled handful sundried tomatoes, chopped

4 Heat a frying pan to a medium heat and fry the burgers for 3 minutes on either side. 5 Whilst they are cooking, toast the buns and dress with the mayonnaise, rocket, sliced tomato and red onion. 6 Once the burger is cooked let it rest for 1 minute, then place on top of the salad. Crumble the feta and chopped sundried tomatoes on top of the patty and spread a decent amount of the pesto on the inside of the bun lid.

Or to make linguine: 300g dry linguine pasta rocket leaves, to serve large handful feta cheese, crumbled large handful sundried tomatoes, chopped

Or to make linguine: 3 Bring a pan of salted water to the boil, and heat a frying pan to a medium-low heat. 4 Add the pasta and cook until al dente. Meanwhile, roll the chorizo mix into balls and fry in a little oil, making sure they brown evenly and cook right through. 5 When the pasta is ready, drain it, reserving a few tablespoons of the water. 6 Add the pasta to the pan with the meatballs and pour in the reserved pasta water, a little at a time, mixing until a nice, silky consistency is achieved. Stir the pesto and the rocket though, and take off the heat. 7 Transfer to plates, scatter the feta and sundried tomatoes over the top, and drizzle with olive oil.

1 Thoroughly mix the pork, garlic, red wine, paprika and salt together in a bowl and leave to rest in the fridge for 2 hours. 2 Blend all the ingredients for the pesto together in a food processor (we like to leave it a little coarse) and season. To make burgers: 3 Divide the chorizo mix into 4 equal potions and form into flat, round patties.

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C H E F !

Willow is the owner and chef of the newly revamped Dark Horse pub in Redfield. This is her second venue, sibling to the award-winning Plough Inn, in Taunton. Both spots are predominantly pubs that sell food, rather than restaurants disguised as pubs. However, the Sunday roasts at The Dark Horse are quickly gaining a top rep, we’re told. This is a recipe that Willow discovered while living on an island off the coast of Belize. “Backpackers came through all the time from various countries, and this dish was their breakfast of choice,” she says, although she reckons it’s a great option at any time of day.

SHAKSHUKA SERVES 4 olive oil 2 onions, finely sliced 1 red pepper, finely sliced 1 level tbsp cumin seeds 6 garlic cloves, finely sliced 1 tbsp tomato purée 1 vegetable stock cube 2 x 400g tins good quality chopped tomatoes harissa paste, to taste small bunch coriander, leaves picked and stalks finely chopped 4 eggs sourdough bread, sliced, to serve 1 Warm a glug of olive oil in a pan over a medium-high heat and add the onion along with a pinch of salt. 2 After a couple of minutes add the red pepper. Continue to cook until the onions start to brown, then add the cumin and garlic. 3 Add the tomato purée, tomatoes, harissa and coriander stalks, and crumble in the stock cube. Stir to combine and turn the heat down to low. Cook for 45 minutes, allowing the sauce to thicken.

Konik’s Tail Vodka £32 (70cl), Great Western Wine “There is only one way to go with this delicious breakfast: a Bloody Mary! Mix Konik’s Tail vodka with high quality tomato juice and a dash of Tabasco and you’ve got the perfect combination,” Kate Robinson says.

bReakfast Of ChampiOns

WILLOW REED SURE KNOWS HOW TO START THE DAY OFF ON THE RIGHT FOOT... 4 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6, with 4 individual ovenproof dishes inside. 5 When the sauce is ready, transfer it to the hot dishes. In each dish, make a well in the middle of the sauce, and crack in an egg. Season and cook in the oven for approx. 8 minutes, or until the whites of the eggs are cooked through. 6 Sprinkle over the chopped coriander leaves and serve with plenty of sourdough toast. TIP! For a vegan version, used chickpeas or silken tofu instead of egg. Although brown sourdough is our bread of choice, any other crusty loaf for dipping will do.

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The Dark Horse, 172-174 Church Road, Bristol BS5 9HX; 0117 955 5725; thedarkhorsebristol.co.uk


LEMON SOLE WITH SEAWEED BUTTER, LOVAGE EMULSION, AND WHEY AND CAVIAR SAUCE

WhEY TO GO!

JETHRO LAWRENCE SHOWS US HOW TO GET OUR CHEF ON AT HOME WITH THIS FANCY FISH DISH... Jethro joined Woolley Grange as head chef last November, with 16 years’ experience under his belt. Having made it to the quarter finals of MasterChef: The Professionals, he’s quite well known; you might also have come across him in previous roles, such as head chef at The Muset and Cowshed in Bristol. His most recent experience, however, has been with renowned chef Simon Rogan in his threeAA-rosette venue, Rogan and Co, in the Lake District. Here he enjoyed working with the highest standard of produce, picking and gathering from the restaurant’s own farm, and foraging in the local countryside. “I’m passionate about fresh food and flavours and love working at Woolley, using produce picked from the garden and foraged for locally,” Jethro says. “I particularly like this dish because of the delicate balance of delicious flavours that it delivers. The whey is a by-product in our kitchen from hanging yogurt; it’s not essential, but adds a sharp freshness to the sauce.”

Picpoul de Pinet £9.95, Great Western Wine “This wine is a particular favourite of mine,” says Kate Robinson. “The delicate lemon note here will match perfectly with the sauce in the dish, whilst the acidity would cut through the creaminess nicely.”

SERVES 4 100g butter dashi flakes, for seasoning 20g edible seaweed 50g lovage 100ml rapeseed oil 30g egg yolk 10g sherry vinegar 10g Dijon mustard 50ml vermouth, or white wine 200ml fish stock 200ml whey 1 shallot, very finely chopped 1 bay leaf 2 sprigs thyme 150ml double cream 4 medium-sized whole lemon sole (head off, skin off and blood line removed from cavity) 80g brown shrimp, peeled and precooked 20g avruga caviar borage and oyster leaf, to garnish 1 For the seaweed butter, beat the butter until soft and season with the dashi flakes. Wash and dry the seaweed and chop finely. Mix it with the butter (I reserve a little of the seaweed and dehydrate it for garnish) and leave in the fridge to set. 2 For the lovage emulsion, blend the lovage and oil together, then pass through a fine sieve. Whisk the egg yolk, sherry vinegar and Dijon together with a pinch of salt flakes, then slowly drizzle in the lovage oil, continuing to whisk, to emulsify. It should end up with a silky, thick, mayonnaise-like consistency. 3 For the whey and caviar sauce, combine the vermouth, fish stock, whey, shallot, bay and whole thyme springs in a pan. Place over the heat and reduce by half. Then add the cream and reduce a little more; it should be light in texture, not too thick or heavy. Finally, pass it through a fine sieve. Keep warm. 4 Place a pan over a medium-high heat, and cook the lemon sole for about 3 minutes each side, depending on size. Then rest it on kitchen paper and heat the grill. 5 Transfer the fish to an oven tray and top with slices of the seaweed butter and brown shrimp. Finish under the grill to melt the butter. 6 Add the caviar to the whey mix to warm through. 7 Plate the fish and pipe dots of the lovage emulsion around. Spoon some caviar sauce onto the plate, and garnish the fillet with the borage and oyster leaf (and the remaining seaweed, if you kept some back). Woolley Grange Hotel, Woolley Green, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1TX; 01225 864705; woolleygrangehotel.co.uk

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C H E F !

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BREAMS CAN COME TRUE MATT GIBBS IS SURE MAKING THE MOST OF THAT SUMMER VEG LATELY...

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C H E F !

The Jetty in Bristol – inside the impressive Harbour Hotel – is part of a family of award-winning restaurants, scattered all over the south. Set within the former banking hall of the building, the restaurant has bags of character, and nods to its history as part of the old financial district of the city; expect classic restored architecture, marble surfaces and bespoke lighting features. The kitchen team prides itself on using local, seasonal ingredients and serving them up alongside eclectic wines and innovative cocktails. Matt Gibbs heads up said team now, having moved from popular neighbour, The Ox. With a true passion for local produce, Matt likes to put a unique and elegant spin on classic dishes. This particular creation was inspired by the arrival of the warmer season; it’s a fresh and simple dish that’s perfect to tuck into on sunny spring evenings, sat in the garden with a glass of crisp dry white.

FILLET OF BREAM WITH SPRING VEG AND A LEMON AND CHIVE BUTTER SAUCE

dash of cream 100g butter lemon, juice only, to taste small handful chives, finely chopped 1 For the lemon and chive sauce, place the white wine and white wine vinegar in a pan over the heat and reduce until just 1 tsp of liquid is left. Then add the cream and slowly reduce by three quarters. 2 Remove from the heat and whisk in the butter, a bit at a time. Finish with Maldon salt and lemon juice to taste, and the chopped chives. Keep warm. 3 Season the bream and score the skin with a knife. Heat a pan with a dash of oil and, when hot, place the fish in it, skin side down, and add a knob of butter. Cook for around 4 minutes until the skin is crisp, then flip. Remove from the pan and place skin side down to rest for 2 minutes. 4 Lightly blanch the samphire for 30 seconds in lightly salted boiling water, then drain. 5 In a pan, lightly warm some more rapeseed oil and add the peas, broad beans, spring onions, and cherry tomatoes. Season, then add the samphire and lightly warm through. 6 Transfer the warm veg to a bowl, dress with the butter sauce, and top with the bream. Garnish with peashoots.

SERVES 2 1 large bream fillet (500-700g) good quality rapeseed oil knob of butter 100g samphire 100g frozen peas 100g broad beans, blanched and peeled 2 spring onions, finely sliced 10 cherry tomatoes, halved peashoots, to garnish For the lemon and chive butter: 50ml white wine 50ml white wine vinegar

Mar de Frades Albarino £18.75, Great Western Wine “A perfect match to the bream and the harbourside setting is this, from the Rias Biaxas region on the Atlantic coast of Spain. Vibrant, crisp and zesty, it’ll have your mouth watering on a summer’s evening,” reckons Kate Robinson.

