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CRUMBS BATH & BRISTO L

148 paGes!

There wasn’t mushroom!

BIGGEST ISSUE EVER

A little slice of foodie heaven

Why did the fungi leave the party?

NO.68 AUTUMN 2017

NO.68 AUTUMN 2017

SUNDAY BEST!

ST REETSMART IS BACK!

HERE's HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED

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CRUMBS BATH & BRISTO L

148 paGes!

A little slice of foodie heaven

BIGGEST ISSUE EVER

Why did the fungi leave There wasn’t the party? mushroom!

NO.68 AUTUMN 2017

NO.68 AUTUMN 2017

SUNDAY BEST!

STREETSMART IS BACK!

HERE's HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED

hOT OR NOT?

FINd YOUR dREAM ROAST

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GO tO fOR the Where find the ChOp! miGhtiest meat

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THE MOULD AND THE BEAUTIFUL!S

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EpIc REcIpES FROM THE REGION'S BEST CHEFs

CHANTERELLE BORN THRILLERS

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£3 where sold

ISSUE 68 AUTUMN 2017 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk CONTRIBUTORS

MARK TAYLOR

GOLD DIGGER

ART DIRECTOR

TREVOR GILHAM ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY PRODUCTION MANAGER

KIRSTIE HOWE kirstie.howe@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 www.mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month (as well as dining 100ft in the air) we ate and drank ourselves silly at Abergavenny Food Festival, checked out Bristol Craft Beer Festival, and even found time to drop into Cocktails in the City. Boom.

large version

Yeah, yeah, I know – I could do with running a brush through my hair here. But I had to share this snap of the best views I’ve ever eaten dinner over. And I mean ‘over’; last month I got properly high (100 foot, to be precise) to eat a rather special meal, cooked and served by Gordon Jones and his team, while dangling from a crane. Regardless of context, this has to be one of my favourite meals I’ve had all year. Standout dish? For me, it was the very first: a rich and silky girolle – or chanterelle – mousse. Which leads me nicely to my next topic: this month’s Hero. (We don’t just chuck this all together, folks. Oh no.) These golden-yellow ’shrooms have been kicking around our woodlands for a good few weeks now, and are well worth making the most out of while they’re still in season and fresh. As usual, we’ve got all the info you could want – and then even more that you probably won’t – on these sunny little beauts in the following pages. Moving on, have you noticed the size of this absolute beast of a rag that you’re holding right now? This, friends, is Crumbs’ biggest issue ever – ever, ever. And it’s packed to the rafters with news, recipes, features, reviews, and interviews. Speaking of interviews, don’t miss our chat with one of the most friendly, kind and enthusiastic chefs we’ve ever had in this here mag: José Pizarro. (After our chinwag on the phone, I spotted him in Bristol – what are the chances? – and promptly made a beeline for the poor guy, to plant a smacker on his cheek and tell him what a hero he is.) Finally, the weekend that this issue comes out also happens to be the weekend of the first ever Crumbs Awards, which will have seen the great and the good of our local food scene gather at Bristol Old Vic to find out who those trophies rightly belong too. We’ll have the skinny in the next issue for you, out on 24 November. Until then...

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

Crumbs is now an app! You can read all editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, Cotswolds and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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Table of Contents NO.68 AUTUMN 2017

STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT ’Shroom for a little one? 21 SIX PACK Belting butchers 25 ASK THE EXPERT Answering those coffee questions you’ve ‛bean’ meaning to ask...

CHEF!

40 Spatchcock poussin, by Tom Green 42 Venison with poached pear, by Chris Cleghorn 45 Candied bacon, by Russell Norman 46 Huevos rancheros, by Matthew Seaton 51 Apple pie, by Tristan Hogg and Jon Simon

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52 Cinnamon Pavlova with fresh figs, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh 54 Muscovado and nutmeg brûlée, by Paul O’Neill

77 FASHION POLICE The kitchen trends of 2018, predicted by the pros

ADDITIONAL RECIPES

10 Hake with chanterelles, by Freddy Bird 31 Clafoutis, by Rose Prince 74 Broccoli and onion bhajis, by Beth Al-Rikabi 94 Kimchi, by Lydia Downey

MAINS 91 POP CULTURE Fabulous fermentation 96 HOP STARS There’s a special new brew coming to town... 103 A RIGHT ROASTING Where to find some of the best local Sunday lunches 115 SO STREET StreetSmart is back!

KITCHEN ARMOURY 69 CRUMBS COOKS WITH We make lunch with the Free Range Chef...

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118 GRILLED José Pizarro talks all about Spanish cookery and his brand new book...

AFTERS 134 Bomboloni 136 The Athenian 140 The Mill 142 Windmill Hill City Farm Café PLUS! 146 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Ben White’s favourite haunts


THE COTTAGE INN Welcome aboard! The Cottage Inn, Bristol has reopened its doors and welcomes you to come and try our brand-new seafood inspired menu which has been crafted to give you a perfect waterside experience. Weยนve even got a take away menu now available, so why not don your deck shoes and head on down to relax with us by the water. THE COTTAGE INN 01179 215256 Baltic Wharf, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG

www.butcombe.com


START E RS INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

GET FIZZ-ICAL, TAKE A CULINARY TRIP TO THE SUBCONTINENT, AND HAVE A FOOD FRIGHT THIS MONTH… THE WINE GANG WINTER FESTIVAL  14 OCTOBER Drop into this tasting event at The Guildhall in Bath, and you’ll find over 200 wines available to sup on, including some cracking Kiwi varieties from local merchant Roving Sommelier Wines. You can even sign up for a free Wine Walk or join a PopUp Presentation. Tickets start at £20. thewinegang.com CHAMPAGNE DINNER AT THE BATH PRIORY  19 OCTOBER This rather special evening will see guests treated to a Champagne and caviar reception, followed by a sixcourse meal cooked by resident chef Michael Nizzero and Michelin-starred Thomas Debouzy. A specially curated Champagne flight from Laurent Perrier will accompany the meal. Tickets £150; to book, call the Bath Priory on 01225 331922. thebathpriory.co.uk

EaT, SLeeP, drINK, repeAT 7

ACROSS INDIA SUPPER CLUB  26 OCTOBER This three-course dinner is taking place at the Zion community café as part of its Diversity Month, and will see the ace Gopal’s Curry Shack cook up colourful mixed Thali plates. Tickets are £15 per person. zionbristol.co.uk HALLOWEEN CINEMA CLUB  31 OCTOBER This special screening of What We Do in the Shadows will be accompanied by Halloween-themed food and drink at Bristol Spirit. Tickets are £12, and include a cocktail and popcorn. espensenspirit.com

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S T A R T E R S

ChantereLLes

SOMETIMES CALLED GOLDEN CHANTERELLES – OR GIROLLES, IF YOU’RE BEING FRENCH AND POSH – THIS SMALL, FRUITY, PEPPERY FELLA IS BLESSED WITH GOOD LOOKS AND DELICATE FLAVOUR; IT’S ONE OF THE GREAT TASTES OF AUTUMN

T

hey may be everybody’s favourite wild mushroom, but there are a few annoying things about the chanterelle. For one thing, you’ve got to find them – they’re expensive in shops, and almost impossible to cultivate (blame the symbiotic relationship they demand with trees and other plants for this). For another, it’s hard to know what to call them... There’s chanterelle (from the Greek for ‘cup’, which they somewhat resemble), and ‘golden chanterelle’, which simply highlights their delightful egg-yolk colour. But then there’s girolle, too. This is the French name – and since it’s the French who’ve mostly popularised these things, that’s the name plenty of people use. (We’ll skip past a half-dozen other names too, except for the German pfifferling, which is almost as fun to write as it is to say.) Whatever you call them, they’re great all-rounders – with light, clean flavour and a usefully meaty, tender, non-crumbling texture – and many chefs value them above any other ’shroom, even the likes of ceps and morels. (They certainly bring superior looks and texture to the table.)

CHANTERELLES ARE THE sort of mushroom many of us forage for, rather than buy, but luckily they’re pretty easy to spot – look for their bright colour; their wide, funnel-shaped caps; and the wavy, forked false gills on the underside, which look a little like they’ve melted and run down the stem. Chanterelles often grow in some profusion, but spread about rather than clumped together. If there are trees around, and moss underneath them, that’s a good place to look; they like shade on the edge of woods (beech and birch seem best), and can often be found near a path, stream or roadside. You’ll start seeing chanterelles in the summer, but September and October are also good months, and you may luck across them in November on occasion too. It’s in the autumn that they seem especially magical, resembling unexpected golden flowers against the dull, damp woodland. As with most mushrooms, the very best time to forage seems to be after a rainy spell, followed by a day or two of sunshine. Beware, though! Foraging is risky; never eat anything you’re not sure you can identify. The jack-o-lantern mushroom is sometimes mistaken for the chanterelle, and is properly poisonous, so be careful. (These

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tend to be a brighter pumpkin orange, often grow in clumps – which chanterelles never do – and are easily identified by their true gills, nonforked and knife-like.) Also to be avoided are the thinner stemmed, patchier-coloured false chanterelles, which also have true gills, and some claim to be mildly hallucinogenic. (Most, however, simply find them bitter and disappointing.)

THOUGH CANTHARELLUS CIBARIUS is only actually native to Europe, there are similar species across Asia, Africa and North America too. Doubtless they’ll all be given their own names one day, but right now it’s almost impossible to tell them apart. They all have variations on that beautiful golden colour (some have a slightly pinkish hue). They all smell amazing (sort of fruity and perfumed; many liken it to apricots or peaches, but it’s often more earthy and woody than that). And all have a mildly peppery, even spicy, flavour when cooked. Prep is simple but a bit of a pain, as grit can work its way into the stem and gills; you basically want to pull them open and then get busy with a toothbrush. Chanterelles are super-rich in potassium and vitamin D, but there’s plenty of vitamin C here too. And, since maggots and insects (or, indeed, other woodland beasts) rarely seem to bother with them, it appears they contain a handy natural insecticide that’s harmless to humans. It’s always respectful to leave the smallest chanterelles alone, by the way – giving them a chance to grow and add to their numbers – and only take those that have reached maturity. (Think a couple of centimetres across the cap, or bigger.)

Simply sautéed in butter (perhaps with garlic and parsley) they’re a dream, especially when served on thin slices of toast. (The flavour compounds in chanterelles are fat-soluble, you see.) And with eggs they’re amazing – scrambled eggs with chanterelles, double cream and perhaps a little truffle oil is a truly wonderful thing. But that’s only the start of it. As it doesn’t have many water- or alcohol-soluble flavourings, for instance, the chanterelle is one mushroom that really lends itself to cooking in wine. Chanterelles are best used fresh (although they’ll keep in a paper bag in the fridge for over a week), and most find they don’t dry particularly well (though some chefs have claimed that reconstituted chanterelles are actually tastier than fresh ones). But you can sauté then freeze, or pickle them in a vinegar-based brine. Finally, one mistake to avoid: never undercook your chanterelles. They need their high water content driven off, intensifying the flavour and firming up the texture. Cooking on a medium heat until the juices run free (which you can keep as mushroom stock), before transferring to a hot frying pan to sear them, is a particularly effective way to go.

WHAT TO DO with them? Well, chanterelles can be used in risottos and omelettes, soups and sauces – dried, their powder is a great addition to a béchamel sauce or a casserole – and their subtle flavour works brilliantly with mild, rather than strong, flavours. (Consider chicken, pork, fish, rabbit, guinea fowl, eggs, pasta and vegetables – though, for some reason, venison goes a treat with them too.)

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R E C I P E

HAKE WITH CHANTERELLES, FINO, GARLIC AND JAMON

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS extra virgin olive oil 800g (approx) hake fillet 6 very large handful of chanterelles (they will shrink!) large knob of butter 4 large garlic cloves, finely copped 2 spring onions, finely sliced 150ml Fino, plus a little to finish the dish (drink the rest whilst you cook!) 250ml chicken stock (preferably made with a pig’s trotter as well) 2 tsp chives, chopped 2 tsp flat leaf parsley, finely chopped small handful serrano ham or pata negra, finely chopped

LIDO’S FREDDY BIRD MIXES THE FLAVOURS OF EARTH AND SEA, PAIRING THIS MONTH’S HERO WITH HAKE... I USED TO have a lot more time to go mushroom picking. I’d find wax caps on the Mendips, chanterelles, ceps, wood blewits, amethyst deceivers, hedgehogs, millers and the humble (but delicious) field mushroom over the bridge near Chepstow. I’ve even found a few boletus on the Downs before! I no longer have the time to pick mushrooms for the restaurant, but luckily have a fantastic forager who does, picking them only hours before we serve them. The difference in flavour is incomparable – if you want the tastiest wild mushrooms, pick them and eat them as soon as possible! Too often, wild mushrooms are shipped halfway across the continent, only to end up tasteless by the time you get them into your pan. If you don’t pick your own or aren’t confident in identifying them, try and buy when they are in season in the UK. If you do know what you are looking for, chanterelles are most commonly found in mature forests where oak, pine, birch and beech are predominant. Their colour can make them tricky to spot, though, in the fallen autumn leaves! This dish is utterly simple and relies on the freshest of chanterelles...

