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CRUMBS BATH & BRISTO L

ASIA’s GOT TALENT!

A little slice of foodie heaven PLUS...

NO.69 NOVEMBER 2017

TAKE A TOUR OF THE EAST

• PUMP HOU’sSE • ZANKY • BATH PRIORY

(NO PLANE REQUIRED!)

WIZARD CHEESE!

NO.69 NOVEMBER 2017

YOU’LL WANT TO VISIT THEM ALL

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RUSTY STAG

It’s deliCiOUs and nUtritIOus

IN BROUGHTON GIFFORD YET?

(WE HAVE!)

KNOCK OUT!

5 F

BEST CHEF s

£3 where sold

HARE GAME

PUNCHYS RROEMCITHEPREGE ION's

Why did the bald guy paint rabbits on his head?

From a distance they look like hares!

THE ULTIMATE FREESTYLE IT’S CULIN ARY TMAS WRAPPING! CHRIS GIFT GUIDE


Imagined in the 19th Century, Established in the 21st

Come and visit the ďŹ ctional watering hole of the adventurer Captain Sebastian Commodore. Each cocktail has a story to tell...will you be there to hear them?

Christmas bookings now being taken. 16 St Stephens Street Bristol BS1 1JR 01179276869 theclockworkrose.com thecaptain@theclockworkrose.com


CRUMBS BATH & BRISTO L

ASIA’s GOT TALENT!

A little slice of foodie heaven PLUS...

NO.69 NOVEMBER 2017

TAKE A TOUR OF THE EAST

• PUMP HOUSs E • ZANKY’ ATH • BAT PRIORY

(NO PLANE REQUIRED!)

WIZARD CHEESE!

NO.69 NOVEMBER 2017

YOU’LL WANT TO VISIT THEM ALL

wINnERS EaLeD! rEV CLEAnED THE GAnG WHO

WE VISIT THE BE CHEESEMONGER INSTTHE COUNTRY – OFFICIAL!

MEET EVER uP AT OUR FIRST

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CRUmBS AWAR

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IT’S THE CHEESE KNEES

TRIED THE NEW

RUSTY STAG

It’s deliCiOUs and nUtritIOus

IN BROUGHTON GIFFORD YET?

(WE HAVE!)

KNOCK OUT!

5 FROM THE BEST CHEFs

£3 where sold

HARE GAME

PUNCHY RECIPES REGION's Why did the bald guy paint rabbits on his head?

From a distance they look like hares!

THE ULTIMATE FREESTYLE IT’S CULIN ARY TMAS WRAPPING! CHRIS GIFT GUIDE

ISSUE 69 NOVEMBER 2017 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk ART DIRECTOR

FAST LOVE

TREVOR GILHAM ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE

ALISTAIR TAYLOR alistair.taylor@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER

GEMMA SCRINE gemma.scrine@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 www.mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we tested out the brand new menu at Le Poivrot, celebrated Bristol Beer Week with a beer-focused menu at Wellbourne, and went for a gin-themed dinner at The Royal Crescent.

large version

WE OFTEN HAVE little squabbles at Crumbs HQ about our culinary cover stars, but this month we all agreed pretty early doors on the cheeky critter that’s gracing the front of this here mag. And not just because of its great looks... Known for their speed, springtime boxing matches and handsome features, hares are bang in season right now, and shouldn’t be too hard to come by. Although they’re nationally far fewer in number than rabbit, they’re still a pretty sustainable source of meat: they can be plentiful in some areas, and aren’t farmed, so will be completely natural. It has to be said, though, that hare is not to everyone’s taste; the rich, distinctive flavour might well take some getting used to, as may the idea of cooking with the blood, which is common practice when using this animal in the kitchen. Even Freddy Bird wasn’t sold on this meat as a young ’un, as he tells us in his recipe – but he’s game (ahem) for a pastrytopped dinner of hare these days. In other news, our first ever Crumbs Awards winners have now been revealed! The ceremony at the Bristol Old Vic saw the great and the good of the Bath and Bristol food scene get together to celebrate our developing food economy, and learn the stories of people having a positive impact on the local culinary landscape. Some incredibly inspiring and forward-thinking winners picked up those coveted trophies, from a supersustainable restaurant to someone helping to build multi-cultural communities through food; from a special needs school offering students invaluable hospitality experience and training to a front of house pro that goes above and beyond when it comes to service. Meet them all in our mammoth awards feature on p47. That’s all from me for now – see you in four weeks!

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

Crumbs is now an app! You can read all editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, Cotswolds and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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Table of Contents NO.69 NOVEMBER 2017

STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT Hare today... 12 OPENINGS ETC Hot gossip and news 17 KITCHEN LIBRARY Top culinary reads

CHEF!

22 Duck breast with confit leg, by Dan Moon

25 Spelt and kale salad, by Kathy Slack 26 Brill with mushroom, by Josh Sands

KITCHEN ARMOURY

AFTERS

35 XMAS CRACKERS Festive foodie gifts

ADDITIONAL RECIPES

MAINS

70 The Rusty Stag 73 Zanky’s 78 The Pump House 80 The Bath Priory

10 Hare and pig trotter pie, by Freddy Bird 17 Octopus with smashed potatoes, by Nuno Mendes

47 WINNING! Meet the first ever Crumbs Awards winners 58 EASTERN EATS Where to find some of the best local Asian food

PLUS! 82 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Dan Izzard’s foodie hangouts


START E RS INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

after darK GET THOSE LAYERS ON AND BRAVE THE CHILLY AUTUMN EVENINGS; THIS MONTH’S EVENTS ARE TOTALLY WORTH IT...

1 NOVEMBER GREAT WESTERN WINE PORTFOLIO TASTING Test out a whole range of wines, meet the makers, and nibble on offerings from Pong Cheese and Cocoa Runners while enjoying music and general merriment. Tickets £20 from greatwesternwine.co.uk

13 NOVEMBER OLIA HERCULES COOKS FROM KAUKASIS Olia’s new cookbook, chocca with new recipes and the stories behind them, is all about perhaps lesser-explored foodie regions such as Georgia and Azerbaijan. The well-travelled chef will be talking and offering tastes of some recipes. Tickets start at £10 and are available online at toppingbooks.co.uk 23 NOVEMBER CHIVAS WHISKY CLUB AT HYDE & CO This guided tasting will feature five celebrated Chivas whiskies – from 25-year-aged creations to new releases – for guests to enjoy alongside plenty of nibbles. Tickets are £21 from foozie.co.uk

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P H OTO BY E L EN A HE AT H E RW IC K , TA K E N F RO M KAUKASIS BY OL I A HE R CUL E S ( MI TCHE L L B E A Z L E Y, £ 25 )

10 NOVEMBER TUTTI A TAVOLA! A FEAST OF POLENTA ON THE TABLE The folk at Better Food at Wapping Wharf are joining forces with the Ferrante family from Italy to host a special sharing feast, served directly on the table. Think polenta, rich tomato sauce, meat and vegetables. Tickets are £20 and include a glass of sparkling wine; get them from betterfood-polenta.eventbrite.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

haRe

ONE OF THE GREAT SIGHTS OF SPRING IS HARES LEAPING INTO THE AIR AND ‘BOXING’ EACH OTHER – NOT FOR NOTHING HAVE WE BEEN SAYING ‘MAD AS A MARCH HARE’ FOR 600 YEARS – BUT BEFORE THAT HAPPENS, WE EAT THEM. (HAPPILY, THEY’RE NOT QUITE AS CUTE AS RABBITS – BUT IT’S CLOSE…)

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ne of the most ancient of animal species (there were early hare ancestors around at the time of the dinosaurs), hares are not native to Britain, but nobody knows how or when they got here. Maybe the Romans brought them, as with so much, or maybe they’ve been hanging around far longer than that… Little kids are always confused by hares. Check out that weird-looking rabbit, they say. And it’s not a stupid comment, for these things come from the same family, are only slightly larger, eat the same diet, live in the same places, and look pretty damn identical – except not. The thing is, everything about them is longer: their legs, their noses, their almost ridiculously lengthy ears... They’re much faster than rabbits too – the European brown hare, the main type we get, has been timed at 35mph and above, and others are even quicker – and much less gregarious, usually living solitarily or in pairs. Not warren builders, they’re born fully furred with open eyes, ready to fend for themselves almost immediately – no bad thing, when your home is usually little more than a flattened nest of grass. Generally shy and little seen (remarkable, since they never hibernate and have to keep eating to survive, even in the dead of winter), they famously go loopy in the spring, when adults are seen chasing each other all over, and sometimes standing tall, punching each other with their paws. Some seem to be boys, trying to impress females by hitting other boys; others are girls, giving unwelcome suitors a rather robust brush-off.

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Unlike rabbits, hares have never been domesticated – we don’t keep them as pets, nor do we breed them for eating – so every hare we cook has to have been hunted in the wild. Hare meat is darker, richer and tastier than rabbit, and, as they’re bigger, one hare can serve up to eight. We cook them as we do rabbits, often roasted or fried (perhaps in bread) or in a rich autumn stew. Various versions of this crop up across Europe: a Greek one with onions, vinegar and cinnamon is particularly good, as is the sour German variation, thickened with hare blood. And then there’s the famous jugged hare, where the beast is cut up, marinated, and cooked for hours with red wine and juniper berries in a tall jug standing in a pan of boiling water. An 18th-century classic, it’s sometimes somewhat gorily served with the hare’s blood as a sort of sauce, perhaps mixed with red wine vinegar to stop it being quite so revolting. Jugging, as a form of slow cooking, is particularly suited to tougher, older hare – some say any hare older than a year should be a slow-cooking candidate – or to the less tempting cuts of younger animals. One beast can usually make two or three different meals: roast the shoulder and saddle, stew the legs, then make soup from the head and anything else you have left. Potted hare, meanwhile, is a dish that once seemed to be dying off, but has seen a bit of a revival. The meat is cooked, then pressed into a pot and covered with an inch or more of butter, which keeps the air out and preserves it for several months, to be served cold, often as a starter or appetiser with bread. Hare terrine is similarly great with hot toast, dressed green leaves and a decent fruit chutney, while chunks of hare meat makes a great addition to game pie, perhaps with venison, pheasant or partridge.

Like rabbits, hares feature prominently in many a mythology, often as tricksters or associated with the moon, thus symbolising rebirth and resurrection. The American Br’er Rabbit stories are but modern retellings of older African tales starring a wily hare, while the Greeks and Romans noticed the hare’s spring horniness and soon associated him with love

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gods like Aphrodite and Eros; in time, live hares were even being given as love tokens. Because they’re fast and elusive, stories of hares often paint them as either arrogant or scaredy-cats – think of the overconfident runner who lost to a tortoise in Aesop’s Fables – and they’re certainly challenging prey for the hunter; beagles were first bred to assist with hunting hares, as were basset hounds. These days you can buy hare from the start of August to the end of February, the season peaking about now: hare tends to be most freely available from October until just after Christmas. (In spring and summer, their breeding season, we leave them alone – as is only polite.) The easiest way to buy hare is often to order it in advance from a game dealer or good butcher. (These guys will joint your animal for you – a good idea, as dismembering them yourself is a messy business – and will give you the blood separately, just the thing for enriching stew or sauce.) Though frozen hare is available, they’re best bought fresh, when they’re at their tastiest. It’s true that there are far fewer hares around now than in the past. There were maybe four million in the country a couple of hundred years ago, but since the ’60s the population has plummeted to perhaps 20 percent of that number, and there are now government-sponsored measures in place to build their numbers up again. This decline has precious little to do with us shooting them though, and more to do with how we manage the land. Blame crop spraying, modern crop rotation that leaves them little to eat, and the decline of their favourite habitats: the hay meadows and fallow fields – or ‘leys’ – of mixed arable and livestock farms. Add to that the removal of the hedgerows that give them winter food and the cover they need to dodge foxes, and things do look rather bad for the hare. But there is hope! For one thing, climate change is allowing them to breed throughout most of the year. And for another, eating them actually preserves them in a way, as by building commercial demand you inspire people to change their behaviour and the environment, thus giving this handsome, tasty, combative animal a fighting chance...

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R E C I P E

HARE PIE SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS For the pastry: 375g plain flour 1 tsp baking powder 1 heaped tsp mustard powder 170g raw bone marrow, grated (you can get this from your butcher, or butter will also work) iced water milk, to glaze

FREDDY BIRD WASN’T ALWAYS KEEN ON HARE, BUT HE CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF IT NOW IN THIS PIE... I’VE NEVER BEEN a mad fan of hare – to eat, that is. Growing up in the countryside, I was happy shooting rabbits, but when I spotted a hare I was always so excited and thought them far too beautiful to shoot for the pot. Thankfully my dogs were always too slow to catch them too, even if they did have a good go; I’d stand in the corner of the field shouting madly at them to stop – they were so daft I’m not sure they’d have known what to do if they had caught up with them anyway! However, over the years I have enjoyed cooking hare more and more. The shoulders make a delicious pie, and pig trotters and pork fat work really well to lubricate the mix, as the hare itself can be quite dry.

Lido, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 933 9530; lidobristol.com

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For the filling: 10 hare shoulders 125g butter 300g streaky bacon, cut into lardons 1 large onion, diced 2 carrots, diced 2 sticks celery, diced 6 garlic cloves, chopped few sprigs of thyme 2 bay leaves 3 pig trotters 1 bottle good red wine 1 ltr gelatinous chicken stock (homemade) skin from belly or loin of pork (optional, but worth it!)

METHOD 1 First, make the pastry. Put all of the ingredients into a food processor (except the water and milk) with a pinch of salt, and pulse until evenly mixed. Slowly add the water to form a dough. When combined, wrap in cling film and leave in the fridge for at least 1 hour. 2 Preheat the oven to 150C/300F/gas mark 2. 3 In a large casserole with a lid, brown the shoulders all over with a knob of the butter and a little salt and pepper. Remove from the pot and set aside. 4 Next, fry the bacon until golden but still soft. Add the rest of the butter, diced vegetables, garlic and herbs. Sweat down until soft, adding a little more salt and pepper. Add the trotters and wine. 5 Reduce the wine until it barely covers the bottom of the pan, then add the shoulders back in, along with the stock. 6 Cover the stew with the pig skin – or you can use parchment paper. Then cover with a lid and cook in the oven for about 2 hours. By then, the meat should be tender and falling away from the bone. If it isn’t, give it a little more time. 7 Remove the pig skin and discard, then take out the shoulders and trotters, and set them aside to cool. 8 Pick the thyme stalks and bay from the mix, and put the pot back over the heat. Leave the sauce to slowly reduce, while you pick the hare and trotter meat from the bone, keeping the trotter fat and skin, too. Keep the hare meat fairly chunky but run a knife through the trotter skin, meat and fat. Once the sauce has reduced, return all that to the pan, stir and check the seasoning. The liquid should just cover the meat and veg. Pour into a pie dish. 9 Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. 10 Next, roll out the pastry and lay it over the top of the dish. Crimp around the edges and pierce the middle to allow the steam to escape when cooking. Brush lightly with milk. 11 Return to the oven for about 25 minutes (depending on how cool the mix has gotten), until the pastry is golden and crisp. 12 Serve with veg and a good bottle of Burgundy!