The Jetty, 55 Corn Street, Bristol BS1 1HT; 0117 203 4456; bristol-harbour-hotel.co.uk

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ROAST PORK STUFFED WITH GOOSEBERRIES AND BLACK PUDDING Apples are traditionally paired with pork, but gooseberries share some of the floral acidity of apples, and are a great alternative when they are in season in June. Paired with deeply savoury black pudding and a hint of caramel from the sugar, this combination makes for a stunning roast. If possible, leave the pork joint uncovered, skin side up, in the fridge overnight. This helps to dry the skin, which makes for better crackling. SERVES 6-8 loin of pork (1.5-2kg), boned and rolled 350g gooseberries  20g soft brown sugar  100g black pudding, skinned  ½ tbsp coriander seeds, crushed

whaT’S The PIG Idea?

RIVER COTTAGE EXEC CHEF GELF ALDERSON SURE KNOWS HIS WAY AROUND A PORK LOIN... Bristol Food Connections is back, folks! There are festivities and events taking place in all corners of the city beween 11 and 17 June, including this one by River Cottage Kitchen. The team will dish up an evening of mouth-watering food and thought-provoking conversation with Peter Greig, from the award-winning Pipers Farm, on 13 June. With veganism on the rise but meat consumption also as high as ever, Peter will be asking the question of whether we should be cutting back on meat. From intensive to free-range and organic farming, he’ll be discussing the systems and their pros and cons, as guests tuck into a specially curated three-course menu.

1 Preheat the oven to 220C/425F/gas mark 7. Score the skin of the pork using a very sharp blade, going about 3mm into the fat, but not down to the meat. 2 Unroll the pork and place skin side down on a board. Slice down the centre of the meat (without going all the way through) to create an extra pocket for stuffing. Open up the meat as much as possible and season all over. 3 Scatter over 100g of the gooseberries (roughly slicing any large ones first). Press them down and sprinkle with the sugar. Crumble the black pudding over the surface, pressing into the loin. Roll up the joint, enclosing the stuffing, and tie firmly in a few places with cotton string, pushing any escaping stuffing back inside. Turn the joint skin side up and wipe the skin dry. Season the skin well with salt and a little pepper, sprinkle over the crushed coriander seeds, and place in a roasting dish. 4 Roast in the oven for 20 minutes, then lower the setting to 170C/325F/gas mark 3 and pour a glass of water into the tin around the meat. Roast for a further 1 ¼-1 ½ hours until a meat thermometer inserted into the centre registers 70C, and the meat juices run clear. Transfer the joint to a warm plate to rest for 20-30 minutes. (If the crackling is not crisp enough, you can slice it off the meat and put it under a hot grill until crackled and blistered, keeping an eye on it as it can quickly burn.) 5 Meanwhile, put the remaining gooseberries into the roasting tin with the pork juices and cook in the oven for about 10 minutes until soft. 6 Serve the pork in thick slices with spoonfuls of the tart gooseberry compote from the tin. Serve with roast or mashed potatoes and some leafy greens, such as kale or purple sprouting broccoli.

River Cottage and Pipers Farm present What’s the Beef with Eating Meat on 13 June, tickets £35; bristolfoodconnections.com

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A community day of sport and fun for everyone TRY TRI - HAVE A GO AT THREE OR MORE INCLUSIVE SPORTS, INCLUDING A FUN RUN AMAZE - DISCOVER A NEW SPORTING TALENT OR PASSION SHARE - BECOME PART OF AN INCLUSIVE SPORTING COMMUNITY ENJOY - LOOK OUT FOR SOME MORE SILLY ACTIVITIES GOING ON AROUND THE GROUND FUNDRAISE - ALL SPONSORSHIP AND FUNDS GO TO SUPPORTING THREE WAYS SCHOOL

3rd June • 10-4pm Odd Down Sports Ground PLEASE PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS VIA THE WEBSITE. FIND OUT MORE AT: WWW.TRYGAMES.CO.UK HELLO@TRYGAMES.CO.UK #TRYGAMESBATH THREE WAYS SPECIAL SCHOOL IN BATH NEED TO RAISE £30,000 TO PROVIDE AFTER SCHOOL SPORTS FOR THE CHILDREN - JOIN OUR WONDERFUL COMMUNITY AND LET’S DO THIS TOGETHER. THREE WAYS IS A SPECIAL SCHOOL AND CENTRE OF EXPERTISE FOR PUPILS AGED 3-19 YEARS WHO HAVE A RANGE OF SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS, SUCH AS MODERATE, SEVERE AND COMPLEX NEEDS, PROFOUND AND MULTIPLE LEARNING DIFFICULTIES, COMMUNICATION AND AUTISM.


( advertising feature )

crumbs presents

Menu Gordon Jones in the Square For the first time ever, award-winning chef Gordon Jones will be hosting a pop-up supper club in the centre of Bath – get Sunday 10 June in your diary... Bath Boules Week, 10-18 June Every year Bath has a massive bash in Queen Square to raise money for local charities. Check out this year’s line up... Sunday 10 June: Crumbs Presents Menu Gordon Jones in the Square Monday 11: School of Boules practice sesh Tuesday 12: Hear Glasto’s Michael Eavis talk, and watch a screening of a full-length film about his epic festival Thursday 14: Creative Bath Awards and summer party

Friday 15: Legendary Friday night party and celebrity barbecue with David Flatman Friday 15-Sunday 17: The actual Bath Boules weekend; come and join the party! Monday 18: England vs Tunisia World Cup match on big screens For more info and tickets, visit crumbsmag.link/bathboules

In the Square: Fully-stocked bar! Pimm’s Tent! Champagne bar! Music!

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hat do you get when you cross your favourite food magazine (er, that’s us, of course) with one of Bath’s most celebrated restaurants? We’re giving you the chance to find out first hand, at our first Crumbs Presents event, with Menu Gordon Jones in the Square. This belter of a pop-up, taking place in a cool marquee in Bath’s Queen Square, is going to take place over two sittings – each with a strict limit of 100 spaces. Here, Gordon will cook a four-course menu, specially curated for the evening, and will be on hand to talk it through with his guests. See you there, folks!

£36 per person for food, plus drinks options; book online at crumbsmag.link/mgj


THURSDAY SUPPER CLUB The Last Thursday of every month. 4 courses | £25

Bar • Kitchen Dining

IT’S MAY TIME Sumptuous dishes created with seasonal produce. Thursday 31st May | £25 English Asparagus, topped with a poached duck egg, glazed with a wild garlic Hollandaise. Twice baked goats cheese souffle with an old Winchester fondue glaze. Confit duck leg, on smoked garlic creamed potato, braised lettuce and Peas with a Madeira sauce. Iced Elderflower Parfait, granola crunch and a Kir Royale sauce.

A JUNE JOLLY Thursday 28th June | 4 courses | £25 Crab and ginger salad with baby gem, avocado and fennel shavings. Wild mushroom Arancini balls, white truffle oil and Parmesan served with George’s ketchup. Fillet of Church Farm beef with steamed pudding, charred sprouting broccoli and baby carrots. Lemon and honey rum baba with creme chantilly. It’s May Time & A June Jolly: There will be a wine flight also available to accompany the dishes, featuring a glass with each course | £14

TO BOOK CALL

01225 865650

67 Woolley St, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1AQ • info@thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk • thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk


ARMOURY

CHOOSE YOUR WEAPONS

Eau GOOdness

DOING YOUR BIT FOR THE SEAS, SAVING MONEY, AND LOOKING COOL WHILE YOU DO IT? SOUNDS LIKE A NO-BRAINER TO MATT BIELBY. (PLUS, THE EAU GOOD DUO EVEN MAKES TAP WATER TASTE GOOD.) I love David Attenborough. Who doesn’t? He’s everyone’s Greatest Living Englishman – head, shoulders and crumpled blue shirt above Caine, McCartney, Pinter, Berners-Lee, and whatever other actors, singers, writers and scientists you fancy. And if you wanted proof, just consider his Blue Planet II, which – as well as being amazing in all sorts of ways – has almost single-handedly tipped the balance away from single-use plastics and towards a much more sustainable lifestyle. Hence this thing, I suppose. Hence this thing – the Eau Good Duo water bottle by Black and Blum, which started as a Kickstarter project and makes tap water taste great. How? By combining filter and infuser functions to make it delicious, with use-it-again-

and-again qualities designed to remove another nasty taste from your mouth. (Yes, the idea that we might be destroying the planet, I’m talking about you.) I suppose you’re going to tell me how it works now, aren’t you? I am! Basically, each Eau Good Duo bottle contains an activated stick of Japanese Binchotan charcoal, which lasts for six months and softens the water, adds goodies like calcium, balances PH, and absorbs any yucky tastes, like chlorine. And if that’s not tasty enough for you, why not add a bit of flavour through the built-in infuser cap? (Just pack it with fruit or herbs or whatever.) Pouring’s easy too – there’s an efficient little leak-proof spout – or you can just drink straight from the bottle.

It does sound good, I suppose. Just think of how much you’ll save on bottled drinks. (Around £200 a year, the guys from Black and Blum reckon, and whether that’s realistic or not, it’ll certainly pay for itself before you know it.) And think of the fishes, too! The fishes don’t care what I’m drinking out of… They don’t. But they sure care about our crappy single-use bottles being dumped in their home. You don’t have to buy this particular thing (though it does seem quite cool), but any tactic you can employ to cut down on your plastic waste is made of win. Eau Good Duo has now reached its Kickstarter target, and individual bottles sell for £26; black-blum.com

THIS MONTH • BOTTLED IT • BRIGHT YOUNG THINGS • STEEL THE SHOW

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House Call

TELLING TRAILS WE CATCH LOCAL TRAVEL WRITER MARIANNA HUNT ON A RARE DAY THAT SHE’S AT HOME; MOST OFTEN YOU’LL SPOT HER IN HER NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OF A COFFEE SHOP...

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a Words by JESSICA CARTER Photography by NICCI PEET

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s a travel writer, Marianna, obviously finds herself in new and unfamiliar towns and cities on a regular basis. Whether it’s a rural suburb or bustling urban sprawl, her first port of call is always a local coffee shop. No, she doesn’t have a caffeine addiction to rival that which you’d find in a Wall Street office block. In fact, it’s not actually about the coffee itself; it’s about what it sits in the centre of. “I naturally gravitate to coffee shops when I’m travelling, and it’s really started to become apparent how central they are to the community; how much importance they have; and how they can actually really reflect the culture of the area,” she tells us, as she hands us a cuppa. “It’s about the roastery where the coffee has come from, the carpenter who made the furniture, the baker who supplies the bread, the artist whose work hangs on the walls…” This recently gave the young explorer a bit of a brainwave for a new kind of travel guide: one that won’t be aging as its ink dries on the page. Instead of simply telling you where to go, it would be about how to find the

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Loca l . Se a s ona l . S p e c i a l i s t.