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METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 220C/425F/gas mark 7. 2 Heat a little oil in an oven-proof frying pan and, once it’s hot, place the fish in, skin side down. Cook on the skin side for 2 minutes (do not be tempted to move the fish once in the pan), then transfer to the oven for around a further 6 minutes, or until cooked through. 3 Meanwhile, in a very hot pan, fry the mushrooms in a little extra virgin olive oil. Use the biggest pan you have – you don’t want to crowd the pan, as you want them to fry and colour, not stew. If necessary, cook them in small batches. 4 Once coloured all over, season the mushrooms well with salt and black pepper. Add a knob of butter and the garlic, followed by the spring onions. 5 Pour in the Fino to deglaze the pan, then leave over the heat to reduce by ⅔. Add the chicken stock and reduce again by about ⅓. 6 Next, chuck in the rest of the butter and agitate the pan until it has emulsified in the sauce. Add the chives and parsley, and lastly the jamon, along with a tiny splash more of Fino. 7 Serve in a shallow bowl or deep rimmed plate, with the fish sitting on top.

Lido, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 933 9530; lidobristol.com


S T A R T E R S

Openings etc

HOW DO YOU BREW? Pro barista Alex Zeal, and top baker Bethen Reid (who makes cakes for the likes of Boston Tea Party and The Vintage Birdcage Cakery), have joined forces to open a café in Bristol. Located in the Grade II* listed Royal West of England Academy, The Epiphany is open from 10am (11am on Sundays), serving not only great brews and cakes (think tarte aux cerises, Madeleines and friands) but also fresh, seasonal dishes such as frittatas, sarnies, salads and tarts, all made with local ingredients. A carefully chosen list of wines and craft beers are also on offer, and every Sunday an ingredient from one of the pair’s producer friends will be showcased on the menu. theepiphanyrwa.com

HOT CHOCOLATE A new chocolate-themed café has appeared in Bristol, in the form of Mrs Pott’s Chocolate House. The Park Street venue was launched in September by Michael and Jennifer Potts, who hail from Australia – where chocolate bars like this are super popular. This Bristolian version, though, sees the couple working with local suppliers such as Guilberts Chocolatiers and Wogan Coffee. The venue has a large marble counter at its centre, where you’ll find pots of silky melted chocolate, ready for customers to dive into. (Not literally, you understand – we couldn’t possibly condone such behaviour…) Expect various takes on the traditional hot chocolate, as well as regular teas and coffees, and desserts along the lines of soft-set chocolate pots, chocolate tarts and an Eaton mess drizzled in (yes, you guessed it) chocolate. mrspottschocolatehouse.co.uk

RETURN OF THE MAC The Urban Standard on Gloucester Road has launched a brand new mac ’n’ cheese night. Each Wednesday now sees a dedicated menu on the go, packed with variations on this classic comfort food. Think ‘beef and blue’, chimichurri sweet potato and shrimp, and even a mac ’n’ cheese burger. Yup, really. It’s head chef Jasper Prickett who’s come up with these new dishes, which will hopefully become as popular as The Urban Standard’s staple ‘dirty mac ’n’ cheese’, which has been going down well with punters since the indie bar opened in 2014. theurbanstandard.co.uk

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new kid On the bLOCk

MEET MÁTÉ ANDRÁSKÓ, HEAD CHEF AT THE NEW CORKAGE ON CHAPEL ROW

DELA-CIOUS A brand new Easton venue, specialising in social, communal eating, has just opened. A joint venture between local food professionals Lara Lindsay and Mike Orme, Dela has been a couple of years in the making, with the pair having hosted several sell-out supper clubs at Hart’s Bakery during that time. The new Scandinavianstyle café, bar, restaurant and event space is focused on seasonality and provenance, and serves food and drink right through the day until late in the evening. Meaning ‘share’ in Swedish, Dela dishes up sharing plates such as Danish sourdough pancakes with various toppings (pickled mushroom, ceviche, and pig cheek ragu, for instance), as well as brunches, take outs, and lunch specials. Located in an industrial Victorian building, the restaurant now has a bright and airy look, in keeping with its Scandi theme. delabristol.com

ShOP RIGhT ThERE!

Bath now has its very own branch of Nisbets. Founded back in 1983 as a catalogue biz, the retailer, which specialises in catering equipment, has been busy opening up more bricks-and-mortar shops of late, including the central Bristol branch which opened two years ago. Aimed at both home cooks and professional chefs, this new store stocks around 2,500 products, including items from brands such as KitchenAid and Samsung. Find it in the Grade II listed former Labour Exchange building, on James Street West. nisbets.co.uk

What first inspired you to cook professionally, Máté? At school I imagined I would follow in my parents’ footsteps and study law. However, I later realised academic study wasn’t for me and going to catering college was an obvious choice, given my interest in all things food. What was your very first job in the industry, then?  An apprenticeship which I carried out as part of my college training in a restaurant called Remiz, in Budapest. I spent most of my two years there peeling potatoes and washing lettuce. What’s the toughest job you’ve tackled so far? Working as sous chef at The Fox in Broughton Gifford. On my first shift the owner informed me that the head chef walked out the day before, and I had to take charge until he found someone! I ended up staying there for almost two years, and got promoted to head chef shortly after I started. Proudest career achievement? Securing my current position; I’m honoured that Richard and Marty trust me with the food at their new venture. Where else might we know you from?  As well as The Fox in Broughton Gifford, I’ve worked at Beaujolais, and most recently The Circus restaurant. What attracted you to Corkage, then?  Having worked with Richard previously, I knew we could work well together. At our first meeting we just clicked and I knew that I could cook the food I love here. How have you approached the menu? It’s similar to Walcot Street, but because our kitchen is much larger we can make the food a bit more complex, have a few more dishes on the menu, and make all our puds in-house, as well.

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How would you describe your personal style of cooking? Simple and ingredient-driven. I feel most comfortable cooking with European, Mediterranean, and Middle Eastern flavours and ingredients. What are your favourite ingredients to work with at the moment? Chard, crown prince squash, beetroot, and, of course, the magnificent grouse. Which piece of kitchen equipment couldn’t you live without? It has to be my trusty paring knife. I’ve had it for over ten years now, and it has to be the most used knife in my collection. Which other local restaurants do you like to eat in? Since our daughter was born we don’t get to eat out as much as we’d like to, but I enjoyed the tapas in the recently opened Pintxo in Bath, and The Circus is always a good choice. What and where was the best meal you’ve eaten? As always, it’s not just about the food, but the time and the place and the people you had it with. For me it was the dinner I had with my wife on my 30th birthday at Moro restaurant, in London. Favourite cookery book? Tough one; can I do top three? Nose to Tail Eating by Fergus Henderson, Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi, and The French Laundry by Thomas Keller. Foodie heroes? Sam and Sam Clark of Moro, Fergus Henderson of St John and also the late Keith Floyd. Current favourite flavour combination? Squash, charred corn, feta, oregano. corkagebath.com


S T A R T E R S

BUTTER YOU UP

BLOCK PARTY Bath has bagged itself a new steak restaurant in the form of Bar + Block Steakhouse. This is the group’s fourth restaurant, and will be serving the same top-quality, dry-aged South American beef as its siblings. From classic cuts to more unfamiliar offerings, smoked rib to burgers, the kitchen team cook up cow in many guises, through breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner. To celebrate its launch, the restaurant is promising 50 percent off customers’ total food bill in its first week of trading, from 28 September to 5 October. barandblock.co.uk

The Mercure Bristol Brigstow Hotel’s new restaurant (which is from the same team as Absurd Bird) has officially launched, and is now knocking up a range of laid-back dishes from morning until evening, seven days a week. Buttermilk & Maple is inspired, we’re told, by chilled out Aussie cafés and urban New York nighttime hangouts, and has a long, well-stocked bar, with a mix of tall bar-style and comfy bench seating for diners. The all-day menu lists dishes ranging from salted caramel French toast and harissa eggs to lobster mac ’n’ cheese, truffle chicken and spaghetti and meatballs. To drink, meanwhile, you’ll find an extensive range of premium spirits and wines, as well as some crafts beer from local brewery Lost and Grounded. buttermilkandmaple.com

COLLECTOR’S ITEM

A new restaurant from The Ivy Collection opens in Bath this month. The Ivy Bath Brasserie follows the launch of its Bristol sibling just over year ago (which is, incidentally, celebrating its first anniversary with a limited edition afternoon tea experience, available until November). Occupying the former NatWest bank on Milsom Street, it’ll serve the same wide selection of classic British dishes: think shepherd’s pie, eggs Benedict and that chocolate bomb, with salted caramel sauce. It’s open to the public as of 11 October, and there are plans to extend it upwards into the first floor next year. theivybathbrasserie.com

CRUMBS AWARDS: THE CHOSEN ONES! SO, THE WINNERS of the first ever Crumbs Awards have officially been chosen by our panel of independent pros, and by the time you have this here mag in your mitts, we will have announced them to the world, an’ all. The people and business who are now in possession of those coveted trophies are some of the most unique, positive, successful and ethically responsible on our patch, and we hope that by gathering the whole industry together to hear their stories and celebrate them – and all of our impressive finalists – we can help keep our awesome food scene moving forward and developing for the better. For the full list of winners, visit the website below, and check out our next issue to learn all their stories and get the inside goss from the epic awards ceremony at the iconic Bristol Old Vic! crumbsmagawards.com

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S T A R T E R S

AsK the Waiter MEET KIERAN MANNING, GENERAL MANAGER AT KOH THAI TAPAS IN BRISTOL How long have you worked here then, Kieran? One year – I came in as a trainee assistant manager originally.

team is quite a difficult process, but being able to train and fine tune them is both fun and very important.  

And where did you work before? I have worked in nightclubs, bars, gastropubs, airport restaurants and fine dining venues: a complete mix!

What are the bestselling dishes at the moment? People go crazy over the 24-hour ribs, Koh’s chicken satay and the dim sum.

How long have you been in the hospitality game for? Around three or four years now.

What are the bestselling drinks? Our in-house gin cocktails are flying out: strawberry and cracked black pepper mixed with Bombay Sapphire and Fever-Tree tonic, or cucumber and Thai basil with Hendrick’s Gin topped with FeverTree Mediterranean tonic.

What do you like most about working in the industry? I really enjoy the socialising that comes with the job. Also, it’s nice to see customers happy with their experience, as I know I have achieved my aim. I also enjoy learning new skills and challenging myself to impress customers with things such as cocktails. What’s the best thing about your current job? The people who I work with are some of the most down to earth I’ve met – from the front of house staff to the head office team. It makes everything much easier when you are able to talk to people in a close, friendly and professional manner, rather than by an email from an unknown boss! And the most challenging part? Keeping up with the market. Social media, technology and ever-changing eating habits make staying ahead of the game pretty difficult. What kind of relationship do front of house staff have with the kitchen team?  We are very lucky as both our kitchen and front of house teams are very good communicators. We sometimes notice a bit of a language barrier with our Thai chefs, but it is good experience for the staff to build sound communication skills for their futures. And how about you; what skills have you learnt since coming here? How to build a team of people who all get on well and enjoy what they do. Creating a strong

What makes the restaurant a special place to visit? The atmosphere and service you receive. At the start of the night, the music is a little slower and quieter – which is great for families – and then throughout the night the music comes on a little louder, the lights are dimmed and people relax and enjoy themselves. Perfect for Friday and Saturday socials! If you were a customer today, what would you order? The tamarind duck is the winner for me. Duck served with sweet tamarind sauce washed down with our Summer Dazed cocktail is a no-brainer. What do you think makes great customer service? Understanding that each customer is different. Trying to get people to try some food they may not have tried before and catering to their needs is so important, too. Where have you visited locally where the customer service was excellent? Pieminister in Stokes Croft has a wonderful manager who really stood out for going above and beyond. I wanted to ask her to come join our team, as she really impressed me! koh-thai.co.uk

DROP IT LIKE IT’S hOT

Farmdrop has landed in Bath and Bristol. This grocery delivery service lets customers order food direct from producers (there are currently 170 available for our patch, within a 100-mile radius), ensuring a suitable price not just for them, but for the farmers, too. Local brands such as The Story Organic, The Severn Project, Hobbs House and Grow Bristol are all on the books, and Farmdrop will deliver their goods for free by electric van. Aiming to get produce from farm to your fridge in under a day, Farmdrop seeks to aid food miles, wastage, and unfair deals for producers – you’ll no doubt be seeing it’s ‘vanimals’ around town. (Fancy £25 off your first shop of over £50? Enter discount code CRUMBSMAG at the checkout!) farmdrop.com

BRAND NEW BOOZER Spotted the new pub on St Michael’s Hill in Bristol? Inside, The Cotham Arms blends classic pub style with modern and industrial touches, with exposed light bulbs hanging from the ceiling and artwork on the walls. To drink is a selection of locally made ciders and beers, as well as Bristol gins – including Psychopomp, which is made at the microdistillery just a few doors down. These are available alongside a casual food menu of meat and cheese sharing boards, and sandwiches such as salt beef and brie, plus comforting cheese toasties. thecothamarmsbristol.co.uk

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S T A R T E R S

the

instA FEED

Hip shOps

ROBERT WELCH

@kymgrimshaw

has a sneaky preview of the @greatbathfeast

@charlie_editor

gets her lobster mac ’n’ cheese on

@emmadance1980

has a craving for cake...