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S T A R T E R S

Openings etc

FOSTER HOME The Bristol Old Vic, which is currently undergoing substantial work to restore the 250-year-old venue to its former glory, has announced an exciting food partnership. The former Cooper’s Hall ballroom (which has acted as the entrance to the theatre for the last few decades) will be back in business as a dining and events space, and a brand new café-restaurant will also be launched. Taking on the culinary responsibilities? That would be the local Fosters Catering. Committed to using quality, seasonal produce, this events catering outfit is eager to get its hands on what will be its first permanent restaurant, as well as take care of the food for all kinds of celebrations hosted in the new space. fostersevents.co.uk

STARRY-EYED With the recently released Michelin Guide 2018 has come a brand new Michelin star for Bristol. It was Spanish-style tapas bar (and sister restaurant to Casamia) Paco Tapas which was the recipient of said award, and owner Peter Sanchez-Iglesias, who conceived the restaurant with his late brother Jonray, has told us at Crumbs just how chuffed he is about the new accolade: “I’m still blown away, to be honest. To think we have two restaurants at The General in Bristol with a Michelin star is almost beyond anything we’ve dreamed of.” Pete tells us how the team works hard to build a specific feel and character for the restaurant – which is named after his dad – through both the food and the service they offer. It’s clearly working, too; this waterside joint is doing pretty well for something that’s barely a year old, right? pacotapas.co.uk

PIE ANOTHER DAY Pie Baby has taken over the kitchen at The Golden Lion. New Zealanders Lara and Finn Fair are the couple behind this foodie business, which specialises in vegan, Kiwi-style, potato-topped pies. Having moved to Bristol from London, they started their residency at The Golden Lion on Gloucester Road at the very end of September, following two successful pop-ups at Small Bar and Moor Beer brewery. The pies are served in the evenings from Wednesday to Friday, and all day over the weekend, and you’ll find the likes of the Cheesy Rider (a macaroni and cheese pie with onion rings) and El Fuego Bandida (a Mexican chilli number) on the menu. piebaby.co.uk

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new kid On the bLOCk Can we expect much change how you’re at the helm? Local favourites like The Swan’s famous wedge of pie and faggots will remain, but menus will change monthly and there will always be events for the calendar. Which other local restaurants do you like to eat in?  Marlborough Tavern, The Pony & Trap, and The Salamander.

IN THE MIX Bristol bartenders Danny Walker and Dee Davies have joined forces with local biz Beyond the Bean to create a brand new range of cocktail syrups. Bristol Syrup Co hosted its launch event at cocktail bar Red Light during Bristol Cocktail Week, celebrating the 14 new syrups becoming available across the South West. These syrups are all about authentic, natural flavours, and come in both straight up, classic varieties – raspberry, passion fruit and elderflower, for instance – and more specialist variations, such as Raspberry Shrub, Pineapple and Coconut, and Cherry and Vanilla. bristolsyrupcompany.com

SHOP TO IT

Noticed the new deli and café that’s popped up on Wells Road in Bristol recently? Fox & West is the creation of local food-loving friends Hannah West and Lucy Fox, who decided to pack in their day jobs and make the deli that they’d always joked about opening a reality. The pair are focused on sourcing all their stock – which ranges from fresh veg and spices to cheese and beer – from the nearby area, meaning customers can expect to see products from the likes of Sausagenius, Incredible Brewing Co., and even local foragers. It’s not just about the groceries here, though; there’s a small café offering of coffee and locally baked Bosh cakes too, which the pair plan to grow to include food prepared in-house. foxandwest.co.uk

MEET MATT DAY, THE NEW HEAD CHEF AT THE SWAN, SWINEFORD So, Matt, how would you describe your style of food? Simple, fresh and British – I always work with the seasons. And when did you begin cooking? Five years ago, when I started as commis chef at The Garrick’s Head in Bath. What initially inspired you to start cooking professionally?  I’d been working in hospitality and had always loved the feel of the kitchen. What’s been the toughest job you’ve tackled so far?  It was at a golf club: I tried to install a new menu, which visitors to the restaurant loved but members hated. It took three years to win them over!

What makes the local foodie scene so great? Everyone locally has very high expectations. There’s a lot of great food being served in the surrounding areas, and a lot of great produce coming from Bristol as well, so standards are high. It’s very exciting to be part of that.

What are your favourite ingredients at the moment? I’m looking forward to pheasant, and game season in general. Do you grow anything yourself?  Herbs, like rosemary, lavender and sage. Who are your favourite suppliers you use for the restaurant?  Fine Food, Ruby & White, and Kingfisher are all great. Which piece of kitchen equipment couldn’t you live without?  My cleaver; I found it in an old cellar and sharpened it! What and where was the best dish you’ve eaten?  Smoked salmon and pickled cucumber sorbet at The Pony & Trap. Every element was perfect.

Tell us what attracted you to working at The Swan, then. It’s an established business with a great following. It’s also a really friendly local country pub, and has plenty of potential.

Favourite cookery book? The River Cottage Meat Book by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. It has great detail on how to deal with meats – I’ve read it front to back several times!

How many of you are there in the kitchen team? Four: I’m joined by a sous, a junior sous and an apprentice.

Current favourite flavour combination? Pheasant, chestnuts, pearl barley, pancetta, Pink Fir Apple potatoes.

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bathales.com


S T A R T E R S

the

instA FEED

@kymgrimshaw

visits the new Sholay at Cargo2

FIT FOR A KING A brand new food market will be popping up in Bath soon. Located on Kingsmead Square, The Christmas Street Food Market will see vendors of all kinds of cuisine come together to keep hungry shoppers well-fed with the likes of Cantonese dumplings, Alpine-style macaroni cheese and Valencian paella. There will, of course, be some mulled refreshments on offer too, and visitors needn’t eat, drink and run; covered seating and live music will have you hanging around for far longer than planned. The street food market will take place on Fridays and Saturdays, 12pm-9pm, throughout the duration of the Bath Christmas Market, starting at the end of November. casus-events.co.uk

@lauraleighchapman

cooks up a colourful shakshuka

SMOKIN’ BASES! A brand new indie restaurant will be opening in Keynsham’s Chocolate Quarter development, specialising in wood-fired pizzas. B Block is the creation of local chefs Adrian Kirikmaa and Ben Sacree, and will be an all-day dining kind of joint, situated in the former Frys factory. Expect pastries and breads on the go in the morning; pizzas, salads, flatbreads and paninis for lunch; and locally sourced, seasonal meals for dinner. To drink? You’ll find top-notch wines, gins, ciders and craft beers, as well as Wogan coffee. This gaff will reflect its building’s history, by way of a cool, industrial-style interior with bespoke, upcycled and retro furnishings and fixings, and will be home to an impressive wood-fired oven. b-blockpizza.co.uk

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@vivyapp

reckons @soukitchenbris may well have the best baba ganoush in Bristol Want to see your pics in the mag? Tag #CrumbsSnaps and you bloomin’ well might do!


S T A R T E R S

asK the Waitress

MEET DANNI GILLESPIE FROM THE VICTORIA PARK How long have you worked here for then, Danni? 18 months.

H I P SHOPS THE BRISTOL CHEESEMONGER

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So, what does she look for in a cheese hen we swing by to visit Rosie maker when she meets them for the first time? Morgan, her win at the Great British “It’s that passion and drive of the makers,” Cheese Awards is still as fresh as the she tells us. “And a real understanding of the temperature in her refrigerated shipping raw ingredients, and how they vary.” container shop. She may be telling us how Indeed, milk itself differs from season to she really wasn’t expecting to win, but The season – and it varies in the way in which it’s Bristol Cheesemonger being named Best treated, too. Raw (unpasteurised), Speciality Cheese Retailer in the thermised (treated with low heat), country is probably a little less of a and pasteurised milk all result in shock to her many loyal customers slightly different end products. and fans… “With unpasteurised milk you Located on the ground floor in perhaps get more depth in the the newest part of Bristol’s Cargo, flavour; the milk still contains all the the business – until recently a onenatural bacteria and things, which man-band outfit – moved here last is only going to add to the summer from St Nicholas Street. cheese’s taste and texture.” “I didn’t plan on moving,” she So, what’s hot right now in the tells us, “but I was offered a unit What: Cheese shop? Well, the Renegade Monk is here and it seemed like a great Where: Cargo 2, one of Rosie’s picks – it’s only opportunity. Lots of our Museum Street, been in existence for about six customers from the old shop Bristol BS1 6ZA months or so, and was another have followed us, though, which When: Wed-Sat winner at the same recent cheese is lovely.” 11am-6pm; Sun awards – and we’re told to look Whapping Wharf is no longer 11am-4pm out for a Stilton and some local just a dining destination, but a Brie-style numbers coming in for retail one too – and with the the Christmas season, too. opening of butchers Meat Box in a neighbouring container, “people are treating it Having now taken on her first member of staff, Rosie’s hoping to free up some time to a little bit more like a high street, coming here develop the wholesale part of the business to do their errands,” comments Rosie. (she currently supplies the likes of Dela, Birch, The Bristol Cheesemonger focuses on Bell’s Diner, Cargo Cantina and Tare), and visit British creations, with the majority of the stock even more cheese makers to keep her range coming from right here in the West Country. varied and fresh (speaking of which, she’s And you can get the story behind each and also currently on the hunt for a great every variety on the shelves, because Rosie mozzarella and burrata). So, keep your eyes personally visits all the makers regularly peeled for lots of newbies on the shelves… (which is where you’ll likely find her on the bristol-cheese.co.uk days the shop is shut).

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And where did you work before? The Famous Royal Navy Volunteer on King Street in Bristol. How long have you been in hospitality for, all told? About seven years, partand full-time. What do you like most about working in the industry? It’s increasingly varied; I like that one day I could be running around our beer garden on a busy Saturday, and another I could be painting and decorating the pub signs. What’s the best thing about your current job? We have quite a small team at The Victoria Park and, because of this, we really know how to work well together and are all good friends. We socialise outside of work, as well as after shifts.  And the most challenging part? Because the team is small, busy shifts can sometimes be a challenge – but one we’re definitely up to! What makes the pub a special place to visit? The atmosphere, I think; if the staff are having fun and want to talk to you about what they do, you feel positive and enjoy your time there. If you were a customer today, what would you order? I’m writing this on Monday, which is steak night, so I would definitely have a steak. (You can get two, and a bottle of wine, for £29.99!)  Where have you visited locally where the customer service was excellent? I went to The Windmill recently, just over the hill, and the staff were great. thevictoriapark.co.uk


B O O K

O F

T H E

M O N T H

MARK TAYLOR HAS CHRISTMAS IN MIND AS HE THUMBS THROUGH THIS MONTH’S LITERARY PICKS…

OCTOPUS WITH SMASHED POTATOES, OLIVE OIL AND PISO SERVES 6-8

I like to make a double, triple or quadruple batch of the piso and store it in the fridge for a week. It works well as a marinade, too. INGREDIENTS

Nuno Mendes Bloomsbury, £26

Known as Portugal’s ‘City of Light’ because of its beautiful buildings and cobbled streets illuminated by the reflections of the nearby waters, Lisbon is also one of the relatively undiscovered culinary centres of Europe. Londonbased chef Nuno Mendes was born and raised in Lisbon and this cookbook is a guide to the historic city’s bustling, modern food culture, combining dishes from restaurants, bars and homes. Mendes guides us through the streets and shoreline, from breakfast of pasteis de nata custard tarts or almond and butternut squash tarts through to lunch of grilled sardines with roasted green pepper salad. As evening approaches, thoughts turn to rich and warming dinners of marinated pork with black olives and parsley or baked celeriac with fennel and coriander broth.

METHOD

1 Rinse the octopus under cold running water. Half-fill a large pan with water and add the bay leaf, onion and garlic and a generous pinch of salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, add the octopus, and boil for 3 minutes. Carefully remove the octopus and set it aside to rest for a few minutes. 2 Bring the same water to the boil again and repeat the process two more times. In this way you can control the cooking process and check how firm the octopus flesh is becoming. At this point, the flesh should be tender with a little resistance when you insert a knife, and the skin slightly gelatinous. 3 Turn the heat down to low. Simmer the octopus, covered, for 20 minutes. Remove it from the pan and allow it to cool. If you have time, chill it overnight, which allows the flesh to become firmer. When the octopus has cooled, cut it into 3cm-4cm pieces. 4 To make the piso, mix together the coriander, garlic and lemon zest with a

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generous pinch of salt and pepper until you have a paste. I like to make this in a pestle and mortar, but you can also chop everything very finely by hand. By adding salt at this early stage, the flavour will be drawn out from the garlic. Then stir in the olive oil. I like it sharp, and I add about 2 tbsp lemon juice just before serving so it doesn’t discolour. It will keep in the fridge for a few days with an extra glug of olive oil on top. 5 To make the smashed potatoes, preheat the oven to 210C/410F/gas mark 6½. Cook the potatoes in plenty of salted boiling water until just tender but not breaking up. Remove from the pan, drain well and leave until cool enough to handle. Murro means ‘punch’ in Portuguese, and we are now going to punch the potatoes. Smash each one gently with the palm of your hand. Toss them in a bowl with the olive oil, bay leaves and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Put them in a large baking dish (big enough to hold the octopus too) and bake for 30 minutes, or until golden brown and crispy. 6 Drizzle the octopus with extra-virgin olive oil and put the pieces on top of the potatoes. Increase the oven temperature to 220C/425F/gas mark 7 and cook for 10 minutes, or until the octopus has lovely crispy edges. Drizzle with the piso, take it straight to the table and let your guests help themselves.

P H OTO GRA P H Y © A N D RE W M ON TGO ME RY

LISBOETA

For the octopus: 1 octopus (about 600g), cleaned, with head, eyes and innards removed 2 bay leaves 1 white onion, quartered 2 garlic cloves For the piso: bunch of coriander, leaves and stalks finely chopped ½ garlic clove, finely crushed ½ lemon (finely grated zest plus freshly squeezed juice, to taste) 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling For the smashed potatoes: 8-12 floury potatoes, such as Maris Piper or similar, skin on 4 tbsp olive oil 2 bay leaves 4 garlic cloves, smashed


S T A R T E R S

THE CHRISTMAS CHRONICLES Nigel Slater Fourth Estate, £26

Through his books and newspaper column, Nigel Slater has been a part of our culinary lives for quarter of a century, and there seems to be no dip in productivity or quality. His latest book is an extended love letter to winter and although there are 100 fabulous new recipes, it’s Slater’s beautifully evocative writing about festive rituals, feasts and fables that once again sets him apart from his contemporaries. Whether it’s describing candles, buying a Christmas tree or carol singing, Slater’s perceptive descriptions are as delicious as the dishes themselves. Not that the recipes are to be ignored, with highlights including pot-roast partridge with parsnips and smoked garlic; roast pumpkin with dukkha and pomegranate; and fig, maple syrup and Marsala ice cream. A genuine Christmas cracker.

THE SUNDAY NIGHT BOOK

MADE AT HOME

This pocket-size (and therefore ideal for Christmas stockings!) book from highly regarded chef and food writer Rosie Sykes shoehorns 52 recipes into its 128 pages – one for each Sunday of the year. Sykes wants to make Sunday nights the best evenings of the week with quick, simple but delicious, uplifting recipes that banish any back-to-school feelings. The book is packed with heart-warming recipes, most of them achievable in the time it takes to run a relaxing bath. A chapter of ‘things on toast’ include Caerphilly with leeks and mustard, and there are one-pot dishes such as spiced rice and lentils. Other recipes to bookmark include ‘Remains of the Day’ dishes using leftovers from the Sunday roast – chicken harira, perhaps, or ‘epic’ bubble and squeak.