Supplying artisan West country cheeses to the good folk of Bristol. Please pop into store or visit our website

Tuesday to Saturday 11 - 6 and Sunday 11 - 4 Unit 8 CARGO 2, Museum Street bristolcheesemonger@gmail.com a bristol_cheese www.bristol-cheese.co.uk bristol_cheese/


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best places. Having named it The Coffee Trails, Marianna has experimented with the concept in not only Bath and Bristol, but in towns as far flung as Havana and Stockholm. She begins at a coffee shop (duh) and gets all her leads from there. It could be a chat with the barista about where they hang out in their down time, it could be noting down the local painter whose work is for sale there, it could be a talk with the kitchen about a farm they work with. She then visits those secondary destinations, and gathers more leads to continue with. And on it goes, until she’s zig-zagged her way around the area, having unearthed the local residents, businesses, locations and lifestyles that illustrate and shape the area’s character and culture. “I’ve ended up in a Nepalese street food café playing Himalayan boardgames, and meeting an eco-baker who trades his bead for people’s surplus veg to go in his bakery’s sandwiches,” Marianna says, sipping her tea. As we talk, we’re sat in the open plan kitchen-diningliving area of the Montpelier home that’s her base when she’s in Bristol. Light pours in through the large bay windows at the front, and the French doors that lead out to

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the garden at the back. Rustic but also bright and clean, the space mixes lots of wood (floorboards underfoot, a handcrafted dining table and bench, dusty-coloured painted wooden cabinets) with gleaming white tiles and white painted walls. “I like a lot of light in a kitchen. And there needs to be plenty of space for dancing,” Marianna tells us. “It’s my dance floor! My kitchen’s often filled with Latin tunes. I’m really into salsa. I much prefer the wooden, natural look too. Nothing too sleek or glossy; it just shows up any mess too easily. And I’m a messy cook!” We can relate...

Marianna is about to launch a Kickstarter campaign to get the Coffee Trails onto paper, sharing the people, places and stories that she’s unearthed. If you’d like to support the campaign, get some more information, or just try your hand at your own Coffee Trail, drop an email to thecoffeetrails@gmail.com, or follow Marianna on Instagram @thecoffeetrails_ and Twitter @mariannahunt5

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C A L L


Nestled in 36 acres of beautiful West Country parkland, Ston Easton Park is unique; the hotel is adorned with original antique furniture, sumptuous fabrics and glistening chandeliers, yet the warm welcome and homely atmosphere prevails, creating an idyllic home-away-from-home. One of the most luxurious pet-friendly country house Hotels in Somerset with an award-winning ďŹ ne dining restaurant and kitchen garden. Our Head Chef is passionate about developing menus that use fresh, locally-sourced ingredients; he works closely with local suppliers and the hotel garden team, sourcing almost 60% of the fresh produce used in the menus from the hotel’s Victorian kitchen gardens. As well as offering the perfect destination for a luxury hotel break, the house is open daily to non-residents for morning coffee, lunch and light snacks, traditional afternoon tea and dinner. Located just 12 miles from Bristol and 11.9 miles from Bath.

Ston Easton, Nr Bath, Somerset BA3 4DF To book, call 01761 241631 or email reception@stoneaston.co.uk

www.stoneaston.co.uk

SPECIAL OFFER

Complimentary glass of Prosecco to all joining us for Afternoon Tea. QUOTE SCMB01 (Offer valid until 31/05/18)


H O U S E

KITChEN CONFIdENTIAL Name: Marianna Hunt. Hometown: Bath. Occupations: Part-time writer, full-time café lover. Must-have kitchen item: I’ve heard of a biscuit dunker that stops soggy crumbs dropping in your tea. Christmas wish list 2018? Most prized item: My trusty travel mug. It’s been around the world with me. Favourite kitchen hack: Poached egg pods. Secret kitchen skill: Experimentation. I once won a Ready Steady Cook-type competition with my friends with a caramelised peach tagine. You love the taste of... Caramelised banana. Coffee or tea? Controversially, when I’m at home, tea! Beer or cider? Beer. Go-to recipe: Goat’s cheese risotto. Guilty pleasure (we’re not here to judge…): Custard. Hot, cold, straight from the tin... A food you couldn’t live without: Camembert. Favourite condiment: Gravy. Chips and gravy over chips and mayo any day. Five people you’d invite to your dinner party, dead or alive: James Martin to help me out in kitchen. Graham Norton to keep the guests entertained while I’m busy. Al Green to serenade us with some musical accompaniment. And James McAvoy and Helen Mirren – just because. Give us the style of your kitchen in three words: Old school charm. Your kitchen is awesome because... It’s where I mull over all the big decisions in my life. If you could change one thing about it, it would be… Insert my own personal dance floor. What are you going to rustle up this weekend? A Nicaraguan stew I learnt during a recent trip. Unexpected item in your kitchen cupboard: Pickled mushrooms from the 1990s – a present from my landlady and babushka (adopted grandmother) in Russia. One thing your kitchen is used for that doesn’t involve cooking or eating: Salsa dancing.

“IT’S WHERE I MULL OVER ALL THE BIG DECISIONS IN MY LIFE” MARIANNE HUNT

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FRONT OF HOUSE SUPERVISORS SOMMELIERS MANAGERS CHEFS

info@purplecarrot-recruitment.com www.purplecarrot-recruitment.co.uk


WH I T EH ALL GARD EN CEN TRE , LAC OC K , I S PROUD TO BECOME TH E LATEST O FFI C IAL W EBER WORLD STORE CO M E INSTO RE TO DISCOVER OUR EXT EN S IV E RA N GE O F BB Q’ S TO M AK E FULL USE OF YOUR GAR D EN T HI S S UMMER

E XP E RT STAFF

EXT EN S IVE RAN GE

REGUL A R C O O KI N G D EMO S

O u r e x p e r t s are on h an d t o of f er you f ri e n d l y an d kn ow l e d ge ab l e ad v i ce, an d h elp you ch oos e t he b arb e cu e an d acce ss ori e s t h at are ri ght f or yo u.

Webe r Wo r ld St o re s h ave t h e f ull ra nge of ba r be c ue s a n d a c c esso r ies o n display plus e xc lusive pro duct s in c luding t h e Sum m it C h a rc o a l a n d G a s g r ill ser ies.

S e e first hand how to get the be st from your bar be cue with m any live cooking de m onstrations throughout the ye ar.

W W W.W H I T E H A L L G A R D E N C E N T R E . C O . U K


K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List

WE’RE WAGING WAR ON WASTE WITH REUSABLE, SUSTAINABLE FOOD AND DRINK STORAGE…

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1. Frank Water Pledge to Refill Bottle £19.79 Sold by local water charity Frank, this plastic-free water bottle is made from stainless steel and bamboo, by quality producer Klean Kanteen. Order online. frankwater.com 2. Kilner Salad On the Go Jar £9.99 This airtight glass jar will keep your salad super fresh, and there’s a stainless steel tub at the top to keep dressings in too. Find it at Lakeland in Bath or Bristol. lakeland.co.uk 3. My Cleverbox Two Tier Lunch Box £22 Made from stainless steel with handy compartments, this cool lunchbox is sourced responsibly from India by a Bristol-based ecominded biz. Buy online. mycleverbox.co.uk 4. Thali Tiffin £29 Inspired by lunchtime scenes in Mumbai, this insulated tiffin tin not only helps you cut down on your takeaway plastic waste, but gets you money off your Thali, too! Buy from the restaurants in Bristol. thethalirestaurant.co.uk 5. KeepCup from £14 These cups, made largely from recyclable materials, are designed to have a long life, so you can refill and save on your brew-to-go for a long time to come. Buy online or find them at the likes of The Society Café. keepcup.com

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Indian Dining Arguably Bath and Bristol’s best and most modern Indian restaurants with fabulous cocktails, refined and flavoursome Indian cooking, and friendly service…

the biddestone arms

Piper Heidsieck Rooftop Champagne Bar Now Open at Our Bath Restaurant 12-16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 01173 291300 Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB Tel: 01225 446656 Email: info@themintroom.co.uk www.themintroom.co.uk

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A traditional Cotswolds pub with a beautiful garden Local beers • Full wine list • Excellent menu Biddestone Arms, The Green, Biddestone, Nr Chippenham, Wiltshire, SN14 7DG Tel: 01249 716481

Boules piste now open


( adverti sing feature )

THAI TAPAS AT GIGGLING SQUID Send your taste buds wild with a selection of tasty tapas dishes at Giggling Squid...

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iggling Squid’s renowned lunch menu offers a brilliant combination of bold Thai flavours and authentic cooking techniques, from lunchtime tapas to delicious curries, rice and noodles. The established tapas menu offers an array of signature small plates to tantalise the taste buds, including salt and pepper squid, and sleeping honey duck, alongside the lime and chilli beef, Thai chicken wings and pork ribs. The super popular ‘tasting sets’ – from the Hungry Squid and Wealthy Squid to the Starving Squid – offer a selection of four carefully curated dish combinations, competitively priced between just £9.95 and £11.95.

The two-dish meal combi, of a Thai curry and light bite, offers fantastic value too, priced between £7.95 and £9.95.

Giggling Squid, Bluecoat House, Saw Close, Bath, BA1 1EY reservations@severnandwye.co.uk 01225 331486, www.gigglingsquid.com f a x @GigglingSquid

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We are a friendly, family owned inn offering hearty home cooked food, in a small country village setting. Whether you are local or travelling from further afield, you are guaranteed a warm welcome.