Want to see your photo here next month? Tag your Insta pics with #CrumbsSnaps, and you just might...

make them as strong as possible while offering WE FEEL LIKE some party poppers are in great precision, too. order for this Bath-based kitchenware shop, as “Until you invest in a really sharp knife you it’s celebrating its fifth birthday this month. Its sibling, the original Chipping Campden shop, is don’t know what you’re missing,” Alice comments. “Not only is it safer to use a sharp quite a bit older, however, having been opened blade, but the benefits when it comes to almost 50 years ago by designer Robert Welch preparing food are many. You can slice with a himself. Although the brand has become high level of precision, and there’s less danger a famous for its knives (which we’ve heard pro blade will slip. Choosing a knife that has been chefs bigging up in the past) and cutlery, the designed to fit your hand ensures that it is kitchen range now includes everything from comfortable to use for long periods of time, too.” barware to cookware, too – and you’ll find most We all know that a good set of of it in this Bath shop. (Anything knives, while a worthy investment, that’s not stocked here, though, the What: Kitchenware can be a costly one, too. So, which team can order for you.) Where: 6 Broad knife would Alice recommend as a “Our recently launched Drift Street, Bath great all-rounder if a whole set is a barware has been really popular in BA1 5LJ; bit out of budget? Bath,” comments Alice Welch, who 01225 336530 “Our Signature cook’s knife would took over the business from her When: Mon-Sat be my choice; it’s really versatile, father, alongside her brother, Rupert. 9.30am-5.30pm; with a curved blade that’s perfect for “The collection includes a wine Sun 11am-5pm the rocking motion used when coaster, wine cooler and a drinks tray chopping; it’s great for all sorts of food prep.” – it’s chosen a lot for wedding gifts.” These range between £40 and £64, Of course, though, it’s the cutlery that gets taken home by customers the most, Alice tells us. depending on size. A pretty sound investment really, seeing as these knives are built to last, And that’s thanks, in part, to the ergonomic and even come with a 25-year guarantee. So, if aspects of its design. “We’ve been creating we want our investment to last the distance, cutlery ranges since 1955, and we’re known for what advice does Alice have for us? our product knowledge – you actually have to “Always use a wooden or plastic chopping take a lot into consideration when choosing board – this will protect the blade and keep it cutlery for your home or restaurant.” And the same attention to detail is true of the sharper for longer. Signature knives are dishwasher safe, but we advise customers to cooking knives – which were in development handwash them to keep them in tip-top for a long time before the ideal, investmentcondition. And, of course, hone them regularly.” worthy result was finally achieved. “Our team Hankering for some new tools now? Visit this worked on the design for two years, making month, as the shop is celebrating its birthday over 200 prototypes,” Alice says. with lucky dip prizes for customers... The resulting knives blend German stainless steel with a Japanese-style cutting edge, to robertwelch.com

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EXCEPTIONAL EVENTS fostersevents.co.uk


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In the Larder 5 3

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1 2

best Of bRitish

WE’VE GONE QUINTESSENTIALLY BRITISH THIS MONTH, ENJOYING THE CLASSIC FLAVOURS OF THIS FINE ISLE…  1 HIP TO BE SQUARE  Wiper and True Yorkshire Square, from £3.19/500ml  This experimental beer from one of Bristol’s finest craft brewers is all about using native ingredients. British hops, malt and yeast all go into the pale ale, which takes its name from the traditional strain of yeast that it’s made with. Having been brewed in a Saisonstyle fashion, this new, easydrinking release is refreshingly light and fruity, with a hint of sweetness and spice – and we can’t get enough of it. Available at Independent Spirit of Bath, and Corks and Grape & Grind, both in Bristol. wiperandtrue.com  2 TO A TEA  T2 Caramel Swirl Tea, £16/150g  Bevvies surely don’t get much more British than tea, right? Lately though, alternatives to the traditional builders’ are getting more and more

popular. This black loose leaf drink contains actual caramel pieces and cocoa nibs, giving it hints of fudge and a rich creaminess. It makes a great cup of something warm to hunker down with this autumn, and will certainly see your sweet tooth right. Find it at T2 in Bath, as well as online. t2tea.com 

press. Fresh-tasting as opposed to sweet and sugary, this apple juice has nothing added to alter the flavour – ’cause you just can’t improve on pure fruit, right? Available at all good local independent retailers, including Roscoff Deli in Bath, and The Mall Deli in Bristol.   bradleysjuice.co.uk 

3 THEM APPLES Bradley’s Juice Cloudy Apple Juice, from £1.50/250ml  This juice company is based on a Somerset farm, and makes all kinds of refreshing sips from natural ingredients. Its apple juice is perhaps what it’s best known for though, and is made with the fruit from their own orchards, along with locally picked additions. Now is right about the time that these apples will be harvested, and this year they’re being juiced by a brand new British-made

4 CHIP ON YOUR SHOULDER Burts Chips Fish ’n’ Chip Crisps, £79p/40g  This South West-based crisp maker has teamed up with celebrated seafood restaurant Rockfish to come up with this limited edition flavour. Carefully sourced, authentic ingredients are used to make these moreish potato snacks, which are handcooked in small batches, and sliced thickly for extra crunch. Grab a packet and see how it reps the traditional fish and chip supper in its flavour, finished

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off with a whisper of vinegar and fresh lemon. Available in independent retailers throughout the South West, while stocks last.    burtschips.com    5 CONE HEAD  Choc on Choc Chocolate  Mr Whippy, £18 for 2   This solid block of choc, disguised as a classic 99 ice cream cone, is made by a familyrun chocolatier biz in Frome. The top features creamy white chocolate, studded with sweet fudge, while the cone is made from top-quality Belgian milk choc. Like the rest of the range, this is made by building up layers of chocolate (hence the company’s name, duh) to create life-like designs. This might not melt as quickly as a real Mr Whippy, but it doesn’t mean it’ll hang around for much longer… Available online.   choconchoc.co.uk 


4 Edgar Buildings, George St, Bath, BA1 2EE Tel: 01225 466667 Email: drinks@sub13.net www.sub13.net /sub13bar

@sub13bar


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Six Pack

M E ATH E A DS HERE ARE SIX LOCAL BUTCHER SHOPS WHERE YOU CAN GRAB YOURSELF A QUALITY CUT OF MEAT, AND BE SURE ABOUT THE ETHICS THAT HELPED PRODUCE IT...

#1 Puxton Butchers 1

Father and son Derek and Alistair Mead founded their adventure park in 2007, and were keen to include a butchery as part of the business. Now part of Puxton Farm Shop, the butchers sell pork and lamb from Puxton Park’s very own farm, within which the animals can roam as they please. Beef, meanwhile, comes from a local meat market, owned by the same family. This means that food miles are kept to a minimum, which is great for two reasons: the animals don’t have the potential stress of travelling, and

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consumers can rest assured they’re keeping their carbon footprint under control. Not only can you pick up your meat at this joint (ahem), but you can also learn the basics of butchery from the head butcher. Just £30 will get you pro knowlege and a pair of 8oz rump steaks to take home. That’s a juicy deal if ever we heard one. puxton.co.uk

#2 Hartley Farm A working livestock farm, Hartley opened its butchers and farm shop about a decade ago, to allow customers to buy produce direct from the farm itself. Located in the village of Winsley, just outside of Bath, these guys also work with a select few other farms in Box, Devizes, Radstock and Winsley itself. The animals these guys use have plenty of space to roam around and play in, meaning they burn energy and develop more slowly. This, owner and fifth generation farmer Tom Bowles tells us, means that more fat is laid down between the muscle fibres (think of that the all-important marbling in a great steak), so the meat becomes much more developed and flavoursome. Being a whole carcass butchers, these guys can get just about


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3 anything their customers are after, and take special orders for many of them. They also work with the ethically-minded Three Bags Full delivery service, so much of their top-drawer meat can be delivered to your door in Bath free of charge, by electric bike. hartley-farm.co.uk

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#3 Walter Rose & Son While still a traditional butchers, offering hand-made products and personal service, this family-run Devises outfit is a modern, forward-thinking one, which makes a point of changing with the times. It buys its meat direct from farms in order to maintain total transparency of provenance and welfare standards, and to keep prices fair. They can also deliver to your door (a service that’s totally free for local postcodes) and are keen to help customers on a budget get the best value and quality possible. They do this by championing affordable and often lesserloved cuts, and offering advice on how to cook them. There’s loads you can learn from the team here, and not just while buying your meat; they teach butchery classes, too. Here you will not only learn knife skills and get hands-on experience, but also find out about how the animals are reared and slaughtered. This multi-award winning butchers is popular with top local chefs, as well as big-name national pros in the food industry – and little wonder, too. walterroseandson.co.uk

#4 Molesworths of Henleaze The Molesworth story started in 2001, with the purchase of a large traditional retail butchers in Newport. They were all about the Gower salt marsh lamb, wild boar, venison, and free-range chicken from Newent. It was in 2009 that the team moved onto our patch in Briz, and rebranded to become the butchers we know today. Last year saw them open a second branch in Frampton Cotterell, too. They’ve kept many of their trusted Welsh suppliers, and focus on outdoor-reared, free-

5 range meats. You’ll also find local game here, too – a range that the team champions as perhaps under-loved but affordable meat, especially when it’s in plentiful supply in the right seasons. They also recommend offal for great value, and mutton – have a chat while you’re there about the best ways to cook it. Splashing out? Treat yourself to their salt marsh leg of lamb. henleazebutchers.co.uk

#5 Ruby & White Owner Adam Denton teamed up with pro butcher Dave Kelly to open this Whiteladies Road shop back in 2011. He wanted it to not only be somewhere that could supply Cowshed – his steak restaurant next door – but also the local community, allowing residents to cook the same great quality meat at home that the chefs were using in the restaurant. Said meat is West Country-reared, and comes from farms in Gloucestershire, Devon and Somerset. The team have solid relationships with each farmer, and share a common interest in the animals’ quality of life, which means they can be confident in terms of their welfare and ethical standards. Rearing the animals on additive-free feed, allowing them to grow slowly at a natural rate, and keeping them calm and stress-free means the resulting meat is going to be of the best possible quality, these guys say, and carry a far deeper flavour. The team are friendly and

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6 personable here; Ruby & White was always intended to be a relaxed and unintimidating environment to shop in – so feel free to chat to the staff and find out what cuts are great right now. rubyandwhite.com

#6 Larkhall Butchers Owner Peter Milton actually started work at Larkhall as a Saturday boy, in charge of scrubbing the floors and blocks for the butchers. Having risen through the ranks, he eventually bought the business two years ago, and has since been working to keep developing and improving its practices. For instance, the team have been forming strong relationships with local farms, as opposed to going to an abattoir for their meat. This not only helps to support these small, neighbouring producers and get the right price for both the farmer and the customer, but also means they have access to in-depth information on rearing methods and provenance. These guys are seeing the demand for organic meat steadily increase, and go to Whaddon Grove Farm, Stream Farm and Ivy House for everything from beef to chicken and even milk. Local charity Jamie’s Farm is another important supplier for these guys, who not only love their cause but the quality of their produce, too. larkhallbutchers.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

Ask the Expert

What the baRista knOws...

BATH-BASED COFFEE PRO MAXWELL COLONNA-DASHWOOD IS NOT ONLY A CHAMPION BARISTA, COFFEE-POD PRODUCER, AND OWNER OF COLONNA AND SMALL’S (WHERE YOU’LL FIND SOME OF THE BEST COFFEE ON OUR PATCH), BUT HE’S JUST RELEASED A BOOK ABOUT THE STUFF TOO. SO, HE’S JUST THE GUY TO QUIZ ABOUT OUR FAVOURITE BUZZINDUCING BREW...

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Maxwell, we have a lot of coffee-related questions, so need to know you’re the right guy to ask ’em; tell us about your experience in the trade. I actually had very little interest in coffee until a lifechanging shot of espresso in Melbourne, Australia. I decided there and then I wanted to pursue coffee. My wife and I were recently married, and had working visas in Melbourne. We were shocked how culinary coffee could be, and how complex and characterful it could be too. We spent the year soaking up coffee, working in different cafés and training with barista champions. We then headed back to the UK, started an events company and then a shop in Bath. I started taking part in Barista competitions and won the UK championships three times, and also made all three world finals. This opened up all sorts of opportunities. We worked with different coffee professionals across the industry and teamed up with scientists on academic papers, seeking to solve some of coffee’s mysteries. Coffee has never been more exciting and interesting, and we continue to learn and be enthralled by this amazing drink. Now we’ve established you’re up to the job, let’s get down to the nitty gritty: what exactly is a coffee bean? It’s actually a seed. Two of them grow at the centre of a fruit that we call a coffee cherry (due to its physical resemblance to a cherry). Every now and then, though, you only get one seed growing in the cherry; this type of coffee bean is called a peaberry, and they are often sorted to one side to be sold and brewed on their own.  And how many varieties of bean are there? Oh, wow. Well, there are hundreds of species, but only a couple are of real interest. Arabica is the species responsible for all of the world’s high-grade coffee, but there is plenty of low-grade Arabica also. Then, within Arabica, there are hundreds of different varieties that get grown around the world regularly. Some common varieties are Bourbon and Caturra, and it’s also possible to make hybrids. Does the country and climate a bean is grown in affect its flavour profile? Hugely. The same variety grown in one country can taste completely different in another country: just taste the Bourbon variety grown in El Salvador versus Rwanda. Go on then, tell us how. It’s a really complex web of factors; separating them out is almost impossible. The soil has a huge impact; phosphoric acid, for example, can only come from the soil. The climate and altitude have a huge impact also, and then there are the different approaches to harvesting that you get around the world. The variety has a huge impact, as PHOTO well; a variety that tastes in one environment S M AT T AUS T Igreat N may not fare so well in another. We know a lot about where coffee’s favour comes from, but there is much more to explore to really isolate the different impacts. It’s fascinating and exciting.