Home for Giorgio Locatelli may now be north London but a large piece of his heart is still in Lombardy, northern Italy, where he grew up, learning to cook at his uncle’s restaurant. Made at Home is a colourful collection of the food that Locatelli loves to prepare for family and friends, whether it’s in London or Italy. Although there are some wonderful meat and fish dishes in the book, this is as much a celebration of vegetables, whether they are in vibrant salads, seasonal stews or as an accompaniment. From Tuscan tomato and bread soup, and monkfish stew with tomatoes, garlic, chilli and black olives, to simple pasta and pizza dishes and Sicilian orange and chocolate cake, these are simple Italian family recipes from one of the masters.

Giorgio Locatelli Fourth Estate, £26

Rosie Sykes Quadrille, £12.99

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PADSTOW FESTIVAL COOKBOOK

Barefoot Media, £12 from Padstow Tourist Information (01841 533449) The tenth Padstow Christmas Festival takes place 7-10 December, with a stellar lineup of chefs including Rick Stein, Angela Hartnett, Nathan Outlaw, Paul Ainsworth and José Pizarro. All of whom appear in this anniversary edition of the event’s cookbook, which features 56 recipes from national and local chefs linked to the festival. Needless to say, fish dishes dominate the book, with recipes including pollock and cauliflower curry, and panfried monkfish with mussels, grain mustard and tarragon sauce. There are also seasonal meat dishes such as Mark Sargeant’s braised Angus beef with chestnuts and charred hispi cabbage, and Neil Borthwick’s roast quail with hazelnut pesto, remoulade and foie gras. Desserts like Mark Hix’s Christmas Mess and Dan Doherty’s Queen of Puddings will certainly hit the sweet spot.


CHEF! WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

Plum is duck’s BFF in Dan Moon’s Orient -inspired treat

H I G H L I G H T S

TOTALLY QUACKERS

Duck comes in two forms in this showstopping dish Page 22

GRAIN OF YOUR LIFE

Spelt is the star of this warming, autumnal culinary show Page 25

FISHING FOR COMPLIMENTS

Here’s a seafood spesh that mixes the flavours of earth and ocean Page 26

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c h e f !

dUCK TALES LEARN HOW TO MAKE THIS IMPRESSIVE DUCK DISH BY DAN MOON...

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ROAST BREAST OF CREEDY CARVER DUCK WITH CONFIT LEG SPRING ROLL, PLUM PURÉE AND TOASTED SESAME SEEDS SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 4 Creedy Carver duck breasts knob of butter 2 pak choi, chopped 1 large carrot, julienned 1 mouli, thinly sliced 1 plum, sliced 50g-100g black and white sesame seeds, toasted For the spring rolls: few pinches of celery salt 6 duck legs vegetable oil 2 tbsp dark soy sauce 1 tbsp oyster sauce 2 tbsp sherry vinegar 1 tsp fish sauce 2 tbsp honey 1 tbsp stem ginger syrup 1 egg 4 spring roll pastry sheets For the plum purée: 10 fresh plums, deseeded and cut into quarters 100g demerara sugar 1 tbsp mixed spice

It’s been a pretty great year for this wellknown Bath chef. First, The Gainsborough’s restaurant was relaunched as Dan Moon at The Gainsborough Restaurant, in his honour. Then, just last month, it was awarded three AA rosettes. This recipe is classic Dan: traditional flavours combined with modern techniques and striking presentation. It’s definitely one to give a go at home if you’re out to impress some dinner guests, but if you want to see how it’s done by the pro, go and try it at this Bath restaurant while it’s still on the menu. Dan Moon at The Gainsborough Restaurant, Beau Street, Bath BA1 1QY; 01225 358888; thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk

METHOD 1 The day before you cook, salt the duck legs with a couple of pinches of celery salt, and leave overnight in the fridge. 2 When ready cook, preheat the oven to 150C/300F/gas mark 2. 3 Rinse the duck legs and pat them dry. Place them in a deep oven tray and cover with vegetable oil. Cook for 5 hours. 4 Take the meat out of the oil, let the excess oil from the meat drain

a Grape matCh!

Are You Game Pinot Noir 2014 £12.95, Great Western Wine “Duck has a natural sweetness and, combined with the richness and spiciness of the oriental influence in this dish, it calls for a soft, silky red, which enhances and fuses with the flavours,” says Angela Mount. “This is just the wine, with its rich yet voluptuous scents and flavours of cherries and plums, and a seductive softness.”

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(reserving it), then place in a tray and cover with cling film. Set aside to cool down – then you can start picking the meat off the bone. 5 For the spring rolls, combine all the ingredients apart from the egg and pastry sheets in a large bowl with the confit duck meat, and season. If the mixture is too dry, add a bit of the confit oil to moisten it. 6 In a separate bowl, whisk the egg. Peel off one pastry sheet and cut it in half. Place a spoonful of the duck mixture onto the pastry, brush with the egg mixture, fold and roll. When ready, deep fry at 170C for 3 minutes until golden brown. 7 For the plum purée, place all the ingredients into a pan and slowly cook down until the liquid reduces. Then blitz in a blender until smooth. Let it cool down before putting into a piping bag ready to use. 8 For the duck breasts, score lines very close together into the fat. Trim the sinew and season. Warm a dry pan over a medium heat, and place in the duck, fat side down. Cook slowly to render the fat gradually, so it doesn’t colour too quickly. When the duck is nicely coloured, turn it over in the pan, remove from the heat, and leave for 3½ minutes. Then take it out of the pan and leave to rest for 5 minutes, then slice. 9 For the vegetables, bring a pan of water to a simmer with the butter and a pinch of salt. Drop in the vegetables to poach for 15-20 seconds – they should still be nicely al dente. 10 To serve, pipe the plum purée onto each plate, and top with three slices of the duck. Then add the pak choi and mouli, then a spring roll and another duck slice. Finish off with a plum slice, carrot and a sprinkling of the toasted sesame seeds.

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c h e f !

YOU’Ve GOT KaLe KATHY SLACK HAS GOT A WARM, AUTUMNAL SALAD THAT’S RIGHT UP OUR STREET…

Spelt is an ancient grain, and is a great alternative to more common forms of wheat. This wholegrain has a tonne of nutritional benefits – B vitamins, vitamin E, magnesium and potassium, to name but a few – and is a great form of slow-release energy. Best of all, though, it tastes pretty darn good, and is grown organically on this here patch at Sharpham Park, in Somerset. Here, it’s paired with kale – also known for it’s nutritional power – and broccoli, and pepped up with chilli, garlic and anchovy for a great little kick…

KALE AND SHARPHAM PARK SPELT SALAD SERVES 2

PH OTO BY KAT HY S L AC K

INGREDIENTS 150g Sharpham Park spelt grain 150g kale glug of sunflower oil ½ tsp chilli flakes pinch of garlic granules 175g purple sprouting broccoli 1 shallot (or ¼ red onion) splash of sherry vinegar 10 tinned anchovy fillets glug of extra virgin olive oil

a Grape match!

Pecorino 2016, Umani Ronchi £11.95, Great Western Wine “Fresh yet characterful dry whites are the best option for this healthy, punchy vegetarian dish,” says Angela Mount. “Pecorino 2016 Umani Ronchi works a treat here, with its ripe peach, lemon peel, and thyme-infused character. It’s super fresh and bright, which complements the freshness of the kale, but there’s enough oomph and sass to match the power of the chilli and anchovy.”

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METHOD 1 Rinse the spelt, then cover with cold water and boil for 20 minutes until just soft. Drain, rinse again, then set aside until needed. 2 Preheat the oven to 170C/325F/gas mark 3. 3 Remove the stalks from the kale and tear into pieces that are roughly an inch square. Pop the leaves in a bowl with a slug of sunflower oil, salt and pepper, chilli flakes and garlic granules. Massage the oil and seasoning into each piece of kale, making sure everything is nicely coated – but not swimming in oil. 4 Lay the kale out across two baking trays, with the leaves well spread out. Bake for about 15 minutes until crispy but not brown, turning half way through, then remove from the oven and set aside until needed. 5 Get a griddle pan nice and hot, drizzle a little sunflower oil over the broccoli spears then griddle them until just soft and nicely toasted. You will need to do this in 2-3 batches. 6 Finely chop the shallot and 4 anchovy fillets, and put in a large bowl with a splash of sherry vinegar and slug of extra virgin olive oil. Muddle it all together and leave for a few minutes to allow the shallot to soften. 7 To assemble the salad, toss the spelt in the shallot mix, then add the broccoli and the remaining whole anchovy fillets. Adjust the seasoning and pile onto a plate, adding crispy kale as you go. sharphampark.com

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c h e f !

have yer briLL

JOSH SANDS, HEAD CHEF AT THE SPOTTED COW IN BRISTOL, HAS AN EARTHY AUTUMNAL DISH FOR US TO HUNKER DOWN WITH...

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“Brill is a delicious flatfish with a sweet taste and a firm texture, which makes it quite ‘meaty’ and means it carries flavours very well,” says Josh. “It’s similar in taste and texture to turbot, and is therefore a highly sought after fish; for this reason it is overfished, so make sure to buy yours from a sustainable source. If you can’t get hold of brill or turbot, or want to use a more sustainable fish, you could substitute it with fillets of sole or plaice, or use farmed turbot or flounder. “This dish is essentially quite autumnal, though I think it lends itself to the winter months very well. It has lots of earthy notes from the mushrooms and walnuts, which perfectly complement the sweetness and richness from the brill and Jerusalem artichoke purée. The tarragon oil adds a nice bit of colour and fragrant anise flavour as a finishing touch. “Something to bear in mind with this recipe is that the tarragon oil and walnut crumb can both be made a few days in advance. Similarly, if you have any of these parts left they would be great accompaniments to other dishes, such as salads. “You will find this dish on the Christmas menu at The Spotted Cow this year.”

BRILL WITH MUSHROOMS, JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE, WALNUT AND TARRAGON SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 10g tarragon, picked 100ml rapeseed oil 150g chestnut mushrooms 3 garlic cloves, crushed 250g unsalted butter bunch of thyme 100g walnuts 50g panko breadcrumbs 600g Jerusalem artichokes 400ml whole milk 100ml double cream 2 bay leaves 4 x 160g brill fillets 180g shiitake mushrooms, sliced 120g samphire METHOD 1 Start by making the tarragon oil. Blanch the tarragon leaves in a pan of simmering water and refresh in a bowl of iced water. Pat dry using kitchen roll and place in a blender. Process until the leaves are broken down, while slowly adding the rapeseed oil. Then place a muslin cloth in a sieve and pass the mix through so you are left with a green oil. 2 Next, make the walnut crumb. Put the chestnut mushrooms in a blender and pulse until they are the consistency of breadcrumbs, being careful not to break them down too much. Then tip into a hot frying pan with 1 crushed garlic clove, a knob of butter and the thyme. Cook until softened. 3 Toast the walnuts under a grill or in the oven, then add to a food processor along with the panko breadcrumbs, cooked mushrooms, 1 tbsp butter, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Blitz, then place this on a tray, ready for later.

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4 Next, peel the artichokes and place in a saucepan with the milk, cream and bay leaves. Bring to the boil, then immediately turn down to a simmer. Cook for about 30 minutes or until nice and soft, topping up with water if need be. Then remove the bay leaves and pour into a colander over a bowl, retaining the liquid. 5 Place the artichokes in a food processor, along with half of the liquid, and blitz to a purée, adding more of the liquid if required. Remove from the blender and push through a sieve using the back of a spoon or ladle, so you are left with a lovely smooth purée. Season with salt and pepper and place in a saucepan over a very low heat to keep warm. 6 Now it’s time to cook the brill, so place the walnut crumb under a low grill (or in a warm oven) at this point and flour the skin side of the fish. 7 Put two large non-stick frying pans over a medium heat, adding some oil, and bring a saucepan of water to a simmer. 8 Place the brill, skin side down, in one of the hot pans. Add 1 tbsp butter and season with salt and pepper. Then, place the samphire in the pan of water, and the shiitake mushrooms in the other frying pan, with 1 tbsp butter and the remaining 2 crushed garlic cloves. Fry until golden and slightly caramelized all over, then add the samphire into this pan and remove from the heat. 9 Once the skin side of the fish is golden brown and crisp, flip the fillets carefully and remove from the pan after 1 minute. 10 To serve, place 2 tbsp of the artichoke purée on each plate, and drag across the plate in a line with the back of a spoon. Add the samphire and shiitake mushrooms, then place the brill on top and sprinkle the walnut crumb around the plate. Drizzle a little of the tarragon oil over the food and around the plate.

a Grape matCh!

Brusco dei Barbi 2015 £12.95, Great Western Wine “This is a great autumnal dish, redolent with the rich, seasonal flavours of mushrooms and Jerusalem artichoke,” says Angela Mount. “I like to break the rules, especially by pairing red wine with fish, and this fits the theme. Its silky soft texture is rich enough to cope with the intensity of the creamy, earthy flavours, yet fresh enough, with its bright cherry and herb flavours, to lift and enhance the rich, truffley character of the dish.”

The Spotted Cow, 139 North Street, Bristol BS3 1EZ; 0117 963 4433; thespottedcowbristol.com

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Choose your weapons I love a hand blender. They’re smaller and cheaper than the jug versions, and dead handy: just stick it in a pan and go. And I agree! Because there’s no jug, they save on waste and washing up too. The problem is choosing between them, since there are so many on the market, at all different price points and power levels. You might want to check out how noisy the one you’ve got your eye on is, too: nobody likes an electric hand-held item that your neighbours can hear you using through the walls, after all…

Yeah, right. I’m not a hundred percent sure I understand it myself, but somehow the shape of the various blades – like the S-shaped one for dicing tough veggies, or the plastic potato masher for creaming spuds at low speeds – work in unison with the dome to be super-efficient, or something. (Look, it just works, okay?) The motor’s a reasonably powerful 700W effort – not class-leading, but up there – with adjustable speed control and even a so-called turbo function, which we imagine to be like the turbo boost on KITT in Knight Rider. There’s a ton of accessories, too: like a whisk for beating eggs, and a 1.4 litre jug.

Indeed not! If you’re investing in a posh blender, there are probably two main ranges you’re looking at: KitchenAid and Smeg, as seen here. There seems to be a bit of a war going on between them at the moment, both keen to colonise every corner of your kitchen. They’re basically the same, though, aren’t they? Both make high end kit, both have a retro vibe, both have rarely met a bright colour or a pastel tone they don’t like... The question may be, which aesthetic do you prefer? This latest offering from Smeg – the Italian luxury appliance giant with the schoolboy-tickling name – is certainly handsome, in a futuristic 1950s-style. Snappily titled HFB02, it offers especially smooth, even blending, achieved through what they call a ‘Flow Blend’ system.

But what about the most important thing (the colours, obvs)? Of course! It comes in black or red for the bold, or a more subtle cream or pastel blue. All are designed to match the rest of the Smeg kit you’ve doubtless got, like their toasters, coffee machines, juicers and kettles.