THE

CAKERY

PUB • RESTAURANT • FUNCTION ROOM • ACCOMMODATION

ARTISAN COFFEE CUSTOM MADE CAKES FRESH BREAD

Gluten free, dairy free and vegan options available 21 Claverton buildings, Bath BA2 4LD tel 07891 211852 email thecakery-@hotmail.com

Tunley Road, Tunley BA2 0EB • 01761 470408 Email: info@kingwilliaminn.co.uk • f T @kingwilliam84 www.kingwilliaminn.co.uk

Award Winning, Family Run Farm Shop Established for over 30 years Selling Quality Local Produce Open Daily 9am – 6pm (9.30am – 5pm on Sundays)

HOME & LOCALLY REARED FRESH MEAT, POULTRY & GAME HOMEMADE SAUSAGES, BURGERS & FAGGOTS

LOCALLY GROWN VEGETABLES, FRUIT & SALADS HOMEMADE CAKES & PIES LOCALLY MADE CHOCOLATES & FUDGE

PRESERVES & CHUTNEYS GIFT HAMPERS www.allingtonfarmshop.co.uk 01249 658112 Allington Bar Farm, Chippenham, SN14 6LJ

www.thecakerybath.co.uk

Situated in the renowned Spike Island, we are the sister café to the much loved Folk House Café and offer a wonderful setting for everyone. 133 Cumberland Road Bristol BS1 6UX spikeislandcafe.co.uk 0117 954 4030

LOCAL, ORGANIC, SUSTAINABLE, ETHICAL, DELICIOUS.

LOCAL CHEESES & HOME COOKED MEATS

FINE WINE, LOCAL ALE & CIDER

b The Cakery  @TheCakeryBath  thecakerybath

Allington Bar Farm, Chippenham, SN14 6LJ To show a Vehicle, book a Stall or to make an Enquiry

cvs@chippenhamlions.org.uk All proceeds to Lions Charities

We also cater for evening events, wedding receptions, birthday parties, supper clubs. Call now for more information. 40a Park Street, Bristol, BS1 5JG folkhousecafe.co.uk 0117 908 5035


Open 7 Days a Week Bar from 8:00am - 11:00am Breakfast from 8:00am - 10:00am Lunch from 12:00pm Dinner from 6:00pm


Bay Watergateight on might be rbut with the beach,aurants to four rest might not visit,you t onto the make it ouat all... sand

MAINS

HIGHLIGHTS

BREAK TIME!

pe to one of Time to book an es caretreats... thes e culinary PAGE 61

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MOVIE N

TOP CULINA CAUSES, INSI RY KNOWLEDGDER AND FOODE PIONEERs

HT The film that’s tryiIG ng reimagining UK food to get us production PAGE 72

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Dinner Bed & Breakfast deal from ÂŁ145 per night for 2 people Contact us for more information Top Lane, Whitley, Wiltshire SN12 8QX T f @peartreewhitley 01225 704966

www.peartreewhitley.co.uk


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Nearby railway station Dog friendly rooms available

SLeeP,

Glamping options Michelin Star restaurant

RePeaT 061

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City centre

Psst: prices shown are on a one-night, room-only basis with two people sharing, unless we’ve said otherwise

One night for £100 or under

THESE GREAT GAFFS WILL PUT YOU UP WHILE KEEPING YOU WELL FED AND WATERED – CAUSE WE ALL KNOW HOW RELAXING REALLY WORKS UP THE APPETITE...


CORNWALL THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

Sleep: Rick Stein’s long-established Seafood Restaurant in the heart of Padstow has 16 guest rooms, all kitted out in a fresh but classic style. Their light and neutral hues echo the seaside location and make for really calm, relaxing spaces. And if there’s no room at this particular inn, fear not: there are 24 more guest rooms within the Stein empire around Padstow. Eat: Much of what’s served in the restaurant has been landed mere metres away from the kitchen. Expect simple, fuss-free dishes, where the fruits of the ocean take the staring role. Grab a stool at the seafood bar in the centre of the restaurant, and oggle all the fish on display. Pay: From £165. rickstein.com

WATERGATE BAY

Sleep: Originally built as a railway inn more than 100 years ago, Watergate Bay is now a stylish beachside hotel, with accommodation that ranges from ocean-view rooms to suites and apartments. The hotel has its own surf school and pool, and runs beach events too. Eat: There are three restaurants at the hotel: Zacry’s, The Beach Hut and The Living Space, and each has its own distinct style, from refined international fare to relaxed beachside dining. The bay is also where you’ll find Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen, a social enterprise restaurant serving great quality Italian-inspired food. Want to make the most of all the food here? Check out the Taste of the Bay three-night break, which includes multi-course dinners at three of the restaurants. Pay: From £185 (including breakfast). watergatebay.co.uk

COTSWOLDS THE FEATHERED NEST

Sleep: It’s places like this that make the Cotswolds such an ideal holiday destination. Overlooking the Evenlode Valley, the pub-cumrestaurant-cum-guesthouse is surrounded by countryside, which it shares with the local deer, badgers, foxes and owls. It’s style is aptly rustic and rural, with stone walls, wooden beams and a huge open fireplace, and the handful of guest rooms are tasteful and cosy. Eat: Head chef Kuba Winkowski works some real magic here, creating impressive menus that show buckets of skill, but still suit the pub-like character of the location. You’ll find locals drinking ale at the bar, dogs at their heels, while you tuck into innovative tasting menus, perhaps featuring pigeon with 25-year-old balsamic, or squid with ’nduja. Pay: From £365 (including dinner and breakfast). thefeatherednestinn.co.uk

THE KINGHAM PLOUGH

Sleep: This award-winning pub with rooms turned 10 last year, and continues to be a super-popular destination for rural breaks. There are six comfortable, airy, country cottage-style rooms, with two pairs that are connected, so great for families. Eat: Former Fat Duck chef and Great British Menu champ Emily Watkins runs this gaff – so expect some top tucker. Showcasing native ingredients from the immediate area, the chefs create imaginative and refined but accessible dishes: think ricotta dumplings with spring veg and wild garlic pesto. Pay: From £145 (including breakfast). thekinghamplough.co.uk

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THE MAYTIME INN

Sleep: Set in the quaint village of Buford, The Maytime Inn lives in prime pub country. Each of the six rooms have their own twist on a traditional countryside feel, but with luxurious touches like rainfall showers and Cowshed bathroom goodies. Eat: Make it past the well-stocked gin bar (with over 100 bottles at the last count) and you’ll find a menu of indulgent modern British pub-style dishes, such as ham hock terrine with quail Scotch egg and piccalilli purée, and wild boar burger with comté cheese and chilli jam. If the sun has got his hat on you’ll be hard pressed to find a better beer garden to enjoy a Ploughman’s, piled high with local cheeses. Pay: From £95. themaytime.com

THE OLD BELL HOTEL

Sleep: Set in the historic market town of Malmesbury, this Grade I listed hotel reopened in February this year, after a huge, millionpound makeover. It now reflects the history of its location with its timeless style and quintessential English character. Rooms all have their own unique look, with some boasting roll top baths and views out onto the 12th century abbey. Eat: Head chef Frédéric Fétiveau began his career in Parisian fine dining kitchens, and now creates menus at The Old Bell that are rooted in British cuisine, but feature a touch of that modern European flair. The new evening menu includes thoughtful dishes such as wild sea bass and sea trout tartar with gingerbread, wasabi cream and salmon eggs. Pay: From £160 (including breakfast). oldbellhotel.co.uk

WHATLEY MANOR HOTEL AND SPA

Sleep: This privately owned, luxury hotel carefully balances the oldschool with the contemporary. The rooms and suites are comfortable and plush, each different from the last, while the modern in-house spa – with hydrotherapy pool, thermal cabins and tepidarium – will step the relaxation up a gear or two. Eat: Chef Niall Keating runs the show at flagship restaurant The Dining Room, cooking internationally influenced food with bold flavours. Chat to the sommelier about your wine choice, or go all out and get the matching flight. The less formal Grays Brasserie has recently been refurbished, while the new Green Room allows you to watch the chefs at work from the Gastronomy Bar. Pay: From £260 (including breakfast and spa access). whatleymanor.com

THE WHEATSHEAF COMBE HAY

Sleep: The guest rooms here are in separate buildings to the pub and restaurant – three are in a former cowshed, and the fourth is a wooden cabin in the garden – making them peaceful and private. This month sees the launch of some luxury glamping bell tents too, each with their own private shower room. Fancy, no? Eat: Head chef Eddie Rains was the first ever winner of the Gordon Ramsey scholarship award, and has worked in several Michelinstarred kitchens. At The Wheatsheaf, he maintains those standards when it comes to quality, but creates more hearty, pub-friendly dishes. To wash it down is a top wine list – and a rather decent selection of gins, too. Pay: Rooms from £120 and tents from £95 (all including breakfast). wheatsheafcombehay.com

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M A I N S

THE WILD RABBIT

Sleep: This gorgeous restaurant has a selection of unique guestrooms and cottages. Elegantly rustic, they’re light and airy, with chalky, natural colour palettes and lots of exposed wood and stone. Eat: A relative of Daylesford (one of the most sustainable organic farms around) this place upholds the same standard of ethics. While you’re here, the Daylesford farmshop, restaurant and cookery school is a must-visit, and only a five-minute drive away. The Wild Rabbit itself serves a fantastic menu of British produce and artisanal ingredients, such as rabbit offal ragout, with black garlic and hispi cabbage. Pay: £175 (including breakfast). thewildrabbit.co.uk

DEVON BORINGDON HALL

Sleep: This carefully restored, historic hotel is within stumbling distance of Dartmoor. Ideal, really, seeing as there’s no better way to work up an appetite than a good old country walk in the fresh air, right? After that, you can treat yerself in the spa, before maybe a quick nap in your four-poster. Get you. Eat: When the clock strikes dinnertime, make your way down to the three-AA-rosette Gallery Restaurant, for a meal of refined, contemporary dishes, such as pollock with katsu spice, pickled ginger and puffed rice. The Mayflower Brasserie is a more relaxed alternative, if you’re after an informal feed. Pay: £180 (including breakfast and spa use). boringdonhall.co.uk

GLAZEBROOK HOUSE

Sleep: The transformation of this place is almost unbelievable; check out the photo album they keep that documents the work. It reopened under new ownership in 2014 as a gorgeously eccentric and kooky hotel, with bags of style and countless curiosities. Want a guarantee that your break will be memorable? This is your gaff. Eat: Its eclectic style is continued in the restaurant, where Ben Palmer curates aptly bold but elegant seasonal menus, listing the likes of curried cauliflower fondant, and market fish with shellfish orzo and crisp soft shell crab. Many ingredients are grown on-site, too. Pay: £159 (breakfast included). glazebrookhouse.com