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Which countries do they grow in, and why can’t we produce them in the UK? There are many different countries, although they all sit between the tropics – coffee fairs well at high altitude and doesn’t like cold temperatures. It’s grown extensively throughout central and South America, with Brazil being the world’s largest producer. Coffee, however, is not indigenous to the Americas, having originated from the east coast of Africa. It’s also grown in some surprising places, such as north east Australia, as well as Yunnan in China. How does this plant seed get turned into the bean that we grind up and brew with? The seeds are dried to 12 percent moisture and packed into big sacks. It’s best hermetically sealed (so it’s airtight), like with vacuum packing (at this point the coffee is a light green-yellow colour). Then it’s shipped around the world on container ships to roasters, who cook the coffee in what is essentially a big hot drum with airflow. This takes somewhere between seven and 15 minutes, depending on the style and approach. The coffee is then packed: oneway valve bags (which keep oxygen out) are better for freshness, and nitrogen-flushed is better again. As much as we love coffee for its taste, we admit we drink it for the caffeine sometimes; what is caffeine, and why does it help us feel awake? It’s the world’s most widely consumed psychoactive drug, and is a central nervous system stimulant. Woah. Why is it present in plants, then? It plays the role of an insecticide, providing a natural defense mechanism for the plant.   And how is it eliminated to make decaf coffee? There are many different processes, such as Swiss water decaf or solvent decaf and so on, but all the methods use the same principle of utilising a substance that can isolate and attach to the caffeine. It’s very hard to put coffee through this process without altering the overall physical properties of it, and therefore its flavour – although caffeine itself has almost no flavour.  Let’s talk cold brew; how is it made, and how does it differ from regular coffee (aside from temperature, obvs)? Cold brew is simple in principle: it’s coffee made with cold water. Without the heat to help extract the coffee, time is used instead, so brews can take between four and 24 hours. This doesn’t generate the same result though, as extraction is different, and certain flavours only extract at certain temperatures. Cold brew is smooth and less acidic, which wins many fans – especially when the coffee is not exceptional to start with. But acidity is paramount to the value and quality of great speciality coffee, so in speciality coffee cold brew is not seen as a way to really showcase character and provenance, but a nice way to prepare an interesting cold drink.  The best before dates of roasted beans don’t give us very long to use ’em; why does coffee’s quality deteriorate over time? The beans don’t actually need to be freshly roasted; really, we are

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after the optimal point, post-roast. Coffee really fresh out the roaster is a little harsh and lacks complexity. It then opens up and balances out before eventually losing flavour. There are different opinions, but light roast coffee in a one-way valve bag is often optimal between 10 and 30 days. Nitrogen-flushed containers, meanwhile, can keep coffee for a long time. It’s fair to say that as soon as coffee is opened to the air it perishes pretty quickly, and more so if it’s ground. Heat, light and oxygen are all enemies in terms of shelf life. What is it that gives coffee that bitter taste? There are multiple bitter compounds in coffee, and a reasonable bitterness actually adds complexity. Increased bitterness, though, can be down to defects in the coffee: bad roasting or bad making. Take the water you use, for example; a hard water will increase perceived bitterness in coffee.  What about milk; should we be having it in our brews or not? Milk is a huge part of coffee culture. It’s interesting to note, though, that when coffee is graded and roasts are developed, the coffee is nearly always tasted black, to highlight as much of its character as possible. While it’s true that milk is a great accompaniment to coffee, there are certain coffees and styles that won’t fare well

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with milk, such as delicate, fruity filter coffee, which may well become slightly sour and flat with milk. A complex espresso tends to be excellent with steamed milk – such as a flat white. Right, let’s get practical: how many ways are there to brew coffee, and how do they affect the end result? There are so many ways. This is part of what people love about coffee – it’s a rich tapestry. The truth is that it’s really just about dissolving coffee into water. But it’s amazing how slight variations in the way this is done can affect the end cup. Espresso machines brew under high pressure, which helps to create an intense and highly complex coffee – but it’s notoriously hard to do and requires quite a bit of investment in equipment. Then there’s a dizzying array of filter methods, such as a syphon that looks like a science experiment, or a clever dripper and so on. For in-between-strength brews, there’s the Aeropress, which is like a syringe, or the moka pot that sits on the stove. Pfft; how are we supposed to choose a method to use at home from so many options? Really, you are making a choice about what kind of strength you would like to achieve, and how much clarity of body you would like. Paper methods hold back nearly all sediment for a crisp cup, and methods like French press and moka pot allow more sediment into the cup creating a coffee with more body. But, really, the key is about understanding each method and how to get the best out of them – for instance, some need short brewing times, others need long times and so on. What do you think is the most common mistake people make when brewing a cuppa at home? Not understanding the fundamentals. You need great coffee

that’s freshly ground, weighed out and brewed with good water – coffee doesn’t like water that’s too hard. Combine this with a proper understanding of the method of choice, and a good cup is achievable. The problem is that coffee is both simple and complex, and this is why we have barista championships and a world of coffee obsession. Extraction is fundamental to a good cup of coffee. Extract too much and it’s flat and woody and bitter, while if you don’t extract enough it’s sour and thin. Coffee is not like wine in that a bottle can just be opened; it needs to be carefully prepared, and a reasonable understanding is needed to get a good result. This is why technology such as capsules and automatic machines are taking hold to help consumers out with the difficulty of making coffee. Oh, and keep everything clean; it sounds obvious, but some machines hold rancid coffee residue easily and it ruins the drink.

COFFEE: A HISTORY

This drink has an amazing history, and many link the emergence of coffee and coffee houses to cultural, social and political change. There are loose myths about coffee consumption back as far as the 10th century, with the most widely shared story being the discovery of coffee by Kaldi the goat herder, who thought his goats’ increased energy could be linked to the cherries they were eating. Coffee really spread throughout the Middle East in the 16th century, and from here through Europe and the rest of the world. Coffee houses started to stimulate conversation, trade and ideas, and are even linked to the European Enlightenment. 

The Coffee Dictionary by Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood is published by Mitchell Beazley, £15; octopusbooks.co.uk; illustrations by Tom Jay

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B O O K

O F

T H E

M O N T H

THERE’S DINNER PARTY INSPO APLENTY IN THE VOLUMES THAT MARK TAYLOR’S BEEN DEVOURING THIS MONTH…

DINNER & PARTY Rose Prince Seven Dials, £25

With so many cookbooks trying to reinvent the culinary wheel, how refreshing to find one that concentrates on practical and simple dishes for the family without relying on smoke and mirrors. There is nothing cutting edge or flashy about Rose Prince’s Dinner & Party, but then this award-winning food writer has been around for the past two decades and practicality and commonsense have always come before fads and trends. Prince’s sound stance on entertaining is that the cook shouldn’t be banished to the kitchen during a dinner party and the trick is to prepare as much as possible in advance. With a useful seasonal menu planner for guidance, the book is packed with classics (coq au vin, cassoulet, chocolate mousse) but also deliciously modern ideas like lemon risotto with rocket, and fishcakes with lemongrass and coriander.

CLAFOUTIS WITH PEARS   SERVES 6-8

The lightest baked creamy custard with soft fruit. I make clafoutis with pears, apricots, plums or figs but very rarely, although faithful to its origins, with cherries – because I am lazy about pitting (stoning) small fruit. Make the clafoutis an hour before serving. It only takes 20 minutes to prepare and can be made with slightly unripe fruit, which softens during cooking. INGREDIENTS

30g butter, for greasing 120g caster sugar, plus extra for dusting 100ml whole milk 150ml whipping cream ½ vanilla pod, seeds only (or ¼ tsp vanilla extract) 4 eggs 20g plain flour 500g perfectly ripe pears, cut lengthways into eighths

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METHOD

1 Preheat the oven to 190C/375F/gas mark 5. 2 Butter an ovenproof metal pan or ceramic dish and then dust it with caster sugar. Put the milk, cream and vanilla in a saucepan and heat to boiling point, then remove from the heat. 3 Put the eggs in a bowl with the sugar and whisk them together. Add the flour and whisk until smooth, then pour the milk mixture in slowly, whisking all the time. 4 Scatter the pears over the base of the pan – you can arrange them neatly in a circle, if you wish. Pour the batter around them, not over the top, and then put the pan in the oven and bake for 20-25 minutes until the custard has puffed and coloured gold in places. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 1 hour. Dust with caster sugar and serve. TIP You can also make it ‘boozy’, soaking the fruit in a tablespoon of corresponding liqueur – Poire Williams for the pears, plum brandy for plums, and so on.


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A N D I N A: T H E HEART OF PERUVIAN FOOD Martin Morales Quadrille, £27

The follow-up to Martin Morales’ debut, Ceviche, Andina explores the innovative dishes, ingredients and food culture of the relatively unknown Andes region of Peru, an area where so-called ‘superfoods’ like avocado and quinoa are essential in traditional dishes. Recipes from the key areas of La Libertad, Ayacucho, Cusco, Arequipa, Puno, Hauncayo and Cajamarca give a taste of the sheer variety and scope of the indigenous dishes. With sections including breakfasts, snacks, ceviche, salads, protein-packed stews, grills and roasts, soups, desserts, and drinks, Andina is a vibrant and tantalising glimpse into a cuisine full of fresh flavours and colours, with over 120 original recipes including pumpkin casserole; tuna, pickled pineapple and black quinoa ceviche; and confit figs with vanilla cream.

KAUKASIS: THE COOKBOOK Olia Hercules Mitchell Beazley, £25

Ukraine-born Olia Hercules won the Fortnum & Mason Debut Food Book Award 2016 for her groundbreaking debut book, Mamushka, and the former Ottolenghi chef is sure to pick up further accolades with this wonderful follow-up. A personal culinary journey through Georgia, Azerbaijan and beyond, this beautifully illustrated and evocative book features more than 100 recipes for earthy and, sometimes, surprising dishes from her travels. Each has a fascinating story attached, the author having met the home cooks of the Caucasus area bridging Europe and Asia. Divided into amusingly named chapters (among them ‘roots, shoots, leaves and all’ and ‘beasts from land, sea and air’), dishes worth bookmarking include cauliflower steak gratin; quince stuffed with lamb and caramelised shallots; and the decadent recipe for Armenian brandy profiteroles.

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SWEET

FEASTS

Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh Ebury Press, £27

Sabrina Ghayour Mitchell Beazley, £20

A new release from Yotam Ottolenghi is always cause for celebration, and his longawaited baking and desserts book is the one his legions of fans have been holding out for. They won’t be disappointed. A collaboration with Helen Goh, who has worked with Ottolenghi for the past ten years, this book features over 110 recipes for cakes, tarts, puddings, cheesecakes and ice cream. Lavishly illustrated with photographs by award-winning New York team Peden + Munk, this is a book that is sure to end up on as many coffee tables as kitchen counters. From blackberry and star anise friands and flourless chocolate layer cake to Middle Eastern Millionaire’s Shortbread and coconut, almond and blueberry cake, this is a classic book that truly hits the sweet spot.

Sabrina Ghayour has become one of the leading voices on Middle Eastern food thanks to her best-selling books Persiana and Sirocco. In her third book, Feasts, Ghayour shows how to create dishes for every occasion, from quick-fix weekday evenings to weekend feasts and large gatherings. With her usual emphasis on simple ingredients and punchy flavours, the book features tailored menus and dozens of recipes for celebrations. Among the highlights are lamb, plum and preserved lemon stew; smoked mackerel and quinoa salad with charred asparagus and cannellini beans; and white chocolate, cardamom and macadamia squares. Ghayour set the bar pretty high with her first two books, but Feasts happily surpasses them both when it comes to inspiration for home cooks.

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CHEF!

WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

Choose figs that are plump and ripe for Ottolenghi’s recipe, but make sure you use them quickly as they don’t stay good for long

H I G H L I G H T S

FLIPPING THE BIRD Change up your regular roast chicken for this spatchcock poussin, why don’t cha? Page 40

UP YOUR GAME

Venison is the hero of this earthy and autumnal plate Page 42

DUKE OF PORK

Sweet meets salty in this candied bacon recipe Page 45

GOOD EGG

P L U S !

Because we love a dish we can eat at any mealtime Page 46

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desserts to finish your feast on a (sugar) high

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c h e f !

dON’T COQ IT UP! TOM GREEN SHOWS US THAT WE’RE ALL ROASTING OUR CHICKENS WRONG...

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Find Le Petit Coq on Twitter @LePetitCoq1 and Instagram @le_petit_coq1

Tom, who’s been in Bristol since 2001, has worked with Michael Caines, was head chef at Riverstation, and helped launch popular local restaurant Rosemarino. Nowadays, though, he’s chef director of Bristol caterering biz Fosters Events, and has recently started a brand new venture, too. Le Petit Coq launched just this summer at the Bristol International Balloon Fiesta. This isn’t Tom’s first foray into street food, though; he was also behind The Quack Shack, specialising in a range of fun free-range Creedy Carver confit duck dishes, including paper bags of his addictive ‘quackling’. Tom is a massive fan of Bristol’s vibrant street food scene, and is excited about this new offering. Here, he tells us all about it. “Our ‘coqs’ are (ahem) rubbed with our special blend of spices, developed in conjunction with Bristol-based Bart Ingredients, before being roasted to perfection on René, our French rotisserie, and served with naked slaw, salsa, fries and chicken salt. “Le Petit Coq is a bit of light relief from the intense menu planning and execution of the high-profile events Fosters do day to day, and an opportunity to get face to face with the punters again. We’ve had several enquiries from couples wanting it at their weddings, and it’s a perfect fit for festivals and events such as the Bath Boules, too.” This recipe features spatchcocked – or butterflied – chicken. This basically involves taking out the backbone so the bird can be opened out and flattened. This means less cooking time. You can either do it yourself, following the instructions below, or get your butcher to do it for you when you buy the birds.