PREmIUm BLENd

WHO HATES WASHING UP? EVERYONE, OF COURSE. TIME TO INVEST IN A TOP-NOTCH HAND BLENDER, SAYS MATT BIELBY, AND START WHIPPING UP A STORM

THIS MONTH • GOURMET GIFTS • SEASONAL SIPS

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So is it better than KitchenAid’s? Well, KitchenAid’s version is perhaps slightly more aggressive looking, like the world’s most powerful electric toothbrush. And it comes in a red that’s all-but-identical too. But really, does it even matter? You’ve probably already decided which team you’re on… The Smeg HFB02 hand blender costs £119.95, and is available at Gardiner Haskins in Bristol, Coopers Stores in Bath, and branches of Currys; smeguk.com

• FESTIVE FODDER


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WHETHER YOU’RE LOOKING FOR SHOPPING INSPO OR PUTTING YOUR OWN CHRISTMAS LIST TOGETHER FOR THE BIG FC*, WE’VE GOT SOME FANTASTIC FOODIE IDEAS RIGHT HERE...

*Father Christmas, naturally

TO KEEP 1 BEER GOGGLES This straighttalking new book from Bristol resident and Grillstock co-founder Jon Finch promises to equip you with all you need to know in order to make and enjoy good beer in the comfort of your own home. Beer Craft, £14.99; online and in local bookshops; littlebrown.co.uk 2 UP IN YOUR GRILL There’s no need to go to Switzerland to get your raclette on this winter; this compact grill will do the job nicely, and comes with four mini pans, allowing each person to add whatever ingredients they like to their bubbling cheese. Raclette Grill, £40; Paxton and Whitfield in Bath and online; paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk 3 TEA-OFF Who says there’s no point making a pot just for one? This lush little hand-painted find is made specifically for solo tea sipping. Tea for One Set, £32; Anthropologie in Bath; anthropologie.com 4 ’SUP Know a juice junkie? Here’s the gift for them: an

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initialled acrylic cup, complete with lid and straw, to allow them to slurp on the go. Dipped Tumbler, £16; Vinegar Hill in Bath and Bristol; vinegarhill.co.uk 5 SPOONING These lovely little wooden spoons are handwhittled by local craftsman Jack Labanowski, meaning no two are the same. Now that’s a quirky Crimbo present, right there. Wooden spoons, £20-£25; The Bristol Cheesemonger; bristol-cheese.co.uk 6 COPPA FEEL This cafetiere set is a bang-on gift for that caffeine addict pal. With that copper finish it’s, like, totally on trend, and comes with two glass coffee cups. Copper Cafetiere and Cups, £35; Marks & Spencer; marksandspencer.com 7 TURNING JAPANESE This fun bento box might have been designed for onigiri rice balls, but it’s handy for all kinds of grub – and there’s no way it’ll get ‘mistaken’ by anyone else in the office for their lunch... Norio Onigiri Box, £8.95; Harvey Nichols in Bristol; harveynichols.com

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8 BOARD GAMES This ethically made Fairtrade serving board, from Somerset-based Decorator’s Notebook, features mango wood and grey marble for a cool, modern look. Just picture it piled with festive cheeses on Boxing Day. Yum! Decorator’s Notebook Serving Board, £28.95; available online from decoratorsnotebook.co.uk 9 BASKET CASE Each of these bright, woollen breadbaskets has come straight from Morocco and is totally unique – the colours and jazzy designs will add a great little splash to your kitchen, too. Vintage Moroccan Bread Basket, £35 each; Mon Pote in Bristol; monpote.co.uk 10 RACK ’EM UP This statement wine rack is made from iron and given a distressed finish for a classy antique look and one-of-akind feel – ideal for storing those special bottles you’re still waiting for the right excuse to open. Jadis Wine Rack, £156; Oka in Bath; oka.com

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11 PINEAPPLES ARE IN MY HEAD Now we’ve come across this beaut, we’re not quite sure how we’ve lived for so long without a golden pineapple teapot in our lives, and we must acquire one, post haste. Pineapple Teapot, £54; T2 in Bath; t2tea.com 12 DUKE OF FORK All of Robert Welch’s stylish stainless steel cutlery is designed in the Chipping Campden studio, and is made to last a lifetime. A sound investment, we’d say. Hidcote Bright 30 Piece Cutlery Set, £84; Robert Welch in Bath; robertwelch.com 13 SERVICE, PLEASE! This is a spot-on gift for someone who likes to think of themselves as a bit of a chef in the


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kitchen at home. We’d strongly recommend only gifting it to people you don’t co-habit with, though. Service Bell, £6; Rossiters of Bath; rossitersofbath.com 14 SMOKIN’ These glasses – which come in packs of six – aren’t yer average vino vessel; with their detailed embossing and smoky-grey tint, they’d look pretty swish on the table at a dinner party. Smoke Embossed White Wine Glasses, £35; available online from coxandcox.co.uk 15 VOUCH SURFING Give the gift of knowledge this Xmas, with a voucher for Vale House Cookery School. They can be used on any of the school’s courses, which range from fishing to butchery and bread making. Vale House Kitchen Vouchers, from £50; available online from valehousekitchen.co.uk 16 CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD The work of local artist Emmeline Simpson is well-known in these parts, depicting the famous vistas and landmarks of Bath and Bristol in fun illustrations and bright colours – these chopping boards are great examples. Chopping Board, £18.99; available online from emmelinesimpson.co.uk 17 DAILY GRIND You just can’t beat a freshly ground coffee, and this snazzy copper grinder – designed in France and sold by Cheltenham-based Farrar & Tanner – will do the business nicely. La Cafetiere Origins Coffee Grinder, £24; available online from farrar-tanner.co.uk 18 HOT DOG This birch wood tray is designed by Frome-based artist Mary Kilvert, and we just can’t resist the cute little pooch,

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in his dapper bowtie. Larry the Long Dog Tray, £20; Mary Kilvert in Frome and online; marykilvert.com 19 THE FRIES THE LIMIT This cool little gold-plated badge will set off any outfit – and yes, we mean any. Fries Pin, £10; available online from howkapow.com 20 OLD SCHOOL These pieces of Moomin enamelware, handmade by Muurla of Finland, have a cool retro look, and will go down a storm with any fans of this childhood cartoon. Moomin Saucepan, £20.95; fig1 in Bristol; fig1.co.uk 21 PAN CLUB Know someone who loves a full English? Course you do. This beast allows you to cook up a big breakfast or other meal, without multiple pans to wash up after. Result. Master Pan Divided Frying Pan, £44.99; Lakeland in Bath and Bristol; lakeland.co.uk 22 PASTA LA VISTA This spaghetti monster is an ace pressie for, well, spaghetti monsters. A surefire way to make someone smile on Christmas morning... Spaghetti Monster, £12.95; The Pod Company in Bristol; thepodcompany.co.uk 23 FOR MEAT’S SAKE There’s no excuse for anything but perfectly grilled meat ever again with this piece of kit. The

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thermometer connects to an app on your smartphone, monitoring the food as it cooks. Clever, no? Weber iGrill Mini, £59.99; John Lewis in Bristol; johnlewis.com 24 IN PRINT Local artist Julie Howard makes these seafood prints using the traditional Japanese technique of gyotaku, where the fish are dried out, inked up and pressed onto material. Julie Howard Mounted Gyotaku Print, £40 (A3) or £60 (A2); Surroundings in Thornbury; surroundingsonline.co.uk

TO MUNCH 25 HAVING A BAUL Handmade in Bristol, these chocolate baubles will look great on your tree, although they won’t last long on it, we bet... Chocolate Baubles, £6 each; Zara’s Chocolates in Bristol; zaraschocolates.co.uk 26 CANDY MAN Sweet vanilla caramel cream encased in Belgian chocolate and powdered with icing sugar? Now, that’s the kind of snowball we sure won’t mind being thrown at us this winter. The vintage-style packaging of these chocs makes them an especially great festive gift, too. Mr Stanley’s

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Vanilla Snowballs, £6.99; available online from mrstanleys.co.uk 27 AVO GOOD CRIMBO! Know an avocado obsessive? Don’t we all. We wouldn’t recommend serving this bad boy on toast, though – it’s made from white Belgian chocolate with a caramelfilled truffle at its heart instead of a stone. Choc on Choc Chocolate Avocado, £12; available online from choconchoc.co.uk 28 BEST OF BATH This hamper is chocca with top produce to feast on over the festive season – all made in Bath. From cheese to beer and chocolate, the contents give you a real taste of city. Taste of Bath Luxury Christmas Hamper, £65; available online from taste-of.co.uk 29 RAISE A TOAST What better way to spend cold, festive evenings than huddled around a fire, toasting marshmallows, we ask you? These kits contain two different flavours of handmade, all-natural marshmallows, as well as a non-toxic gel burner, bamboo skewers and

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33 34 a guide on how to achieve the perfect toast. The Naked Marshmallow Company Marshmallow Toasting Kit, £16.50; Kilver Court in Somerset; kilvercourt.com 30 SECRET INGREDIENT Awardwinning food company Belazu has put together a hamper of its most lust-worthy products for home cooks, from top-notch balsamic vinegar to rose harissa. (Think about it: you may get a meal out of whoever you buy it for...) Belazu Hamper, £15; available online from belazu.com 31 SNOW WAY Made in Corsham, these edible snow globes make perfect stocking fillers; the choc characters have jelly sweet feet, and the snow is made from white chocolate! Lick the Spoon Chocolate Snow Globes, £7.95; available online from lickthespoon.co.uk 32 THE SPICE IS RIGHT A subscription for this Bathbased spice biz will see the recipient receive a kit to make a different Thali-style meal with every month, and learn delicious Indian recipes to boot. The Spice Sultan Recipe Kits, from £19.95 for three months; order online at thespicesultan.com 33 COOKIE MONSTER This little fella, which is made with British ingredients and hand decorated, comes in a cute gift box, making it a great festive gesture that you can get sent straight to the recipient. Biscuiteers Ginger Santa, £6; available online from biscuiteers.com

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34 DIY DESSERTS Make your own choccy treats with this fancy kit, containing top-quality raw cacao, natural fruit sweetener, reusable moulds, and recipe book. Elements For Life Raw Chocolate Making Kit, £21; available online at yumbles.com 35 D’OUGH! Hobbs House’s sourdough culture for making bread is over 60 years old, meaning it has real depth of flavour and will result in a delicious, naturally fermented loaf. Hobbs House Sourdough Starter, £15; available online at hobbshousebakery.co.uk

TO SUP 36 GINNING This limited edition gin is made especially for the cold season, being infused with warming flavours of apple, blackberry and cardamom – and it’s made from all-natural ingredients, as you’d expect from this great distillery. Sibling Gin Limited Edition Autumn Gin, £21.99; Grape and Grind in Bristol; grapeandgrind.co.uk 37 OH, BALLS Stocking filler alert! These bubble tea-style balls come in plenty of juicy flavours, from strawberry to passion fruit, and can be added to spirits, cocktails and Prosecco. Popaball Bursting Juice Bubbles, from £3.49; available online at cotswoldtrading.com 38 UNLUCKY FOR SOME The number 13 might usually be

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something to avoid, but in the case of this new gin, made by an eighth-generation distiller, it only brings good things. Flavoured with 13 botanicals, it has notes of chamomile and citrus with hints of warming spice – a spoton sip this season. Marylebone Gin, £50; available online from Ocado; marylebonegin.com 39 THAT’S THE SPIRIT! Espensen Spirit’s collection of infused gin and vodka miniatures comes with Xmas tree hangers this winter, so you can turn ’em into boozy baubles. Now there’s an idea. Espensen Spirit Miniature Collection, £16; available online from espensenspirit.com 40 FAIR ENOUGH Ethical drinks biz Fair has come up with this top pomegranate liqueur, made from Fairtrade fruit. Its sweet, juicy flavour and deep pink colour make it a festive addition to cocktails. Fair Pomegranate Liqueur, £16.96; from Harvey Nichols in Bristol and online at masterofmalt.com 41 CAN-CAN Cans? Of wine? That’s right. These naturally fermented sparkling numbers are light and easy drinking, and

CRUMBSMAG.COM

have gone down a storm with team Crumbs. And now you can get them in a tube of three, which crackin’ gift. Quello Gift makes a crackin Pack, £9.50; available online from morewine.eu 42 GINSPIRATION! This gin set includes tasting notes, gin pairing ideas, a cocktail spoon and four different ingredients which can be used to infuse gin, or simply to garnish. Gin and Tonic Infusion Set, £17.50; available online from souschef.co.uk 43 WINTER WARMER This Christmassy concoction blends rooibos tea with warming orange peel, cloves and cinnamon for a comforting mulled-like flavour (add a dash of brandy to really warm the cockles). Teapigs Spiced Winter Red Tea, £4.49; available online at teapigs.co.uk 44 WONDERS OF THE WEST Not only are there 10 awardwinning ciders in this tasting kit, but there’s a tasting guide to help you get the most of them, a sample of Somerset cider brandy and special tasting glass. How d’you like them apples? Cider Tasting Kit, £39.50; Bristol Cider Shop; bristolcidershop.co.uk 45 RED ALARM Having only just become available in the UK, this big, hearty Australian red is a pretty spesh vino; the Shiraz grapes are hand harvested, pressed, then oak fermented and aged, and each bottle comes in a velvet-lined display box. Velvet Glove, circa £150; from Wolf Wine in Bath; wolfwine.co.uk


ALL THAT GLITTERS IS GOLD AT MERCURE THIS CHRISTMAS

TIME TO SPARKLE From the decor in the hall to the prosecco in your glass, look forward to a shimmering, glittering time this Christmas. Why not feel extra special at this special time of year? Our Glitter Ball parties are the perfect way to celebrate and scintillate, with as much glitz and glamour as you wish. Dress to dazzle and enjoy great food, great music – and an evening that will shine in your memory.

PARTY DATES Sunday to Thursday Glitter Ball Party Nights – from £36.00 per person Friday & Saturday Glitter Ball Party Nights – from £46.00 per person With an arrival drink, a delicious three-course festive menu, a half-bottle of house wine per person and our resident DJ for the night. Book now to avoid disappointment 0117 930 3322 | ha0i2-sb@accor.com

MERCURE BRISTOL GRAND HOTEL


Big bold American flavours! THIS ISN’T THE KIND OF BBQ YOU COOK AT HOME!

COLSTON TOWER I BRISTOL I BS1 4UB

PE FOR GRFECT R NO N OUPS! PRE-OEED TO RDER !

0117 992 3999 | thesmokehaus.co.uk b @thesmokehausbristol I b @thesmokehausuk I x @thesmokehausuk


Personalised Christmas hampers Ready to order! In large, medium and small sizes. Filled with our locally sourced, quality range of mince pies, mulled wines, sloe gin, luxury cakes, crackers and biscuits, chutneys, sauces, olives, deli cheeses, fine teas and coffees, chocolate and confectionary.*

Make your customers experience that little bit sweeter.. We take pride in baking indulgent Flapjack and Shortbread miniature treats, ideal for all hospitality and catering needs. Using the finest, carefully selected ingredients the bite size biscuits are jam packed with delicious flavour.

Call 01934 523507 or visit us at Cowslip Lane, Hewish, BS24 6AH

*Subject to availability

Premium handmade products Regionally sourced ingredients Family recipes Improving the hospitality experience Over 30 years experience Vale House Kitchen is a bespoke country skills and cookery school situated in the village of Timsbury 8 miles southwest of Bath. We will be offering all the traditional courses you would expect from a cookery school but will have the added dimension of teaching skills such as fishing, shooting, foraging and butchery.