SALCOMBE HARBOUR HOTEL & SPA

Sleep: With all the style you’d expect from a hotel that’s had a multimillion pound renovation, this gorgeous building, perched on the edge of Salcombe Estuary, has some pretty jaw-dropping coastal views. For when you’re not sleeping or eating, there’s a private cinema, spa, and rooftop terrace to take advantage of. Eat: The Jetty restaurant makes the most of the local larder, serving a seasonal menu of fresh seafood, landed by local fishing boats. You’ll also find daily catches at the restaurant’s Crustacean Bar. Enjoy your meal alfresco, out in the sea air, over those awesome vistas. Pay: From £250 (including breakfast). salcombe-harbour-hotel.co.uk

THE SALUTATION INN

Sleep: The beautiful town of Topsham, located at the top of the Exe Estuary, is a great shout if you’re after a break from city life and a bit of good old fresh air. And the 300-year-old hotel that sits at its heart is

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the ideal place to stay. There are six bedrooms above the restaurant, decorated with modern, classic style. Eat: The Salutation Inn is known all over the area for its great food offering, with chef director Tom Williams-Hawkes serving a choice of three weekly changing menus. He cooks with a contemporary French style and, of course, uses plenty of seafood from the River Exe, as well as local game. As well as that flagship restaurant, there’s also The Glass House, a light-filled space for the daytime, serving coffees, light lunches and afternoon teas. Pay: From £115 (including breakfast). salutationtopsham.co.uk

SOMERSET THE BATH PRIORY

Sleep: Built as a private home in the 19th century on land once owned by The Priory of Bath Abbey, this restaurant and hotel is located just outside of Bath’s city centre. It’s surrounded by four acres of awardwinning grounds, and you’ll find it tucked away, back from the road, in a residential area near Royal Victoria Park. Eat: Last year saw the arrival of chef Michael Nizzero, who joined fresh from The Ritz, having helped gain its first Michelin star. His modern French-style food is big on seasonality and has a lightness and freshness that gives classic dishes a 21st century edge. The Pantry is the hotel’s second, much more casual dining option, and spills out onto the Terrace Bar, which is great for the warmer season. Pay: £195 (including breakfast). thebathpriory.co.uk

THE CASTLE HOTEL

Sleep: This millennia-old, wisteria covered hotel has been in the charge of the same family for three generations, over 68 years. It’s within reach of plenty of scenic countryside destinations, such as the Quantock Hills and Exmoor National Park. Eat: There are two restaurants here: the fine dining Castle Bow, which serves up tasting menus for £65 per person, and the more relaxed allday bar and café, Brazz. The hotel also hosts Feast Taunton – a popular food and drink festival, which this year takes place 27-30 September. Pay: From £145 (including breakfast). There’s a special offer for Crumbs readers, also including a tasting menu dinner for two, for £249. the-castle-hotel.com

THE GAINSBOROUGH BATH SPA

Sleep: This impressive hotel has 99 rooms, including 11 suites and three spa rooms, which have access to that famous thermal water. Set smack bang in the centre of Bath, it’s surrounded by all the landmarks and attractions that make this city world famous. Eat: The three-AA-rosette Dan Moon at the Gainsborough Restaurant attracts lots of non-residents, thanks to Moon’s innovative and intricate dishes, made from carefully chosen produce and presented with an artful touch. Expect dinners along the lines of butternut squash samosas with paneer, raita and lentils, and Mendip venison with salt-baked celeriac, goat’s curd and black pudding. Pay: From £285. thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk

THE LITTON

Sleep: This pub with rooms was completely gutted back in 2015 when the current owner took it over, and it’s been really thoughtfully restored, now having 12 vintage-style guest rooms. Throughout

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these, which are each named after a nearby historic location, you’ll find exposed stone, raw wood, quirky furniture and neutral tones. Eat: There are plenty of homegrown herbs and veggies served up here, as part of a menu that’s traditionally British at heart: think pork rillet with pickles and gherkin ketchup to start, and cod with mussels and saffron sauce for mains. There’s a separate vegan bill of fare too, and The Litton often host one-off events with bespoke menus, such as the recent fish taster evening. Pay: From £120. thelitton.co.uk

MOUNT SOMERSET HOTEL & SPA

Sleep: There’s a definite Regency feel to this 19th century house, with its grand, sweeping staircases, high ceilings and elegant décor. Part of the Eden Hotel Collection, it’s surrounded by four acres of greenery, and contains 19 rooms, each individually designed. Eat: Having earned three AA rosettes last year, the enthusiastic kitchen brigade cooks up seasonally focused modern British-style food, like new season lamb with spring vegetable fricassee, wild garlic and rosemary jus. Lunch and afternoon tea are available as well, as are cocktails, which are best enjoyed on the terrace in the sun, we’d say. Pay: From £119. themountsomersethotelandspa.com

THE PIG NEAR BATH

Sleep: The Pig hotels (there are currently five across the South, including Devon and Dorset) are known for their gorgeously rustic style and individuality, with each being unique from the last. This hotel near Bath has a choice of rooms, from ‘snug’ and ‘luxe’ options to two-floor self contained rooms set in the kitchen garden. Eat: Speaking of the kitchen garden, this really is where the magic happens at The Pig. All the chefs’ ingredients either come from there, or from local producers within a 25-mile radius. As such, the menu is British and hearty in style, and you can expect plenty of homegrown veg on every plate. Try, for instance, the pan-fried turbot with spring cabbage, sour onions and crab sauce. Pay: From £155. thepighotel.com

THE QUEENSBERRY

Sleep: With brand new state-of-the-art beds now in each of the 29 rooms, you might just get the best night’s sleep you’ve had in ages here. Views out onto the Georgian buildings of Russell Street or over the hotel’s pretty garden are an additional sell, as is the hotel’s proximity to the renowned Circus and Assembly Rooms. Eat: The hotel’s Crumbs Award-winning Olive Tree restaurant is headed up by celebrated chef Chris Cleghorn, and holds three AA rosettes. The seasonal and contemporary dinner menus come as either five- or seven-course options, with expertly matched wine flights also available. Have an aperitif or a few after-dinner drinks in the hotel’s Old Q Bar, perhaps. Well, you are on holiday... Pay: From £100, or go for a package with breakfast and tasting menu dinner, from £265. thequeensberry.co.uk

STON EASTON PARK

Sleep: There are 23 plush guest rooms at this 18th-century manor house, which was actually a private home until the 1950s. The hotel is brimming with quintessential English countryside style, with plenty of antique furniture and framed artwork. Bedrooms follow suit,

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A country pub in the time-honoured tradition; a place to eat, drink and sleep.

PIZZA WEDNESDAYS Wednesdays 5.30pm – 7.30pm*

STEAK NIGHT Two Steaks, Skinny Chips, Peppercorn Sauce, Watercress Salad & a Bottle of White or Red Wine £32

*weather permitting

Tuesdays 6.30pm – 8.30pm

Wood Fired Pizzas

The Wheatsheaf, Combe Hay, Bath BA2 7EG 01225 833504 | info@wheatsheafcombehay.com | www.wheatsheafcombehay.com


F O O D I E

B R E A K S

with classic and cosy décor that nods to the building’s history and the well-to-do residents who made it their home. Eat: For dinner, visit the hotel’s Georgian-style Sorrel Restaurant, where you can choose between the a la carte and seven-course tasting menus. Fancy a hint as to what you might find on them? Try pan-fried red mullet with lemon purée and fermented garlic, and duck with bulgur wheat, burnt onion and blackcurrant jus. Pay: From £129. stoneaston.co.uk

WILTSHIRE LUCKNAM PARK

Sleep: This privately owned hotel, which sits in a whopping 500 acres of parkland, turns 30 this year – although the building itself dates back centuries, of course. It has 42 rooms and suites, as well as a self-contained three-bedroom cottage, all styled in keeping with the building’s history, but offering some 21st century luxury. The hotel has just received gold and silver accolades at the 2018 Visit England Awards for Excellence, an’ all. Eat: There are two restaurants: the Michelin-starred Restaurant Hywel Jones, and the chilled out Brasserie, which is for more relaxed, all day dining. Chefs of particular note here are, obvs, Hywel, who’s held a Michelin star for 13 years; the award-winning Elly Wentworth of MasterChef: The Professionals fame; and Thomas Westerland, who was recently named National Chef of Wales 2018. There’s also a cookery school on site, with an eclectic programme of classes. Pay: From £295. lucknampark.co.uk

SIGN OF THE ANGEL

Sleep: This 15th-century coaching inn has five unique bedrooms, each with the quirks and character that only come in buildings with such a long history. Guests will find a welcome gift of homemade bakes waiting for them in their room after check-in, too. Set in the picturesque village of Lacock, the hotel has some great scenic walks nearby, as well as lots of classic architecture to inspect. Eat: Breakfast includes the option of a full English, featuring pork that’s farmed just two miles away – and you’ll find this same attention to West Country ingredients in the British a la carte and tasting menus, too. Dishes might include guinea fowl with pea bubble and squeak cake, or goat’s cheese fondant with hazelnut. Pay: From £110. signoftheangel.co.uk

TIMBRELL’S YARD

Sleep: Sat on the edge of the river in pretty Bradford-on-Avon, Timbrell’s Yard has 17 guest rooms, professionally styled by a local interior designer. Some have a cool, modern Nordic look, while others are more rustic and vintage, with thick beams and cast iron baths. Expect antique and reclaimed furniture, rain showers, and lovely Bramley toiletries. Eat: It’s all about local, authentic produce in the kitchen, with ingredients coming from a trusted network of great West Country suppliers. Gastropub in style, the food is of restaurant quality (think Gloucester Old Spot pork belly with wild garlic and apple, spring bubble and squeak, and heritage carrots), but is served in a relaxed, informal environment. Pay: From £95. timbrellsyard.com

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the

smoking

ラーメンbowl

tacos + ramen A twist on Korean inspired tacos and ramen, if you're looking for heat you've found it.

Open Tues - Sat 12noon to 10pm smokingbowl.co.uk

smokingbowl.stokes@gmail.com

0117 329 3730

£2 Taco Tuesday

25-27 Stokes Croft Bristol, BS1 3PY


The Orchard Lounge is a one-of-a-kind cafe bar and restaurant in the heart of the Market Town of Trowbridge We offer a relaxed, cosy and atmospheric venue with something to suit everyone. Pencil these dates into your diary...

