Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 71

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What’s another name for a Brussels sprout?

NO. 71 JANUARY 2018

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LE SA ! R ON TE W IN O W N Premium, Sleek, German Engineered - Luxury Kitchens at competitive prices! Why choose Kutchenhaus? We are the largest retailer of quality German engineered kitchens, delivering pre-built luxury kitchens at a competitive price. Manufactured in Germany, our kitchens come to you directly from the factory. Visit our showroom to start designing your dream kitchen

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BATH & BRISTO L NO. 71 JANUARY 2018

What’s another name for a Brussels sprout?

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CRUMBS

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ISSUE 71 JANUARY 2018 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk ART DIRECTOR

REd ALERT

TREVOR GILHAM ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE

ALISTAIR TAYLOR alistair.taylor@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER

GEMMA SCRINE gemma.scrine@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 www.mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we learned the secrets to Pi Shop’s ace pizzas at a Pi masterclass, explored the Kingsmead Square street food market, and drank all the mulled things at the Wapping Wharf Christmas fair...

large version

THE NEW YEAR is often a time for trying new things, so we are starting 2018 with Veganuary, a month of embracing a vegan diet and showcasing the fantastic plantbased options that are out there. No matter what your normal dietary preferences are, Veganuary is a great opportunity to give new foods a go and celebrate vegetables. With cooking, it’s a time to let go of the old favourites and climb out of your comfort zone. We have 11 delicious vegan recipes for you to have a go at, and have shortlisted some of our favourite new vegan cookbooks, sure to get your taste buds tingling as you’re curled up in front of the fire. Favour seasonal recipes, and make the most of the fantastic locally grown vegetables around Bath and Bristol; root vegetables and healthy dark green kales and cabbages are at their best right now. In the thriving food scene of the South West, there are many great local vegan products to fill our cupboards with, all delicious and some ever-so-indulgent – like the vegan wines that Alan from Great Western Wine has picked out for us. (We trust they will be just as great in February, for all those doing Dry January!) Finally, eating out for vegans is no longer an afterthought (we’ve all experienced the ubiquitous mushroom risotto), with exciting menus from an ever-expanding choice of vegan-friendly restaurants and cafés in Bath and Bristol. Read on for our review of one of the latest additions to Bath – new 100-percent vegan restaurant, Nourish. Before I go, I would like to say a big thank you to the Crumbs team for focusing on plantbased food for this New Year issue, and putting vegetables centre stage. Happy New Year!

Rachel Demuth, vegetarian chef and cookery teacher; demuths.co.uk

Crumbs is now an app! You can read all editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, Cotswolds and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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Fantastic beasts‌.

t: 0117 9731062 4b Waterloo Street, Clifton


Table of Contents NO.71 JANUARY 2018

STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT The big red one 12 OPENINGS ETC Hot gossip 21 SIX PACK Designer outlet

CHEF!

AMAZING RECIPES FROM THE REGION’S TOP KITCHENS

32 Spinach and sourdough ravioli, by Martin Stone 34 Winter coleslaw, by Rachel Demuth 37 Cabbage thoran, by Vicki and Alan Mowart 39 Courgette pakoras, by Sarah and Arun Gurung 44 Cauliflower steaks, by Beth Thomas 47 Vegetable korma, by Vinod Singh 50 Roast squash and apple, by Gill Meller and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall 53 Walnut bolognese, by Philip Pearce 58 Artichoke and mushroom salad, by Rob Howell

ADDITIONAL RECIPES

10 Pickled red cabbage, by Freddy Bird 25 Pearl barley and sprout salad, by Rita Serano

KITCHEN ARMOURY 66 THE WANT LIST Prep that veg

MAINS 70 V-SPOT Could you go plant-based for Veganuary? 77 IN THE VILLAGE Clifton’s calling... 87 GRILLED Elly Wentworth of MasterChef

AFTERS

NEW & NOTABLE RESTAURANTS, CAFÉS, BARS

99 Nourish 102 The Rising Sun 104 Wellbourne PLUS! 106 LITTLE BLACK BOOK


THE COTTAGE INN Welcome aboard! The Cottage Inn, Bristol has reopened its doors and welcomes you to come and try our brand-new seafood inspired menu which has been crafted to give you a perfect waterside experience. Weยนve even got a take away menu now available, so why not don your deck shoes and head on down to relax with us by the water. THE COTTAGE INN 01179 215256 Baltic Wharf, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG

www.butcombe.com


STA RT E R S INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

hOt dRAM!

A HUGE FAN OF ROBERT BURNS’ WORKS OF POETIC ART? OR NEVER READ ONE? EITHER WAY, IT’S NOT ENTIRELY RELEVANT; YOU’LL STILL LOVE THESE FUN, WHISKY-SOAKED BURNS’ NIGHT SHINDIGS, WE BET (20 JANUARY)

(25 JANUARY)

(25 & 26 JANUARY)

Enjoy a four-course Burns’ Night supper as well as live music and ceilidh dancing at this popular annual event. Tickets are £62.50 each, and include a sparkling drinks reception. romanbathssearcys.co.uk

At this intimate dinner hosted in Milk Thistle’s atmospheric dining room, diners will tuck into a Scottish-style menu from the chefs at The Ox, matched to Scotch whisky from Glen Grant. Tickets are £65 and are available online. milkthistlebristol.com

This indie drinks shop is hosting a couple of special nights of whisky tasting to mark the Bard of Ayrshire’s birthday. Guests will get to try five drams, guided by whisky buff and owner of the shop, Chris Scullion. Tickets £25 a pop. independentspiritofbath.co.uk

DINNER AND DANCING AT THE ROMAN BATHS AND PUMP ROOM

DINNER WITH WHISKY FLIGHT AT MILK THISTLE

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WHISKY TASTING AT INDEPENDENT SPIRIT

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S T A R T E R S

red cabbaGe

WITH ITS JOLLY COLOURING AND ENDLESS HEALTH BENEFITS, RED CABBAGE REALLY IS KING OF THE BRASSICAS. NATURALLY, THE LIGHTER YOU COOK IT THE BETTER…

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ed cabbage is so glamorous and regal in his shiny red coat that many of us – cooking him just a couple of times a year as part of a traditional winter spread – tend to mutter to ourselves as we do so. And what we mutter is this: why don’t I eat this stuff more often? Well, why don’t we? After all, red cabbage is delicious, easy to grow, long lasting in the fridge (if the outer leaves go black and soggy, just peel ’em away to reveal glossy freshness beneath), and looks a delight on the plate. But perhaps red cabbage’s enduring qualities are part of his downfall. Like the Red King of Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, he’s happy to do nothing very much the entire winter – just as the Red King snores away under a tree for the whole book – in the sure knowledge he’ll still be fresh as a daisy when we get round to him. Perhaps that’s why, in no hurry, we buy a red cabbage each year – and then forget about him. More fool us!

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SO whAT ShOULD we be doing? Mostly thought of as a great accompaniment to a roast, red cabbage has many more strings to its bow. It makes a great winter salad with nuts and Cheshire cheese, for one, and works in a stir fry too. There’s a mulled version that tastes like everyone’s favourite by-the-fireside tipple – perfect! – and then there’s Chinese braised red cabbage, which adds flavours like soy sauce and star anise. And though red cabbage goes brilliantly with everything from goose to venison to anything pig – even the humble bangers and mash – there are plenty of one-pot dishes it’s happy to star in, too. A midwinter classic, though, is the combo of braised red cabbage with smoky bacon and apple, a winner since Eliza Acton popularised the recipe in 1845. (Full disclosure here: she actually used ham.) Just heat some olive oil in a pan, chuck in the bacon and some fennel seeds, then add onion until golden and sticky. Now introduce some sharp apple (Granny Smith or Cox would be best), followed by the cabbage and a liquid of some sort. Stir together, and cook on a low heat for an hour. The result: a sticky-sweet cabbage dish you’ll want to eat straight from the pan. What liquid to use, though? Red wine vinegar and cider vinegar are most tempting – and we’ve even heard of Ribena being used! – but balsamic would be an interesting choice, adding a caramel-like quality. Others add cranberry sauce to help with the sweet side of things, and some bin the fennel in favour of cloves, nutmeg or cinnamon. Whatever you put in there, though – and there must be some vinegar, or the red colour will run, leaving an unappetising blue mush – the end result should be an entertaining mix of the sweet and the sour. Alternatively, red cabbage can be boiled or pickled, the latter stretching out the cabbage-eating season and allowing you to add aromatics like mustard seeds, chilli and ginger.

Rachel says “Red cabbage is in season all winter, and is such an underrated vegetable. We love red cabbage in coleslaw, in fabulous red sauerkraut, braised with chestnuts and lots of warming spices, or even to add colour to brighten up bubble and squeak. “As red cabbage is tough, I tend to braise it with vegetable stock, a touch of vinegar and spices. Keep it covered and cook for at least an hour on a gentle heat, which makes the cabbage unctuous. Spices I find go well with it are caraway, dill, juniper, coriander, mustard seed, nutmeg, chilli and black pepper. “But cabbage is great raw too. Any cabbage is the foundation of coleslaw, and red cabbage gives it great colour. A lovely simple coleslaw uses finely sliced red cabbage, grated apple and sultanas for sweetness, paired with a lemony dressing.”

bUt what is this thing, anyway? Well, red cabbage is a variety of brassica, fairly obviously, variously described as purple, red or blue, which grows differently depending on the pH value of the soil it’s living in. It goes red in acidic soils, purple in neutral soils, and a sort of yellowgreen in alkaline ones. Harvested at the end of the year, it’s been part of the northern European diet since forever. Native to the Mediterranean, it was first popularised by Cato the Younger – a Roman statesman who lived just before Christ – who some credit with inventing coleslaw. A hundred years later, Pliny the Elder focused on its medicinal qualities. With these two backing it, the Romans quickly spread red cabbage across Europe. Picking a red cabbage is easy – you want one that’s bright, crisp and heavy, without puffy leaves or signs that the outer layer has already been removed – and prep’s a doddle too. Just strip off the outer leaves, wash, then slice into quarters, taking out the hard central core of each – though these are lovely to eat raw. Then chop or shred. SINCE IT’S JANUARY and everyone’s feeling chilly and skint – not to mention flu-hammered – it’s worth taking a moment to think on the further benefits of red cabbage. For one, it’s thrifty. A head will hardly break the bank, and goes a long way. But even more striking are the health benefits. Red cabbage heaves with vitamins A, C and K, and boasts plenty of minerals and antioxidants too, so eating it raw – or juicing it – provides a fantastic boost to the immune system. It combats inflammation and arthritis; is good for the bones; battles degenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer’s); promotes a healthy gut; and even ranks high amongst the cancerfighters. Though all cabbage is good for you, red is best – it has more vitamin C than oranges, even. Still not sold? Then keep in mind that the Danes swear by it – and with all things Scandi still in the ascendence, it’s hard to see this king of the brassicas going away any time soon.

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R E C I P E

FREDDY BIRD GETS IN A BIT OF A PICKLE WITH THIS MONTH’S HERO INGREDIENT…

PICKLED RED CABBAGE THERE IS BARELY A DAY that goes by where I don’t consume some form of brassica – whether it be in my early morning smoothy, or simply steamed and tossed in a little olive oil. I love to eat it raw, too; sliced, and eaten nice and fresh, it has a wonderful sweetness (leave it too long, though, and it turns bitter). My favourite way to eat it, however, is pickled (I have a small addiction for pickles). So, I always look forward to the end of the night in the kitchen; we take the last of the flatbread dough, roll it out into a huge sheet and throw it on the grill to blister all over, before throwing on yoghurt, harissa and then the meat scraps (all the bits of meat left over in the resting tray, like scraps of chicken or lamb, soaked in their juices). We top it all off with torn coriander and then the pickles. They’re usually chopped guindillas, cauliflower and – my favourite – coarsely chopped sweet pickled red cabbage. Then we finish it all off by pouring over the meat juices. We roll this up and cut it into chunks for the chefs to share, the yoghurt, harissa, meat juices and pickle juices all spilling out. After a night of cooking great food for customers, this has to be our favourite meal of the day. It works without the pickles, but they’re what really make it. Pickled cabbage is also a great accompaniment to lamb kofta or other fatty meats (we serve bowls of the stuff at Three Brothers Burgers – perfect for cutting through the meat and melted cheese). It’s also a wonderful accompaniment to raclette – a firm family favourite of ours at this time of year! The recipe couldn’t be more simple: coarsely shredded cabbage, covered in this pickle liquor and left for anywhere between 6 hours and a couple of weeks. (Or more – if you’re able to stay out of the jar, that is!) Lido, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 332 3970; lidobristol.com

INGREDIENTS 600g caster sugar 40g sea salt 1 ltr moscatel vinegar 1 ½ ltrs water 1 tbsp coriander seeds, slightly crushed 1 tbsp fennel seeds 6 bay leaves 1 tsp wild black peppercorns (or regular, if you can’t find them) 1 tbsp mustard seeds 2 red cabbages, cores removed and shredded (¼cm thick slices)

METHOD 1 Heat all the ingredients, apart from the cabbage, together in a saucepan until the sugar and salt have both dissolved. Then remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly. 2 Meanwhile, divide the cabbage into a couple of Kilner jars. When the pickle liquor has cooled, slightly pour it over the cabbage and seal the jar closed. Leave for at least 6 hours before digging in.

TIP: THIS PICKLE WORKS WELL FOR LOADS OF VEGETABLES –

DON’T STOP AT RED CABBAGE! TRY ROMANESCO, CARROTS, CAULIFLOWER AND BABY ONIONS, TOO

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S T A R T E R S

Openings etc

RICE ONE! A new Vietnamese restaurant has just opened in Bath on St James’ Parade. Noya’s Kitchen is founded by local Noya Pawlyn, who has been running superpopular supper clubs (and we mean popular – they’ve been known to be booked out six months in advance!) in the city since 2013. The restaurant is housed in a Grade II listed building, and is the new home of those aforementioned dinner events (formerly held at The Bear Pad café), which now run three nights a week. The pre-bookable evenings see guests tucking into ever-changing five-course set menus. Drop-in lunches are also on the go between Mondays and Saturdays, promising a selection of Vietnamese small plates. Noya, who is always keen for her guests to try something new, will be experimenting with fresh, novel dishes as well as serving her well-known and much-loved signatures. noyaskitchen.co.uk

TOUR THING The Bristol Food Tour is launching a brand new, 100-percent vegan version of its culinary explorations in 2018. The new tour will take place south of the river, covering Wapping Wharf and North Street, letting groups in on where to find the best, most exciting plant-based food on that patch. This joins TBFT’s already-popular vegan tour in Stokes Croft, which will also keep running regularly. The Bristol Food Tour launched in summer 2016, and has quickly become a favourite way of exploring the city through food – for tourists and locals – with dates regularly selling out. Among the treats on the new tour are Middle Eastern creations, big Indian flavours and an exclusive vegan cheese tasting. thebristolfoodtour.com

NEW DELI Bath has a brand new shop and deli in the form of The Italian Food Hall, where you can expect to find regional Italian produce from small, independent, and mostly family owned businesses. Laura Doria is the person behind this new venue at the top of Milsom Street; originally from Italy, she moved to Bath three years ago and has set up the shop with two Italybased friends. The team are importing everything from fresh cheese (think ricotta and burrata) to pasta, cured meats and chocolate, and much of the produce is from artisans in smaller, lesser known regions. There’s also a good range of food that’s gluten free and vegan (we hear the vegan pesto is particularly ace!), and there are paninis and coffee to go, too. theitalianfoodhall.com

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NORTHERN LIGHT The Old Butcher’s on North Street in Bristol has launched a brand new Spanish tapas menu, and we’ve been along to test it out (obvs). Scott Hislop (formerly exec chef of the No.1 Harbourside group) is manning the pass now, and it’s a bit of a homecoming too, as he was the chef at sister site The Old Bookshop when it first launched in 2011. Platos is the name of the menu, and it features lots of slow-cooked meats, fresh seafood and hearty veggie dishes right now; our faves are the beef cheek (bang on the money, with the meat coated in a rich and fiery sauce), jamon butter, and the uber-tender, slow-cooked chipotle-smoked ribs. The inside has had a wee bit of a tweak too; new plants and thick red velvet curtains give it a softer, cosier edge.

new kid On the bLOCk MEET ADRIAN KIRIKMAA, WHO JUST OPENED NEW GAFF B BLOCK IN KEYNSHAM an industrial, shabby chic style, and offer great pizzas, coffee and craft beer. How many of you are there in the kitchen? There are three in the pizza division, with the team headed up by pizza legend Ben Sacree!

facebook.com/theoldbutchersbristol So, Adrian, when did you begin cooking? When I was a wee boy in Scouts, over campfires. That was when I discovered I loved food, and decided the best way to eat was to cook! Fondest foodie memories from your childhood? Ha, that’s an easy one. I’ve never forgotten my first prawn cocktail; it was 1978 in St Peter’s Port, Guernsey, and it blew me away! How long have you been in the industry? It’s been 35 years now – and I’ve enjoyed every minute.