CHRISTMAS VOUCHERS NOW AVAILABLE

Ideal , ce events ffi o for rty a p , rs u o fav wedding des ri s & cycle bags, walk tea... or for on & afterno ret supply. sec n w o your

November 15th – Game Butchery and Cookery November 25th – Fish Cookery

January 13/14th – Shooting and Game Experience

01761 470401 | info@valehousekitchen.co.uk

www.valehousekitchen.co.uk

Marshfield Bakery, Tolldown Barn, Dyrham Wiltshire SN14 8HZ 01225 891709 | a @marshbakery

www.marshfieldbakery.co.uk


M AI N S TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS, AND PEOPLE THAT MATTER

H I G H L I G H T S

TROPHY LIFE

EASTERN PROMISE

Can you feel the tension? The Crumbs Awards ceremony was nail-biting stuff!

There’s some top Asian fare to be found in Bath and Bristol Page 58

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PAOLO F E R L A P HOTO GR A PH Y

Meet all the winners of our hotly contested awards! Page 47


THE SEVERN PROJECT CIC Home of Social Salad since 2010

Recently refurbished! Now delivering in Bristol, Bath and beyond! Range of fresh leaves and herbs available for next day delivery throughout the year

Stunning Whiskey and Gin bar Beautiful Pie and Pizza Lounge Booking essential – 01225 872728

The Crown, 500 Bath Road, Saltford, BS31 3HJ

f

@thecrowninsaltford

www.thesevernproject.org | 07960 290 943


M A I N S

CRUMBS AwARdS:

The wINNeRs! FROM MORE THAN 400 ENTRIES, JUST 16 WENT HOME FROM THE FIRST EVER CRUMBS AWARDS CLUTCHING TROPHIES IN THEIR MITTS. MEET ALL THE CHAMPS (SOME YOU’LL ALREADY KNOW; SOME YOU MAY WELL NOT) AND FIND OUT HOW THEY’RE NOT ONLY HELPING MAKE OUR LOCAL FOOD SCENE ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING IN THE COUNTRY, BUT ALSO GIVING IT A BRIGHT, SUSTAINABLE FUTURE…   

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PAOLO F E R L A P HOTO GR A PH Y

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CAFÉ

WINDMILL HILL C I T Y F A R M C A F É

NICCI PE E T

BAR/PUB

HYDE & CO

The judges said: “This bar is innovative, young and happening. The branding is incredible, the service and experience is just great and it’s pioneering the Bristol cocktail scene. It’s the go-to place.” 

Born out of the need for a quality watering hole in Bristol, offering great cocktails, first-rate service and a unique setting, this speakeasy-style bar has been a major player in the development of the local cocktail scene, and has been mixing up homemade syrups, tinctures and infusions with premium spirits for almost eight years now. General manager Andrew ‘Oz’ Osborne and bar manager James McGovern both came on board in early 2016, and have been responsible for making this last year a particularly exciting one for the bar; perhaps most notably by introducing a new, conceptual menu, entitled The Last Carnival. “We spent months working on it to create a truly immersive, interactive menu, which essentially tells the story of a 1920s detective in New Orleans, through the medium of cocktails,” says Oz. “Guests can feel as if they’ve been transported to a different city and time.”  Indeed, for these guys the Hyde & Co experience is very much a multisensory one. James explains: “We work on the motto of ‘feed the eyes and the mouth will follow’, mixing visually beautiful drinks, which are still excellent quality, and creating a bit of theatre around the experience of it all.   “Winning this award tells us that people love what we’re doing. As one of the older cocktails bars in town, it’s brilliant to still be recognised for pushing boundaries and doing things differently after all this time!” hydeand.co

CASUAL DINING RESTAURANT

POCO

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NI CCI PE E T

Established by mates Jen Best, Ben Pryor and Tom Hunt, who met while working the festival circuit, Poco has been a Stokes Croft staple since 2011.   “It was born out of friendship, as well as a passion for seasonality and ethics in food,” explains Ben. “We wanted to see if we could set an example as a business that can operate transparently and sustainably in every area.” Ethics really are at the core of what these guys do – and not just in terms of the food, either. Their high standards influence the way they treat their staff, how they manage their waste, and the experience they offer their guests. But that’s, of course, without compromising on the food that they’re, first and foremost, well known for: “We wanted to do all that whilst turning out some of the most colourful, exciting and flavourful plates of food in in the South West, at prices that are approachable for everyone in our community.”  An all-round deserving winner, then, aye?   Having also recently picked up awards The judges said: from The Soil Association and Sustainable Restaurant Association, they were pretty “Amazing food, stoked to win this super-competitive category.   fabulous service, “We and our team really couldn’t be prouder. ethically sourced A lot of people put a lot of time, hard work and ingredients and love into getting a restaurant ready to open happy staff. What’s not to love its doors of an evening, and to get this kind of about Poco?”  recognition from people we really look up to is the best kind of reward.”  pocotapasbar.com 

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This South Bristol institution, established in 1976, was the first city farm in the country outside London. Rearing farmyard animals and all kinds of seasonal crops, the charityrun project aims to help people form stronger connections with their food.    “The Café and Farm Shop try to continue that job, selling our own and other local people’s produce, and putting it on the menu,” explains café manager Anna. “We buy whatever the gardeners and farmers have grown and raised and, as well as paying them for their produce, we return all our profits to help support the work that goes on here. And plenty has been going on recently; not only did the farm celebrate its 40th The judges said: birthday last year, but it also expanded “This café offers and redesigned its great quality local food in a community café, which offers run, family friendly volunteer  environment. It’s opportunities to a long-standing  people wanting to project, which get back into work deserves to be after mental health shouted about.”  or addiction issues. The small, child-friendly menu of great quality food is built around what their suppliers have on offer each season: supporting small growers and businesses is a big deal here.  windmillhillcityfarmorg.uk


C R U M B S

A W A R D S

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COOKERY SCHOOL

DEMUTH’S COOKERY SCHOOL

N IC C I P E E T

DRINKS PRODUCER

PSYCHO POMP  

The judges said: “An inspirational, longstanding cookery school, using fresh, local ingredients and encouraging minimal food waste while creating delicious meals. A true pioneer.”   

Chef Rachel Demuth is joined at her eponymous cookery school by a range of tutors with different skills and knowledge, aiming to inspire more vegetarian and vegan cookery. From day and evening courses right up to a full-time vegan diploma, Demuth’s offers a whole spectrum of classes, and attracts everyone from professional chefs and accomplished home cooks to total beginners.   It’s one of just a few dedicated vegetarian cookery schools in the country, and its aim is to show its audience of meat-free and meateating students just how exciting and versatile vegetables and fruits can be to cook with. “Using vegetables in new and exciting ways, and cooking them in modern styles, appeals not only to vegetarians or vegans, but to anyone who is looking for a new and enjoyable eating experience, all the while reducing the impact on the world around us,” says Rachel. And Demuth’s isn’t just in Mother Earth’s good books for showing people how they can cut down on meat; the team also uses sustainable, organic, Fairtrade and GM-free products, and works hard to keep food waste to a minimum.   Perhaps above all, though, their friendly, super-practical classes and expert tutors make this a go-to school for anyone wanting to hone or expand their culinary repertoire.  demuths.co.uk 

The judges said: “Psychopomp are artisan and fun, confident and distinctive. The quality and taste of the end product is highly impressive, underpinned by a great story.”  

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N I CC I P E E T

It all started for founders Danny Walker and Liam Hirt nearly nine years ago, when they began making gin as a hobby. Over time, their extracurricular distilling turned into a fullblown business, and last year saw them open a new distillery-cum-bar on St Michael’s Hill. Their signature Woden gin, for which they are probably best known, is still the same as the version they first created when they were just starting out, but the team also now makes seasonal gins, bespoke gins for local businesses, aquavite, coffee digestifs and even absinthe. Always encouraging us to see gin in new lights, they have an active involvement in the local food and drink scene, and collaborate with local breweries, coffee roasters, bakers, tea blenders and restaurants; they’ve even been known to host cheese and gin pairing events.  Despite having scaled up, Psychopomp has never strayed far from its origins, meaning it’s maintained real ‛craft’ character, and kept that small-batch quality.   “We’ve always focused on the liquid, and not the business,” Danny tells us. “We make gin because we love it – and if other people enjoy it too, than that’s great. We have a pretty amazing day job!”  For those who are yet to be introduced to these exciting, carefully made gins, start with the staple, says Danny: “Woden is great as a simple G and T with Fever Tree Indian tonic and a slice of grapefruit, or in the summer I drink it with fresh pink grapefruit juice and soda.”  microdistillery.co.uk 

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C R U M B S

A W A R D S

FOOD EVENT

T H E F R O M E INDEPENDENT Founded in 2013 as a not-for-profit company to help regenerate and support the local economy, The Frome Independent is, as its tagline suggests, ‛more than a market’.  Taking over the centre of the town one Sunday a month, the unique festivities are primarily organised by three people: Tabitha leads the team and is in charge of strategy and vision; Liz is the office manager; and Claire covers PR and communications. It’s a real celebration of local food, with the organisers looking for those innovating in their area of expertise. When it comes to producers and traders, it’s all about provenance, authenticity, and commitment to sustainability and welfare.   “We want our events to promote a more conscious approach to consumerism – one where you can meet The judges said: and chat with the person who made your lunch, grew the “Not only does The veg or reared the meat that you’re taking home for your Frome Independent dinner,” says Clare. “As well as meeting the attract thousands of makers, people love the festival atmosphere, the chance visitors, it also has an to relax and socialise and the opportunity to reclaim the exceptional reputation high street from traffic and faceless multinationals.” with traders. It’s a And people properly love it: the monthly marketmassive event that cum-festival sees up to 220 stalls at each keeps on getting event, and 80,000 visitors to Frome every year bigger and better.”  to enjoy the atmosphere as well as the shopping. thefromeindependent.org.uk   

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FINE DINING RESTAURANT

OLIVE TREE RESTA URANT N IC C I PE ET

“De-formalised fine dining,” is how long-serving chef Chris Clegorn describes the concept of the Olive Tree Restaurant. This Bath stalwart sits within the Queensberry Hotel, cooking contemporary-style British food curated from local West Country ingredients in accordance with the seasons.  “We want to offer the very best modern British menus, served by a team that are friendly, knowledgeable and welcoming [...] without becoming overly serious and stuffy!” Chris says. “A great restaurant is like a three-legged stool: great food, great service and a great atmosphere. If any one of these is off, then the stool will be rather wobbly. I’m very lucky to have a highly talented restaurant manager, Selam, who has built a front of house team who are as passionate about our food as the team in the kitchen. Also, The judges said: Laurence and Helen, our owners, “Faultless service, have always supported our serious cooking of aspirations and invested not only prime ingredients in the restaurant but specifically and consistently in the kitchen.”  high quality. This is The restaurant is constantly as good as it gets.”  developing, meaning it’s as relevant now as ever – something we largely have Chris to thank for: “I believe in evolution, not revolution. The process of developing the menu, the wine list and the team is a steady and constant process.”  olivetreebath.co.uk 

FOOD HERO

KALPNA WOOLF

The judges said: “Kalpna’s 91 Ways is truly amazing. Simply put, she significantly improves lives by bringing people together through food.” 

A former head of production at the BBC, Kalpna is a cook, food writer and recipe book author, who come up with the idea of 91 Ways just a few years ago. The concept is a simple one: to celebrate and unite all the cultures and communities from each of the 91 languages spoken in Bristol. And food is the vehicle for that change, with the project manifesting itself in colourful and exciting supper clubs and culinary events, each focusing on different cultures and cuisines from all over the world.   “Food has the power to unite people,” says Kalpna. “It is a language and experience common to us all, so we at 91 Ways create food sharing events where people talk about their heritage, their cultures, their memories and their values through the dish they bring. This breaks down barriers and builds links between communities.  “I hope our project will bring a greater understanding of the similarities we all share, while celebrating our differences. This feels critical at a time when there is so much focus on what divides us.”  kalpnawoolf.com; 91ways.org 

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M A I N S

WinNer Of winNers

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FOOD INITIATIVE TO RY M C TE RN A N

3 C A F É A N D KITCHEN

The judges said: “What an amazing year 3 Café and Kitchen have had! A really strong organisation, which has worked so hard in achieving its goals. Completely deserving of this award.” 

Bath’s Three Ways School is a special needs academy, with over 200 students with disabilities and learning difficulties. Having spent years raising £500,000, the school opened its new 3 Café and Kitchen in 2017. Here, they run qualifications and provide work placements for young people with special needs. That’s as well as providing the community with a welcoming social hub where they can get great food.  The café’s had a fantastic reaction from the public in the few months it’s been open: “The fact that you are giving back to the community by buying your cake and coffee here means that our customers have become regulars,” we’re told by the team. (Pictured left to right: Mark Vicary, Café manager; Amelia Hartley, business manager; Kye, student and trainee; Becky Stirling, assistant café manager). Meanwhile, the students are also benefiting hugely: “Young people are enjoying the opportunities to work in the café, practice their communication skills, assist with the cooking, serving, clearing, taking orders and using the tills. Parents are so pleased their children are getting these opportunities and are able to see that there might be employment potential after school or college.” Having not only won their category, but also the Winner of Winners award, this team have big hopes for the future: “We want the café to be a successful, self-funding enterprise and a wonderful community resource. We also need to ensure that links and relationships are created with local organisations to create opportunities for the students when they leave school.”  threeways.co.uk 

FOOD PRODUCER

THE SEVERN PROJECT

The judges said: “Excellent combination: the superb quality of their product is allied to highly impressive social enterprise. It plays a significant role in the foodie scene, supplying a wide array of businesses.”

NI CC I P EE T

This social enterprise not only works to provide retailers and chefs with quality, locally grown produce, but it does so while creating positive social outcomes. Steve Glover came up with the idea for The Severn Project after studying and working in the field of addictions counselling.     “It became quite clear to me that people with a history of substance misuse often had, for a period of time, lived outside the norms of society,” he tells us. “What people in recovery needed, in my opinion, was to become a member of society, and what better way to do that than by having a job – and what better job than that of growing food for the community?”  So, with a £2,500 grant, Steve rented a couple of acres and started growing food with people in early recovery from substance misuse – and The Severn Project has developed from there. It now grows great-quality salad and herbs on two sites in Bristol and Wiltshire. Crops are organically grown, fresh and nutritionally dense, and irrigated with harvested rainwater.   This last year has been a particularly great one for The Severn Project, despite a tough growing season; having secured more funding, it’s been able to diversify and start growing even more produce, which you’ll be able to spot in retail stores as well as on the menus of top restaurants all over the area.  thesevernproject.org 

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D N A R IN A W BO O D EN IL M W GA

For great Christmas value

• Woolley Park (Bath) free range turkeys, geese and ducks • Copas organic and free range turkeys • Usk Vale boneless turkey crowns stuffed to order Gift vouchers • Set boxes Molesworths of Henleaze 101 Henleaze Road, Bristol, BS9 4JP

Molesworths of Frampton 147 Church Road, Frampton Cotterell, Bristol, BS36 2JX

0117 962 1095

01454 777337

www.henleazebutchers.co.uk

BATH’S BEST BUTCHER

Larkhall butchers combines passionate, traditional butchery with a modern take on the profession. Supplying to Bath and the surrounding areas, we have a reputation for providing produce of the highest quality to restaurants and the community alike.