PETIT COQ, NAKED ’SLAW AND SWEETCORN SALSA SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 4 poussins For the marinade: 4 tsp rapeseed oil (we use Bath Harvest) 19g Bart Ingredients Chicken Seasoning 1 tsp sweet smoked paprika 1 tsp dried chilli flakes (adjust to taste) For the naked ’slaw: ½ small red onion, finely sliced ½ small red cabbage, finely shredded ½ small white cabbage, finely shredded 2 medium carrots, grated small handful flat leaf parsley, chopped small handful chives, chopped 1 tsp tarragon, chopped For the dressing: 1 tsp cider vinegar ¼ tsp Dijon mustard 1 ½ tbsp rapeseed oil For the sweetcorn salsa: 340g sweetcorn 200ml sweet chilli sauce 1 tbsp red onion, finely diced large handful coriander, chopped handful flat leaf parsley, chopped For the optional garnish: dried chipotle chillis blackened lemons

METHOD 1 To spatchcock the poussin, place the bird on a chopping board, under-side-up, and feel down the centre for the bone. Insert the point of a hefty, sharp knife on one side of it, and then bring it all the way down, cutting right down the side of the bone. Repeat on the other side before removing the bone and spreading the bird out flat. (Your butcher can do this for you if you prefer.) 2 To marinade, rub the rapeseed oil all over the birds. Place the remaining marinade ingredients in a bowl and mix thoroughly. Sprinkle approximately ⅔ of the marinade on the skin side of the birds and rub well. Turn the bird over and repeat the process with the remaining marinade on the meat side. Place each bird in a freezer bag and leave in the fridge to marinade for up to 2 days, but at least overnight. 3 Remove the birds from the fridge approximately 30 minutes prior to cooking, and preheat the oven to 210C/425F/gas mark 7, or if you have a rotisserie, heat it to low. 4 Season the birds generously with Maldon sea salt. Then, if using a conventional oven, place the birds, skin side up, on a baking tray and roast for approximately 20-25 minutes, until the skin is crispy and the juices run clear. If using a rotisserie, skewer the poussin and cook on low for approximately 25-35 minutes. 5 For the ’slaw, place the red onion in a bowl of iced water, rub gently and leave whilst you make the dressing. 6 Pour the cider vinegar and Dijon mustard into a bowl. Season with salt and pepper and mix thoroughly. Slowly drizzle the oil into the bowl, stirring continuously. 7 Drain, rinse and dry the red onion on a paper towel. Place the onion and the remaining ’slaw ingredients in the bowl with the dressing and toss well. 8 For the sweetcorn salsa, simply mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl and season with freshly ground black pepper. 9 Serve the ‘coqs’ on a large dish, garnished with dried chipotle chillis and blackened lemon. Place in the middle of the table and tuck in! We serve with French fries or roast potatoes.

a Grape matCh! Souson Ailala Ribeiro do Avia 2015 £13.95, Great Western Wine This must be the recipe with the most innuendo potential I’ve ever seen; hot, spiced up, with a riot of explosive flavours. It calls for a ripe, juicy, vibrant red with minimal tannins, and a fresh, sassy character. Try this little known Spanish number, which brims over with bright, fruity, red berry character, yet has a velvety softness that’ll cope with the highly seasoned flavours of this bold dish.

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GOOd GAME CHRISTOPHER CLEGHORN GETS ALL AUTUMNAL WITH THIS VENISON AND PEAR DISH...

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Chris is head chef at The Queensberry Hotel’s three-AA-rosette Olive Tree Restaurant. His novel and refined dishes have seen the restaurant become one of the most established staples on Bath’s eating out scene. Chris’ menus are informed by the West Country’s heaving larder, and this dish is a great example of how he puts its ingredients to great use. It’s ideal for this time of year, and pairs up some of this season’s best produce.

WILTSHIRE VENISON WITH CELERIAC, PEAR AND HAZELNUT SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 2 ripe Williams pears 1 large celeriac 400ml milk 100g Brussels sprouts 100ml blended rapeseed oil 450g venison loin (ask you butcher to trim and remove any sinew) 50g butter 100g hazelnuts, pealed and toasted For the poaching liquor: 1g whole all spice 2g pink peppercorns 1g whole cardamom 350ml red wine 200ml orange juice ½ orange, zested ½ lemon, zested 1 small bay leaf 1g juniper berries 75g caster sugar For the celeriac purée: 300ml semi-skimmed milk 30ml double cream

a Grape matCh! Carrick Unravelled Pinot Noir 2016 £15.95, Great Western Wine Intense and autumnal, and enhanced by the earthy flavours of celeriac, Chris’s rich game dish calls for Pinot Noir, but one that is bold and sumptuous. From the far south of New Zealand, this one delivers, with its perfumed, silky softness and plush raspberry and wild herb character bringing out the luxurious and indulgent flavours.

METHOD 1 For the poaching liquor, lightly toast the spices, then crush lightly in a pestle and mortar. Add them, along with the rest of the ingredients, to a pan. Bring to the boil, then remove from the heat and cover with cling film. Leave to infuse for 30 minutes. Then strain the liquor through a sieve, discarding the spices, and return to a simmer. 2 Peal the pears and place in the liquor. Poach gently for 10-15 minutes until just soft. Remove the pan from the heat and allow the pears to cool in the liquor. This can be done a day before for best flavour. 3 Next, peal the celeriac and cut the top and bottom off. Cut 4 rectangles (2cm x 6cm) out of the middle, reserving the offcuts. Poach in 400ml of milk, with a pinch of salt, until tender. 4 For the purée, thinly slice the remaining celeriac (about 300g), and add to a pan with the rest of the purée ingredients. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5-10 minutes until soft. Blend in a liquidizer till smooth. 5 Peal the sprouts, and discard the outer leaves. Then peal them apart, layer by layer, until you can’t remove any more petals. Set aside. 6 Preheat the oven to 190C/375F/gas mark 6. 7 In an ovenproof pan on the hob, heat a splash of blended rapeseed oil until nice and hot. Season the meat all over, then seal off each side until golden brown. Add the butter and transfer to the oven until the meat reaches a core temperate of 55C for medium-rare (use a probe thermometer to check). Once cooked, remove from the oven and rest on a wire rack for 10 minutes. 8 Gently toast the hazelnuts in a dry pan, and then place in a clean tea towel and lightly crush with a rolling pin. 9 Blanch the sprout leaves in salted boiling water for 15 seconds. 10 To serve, cut the pears into ¼ and remove the seeds. Place a spoonful of purée onto each plate, and top with a spoonful of hazelnuts. Add the poached celeriac, pear and sprouts, followed by the venison. Olive Tree, Queensberry Hotel, Russel Street, Bath BA1 2QF; 01225 446065; thequeensberry.co.uk

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BE RASheR-NAL! THIS SNACK BY SPUNTINO FOUNDER RUSSELL NORMAN IS SO DARN MOREISH IT SHOULD COME WITH A WARNING…

This is a preposterous snack that combines the unholy trinity of fat, salt and sugar in one hit, writes Russell. You really can’t get more sin into such a small package but, likewise, you probably don’t need telling how ridiculously tasty it is. Now, with that warning out of the way, it is only fair to further warn you that this recipe uses a blowtorch. I am aware that this is not a standard bit of kitchen kit, but they’re not too expensive these days and they’re so handy for a variety of tasks, not least for making that perfect crème brulée.

CANDIED BACON MAKES 12 SLICES

INGREDIENTS 12 slices smoked streaky bacon maple syrup caster sugar METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. 2 Lay a sheet of baking paper on a roasting tray and place the streaky bacon in regimented rows. Cover with another layer of baking paper and place a second roasting tray onto the top to create a press. 3 Roast for 15 minutes in the oven, then lower the temperature to 150C/300F/gas mark 2 and remove the upper tray and top layer of baking paper. Roast for another 15 minutes. 4 When the bacon looks evenly brown and crispy, remove from the oven and pat dry with kitchen paper. 5 Allow the rashers to cool for 10 minutes, brush them with maple syrup, and leave to dry for 15-20 minutes. Dust with caster sugar and, using a blowtorch, caramelize the sugar on top. Repeat for the reverse. 6 Let them cool again and serve the rigid rashers upright in a short glass tumbler. Spuntino, Cargo 2, Wapping Wharf, Bristol BS1 6ZA; 0117 376 3698; spuntino.co.uk; Spuntino by Russell Norman is out now (Bloomsbury, £26)

a Grape match!

Bella Luna Amontillado Sherry £6.95, Great Western Wine This snack must be the ultimate in decadence. With sherry rapidly becoming the darling of aperitifs, I’ve opted for a bold, tangy, nutty style, which will stand up to the powerful and intensely sweet and salty flavours. This sip is amber in colour, with a rich, toasted walnut flavour and a lingering salty tang which will cut through, but also enhance, the medley of tastes in this particular ‘spuntino’.

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BrUNChIN’ aBOVe OUr weIGhT THIS SHARING DISH BY MATTHEW SEATON IS A SPOT-ON WEEKEND BRUNCH FOR TWO…

You’ll probably know Tincan Coffee Co as that great little café on North Street in Southville – but it actually began life in 2011 as a travelling business, trading from an HY Citroen truck. After building up a fleet of vans, owners Adam White and Jessie Nicolson made the decision last year to launch their first ever bricks-and-mortar venue, which has since become known for its great coffee and brilliant brunches. Chef Matthew spent four years studying food and culture in Spain, and this really influences his menus at Tincan. “We use great suppliers with a similar ethos – good, unpretentious food, all made from scratch in our own kitchen,” he says. “We want to serve food for everyone, whether you’re vegan or gluten free, love your sugar or want to be healthy!” Wholesome brunches, sourdough toasties, freshly baked cakes and homemade doughnuts (on ‘Doughnut Fridays’) are all on offer, alongside the carefully chosen coffees, including a locally roasted, directly traded espresso blend.

a Grape match! Sipsmith Sipping Vodka £32, Great Western Wine For a lazy weekend brunch, the ultimate drink is a flavourpacked, hot and spicy Bloody Mary. Start with this Sipsmith vodka and add the very best tomato juice you can find. Mix with Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco, lemon juice, salt and pepper; the amount depends on the level of intensity you want. I like to add celery salt, and just a smidge of horseradish to spice it up even further. Pour over ice and serve with a celery stick.

HUEVOS RANCHEROS SERVES 2

INGREDIENTS 1 x 400g tin butterbeans 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes (best quality you can find) 1 tsp onion seeds 1 tsp chipotle paste 1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cumin 5 bay leaves 285ml water 2 free-range eggs 1 lemon, zest only handful of fresh coriander For the ash salsa: 1 white onion, chopped 2 jalapeños 1 poblano (a type of chilli) 2 tomatillos 2 roma tomatoes 8 garlic cloves small handful fresh coriander METHOD 1 For the ash salsa, throw everything apart from the garlic and coriander under a grill (or over open coals) until blackened. Then crush the garlic and chuck the whole lot into a blender with the coriander. Blitz and season. 2 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 3 Mix the remaining ingredients (apart from the eggs, lemon and coriander) in a roasting dish and bake for 30 minutes. 4 Whilst still warm, spoon the mixture into a heatproof bowl and make 2 separate wells. Crack the eggs into the wells and bake for 12 more minutes until the eggs are cooked but soft. Garnish with fresh coriander, lemon zest and the ash salsa.

Tincan Coffee Co, 234 North Street, Bristol BS3 1JD; 0117 963 3979; tincancoffee.co.uk

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A Christmas Party to remember at the Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel Celebrate your Christmas Party with friends or work colleagues at the Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel and enjoy an evening of sumptuous food and dancing. SILVER PARTY NIGHTS

Dates throughout December 2017

£29.95 per adult / Stay overnight from £145.00 per room

6.30pm Bar opens; 7pm Dinner; GOLD PARTY NIGHTS 12am Fri 17th & 24th; Sat 18th & 25th November 2017 Carriages Dates throughout December 2017 £40.00 per adult / Stay overnight from £145.00 per room Private parties catered for, minimum 70 guests Private events catered for, minimum 50 guests

For bookings or enquiries please contact 01225 476 892

M A C D O N A L D B AT H S PA H O T E L

Sydney Road, Bath BA2 6JF 01225 444 424  www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk


A cut above...