SChOOL OF wOK

A pair of Bristol chefs have launched a brand new educational scheme. Having teamed up with Weston College, St Katherine’s School and Ashton Gate Stadium, Josh Eggleton and Adrian Kirikmaa (who is also this month's New Kid on the Block!) hope to “pair practical skills and food knowledge with actual industry experience in professional kitchens,” to inspire chefs and give them the best start in the industry. Students will be taught by professional chefs, taken to visit producers and artisans, and given the opportunity to cook at events and take up apprenticeships that fit with their career goals. The School of Food aims to boost the numbers of people entering the hospitality industry, and ensure there’s a supply of new, experienced talent to support our growing food and drink landscape. school-of-food.co.uk

And how would you describe your style of cooking? Rustic, seasonal and tasty! What’s been the toughest job of your career so far? When I started work at Billesley Manor; I had to build a team from scratch and maintain two AA rosettes. And your proudest achievement? Being named Best Ambassador for Food back in 2014 was a highlight. But I’m incredibly proud of my work with City of Bristol College, my charity work – and also opening B Block at The Chocolate Quarter in Keynsham. Speaking of which, tell us about the concept of B Block. We wanted to pay tribute to the original chocolate factory, so have designed the restaurant with

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Besides opening B Block, what else have you been up to recently? I’m part of Bristol Food Connections and am involved in lots of work in the community and for charities, including work with the homeless, ARA, Bristol Drugs Project, Matthew Tree Project and the Nicola Corey Support Foundation. I also help to plan Great Bristol Menu and have just co-founded The School of Food, to help train and inspire young people interested in a career into hospitality. You keep yourself busy, don’t you! When you do get a bit of spare time, which local restaurants do you like to eat in? Flour and Ash, Pi Shop, The Pony and Trap, and Hart’s Bakery. What do you think of the local food scene? I consider Bristol the capital of the UK for food; there has been a culinary revolution here over the last five years, with the number of restaurants trebling. Bristol’s fantastic, diverse culture is represented in its restaurant offering. What are your favourite ingredients at the moment? Squash, bay leaf, star anise, chillies, kale and artichokes. I also love to pickle and brine ingredients! Do you grow anything yourself? Yes, I have an allotment in Westonsuper-Mare, where I live; we grow pumpkins, squash, raspberries, tomatoes, pears, apples and plums. I love making homemade jams and chutneys. Favourite suppliers you use for the restaurant? One of my favourites is Wogan Coffee; Matt is a coffee legend. I also love working with Total Produce, who support our charity and community work. b-blockpizza.co.uk



S T A R T E R S

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MADE UP

visits the new @jamaicastreetstores

The Methuen Arms in Corsham has officially relaunched after an ongoing refurbishment. Butcombe took the pub over at the end of 2016, and the following 12 months have been spent working on the centuries-old building to give it a new-look bar and restaurant, as well as a handful of extra bedrooms out in the former stable buildings. While redesigning it, the team have been careful to maintain the pub’s character and sense of history, keeping the bare stone walls and exposed beams, and even discovering and restoring an old parquet floor. To reflect the pub’s new chapter, its celebrated head chef Leigh Evans has launched a new menu too, which features everything from classic comfort food, like game and suet pudding, to his signature scallop dish. themethuenarms.com

@simplelampoon

is served a crackin’ Margherita @pishopbristol

PIE ANOTHER DAY Pieminister has just released its first ever vegan pie. Kevin, which hits the shelves at the start of January, has been a long time in the making, with the team having worked hard to perfect a recipe for vegan pastry that’s as flakey, crumbly, and delicious as their regular pie casing. Kevin sees said pastry filled with a rich ragu of mushroom, tomato, quinoa, thyme and red wine, punctuated by the sweet tang of baby onions that burst in your mouth (it’s been going down a storm at Crumbs HQ). Now that the all important dairy-free pastry is nailed, expect these guys to be bringing out more vegan creations in the future… pieminister.co.uk

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@steph_wetherell

pays a visit to the cows @ivyhousefarmdairyl Fancy seeing your pics here? Best get tagging #CrumbsSnaps on Insta then, hadn’t you?


S T A R T E R S

asK the Waiter MEET SCOTT MARTIN, GENERAL MANGER AT PI SHOP

Been here long? I joined two weeks before we opened, in July 2016.

H I P SHOPS

And where did you work before? CAU, up on Clifton Triangle. Favourte thing about being in this industry? Making people happy and seeing that they’re loving what we do. What’s the best bit about working at Pi Shop? The vibe is great: we have a really friendly team, and the informality of our service and the personality of the restaurant is a real joy. Also, we get to collaborate with sister restaurants Casamia and Paco Tapas, so there’s a wealth of knowledge to share. And the most challenging part? Not eating too much Pi and dip... What skills have you learnt here? I’ve definitely upped my cocktail game! Getting to work with Matt Keegan, who has had loads of bar and front of house experience, is brilliant, and I’m always learning from the chefs, too. What’s your bestselling cocktail, then? The Negroni, featuring Punt E Mes vermouth and orange zest, is a favourite. There’s also a seasonal Winter Spiced Negroni that I developed by infusing gin with mulled wine spices. What do you think makes great customer service? Having the intuition to work out what every customer needs: do they want a lot of interaction, or do they want space? Do they want me to go into detail with them about the menu? (I’m always happy to talk about our Pi!) Where do you like to eat on your days off? You’ll mostly find at Sticks & Broth, Asado, Cargo Cantina and Bell’s Diner. thepishop.co.uk

RHUBARB

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like ends, having been designed to be used ucked away down cobbled Waterloo with a rocking motion. Street in Clifton Village, this little shop They’re hand-thrown just down the road in has been going for five years now, Wiltshire, it turns out, and made by designer starting off as a tiny little outfit, selling just Julian Sainsbury (his brand goes by the name kitchenware. It gradually grew and spilled into the bookshop behind it, until it eventually took John Julian). You might well have seen one in action on one of Nigel Slater’s shows (this is over the whole premises. his design of choice); Sarah did, and that’s It’s owned by Nick Mitford (who’s maybe how they ended up in the shop. best known for The Kitchen Man shop, next door), and run by Sarah Harding, who’s always “I saw Nigel using one and searched for them online. I made contact and, luckily, they hunting down new and interesting items to fill said we could stock them. We were really the rustic display cabinets with. lucky to get them, though – there are only a “People who come in here are looking for very, very few places they will something different,” she tells us supply, and they’re very when we swing by one day. “The What: Kitchenware particular about who that is.” things we stock here I never Where: 4a Waterloo Another designer who spot anywhere else.” Street, Bristol catches our eye is Lucy Routh And we’d have to concur; BS8 4BT; – her tea towels, chopping there’s a gorgeous old-school 0117 973 2778 boards, coasters, table mats and copper potato steamer, big When: food-themed wall art sells copper jam pans, and crockery Mon-Fri 10am-5pm; particularly well, Sarah says, with and textiles from designers Sat 11am-5.30pm Lucy coming by to restock pretty we’ve not heard of before. much everything, every week. Sarah points out some We’re particularly coveting a lovely tea towel patterned dish cloths and tea towels by with a painted lobster design, and a framed Swedish brand Jangneus. chilli painting. A friend of Nick’s, Lucy is, “These are reusable – you can put them in happily, another local maker in this little the washing machine loads of times,” she says. independent shop, and is based in Somerset. “And then, when they’re eventually finished Rhubarb is ever evolving when it comes to with, they’re fully compostable. All of us from stock, with everything hand picked by Sarah, the shop use them at home now, and wouldn’t who says she knows instantly when she sees use anything else. They’re so absorbent and something that would work on the shelves such good quality.” here. And this New Year, customers can Our eyes also wander over to some expect more of the same quirky, quality, longinteresting porcelain pestle and mortar sets lasting items, including, excitingly, lots more near the front of the shop. They’re sleek and from John Julian… carefully sculptured: the mortars are almost discoverclifton.co.uk flat, and the pestles have very wide, dome-

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S T A R T E R S

In the Larder

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WE’VE GONE STRAIGHT-UP VEGAN THIS MONTH, GOBBLING UP PLENTY OF PLANT-BASED TREATS... 1 MEALS ON WHEELS MILLER GREEN VEGAN MEZZE BOX, £5.50 This Bristol biz prepares fresh, nutritious, vegan meals – and then delivers them to homes and offices. You can subscribe for regular deliveries or make one-off orders: there are lunches, dinners, sides and dips, and even desserts on offer. We tucked into this Mezze Box recently, which was chocca with herby falafel balls, hummus, roast veg, rice and pulses; a filling lunch which made our seven-a-day quota oh-so attainable. Order from the website. millergreen.co.uk 2 CULTURE CLUB BATH CULTURE HOUSE KIMCHI, £2.95/180g Lucie Cousins knows her stuff when it comes to fermented food:

as well as producing it to sell, she runs courses on it, too. Inspired by the classic Korean dish, her tangy, spicy kimchi is made from nothing but veg – Chinese cabbage, onion, carrot et al – that’s been fermented with sea salt and organic cane sugar, and flavoured with Korean red pepper. Use it as a pokey side dish, or as a base for Asian soups or stir fries. Find it at Harvest in Bath, and Chi Foods in Bristol, or buy online via Farmdrop. farmdrop.com 3 ZEST FEST HULLABALOOS LEMONADE, £3.50/750ml Check out the ingredients list on the back of one of these bottles of locally made lemonade; The Original lists water, lemon juice and zest, and sugar – and that’s literally

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it. The other flavours in the range are simply made by adding an extra fresh ingredient to this base – like raspberry, ginger or elderflower – and the result is a natural-tasting, still lemonade with a refreshing zing that’ll quickly get your tastebuds’ attention. Available from New Manor Farm Shop as well as Bath Soft Cheese. hullabaloos.rocks 4 BEAN THERE GUILDHALL DELI CARIBBEAN PASTY, £2.10 The super-flaky, vegan puff pastry here is spiked with turmeric, giving it a bright yellow glow and extra flavour. Filled with potato, carrot, peas, onion and black eyed beans, it’s got a warming heat to it, thanks to the mix of herbs and spices that are thrown in too. Homemade with no nasty hidden ingredients,

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it made a great aldesko lunch at Crumbs HQ. You can find the pasties at The Guild Hall Deli in Bath. theguildhalldeli.co.uk 5 BIG RED JUICE COLLECTIVE RED 01, £3.95/250ML We’re craving fruit and veg right now like at no other time of year, and Bath drink producer The Juice Collective is on a mission to get our intake on the up with its range of fresh, natural, cold-pressed sips. In this number, beetroot is joined by carrot, ginger, lemon and pineapple for a drink that’s well-balanced not only in flavour, but also nutrition, with a good mix of vegetables and fruit. Find them at Widcombe Deli, and The Green Bird Café, both in Bath. thejuicecollective.co.uk


Bristol’ s ďŹ rst totally vegan delivery service

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We deliver tasty suppers throughout central Bristol from Tuesday to Saturday. Did you know we now offer a new meal plan subscription service? Visit our website for more details!

07910 765649 sue@millergreen.co.uk


Kitchens in Bristol tailored to you Redland Kitchens Bristol specialises in designing and building handmade Shaker and Contemporary in-frame kitchens that are tailored to you. Our kitchen design service enables us to create one-off kitchens that are completely unique. Our highly skilled craftsmen make and install our kitchens so there is continuous contact with us throughout your project from initial design consultations, the workshop build and ďŹ nal installation. Our products are made from the highest quality wood and materials, each design and build is tailored to your needs, personal style.

Bespoke Kitchen Solutions We work primarily in the Bristol area. If you are looking for an affordable, handmade kitchen in Bristol, wish to discuss your ideas or would like a free in-home consultation and quote, just give us a call on 0117 203 4172 or 07813 636 342 or email info@redlandkitchens.co.uk Redland Kitchens, Bristol BS1 5XJ | www.redlandkitchens.co.uk


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Six Pack CH A NGI NG ROO MS DON’T PANIC: YOU WON’T FIND ANY OF THESE KITCHEN DESIGNERS PROFFERING LEOPARDPRINT WALLPAPER, OR GIVING HANDY ANDY TASKS TO PERFORM WITH SHEETS OF MDF. THESE LOCAL PROS ARE ALL ABOUT DESIGNING KILLER KITCHENS...

#1 Phil Harflett

HEAD OF DESIGN AND SALES AT HOBSONS CHOICE, BATH So, Phil; been doing this long? It’s been over 20 years now. How did you get into the industry? I completed an A-level work placement with a luxury KBB retailer – and was offered a job at the end of the week, as they were so pleased with my attention to detail and work ethic. The rest, as they say, is history! Describe your personal design style. Simple elegance with an industrial edge. What’s the most important bit of information you need to design a kitchen for someone? It’s vital to understand how the space will be used, so that the design can be considered correctly in terms of both form and function – be that for budding chefs to cook in, for hosting dinner parties, or as a place to study, work from, or relax in... What is the most challenging issue that you have to negotiate when designing kitchens? Traditional kitchen planning hasn’t really moved on sufficiently to reflect the way in which people now live. The kitchen is such an important social space and, accordingly,

the design of the kitchen needs to reflect that. That tends to mean that we might design a kitchen quite differently to what our clients are expecting to see. hobsonschoice.uk.com

#2 Malcolm Brown

DIRECTOR AND PROJECT MANAGER AT REDLAND KITCHENS, BRISTOL How long have you been designing kitchens for, then? Ten years. And what inspired you to start this business? My best friend, Oli, was a cabinet maker, and I love interior design and cooking. So, over a glass of wine or two, we put our heads together and decided we could build better quality kitchens at lower prices than other kitchen companies. And we’ve not looked back since! Did you study design? No, I studied ecology in Sheffield, and then marine biology, before working on coral reefs around the world! Then I moved into property developing and interior design, and then landed on kitchens. This room is my favourite place in the house. What’s the most popular kitchen feature right now? Our built-in larders. There’s a

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fantastic foodie movement happening, which means that people are filling their larders with all sorts of exotic staples and spices, on top of their traditional ingredients. Every home is unique, and when we build something made to measure – like a double door larder – you know you’re making the most of the space you have. What kitchen brands do you use? We make our own kitchens! We make different designs for different customers to reflect their spaces and individual style; particular favourites at the moment are our slab door and slab drawer in-frame kitchens. redlandkitchens.co.uk

#3 Vicky Elmore

CO-DIRECTOR AT ELMORE KITCHENS, BATH How long have you had your business for, then? Me and my partner Ben took ownership of the business in July 2017. We hit the ground running and haven’t looked back! What inspired you to take it on? We had prior knowledge of In-toto as a company, so when the Bath franchise came up for sale we felt it was the right business for us, as a couple, to own and run


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4 together. With my background in design, and Ben’s background in sales and project management, we make a pretty good team! But it’s not In-toto any more, is it? The In-toto franchise system broke down at the end of September due to the owning company, Alno, going into administration. This has given us the opportunity to be a fully independent retailer, and to put our own name above the door. Describe your personal tastes in three words. I would describe Ben’s as classic, timeless and understated, and mine as simple, colourful and elegant. What’s a key question you ask a client to determine what they really want? The most important thing before starting a design is to listen; getting to know the client helps more than any question we could ask them. Most challenging issue you have to negotiate when designing? The lack of straight walls in English homes! elmorekitchens.com

#4 Rob Cash

DIRECTOR AT KUTCHENHAUS, BRISTOL What gave you the idea to become a kitchen designer initally? Having completed my graphic design degree, I wanted to find a job where I could utilise all the skills I learnt at university.

What client requests are you hearing more and more recently? There’s increased demand for building walls around the kitchen units to make them appear as if they are built into the walls. Tall units can feel very big and bulky, and this hides them well. Which of your ranges is the hottest right now among your customers? We find the most popular kitchen style is our handless Line N range, which is ultra modern and sleek, and comes in a whole range of different colours and finishes. Any new ranges for 2018? Yes, we have just launched some exciting ones, including slate and stainless steel doors. What is the trickiest, or most common issue that you tend to face when designing kitchens? We deal with a huge number of customers who are planning and building house extensions. We find that most customers struggle to visualise what the new space shall look like – which is where our design service helps out! We plan and design the whole space, to help people see what they’re going to end up with. kutchenhaus.co.uk

#5 Leory McKenzie

OWNER-MANAGER AT SCHMIDT, BATH How long have you been designing kitchens for? It’s about 22 years now. And how many kitchens do you think you’ve worked on during that time? Schmidt has had over two thousand kitchen projects in Bath to date. Impressive! What’s been the most memorable of all of them? We once took one on where the celebrity client was getting married on the property. This meant we had a very tight schedule, as the caterers were planning on using the new kitchen to do the food. It was about 70 miles from Bath, so we worked ten hours per day for three weeks to get the kitchen finished on time.