Christmas orders now being taken! “Larkhall Butchers goes the extra mile for its customers. It’s an innovative business in a traditional area and is notably customer-focused.” - Crumbs Magazine Bath Good Food Awards best butchers 2013-17 Crumbs best food retailer 2017

01225 313 987

info@larkhallbutchers.co.uk

larkhallbutchers.co.uk


A W A R D S

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C R U M B S

FOOD RETAILER

The judges said: “Larkhall Butchers goes the extra mile for its customers. It’s an innovative business in a traditional area and is notably customer-focused.” 

LARKH ALL BUTCHERS

NICCI P E E T

This neighbourhood butchers was taken on by Peter Milton in 2015, who actually started out as a Saturday boy there. All too aware of the darker sides of the meat industry, Peter is determined to help develop the demand for organic and high welfare meat, ensuring farmers can continue in their trade, more animals are treated with respect, and punters get the best meat possible. And to do this, he has close relationships with neighbouring farmers, whom he gets his meat from directly.    “Going straight to the farmer allows us to know that our customers’ money is going to the right man, and ultimately back to the rearing of the animals themselves,” he explains. “We like to think that increasing demand for this more ethical farming has a wider impact on the industry, making it more viable for farmers to pursue these better practices.”  Considering the bigger picture in this way is helping to ensure not only that the butchery business is sustainable, but the whole food production system is, too. But Peter’s sense of responsibility doesn’t end there. The butchery also offers extra services to its customers and community, ranging from knife sharpening to local deliveries, which are made on 100-percent electric vehicles.   larkhallbutchers.co.uk 

FOOD TRADER

E A T C H U

FOOD SUPPLIER

A dish can only be as good as its ingredients, right? And how, exactly, do these get into the right kitchen? Via businesses like Total Produce Bristol Foodservice.   This team is relied upon not only to get the right ingredients to the The judges said: right places, fresh and in pristine condition, but also to keep cooks and “Total Produce chefs in the loop when it comes to what’s being harvested. It publishes a have such a strong monthly market report, offering information on what’s plentiful and at its reputation as being best, as well as how successful growing seasons are looking. This, along a fantastic company with the team’s personal knowledge, means their customers can choose to work with. Staff are the best value and quality when it comes to ingredients.  helpful, enthusiastic and reliable.”  “I’d like to think that as well as doing our best for our customers every day, we also throw ourselves wholeheartedly into Bristol as a community,” says commercial manager Phil Nichols. “We are very aware that, after 60 years of trading here, it is very important for us to give something back to the city that has served us so well.” Indeed, Total Produce has supported some great local causes over the last year, including St. Peter’s Hospice, Fareshare, and Hospitality Action, and continues to be an important cog in both the food industry and the Bristol community.   totalproducelocal.co.uk   

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NI CCI PE E T

TOTAL PRODU CE

Eatchu is a pretty young biz, having started trading at Bristol markets just 18 months ago. Guy and Vic Siddall are the husband-and-wife team behind the outfit (which now has a permanent spot at St Nicholas Market) and have been responsible for introducing countless locals to gyoza.   “We’re pleased (and relieved) that a lot of people have decided they love gyoza as much as we do!” Guys says. “We still meet loads of new people every day who are giving it a go The judges said: for the first time. However, the number of regulars that “Eatchu do one thing and they we see week after week has do it really well. always been a huge source An honest, fun of encouragement for us.”  business that And if they ever run low of said encouragement, they’ve is highly ethical and celebrates got a pretty hefty trophy to Japanese food. remind them of just how One to watch.” popular they are in the city, and how much people appreciate their high ethical standards (for instance, meat comes from the awesome Ruby & White, all packaging is compostable, and chopsticks are made from sustainable bamboo).   “To receive acknowledgment from such a stellar panel of judges on behalf of our favourite foodie magazine is definitely the best thing that has happened since we launched the business,” says Guy.   Shucks. So, what now for Eatchu? “Hopefully, someday soon, we’ll have a place where we can serve gyoza dumplings for dinner, rather than just for lunch!” eatchu.co.uk


Christmas at Wellbourne We’re now taking bookings for Christmas at both lunch and dinner. Have a look at our exclusive Festive Menu.

VOL AU VENTS STARTERS Potted duck, toasted brioche & wild cherry chutney. Cured organic salmon, bergamot & winter leaves. Crispy hen’s egg, truffle dressing & hazelnuts.

MAINS Stuffed turkey, chestnut stuffing & charred cabbage. Steamed cod, sprout tops & Jerusalem artichoke. Whole roast cauliflower, smoked butter & golden raisin.

AFTERS Stollen & marzipan ice cream. Clementine savarin, spiced rum & crème fraiche. Colston Bassett, celery & crackers. For all Christmas bookings please email clifton@wellbourne.restaurant or telephone us on 0117 2390683 Terms and conditions apply. Pre-orders and deposits are required.

a

@_Wellbourne

@wellbourne.restaurant

25 The Mall, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4JG


C R U M B S

KITCHEN AND INTERIORS

SUSTAINABLE KITCHENS

TO RY MCTE R NA N

FRONT OF HOUSE

ROSS J OSEPH (ALLI UM) Ross grew up in Ireland and, with his family managing a string of pubs, has been involved in the hospitality trade from a young age, finding it “immediately engaging”.  This enthusiastic and ambitious young front of house pro was made restaurant manager at the age of just 23, tasked with heading up the team at one of Bath’s most renowned restaurants.  “People ask me if the next milestone is hotel management, but food and wine is the reason I get up every morning, and I live for the buzz of The judges said: interacting with people for “Ross has such a a living, so that has to be great reputation and on my horizon,” Ross tells always gets amazing us, when we ask about his reviews. He goes future plans. “My new above and beyond, dream is to run my own and therefore is restaurant by the age of totally deserving 30, so watch this space!”  of this ward. Having always wanted Great exemplar.”  to work in hospitality, Ross is aware that it’s not always given the recognition as a career that it deserves, and is hoping to see the industry develop: “I would love to see more young people buying into the heart of a restaurant or hotel, and working with properties for longer periods of time. It can be a very nomadic and changeable trade, and it would be good for the industry to have a little more employment longevity,” he says. abbeyhotelbath.co.uk   

WANT TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT OUR WINNERS? KEEP YOUR EYE ON CRUMBSMAG.COM FOR THE FULL INTERVIEWS!

Sustainable Kitchens (originally IT Woodwork) is the brainchild of Sam Shaw and Charlie O’Beirne, who have always been very specific in their goals. “We aim to make beautiful, high quality, bespoke kitchens that will last a lifetime,” they say. “We make all of our kitchens from sustainable materials and do our best to minimize our environmental impact. Sustainability is one of our most important considerations, so we want to make kitchens The judges said: that will be loved and “Sustainable used for years to come Kitchens produce by families.”  impressive kitchens Not only do these whilst being guys use sustainable environmentally materials, but friendly. Ethics also recycle their waste, really matter, and plant trees, and work so does superb with renewable energy, customer focus.”  to be as kind to the planet as possible.   Of course, despite their virtues, they still need to have a bloomin’ good product in order to be a success. And that they do: all their kitchens are made by hand in Bristol, and feature quality, solid wood. Although they began solely in joinery, the team can now manage whole projects, and have recently expanded to include an in-house installation team. Great ethics and great quality? That’s what winners are made of. sustainablekitchens.co.uk

N IC C I P E E T

NEWCOMER

SHOP 3 BISTRO Kathryn Curtis and Stephen Gilchrist opened this Clifton restaurant at the end of 2016, and it was immediately talked about as one of the year’s most exciting new food hotspots. “We’ve been so amazed at the warm welcome from local Bristolians, support and encouragement from other restaurants, and the generosity of spirit that exists in this city,” says Kathryn, when we ask what their reception was like initially. “We’ve received some really lovely comments from customers; I think people have understood what we are trying to achieve.”  Said achievement is a welcoming restaurant in a popular part of the city with a neighbourhood  feel, attentive but relaxed service, and good, honest cooking. The food is rustic and accessible in style, modern in concept, carefully cooked and thoughtfully presented; it’s not fussy or try-hard. Many of the ingredients are foraged and there are often novel flavour combinations to try. That, along with the warm team who offer a lovely service, make this joint one to keep your eye on...  shop3bistro.co.uk

The judges said: “Shop 3 Bistro is beautifully independent, ingredient focused, constantly surprising and great value. It’s cracking a notoriously tricky spot, and doing a great job. The understated atmosphere with the wow-factor food is a compelling combination.”  N IC C I P E E T

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A W A R D S


the home of rice and noodles Classical Thai cuisine in a relaxed and friendly authentic Thai environment.

Christmas isn’t Christmas until you’ve tried our fabulous Christmas menu! 15th November – 25th December Bookings now open!

Set over two floors with beautiful views of the Weir. Party bookings are welcome

New Hot Pot Menu Traditional East Asian cuisine, consisting of a simmering metal pot of stock at the centre of the dining table with ingredients placed in the pot, cooked at the table and served with a dipping sauce

01225 444 834

16 Argyle Street, Bath BA2 4BQ info@thaibytheweir.com | www.thaibytheweir.com

C H I N E S E R E S TA U R A N T

Family run and providing quality food and service since 1985

Christmas bookings now being taken 1-2 New Street, Kingsmead Square, Bath BA1 2AF Tel: 01225 466377 www.pekingrestaurantbath.co.uk a @PekingBath

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pekingrestaurant

Opening Hours: Monday – Saturday 12 noon – 2.00pm and 6.00pm – 10.30pm | Closed Sundays.

Fabulous new à la carte menu coming early next year! 12-16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 01173 291300 Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB Tel: 01225 446656 Email: info@themintroom.co.uk www.themintroom.co.uk

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curry shack

VIBRANT, SEASONAL INDIAN STREET FOOD

Unit 2, Cargo 2, Wapping Wharf, Bristol BS1 6ZA Weddings | Parties | Private hire www.gopalscurryshack.co.uk

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Kingsmead Square, Bath

Fragrant Nepalese Kebabs – Shekuwa Crispy Vegetable fritters – Pakora Curry In A Hurry - Veggie and Meaty options Speciality Coffee Lassi – iced yoghurt milk shakes Eat in or Takeaway. Vegan, Veggie and Gluten free friendly www.phatyaks com @phatyaksbath @phatyaks

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P H OTO PAOLO F ER LA

BATH AND BRISTOL HAS A BANGIN’ PAN-ASIAN FOOD SCENE GOING ON RIGHT NOW: FROM KOREAN TO JAPANESE, INDIAN TO NEPALESE, IT’S ALL HERE FOR THE EATING. HERE ARE SOME LOCAL PLACES TO GRAB A BITE OF THE EAST…

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M A I N S Left: Did you know that Woky Ko makes a mean seabass tartare? You do now

Bento Boss opened its doors on Whiteladies Road, Bristol in 2014, after Malaysian couple Tracy Koh and James Fong took over a notoriously tricky restaurant site at Clifton Down Station. Having worked in Japanese restaurants for a number of years, the pair wanted to combine sushi with food from all over Asia on their menus, and serve it in a casual, chilled out space at affordable prices. Perhaps best known for its sushi and bento boxes, this place also makes killer noodle soups. bentoboss.co.uk Family run Chai Shai is an Indian gaff that’s out to prove it’s far from your average Bristol curry house. All about fresh, authentic flavours from the Subcontinent, it serves up dishes made from real family recipes, using traditional cooking techniques from a variety of regions. While the food may be Indian, many of the ingredients are local, and you’ll notice a focus on seasonal, fresh and wholesome produce. facebook.com/chaishaikitchen Specialising in the cuisine of Indian state Gujarat, Chai Walla’s food is largely vegetarian. This small take-out venue just off Kingsmead Square in Bath was founded by Niraj Gadher, who often goes back to Gujarat to visit family. Expect sweetness, salt and spice in this moreish food; the onion bhaji wrap is very popular for that reason. facebook.com/chaiwallabath Japanese street food biz (and Crumbs Awards winner) Eatchu specialises in gyoza – now one of the most Instagrammed street food offerings in Bristol. The plump dumplings come in all kinds of flavours – think chicken and nori butter, teriyaki beef and bamboo shoot, and mushroom and leek, just as examples – and are all handmade with super thin dough, giving them a great pastry-to-filling ratio. They’re then topped with an array of sauces and sides to serve. eatchu.co.uk At Chilli Daddy, the kitchen uses classic Chinese family recipes alongside fresh, local ingredients to create authentic-tasting Szechuan dishes. Bristol diners can choose just how hot they want their noodle and rice dishes – these guys work on a heat scale of one to five – so the question is, how daring are you? chillidaddy.com JP Destiny’s co-owner Mantanee Lewis (who owns the restaurant with her husband John Jeremy) is originally from Pattaya in Thaliand, which is where she learned her trade. Mantanee’s Thai roots inspire a large proportion of the menu, although you’ll also find plenty of influence from Malaysia, Singapore and China among the Asian fusion-style dishes available. Mantanee uses fresh produce, cooked very precisely to keep its vibrancy and crunch. The Thai green and massaman curries are particular Bristol faves. jpdestinythaicorner.com Founder of Giggling Squid Pranee Laurillard grew up on the banks of the Mekong river in Southeast Asia, and would visit the markets there with her mum. Aiming to recreate the flavours of home, she

Top: Eatchu’s much-Instagrammed gyoza Middle: Thaikhun is heavily influenced by Bangkok Bottom: Gopal’s Curry Shack is all about street food

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opened her first restaurant in Brighton, which has been followed by several more branches. The food focuses on incorporating spicy, sour, sweet, salty and bitter flavours, balancing them in different ways. Order the salt and pepper squid whether you're in the Bristol or new Bath branches – it’s a super popular choice. gigglingsquid.com The ethically minded Gopal’s Curry Shack actually began as a supper club in 2011, before becoming a pop-up business and finally opening a permanent site at Bristol’s Cargo this year. It’s still street food that founders Heather Simmonds and Melanie Taylor focus on, though, and they describe their seasonal vegetarian and vegan dishes as fresh, aromatic and flavour-packed. Try the samosa chaat (tomato and chickpea curry with smashed samosas, topped with date and tamarind chutney and pomegranate garnish) or the South Indian seasonal vegetable and coconut curry, to get a real taste of what they’re all about. gopalscurryshack.co.uk Mint Room in Bath is a mainstay of the local dining scene – and for good reason. Its modern take on Indian food sees top-quality, contemporary dishes from all over the Subcontinent served in a fine dining setting. To start, you’ll find the likes of tempura prawn and pan-fried scallop in a coconut, cumin and fenugreek sauce, and marinated lamb neck fillet cooked over charcoal and served with clarified butter and cloves. Mains, meanwhile, bring palak kofta (spinach and onion dumpling in a tomato and cashew sauce), and Bengali spiced smoked Tawa duck. There are wine matches for each dish, so you can go all out, and there's a Bristol site too. themintroom.co.uk

Left: You’ll get top-quality, contemporary food at Mint Room Right: Sky Kong Kong in Bristol is known for its fresh, carefully prepared Korean food

Celebrating its first birthday this autumn, Nutmeg in Clifton is the brainchild of Raja Munuswamy, who wanted to offer modern Indian food, and showcase the variety of cuisines to be found across India’s 29 states. On the menu you’ll find some well-loved classics – beef madras and saag paneer – as well as less familiar creations, like monkfish moli. The wines have been specially selected to pair with the food, and the bartenders also mix up a range of cocktails. A mix of Indian spices and local meat make for great quality food that’s rooted in India but has a West Country edge. nutmegbristol.com