Fabulous new Ă la carte menu coming soon! 12-16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 01173 291300 Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB Tel: 01225 446656 Email: info@themintroom.co.uk www.themintroom.co.uk

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PIE hARd

JON SIMON AND TRISTAN HOGG TURN UP THE COMFORT FACTOR WITH THIS BLACKBERRY AND APPLE NUMBER... Brothers-in-law Jon and Tris began baking pies on Stokes Croft back in 2003, where they still work together above their original Pieminister restaurant. Still a popular food hangout, it’s a great place to try one of their legendary pies. The pair also now have a cosy café in St Nicholas Market, and a restaurant near the river on Broad Quay. This special sweet pie is from their book Pieminister: A Pie for All Seasons, and is making us want to hunker down and tuck into one, as this chilly autumn weather sets in…

BLACKBERRY AND APPLE PIE SERVES 6-8

INGREDIENTS 400g plain flour, plus extra for dusting pinch of salt 200g suet 120-150ml milk 50g unsalted butter 2 large Bramley apples, peeled, cored and cut into 10 wedges each 5 Cox’s apples, peeled, cored and cut into 8 wedges each 4 tbsp golden caster sugar 1 tsp mixed spice 150g blackberries 1 free range egg, lightly beaten ½ tsp ground cinnamon METHOD 1 For the pastry, put the flour and salt into a bowl and stir in the suet. Gradually stir in enough milk to make a fairly stiff dough – be sure to add it very slowly, or you might find the mixture has suddenly become saturated. If this does happen, mix in a little extra flour. 2 Turn the pastry out onto a lightly floured board and knead for a couple of minutes, until smooth – you can treat this pastry more firmly than ones made with butter. Wrap it in cling film and chill in the fridge for about 30 minutes before use. 3 For the filling, melt half the butter in a shallow pan over a medium heat. When the butter is hot and bubbling, add half the Bramley and Cox’s apples and cook until golden and almost tender, turning once to

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cook the other side. Combine 3 tbsp of the sugar with the mixed spice, and add half of this mix to the apples. Cook until the mixture starts to caramelize, then pour into a dish and cook the remaining apples in the same way with the rest of the butter and spiced sugar. When complete, put all the apples to one side and leave to cool. (The reason we don’t do all the apples at once is because it’s very difficult to get good, even caramelization if you overcrowd the pan.) 4 Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Roll out half the pastry onto a lightly floured surface to about 5mm thick. Line a shallow 26cm pie dish with the pastry, trimming off any excess around the edges using a sharp knife. Tip the cooled apples into the lined pie dish, and sprinkle with the blackberries. 5 Brush the edge of the pastry with the beaten egg. Roll out the other half of the pastry and lay it over the top of the pie. Trim the edges and crimp them together with your fingers. 6 Brush the top of the pie with beaten egg, and mix together the remaining 1 tbsp caster sugar with the cinnamon. Sprinkle this over generously, and make a couple of slashes in the top of the pastry. 7 Place the pie on a baking tray and then put it directly on the bottom of the oven (this really helps it to crisp up nicely). Cook for 55-60 minutes, until the pastry is golden brown and crisp. Serve with clotted cream, ice cream or custard. pieminister.co.uk

a Grape match!

Domaine de Barroubio 2015, Muscat de St Jean de Minervois 2015 £18.50, Great Western Wine The sweet, bright flavours of this pie need a gently sweet wine. Both fruits have high natural acidity so a soft, fragrant, more delicate style is what’s needed. This number has entrancing aromas of candied orange peel and honeysuckle; the palate picks up the liveliness of the fruit character with a sweet acacia honey flavour, mingled with a refreshing citrus finish.

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WhAT’S ThE FIG IdEA?

FOLLOWING THEIR RECENT VISIT TO BATH, YOTAM OTTOLENGHI AND HELEN GOH HAVE GIVEN US THIS IMPRESSIVE RECIPE FROM THEIR NEW BOOK, SWEET... This is a stunning dessert for a special occasion, write Yotam and Helen. It also has a nice element of surprise, as the meringue base is not quite what you might expect: gooey – almost toffee-like – rather than dry and crispy. This is due to the brown sugar in the mix. Combined with the praline cream and fresh figs, it’s absolutely delicious. Pavlova is the dessert to make when you have a bit of time and are feeding people you adore. The recipe calls for flaked almonds, but you can easily substitute those with chopped pistachios, as photographed.

CINNAMON PAVLOVA WITH PRALINE CREAM AND FRESH FIGS SERVES 10-12

Sweet, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh (Edbury Press, £27)

INGREDIENTS 20g flaked almonds 50g dark cooking chocolate (70% cocoa solids), finely chopped 600g fresh figs, cut into 1cm discs 3 tbsp honey For the meringue: 125g egg whites (from 3 large eggs) 125g caster sugar 100g dark muscovado sugar 1½ tsp ground cinnamon For the praline cream: 50g flaked almonds 80g caster sugar 2 tbsp water 200ml double cream 400g mascarpone

METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 170C/325F/gas mark 3. 2 Spread out all the almonds (for both the pavlova and the praline, 70g) on a baking tray and toast for 7-8 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from the oven, divide into two piles (20g for the pavlova, 50g for the praline) and set aside to cool. 3 Reduce the oven temperature to 120C/250F/gas mark ½. Cover a large baking tray with baking parchment and trace a circle, about 23cm in diameter, onto the paper. Turn the paper over so the drawn-on side is facing down but still visible. 4 First make the meringue. Pour enough water into a medium saucepan so that it rises a quarter of the way up the sides: you want the bowl from your electric mixer to be able to sit over the saucepan without touching the water. Bring the water to a boil. 5 Place the egg whites and sugars in the bowl of an electric mixer and

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whisk by hand to combine. Reduce the heat under the saucepan so that the water is just simmering, then set the mixer bowl over the pan, making sure the water doesn’t touch the base of the bowl. Whisk the egg whites continuously by hand until they are warm, frothy and the sugar is melted, about 4 minutes, then transfer back to the electric mixer with the whisk attachment in place and whisk on a high speed for about 5 minutes, until the meringue is cool, stiff and glossy. Add the cinnamon and whisk to combine. 5 Spread the meringue inside the drawn circle, creating a nest by making the sides a little higher than the centre. Place in the oven and bake for 3 hours, then switch off the oven but leave the meringue inside until it is completely cool: this will take about 2 hours. Once cool, remove from the oven and set aside. 6 Place the chocolate into a small heatproof bowl and set it over a small saucepan of simmering water, making sure the base of the bowl is not touching the water. Stir occasionally until melted. Cool slightly, then brush the chocolate inside the meringue nest, leaving the top and sides bare. Do this gently, as the meringue is fairly delicate. Leave to set for about 2 hours. 7 Make the praline. Place the 50g toasted almonds on a parchmentlined baking tray (with a lipped edge) and set aside. Put the sugar and water into a small saucepan and place over a medium-low heat, stirring until the sugar has melted. Cook, swirling the pan occasionally, until it turns a dark golden brown. Pour the caramel over the nuts (don’t worry if they’re not all covered) and leave until completely cool and set. Once cool, transfer the praline to the small bowl of a food processor and blitz until fine. 8 Place the cream, mascarpone and blitzed praline in a large bowl and whisk for about 1 minute, until stiff peaks form. Be careful not to overwhisk here – it doesn’t take much to thicken up – or it will split. If this begins to happen, use a spatula to fold a little more cream into the mix to bring it back together. Refrigerate until needed. 9 To assemble, spoon the cream into the centre of the meringue and top with the figs. Warm the honey in a small saucepan and stir through the 20g almonds (or pistachios, as pictured). Drizzle these over the figs, and serve.

a Grape matCh! Moscato D’Asti Moncucco 2016 £9.95, Great Western Wine This dreamy, creamy delight sounds irresistible, with a richness of flavour, yet lightness of touch. This softly sweet and fragrant wine has heady aromas of honeysuckle and freshly crushed grapes, together with a delicate honeyed and floral character, and a bright, lively style. It’s a refreshing, easy drinking, ethereal fizz.

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TOP BANANA! PAUL O’NEILL SHARES ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE DESSERT RECIPES FROM HIS CURRENT A LA CARTE MENU…

Now head chef at Berwick Lodge’s restaurant, Hattusa, Paul began his culinary training in Claridge’s in London in his teens. Having risen up the ranks in various kitchens, he was made senior sous at the age of just 22. He went on to become the 30th Roux Scholar in 2013, with Michel Roux Jr praising him for his precision and cool, collected persona in the kitchen. Having joined Berwick Lodge in 2014, he has since earned this 19th-century manor house-turnedhotel and restaurant two AA rosettes with his food. Here, Paul shows us how to make his take on a crème brûlée, which is pimped up with caramelized banana and smashed pistachio praline.

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a Grape matCh! D’Arenberg The Noble Wrinkled Riesling 2016 £11.50, Great Western Wine The deep flavours of the muscovado sugar add a layer of intensity to this dessert. This is where this seductively rich dessert wines come to the fore. With heady scents of caramel, Manuka honey and dried apricots, it has a mellifluous richness, with the flavours of raisins, sweet spice and orange zest enhancing the intensity of this dish.

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© J O N C R A I G .C O . U K

MUSCOVADO AND NUTMEG BRÛLÉE WITH PISTACHIO PRALINE SERVES 6

INGREDIENTS For the praline: 100g caster sugar large handful pistachios For the purée: 100g butter 100g muscovado sugar 200g banana, chopped For the brûlée: 200g muscovado sugar, plus extra for caramelizing 6 egg yolks 570ml cream freshly grated nutmeg, to taste 1 banana, sliced METHOD 1 For the praline, line a baking sheet with baking paper. 2 Pour the sugar into a pan, and leave over the heat – no stirring! – to cook to a dark caramel. Then, take off the heat and stir in the pistachios. 3 Pour onto the lined baking sheet and leave to cool. Once it's set, smash it into crumbs. 4 For the purée, place all the ingredients in a pan and heat until soft, then blend until smooth. 5 Preheat the oven to 120C/250F/gas mark ½. 6 Combine the sugar and egg yolks, and bring the cream and nutmeg to the boil. 7 Pour the cream mixture onto the sugar and egg yolks, whilst whisking. Then transfer into six rings (wrapped in cling film and placed on a lined baking sheet) or ramekins. 8 Bake for 25-35 minutes, or until the brûlées have a nice wobble. When cool, remove the rings, if using them. 9 Coat each slice of banana with muscovado sugar, and sprinkle more sugar on top of each brûlée. Place under a hot grill (or use a blowtorch if you have one) until the sugar has caramelized and formed a crust. 10 Serve each brûlée with a couple of slices of caramalized banana, some pistachio praline crumb scattered over, and a scoop of ice cream. Hattusa, Berwick Lodge, Berwick Drive, Bristol BS10 7TD; 0117 958 1590; berwicklodge.co.uk

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Staggeringly good Thai coming to Bath this Autumn From lunchtime tapas to delicious curries, exotic seafood, stir fry and noodles, Giggling Squid’s menu lends itself to the distinct sharing culture of Thailand. Bath guests are invited to experience bold Thai flavours and exciting dish combinations created by a team of talented Thai chefs in stylish, contemporary surroundings. A dedicated “little tapas for little people” menu is also available and guaranteed to ensure smiles all round. “Exciting cooking” The Times

Bluecoat House, Saw Close, Bath BA1 1EY www.gigglingsquid.com @gigglingsquid


The Wine Guy

Larkin and Andy clearly keep each other at arm’s length. Literally

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TaKe a BaO

ANDY CLARKE GETS HIMSELF DOWN TO CARGO TO BINGE ON BAOS IN THE NAME OF ‘WORK’...

ometimes you get that urge for a taste of the Far East, and nothing else will do. Luckily, when you live in Bristol, there are plenty of ways you can scratch that itch. One of the most interesting and dynamic places I’ve been to recently has to be Woky Ko. This ground-floor shipping container at Cargo 1 has Asian style packed into every square foot (which is just as well, because it’s pretty small in there!). As you dine under the sky of upturned umbrellas, you can see MasterChef finalist, trained lawyer and all-round nice guy Larkin Cen and his team of ‘wokstars’ creating their mouthwatering masterpieces before your very eyes. From KFC

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(Korean fried chicken) to Thai green curry (a brighter version than a lot of us are used to, and with no coconut milk, interestingly), there’s a host of intriguing dishes which leap out of the menu. But it’s the selection of steamed bao buns that makes me the most happy, which is why I have prised a recipe for the pork and hoisin ketchup bao from Larkin. He assures me they’re easy to make at home – so bring on the challenge, I say!  But what should we sip with these light, spongy Oriental bites of delight? Well, you can go either white or red; pork loves both. (As do I.) At the restaurant, there’s a Novas Riesling from Chile on the list, which is great with everything on the menu, and you can even

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buy it from Corks next door to take home. My favourite Riesling of the moment, though, is from Alsace in France, and the good news is you can get it from Majestic Wine. It’s so good that it’s well worth the cycle up Falcondale Road, to my local branch, DrinK up! for this alone. Kuhlman-Platz Kuhlman-Platz Riesling Riesling 2016 £9.99, 2016 isn’t your typical Majestic Wine Warehouse; sweet, petrolly number; majestic.co.uk this edgy little beauty has Fleurie £11.50, a dry crisp snap and clean Marks and Spencer; minerality with a luxurious marksandspencer.com finish, which is perfect for the rich peanut butter in the hoisin ketchup. There’s a ripe stone fruit character that goes with the unctuous pork meat too, and the texture of the wine complements the delicate steamed buns. But if you want a red, never fear, Fleurie is hear. Fleurie 2016 from Marks & Spencer, to be precise. This bright cerise beauty is one of the most sought after ‘cru’ wines of the Beaujolais region in France and is made from the Gamy grape, which produces a really light yet flavourful wine. It has a cherry and mulberry nose which is incredibly inviting and mixes well with the fragrant porky filling. Its smooth texture is a delight with the bao bun itself and, because it’s low in tannin, the ripe cherry-drop juiciness is crying out for the heady sweet and sticky pork and hoisin concoction. Bright and cheeky wines like these two go really well with the sweet and sour flavours of the Far East, so whether you’re ordering from your favourite take away or getting your bao on in the kitchen, you really can’t go wrong.