Event Nights Weekly Wednesdays Tapas Night Thursdays Steak Night Monthly Wednesdays Acoustic Nights Please see our Facebook page for our events schedule. To Book a table please call:

01225 767511 01225 767511 • info@theorchardlounge.co.uk • 66 Fore St, Trowbridge BA14 8HQ


OUTSIDE CHANCE

2018 PRESENTS SOMETHING OF AN OPPORTUNITY FOR THE UK’S FARMING LANDSCAPE; HERE’S HOW A LOCAL FILMMAKER AND LAND WORKERS’ UNION HAVE JOINED FORCES TO SPREAD THE WORD...

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ristol production company Black Bark Films premiered its first feature length documentary at the end of 2017. Made in partnership with the Landworkers’ Alliance, it was unveiled at a sell-out screening at The Cube in November. Since then, the film has gained considerable momentum, and been screened to audiences across the city several more times. In Our Hands tells the real-life stories of small-scale farmers and producers who are working to reclaim a food system that’s become dominated by profit-focused giants. Cameras follow them at work, showing how these forward thinkers are reinventing production systems, reconnecting people with their food, and trying to create a fairer market that puts both producers and consumers at the helm. Crumbs recently saw the film at Dela, which teamed up with Poco and a number of other Bristol restaurants and producers to host a dinner and screening. Here, we met Humphrey Lloyd from the Landworkers’ Alliance, who helped produce the documentary with Holly Black and Jo Barker. We caught up with him after the screening to talk more about the film, and how it aims to give a clearer understanding of the food economy that we all contribute to. “We’ve got to the stage where a lot of people understand that eating too much meat is unsustainable, for example, or that we should eat fewer ready meals for our health,” says Humphrey. “But we don’t yet have a clear understanding of the political dynamics that drive the regressive trends occurring in the food system. “This film is designed to reveal these power dynamics and make people realise that they can change them if they choose to engage. The expected implication of In Our Hands is that people begin to think of food ethics not solely from the consumer end of things, but as a wider set of political dynamics that they can change and improve.” Let’s rewind a little here, shall we? What’s gone wrong in the first place; why did these guys feel the need to make this documentary at all? Well, we lost around 33,500 farms between 2005 and 2015, according to government stats. That’s nine a day (quick maths). Why? Farming is a tough gig, of course, but it’s made even worse, Humphrey says, by a system that’s motivated largely by cash instead of the welfare of people and the environment.

“The current food economy is part of a wider neoliberal economy that is driven by profit, rather than rights,” he says. “Our rights to healthy food, farm jobs and a biodiverse environment aren’t respected by the current system. “For instance, take the fact that seeds are progressively more privatised, year on year – it’s a good example of how corporate profit, rather than food security, is the goal of the current food system.” (Seed privatisation, by the way, refers to how large companies have come to own the monopoly on

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Filmed throughout 2016, In Our Hands tells the stories of several smallscale producers doing exciting things in a restricted food system


M A I N S

the seed market, with farmers forced to buy their standardised hybrid products. This ain’t exactly great news for biodiversity, and means regionally varied produce is disappearing – a worry, especially in the face of climate change.) The fundamental goal of the Land Workers’ Alliance is to achieve ‘food sovereignty’: a “system of human rights,” as Humphrey puts it. “Everyone’s right to food, and a farmer’s right to earn a decent living producing it. “In practice, this means defending how food is produced, processed and distributed, so that we all have some power in this most crucial of economic and cultural systems. For people in countries like Malaysia BE N PRYOR or Brazil, this might mean literally fighting off a palm oil company from taking their farmland in order to produce a commodity crop. For people in a country like the UK, it means re-engaging with our food system by setting up small farms, shortening supply chains to cut out supermarkets, defending the right to use openpollinated seeds, lobbying for fairer policies and so on.” The result for the consumer? Local, nutritious and sustainable food – made affordable and accessible. In Our Hands introduces us to nine small-scale producers; we learn their struggles and victories in making a fair living by producing good quality food. We hear, for instance, about the ever-plummeting price dairy farmers are forced to sell their milk for, despite the rising production costs. “The fact that over 90 percent of food retail is controlled by eight supermarkets, whilst production is dispersed amongst 200,000 farmers, means that retailers have been able to drive down farm gate prices,” says Humphrey. “The European common market has also brought many food stuffs, such as fresh fruit, into Britain at prices below that of domestic production – the domination of the UK apple market by French varieties is one example.” One of the film’s heroes was particularly illustrative of this point, as producer Holly Black points out: “We think anyone who sees the film will agree with us that Gerald steals the show at the end. He’s such an inspirational elder who has seen it all – the dairy crisis, GM crop trials, almost losing his farm and turning it around when son Caz came home to start a Community Supported Agriculture system. “The fact that so many of the contributors to In Our Hands were so young, like Caz, was incredibly inspiring. These farmers are the future of our food!” It’s no coincidence that these guys are keen to get the message across now, in 2018. There’s a tangible opportunity at the moment, as the government reconsiders its processes in preparing to leave the EU. “Brexit means the food and farming policy framework that has governed us since the 1970s is being re-written,” explains Humphrey. “It has a chance to get much worse, but we also have a chance to make it better, if a progressive agricultural bill is secured in 2018.”

The Landworkers’ Alliance are keen to secure betterconcentrated support – in order to help organic farming, new farmers and community supported agriculture – as well as changes in law and a tariff regime. “Another food system is possible,” says Humphrey. “We really can have a rich, exciting and affordable food culture, connected to bustling markets and great restaurants, underpinned by a thriving countryside of diverse farms teeming with busy workers and wildlife. The barriers are not ecological but political. It’s within our reach. We just need to organise.”

This feast at Dela was in aid of sharing the film, and spreading the word on how we can all help shape a fairer food system

For more, visit landworkersalliance.org.uk

Q&A

BRISTOL FILMMAKER HOLLY BLACK

First off, what is Black Bark Films? We are a female-led Bristol-based film production company. We work collaboratively with our clients to create all kinds of film, from short and long-form documentary to promotional videos and crowdfunding films. And what, for you, is In our Hands really about?  It’s about so much more than food and farming policy in the UK. For us, the way in which we farm and the way in which we eat is fundamental to the way in which we live. In Our Hands is about the real stories of the people who are out in the fields, growing our food, feeding our cities and taking control of our food system.  Why do you think film is so powerful in telling stories like this one? Moving image is accessible in a way that written text never will be. It’s stimulating and thought provoking, and easy to digest. Tell us about the experience of making the documentary. It was a real joy to work with such a talented team and such interesting and dedicated contributors. Our primary camera person, Jason Brooks, does incredible work; his passion for the issues covered in the film really shone through in his footage.  And how did you find working with the Landworkers’ Alliance? A complete dream. Marrying the hard policy and key messages of the LWA with our own quest to show the human side of farming and stories of the people shown in the film was a really enjoyable process. blackbarkfilms.com; inourhands.film

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201o8ffer: special rom

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Riverstation sits majestically on the harbourside as it has done for the last 20 years. Our iconic building boasts one of the best sunshine locations in Bristol and offers al fresco dining in abundance.

Are you organising a small intimate wedding or a large family affair? Homewood Park Hotel & Spa is the ideal venue. Set in ten acres of wonderful gardens and parklands, we have the perfect setting for your special day. Contact our wedding planner on 01225 723731 or email weddings@homewoodpark.co.uk to arrange a personal viewing.

You can dock on the pontoon from the ferry and enjoy the whole day in this wonderful setting. The newly refitted restaurant offers fantastic views across the water and delivers monthly rotating seasonal menus. Balcony seating also allows you to leisurely watch life go by. The up-beat ground floor hosts a large sunshine terrace so you can while away a summer’s night with cocktails, or enjoy a bottle from our extensive wine selection. We proudly support local Bristol breweries, as well as offering our flagship Young’s ales on tap. Be sure not to miss out on our great Summer events hosted in proper Bristol fashion. Follow our social networks for updates.

We’re now taking bookings over the Summer months, including for Graduation.

The Grove, Bristol BS1 4RB; 0117 914 4434 riverstation@youngs.co.uk www.riverstation.co.uk

f riverstation.bs1 a riverstation_ x riverstation.bristol


Welcome to Bistro Lotte & Frome Town House Accommodation

Your OHH Pub’s Bespoke Events! Keep an eye out for our Pub’s bespoke events! The last Wednesday of every month will see all OHH Pubs simultaneously host their own Event day or evening. Stay updated on our website and why not choose the monthly event that suits your mood.

OHH Brunch Social Just £17.50 per person for 90 minutes of Bottomless Brunch with unlimited tea or coffee to accompany. Line the stomach with pastries on arrival and choose from an array of Breakfast and Brunch dishes to continue. Reservations only. Why not Fizz up the experience and enjoy 40% off a glass of Mimosa or Prosecco. Visit any OHH Pub on the first Saturday of every month. Reservations from 9.00am to 10.30am.

Frome’s fabulous new establishment at the top of Catherine Street combines a casual ground floor bistro & cafe with six beautiful en-suite guest-rooms above. Bistro Lotte is our all day dining restaurant and Frome Town House Accommodation our boutique bed and breakfast upstairs.

Coffee & Cake Social Enjoy a mug of tea or freshly ground coffee with a slab of homemade cake for just £3.50. Available at any OHH Pub weekdays until 5pm

Tuesday night is Steak night Enjoy a mouth watering steak and homemade chips for just £10. Wash it all down with a fine bottle of House red wine for just £12. Served every Tuesday at all OHH Pubs 5pm - 9.30pm

Fizz Thursdays Come and relax with a glass or bottle of Prosecco. 40% off Prosecco all day and evening every Thursday. Available at all OHH Pubs every Thursday throughout the day, from lunch to dinner.

Opening Times Monday – Thursday: 9am – 11pm Friday – Saturday: 9am – 11pm Sunday: 9am – 3pm

23 Catherine Street, Frome, Somerset, BA11 1DB 01373 300646 • info@bistrolottefrome.co.uk bistrolottefrome.co.uk

Come and visit our pubs or take a look at www.ohhpubs.co.uk


The Malago

MON - SAT: BRUNCH/LUNCH: 9AM - 3PM • DINNER: 5.30PM - 9.30PM SUNDAY: BRUNCH/LUNCH: 9AM - 12PM • ROASTS: 12:30PM - 7PM

www.themalago.club • eatout@themalago.club 220 North Street, Southville, BS3 1JD • 0117 963 9044

Serving you proper pub food, with fresh veg and freerange meat from local butchers. Everything is made from scratch in the kitchen by our team of immensely talented chefs, with lovely new starters and desserts made especially for our Sunday Roast Menu.