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Phat Yaks in Bath focuses on the food that’s cooked and sold roadside in Kathmandu and all over Nepal, with the team travelling there quite regularly to research and develop new recipes. The popular ‛curry in a hurry’ contains rice, dal, salad and chutney, as well as the main event of vegan or chicken wok-fried curry, while pakora wraps give traditional snacks a modern packaging, and make them great to eat on the go. Spices are imported from Kathmandu, and dishes are cooked fresh each day. phatyaks.com Having opened in August to a great reception, Sholay is a pan-Indian restaurant housed in a shipping container at Cargo. Offering casual, laid-back dining, this place has street food at its heart, focusing less on curry-style creations and more on fresh, fast dishes that are uncomplicated, packed with flavour, and thoughtfully presented. With communal tables and small plate options on the menu (as well as full-sized main meals), Sholay has a social vibe and encourages sharing among diners. sholayindiankitchen.com


M A I N S

Central Bristol’s laid-back Sky Kong Kong has real pedigree, with Koren-born chef Hwi Shim (who you may know better as Wizzy) having worked in high-end and Michelin-starred kitchens in London before opening her own gaff in 2014. The food here is primarily Korean, and is made with fresh ingredients that are treated with care. Not just about the flavours and textures, Wizzy works to retain the produce’s nutritional goodness, too. The menu is always evolving, so you’ll often find new creations to try. skykongkong.co.uk Thai by the Weir was originally opened in 1995, and moved to its current Argyle Street location in Bath in 2000. Although the food is primarily Thai-focused (well, duh), the chefs do incorporate touches from all over Asia: particularly Japan, Malaysia and Indonesia. Check out the pad Thai and tom yum soup. thaibytheweir.co.uk With spots across the country, including our very own Bath, Thaikuhn aims to recreate the food and atmosphere of Thailand’s buzzy city roadsides. Co-founder Kim Kaewkraikhot started out cooking in the streets in Bangkok before opening a small restaurant there and going on win awards for her food in Thailand. Kim returns regularly, to pick up inspiration for new dishes as well as scout out ingredients. If you drop in, give the traditional pinto boxes ago, which incorporate both a curry and stir fry, as well as noodles and rice. thaikhun.co.uk Started in Bristol by a chef and a front of house pro, Tuk Tuck’s food is predominately inspired by the cuisine of Korea, Japan and Thailand, but you’ll notice whispers of influences from all over South East Asia, too. Personal family recipes are used for the kimchi and gochujang chilli sauce, and the team focus a lot on food that’s rich in nutrition as well as favour. Mention Tuk Tuck to someone, and they’ll no-doubt bring up the chicken katsu curry – one of the most popular dishes, alongside the bibimbap (Korean rice). twitter.com/teamtuktuck Tsukemono was born out of Adam and Iris’s mutual love for Japan; they wanted to recreate the style and flavours that you only get in food from this region, teaching themselves to cook all the dishes they couldn’t find in the UK. A relatively new biz, Tsukemono can be found at markets in Bristol, and recently had a pop-up at The Volunteer Tavern. It’s out to show diners that Japanese food isn’t all sushi and ramen, and to offer a contemporary take on the flavours the country is known for; try the kimchi fried rice Scotch egg, Japanese fried chicken, and Japanese pizza, and you’ll understand. tsukemono.co.uk

Top: Tsukemono is an exciting new Japanese food biz Bottom: Tuk Tuck uses family recipes and infuences from all over Asia

Woky Ko, founded by MasterChef finalist Larkin Cen, is a cool shipping-container bao and noodle bar in Bristol. Larkin’s family are from Guangzhou in south China, so you’ll find a lot of the classic flavours from that region in his food. That said, Woky Ko is not shy when it comes to experimentation (did someone say salted caramel ice cream bao?), and Larkin gives himself the

freedom to play around with flavours and styles from all over Asia. Word on the street is that this fun, contemporary Chinese restaurant might well be opening a second venue in the not-too-distant future too. woky.co One of the first restaurants to serve traditional Nepalese flavours on our patch, Bath’s Yak Yeti Yak has been going since 2004. It focuses on the wide variety of cuisine in Nepal – which is influenced by Indian, Himalayan and Tibetan cooking. Despite its broad range of styles, though, the food is all connected by its freshness and fragrance – which are more prominent characteristics than spice, although you’ll always find extra chillis on the side if you’re keen for that kick. Try the momos – steamed dumplings stuffed with meat and served with a selection of fresh chutneys. yakyetiyak.co.uk

Have we missed off your favourite local Asian restaurant? Tweet us about it @crumbsmag!

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Find us at CARGO1, Wapping Wharf www.woky.co @wokyko Unit 7, CARGO1, Gaol Ferry Steps, Bristol, BS1 6WP

No MSG Responsibly sourced

1 Church Street Bradford on Avon Wiltshire BA15 1LN stay@theswanbradford.co.uk f swanbradford T @stayswan www.theswanbradford.co.uk

BRADFORD ON AVON

01225 868686

Casual Thai Dining

OFFERING AUTHENTICALLY PREPARED THAI FOOD Now serving authentically prepared Thai food in a casual dining atmosphere prepared by our own Thai Chef. Pub classics menu also available. Open 7 days a week for Thai food and pub classics Monday - Saturday: 12noon-3pm & 6pm-10pm Sunday Carvery served 12noon-3pm, normal menu 4pm-9pm

Thai takeaways also available • Centrally located 2 minutes walk from the train station • Free parking

CHRISTMAS PARTY MENUS NOW AVAILABLE, OFFERING BOTH WESTERN AND THAI OPTIONS


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A Timbrell’s Christmas Those who were at the Timbrell’s Yard summer gathering know that these guys put on a great party – and there’s more of the same in store this Christmas...

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imbrell’s executive chef Tom Blake, formerly head chef at River Cottage, is a renowned and dedicated champion of local suppliers. His outstanding menus showcase South West ingredients and skilled cooking. Main courses among Tom’s top Christmas offerings this year include spiced feather blade of beef; Cornish hake; spinach, ricotta and mushroom arancini; and, of course, free-range turkey. Tom and the team do a mighty fine job in the kitchen; The Times even recently said that he “serves delicious imaginative morsels in the high-ceilinged restaurant…a lavish affair.” If you don’t know Timbrell’s Yard, it’s a real gem – a Grade II listed riverside inn, at the heart of Bradford-on-Avon. It has 17 stylish bedrooms, a contemporary bar, fabulous restaurant and picturesque views across the water. And it’s happily close to the station: the train journey from the centre of Bath takes less than 10 minutes. The great atmosphere, relaxed vibe, stunning interiors and firstclass food all make for the perfect venue for a Christmas party with family, friends or colleagues. The two-course Christmas menu is £26 per person and three-courses £32 per person. Large parties are welcome and they can cater for groups of up to 60.

Timbrell’s Yard, 49 St. Margaret’s Street, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire BA15 1DE Tel: 01225 869492 Email: info@timbrellsyard.com For Christmas & New Year Opening Times please visit timbrellsyard.com Twitter: @TimbrellsYard


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10 The Mall | Clifton | BS8 4DR | 0117 360 0288 | info@nutmegbristol.com | www.nutmegbristol.com


A F T E RS

NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

H I G H L I G H T S

OH, DEER

Lunch at Broughton Gifford’s new Rusty Stag Page 70

COME TO MED

We cosy up with some hearty Sardinian grub at Zanky’s Page 73 We chilled out here with a couple of gins before our multi-course lunch at The Priory

PUMPED!

Not just a watering hole, The Pump House serves up top-drawer food, too Page 78

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( N E W R E S TA U R A N T S )  

THE RUSTY STAG      JESSICA CARTER HEADS OUT FOR A LEISURELY LUNCH AND FINDS SOME AMBITIOUS COOKERY GOING ON IN A SLEEPY RURAL VILLAGE...

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hef Tom Mackins came to Broughton Gifford from Chapter 1 in Newquay, to re-open a former neighbourhood gastropub. The newly named Rusty Stag (formerly The Fox) has been open for around three months, and is now more ‘gastro’ and less ‘pub’, it’s safe to say, with the restaurant-style menus showing plenty of ambition and not-so-subtle intent. Inside, the restaurant has had a freshen up since reopening in its new guise, but nothing has drastically changed; it’s still got that cosy, rustic, country pub kind of look, with low ceilings, wooden beams and a stone fireplace. There’s a separate menu for lunch and dinner, although there’s some cross over between them. In the evening, starters range from about £7 to £9, and mains £15 to £24, while the lunch menu promises one course for £12, two for £16 and three for £20, which is pretty great value for food of this quality. That daytime offering was what we were choosing from. To start, the spiced lamb faggot was an obvious choice as far as we were concerned. The rich ball came in a chic slate-grey bowl, and bathed in a velvety celeriac purée – a thoughtful alternative to the traditional gravy, which would have probably made the dish that bit too heavy, and been in danger of rendering the main course redundant. Served on a wooden board with a bread roll, it was a good example of a classic, thrifty British dish, brought up to date without compromising its original charm. Conversely, the curried cauliflower starter had an altogether more modern concept at its heart. The edges of the golden florets had just started to catch while cooking, giving them extra colour and flavour, while a peppering of puffed rice

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brought crunch. Finished off with sweet bursts of mango and raisin, it was a light starter which demonstrated a delicate hand. There was a fish and a veggie option among the main courses – a take on fish and chips, with hake and pea purée, and an autumnal-sounding roast squash risotto with tarragon and feta – but we were all about the meat on this particular day. A generous portion of ox cheek arrived in large hunks, piled atop a bed of savoy cabbage. Deep in colour, it had flavour to match: the rich, slow-cooked meat was all kinds of comforting, and flaked willingly at its introduction to my fork. Fiery hits of English mustard hid among the cabbage, the fresh heat complementing each rich mouthful. Finished off with half a nicely caramelised shallot – which added its own welcome sweetness – and the braising liquor, it was hearty and bold, and just the thing for autumn. The square sausage sounded too intriguing for my chum to pass up (and as she was nursing a wee bit of a hangover,

this kind of hearty meal was right up her street). The herb-flecked, caramelized slab certainly looked the rib-sticking part, and was crowned by a mini Yorkshire pudding. The comforting dish came with sticky, slow-cooked onion, silky smooth mash, a smattering of kale and a deeply meaty jus. The only thing to miss the mark was that Yorkie, which was crisp all the way through, so a bit tough. Dessert arrived in the form of subtly flavoured salted caramel rice pudding, topped with a scoop of creamy coffee ice cream. It melted nicely into the plump rice, which had been cooked to retain its shape and bite. A slab of pistachio and olive oil cake was pleasingly moist and came with a crunchy crumb, while its accompanying sea salt ice cream nicely levelled out the dish’s sweet-savoury balance. Finished off with a dramatic slick of deep-green pistachio sauce, it was a handsome plate. The contemporary takes on traditional home comforts were nicely done, the dishes having been updated without sacrificing any of the qualities that made them classics in the first place. Dinner, though, seems to involve more novel assemblies (think yoghurt-marinated lamb loin cooked over coal, and hake with black garlic and samphire) which perhaps represent more specifically what Tom wants The Rusty Stag to be about: ambitious cooking that allows for the flexing of his creative muscles. It’s clear that Tom – who’s worked in Michelin-starred kitchens and clocked

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on for shifts alongside the likes of Kevin Viner and Paul Ainsworth in the past – is confident in what he wants to cook, and is out to impress with it. The Rusty Stag, 148 The Street, Broughton Gifford, Melksham SN12 8PR; 01225 308541; facebook.com/therustystag


WE ARE NOW TAKING BOOKINGS FOR CHRISTMAS Blessed with a beautiful building and a team of talented Chefs, The Pump House is the perfect place for a party. Contact our events team for a cracking Christmas: info@the-pumphouse.com | 0117 927 2229

THE PUMP HOUSE Merchants road, Bristol BS8 4PZ www.the-pumphouse.com

A Christmas Party to remember at the Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel Celebrate your Christmas Party with friends or work colleagues at the Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel and enjoy an evening of sumptuous food and dancing. SILVER PARTY NIGHTS

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6.30pm Bar opens; 7pm Dinner; GOLD PARTY NIGHTS 12am Fri 17th & 24th; Sat 18th & 25th November 2017 Carriages Dates throughout December 2017 £40.00 per adult / Stay overnight from £145.00 per room Private parties catered for, minimum 70 guests Private events catered for, minimum 50 guests

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M A C D O N A L D B AT H S PA H O T E L

Sydney Road, Bath BA2 6JF 01225 444 424  www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk


( C O M F O R T I N G I TA L I A N S )  

ZANKY’S      THE HOME-COOKED ITALIAN FOOD AT THIS NORTH BRISTOL NEIGHBOURHOOD GAFF LEFT JESSICA CARTER FEELING ALL WARM INSIDE...

R

ight at the top of Gloucester Road, where it turns into Filton Road (high up enough to give South Bristol advocates a nosebleed), you’ll find this unassuming little Italian joint. It sits in a small row of shops in a largely residential area in Horfield. I first heard about it when my pal who lives there (that’s in Horfield, not at Zanky’s) was getting all excited about having a new restaurant in walking distance. And her excitement for somewhere new to eat

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was completely justified; there really isn’t too much choice up here, just on the edge of Southmead. The area is, however, becoming more and more popular for first-time buyers, so there’s inevitably a decent enough market of yopros and families who’d have shared in her excitement at the prospect of a low-key, friendly, neighbourhood eatery, serving up comforting Italian grub. Heck, who wouldn’t want that down the road? Zanky’s – which opened in February this year and is named after the owner’s grandfather – is the first restaurant by a local Bristol family, who hail from Sardinia. Although the exterior doesn’t give much away, inside you can really feel that familyrun vibe, thanks to both the small and welcoming team here and the hearty, homemade food. There’s plenty to read through on the menu, even without the pizzas, which weren’t on the day we visited. To start was the fritto misto (£8.65), which saw deep-fried pieces of squid, sardines and prawns all coated in a nicely light batter, and served with crisp Sardinian flatbread and curry mayo. The arancini starter (£8.45), meanwhile, saw three golden, breadcrumbed balls of risotto all lined up, each with a different filling. The confit courgette and garlic number was

comfortingly cheesy and came sat in a dollop of fresh-tasting tomato and basil sauce, and the rich squid ink ball, intensely black inside, was full of subtle flavour from the squid ragu and complemented by a punchy pea purée. Both starters were of a generous portion – we could have easily just shared one between us if we weren’t the gannets that we undisputedly are. Main courses were all pasta-based on the day we visited, with said pasta being handmade fresh in the kitchen each day. However, there are always some alternatives on the specials board; while the menu is a bit more general Italian, this daily changing list is where you find some real traditional Sardinian-style grub. My lunch date was all but set on the ‘raviolo di patate e fromaggio’ (that’s ravioli stuffed with potato, Sardinian cheese and fresh mint in a tomato sauce) from the stuffed pasta section, where there’s also an interesting ravioli stuffed with saffron and Parmesan risotto in a bone marrow sauce. A last minute change of the mind, though, saw C instead order the porcini mushroom parpadelle (£13.80). Quite indulgent for a meat-free dish, it involved plenty of butter and cream, but the flavour of that rich sauce still managed to avoid overbearing the fresh pasta. She’s keen to go back for that ravioli, mind. The ox cheek parpadelle (£13.45) saw those same great ribbons of pasta – cooked to retain just the right amount of bite – coated in a tomato sauce, and tangled up with hunks of tender ox cheek. The sauce was fresh and light, keeping the dish from becoming too rich with the slow-cooked, lardy meat. Finished off with tiny leaves of fresh basil, it felt very much like something you’d find on an Italian family dinner table.