MAKES 20

INGREDIENTS For the filling: 200ml hoisin, plus extra for serving 50g smooth peanut butter 10ml oyster sauce 10ml light soy sauce 20g sugar 500g pork belly For the buns: 500g Asian bao flour (or strong white bread flour) 225ml milk 10g fresh yeast 75g sugar 50g unsalted butter ½ tbsp baking powder To serve: ½ cucumber, finely diced 4 spring onions, finely sliced peanuts, crushed METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 160C/310F/gas mark 2. 2 Mix all the filling ingredients (apart from the pork) together until combined. Put the pork bellies into an oven dish and pour the mix over, rubbing it in (save all the excess marinade for later use). 3 Cover with water (or chicken stock if you prefer), and cover the dish with foil, sealing around the edges. Cook in the oven for 2 hours 40 minutes. 4 Once cooked, take off the excess fat and shred the meat. Add some of the cooking liqueur back through to keep it moist. It’s best left in the fridge

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overnight at this point, as the cooking liquor is absorbed by the meat. 5 To make the baos, combine the bun ingredients together and knead for 5 minutes, then let the dough rest for 2 hours. 6 After 2 hours, punch the dough down and turn out onto a clean work surface. Divide it in half then gently roll both pieces into logs, before portioning up into smaller peices, about the size of a ping pong ball. Roll each of the pieces into a ball and place onto parchment paper. 7 Flatten one ball with the palm of your hand and lay a greased chopstick in the middle, folding the bun over. Then allow the baos to rest for 15 minutes. 8 Steam the buns in a bamboo steamer lined with parchment paper to stop it sticking – they will only take 10 minutes. (You can either use the buns fresh or they can be frozen at this point and re-steamed when you want them.) 9 To serve each bao, add some hoisin, cucumber, spring onion and crushed peanuts to each bao, along with the meat. Use some of the excess marinade to season the pork. woky.co Andy Clarke is a freelance TV producer and writer. Follow him on Twitter @TVsAndyClarke;  one4thetable.com


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SMOKIN’ ACES

Now taking Christmas party bookings for 2017

Bristol biz Smoke Catering brings food from the deep south of the US to the South West of the UK...

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orn in Texas, raised in Bristol. This is Smoke Catering, an authentic Texan barbecue catering company, created by Rob and Claire Dacey from Somerset. The pair, together with their 12ft smoker, pitch up at locations all over to cook using the Texan methods taught to them by one of the best pitmasters in Texas. The nine-hour smoked beef brisket is a particular favourite of theirs – it’s so juicy and buttery it practically just melts in your mouth, and has a light crunch from a special spice rub. The seven-hour smoked pulled pork shoulder (from the award-winning Newton Farm near Bath), meanwhile, is splashed with barbecue sauce right before serving, and the handmade beef and chilli sausages also come from Newton (and are great with the maple-smoked bacon that Smoke Catering produce, too). It’s not all for the die-hard meat-eaters though; fish fans listen up. These guys hot smoke salmon sides over cedar planks, before sprinkling with their homemade rub and finishing with a hit of maple to bring out the sweetness and the heatness for ya’ll! All their food is homemade; from the rubs and pickles to the barbecue sauce and all the sides. The big boy smoker offers a great conversation piece, always draws interest and even acts as a heater during the colder months – bonus! This is truly a labour of love, with Rob and Claire spending up to 12 hours tending to the fire to ensure the food comes out with a beautiful hint of spice, gentle smoke, and pretty unique flavour. This pair have a combined total of over 30 years in the hospitality industry from cheffing, waitressing and bar management to eventual hotel and event management, so they’re fully equipped to help with planning any function you need! Find them at smokecatering.com, on Twitter (@catering_smoke) and on Instagram (/Smoke.Catering)

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Choose your weapons

wraPPer’s deLIGhT MATT BIELBY CAN’T HELP WAXING LYRICAL OVER THESE NIFTY NEW BEESWAX WRAPS. IN FACT, HE RATHER THINKS THEY’RE THE BEE’S KNEES… What are these, posh napkins? We’ve fallen quite a way from the fancy kit you’re usually trying to push on this page, haven’t we? Well, yes – and no. You see, this month’s object of desire might not cost much, and might not have lots of chrome and fancy functions, but in its own way it’s just as exciting. And, most likely, you’ll use it a lot more often, too. What we have here is no more or less than an eco-friendly alternative to cling film and tinfoil. Made from 100 percent cotton, which is coated in pine resin, jojoba oil and beeswax, the whole idea is that each wrap is reusable and biodegradable.

something. If you want to imagine them doing it, they say they make up crazy songs to sing as they do so...

So no-more throwing away a stretch of cling film after a single use? (And no more nicking my hands on those metal teeth you get along the side of the pack either?) Hopefully not! Even better, this stuff is made quite locally, by Stroud crafting pals Carly and Fran. They source their beeswax from a friendly local beekeeper, then make them all by hand, probably on a kitchen table or

And the point is? The point is, these wraps do most of the jobs cling film will do, but in a more natural way. Beeswax and pine resin have natural antibacterial and anti-fungal properties, and the use of cotton means your food gets to breathe, too. Meanwhile, the pine resin gives the wraps a natural adhesive, the warmth from your hands creating a strong seal on

The whole look is a bit Cath Kidston, isn’t it? It is, though a little funkier, I’d say. And although you can’t specifically pick from the many different patterns they do, their selections are designed to appeal to different types: bright colours in the children’s lunch pack set, slightly edgier patterns in the teenager’s pack, serious hanky-style solid block colours and restrained dots in the pack designed for men, and so on.

bowls and dishes. The best thing, though, is you don’t throw them away afterwards, but instead wash ’em in cold water and soap, then they’re ready to go again. I like it, except I have one worry. You said cheap, didn’t you…? A single large beeswax wrap (about 40x40cm, big enough to cover a casserole dish) will set you back a tenner; packs of four smaller wraps (for sealing jars and wrapping sandwiches) are £20; and then there are packs for kitchen use, the most expensive being the family pack (two large, four medium, four small) at £60. Since each wrap will last a year, and a roll of cling film is a quid or so, these things probably won’t save you money – but they’ll not cost you much, either. And, as they’re cooler, and way more eco-friendly, they’re a no-brainer, I reckon. Beeswax Wraps can be found at Better Food branches in Bristol; or buy online at beeswaxwraps.co.uk

THIS MONTH • WAX ON • COUNTRY COTTAGE • BACK TO THE FUTURE

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Crumbs cooks with

GOOd mOOd fOOd FOOD-LOVING CHEF, WRITER AND YOGI BETH AL-RIKABI IS ALL ABOUT THE STUFF THAT MAKES YOU FEEL GOOD…

WORDS BY JESSICA CARTER PHOTOS BY TORY MCTERNAN

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eth Al-Rikabi is – among many other things – a caterer, producer, supper club host and, perhaps most importantly, a feeder. And we mean that in the best possible way; we mean it in the way that sees her having put together a wholesome, colourful and generous menu for us when we visit, half of which she’d already excitedly prepped before our 11am arrival. Based just outside of Bath in a quirky little cottage, Beth works mainly from her little kitchen there, but recently penned her first recipe book, Tales From My Happy Place: Recipes from the Free Range Chef, which was selfpublished in June. We thumb through it while we chat to her, admiring the photography. Interestingly, this whole book was shot on an iPhone, by local art director and photographer Matt Inwood. “I went to one of Matt’s Instagram workshops,” Beth says. “Since then I make far better use of the editing suite, and avoid the filters. It’s incredible what it can do. Instagram has really come into its own for me over the last year; it’s such a great tool for my business.” So what of the book itself – what was the concept behind it? “It’s like an EP, really,” Beth says, as she slices a head of broccoli. “It’s a small collection of recipes that I’ve collected and developed during my travels. I just wanted to try it out, see how people used it and get some feedback before putting a full-size book out there. “The dishes are all inspired by the people I’ve met and the produce that was available when I was cooking.”

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C R U M B S

C O O K S

W I T H

Beth spent three months catering in Italy a couple of years back, and it’s clear how the experience has informed her food and cookery style. Out the back of the cottage, in her garden, she’s planted a mini Italian herb garden – here she grows rosemary, thyme, sage and a bit of lavender, too. She takes us out there to collect some of the greenery for our lunch. “I was in Italy, as someone asked me to go out and cater for a yoga retreat there. They had these herb gardens, and they just smelled amazing. I’d get up at silly o’clock in the morning to go and walk round them, and make sage tea.” Back in the house, Beth adds the herbs to a casserole dish of red onion and beetroot before sliding it into the oven. As it cooks, wafts of their fresh fragrance sweep over the kitchen. Beth cracks on with a cannelloni bean hummus, whizzing up the pale beans with tahini, a little lemon, garlic, and a couple of sun-dried tomatoes in a Magimix – her most-used piece of kitchen equipment. “I’d be in a right pickle if I didn’t have this,” she says. “I make so much hummus and pesto for the food assemblies and markets, I use it all the time.” Beth makes produce for both the Bradford-on-Avon and Frome food assemblies, formed of groups of producers who aim to make local, quality food available to consumers, giving them the convenience of a supermarket. You place your order from them, then collect your goods at the same time and place each week.

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C O O K S

W I T H

“I’ve been doing the Bradford-on-Avon assembly for about six months, and have just started with Frome. I do the Frome Independents market too – it’s the same cool crowd. “The food I sell there is always different – there’s an emphasis on using ingredients up, making the most of what happens to be around and might be wasted. People don’t seem to mind that it’s never the same, though!” Turning back to the broccoli, Beth runs her finger down the list of ingredients in her bhaji recipe – which she’s reading from her own book. “I don’t really use many recipes, ironically! That’s how most of my own have come about, really. So there have, of course, been some real disasters. The first was trying to make chewing gum when I was about five…” She talks while plucking various spices off her shelf, and shaking the contents over the chopped broccoli and onion, by eye. Then she starts whisking up a batter with egg, quinoa flour from Bath Farm Girls, and some water, before combining the two, and frying spoonfuls of the mix in small batches. We eat in out in the garden, topping the crisp and delicately spiced bhajis with that hummus – which is bright yellow in colour, smooth in texture and far tastier than any equivalent you could buy from a shop, we’re willing to bet. There’s also that warm salad of beetroot and red onion (which is now heaving with lentils and topped with purple shoots) and rocket pesto. Just when we think we’re done, Beth brings out a vintage platter of Belgian-style buns. The soft, bready swirls are filled with an apple and rhubarb mix and topped with light icing. They’re a sweet triumph, and we even manage to bag an extra one for the road... To download Beth’s e-book, Tales from My Happy Place: Recipes from the Free Range Chef, for a mere fiver, visit her website; thefreerangechef.com

BROCCOLI and ONION BhAJIS SERVES 4 This amount should feed four faces as a snack, served with a dip made by combining natural yoghurt mixed with a squirt of sweet chilli sauce, writes Beth. There will, of course, be no leftovers here as midnight fingers will find the fridge and secretly snaffle any stragglers. You can use cauliflower or purple sprouting broccoli if it’s easier to get hold of that season. If so, you can keep the outside leaves and fry off in some butter and cumin to complement a pasta dish or some sturdy white fish.

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INGREDIENTS 1 large red onion, finely sliced 1 medium broccoli, chopped roughly into 1cm pieces ½ tsp turmeric ½ tsp ground cumin ½ tsp cumin seeds sprinkling of chilli flakes, to taste 1 tsp garam masala 50g chickpea flour ½ tsp baking powder 1 tsp salt 1 large egg 1 tbsp lemon juice

CRUMBSMAG.COM

METHOD 1 Mix everything in a bowl except the egg and lemon juice. Once this mix is well combined, pop in the egg, lemon juice and enough cold water to make a thick batter and mix it all together. 2 Pour 2cm of oil into a deepsided frying pan. Drop a little mix in after a minute to check it’s hot to rock; it should be sizzling. 3 Take 1 tbsp of the mixture at a time and plop it in carefully, cooking in batches and turning to achieve a golden, crispy, crunchy bundle of happiness.


M A I N S

IN ’N’ OUT!

PLANNING ON UPDATING YOUR KITCHEN NEXT YEAR? STOP RIGHT THERE! DON’T DO A THING UNTIL OUR INTERIORS PROS HAVE TOLD YOU WHAT THEY RECKON IS GOING TO BE HOT (AND WHAT IS DEFINITELY NOT) FOR 2018…

These pocket doors by Hobsons Choice subtly hide appliances, to help the kitchen blend in with the rest of the house

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OUTSIDE CHANCE

People are using their outside space as extensions to their kitchens and this, coupled with the rise in popularity of alfresco ovens, mean that designers are being tasked, more and more, with blending the inside with the out. “We have been seeing an increase in requests from clients to bridge the gap between the kitchen and the garden,” says design and project manager at Stephen Graver, Jonathan West. “The quality of outdoor kitchen grills, barbecues and appliances now allows for the same kind of precision control and ease-of-use features that you would find indoors. We are now in the process of developing ‘the outdoor kitchen’ incorporating Wolf and Sub Zero equipment – some of the best cooking and cooling appliances in the world.” Olga Alexandru of Sustainable Kitchens agrees: “We’ll be seeing more greenery in the kitchen next year. We all know that plants have added health benefits, but in 2018 we’ll really start seeing that come to life. People are already adding plants on a windowsill or incorporating small herb planters into their kitchen.” Extending the kitchen panelling into the dining space unifies the two areas

GLOSS BEGONE

There’s change afoot when it comes to the textures people are choosing in the kitchen, too... “Matt-textured kitchens are leading the way, ahead of gloss,” says Rob Cash, director at Kitchenhaus, who has noticed a definite increase in “MATTinterest in the matt-finished doors. TEXTURED “Colours such as Satin Grey and KITCHENS ARE Aqua from our Touch range gain a LEADING THE lot of interest. Although gloss gives WAY, AHEAD an ultra-modern look, people are OF GLOSS” veering towards a more understated appearance. We also have many people interested in our matt concrete texture, which is great for an industrial feel.”