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6 They were so pleased they invited the whole team to the big day! What did you study? Engineering, in Birmingham. What is everyone asking for in their new kitchens currently? Everybody wants an island or breakfast bar. What is the most important question you ask the client before starting work on their design? “Can I call you by your first name?” What materials are you loving for kitchens right now? Dark oak. home-design.schmidt

#6 Kelly-Marie Hicks HEAD DESIGNER AND PROJECT MANAGER AT HOMEMAKER, BATH

What first gave you the idea to become a kitchen designer, Kelly? I worked at B&Q whilst doing my art and design degree, and was put onto the kitchen and bathroom design section. That’s where it all started! And who do you work with at Homemaker? It’s just me – I run the business on my own. What’s your personal design style? I am Scandinavian inspired, and my design work usually includes a mix of natural materials and textures. What kitchen trends are you seeing emerge lately? Quooker hot taps, industrial finishes and Dekton worktops. What’s your favourite kitchen range? I’ve always loved Hacker kitchens, and I must say I do love the Poggenpohl kitchens, too. Tell us about a particularly fun project you’ve worked on. I recently designed a kitchen for an amazing space on 13 metres, where I used kitchen units to divide it up so it had kitchen, living and dining areas, but with a fun and unique twist. myhomemaker.co.uk



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IN HONOR OF VEGANUARY, JESSICA CARTER TAKES A LOOK AT SOME TOP VEGAN RELEASES...

BOOK OF THE MONTH

VEGAN IN 7 Rita Serano Kyle Books, £16.99

RIVER COTTAGE: MUCH MORE VEG

VEGAN: THE COOKBOOK

VEGAN 100

A follow up to River Cottage: Veg Every Day, Hugh FearnleyWhittingstall’s new book aims to encourage and inspire us to get more vegetables and fruit onboard. So, not only does it make them the heroes of each dish, but the only players. As well as no meat, fish, dairy or honey, the recipes also steer clear of bread, pasta, noodles and pastry. Not to insinuate they’re no good for us, but rather to show that we needn’t rely on them as much as we perhaps do. From hearty stews, roasts and soups to raw salads, dips and sides, the recipes cover all bases, making thoughtful use of beans, pulses, nuts and seeds throughout. The roast fennel, new potato and tomato stew; turnip and red lentil chilli; and spicy sweet potato soup with orange, look particularly comforting and nourishing for this time of year.

A French chef specialising in plant-based and raw food, Jean-Christian Jury flexes his creative muscles and uses his encyclopedic knowledge of plant-based ingredients in this varied and comprehensive collection of recipes. Approaching a whopping 500 in number, the dishes are inspired by cuisines from all over the world – from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe via Ireland, Peru and Sweden – using a host of ingredients and cookery methods. So many recipes are packed in here, in fact, that there are no fewer than four indexes, so the reader can search by dish, ingredient, country of origin or course. Picking out highlights, then, is tricky, but the Greek potato and kalamata olive stew; Indian tofu and paneer tikka masala; and Mexican tortilla casserole all rep both the range and enticing nature of Jury’s vegan recipes.

When chef Gaz Oakley went vegan and started experimenting with plantbased recipes, he took to social media to share his creations, and the Avant-Garde Vegan was born. Now, with 120,000 YouTube subscribers and 150,000 Instagram followers, Gaz has found a home for 100 of his plant-based recipes in print. Fresh, modern and especially appealing to young foodies, the collection is split into sections such as ‘burgers, dogs and wraps’, ‘breakfast and brunch’, and ‘health potions’, each enhanced with imagery that’s rich in colour and texture, echoing the enthusiastic and up-to-date approach that this chef cooks with. Featuring everything from comfort food like sweet and spicy broth, to sharing dishes like loaded nachos, this is a collection of vegan recipes with real attitude.

Jean-Christian Jury Phaidon, £29.95

Gaz Oakley Quadrille, £20

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall Bloomsbury, £26 Having been cooking plantbased food for more than two decades, Dutch blogger and recipe developer Rita Serano has used her experience to put together a collection of straightforward, approachable vegan recipes – all of which involve seven or fewer ingredients. This fuss-free approach makes Vegan in 7 a great pick not only for plant-only foodies, but any time-poor home cook looking for nourishing and practical recipes, which can be made largely using store cupboard staples. As well as main meals like lentil and porcini ragout, mushroom polenta tart, and fennel and saffron stew, there are sides and desserts, too. An additional section of ‘basics’ also shows you how to make the likes of almond milk ricotta, and feta, cashew and coconut milk yoghurt, stocks, sauces, oil-free dressings and pickles.

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B O O K

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M O N T H

Recipe from Vegan in 7 by Rita Serano, published by Kyle Books

PEARL BARLEY AND CLEMENTINE BRUSSELS SPROUT SALAD SERVES 4

P HOTO GR A PH Y BY L AU RA E DWA RD S

Salads don’t just have to be for the summer. As the weather gets colder, simply add grains, beans and warm seasonal vegetables to make a nourishing and comforting meal. This dish uses Chioggia ‘candy cane’ beetroot, named because of the distinctive pattern on the inside of the vegetable.

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INGREDIENTS

150g pearl barley 1kg Brussels sprouts juice of 2 clementines 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 Chioggia beetroot, finely sliced 75g pumpkin seeds 3 tbsp olive oil (optional) METHOD

1 Cook the pearl barley in water or stock according to the packet instructions. Drain (if necessary) and set aside. 2 Remove and discard the outer leaves of the Brussels sprouts and thinly slice them on a mandoline. Quickly stir-fry the sliced sprouts with 2 tbsp clementine juice, the

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fennel seeds, and salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. This will take only a minute or two – there should still be some crunch to the Brussels sprouts. 3 Transfer the sprouts to a bowl and add the pearl barley and Chioggia beetroot. 4 Dry-roast the pumpkin seeds in a hot pan, stirring often to prevent them from burning, until they pop and are golden brown. Add the pumpkin seeds to the bowl and drizzle over the remaining clementine juice and olive oil, if using. Add salt and pepper to taste, then gently toss to combine, and serve.





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flying pig renovations

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he Flying Pig Renovation Company specialises in the renovation of prestigious properties within Bath and the surrounding area. A family business owned by Andy, Sharon, Zak and Kye Paradise, the Flying Pig Company combines the local knowledge that enables them to meet the challenges presented by a UNESCO World Heritage site, together with a passionate commitment to customer service and focus on fine attention to detail. “The key to what we do is taking beautiful historic buildings and re-energizing them to create fresh new homes” says Andy. “The crucial thing is to blend the heritage features of a listed property with the standards of modern living. This is always a challenge in terms of both practicalities and creative design – a challenge we relish and enjoy.” A great example of a Flying Pig development is this luxury development at Somerset Place in central Bath. “When it came to the brief the client had a clear view of exactly what they wanted in terms of style and design and the materials to be used,” says Andy. “Taking about nine months in total to complete the project required all the knowledge and experience we’ve learned through decades of property development. To see the end result – a tired dilapidated building turned into an amazing home – is truly inspirational and exciting. “That’s how we achieve the best possible results. We don’t want to lose period character; we want to enhance it. Equally, a home shouldn’t be a museum, so our renovations are also geared towards creating vibrant, exciting spaces that are a pleasure to live in. “Our vast experience has grounded us firmly in the practicalities. The first step is always working out what needs to be done along with acquiring listed building consent and planning permission. We will then draw up plans and designs that are bold and imaginative, yet also sympathetic to the building in question. Inevitably many original features will have been damaged or lost but where possible cornices, fireplaces, doors and staircases will be carefully restored. Plumbing and electrics will be brought up to modern standards. “The final weeks of any project are vital and require skill, patience and an acute eye for detail. Whether through sumptuous wallpaper, subtle paints, bespoke joinery, handmade furniture or clever lighting we will deliver on the vision and immaculate standards our customers deserve. “Through every stage of the project our uniquely qualified project management team will deliver a professional and personable service. Clients can expect a full schedule of works and a constant communication to ensure the project comes in on budget, time and to the exacting standards we pride ourselves on. “We’ve specialised in everything from full Georgian town houses and Victorian villas through to country estates and manor houses. Our ethos is to provide our clients with a project that is delivered to the highest possible standards incorporating the best materials and craftsman in the local area to achieve the perfect home.”

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Unit 2, Locksbrook Works, Locksbrook Road, Bath BA1 3EN 01225 420370; andy@flyingpiginbath. co.uk www.flyingpiginbath.co.uk



CHEF! WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

Lovage leaves are super versatile; they form the base of a pesto in one of this month’s recipes

H I G H L I G H T S

SEE ’SLAW

This colourful winter coleslaw makes the most of our Hero Page 34

STEAK HOLDER

We’ve got no beef with this tasty steak... Page 44

RULES OF SQUASH

This warm salad packs a nutritious punch Page 50 P L U S !

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more plantbased recipes to help you ace Veganuary

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C H E F !

BEET IT!

WE’RE LOVING MARTIN STONE’S PIMPED-UP PASTA…

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Martin, who was classically trained at Weston College, cooks at the Gallimaufry on Stokes Croft. Having started his career in food at Pullin’s Bakery as a 14-year-old, he joined the team as sous chef two years ago, and was senior sous at the Riverstation for four years before that. The kitchen brigade at the Gallimaufry have curated an inclusive menu that has plenty of choice for vegans – here’s an example of the kind of creative plant-based dishes you can find there...

SPINACH AND SOURDOUGH RAVIOLI WITH ROAST BEETROOT, WILD MUSHROOMS AND LOVAGE PESTO SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 4 medium beetroots ½ bag spinach 200ml vegetable oil 225g sourdough starter 250g ‘00’ pasta flour ½ bunch lovage 50g pumpkin seeds olive oil almond milk, for brushing 60g wild mushrooms METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 250C/300F/gas mark 2. 2 For the beetroot purée, place the beetroot in the oven for 1 hour, or until soft right through. Once cooked and still hot, peel and place in a food blender, adding just enough water to get a silky consistency (it shouldn’t be too wet). Season to taste and place in the fridge to cool. 3 Blanch the spinach in boiling water then refresh in cold water. Blend this with the oil in a food processor, then pass the mix through a muslin. 4 Place the sourdough starter and flour in a bowl with a pinch of salt. Slowly add about 70ml of the spinach oil until the dough comes together. (Keep the remaining oil for next time!) 5 Once combined, turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and work until smooth. Cover and leave in the fridge to rest for 1 hour. 6 For the pesto, blend together the lovage and pumpkin seeds, adding the olive oil until you reach the desired consistency. Season to taste and set aside. 7 Cut the pasta into 4 equal pieces, then roll it through a pasta maker once on each setting, working down from the thickest to the second from thinnest. Then cut each sheet in half (making 8 in total) and place on a floured surface. 8 Put 3 evenly spaced teaspoons of the purée along 4 of the sheets of pasta, leaving enough space between each to cut the ravioli. 9 Brush the pasta with almond milk, making sure you go around and in between the purée. Then gently lay a second sheet over the top and push out any air trapped in between. Carefully cut around each to separate the ravioli, then place back in the fridge until ready to serve. 10 To serve, pan-fry the mushrooms in a little olive oil, and cook the pasta for 2 minutes in boiling salted water, then drain. Arrange on the plate and dress with the pesto.

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The Gallimaufry, 26-28 The Promenade, Gloucester Road, Bristol BS7 8AL; 0117 942 7319; thegallimaufry.co.uk

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C H E F !

HACK ’sLaw RACHEL DEMUTH USES THIS MONTH’S HERO INGREDIENT IN A FILLING WINTER SALAD

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“In winter, dried fruit is a great way to brighten up savoury dishes and provide a sweet, contrasting taste; mix it through a pilaf or add to winter salads – like this one,” says Rachel. “I like dried cranberries, blueberries, yellow sultanas and barberries (Berberis vulgaris). These are sweet and sour berries known as ‘zereshk’ in Persian and Iranian cooking, and are added to rice dishes. They have a lovely sour bite, a beautiful red colour and are full of vitamin C. Barberries are available dried from Middle Eastern stores or online; rehydrate them in hot water for 30 minutes and then rinse them well, as they are often gritty. If you can’t find them, use dried cranberries instead. “This colourful coleslaw goes really well with most meals. It adds a lovely fresh crunch to filled pittas and wraps, and also works with baked potatoes, quiches, curries or Eastern noodle or rice dishes.”

WINTER VEGETABLE COLESLAW WITH BARBERRIES SERVES 4-6 (OR 6-8 AS A SIDE)

METHOD 1 Finely shred the cabbage and Brussels sprouts by hand or using the slicer attachment of a food processor. 2 Place this into a large mixing bowl with the grated carrot, parsnip, celeriac and beetroot. 3 Finely slice the red onion and place into a small bowl of cold water, making sure it’s fully submerged. This will help to remove the strong pungency of the onion flavour, and crisp up the texture. 4 Chop the fresh herbs roughly, and add to the grated vegetables. 5 To make the dressing, squeeze the lemon or lime and mix the juice with the olive oil and red chilli, if using. Taste and add enough agave syrup to slightly sweeten. 6 Drain the onion in a sieve, then add to the other vegetables. 7 Pour the dressing over the coleslaw, and mix it through thoroughly. Season with a pinch of salt and taste. Add a little more salt, oil or lemon juice, if necessary. Finally, sprinkle over the barberries, sunflower and pumpkin seeds. Demuths Cookery School, 6 Terrace Walk, Bath BA1 1LN; 01225 427938; demuths.co.uk

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ROB WICKS

INGREDIENTS 300-400g red cabbage a few Brussels sprouts 1 medium carrot, peeled and grated 1 small parsnip, peeled and grated ¼ small celeriac, peeled and grated (or 1 stick celery, finely chopped) 1 small beetroot, peeled and grated 1 small red onion, peeled handful of parsley, large stalks removed handful of mint leaves 1 lemon (or lime) 2-3 tbsp olive oil 1 red chilli, seeded and finely diced (optional) agave or maple syrup, to taste handful of dried barberries, soaked, drained and rinsed handful of sunflower seeds, toasted handful of pumpkin seeds, toasted

TIP! THIS COLESLAW WILL KEEP FOR UP TO

THREE DAYS IN A CONTAINER IN THE FRIDGE

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Vegetarian | Vegan | Gluten Free

Tel: 01225 464631 Tel: 01225 466626 TAKEAWAY WE TAKE ORDERS FOR OUTDOOR CATERING AND PARTIES, PLEASE CONTACT US FOR MORE DETAILS INDIAN TEMPTATION 9-10 High Street (Cheap Street) Bath BA1 5AQ

www.indiantemptation.com


C H E F !

CABBAGE PATCh KIdS

BATH RIVERFORD REPS ALAN AND VICKI MOWART SHARE A TOP RECIPE, IDEAL FOR VEGANUARY… Cabbage is something that Alan and Vicki always have in the veg boxes they deliver, whether it be the slow-growing hardy savoy, the sweet and delicate hispi, or any other variety in between. The versatile cabbage lends itself to quick cooking, slow braising or being eaten raw in thinly sliced ’slaws. Alan and Vicki say this stir fry is delicious with just a poppadom or two. Cabbage pairs brilliantly with chilli, mustard seeds and ginger, and this dish is one of the many regional Indian variations on the theme. Don’t worry if you don’t have the curry leaves or coconut – the recipe will still work without them. And, as Brussels sprouts are in season right now, try using them instead of cabbage, perhaps.