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Our desserts were homemade: tiramisu (£6.25) with delicate coffee flavour and lashings of sweetened cream, and a lighttextured amaretto semifreddo (£6.50) with almond crumb and agave syrup. Yes, they were both rather sweet, but not to the extent that we couldn’t finish them – two clear plates went back to the kitchen. A couple of super-strong espressos and a chat with the friendly owners marked the end of a really good, unfussy and satisfying meal. You’ll often find plenty of Italians eating here, and it’s not uncommon for the team to be told how the food ‘tastes like home’. Good sign, right? Zanky’s, 26 Filton Road, Bristol BS7 0PA; 0117 904 76 46; zankysbristol.co.uk


Introducing

Christmas parties Abbey style!

The Abbey Hotel is wellknown for its spirit of entertaining, so let us be your hosts. Whether you’re planning a seasonal shindig, large or small, we can help you to plan the perfect party. ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

Cocktails, alcoholic ice creams, sorbets and more! Come and find us at 43 St Nicholas Street, Bristol Open Thursday – Saturday (11:00 – 23:30)

TO BOOK OR FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 01225 805895 OR EMAIL EVENTS@ ABBEYHOTELBATH.CO.UK

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We are a friendly, family owned inn offering hearty home cooked food, in a small country village setting. Whether you are local or travelling from further afield, you are guaranteed a warm welcome. PUB • RESTAURANT • FUNCTION ROOM • ACCOMMODATION

Christmas menu out now

Tunley Road, Tunley BA2 0EB • 01761 470408 Email: kingwilliamtunley@live.com • f T @kingwilliam84 www.kingwilliaminn.co.uk


LITTLE KITCHEN Cookery School

Little Kitchen is Bristol’s specialist, relaxed and affordable cookery school.

Our upcoming classes... Decadent Desserts Sunday 19th Nov, £45 Christmas Bread Sunday 26th Nov and 10th Dec, £55 Christmas Cake Course Tuesday evenings 28th Nov - 12th Dec, £135 Kids holiday clubs Sunday 17th Dec and 19th Dec, from £18 www.little-kitchen.co.uk 07783 334881 153 Wick Road, Bristol BS4 4HH


Award Winning, Family Run Farm Shop Established for over 30 years Selling Quality Local Produce Open Daily 9am – 6pm (9.30am – 5pm on Sundays)

HOME & LOCALLY REARED FRESH MEAT, POULTRY & GAME HOMEMADE SAUSAGES, BURGERS & FAGGOTS Christmas orders now being taken Join us for our Tasting Day on Saturday 18th November 10.30am – 3pm; Meet our suppliers and sample their delicious produce!

LOCAL CHEESES & HOME COOKED MEATS LOCALLY GROWN VEGETABLES, FRUIT & SALADS HOMEMADE CAKES & PIES LOCALLY MADE CHOCOLATES & FUDGE FINE WINE, LOCAL ALE & CIDER PRESERVES & CHUTNEYS GIFT HAMPERS Premium Christmas Trees on sale from 29th November

www.allingtonfarmshop.co.uk | 01249 658112 Allington Bar Farm, Chippenham, SN14 6LJ

LITTLE DUCK DOUGHNUTS The early duck gets the doughnut

20% off your first order at littleduckdoughnuts.com

@littleduckdoughnuts 07447155527 www.littleduckdoughnuts.com


( G R E AT G A S T R O P U B S )  

THE PUMP HOUSE      USUALLY SPOTTED AT THIS HOTWELLS PUB WITH A GIN IN HAND, JESSICA CARTER MAKES A TRIP ESPECIALLY FOR THE FOOD

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know, I know; I couldn’t believe we’d never reviewed this place before, either. Better late than never though, hey?   And late it is; it’s been 10 years now since The Pump House’s current proprietors, Dan Obern and Toby Gritten (who are also responsible for The Bird in Hand in Long Ashton and The Redan Inn in Chilcompton), took over the venue and turned it into the home of perhaps Bristol’s biggest gin collection. That’s on top of being a popular watering hole, restaurant, events venue and summer alfresco spot, of course.   The building – which sits right on the edge of the Cumberland Basin, itself constructed in the early 1800s – dates back to the 1870s, and was originally home to the hydraulic pump that powered Bristol’s bridges and lock gates, back when the city’s waterways were integral to its trade. After it was made redundant by the construction of the Hydraulic Engine House at Underfall 

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Yard, the building was used for all kinds of things – it was even an abattoir at one point. Now, though, you’ll find guests sitting outside in the summer with a gin, watching the boats pass through the lock, or hunkering down indoors in the winter with a craft ale. (That’s not to generalise, of course – if sitting outside in the winter with a different sip altogether is your thing, then you just crack on.)  We went for the predictable indoorwith-beer option, though; it was an early October evening and you could really feel the change of season in the chill outside. (As well as an impressive list of gins, these guys keep a large wine collection too, and have a really decent number of rotating beers and ciders on tap.)  The kitchen team had clearly been feeling the seasonal shift too – although probably more in terms of the produce their suppliers were proffering rather than the weather outside – as they’d just launched their new autumnal menu.   On said menu there’s a restaurant-style a la carte selection, with a handful of starters and mains – think wild venison with charcoal, fennel and mustard, and pan-fried turbot with suckling pig belly and truffle – as well as pub staples like beer-battered hake and chips, and mussels in cider.  


A F T E R S

There’s also a fancy tasting menu, priced at £45, which might have been a bit of an indulgent dinner for a Monday night, but, heck, we had it nonetheless.   Having begun with a gin of the day (Wannborga from Sweden, made with  Baltic Ice Lake water) we got going on a plate of beetroot, sheep’s curd and walnut. The beetroot – which comes from the pub’s own neighbourhood of Hotwells – came in three forms, with each bringing out a different characteristic of the sweet, earthy and versatile root. The curd (from Bagborough Farm, just south of Bristol) was an ideally mild, creamy accomplice, as was the earthy, crunchy walnut. Finished off with a drizzle of local rapeseed oil and nasturtium leaf, this starter was a telling precursor of the quality of the rest of the meal.  Next, Cornish mackerel had been blowtorched for crisp skin and plump, pink flesh. It was joined by Exmouth mussels, dill, and ribbons of home-grown cucumber (this place grows much of the kitchen’s ingredients in its garden and greenhouse). Beneath the strips of fish was a light aioli sauce, in which hid tiny cubes of gin-soaked cucumber. A super-fresh and delicate plate of food.   Brill followed, with pan-fried scallop and lemon and parsley quinoa, the latter given weight and flavour by the rich stock it was cooked in. Balls of apple that had been

soaked in Chardonnay vinegar cut right through that richness, though, with ease, thanks to their bursts of refreshing tang.   Potato and Westcombe Cheddar gnocchi  was fried and served with fresh, homemade ricotta and tiny chanerelle mushrooms that had been foraged in Bristol. A scattering of cob nuts from Long Ashton, hunks of butternut squash, and pear finished off this oh-so autumnal main course, which was crowned with a well-timed, softcentered, deep-fried egg yolk.   Pre-dessert saw poached peach hide underneath a neat little mound of sable biscuit crumb, chewy candied pistachio, and olive oil jelly. Peppered with grated frozen raspberry it hit a great sweet-savoury balance, which saw us nicely into dessert proper. This was an impressive lemon meringue pie, made from gooey, marshmallowy Italian meringue that had been carefully piped around frozen lemon posset and sorbet made with home-grown lemon verbena. Served with a shot glass of head chef Nick’s homemade limoncello, it reset our palates nicely with its fresh, tangy character.   This much-loved pub may be an ace watering hole, but it’s wise to make the most of its thoughtful and well-executed food while you’re there – whether that’s in the form of comforting pub grub, a threecourse meal, or full-on tasting affair.

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The Pump House, Merchants Road, Hotwells, Bristol BS8 4PZ; 0117 927 2229; the-pumphouse.com


A F T E R S

( N E W C H E F S )  

THE BATH PRIORY      IT WAS ALL CHANGE IN JANUARY FOR THIS CELEBRATED HOTEL’S RESTAURANT, SO JESSICA CARTER WAS KEEN TO SEE HOW IT’S FARING, ALMOST A YEAR ON...

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t was very much ‘in with the new’ at the beginning of this year for The Bath Priory, following long-serving chef Sam Moody leaving after almost seven years in its kitchens. Michael Nizzero was the chef chosen to take on the restaurant at this celebrated ‘county house-style’ hotel, which actually happens to be in residental Weston, near the western edge of the city. He came to Bath straight from The Ritz in London, where he’d helped earn it its first ever Michelin star. But that’s just the tip of the impressive iceburg that is Michael’s CV; this Belgian chef actually has 14 years’ experience, gained in kitchens all over the UK, Europe and even places as far-flung as Dubai. A stint working under Michel and Alain Roux at celebrated their French restaurant at Bray, The Waterside Inn, is of particular note – this place got its third Michelin star back in 1985, and has retained that number ever since. In fact, Michael has quite a history with Michelin, bagging his own first star in 2012, aged just 29; he was the youngest Michelinstarred chef in France at the time.


A F T E R S

So, all in all, this seems like a guy who’s well up to the job of taking on the city’s beloved Priory. And he’s brought with him some of his signature plates from those respected restaurants of his past, giving them a new twist for us here in Bath. As you’d expect from a chef with this pedigree, Michael’s style is classical French, but perhaps with a lighter edge than usual: he aims for clean flavours, he told us, and often employs citrus to do the heavy lifting in his food. There’s a choice of menus here: a seven-course tasting option (£98) and a three-course a la carte (£85). Visit at lunch, though, and you’re in for a bargain: two courses are just £25 and three are £30, between Monday and Saturday, with Sunday lunch being only slightly more dear. The handsome Georgian hotel – which was actually a private home from when it was built in 1835 right until the 1960s – comes with three acres of preened gardens, 33 guest rooms and a spa. It’s easy to forget you’re only a 20 minute walk from the city centre here. The weather gods may have been in a bad mood when we visited (the rain was almost Biblical), but, if anything, it made hunkering down in the lounge with a pre-food gin and tonic even more satisfying. This might be one of the area’s most highend restaurants, but it’s actually a pretty laidback spot. We were joined by other casually dressed guests in the lounge, and were happy to be led into a dining room filled with a good bit of hubbub – as opposed to one of self-conscious silence. There was a large family table just behind us, clearly enjoying a celebratory meal, while smaller groups and couples peppered the traditional-style, white-table-clothed dining area. A cool, refreshing gazpacho came with a subtle twist of peach, and had a beautifully light texture. It was followed by a gorgeously delicate-looking plate of Cornish crab. The flecks of sweet white meat were arranged in a disc, and balanced with whispers of crisp, savoury flavours from celery and lovage. Wild seabass, meanwhile, was joined by a decadent Champagne emulsion and fennel purée. The main event was squab pigeon, with Jersey royal potato and cabbage. The plump, blushing meat was cooked with precision to achieve that optimum texture. The departure of our cleared plates was the cue for the cheese trolley, which was brought over by a member of the approachable front of house team, who

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then guided us through all the varieties it displayed, never wavering in the face of our geeky questions about where they came from or how they were made. To end, a salted caramel fondant with banana sorbet gave all the flavours of those most comforting of desserts, but with a grown-up sense of occasion. The food at The Bath Priory is clearly in safe and skilled hands with Michael. There was no fault to be picked with these wellpracticed, precisely cooked, and delicately presented dishes, and we’re intrigued to see how the menu develops during the reign of this experienced chef. The Bath Priory, Weston Road, Bath BA1 2XT; 01225 331922; thebathpriory.co.uk


L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

daN IzZaRd YOU’VE GOT A GOOD CHANCE OF RUNNING INTO OUR NEW ONLINE EDITOR AT THESE LOCAL JOINTS...

Breakfast? Melbourne-style café Ceres is pretty special; Australians know how to do breakfast right. Best brew? Colonna & Small’s in Bath is my regular morning spot, even if I do feel like I’m cheating on my Bristol favourites! Best wine merchant? Once you’re in, it’s quite hard to leave Corks at Cargo without grabbing a stool and drinking a cheeky glass. Quick pint? Small Bar. Predictably, I’m partial to an IPA or pale ale, but love something a bit fruity and experimental too. I tried a Wiper & True oakbarrel-aged barley wine recently, which was crazy-good. Cheeky cocktail? Playground Coffee House have a unique coffee-infused gin and make a mean Espresso Martini to boot. You can also sit on swings there, which is more than a little bit cheeky.

Food on the go? With a Crumbs Award in the bag, it has to be Eatchu, for their handmade Japanese gyoza. Amazing little dumplings that are steamed and crisped to perfection.

Posh nosh? I’m so glad that the guys behind Wellbourne decided to open in Bristol. So much effort goes into the food, and I’m very keen on the vol-au-vent revival it’s initiating.

Hidden gem? The Bank Tavern. Somehow it’s both a cosy boozer where you can watch the rugby, and somewhere you’ll have one of the most exciting pop-up feasts in Bristol. I won’t tell you how good the roast is, or I’ll never be able to get a booking again.

With friends? Chance & Counters. Loads of board games, tasty snacks, lovely drinks, and tolerant staff who can deal with my inability to remember more than two rules at a time. What colour was I again?

One to watch? Dela is a great addition to Easton. Beautifully presented Swedish sharing platters with loads of local produce and homegrown veg. I expect by the time you read this it’ll already have quite the following. A really nice idea, executed well. Very Bristol. Best value? Anything on Wriggle: it’s a little black book you can use everyday. (No, they didn’t pay me to say that – I just love a deal!)

With the family? Pasta Loco is still top of my list when I have to suggest a venue. It’s a restaurant assured in its own style and ability. When I close my eyes I can still see their carbonara; eating it was like the first time I listened to The Beatles. Belting burger? Three Brothers is still the one for me. Always a great burger and they get bonus points for having chipotle sauce on the table as standard. I inevitably end up ordering a huge mound of chilli cheese fries, too...

QUICK! Now add this little lot to your contacts book • Ceres, Bristol BS1 3QD; facebook.com/cerescoffee.co • Colonna & Small’s, Bath BA1 1HN; colonnaandsmalls.co.uk • Corks at Cargo, Bristol BS1 4RN; corksofbristol.com • Small Bar, Bristol BS1 4DZ; smallbar.co.uk • Playground Coffee House, Bristol BS1 1TP; playgroundcoffee.co.uk • Eatchu, Bristol BS1 1JQ; eatchu.co.uk • The Bank Tavern, Bristol BS1 2HR; banktavern.com • Dela, Bristol BS5 6JF; delabristol.com • Chance & Counters, Bristol BS1 5BS; chanceandcounters.com • Pasta Loco, Bristol BS6 6JY; pastaloco.co.uk • Wellbourne, Bristol BS8 4JG; wellbourne.restaurant • Wriggle; getawriggleon.com • Three Brothers Burgers, Bristol BS1 4SB; threebrothersburgers.co.uk

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Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 69  
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