STAY AT THE WELLINGTON

THE GOOD BEAR CAFE & BAR

BREAKFAST - BRUNCH - LUNCH SPECIALS Come and browse our shop for Sardinian wines, specialities and local farm produce.

COMING SOON Supper clubs organised by local talented chefs as well as our own themed nights! Visit our website for more information...

The Wellington’s ten boutique hotel style, ensuite bedrooms are stylish and inviting, blending character with contemporary design. Each guest room comes with full amenities including contemporary ensuite bathroom with shower, television, tea and coffee making facilities and WIFI. The next morning pop downstairs for your Full English Breakfast. We also offer an extensive menu of hot and cold options, fresh juices and hot drinks. For bookings and enquiries call 0117 9513022

01225 330255 www.thegoodbear.co.uk 7 Hayes Place, Bear Flat Bath BA2 4QW b a @goodbearcafe

The Wellington Hotel, Gloucester Road, Horfield Bristol, BS7 8UR. Tel: 0117 9513022 Visit us online: www.thewellingtonbristol.co.uk/food


Reach the best in the west Affluent, active and influential and just a call away

JUST A PUB, NOTHING MORE, NEVER LESS. www.theravenofbath.co.uk 01225 425045 | 7 Queen St, Bath, BA1 1HE

Crumbs team 01225 475800


Gift Vouchers available

Jim and lucy fisher welcome you to Exeter cookery school FUN, HANDS-ON COOKERY COURSES ON EXETER’S HISTORIC QUAYSIDE. HALF-DAY COURSES FROM £39 (CHILDREN) and £65 (ADULTS). ALL SKILL LEVELS.

COMPETITIVE RATES FOR GROUP BOOKINGS, CORPORATE and TEAM BUILDING EVENTS. STUNNING WATERSIDE VENUE. HEN PARTIES ARE WELCOME.

www.exetercookeryschool.co.uk

SET IN AN IDYLLIC LOCATION ON EXETER’S HISTORIC QUAYSIDE


Just 20 minutes drive from both Bath & Bristol lies the tiny Hamlet of Stanton Wick, home to The Carpenters Arms. A traditional inn Serving great food in a relaxed environment in the country. Plenty of parking available. Private Room Perfect for relaxed private dining & small conferences. Great packages available.

Stanton Wick, Nr. Pensford North Somerset, BS39 4BX

tHIRTEEN en-suite bedrooms These delightful rooms offer king sized beds, digital flat screen televisions & superfast fibre optic internet, all in a contemporary styled room.

01761 490202 www.the-carpenters-arms.co.uk


AFTERS NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

Could Noya's 'lunch club' be one of the the best value feeds in Bath?

HIGHLIGH

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FLOAT Y ER B O A T Top tap

FOLKLORrkE Street,

off Pa Hidden jusotus e Café is a badly The Folk Hkept s ecret

as o all aboarn t he river: d t he StarUsnder

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BIRD HOUSféE

Green Bird Ca sorts us right out on a miserable midweek afternoon PAGE 89


A F T E R S

(NEW DIGS)

 

NOYA’S KITCHEN

       

THIS ENERGETIC BATH COOK SERVES UP FRESH, COMFORTING ASIAN FOOD IN HER HOMELY CAFÉ, FINDS JESSICA CARTER

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he might have opened her café just last January, but Noya Pawlyn has been cooking her authentic, colourful Vietnamese food for Bath locals for five-odd years, having opened up her kitchen at home to run cookery classes and held regular sell-out supper clubs at Bear Flat. She still does all of the above, but now in her own rustic, cosy little restaurant on St James’s Parade. Full of energy and vigour, Noya has found an ideal outlet in cooking, and has been whipping up meals since the age of seven. It was then that she left Vietnam with her family, and was charged with

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getting dinner on the table for her four siblings while her parents were at work. She may have left her home country at a young age, but its food certainly came with her. Vietnamese cuisine is characterised by its freshness, colour, texture, balance of tastes, and incorporation of leafy herbs, and Noya knows it inside out. Evening supper clubs – with set five-course menus – run at the café on Friday, Saturday and some Thursday nights, while lunch is served from Tuesday to Saturday. Not a trained chef, this has probably been the biggest leap for Noya; having orders for different dishes flying

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into the kitchen unpredictably is a whole new experience for her. Not that this was apparent to us punters in the dining room, though. There was a definite a rush on when we dropped in – front of house were zipping about with a sense of urgency – but the food itself came swiftly and well presented. The laid back venue was mostly full, and wasn’t only playing host to lunch-break catch ups like mine and E’s; one table was talking shop over pots of speciality tea, while our neighbours to the other side were a couple enjoying a long lunch with a bottle of wine they’d brought in with them (did I mention it’s BYO here?). Inside, big windows (the building has a gorgeous Georgian frontage with leaded glass) let in lots of light, while the midnight blue walls keep things cosy and atmospheric. Look out for all the old family photos dotted around in frames, too. The lunchtime menu changes all the time: it’s officially weekly, we’re told, but Noya is prone to playing around with it whenever the mood takes her. It’s always short and sweet though, and you’ll find it chalked on a small blackboard, hung up on the wall with string. There were a couple of starters (£6 each) and three mains available in small or large portions (£6 or £9), meaning you can try a bit of everything if you like, or hog your bowl to yourself if that’s more your style. It struck me now inclusive the food is; while meat is available there’s no focus on it, and there are an equal number of veggie alternatives. Gluten-free dishes can be rustled up with ease, too. Dumplings are always a win, right? And especially so here. With crisp, thin jackets, they came with Noya’s obligatory chilli dip and a fresh ’slaw of carrot and mint, peppered with sesame seeds. E’s were stuffed with sweet potato, and the first bite saw a satisfying crunch give way to a creamy, fluffy filling, with a delicate sweetness that paired a treat with that dip. My meatier version swapped out the potato for a generous amount of nicely cooked, well-seasoned pork. The aubergine and ginger stir fry –  fresh on the menu that day, thanks to a supplier’s glut and Noya’s whim – came with perfectly cooked jasmine rice, red chilli, spring onion, pickled radish, nuts and a heap of coriander (herbs are way more than just a garnish in these dishes). The aubergine itself had been cooked until the flesh was soft and silky, and coated in a thick, intense dark sauce that seeped pleasingly into the rice. Made from chilli, soy, dark brown sugar and rice vinegar, it achieved that ideal balance of sour, sweet and sharp character, with a gentle kick of spice. The tofu and fresh vegetable stir-fry offered a mouthful of different flavours with every bite: fine rice noodles hid beneath sweet, tangy pickled carrot, crushed nuts, radishes, crunchy beansprouts and chunks of tofu, with a polite suggestion of heat. This really feels like food for the soul – it’s fresh, vibrant and nourishing, and you certainly don’t have to have grown up eating Vietnamese meals to find it uber-comforting. With bowls like this from £6 (which you could easily spend on a sarnie in Bath, right?), the value box gets a big fat tick, too. Noya’s Kitchen, 7 St James’s Parade, Bath BA1 1UL; 01225 684439; noyaskitchen.co.uk

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A F T E R S

(LUSH LUNCHES)

 

FOLK HOUSE CAFÉ         IT WAS A FIRST TIME VISIT TO THIS CHILLED OUT, ETHICAL CAFÉ FOR JESSICA CARTER

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Folk House Café, 40a Park Street, Bristol BS1 5JG; 0117 908 5035; folkhousecafe.co.uk

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he light, fun, eclectic interior of The Folk House Café gives plenty away about the food that the kitchen team knocks out. The walls display work from local artists; repurposed tins are used as cutlery holders on the tables; contrasting colours coat almost every surface; and festoon lights hang at the bar for a cool, festive feel. The food, you’ll also find, comes from local residents (The Severn Project, Four Seasons Organics, Bruton Dairy) with a focus on sustainability – the team are keen to do their bit to limit their impact on Mother Earth. And the dishes are vibrant, colourful and varied, with hearty, comforting dishes sitting alongside more virtuous meals on the ever-changing menu. To drink are organic wines and spirits and locally brewed beers. Coffee comes from Clifton Coffee and would go down a treat with anything from the heaving display of cakes and slices, which include a really decent selection of vegan and gluten-free bakes. Lunch is served 12pm-3pm (brekkie stops at 11.30am), and the menu is made up of a seasonal soup (£4.70), a pasta dish (£7.50), a daily plate (£8), a hot bowl (£6), and a tart (£7.50). All of which, obviously, change up on the regular. Having missed the tart (it was already sold out at 1.30pm – a good sign), we dove in with a pasta dish, a hot bowl and the daily plate. The pasta was macaroni cheese, the long tube shapes bound in a thick sauce and topped with toasted breadcrumbs for a lovely bit of crunch. Stodgy and cheesy, it screamed homemade comfort food. The hot bowl, meanwhile, was a black bean chilli, served with rice, sour cream and fresh coriander. It had spice and smokiness in equal measure, and, shovelling it into our gobs, C and I commented on how we’re still on the hunt for a properly decent veggie chilli recipe like they’ve used here. ‘Hefty’ would be the chosen adjective to describe the daily plate, which was piled with all the meze favourites. Dolmades were soft and, as C commented, not nearly as greasy as they can sometimes be; the hummus was topped with a generous peppering of paprika and a glug of good olive oil; and the sweet, earthy beetroot borani paired up nicely with a slightly salty, herby feta. More still came in the form of a good heap of potato salad, grilled courgette slices, a pile of green olives and a mound of generously dressed salad leaves, Needless to say, we didn’t have any room left for one of those cakes, sadly… Staff are friendly and laid back, food is fresh, fuss-free and good value, and – seeing as the place was pretty well populated when we rocked up in the middle of the day on a Thursday – it seems safe to say that there are plenty of Bristolians inclined to agree.