KERALAN CABBAGE THORAN SERVES 2

INGREDIENTS 3 tbsp coconut oil (or vegetable oil) 2 tsp black mustard seeds 10 fresh curry leaves, roughly chopped (optional) 1 tsp cumin seeds 2 dried red chillies, broken into several pieces 30g (or 4cm piece) fresh ginger, peeled and very finely grated 2 fresh green bird’s eye chillies, sliced thinly, with seeds ½ tsp ground turmeric 250g hispi or pointed spring cabbage, shredded into 5mm pieces 2 carrots, peeled and cut into fine matchsticks (or coarsely grated) 100g fresh grated coconut, or 2 tbsp desiccated coconut (optional) handful of fresh coriander leaves, finely chopped ½ lemon, juice only (optional)

METHOD 1 Heat the oil in a heavy-based saucepan or wok over a medium heat, and, when hot, add the mustard seeds followed by the curry leaves (if using), cumin seeds and dried chillies. 2 Stir for about 30 seconds, then add the ginger, fresh chilli, turmeric and a pinch of salt and pepper and fry for another 30 seconds. Watch out – the mustard seeds will pop and spit. 3 Stir in the cabbage and carrots and cook, covered, over a medium heat for 5-7 minutes, until the vegetables are tender, adding a splash of water if they start to stick to the pan. 4 Scatter over the coconut (if using) and coriander, and sprinkle with the lemon juice (if using), then serve. TIP! YOU DON’T HAVE TO STICK TO CABBAGE – THIS WILL MAKE A LIGHT, HEALTHY DINNER WITH ANY GREENS, SUCH AS SPINACH, CHARD, KALE OR EVEN SHREDDED BRUSSELS SPROUTS riverford.co.uk

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Kelly will provide you a German kitchen that is beautiful not just to look at, but to be in. Take the first step towards your dream kitchen, contact Kelly today. 8 Pulteney Terrace, Bath BA2 4HJ t 01225 481 881 e homemakerdesign@btconnect.com

Proud Finalists of


C H E F !

YAK ATTACK!

SARAH AND ARUN GURUNG FROM PHAT YAKS IN BATH TEACH US HOW TO MAKE A PERFECT PAKORA...

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Mother and son Sarah and Arun Gurung put their heads together to create Phat Yaks, a street food café in Kingsmead Square, Bath. As you would expect from the youngest of the Yak Yeti Yak family, the focus is on the quality of their food and the easy-going, friendly atmosphere. Pakoras are one of the most popular dishes here, and at the family’s Pierrepont Street restaurant, Yak Yeti Yak. “We created this recipe some years ago when we had a glut of courgettes on our allotment,” says Sarah. “The whole family loved them, but we still had a mountain of courgettes! The following week we tried them as a special in Yak Yeti Yak and quickly sold out. “This recipe is a slight adaptation from the original and is a popular special in Phat Yaks, where we serve the pakoras in wraps, or often on their own as a snack.”

COURGETTE AND LEMON PAKORA SALAD WITH SESAME DRIZZLE SERVES 4-6 AS A STARTER

INGREDIENTS For the sesame drizzle 2 tsp tahini ½ lemon, juice only 2-3 tbsp boiled water 1 green finger chilli, seeds removed and finely sliced (optional) For the pakoras 250g courgette small bunch of fresh coriander 125g chickpea flour ½ tsp ground coriander ½ lemon zest, finely grated ¼ tsp turmeric ½ tsp salt (or to taste) oil, for deep frying To serve 80g mixed green salad leaves (we use rocket, spinach and watercress) sesame seeds, toasted red chilli, finely sliced (optional) METHOD 1 To make the sesame drizzle, combine the tahini and lemon juice in a mixing bowl, adding the hot water until you have a drizzle consistency. Then add the chopped chilli and some salt, a little at a time, to your required taste. Set aside to cool. 2 For the pakoras, coarsely grate the courgette and finely chop the fresh coriander, reserving some for the salad. Make a batter by combining all the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl, and add water a little at a time to make a smooth mixture, similar to cake batter. Add the courgette and remaining fresh coriander into the batter and mix very well. 3 Using a deep fryer or deep-sided pan, heat the oil to 185C/360F. Test if the oil is up to temperature by dropping a couple of bits of batter into it; if they rise straight to the surface, bubbling, then the oil is ready. Using a tablespoon as a measure, carefully drop dollops of the pakora mixture into the hot oil to fry, turning them so they cook evenly. Once the pakoras are golden brown all over, remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. Repeat until all the mixture is used. 4 To serve, wash and thoroughly dry the salad leaves, and divide them between the plates. Arrange the still-warm pakoras on the leaves, drizzle with the sesame drizzle, then sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds, chilli slices and the reserved chopped coriander.

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Phat Yaks, 3 New Street, Bath BA1 2AF; 01225 571057; phatyaks.com

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C H E F !

CAULIFLOwER ’ERE! BETH THOMAS, RECIPE DEVELOPER AT FARMDROP, SURE KNOWS HOW TO PIMP UP A CAULIFLOWER…

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“We love it when veg takes centre stage, and these cauliflower steaks really hold their own in this South Indian inspired dish,” says Beth. “They suck up the turmeric-dyed marinade for tender, juicy flesh and crisp, caramelised edges. Even the offcuts of the cauliflower are used to thicken the coconut sauce and impart their subtle mustardy flavour. This one will become a favourite way beyond Veganuary.”

TURMERIC CAULIFLOWER STEAKS WITH COCONUT SAUCE SERVES 2

INGREDIENTS 1 cauliflower small handful fresh coriander, chopped ½ red chilli, sliced For the marinade 1 inch piece fresh turmeric, grated 2 inch piece fresh ginger, grated 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 tbsp plain oil (such as vegetable) For the coconut sauce 1 tbsp plain oil 4 cardamom pods 1 cinnamon stalk ½ tsp cumin seeds 1 banana shallot, finely chopped ½ red chilli, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, crushed 2 inch piece of fresh ginger, grated 1 tsp garam masala 200ml coconut milk

METHOD 1 Preheat oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 2 Keeping the leaves on, cut the cauliflower in half through the stalk. Cut a 3cm-thick steak out of the centre part of each half and place on a baking tray. Chop up a handful of the leftover cauliflower florets into small chunks. 3 Mix together the marinade ingredients, seasoning with a good pinch of salt. Brush this all over the cauliflower steaks on both sides, then leave to marinade for at least 5 minutes. 4 Pop the steaks in the oven for around 25 minutes, turning halfway through, until crisp and golden on the edges and tender in the middle. 5 For the sauce, heat the oil in a saucepan. When hot and shimmering, add the cardamom, cinnamon and cumin seeds and leave to crackle for 10-15 seconds until fragrant. 6 Next add the shallot, red chilli, garlic and ginger, garam masala and a pinch of salt and pepper. Cook on a medium heat for 4-5 minutes, stirring constantly, until golden. 7 Pour in the coconut milk and cauliflower pieces and bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cover. Cook until the cauliflower is soft. 8 Pull the cinnamon and cardamom seeds out of the curry sauce and discard. Blitz the sauce with a hand blender (or in a food processor) until thick and smooth. 9 Serve the steaks on a layer of the sauce and sprinkled with the fresh red chilli and coriander. farmdrop.com

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Staggeringly good Thai coming to Bath this January From lunchtime tapas to delicious curries, exotic seafood, stir fry and noodles, Giggling Squid’s menu lends itself to the distinct sharing culture of Thailand. For your chance to be invited to our VIP Opening Party please sign up to Giggling News via our website www.gigglingsquid.com/bath “Exciting cooking” The Times

Bluecoat House, Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EY www.gigglingsquid.com @gigglingsquid


GOOD KORMA VEGAN KORMA IS A-GO THIS VEGANUARY, THANKS TO VINOD SINGH...

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C H E F !

Vinod Singh is head chef at vegetarian restaurant Indian Temptation in Bath. Coming to the city with an impressive CV, he previously worked in five-star hotel Le Meridien in India, as well as various top-notch London restaurants. This vegetable korma is the bestseller on Indian Temptation’s vegan menu, and is great for this time of year; it’s got a real comfort factor and is packed with lots of fresh, crunchy vegetables.

VEGETABLE KORMA SERVES 1

INGREDIENTS 2 tbsp coconut oil 5g mustard seeds 4 curry leaves 1 tbsp ginger garlic paste ¼ tbsp ground turmeric ½ tbsp lemongrass paste 2 onions, sliced 1 fresh tomato, chopped 4 tbsp coconut milk 50ml water 50g butternut squash, diced 2 asparagus stalks, sliced 2 baby corn, halved 3 mangetout 30g courgette, chopped curly kale, to garnish METHOD 1 Heat 1 tbsp coconut oil in a pan over a medium heat. Add the mustard seeds and curry leaves, and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. 2 Add the ginger garlic paste, turmeric and lemongrass paste, and cook for another 3 minutes, while stirring. 3 Add the onion and chopped tomato and continue to stir over a medium heat for 5 more minutes. 4 Stir in the coconut milk and water and bring to the boil. Then, turn the heat down and simmer for 7-8 minutes. 5 Blend the mixture until smooth to make a semi-thick sauce. 6 Blanch all the fresh vegetables (apart from the kale) in boiling water, then drain. 7 Heat the remaining coconut oil in a large frying pan and sauté the blanched vegetables until just cooked. Add black pepper and salt to taste. Remove the veg and, in the same pan, fry the curly kale. 8 Pour the korma sauce into a serving bowl and place the sautéed vegetables on top, then garnish with the fried curly kale. Serve with your choice of rice or naan.

Indian Temptation, 9-10 High Street, Bath BA1 5AQ; 01225 464631; indiantemptation.com

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C H E F !

VeGGING OUt

GET THREE OF YOUR FIVE-A-DAY WITH THIS ACE MID-WEEK DINNER, TAKEN FROM THE NEW BOOK BY RIVER COTTAGE’S HUGH FEARNLEY-WHITTINGSTALL

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ROAST SQUASH AND APPLE WITH RAW SPROUTS SERVES 3-4

P H OTO S : S I M O N W H E E L E R

INGREDIENTS 1kg squash, such as a medium butternut or acorn squash, or ½ crown prince 2 tbsp olive or rapeseed oil 4-5 bay leaves, roughly torn 2 sprigs of rosemary, roughly torn small handful of sage leaves, roughly torn (optional) 1 tsp fennel seeds pinch of dried chilli flakes 175g Brussels sprouts 2 medium eating apples 25g sunflower seeds (or other seeds of your choice) For the dressing 2 tbsp extra virgin olive or rapeseed oil 2 tsp English mustard 1-2 tsp sugar 1 tbsp cider vinegar METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 2 Halve the squash and scoop out the seeds, but don’t remove the peel. Cut into slim wedges, about 2cm wide at the outside edge, and place in a large roasting tray. 3 Trickle over the oil then scatter over the herbs, fennel seeds, chilli flakes and some salt and pepper. Turn the pieces of squash over in the oil and seasonings, then place in the oven and roast for about 30 minutes until tender and nicely browned in places. 4 Meanwhile, combine all the ingredients for the dressing in a large bowl, adding salt and pepper to taste. 5 Trim the sprouts and remove any damaged or dirty outer leaves, then slice very thinly. Add them to the bowl of dressing and mix well, breaking up the layers of sprout a bit as you go. 6 Quarter the apples, remove the cores and cut each quarter into 2 or 3 wedges (again, no need to peel). Set aside. 7 When the squash is tender and starting to brown, add the apple wedges and stir them in with the squash and seasonings. Return to the oven for about 15 minutes, or until the apples are tender but not broken down. Scatter the seeds over the veg and apple for the last few minutes of cooking, so they toast lightly. 8 Spoon the dressed sprouts over the hot squash and apple wedges, then serve.

Hugh’s ditched the cheese, butter, eggs and cream in his new book River Cottage: Much More Veg, making it totally vegan. This warm winter salad recipe, which he’s kindly shared with us, is taken straight from its pages. It’s a pretty versatile recipe too; if you can’t find squash, just replace it with roughly chopped carrots and parsnips. And, if you’re not a sprout fan, or happen to be cooking this when they’re no longer in season, Hugh recommends you just swap them out for Savoy cabbage. “This wonderful autumnal salad, from my ever-brilliant collaborator Gill Meller, is hot and tender, spicy and aromatic, crisp and raw,” he writes in the book. “The range of textures and flavours is superbly satisfying, and it’s so easy to throw together.”

River Cottage: Much More Veg by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (Bloomsbury, £26); bloomsbury.com

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Imagined in the 19th Century, Established in the 21st

NEW YEAR’S EVE “Around the world in 80 days” with live music by ‘The Old Malt House Jazz Band’ Enjoy our special cocktail menu with taste sensations from around the world! Tickets £25 - avaliable to purchase at the Bar before 31st December* *Due to our size we have limited avaliability. Purchase early to avoid dissapointment.

Each cocktail has a story to tell...will you be there to hear them? 16 St Stephens Street Bristol BS1 1JR 01179276869 theclockworkrose.com thecaptain@theclockworkrose.com


C H E F !

RAW WALNUT BOLOGNESE WITH COURGETTE SPAGHETTI SERVES 4

ROCKET FUEL

INGREDIENTS 200g organic sundried tomatoes 25g organic dates 200g organic walnuts 1 organic carrot, peeled and chopped 1 stick organic celery, chopped 3 organic garlic cloves 1 sprig of rosemary 1 red chilli, deseeded 30ml olive oil 30g basil 2 large courgettes handful of good quality black olives handful of good quality cherry plum tomatoes micro basil, to serve (optional)

BOLOGNESE, BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT, BY PHILIP PEARCE

Philip cooks at the award-wining Green Rocket in Bath – a vegetarian café that’s been going strong for five years. This recipe is not only vegan, but totally raw too, meaning the veggies keep all their goodness. What a way to ace your five-a-day...

METHOD 1 Soak the sundried tomatoes, dates and walnuts overnight. The tomatoes and dates can be soaked together, but the walnuts should be separate. In the morning, drain it all, reserving the soaking water of the tomatoes and dates. 2 Purée the carrot, celery, garlic, rosemary, chilli, oil and basil together with the soaked tomatoes. Then blend the walnuts and dates together to a rough consistency and mix the two mixtures. Thin this out with 200ml of the reserved soaking liquid. 3 Spiralise the courgettes, and mix with the bolognese. Add the olives and tomatoes, and season to taste. 4 Serve, garnishing with micro basil.

Green Rocket, 1 Pierrepont Street, Bath BA1 1NY; 01225 420084; thegreenrocket.co.uk

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One of the most welcoming and attentive stays in Bath Located just a 10 minute walk from the heart of the historic city of Bath and nestled in seven acres of landscaped gardens is the 18th Century Georgian building of the �ive-star luxury hotel, The Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel.

Our food is quite simply outstanding, awarded with two AA rosettes for excellent quality and Service in The Vellore Restaurant. From our award winning breakfast to delicious evening service, it’s an experience you wouldn’t want to miss.

Indulge yourself on a retreat from the stresses and strains of everyday life and sample one of the most sensuous and healing spas in Bath. We have a hidden haven of refreshing spa treatments, ready to wash away your tension in our state of the art spa. For details on Packages available please contact us on 01225 476828 or email sales.bathspa@macdonald-hotels.co.uk

M A C D O N A L D B AT H S PA H O T E L

Sydney Road, Bath BA2 6JF 01225 444 424  www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk


Present this voucher for 10% off you entire bill *

* Terms apply

✂ Multi Award winning Vegetarian Restaurant Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 1 PIERREPONT STREET, BATH BA1 1LB | TO BOOK CALL 01225 420084

Tf

WWW.THEGREENROCKET.CO.UK


Hattingley Vineyards Classic Cuvée, £29.50 From an eco-friendly winery in Hampshire established only in 2008, this creamy, toasted hazelnut and baked apple-infused sparkler, with its fine mousse, vibrant citrus twist and rich briochelike scent, can hold its head proud against the best of Champagnes.

C H E F !

VEGAN VINO

ER, WINE’S MADE FROM FRUIT – SO WHY WOULDN’T IT BE VEGAN? ALAN NORDBERG OF GREAT WESTERN WINE EXPLAINS, AND GIVES US HIS CURRENT FAVE VEGANFRIENDLY PICKS FROM THE SHOP... Labelling on wine is becoming ever more complicated, writes Alan, with lists of ingredients, calorie counts and the like. However, something that’s often not included is dietary information. You see, wine producers have no legal obligation to show whether or not their wine is vegetarian or vegan. That’s despite there being millions of vegetarians and vegans in the UK (the number is growing consistently, too), and the demand for clearer information increasing. Slowly, more producers – and also retailers – are beginning to include this kind of information on their packaging or website, however, but many still don’t. So, what makes a wine vegan or vegetarian? When wine is fermented, by-products such as dead yeast, proteins, and other particles are created – which you certainly don’t want in your glass. Although some red wine is not fined or filtrated (instead the sediment is just allowed to fall naturally to the bottom of the bottle, and the makers simply advise that it’s decanted before drinking), the majority of wine, young wine in particular, needs to be clear with no residue. Hence the need for fining and filtration, which basically clears all that gunk out. There are various options available in the fining process, but many of them involve the use of animal-based products, such as gelatin, albumen, casein and isinglass (fish bladders). It’s only bentonite – a type of clay – that that can be used to filter a wine that’s to be kept vegan. Here are my top picks for vegan wines, covering all the bases of fizz, white, rosé and red – and they are all delicious. greatwesternwine.co.uk

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Yealands Estate Sauvignon Blanc, £11.95 You don’t get much more sustainable than this winery, perched on the hills above the ocean in Marlborough. Carbon-neutral and proudly vegan, this award-winning and popular white bursts with ripe passion fruit, pineapple and bright citrus character. A fantastic day-to-day staple to keep in the fridge!

Pato Frio Cashmere Rosé, £10.95 This tremulously pale pink wine from Portugal definitely deserves a mention. Rosé wines are no longer just for summer, and are some of the best picks for Asian and Indian dishes, as they have the fruitiness to match the powerful flavours. This one has beguiling scents of strawberries, and gentle yet super crisp flavours of freshly crushed red berries, aromatic lemon peel, and wild herbs. Try it with sushi, tuna and prawns.

Vina Falernia Carmenere Reserva, £12.95 An intrepid Italian winemaker moved to the desert in northern Chile and proceeded to weave magic at high altitude. This gorgeous, gloriously rich red is intense, voluptuous and yet silky smooth, jam-packed with dark berry fruit, raisins, dark chocolate and sweet spices. For me, it’s a hug in a glass, and is perfect with steak, stews and cheeseboards.


Recently refurbished and taking bookings T: 01225 865 657 E: thecastle@flatcappers.co.uk The Castle Inn, Mount Pleasant, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1SJ

Recently refurbished and taking bookings T: 01275 857 473 E: thebattleaxes@flatcappers.co.uk The Battleaxes, Bristol Road, Wraxall, Somerset, BS48 1LQ


S

tanding in a veg garden in Provence in the summer [way to make us hate you in 10 words, Clarke – ed] of 2016, I had a bit of a revelation. I was at the Michelinstarred La Chassagnette – a restaurant where the produce from its huge organic garden is the star – filming for a series all about French food and drink. The restaurant, run by Armand Arnal, was not strictly vegetarian, but it was the first restaurant I’d been to where animal and fish protein was an optional side, as opposed to the main event. It really changed the way I think about meat. Later that year, on my travels to the USA, I found myself in Philadelphia, with absolutely no knowledge of the city or its culinary culture. As I love an excuse to talk to strangers (not surprised, are you?), I quizzed the locals about where to go to eat and drink – and the same answer came up time and time again: Charlie was a Sinner. This is a vegan cocktail bar and restaurant, with innovative and exquisite food, and cocktails that are off the scale (butterbean froth was even used instead of egg white in some concoctions!). I loved it so much, I went back to film there in 2017. I wanted to give this unique dining concept some well-deserved airtime on UK TV screens. The fun, creative vibe of the Philadelphia restaurant scene reminded me of the spirit you see here in the West Country, particularly in Bristol. And, more specifically, on the first floor of Cargo. Root is the latest from the Eat Drink Bristol Fashion camp, and has quickly begun exciting the palates of inquisitive foodies. Head chef Rob Howell has curated a symphony of small plates and

specials that encourage meat lovers like me to put aside the animal protein and get jiggy with the veg. His beetroot dish with hazelnut, blackberry and seaweed is pretty legendary. It was, though, the warm cep and crispy Jerusalem artichoke salad with mushroom duxelle that stood out the most for me when I went in for dinner recently. A vegan plate of winter warmth, it encompasses all the flavours and textures that you need at this time of year. So I thought I’d better find a mouthwatering vegan wine to go with it, then.

The Wine Guy

v-PLaTes ANDY CLARKE HAS BEEN CAUSING HAVOC ON OUR RESTAURANT SCENE AGAIN; THIS TIME AS HE TRIES TO SECURE THE RECIPE FOR ONE OF ROB HOWELL’S NEWEST VEGAN DISHES...

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ARTICHOKE AND MUSHROOM SALAD

Cue Great Western Wine’s Librandi Cirò Bianco Greco, 2016. An awesome force in Italian wine, Greco is a fine example of a grape that is designed for the food lover. Its sunny stone fruit nose is bold enough to cope with all the earthy aromas of the salad. When you taste the wine, it has an instant tang that makes your mouth water, as well as a generous texture, which is great with the thyme. Sipping this is like biting into a ripe pear, and that will work brilliantly with the savoury (and difficult to pair) artichoke and mushroom duxelle. Finally, there’s a fresh finish that excites the palate and cuts through the texture of the cep. But this recipe is also a winner with a red. Pinot Noir loves mushrooms in this form, and there are a lot of great German varieties out there to choose from. But if you want something a little bit different, then Austria is the place for you. Höpler, Blaufränkisch 2013, although not a vegan wine, has the subtlety and presence to join with the dish. This is made from Blaufränkisch grapes and it isn’t overtly fruity when you smell it. There’s a hint of damson with freshly cracked black pepper, which is just fab with the artichoke. The wine is soft on the tongue, with a hint of spice and has a surprisingly light finish. It’s not overtly juicy, more subtle and restrained, making it great with wintery mushroom treats that like this, which don’t involve red meat. If you’ve been considering going vegan, it really seems like there’s never been a better time to do it. With Root discretely shining a light for vegan food on Bristol – along with a host of others – and an exceptional wine shop in Bath offering up great vegan sips, you’ll hardly feel like you’re missing out on anything...

SERVES 4 AS A SMALL PL ATE

INGREDIENTS 3 shallots 6 garlic cloves ½ bunch thyme 500g button or flat field mushrooms 20 Jerusalem artichokes 1 lemon 100ml white wine 200ml first press rapeseed oil 4 ceps or king oyster mushrooms 1 bunch watercress fresh truffle, optional METHOD 1 For the duxelle, dice 2 shallots and 2 garlic cloves. Chop a small handful of thyme leaves and sweat it all in a heavy-based saucepan with oil. 2 Meanwhile, use a blender to blitz the button mushrooms (reserving one) until they have broken down but are not puréed. Add to the saucepan, along with a pinch of salt and pepper. Cook on a medium-low heat until the mushrooms have lost all their water content. Remove from the heat and set aside. 3 For the braised artichokes, start by peeling 8, then leave them in a bowl of water with the lemon juice to stop them browning. For the braising liquor, start by slicing the remaining shallot, and crushing 2 garlic cloves. Sweat them down in oil with 3 sprigs of thyme, letting the mix colour. Deglaze the pan with the white wine and add 800ml water and the first press rapeseed oil. Set the heat to a low simmer and season the stock to taste. Add the peeled artichokes and cook for about 15 minutes. When cooked,

DrinK up!

Librandi Cirò Bianco Greco, 2016, £10.95 Höpler, Blaufränkisch, 2013, £12.95 Use the code CRUMBS for 20 percent off your first purchase of either of these wines on the Great Western Wine website! greatwesternwine.co.uk

Andy Clarke is a freelance TV producer and writer; follow him on Twitter @TVsAndyClarke; one4thetable.com

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take off the heat and leave in the liquid to cool. 4 Peel another 10 artichokes and slice thinly. Heat up some rapeseed oil in a heavy-based saucepan and add the artichokes along with seasoning. Cook for 5 minutes on a high heat, making sure to stir well and get an even amount of colour. Add 500ml of water and cook on high heat until soft. When cooked, transfer into blender and purée. 5 Now make the artichoke crisps. If you have a deep-fryer, turn the heat to 150C (alternately, heat up oil in a saucepan and carefully use a thermometer). Keeping the skin on, slice the last 2 artichokes thinly using a mandolin. Drop into the fryer and cook until golden. Then remove and leave to drain on kitchen paper. 6 Heat a frying pan on a high heat, then cut the ceps in half and season. Add the ceps to the pan, cut side down, and cook for about 4 minutes. Then turn and do the same on the other side. Add 2 crushed garlic cloves, some thyme and a drizzle of first press rapeseed oil to the pan. 7 To serve, spoon on some of the duxelle to each plate (we use a ring to keep it neat), then add a layer of the purée, and place the cep onto that. Cut the braised artichokes and place on top – then remove the ring, if using. 8 Sit the watercress on top, and shave the remaining raw button mushroom over the top, using a peeler or mandoli. Finish with the artichoke crisps and, if you’re lucky enough to have some, a grating of fresh truffle. eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk


CAFE KITCHEN Providing young people with special needs training and experience in an award-winning cafe. Open 8am–4pm Monday to Friday and 9am–12pm Saturday, serving delicious home made cakes, breakfasts, lunch and hot & cold drinks. We are available for private hire and bookings are available for the meeting room.

Please call Amelia on 01225 838070 Based next to Three Ways Special School, 180 Frome Road, Bath, BA2 5RF


Try our Kerala tasting menu throughout January and February

10 The Mall | Clifton | BS8 4DR | 0117 360 0288 | info@nutmegbristol.com | www.nutmegbristol.com



DRINKS BRADLEYSJUICE.CO.UK

01934 822356 info@bradleysjuice.co.uk

REFRESH YOUR DRINKS THIS NEW YEAR!



Choose your weapons

Whoa, now there’s a sexy piece of kit! Not the sort of thing I need, exactly (I’ve already got plenty of knives, though none as nice as that), but very much the sort of thing I want. For once we’re in agreement. This is from a range by Savernake Knives, a brand new UK company making bespoke and made-to-order kitchen knives of the highest quality. They’re fairly local too, based on the edge of the Savernake Forest, near Marlborough in Wiltshire.

Never heard of anything like that before... I don’t think anyone else in the country is doing it. Also unusual is that each blade is hollow-ground, which apparently takes weight away from the blade and gives you a great cutting edge and feel. They keep the whole of production in-house – short, they say, of “smelting the steel” – which helps them maintain their speed and flexibility. They already have something of a following amongst Michelin-star chefs, too.

New, you say? The guys behind it are Laurie Timpson and Philip Shaw, who came up with the idea in 2014 and have spent the last three years getting it right, finally launching online in 2017. (That’s right: they were in research-and-design mode for three whole years.) The end results, though, are pretty cool – as you can see. They say they use a combo of “precision engineering and dextrous hand finishing” on each knife, and can turn around both customised and entirely tailor-made knives – you can buy just one, or a whole set – in matter of weeks.

The fancy knives you normally wang on about are all Japanese, and beaten by hand, using old sword-making techniques that date back thousands of years… Yeah, these are not those – but they are very clever. They use high-end Sandvik 14c28n stainless steel – don’t ask – and everything’s designed using Autodesk Inventor, with each bespoke blade made accurate to the last millimetre on a Haas milling machine. The blades are then heat treated by hand, and the handles are crafted using a variety of materials, both traditional and ultra-modern. Sounds cool. So who are these guys, exactly? Between them, Laurie and Philip have served in the Scots Guards, cleared land mines for the HALO Trust, learned to track wild animals with the Maasai, set up emergency relief programmes, looked for gold in Liberia, and launched pubs in London. They’re now both in Wiltshire, with the newly-wed Philip living fairly conventionally, but Laurie existing ‘off-grid’ in Savernake Forest with his wife and baby.

MODERN KNIVES ARE GOODISH

Off-grid? Really? So he says. There’s a lot of backstory here, that’s for sure, but they’re not hard to get in touch with. Look just down at the bottom there – they’ve got a website and everything!

ACTUALLY, RATHER BETTER THAN GOODISH, SAYS MATT BIELBY. SAVERNAKE KNIVES AREN’T MADE TO THE TRADITIONS OF SAMURAI SWORDMAKERS, BUT SPECIAL THEY VERY MUCH ARE…

Savernake Knives start at £180 for customised and £750 for bespoke; savernakeknives.co.uk

THIS MONTH • BLADE RUNNER • VEDUCATION

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K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List WITH ALL THE VEG PREP WE’LL BE DOING IN VEGANUARY, WE’VE BEEN ON THE HUNT FOR THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR THE JOB...

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2 2 2

3 5

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1 FLEXIBLE VEGETABLE SCRUBBING BRUSH £3.29 This bendy brush makes scrubbing your veggies speedy, as it happily wraps itself around each one. Find it in Lakeland in Bath and Bristol. lakeland.co.uk 2 SIGNATURE STORAGE JAR SET £90 Made from shatterproof ‘Eastman Tritan’, these airtight, stackable storage jars are spot-on for keeping pulses, dry pasta and other store cupboard staples fresh. Designed and sold by Robert Welch, they’re available in the Bath shop. robertwelch.com 3 JULIENNE MANDOLIN £19 Mandolins come in really handy when you’ve got loads of veg prep to do, making thin slicing far easier than with a kitchen knife. Find this one at Rossiters of Bath. rossitersofbath.com 4 LEMON SQUEEZE AND MIST £8.99 Once you’ve juiced your fruit on this handy little fella, you can change the top and spray the liquid directly onto whatever you want, to give it a citrusy lift – think risottos and salads. No pesky pips involved. Find it at Steamer Trading. steamer.co.uk 5 EKELUND CITRUS TEA TOWEL £19 Okay, almost 20 quid on a tea towel does seem a wee bit much, but it is made by appointment to the Swedish Royal Family, don’t you know. And it’s 100 percent organic cotton. And, well, it’s pretty. Find it at Salcombe Trading. salcombetrading.co.uk

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Why not treat yourself to one of our exclusive spa days? Detox spa day £70 Includes use of the facilities, robe and towel hire and a 1 hour treatment of your choice

Indulge spa day £85 Includes the same as the Detox spa day plus 2 courses from the set menu and a glass of Prosecco Available Monday to Friday throughout January and February. Contact us today to make your booking. Quote Crumbs magazine when you come in for your spa day, and get a bottle of 250ml Rudie Nudie body wash from the Lido Spa range. www.lidobristol.com Bristol Lido, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ For enquiries & reservations please email events@lidobristol.com or call 0117 332 3970


M AI N S TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS, AND PEOPLE THAT MATTER

Clifton has a heap of cool places to eat at right now, like this revamped swimming baths

H I G H L I G H T S

PLANT THE SEED

Have you thought about going plant-based for Veganuary? Page 70

C-DAY

Clifton food is having its time in the culinary spotlight Page 77

PARK LIFE

We check in with MasterChef’s Elly Wentworth at Lucknam Park Page 87

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HELLO, VEGANUARY! w

hether for environmental, health or ethical reasons (or, indeed, all three!), more people than ever before have started to move away from meat, dairy and other animal products in recent years. From production methods, water use and food miles, to excessive packing, over-consumption and often appalling levels of food waste, the impact that food (in particular the meat and dairy industry) has on the environment is complex and increasingly severe. The production of meat and dairy has a much bigger effect on climate change than that of most grains, pulses, fruit and vegetables; annual carbon dioxide emissions associated with a vegan diet have been estimated to be less than half of those of a meat eater. And with regards to health, aside from helping you get your daily recommended portions of fruit and veg, the benefits of a plant-based diet are being demonstrated in an increasing number of studies; everything from lower blood pressure and cholesterol

AS PEOPLE ARE INCREASINGLY CHOOSING TO CUT DOWN ON MEAT AND BOOST THEIR VEGETABLE INTAKE (ESPECIALLY THIS MONTH), RACHEL DEMUTH LOOKS AT HOW THE TREND IS GROWING – AND STARTING TO SHAPE OUR FOOD LANDSCAPE…

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M A I N S

to lower rates of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer have been attributed to a plant-based diet. With campaigns and movements such as Veganuary, World Vegan Month and Meat Free Monday, awareness surrounding our dietary choices is growing. It’s even become a hot topic on TV, with Netflix playing a particularly large role; first it showed Vegucated, Cowspiracy and Forks over Knives, and then came the loveable Okja, pulling at heartstrings across the nation. Even comedian Simon Amstell has come on board, writing BBC film Carnage: a utopian mockumentary where eating meat is illegal and the future generations are horrified by our current eating habits. Social media, the internet, and the press have been influential too, of course. With a multitude of mouth-watering Instagram accounts dedicated to showing off how varied and delicious a plant-based diet can be, specialist magazines, and easily accessible nutritional information online, old myths such as the one that you can’t get enough protein from plants are now outdated ways of thinking. RESTAURANTS ARE Although not everyone is committing to HAVING TO TAKE a vegan diet, eating habits and attitudes are THE POPULARITY changing, and the number of ‘flexitarians’ OF PLANT-BASED (whether you love or hate that label!) are on DIETS ON BOARD the rise. The Telegraph labelled flexitarianism AND BECOME MORE as one of the biggest food trends of 2017, INVENTIVE WITH with one in three people actively reducing THEIR MENUS their meat intake. Recent research by The Vegan Society, meanwhile, showed that half of people surveyed said they know someone who is vegan, and a fifth said they would consider becoming a vegan themselves. So, with more vegans (and more people adopting some vegan habits) comes an increased demand for plant-based food and dishes. Restaurants are having to take the popularity of plant-based diets on board and become more inventive with their menus – long gone is the day of the single, lonely, uninspiring vegetarian dish. High street chain Wagamama recently launched an entirely vegan menu with an impressive 29 options but, on a smaller scale, the plant-based choice on offer across the wonderful independent eateries in Bristol and Bath is truly fantastic. Creative chefs are using vegetables in new and exciting ways, rebranding them in a way that appeals not only to vegetarians and vegans, but to anyone who is looking for a new and enjoyable eating experience, all the while reducing the impact on the world around us. And supermarkets are responding to the increase in demand too – whether that’s stocking ingredients that were once only found in health food shops, such as tempeh and nutritional yeast, or offering a greater selection of vegan-friendly on-the-go options. Vegans can now enjoy everything from Oatly’s oat-based crème fraîche to indulgent cashew ice cream. As an ever-increasing number of people are adopting a plant-based diet, we have seen a huge rise in demand for vegan classes at Demuths Cookery School. Here we aim to both share and inspire vegetarian and vegan ways of working with food; our intention is to impress students with the flavour and variety of plant-based dishes. We hope to provide inspiration and ideas that are easily achievable, and give students the confidence to cook at home for friends and family. People’s expectations of food are constantly changing and growing. I hope that the future of food is one that views meat and dairy as a treat, and not the integral ingredient that all meals have to be based around. demuths.co.uk

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Acorn serves up modern, refined vegan food...