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Our ingredients are fresh, seasonal, local & ethical - that means meat from farms not factories, free range eggs, organic milk, direct trade tea & coffee, artisan bread, local craft beers & gins. Good vibes taste better. Join us.

templestreetcanteen@gmail.com


( R E S TA U R A N T S O N T H E R I V E R )

 

UNDER THE STARS

       

IT MAY HAVE TAKEN HER A FAIR WHILE TO EAT AT THIS UNIQUE CITY CENTRE JOINT, BUT SURELY IT’S BETTER LATE THAN NEVER, SAYS JESSICA CARTER

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his floating bar and restaurant has been moored up at the cobbled harbourside, by Cascade Steps, for exactly eight years now. It’s eluded me for all that time, though; I have a hazy memory of after-work drinks here one summer evening a few years ago, but apart from that I’d never stepped foot aboard. I can only explain this, really, with the same rule that keeps locals from ever visiting their town’s famous landmarks: it’s part of the furniture, so you take for granted that it will always be there and feel no immediate need to actually visit. And, in many cases, you never do. In all the years I’ve lived in Bristol, for instance, I’ve never been inside St Mary Redcliffe. Or up Cabot Tower. Or inside Bristol Cathedral. (Yes, I’m ashamed. Happy?)

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Although very much a year-round venue, it’s surely this season when cool river venues like this come into their own, be it for the aforementioned drinks to celebrate the end of the working day, lapping up the remaining sunshine from the top deck, or getting a proper feed onboard while staring out across the river. It was the latter that L and I rocked up for on a recent Monday evening. It was pretty chilly (the weather gods clearly hadn’t got the memo about it being May), but there were still people sat out on the top deck, enjoying the fresh air. We – not made of such strong stuff – made our way down inside, though. Light and cosy, the restaurant sports lots of rustic wood and touches of deep teal and mustard yellow. You can see that the back bar is well stocked, and there are plenty of wines and local beers on

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A F T E R S

the menu, joined by a decent cocktail and spirits list. Food-wise, it’s predominantly about the tapas, but there’s a weighty collection of stone-baked pizzas, too. A glass of a light and fresh rosé (well, it’s technically almost summer, even if you’d never guess by the temperature outside) was soon in hand, and crusty slices of warm bread were being employed to scoop up a nicely punchy hummus (£3.50). There’s a good spread of meat and fish small plates, and an even chunkier list of vegetarian ones, though the whole lot is concise enough to fit nicely on one side of A4. There are some traditional Spanish tapas staples here – chorizo in red wine, crab croquetas, and Padrón peppers, for instance –  but there’s also plenty of influence from other corners of the globe. Thin, delicate slices of deeply blushing steak (£6.50) came really nicely seasoned, with a Parmesan breadcrumb and fresh-tasting cherry tomato pasta, while a pair of lamb skewers (£6) were generous in portion (there’s plenty of meat per skewer here) with a vibrant green mint and pistachio pesto. (If I were being picky I’d probably have liked that accompaniment to deliver a wee bit more sharpness, just to cut through the nicely lardy meat.) Spanish black pudding with bacon and duck egg (£6) was a proper standout dish, the richness of the morcilla elevated by the thick,

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gooey duck yolk, and lifted perfectly by a sweet and tangy forest fruit dressing that sliced right through. From the seafood selection was hake (£6) which had been panfried for pleasingly crisp skin. Pokey flavours contrasted with the sweet, mild flesh: a vibrant salsa verde, slices of really good pickled cucumber, and an overarching citrusiness. Sweet potato and goat’s cheese cakes (£5.50) brought some carb to the table, and blended the earthy, salty cheese with sweet, intense balsamic. Fresh ribbons of tagliatelle sported a creamy, garlicy coat and weaved their way around thick slices of wild mushroom (£5). An affogato (£6) afforded me my first socially acceptable taste of Bailey’s since Christmas, while a hypnotically wobbly panna cotta (£4.50) was light and silky, with a gentle vanilla sweetness and a sharp blackberry sauce. The restaurant was pretty full throughout our meal (despite it being a Monday), with after-work drinkers giving way to the dinnertime crowd. There was a nice hum of atmosphere and a chilled out vibe, which suited the food and riverside setting. This place will stay on my radar now. Under the Stars, Narrow Quay, Bristol BS1 4QA; 0117 929 8392; underthestarsbar.co.uk

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A F T E R S

(BEAUTY SPOTS)

 

GREEN BIRD CAFÉ

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his pretty little caff is hidden away down a quintessentially Bathonian street, cobbled and lined with old-school baywindowed shops. Even the downpour that we trotted along it in (c’mon summer, where are you?) couldn’t dampen its charm. Green Bird was opened about three years ago by couple Claire and Henry Hunton, with chef Henry having come from Chandos Deli, where he’d been for 13 years. Open from 8am, the team kick off the day with a breakfast menu, which lists everything from muesli to pastries, pancakes to chorizo and butternut squash hash. Come midday, brekkie gives way to lunch, then, until 3pm, there’s all kinds of on-toast, sandwich, soup and salad options. Sounds like pretty standard café fare, when you put it like that, doesn’t it? Don’t be fooled, this is food with a good bit o’ style: things on toast include Isle of Wight plum tomatoes with cream cheese and almond;

JESSICA CARTER’S FRIDAY IS IMPROVED BY SEVERAL POINTS THANKS TO THIS FRESH AND FILLING LUNCH... sandwiches are served open, tartine style, topped with the likes of goat’s cheese, onion marmalade, spinach and walnut; and salads run along the lines of roast broccoli with chickpea, feta, dried cranberries and sesame seeds. Sounds fancy, yeah? It’s thoughtful food, for sure, but its still rustic and down-toearth, with a proper homemade feel. We stumbled in – brollies dripping, hangovers lurking and stomachs impatiently rumbling – one Friday lunchtime recently, and were well up for a proper feed. So we didn’t hold back. The new Vietnamese chicken salad (£7.99) was first out of the kitchen. Chunks of white roast chicken were entangled in a heap of super-fine and well-dressed rice noodles. Chilli, lime, peanut and fresh coriander gave it a real freshness and that distinctive Asian layering of flavour. Loved it. A colourful open sandwich (£6.50) saw Bertinet bread heaped with wafer thin slices of salt beef and Emmental cheese, drizzled

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with a vibrant yellow sweet mustard sauce and finished with pickles. The toppings were in great proportion for a balance of mild, tangy, sweet and fiery flavours. Not able to choose between the homemade baked beans and creamy mushrooms (£6.50 each, also on the breakfast menu), my lunch date tried both (his hangover was taking hold by this point). The white beans had been slow cooked in a tomato sauce with paprika and ginger for a mild kick, and the mushrooms were sautéed with cream, garlic and thyme. He washed it down with a homemade lemonade, and looked far perkier afterwards. Finishing off with a strong coffee and banging treacle tart (£3) with a crumb made from the surplus ends of the Bertinet loaves, we left in brighter moods. And it had even stopped raining – coincidence? Green Bird Café, 11 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP; 01225 487846; greenbirdcafe.co.uk

    


L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

ALFRESCO FEASTING? I discovered Pi Shop with a group of friends on a warm evening last summer, and it was just gorgeous sitting out by the harbourside. Any place that only has ice cream on the dessert menu is good with me. ONE TO WATCH? I’ve only been once – so far! – but Shop 3 Bistro is seriously good. Tucked into a quiet corner in Clifton, it’s a relaxed, friendly place with a brilliant menu. POSH NOSH? Casamia is where I go for a real treat. The food is just exquisite, and I love the wine pairings. Also great to see so many young chefs in the kitchen, getting brilliant training in a Michelin-starred restaurant.

PAUL BLAKEMORE

SUNDAY LUNCH? I love The Kensington Arms any day of the week, but Sunday lunch is my favourite. They serve the most enormous Yorkshire puddings you’ll ever see, and there’s such a nice, relaxed atmosphere. BEST CURRY? I’ve lived in Clifton for eight years, and annoyingly only went to The Mint Room for the first time six months ago. It has a beautiful dining room, and the food is seriously good.

EMMa StenninG

SOMETHING SWEET? Ice cream is my favourite sweet thing, so it’s very hard to walk home past Swoon on a summer’s eve without popping in. Their mango sorbet really is amazing. BEST VALUE? I’m a huge fan of Wahaca. I love the nachos and guacamole, and the spicy chicken with rice and pickles.

THE CHIEF EXEC OF BRISTOL OLD VIC SPILLS THE BEANS ON HER FAVOURITE HANGOUTS

BREAKFAST? I’m a regular at Source in St Nick’s Market and have breakfast meetings there several times a week. They’ve got the best poached eggs in Bristol, as well as super-friendly staff and a brilliant deli, too. NEXT ON THE HIT LIST? Still trying to get a table at Pasta Loco… CHEEKY COCKTAIL? Milk Thistle. I love the speakeasy vibe, and the Negronis are delicious.

QUICK! Now add this little lot to your contact book...

BEST WINE MERCHANT? It has to be Averys. I’m slowly learning more about wine, and a trip to the cellars is always a real treat – now a Christmas Eve tradition. Really helpful staff, too.

• Pi Shop, Bristol BS1 6FU; thepishop.co.uk • Shop 3 Bistro, Bristol BS8 4HW; shop3bistro.co.uk • Casamia, Bristol BS1 6FU; casamiarestaurant.co.uk • The Kensington Arms, Bristol BS 6 6NP; thekensingtonarms.co.uk • The Mint Room, Bristol BS8 1AF; mintroombristol.co.uk • Swoon, Bristol BS1 5TB; swoononaspoon.co.uk • Wahaca, Bristol BS 8 1QU; wahaca.co.uk • Pasta Loco, Bristol BS6 6JY; pastaloco.co.uk • Source, Bristol BS1 1JW; source-food.co.uk • Milk Thistle, Bristol BS1 1EB; milkthistlebristol.com • Averys, Bristol BS1 5LD; averys.com • Reg the Veg, Bristol BS8 4AA; regtheveg.co.uk

FAVOURITE GROCERY SHOP? I love Reg the Veg in Clifton. It’s a five minute walk from my house, and I love wandering over there on a Saturday afternoon. With several veggie and vegan friends, I’m trying to get more adventurous with my vegetable cookery, and seeing all the beautiful produce here always inspires. bristololdvic.org.uk

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Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 76  
Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 76  
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