YOUR PLANT-BASED PICKS! Sure, you can experiment with vegan cookery when you’re eating at home, but things might get a tad trickier when heading out for a plant-based feed. Our ed Jess asked you lovely lot on Twitter where you thought the best local menus for vegan food were – and these are some of the suggestions you came up with…

1847 (Bristol)

Tucked down St Stephens Street, this veggie gaff has plenty of totally plant-based creations – find them on both the express lunch menu and the evening a la carte. by1847.com

Acorn (Bath)

Totally vegetarian, this restaurant’s menu is rich in vegan options too, with most of its dishes being completely plant-based. Think butternut squash terrine with pine nut risotto, tender stem broccoli and pickled squash. acornvegetariankitchen.co.uk

Beyond the Kale (Bath)

At this this little grocery shop and café in Green Park Station you can tuck into a vegan meal and stock up on yer fruit, veg and whole foods. facebook.com/beyondthekalebath

Café Kino (Bristol)

A cool café on Stokes Croft, this place serves up popular homemade dishes from a kitchen that’s completely free of animal products. Expect great cakes, burgers and brekkies, as well as fresh smoothies and vegan milkshakes. cafekino.coop

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Nourish is a new venture based in Larkhall in Bath. The plant based menu aims to use seasonal vegetables sourced from local suppliers. The team hope to create a vibrant, relaxed and comfortable atmosphere for drinkers and diners alike.

Opening times Tuesday to Thursday: 5pm – 12pm • Friday & Saturday: 12pm – 12am • Sunday: 12pm – 5pm Opening hours extending in 2018

01225 422033 | hello@nourishbath.co.uk


M A I N S

Above, 1847; top right, Chai Wallah; middle, Green Rocket; bottom, Chapel Arts Café

Castle Farm Café (near Bath)

Sat on a working organic farm in Midford, this café cooks up fresh, wholesome dishes, many of which are vegan, organic and gluten-free – like the carrot and cashew pâté with pickled shallots, salad and sourdough. facebook.com/castlefarmcafe

Chaiwallah (Bath and Bristol)

This popular Indian street food takeaway opened a second site in Bristol recently, where it cooks up more of its fresh and fragrant vegan and vegetarian food. facebook.com/chaiwallabath

Chapel Arts Café (Bath)

Another joint with a 100-percent plant-based menu, the Chapel Arts Café is a popular city centre pit stop for fresh, colourful food, all day. Try the brunch burrito, why don’t cha? instagram.com/chapelartscafebath

Flow (Bristol)

This is an exciting player in Bristol’s vegetarian and vegan game, hidden away near the Bearpit in the centre of the city. It’s promising exciting developments after it moves into its new space next door, too. flowbristol.co.uk

Gopal’s Curry Shack (Bristol)

All the dishes on the menu here either are – or can be – vegan. Curries are totally plant-based, and there is even vegan cheese for the Mumbai toasties! gopalscurryshack.co.uk

Green Rocket (Bath)

Breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner are all served up at this veggie café in the city centre. The vast majority of the menu here is vegan, so you may find it pretty tricky to choose. thegreenrocket.co.uk

Root (Bristol)

A small-plate kind of outfit, Root throws the spotlight on plantbased ingredients, and has around 10 vegan options on the menu at any one time; check out Andy’s column on p58 for one such example! eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk/root

Vx (Bristol)

With a ‘vegan junk food’ concept, Vx in Bedminster is entirely plant-based, and aims to show that vegan food can have plenty of attitude. vxbristol.com

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CLIFTON VILLAGE RESTAURANT 29 Regent Street, Bristol BS8 4HR 01179 092 770 • info@boscoclifton.co.uk

WHITELADIES RESTAURANT 96 Whiteladies Rd, Bristol BS8 2QX 01179 737 978 • info@boscopizzeria.co.uk www.boscopizzeria.co.uk

New set lunch menu. Available everyday from 12-6pm

Kingsmead Square, Bath

Fragrant Nepalese Kebabs – Shekuwa Crispy Vegetable fritters – Pakora Curry In A Hurry - Veggie and Meaty options Speciality Coffee Lassi – iced yoghurt milk shakes Eat in or Takeaway. Vegan, Veggie and Gluten free friendly www.phatyaks com @phatyaksbath @phatyaks

@phat.yaks

2 for 1 on all wraps between 5pm and 7.30pm Valid until 31st January 2018 (cheapest wrap free)


eastvillagebristol

Clifton’s Independent Greengrocer

We’re proud to offer quality produce that is seasonal and local where possible, with varieties and prices that you often won’t find in the supermarkets. We’re the preferred supplier of many of Bristol’s best restaurants, so you’ll often find Reg the Veg on the menu! Open Monday to Saturday 9-6, Sunday 11-4 6, Boyces Avenue, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4AA | 0117 9706777


Beat the January Blues 

This voucher entitles the bearer to 50% off their food bill Valid Tuesday - Friday, 6pm-9:30pm, 5th31st January 2018. Maximum of 2 diners per voucher, multiple vouchers per booking will be accepted. Discount applicable to food only. Booking essential, please quote 'Crumbs' when making your reservation and retain voucher for your visit.

“A NEW EXPERIENCE” (FIT FOR A QUEEN)

99 QUEENS ROAD, CLIFTON BS8 1LW

VOUCHER JAN ‘18

T&Cs APPLY - SEE OUR FACEBOOK FOR MORE

01173 179806

f 99Queens

✂ Breakfast, lunch and supper

£10


vILLAGE PEOPLE

IS IT US, OR IS CLIFTON HAVING A BIT OF A MOMENT? NOW, WITH ITS MIX OF MUCH-LOVED STALWARTS AND FRESHFACED NEWCOMERS, HUNGRY DINERS CAN BE FOUND FOLLOWING THEIR NOSES AROUND THE VILLAGE (AND BEYOND), FROM BREAKFAST ’TIL DINNER…

Spicer and Cole is a laid-back spot for a fresh, delicious lunch

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99 QUEENS

NEW!

What you might well know as Rosarios Café has recently been reborn as 99 Queens. Owner Richard is a bit of a globetrotter and has decided to give a Bristolian home to some of the exciting dishes he’s experienced on his travels. The food, then, is informed by all kinds of cuisines and cultures, as well as our seasons here on home turf. The sweet potato fritters with grilled halloumi, avo and poached eggs are going down a treat, we hear. “It’s a dish that’s super popular with my customers, and will be staying on my new menus,” Richard tells us. facebook.com/99queens

BOSCO

Sibling to the Whiteladies Road original, the second Bosco opened in Clifton Village almost a year ago, with the same buzzy, rustic vibe and regional Italian food. Repping different areas across the country, the menu lists Neapolitan-style wood-fired pizzas and classic pasta dishes, as well as fresh salads using Italian veggies and cicchetti (snacks) like arancini and Calabrian anchovies. All made with a mix of specially imported Italian ingredients and West Country produce. When quizzed about Bosco’s signature, though, ops manager Joe Cook says, “We’d have to choose one of our classic pastas – the duck ragu with paparadelle. It’s a rich and tasty ragu of salted duck legs, tomatoes, white wine and dark chocolate, and never fails to get rave reviews.” We’re keen. boscopizzeria.co.uk

BOSTON TEA PARTY

Did you know that, although there are branches of BTP scattered across the South West now, the team at this cosy café in Clifton still make all the food on their menu in-house? That’s everything from the warming soups to the fresh cakes displayed on the counter, and, of course, the breakfasts. This place is big on morning meals, says general manager Mary Cleaver: “I’m always recommending our chorizo hash, which is a homemade potato and chorizo rosti with poached eggs, spinach, tomato and mushrooms – I like to add smoked bacon to mine for the ultimate brunch treat!” bostonteaparty.co.uk

BOTANICA

This restaurant sits on the ground floor of the independent Victoria Square Hotel, and opened just last summer. The modern European food is simple and made using specialist ingredients. To start, you might find the likes of honey roasted fig with buffalo mozzarella and aged balsamic, and bruschetta of smashed pea, mint and feta on the menu. For mains, the most popular dish is the slow-cooked ox cheek ragu with pappardelle – although the fior de latte-topped stonebaked pizzas are obviously a hit, too. victoriasquarehotel.co.uk

THE CLIFTON CLUB

Celebrating its bicentenary this year is The Clifton Club – Bristol’s oldest private members club – where the restaurant is decked out with chandeliers and linen-dressed tables for classic fine dining. Lunch and a la carte menus are served here, and the chefs also put together some pretty

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GIGGLING SQUID

The founder of this restaurant group, Pranee Laurillard, grew up in rural Thailand, and wanted to offer diners authentic, rustic Thai food, featuring great ingredients and novel flavour combos. Open for lunch and dinner, this place serves up Thai tapas, meaning guests can taste a spectrum of different dishes – the salt and pepper squid is a long-time favourite of customers here, though. gigglingsquid.com

THE IVY CLIFTON BRASSERIE

Having opened in summer 2016, this new brasserie is pitched as a casual, accessible, all-day dining relative of the famous London restaurant. Housed in a former bank, it’s pretty special inside, showing off many of the building’s original features as well as lots of artwork, leather booth seating, and marble-look tables. Visit for a fancy cocktail, afternoon tea, or a full-on meal. Brunches are popular here and range from classics like eggs Benedict to hot buttermilk pancakes with fresh fruit and yoghurt. theivycliftonbrasserie.com

LIDO

OUTSIDER

Okay, so this is a wee walk from the Village, but it’s well worth the stroll. Housed in former Victorian swimming Baths, Lido launched 10 years ago this year, and in that time executive chef Freddy Bird has developed a fun, exciting menu, which nods towards Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cookery. Choosing great ingredients from small-scale suppliers, the chefs here cook over fire, so expect dishes like the awesome wood-roast scallops with sweet herbs and garlic butter. And what makes this restaurant even more unique is that it overlooks the outdoor pool, through floor-to-ceiling windows, so guests can watch the swimmers get their lengths in as they tuck into that topnotch food. Bit spesh, no? lidobristol.com special tasting menus. There’s even a seasonal banqueting menu that can cater for up to 100. Manager Amy Edwards describes the food as “modern eclectic British cuisine, made using fresh, locally sourced produce.” Indeed, red winepoached turbot with salt-crust roasted beetroot sure sounds the part. thecliftonclub.co.uk

EAST VILLAGE CAFÉ

NEW!

This cool and cosy plant-packed café, which has taken over the former Arch House Deli site right on the edge of Victoria Square, concentrates on vegan and veggie food, which is organic, where possible. The team were inspired by a plant-based juice bar and café in The Big Apple that they frequented a lot last summer. To eat, guests can tuck into the likes of shakshouka (poached eggs in a spicy tomato sauce); smoky tempeh with harissa, avocado and rocket; and savoury corn and quinoa waffles with cashew cream. There are lots of great-looking cakes on the counter too, and drinks come in the form of coffee by the local Roasted Rituals, and fresh smoothies. Having only opened in midNovember, this is an interesting Clifton newcomer that’s well worth checking out. eastvillagecafe.co.uk

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M A I N S

THE MALL DELI

This place has been a part of the Clifton neighbourhood for 30 years, albeit under different ownership and even, at one time, at a different address. As well as selling produce to take away – think cheese, British charcuterie, bread, and store cupboard staples – its deli counter bursts with colourful, fresh lunches and snacks, either to take-away or eat in the small café area. The Deli Lunch Box should give you a good taste of what these guys are about; it contains a homemade treat such as a sausage roll or slice of frittata, and a selection of the daily-changing salads. Everything here is homemade – either by the in-house team or by small, local producers – and one look at the ever-changing counter displays is enough to get those hunger pangs going. themalldeli.co.uk

MINT ROOM

Having originated in Bath, the Clifton branch of The Mint Room opened in 2014. This younger sibling has always had a slightly different take on its contemporary, refined Indian food than that of the original, though. Here, there’s a subtle European edge to the dishes’ style, which is achieved while, of course, incorporating authentic flavours of the Subcontinent. If you’re more traditional in your tastes, then don’t fear: you’ll find some of those much-loved classics on the menu too. Keen for something new? Give the Keralan moilee (pan-fried fillet of sea bass with creamy coconut) a whirl – it’s on the ‘Taste of India’ menu. mintroom.co.uk

NUTMEG

This Indian restaurant celebrated its first birthday recently, and has built quite the reputation in the short time it’s been going. The menus reps the food of many different regions of India, showing just how diverse the cuisine of the Subcontinent is. There’s a rotating tasting menu available too, which focuses on different regions – right now, it’s Kerala. The most popular dishes requested of the chefs are the beef madras (which features slow-cooked meat in a spicy sauce, infused with curry leaf), and the sharabi jhinga – king prawns marinated in mango, chilli, ginger, garlic and coriander. Some of the best Indian food you’ll find in the city is served right here. nutmegbristol.com

NEW MOON

A globally inspired tapas bar, New Moon relocated from Gloucester Road to Clifton in 2015. In the kitchen is Takvor Terlemezian, who has cooked all over the world, and now flexes his creative muscles by creating a new list of specials each month based on a different country; January, for instance, is the turn of Australia. The most popular couple of dishes from each month’s specials make it onto the main menu too, meaning the offering is constantly evolving. The cosy, welcoming restaurant always has something new for it’s band of regulars to try, then. We nipped in for lunch recently and loved the Rioja chorizo dish, with sweet red pepper and onion. newmoontapas.co.uk

PRIMROSE CAFÉ

OLDIE BUT GO

ODIE

Having been under the same ownership for a quarter of a century, this local stalwart really is part of the Clifton furniture – and you can expect it to be pretty busy throughout breakfast and lunch. Open seven days a week, the mornings kick off with the likes of huevos racheros, Belgian waffles and eggs Benedict, while lunch brings the likes of slow-braised brisket and Ogleshield toasties; homemade tandoori-spiced lamb burgers; and cauliflower and onion bhaji wrap with aubergine pickle. Oh, look out for the seasonal specials on the blackboard, too. primrosecafe.co.uk

REG THE VEG

GREENGROCER

Okay, so you can’t eat here, but we couldn’t not include this legendary fruit and veg shop in our Clifton food round up; just try and find us a local who’s not heard of this 65-yearold green grocers! The current father-son team, John and Tom Hagon, took over back in 2009 and, along with their friendly team, concentrate on filling their shelves with the freshest and best-quality fruit and veg. Right now, that’ll look like celeriac, parsnip, kale, squashes and Jerusalem artichoke – so pick ’em up while they’re at their best. Not only selling to the public, these guys also are relied upon by top Bristol restaurants like The Pump House, Jamaica Street Stores and Poco – not to mention their neighbours Primrose Café, East Village Café, and The Mall Deli – to supply them with great ingredients. regtheveg.co.uk

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NEW MOON TAPAS Small Plates Dining

EAT YOUR GREENS

Tasty dishes from Aubergines, Artichokes, Olives, Spinach, Padron peppers and other greenies

SPECIALS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

OUR TAPAS FAVOURITES Charred Octopus Queen Scallops Pigeon Breasts Baked Quail Lamb Cutlets Rioja Chorizo

Congo, France, Russia, Thailand, Armenia, Britain, Mexico, Cyprus and more...

9 THE MALL CLIFTON BRISTOL 01772393858 WWW.NEWMOONTAPAS.CO.UK


M A I N S

ROSEMARINO

This seven-year-old restaurant, which perches on the corner of York Place, is an old faithful to many. Expect to find it serving classic breakfast with an Italian twist until 3pm (Tommy’s one-pan wonder deserves a mention here, featuring ham hock, sausage, potato, eggs and foccacia). Lunches and dinners are, of course, on the go as well, and are more modern Italian in style, focusing on regionality and seasonality. Soz, you won’t find pizzas here, but with their well-known antipasti – featuring meats exclusively cured for them in Trentino, Italy – and imaginative dishes like the beetroot Carpaccio with Sardinian pasta, goat’s cheese, apple and hazelnut on the go, we reckon you won’t miss ’em. rosemarino.co.uk

SHOP 3 BISTRO

CRUMBS AW

ARD WINNER

This little neighbourhood restaurant was founded by Kathryn Curtis and Stephen Gilchrist, who came to Bristol from New Zealand where they had another successful outfit. It’s all about rustic but carefully-prepared food; the menu is heavily influenced by the West Country larder and what is available to forage. At this time of year, for instance, you might get the likes of Dartmoor venison with winter sprouts and hedgerow jus, or pumpkin and pumpernickel gnocchi with charred hispi and buttermilk ricotta. Cocktails follow suit, and feature infusions made with wild ingredients, too. shop3bistro.co.uk

SPICER AND COLE

Here, instead of choosing from a list of dishes written on a piece of paper or blackboard, customers choose from what they see right in front of ’em. “We like to offer our food up in a ‘farmers’ market’ style – piled high on the counter, without

complicated menus, so customers can buy with their eyes,” says founder Carla Swift. The team make the food here simple, tasty and nutritious, using ingredients from nearby suppliers, including free-range eggs and organic meat and dairy. Eggs and smashed avo on toast is still a really popular breakfast order among locals, and the lunchtime frittata and salads sell out every day. After something a little less virtuous? Get your hands on a slice of the white chocolate blondie, which is one of the most popular homemade cakes here. (You know you want to.) The house espresso comes from the nearby Extract, but rotating varieties are sourced from all over the country – and even Europe. spicerandcole.co.uk

THALI

This established Bristol restaurant group brings a splash of colour to the corner of Regent Street; its tall windowed facade framed with pink and aqua, and the large shimmering sign above the door, are pretty hard to miss. The food follows colourful suit, with a mix of fresh flavours and textures all served up together in its signature Thali dishes. Indian food writer and chef Meera Sodha gives inspiration to the menus, which might include Keralan, Goan, and Punjabi Thali platters, as well as roadsidestyle grills. Ethics are a big deal here, and the group has the highest accolade that the Sustainable Restaurant Association gives out. Don’t fancy eating out? Get yourself a Thali tiffin and take your meal home. thethalirestaurant.co.uk

WELLBOURNE

REVIEW ON P

10 4

The home of the 21st-century vol-au-vent, this restaurant on The Mall serves sandwiches and snacks in the day, and a concise menu of novel mains come the evening. The chefs aim high with their careful and skilled cooking, which might come in the form of Jerusalem artichoke with sliced smoked eel and red grapes, and Ibaïama pork with white beans, fermented cabbage and pickled apple. There are plenty of wines available by the glass too, so washing it all down won’t be an issue. wellbourne.restaurant

HAVE WE MISSED OFF YOUR FAVOURITE FOODIE HANGOUT IN C-TOWN? TWEET US @CRUMBSMAG!

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A truly unique venue in the heart of Clifton Village, we provide the ideal environment for private functions, parties and banqueting. Our traditional and inspiring surroundings are complemented by modern facilities, a welcoming atmosphere and exceptional service. The Clifton Club is an ideal venue for hosting · dinners · private celebrations · drinks & canapes parties · wedding receptions · corporate entertainment. Packages can be tailored to suit your specific requirements.

IN THE HEART OF CLIFTON VILLAGE Decadent Georgian Surroundings A passion for Excellent Food Dedicated Event Planning Team Professional and Exclusive Service For further details about hiring the Club for your private event, please get in touch. Tel: 0117 9745039 Email: sarah.davidson@thecliftonclub.co.uk

www.thecliftonclub.co.uk

T @CliftonClub

thecliftonclub

The Clifton Club, 22 The Mall, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4DS

Open 7 days a Deli • Café • Gift Hampers week

• Cakes • Catering • Take-away lunches • Picnics Shop online via www.goodsixty.co.uk

14 The Mall, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4DR  0117 9734440 @themalldeli x themalldeli

www.themalldeli.co.uk


The

Guildhall Delicatessen

Situated in Bath’s famous indoor market

We stock a wide range of vegan, vegetarian and meat based products as well as delicious cakes and Bath Buns. Ideal for lunches, any time snacks or picnics. Come and order your food and collect it when you need it. We can even cater for small business lunches. Our range includes: Vegan, lamb or chicken samosas, veggie or meat pasties, bhajis, vegan or pork sausage rolls and veggie or pork scotch eggs. We also stock a range of speciality scotch eggs, pies and vegetarian quiches. Why not add a Lovely juice drink to your lunch time selection.

Open Mon - Sat, 9.30 - 17.00

8 Guildhall Market, Bath BA2 4AW • Tel: 01225 427195 email: guildhall-deli@hotmail.co.uk twitter: @GuildhallDeli

HAND BREWED. HAND BOTTLED. HAND LABELLED.

The Malago is a friendly bar and restaurant with a focus on fresh, locally sourced, quality food. Our dishes offer something for everyone. Our menu is inclusive of vegetarians and vegans, we have a delicious, freshly prepared children’s menu, and our chefs can cater for all dietary requirements. Now serving freshly prepared roasts every Sunday, 2-8pm. Meat, vegetarian and vegan options available. Booking advised! Open Monday to Saturday 9am to 11pm, Sunday 9am to 10pm Our kitchen is open daily serving brunch 9-3pm, lunch 12-3pm, and dinner 5.30-9.30pm (5.30-9pm on Sundays).

BEER BEYOND BOUNDARIES

www.themalago.club  eatout@themalago.club 220 North Street, Southville, BS3 1JD  0117 963 9044

www.devitera.co.uk/crumbs




M A I N S

ELLY weNTwORTh WITH THE TENTH MASTERCHEF: THE PROFESSIONALS FINAL NOW DONE AND DUSTED, EMMA DANCE CATCHES UP WITH LUCKNAM PARK’S ELLY WENTWORTH TO FIND OUT HOW LIFE’S BEEN TREATING HER SINCE SHE WOWED THE JUDGES ON LAST YEAR’S SHOW… CAST YOUR MIND BACK 12 months or so to last year’s series of MasterChef: The Professionals. Remember Elly Wentworth? If you don’t, you should. The then 24-year-old blew the judges’ socks off in her very first round – getting 10 out of 10 from the notoriously hard-to-please Marcus Wareing – and continued to impress, challenge after challenge, making it all the way through to the final. She may have finished second (the win went to 45-year-old Gary Maclean from Glasgow), but there’s little doubt that the show has boosted the talented young chef’s trajectory to stardom.

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M A I N S

“I can’t believe it was a year ago that it was on TV,” says Elly, as we sit in the magnificent surroundings of Lucknam Park, where she still works, having risen through the ranks to the position of sous chef. “It feels as if it was yesterday! Everything happened really quickly – it was only a few weeks after I applied that I was in the kitchen doing my skills test. “I’d practised so many things beforehand, so I’d be prepared. I was spending my days off with butchers and so on, and really trying to up my game so I’d know what to do, whatever they threw at me. Then they asked me to make a raspberry tart. I don’t work on pastry very much, but actually a tart is a pretty basic skill – if you’re a qualified chef, you should know how to do things like make a tart, or turn an artichoke.” It probably helped that Elly’s got no shortage of competition experience. She’s twice been named South West Young Professional Chef of the Year, also scooping the overall title the second time around. She was even taking part in the prestigious Royal Academy of Culinary Arts awards while she was competing on MasterChef (and went on to be one of only four chefs to be given an Award of Excellence). She definitely doesn’t believe in making life easy for herself. But, despite her preparation and competition experience, Elly wasn’t immune to the nerves. “I was so nervous!” she admits. “The first time you walk in that kitchen it’s really nerve-racking; you’re expecting the unexpected. But then, every stage you get to it’s the same feeling, really – it doesn’t get any better! “I’d watched the show for years and, like everyone, I’d look at the chefs messing up their tests and think, ‘What are you doing?’ But then I was there, and you’re under so much pressure. I could have gone in there and burned something. Of course, you don’t want to look like a fool – but when it’s a TV show like MasterChef it’s not just about you, either. It reflects on where you’re working as well. I didn’t want to let anyone down.” Elly clearly didn’t need to worry, though. She bossed round after round, barely putting a foot wrong and winning the admiration of not only the watching public, but the judges – especially Monica Galetti. I suggest to Elly that, from the outside at least, it seemed as if Monica had a bit of a soft spot for her. “Yeah, she did like me, I think,” says Elly. “She’s a really lovely lady, and we’re still in contact. She has definitely

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Elly with her executive chef at Lucknam Park, Hywel Jones

been an inspiration, and it’s amazing to see how far she’s come and what she’s achieved. As a female in a very male-dominated industry, it’s great to have people like her to look up to.” But much as Elly might admire Monica, as she talks there’s little doubt that it’s Lucknam’s executive chef, Hywel Jones, who has been the biggest influence on her career to date. “Of course, MasterChef has had an absolutely massive impact too,” she says. “I’ve done a lot of pop-ups and food festivals and things like that, which I simply wouldn’t have done if it wasn’t for the show. This winter I’m going to London to do a MasterChef pop-up, for instance, which will be really fun. “But it’s being at Lucknam Park that’s been the biggest thing for me. Working for Hywel is amazing. If you ask any chef why they come to work here, it’s because of Hywel. He’s the best chef in the country to work for. He’s an incredibly talented man, his food is incredible, and he’s so supportive. He’s looked after me really well, and encouraged me to do everything – and never said ‘no.’ “I was out of the kitchen for the best part of three months doing MasterChef, and he not only allowed me to do that, but actually encouraged me. Hywel wants everyone to learn and do well and, if he sees a sparkle in you, you’re going to fly. He’s not just a boss, he’s almost like a father figure to me. “It’s incredible to work somewhere where the staff turnover is almost none,” she continues. “No-one walks in here and walks back out again; everyone does their time. When people do leave, they do exceptionally well: Hrishikesh Desai at the Giplin Hotel, Richard Edwards was at Lords of the Manor, Mark Stinchcombe at Eckington Manor, Robert Potter at The Manor House – they’ve all gone on to get Michelin stars, and I think that’s got a lot to do with Hywel. “Hywel cares about absolutely everything that we do here at Lucknam Park – front of house, the Brasserie, the lot, not just the fine dining restaurant. It’s nice to work somewhere where you feel that you are part of a huge, successful team. To be honest, just to come here every day is really special.”

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Lucknam Park’s flagship restaurant holds a Michelin star

So, what’s next for the young culinary star? “It’s something I’ve talked about with Hywel,” she says. “When I started here I was a chef de partie, and now I’m a sous chef, but there’s not much further I can go here. “I’ve always dreamed of doing the Roux Scholarship, so I’m planning on entering that in January and we’ll see how that goes. It’s not really about positions and menus for me, though. It’s more about getting my CV to where I want it to be. “I’d like to be a head chef next, but I have got ages to find exactly what I want. One day I’d like my own country pub that does really, really good food, and win my own accolades, but that’s a little way down the line. I definitely want to stay in the South West – I love it here. There are so many great ingredients, and brilliant restaurants and amazing chefs. But, for now, I don’t know exactly what’s around the corner.” So, what advice does Elly have for any MasterChef: The Professionals hopefuls out there? “Just keep calm and cook to the best of your ability,” she says. “It’s harder than you think, but if you really enjoy cooking, it’s worth it. Just ignore everyone around you, and focus on what you’re doing. After all, the only person who can knock you off your stride is you.” lucknampark.co.uk

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We are a friendly, family owned inn offering hearty home cooked food, in a small country village setting.

THE BRISTOL FOOD TOUR

Whether you are local or travelling from further afield, you are guaranteed a warm welcome.

The Bristol Food Tour is a unique culinary adventure showcasing the very best of Bristol’s independent food scene. Our tours are relaxed and fun, with a knowledgeable guide to introduce you to hidden foodie gems and share insider local knowledge

PUB • RESTAURANT • FUNCTION ROOM • ACCOMMODATION

tours include at least six generous tasters, with a couple of extras along the way! dietary requirements catered for • monthly wholly vegan tours

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We also sell beautiful gift vouchers that are valid for a year and can be used on any of our tours with availability. To fi nd out more, please visit: www.thebristolfoodtour.com or drop us an email at: thebristolfoodtour@gmail.com

We look forward to seeing you on a tour soon! f

thebristolfoodtour

a bristolfoodtour

Tunley Road, Tunley BA2 0EB • 01761 470408 Email: kingwilliamtunley@live.com • f T @kingwilliam84 www.kingwilliaminn.co.uk

BUTTERMILK FRIED CHICKEN

CRAFT BEER & COCKTAILS

On the riverside, Taunton 01823 252466 | info@eatthebird.co.uk x eatthebird a tw_eatthebird


WHITEHART • w i d c o m b e •

Join us in January and February every Tuesday evening FOR six consecutive weeks of special menus Moroccan night

Tagines, Moroccan spiced salads & pastries.

Other weeks will include Bistro night, Mussels night & Steak night, all at £15. Selected wines at reduced prices. The White Hart | Widcombe | Bath | BA2 6AA T 01225 338053 | www.whitehartbath.co.uk


PLENTY MORE FISH IN THE SEA

100% PLANT BASED TAKEAWAY IN BRISTOL A fresh new take on classic British and Chinese takeaway cuisine. Hand prepared from 100% plant based & organic ingredients!

OPENING HOURS Tuesday - Saturday 5pm - 9:30pm MATTER FASTFOODS 660 Fishponds Road, Bristol BS16 3HJ 0117 9655050 matterbristol@gmail.com www.matterfastfoods.com


DARCY’S NEWS CAFÉ

Bath’s finest independent news café We are a family run, independent café in central Bath. We serve breakfast from 8am and our menu includes bacon rolls, porridge, yoghurt & granola and smashed avocado on sourdough with smoked salmon. Our wholesome lunch menu includes a range of homemade, hearty soups, quiche or sausage rolls, all served with a choice of salads. While you’re here you can pick up a newspaper with your Lavazza coffee or choose from our extensive hot chocolate menu. We also deliver newspapers across Bath too! Call today to see if we deliver to your area.

01225 425308 | 34 Gay Street, Bath BA1 2NT | f darcysbath

Café | Bistro | Catering

DELICIOUS & FRESH Tucked away in the Chew Valley, Chew Kitchen combines fresh local ingredients to create a diverse menu that changes daily. From perennial classics to international inspirations, there¹s something for everyone. Just leave room for a dessert you won’t be able to refuse...

Bringing you the very best of Colombia! 01275 332933 • hello@chew.kitchen • www.chew.kitchen • f chew.kitchen Chew Lane, Chew Stoke, Bristol BS40 8UE (opposite the medical surgery)

6 Abbey Gate Street, Bath BA1 1NP 07534 391 992 jhampoll@thecolombiancompany.com www.thecolombiancompany.com


Bath's critically acclaimed Nepalese restaurant

Vegetarian and vegan wholefood shop and deli One of Bath's longest established restaurants is pleased to offer you 2 for 1 on wine by the glass, draught beer or soft drinks with this advert.

10% off all essential brand products every Wednesday

Valid Monday – Thursday inclusive 1st January – 31st January 2018 12 Pierrepont Street, Bath BA1 1LA 01225 442299 | www.yakyetiyak.co.uk

37 Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BN tel: 01225465519

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CAKERY ARTISAN COFFEE CUSTOM MADE CAKES FRESH BREAD

Gluten free, dairy free and vegan options available 21 Claverton buildings, Bath BA2 4LD tel 07891 211852 email thecakery-@hotmail.com b The Cakery  @TheCakeryBath  thecakerybath www.thecakerybath.co.uk

SERVING LUNCH, AFTERNOON TEA AND DINNER, 7 DAYS OF THE WEEK Backwell House, Farleigh Road, Backwell BS48 3QA 0117 325 1110 enquiries@backwellhouse.co.uk www.backwellhouse.co.uk


THE OLD STATION INN & CARRIAGE RESTAURANT

01761 452228

Wells Road | Hallatrow | Somerset | BS39 6EN www.theoldstationandcarriage.co.uk

PUB • RESTAURANT • ROOMS Dine in our elegant Pullman carriage restaurant, in our bustling eclectic pub or even al fresco in our large beer garden... Whatever your mood or occasion there will always be a warm welcome and fantastic food.

New menu now available Under new ownership and recently refurbished We believe that simple pleasures are important. We keep things simple with our traditional methods and natural recipes. Each bottle is made by hand in the Somerset countryside, using real ingredients with no baddies or bubbles needed! Our lemonades will leave a tingle on your tongue and make your taste buds come alive. They are full of real fruit juice and come in a variety of tongue-tingling flavours.

Hullabaloos Lemonade 01934 733696 hullabaloos.rocks@gmail.com www.hullabaloos.rocks

Dog friendly The only Bristol pub to serve Pieminister pies

Pie and a pint for £ 12. 50 Every Wednesday, 6 - 9pm 75-78 St Luke’s Rd, Bristol BS3 4RY 0117 431 4973

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STEPHANIE BOOTE CATERING EVENTS/PRIVATE DINING/WEDDINGS

Let us help create your special event www.stephaniebootecatering.com


A F T E RS NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

This new gaff on The Mall has been getting many a tongue wagging...

H I G H L I G H T S

LIVING ON THE VEG

Dinner at Bath’s newest vegan restaurant, Nourish Page 99

HELLO, SUNSHINE

A pub dinner at Backwell’s Rising Sun Page 102

VAVAVOOM

We scoff all the VaVs at Wellbourne Page 104

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Christmas isn’t Christmas until you’ve tried our fabulous Christmas menu! Bookings open for our New Year’s party! With its waterside location and two large alfresco terraces, Riverstation is a friendly and relaxed space for any time of day. From breakfast and brunch to lunch and dinner our seasonal menus, carefully selected local beers and ciders, wines by the glass or bottle and expertly mixed cocktails work side by side with a warm welcome, professional service and delicious food whenever you choose to visit.

Newly launched Bar & Kitchen food and cocktails menu. Perfect for any occasion. Now taking bookings for January and February

Happy 2018 to you all! See you soon…

The Grove, Bristol BS1 4RB; 0117 914 4434 riverstation@youngs.co.uk www.riverstation.co.uk

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12-16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 01173 291300 Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB Tel: 01225 446656 Email: info@themintroom.co.uk www.themintroom.co.uk

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( M E AT- F R E E M E A L S )

NOURISH THERE’S SOMETHING ABSENT ON THE MENU AT THIS NEW RESTAURANT – BUT NOTHING THAT JESSICA CARTER MISSED...

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ocals – and the keen-eyed among you – will known that all was quiet on The Beaufort front until recently, with the popular gastropub having suddenly closed its doors some months ago. When it opened back in 2015 (co-owned by Robbie Tack, who also has GPT Smokehouse), we loved its bold, inventive modern British menu – not to mention its ambitious attitude. It would, after all, have been perfectly understandable to play it safe at a venue such as this, at the end of a jaunt out of town on Bath’s London Road. It was a bit sad, then, when we found out that The Beaufort was no more. But you know the phrase: as one door closes, yada yada. What we’re trying to say is that the restaurant is back open, Robbie is still very much at the helm, and the menu is, again, an intriguing and pretty daring one. This new reincarnation is called Nourish, and it’s serving 100-percent plant-based food. No meat, no dairy, no animal or fish products of any kind. I can’t pretend there weren’t a few raised eyebrows in the Crumbs office when we found out about this new direction. But after a two-minute chat with Robbie – whose diet is all but plant-based, give or take a weakness for a good


A F T E R S

croissant, it made a lot of sense. This is a guy who, safe to say, ain’t scared to try something new, and with meat production systems just not sitting well with him, it feels like a natural move. Inside, the space is quite bare; tables aren’t laid with cutlery or glasses – perhaps it’s still pitching itself as a bar, too? – and there are no unnecessary furnishings or frills, aside from a few large, colourful paintings on the walls. With the lights right up as they were when we arrived, the dining space we were in (there was a section behind us that was taken up by a large party) had a chilled daytime, café-like vibe going on.

As well as being vegan, the menu was pretty much entirely gluten free. The kitchen sure doesn’t shy away from a culinary challenge here. To look at, you could have mistaken the croquettes (£6.50) for straight up falafel. It was, admittedly, without excitement then that the first mouthful went down the hatch. But we judged too soon; the texture was light and fluffy as opposed to dense and crumbly and, along with the smoky aubergine purée and pokey pickled red cabbage, it was a winner. The Chinese spring rolls (£5.95), meanwhile, were stuffed with a meaty mix of enoki mushroom and tofu, and had been fried for a crisp, golden outer and proper chew. Good starters, then, which we were more than happy with. The tacos (£4.95 each) easily trumped ’em both, though. The first was barbecue jackfruit. (Remember that ingredient everyone started going nuts for a couple of years ago, as the plant equivalent of pulled pork? That’s jackfruit, in its young, unripe form.) Meaty and savoury – and yes, really, very much like pulled pork – it was joined in its soft tortilla with salsa, guac, and a coriander and coconut yoghurt that helped to cool down the jalapeño heat. The second was coconut-crumbed tofu with pineapple and mango salsa: another wellbalanced filling that saw us hoovering up every last crumb that spilled out onto the table. (Perhaps not first date food.) The cauliflower steak (£12) had been treated to a good old spice rub, and its edges were a deep golden colour where it

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had been allowed to start caramelising in the heat. Sat on a bed of herby puy lentils with salsa verde, it was so filling that my pal couldn’t even finish it (had nothing to do with those four starters we had seen off between us, of course...). Served with garlic bread and dressed leaves, the lasagne (£13.50) involved a romesco-like sauce (a sweet and earthy mix of tomato, red pepper and walnut) while the ‘cheese’ layer came courtesy of cashew. Firmer, and without the ooze factor you usually get with the standard bolognese and cheese sauces, it was still a really comforting, satisfying veggie bake that didn’t want for meat. The pumpkin pie with silky coconut cream Chantilly and maple-glazed pecans (£6.50) was bang on the money for dessert: super light, subtly sweet and with a nicely thin pastry base that we wouldn’t have known was vegan, had it not been served here. The chocolate mousse (£6.50) was the only dish to miss the mark; super-rich and dense, it proved just too overbearing for us to tackle. Nourish may face some challenges with its niche and location, but the food is ambitious, confident and thoughtful. We left full and satisfied – but with none of the usual heaviness – and also pleasantly surprised. And that was in the restaurant’s first week of trading – it’s only going to get better, surely? Nourish, London Road, Bath BA1 6QB; 01225 422033; nourishbath.co.uk


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A F T E R S

(GOOD OLD GASTROPUBS)

THE RISING SUN JESSICA CARTER FINALLY MAKES IT INSIDE THIS FAMILIAR PUB FOR A HEARTY FEED…

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ust a couple of years ago it looked as if time was going to be called on this Backwell pub, with the then-owners thinking about having it knocked down to develop the land. Fearing for the future of their local watering hole (as you well might), regular punters took action, setting up a petition to save it. There was a bit of a communal exhale in this little village, then, when the family-run OHH Pub Company stepped in and added it to their small portfolio.

The Rising Sun is still very much a friendly, casual village boozer; you may well just want to swing by for a leisurely pint, which is more than okay. You could get comfy with a full-on three-course meal too, though. You know, up to you. For somewhere that I’ve never actually stepped inside before, The Rising Sun is pretty familiar. Having grown up in Westonsuper-Mare, I’ve been frequenting the A370 – the road it sits on the edge of – ever since I started catching the X1 to Bristol as a teenager, and still drive past often on my

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way back to visit Mrs C. Given its location, dinner here seemed like a great excuse to catch up with a mate from the ’Mare; one whom it’s become increasingly difficult to convince to make that long and drawn out (er, not) journey to Bristol. This gaff is pretty much smack bang half way, and left him with no argument. Well, none that I was willing to accept. The pub was pretty chilled when we arrived (well, it was only 6.30pm on a Monday), and we had the restaurant all but to ourselves for the majority of the evening. Its menu is pretty extensive, jumping from classic British comfort food to fresh pasta, seafood and even pizza. Larger menus are always a wee bit of a concern: firstly because they present a more difficult decision-making process for my indecisive brain, and secondly ’cause you have to wonder if that whole spectrum of meals can be cooked fresh – and well. However, the Walter Rose and Son logo at the head of the


steak section was a good indicator of the quality of ingredients these guys use, and the menu prices being slightly higher than that at your bog-standard boozer also had me keeping faith. We ordered a couple of pints and got stuck in. The moules marinière starter (£7.50) was first; the mussels bathed in a light, creamy sauce with crescents of onion and flecks of parsley. Served simply with a couple of slices of bread (which the menu told us was homemade), it was a hefty first course, and indicative of the straight up, home-cooked food that would form the rest of our meal. The lamb kofta starter (£6.25), meanwhile, went down a treat across the table; balls of lean, gently spiced meat were skewered and rested on warm, fluffy flatbread, alongside a minty yoghurt dip. My carnivorous companion bounded eagerly from lamb to pork, ordering the fillet (£16.95) for mains. The good-quality meat was ever so slightly blushing in the middle, and arrived in slices to show off its delicate hue of pink. Soft and tender, it was surrounded by sweet and earthy root veg (carrot and candy beetroot), and fluffy potato croquettes, which were pleasingly crisp and golden. Finished off with a pork jus, it put a right smile on his face. In front of me sat a heap of linguine, tangled around tomatoes, prawns and slices of red onion, all bespeckled with chopped parsley and chilli (£14.75). The linguine

itself was slightly too soft and overcooked for me – I do like a little bit o’ bite to my pasta – and the prawns weren’t as sizeable as expected, considering they were of the tiger variety. (They were plump and wellcooked, mind.) That said, the flavours were all there: the delicate, skinless tomatoes released their lovely sweetness when bit into; the onion was cooked just enough to provide a delicate sharpness; and the chilli was used to enhance the assembly of flavours, as opposed to overbear it with heat. Finished off with a whisper of lemon that elevated the silky coating on the pasta, it was a hearty and tasty main (and another generously portioned dish). Digging deep, we found room for something sweet. The comforting apple and cinnamon crumble (£6) saw a pool of warm stewed fruit hide beneath a scattering of sweet crumb, while the old-school sundae (£6.95) hit the spot, combining brownie, ice cream, cream, caramel and walnuts in a traditional tall glass. A village pub that’s not trying to be anything else, The Rising Sun is a friendly spot that serves good-quality, honest homemade food, and certainly aims higher than many a rural watering hole.

The Rising Sun, 91 West Town Road, Backwell, North Somerset BS48 3BH; 01275 462215; ohhpubs.co.uk

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( N E W R E S TA U R A N T S )

WELLBOURNE

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IT WAS DINNER WITH A SIDE OF SURPRISE HERE FOR JESSICA CARTER...

lifton seems to be coming back around when it comes to food. Although it’s kept a few staple food hangouts over the decades, you could argue that it, for a time, kind of dropped of the culinary radar. Then, a few intriguing new joints started popping up: Nutmeg arrived serving great regional Indian dishes; Shop 3 Bistro appeared with its wild food ethos and novel flavour combinations; and The Ivy group also stirred up conversation when it opened a brasserie in a former bank here. Finally, in mid-August last year, a former Indian gaff reopened on The Mall as Wellbourne. Founded by three industry pros – chefs

Ross Gibbens and Michael Kennedy, and operations manager Martin Irwin – who have an impressive amount of collective experience, it once again got Clifton on the tongue of the city’s enthusiastic diners. And not least because of the classic ’80s party food that it’s brought back… Open for lunch every day and breakfast at the weekends as well, this stylishly decorated restaurant – with its shades of grey, white tiles and gold finishes – is a casual hangout during daylight hours, and a cosy, candlelit space in the evening. The now well-talked-about VaVs – that’s vol au vents, guys – rotate regularly, changing up with the season (from £2 a

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piece, depending on how many you order). On this winter’s night the shiny, golden pastry encased fillings of soft, savoury salt cod brandade and wild chervil; earthy and comforting creamed trompette mushroom with garlic and thyme; and sweet pork and chestnut stuffing, with scarlet cranberry. Each a pretty great mouthful (or two mouthfuls, if you’re being all polite about it), they had gorgeously flaky pastry that broke into the most delicate golden wisps when bitten into. We washed ’em down with a glass of well-chilled Cava. Because, well, why not? Home-baked bread came warm and crusty, and was served with an interesting


A F T E R S

fig leaf-infused butter, which had a fresh and clean flavour. There’s just a handful of options for each course, keeping things nice and straightforward. The spatchcock quail (£10) with oxeye daisy, white radish and golden raisins, and venison tartare (£9) with mushrooms, walnuts and quail’s egg were two big contenders to kick off with, but in the end it was the charred lettuce filled with crab and peanut and topped with vibrant tagete petals (£9), and the beetroot with mushroom, hazelnut and kinome leaves (£8), that were served to the table. On the latter, pretty pink ribbons of bright candy beetroot wove in and out of each other, and a light, warming broth was poured over them at the table. Underneath sat a pinch of seaweed threads that gave a subtle, truffle-like flavour, enhancing the hints of mushroom in the stock. Next, the shoulder and breast of salt marsh lamb (£22) was buddied up with some rather unobvious plate fellows: a simple pesto of sea beet and shallot, and thin – almost translucent – strips of pickled salsify. The latter’s crunch and tang cut through the rich, uber-tender lamb, which fell apart on contact with my fork. There were even more imaginative components with the roast monkfish tail (£22), parsley root shavings echoing the earthiness of the golden chanterelles that sat atop the meaty, carefully cooked fish.

I’ve tried the imaginative black pudding tart with Devon Blue cheese from the ‘afters’ section before, and it’s a spot-on way to end a meal here, especially if you’re not into anything too sweet. But I, of course, am, so today was the turn of the pear with honeycomb, and slow-cooked chocolate fondant (both £7.50). The fat pear half was peppered with slightly bitter and even smoky cocoa nibs, sweet cicely leaves, and shards of honeycomb, and it bathed in a golden honeycomb mousse. The chocolate, meanwhile, was expectantly rich, but a crushed fig leaf Arbequina olive oil, with its subtly clean flavour, was poured over it at the table and gently lifted the choc. The food here avoids being too fussy, but is certainly a bit out of the ordinary, and prepared with obvious skill. There will likely be ingredients on the menu that you’ve not tried or heard of before, but there’s no pretentiousness around them; get the low down from the front of house guys, as opposed to Googling ’em under the table. The wines are also on the unusual side, and there are plenty available by the glass. The imaginative ingredients and flavour combinations make this place one to keep an eye on – here’s hoping its Village location serves it well.

Wellbourne, 25 The Mall, Bristol BS8 4JG; 0117 239 0683; wellbourne.restaurant

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L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

TOry MCTeRnan

HERE’S WHERE YOU’RE LIKELY TO SPOT THIS BUSY LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER...

BREAKFAST? Yeo Valley Canteen in Blagdon. It’s a great place to start the day: fabulous food, all organic and local. And great value. FAVOURITE GROCERY SHOP? Williams in Somerton is family run, stocks masses of local produce, and always has what I need. BEST WINE MERCHANT? Grape & Grind on Gloucester Road. It sells unusual, delicious wines, and the team give great advice if you are stuck and need some inspiration. QUICK PINT? Devonshire Arms, Long Sutton. An elegant, stylish place to pop into after a walk and grab a bag of crisps and a pint. CHEEKY COCKTAIL? Hyde & Co – a dark, cosy, hedonistic Prohibition bar in Bristol that does fab cocktails. WITH FRIENDS? Paco Tapas. It’s a hip tapas bar serving – amongst other treats – great fino and awesome aged Galician beef. Authentic and fun. WITH THE FAMILY? At the Chapel in Bruton. Relaxed, informal, great pizzas, buzzy atmosphere – our children love it there.

QUICK! Now add this little lot to your contacts book Yeo Valley Canteen, Yeo Valley HQ, Blagdon BS40 7YE; yeovalley.co.uk Williams Supermarket, Somerton TA11 7PY; williamssupermarket.co.uk Grape & Grind, Bristol BS7 8AT; grapeandgrind.co.uk Devonshire Arms, Long Sutton TA10 9LP; thedevonshirearms.com Hyde & Co, Bristol BS8 1JY; hydeand.co

BEST ATMOSPHERE? Bell’s Diner. I adore it – great Negronis and delicious Mediterranean-inspired food to share.

Paco Tapas, Bristol BS1 6SY; pacotapas.co.uk

SUPER STEAK? Roth Bar & Grill is a brilliant place; there’s so much to praise, but the steaks really are fantastic.

At the Chapel, Bruton BA10 0AE; atthechapel.co.uk Bell’s Diner & Bar Rooms, Bristol BS6 5QB; bellsdiner.com Roth Bar & Grill, Bruton BA10 0NL; rothbarandgrill.co.uk

torymcternan.co.uk

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