BLURRED LINES

Kitchens are multi-purpose spaces; we don’t just cook in them, but entertain and relax there too. So, it’s no surprise the designers at Hobsons Choice are seeing people want to blend them into the other living areas of the house. “When designing open-plan layouts we’ve found that clients are becoming more interested in how the kitchen interacts with the rest of space and how to link these areas together,” says design consultant Pieter du Toit. “In such instances we often use our bulthaup wall panelling system, which functions as a splashback, and subsequently extend it beyond the kitchen area and into dining and living areas. “The continuation of the same elements serve to unify

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M A I N S

It’s matt-textured units all the way for 2018, predicts Rob at Kutchenhaus, and grey is one of the hottest colours for it

the spaces together. For example, when “WE’RE specifying our bulthaup panelling GOING system in the dining area, we often TO SEE A utilise our suspended bench seating LOT OF incorporated next to the table which UNFINISHED, directly links the kitchen and dining RUSTIC room furniture. LOOKS NEXT “On some occasions we have even YEAR” continued the panelling into the living area, where we can install linear floating storage units to house equipment and even stand the television on.”

SECONDS

Upcycling is nothing new, sure, but people are getting more ambitious and creative when it comes to repurposing materials in the kitchen. “From reclaimed wood for flooring or cabinetry to copper piping for taps or hanging rails, we’re going to see a lot of unfinished, rustic looks next year,” predicts Olga. “The industrial look has been a very popular kitchen trend for a few years now, and using reclaimed materials is a new take on this.”

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M A I N S The interest in sleek, minamalist design ain’t going anywhere; handleless doors will still be popular throughout 2018

LIVE AND LET LIVE

Following on from the above points, Pieter notes that his clients are giving more consideration to the aesthetics of kitchen as a living – as opposed to working – area. “In some instances there is a desire to make the kitchen look less like a kitchen and more as part of the overall furniture scheme. In these instances we would propose our bulthaup b3s pocket door furniture, which enable appliances to be hidden from view completely. “We have a couple of versions of this: firstly a tall, fullheight furniture door that opens by touch and slides away to the side revealing large appliances. The second option is a unit that sits on top of another, with doors that slide away to reveal an additional worktop space for small appliances such as food mixers. These even feature sockets, an LED strip light that is activated when the door’s open, and have shelving for additional storage.”

LINE OF DUTY

With its handless kitchens having become increasingly popular, Rob thinks we’ll see this trend grow in 2018. “Sleek, clean lines and a stylish minimalism allow for an uncluttered and hygienic aesthetic, which is brilliantly suited to kitchens,” he says. “This contemporary feel has great appeal for most tastes, and means that your kitchen will still look ‘fresh’ for many years to come.”

DIRECTORY

• hobsonschoice.uk.com • kutchenhaus.co.uk • robertwelch.com • stephengraver.com • sustainablekitchens.co.uk

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FANCY FRILLS “People are going for clean lines rather than anything ornate,” notes Olga. “So we’ve been seeing fewer requests for beading on cabinetry and more for a sleek, modern look.”

BOILING POINT “Clients rarely have kettles nowadays, as we almost always suggest a boiling water tap of some description,” says Pieter. “People are time-poor in today’s hectic world, and it is this convenience of instant boiling water on tap that makes it so appealing. Not to mention the clear work surfaces that are no longer being cluttered up by a kettle!”

SUCK IT UP “We have also found that visible extractors are beginning to fall out of favour,” Pieter notes. “Clients don’t like to see a big bulky extractor hanging from the ceiling whilst they have their dinner party or are watching television on the sofa. Extraction is still very important, however – even more so nowadays with the preference for open plan-living – so we have started to specify more downdraught and ‘hidden’ extractors with every new design.”

CRUMBSMAG.COM


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PAY IT FORWARD As we make more informed and responsible choices when it comes to choosing our groceries, indie retailers have never looked better

A

re you keen on ethical, organic products and supporting local businesses? So are we! More and more independent retailers across the UK are offering organic products, which are better for the environment, animal welfare and British wildlife. These stores have been quick to respond to the public’s concerns about where their food comes from and often opt to stock organic options which support our farmers. You can rely on your local indie retailer for a good chat about the products on their shelves, which can often be tricky at the supermarket. Be sure to visit your local shop and get your questions answered! There are lots of stores to choose from in and around Bath and Bristol that support Britain’s organic producers and brands. Shopping at them means that you can be confident that you’re supporting local and environmentally friendly farming. The Soil Association hosts an Independent Retailer Map on its website, which shows a variety of indie shops offering organic. Take a look, learn more about organic and visit an independent retailer near you today!

soilassociation.org/findanindie; 0117 314 5000

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M AI N S TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS, AND PEOPLE THAT MATTER

Ever tried fresh-hopped beer? We get involved with the brewing of one in Bristol; check out p96

H I G H L I G H T S

MOULD OVER

Why mouldy food can be good for you Page 91

HOSTS WITH THE ROASTS

Sunday lunch at its best in Bath and Bristol Page 103

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NO WAY, JOSÉ

Hear what José Pizarro had to say for himself, before his visit to Bath Page 118

P L U S

1

QUID can make a whole lot of difference...


WE ARE NOW TAKING BOOKINGS FOR CHRISTMAS Blessed with a beautiful building and a team of talented Chefs, The Pump House is the perfect place for a party.

Contact our events team for a cracking Christmas info@the-pumphouse.com 0117 927 2229

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M A I N S

CULTURE CLUB

WITH WINTER ON THE HORIZON AND A CULINARY DRY SPELL (ALBEIT A PRETTY SHORT AND MANAGEABLE ONE IN THIS COUNTRY) IN THE DISTANCE, WE SENT JESSICA CARTER ON A FERMENTATION COURSE TO FIND OUT ABOUT THIS RATHER CLEVER PRESERVATION METHOD...

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L

ike with clothes, music and any other sphere that sees trends come and go like they were caught in revolving doors, the food scene is often shaped by different movements. And again, as with other fashions, they’re rarely brand new. Fermentation has been described as a ‘trend’ in the food world for some time now, getting more and more air time on cookery shows, restaurant menus and, of course, in rags just like this one. The thing is, though, that while its popularity has seen it brought to the fore, there are people around the world who have never stopped making and eating fermented foods. Including here in the UK, even if we don’t think about it when we tuck in. Yoghurt, beer and sourdough bread are, of course, all examples of popular fermented produce. Fermentation itself dates back, it’s thought, to thousands of years BC. So: old news, right? Before we were able to cultivate and import fruit and veg all year round, people would preserve and ferment their seasonal gluts, to make them last into the less hospitable months, when very little would grow. Although it’s remained common practice in some countries, in the UK most types of fermenting have become a bit of a lost skill. Trained biologist Lucie Cousins is one of the most obvious people to talk to about this topic; having started Bath Culture House last year, she makes everything from kombucha to tempeh and sauerkraut, and runs courses at Demuth’s Cookery School in Bath on the subject – one of which we went along to. Lucie first got properly acquainted with foodie bacteria whle working as a cheesemaker, where she was producing mouldripened cheeses. She learned how to maintain bacterial cheese cultures and grow moulds on Camembert and Brie. “Fermentation is a metabolic process in which an organism (yeast or bacteria) converts a carbohydrate (such as starch or sugar) into an alcohol or an acid,” Lucie says. “Yeast performs fermentation to obtain energy by converting sugar into alcohol, while bacteria perform fermentation by converting carbohydrates into lactic acid. More simply, fermentation is the breakdown of glucose to form alcohol and carbon dioxide. “I see it as a pre-digestion process, where a large complex carbohydrate is broken down into its smaller parts, therefore aiding our digestion of it, and allowing the nutrients to be taken up into our bodies more readily.” Of course, it’s health benefits like this that have no doubt helped fermented foods to shimmy into the spotlight in this age of rising awareness of food and wellbeing. “The action of breaking down carbohydrates and pre-digesting the foods prior to eating makes it easier for our bodies to absorb nutrients and food,” says Lucie. “The bacteria and yeasts which are present in fermented foods are also beneficial to our digestive system, which is often historically referred to as our ‘second brain’. A happy stomach equals happy mental wellbeing. “As we consume these bacteria and yeasts, we improve our gut flora (I see it as tending a lawn within our digestive system, maintaining good bacteria and yeast rather than bad and toxic bacteria). These good bacteria and yeast that live in our guts once again aid digestion within our bodies, helping us take up nutrients, remove toxins, prevent disease, improve our immune system health, and more. “Geeky fact: there are more microbes in your body than cells; our gut contains around 100 trillion microorganisms!”

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(There you go, folks. You’ve probably learnt something new for the day now – so you can put your feet up and relax.) “The process of fermentation in foods increases the amount of B vitamins, folic acid, choline and glutathione. B vitamins are important for brain function, energy and heart health; folic acid benefits the brain and many systems within the body; choline helps the body regenerate cells; and glutathione is an antioxidant.”  So, have we talked fermented foods up enough now that we’re all totally sold, and can move on to the subject of mould? ’Cause that’s where we’re heading... During the course, Lucie brings out a block of tempeh to marinate and cook. Tempeh is a soya bean product that’s basically bound together with mould that’s been left to grow around the beans. (Stay with us.) “The process is very similar to fermentation, involving yeast and bacteria, though rather than using wild ferments and cultures found on the outside of fruits and cabbages, as we would with sauerkraut and kimchi, the mould is introduced as a culture: R. oligosporus. This mould is activated when added to soya beans and germinates, growing around the soya beans to create a mycelium network (which is very similar to the growth of white mould on a Camembert or Brie). “The mould, as it grows, releases enzymes which then pre-digests the basic nutrients of the soya bean. The rhizopus moulds produce an enzyme which breaks down phytates, thereby increasing the absorption of minerals such as zinc, iron and calcium. This process softens the beans too, making them easier to digest.” Before anyone starts to reach for that stale crust in the bread bin though, mould is, of course, not usually good for us. You’ve not been chucking out funky-smelling jars of stuff for no good reason. “This mould, grown for tempeh, is specifically grown within a lab, from original Lucie Cousins and her Bath cultures found on Hibiscus leaves. It has Culture House been tested microbiologically to ensure no kombucha (above left and pathogens are present,” Lucie explains. Okay, so it’s understandable to be cautious above): slightly less rustic than when growing moulds, especially seeing as we our Jess’s efforts don’t really get taught to prepare food in this (below left) way – for such an ancient practice, it’s relatively unfamiliar to most of us. If you do fancy giving it a go, though, Lucie recommends starting with sauerkraut – which is basically cabbage and salt, and takes two to three weeks to ferment – or milk kefir, which is almost like yoghurt (it can be made from cow’s milk or a non-dairy alternative), and takes a couple of days. As we learn in the class, though, you do have to ignore all you’ve been taught about going easy on the salt. It’s important you get plenty in there. “Not adding enough salt, or allowing oxygen to get in contact with the fermenting vegetables and fruit, can allow spoilage bacteria and yeasts (non-desirable microbes) to grow,” Lucie says. And the two are connected: salting the cabbage makes it release liquid, which is what the cabbage needs to be submerged in, in order to properly ferment. “It is important that the brine naturally produced when salting shredded cabbage always remains above the top of your ferment. This prevents oxygen from getting in contact with the ferment and non-desirable microbes from growing. It also aids the naturally healthy fermentation from the naturally occurring lactobacillus bacteria growing on the outside of the vegetables.”

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CLASSIC CABBAGE KIMCHI MAKES ABOUT 1 LITRE’S WORTH

Kimchi is essentially Korea’s national dish, and is served with every meal. It’s fermented spicy cabbage, traditionally made by families during late autumn to last them throughout the year, and then stored in pots underground. It’s easily found in Asian stores although it’s not usually vegetarian, as kimchi is mostly made with a small amount of fish sauce and/or shrimp paste. This version, however, is delicious without. INGREDIENTS 1 large napa cabbage (Chinese leaf) 3 tbsp fine sea salt 1 large onion 4 spring onions 4 tbsp gochugaru chilli flakes For the paste mix: ½ onion, roughly chopped 3 garlic cloves, chopped 5cm piece ginger, peeled and chopped 1 tsp sugar

Similar to sauerkraut is kimchi; a spicy Korean side dish of fermented vegetables. A classic kimchi will include Chinese leaf cabbage, onion, garlic, ginger and chilli. But there is plenty of room for variation, explains Demuth’s tutor Lydia Downey, who joins us on the course to share her corker of a recipe. “I mainly make traditional kimchi, but also love to use more local veg, such as red cabbage with carrot,” she says. “This results in a quite different style of kimchi, similar to sauerkraut, and is really good to eat as a condiment and mixed into salads. However, it can be made with any vegetables that are good eaten raw in salads; cucumber, radish (particularly white mooli or daikon), spring onion, and carrot are all good. “To make kimchi taste authentic, you really do need to get hold of some gochugaru (Korean chilli flakes); it’s easy to get in most Chinese and Thai supermarkets these days. I buy it locally in Bath, and also know it’s available in the Chinese shops in Bristol. It has the most beautiful deep rich red colour and flavour that isn’t as fiery hot as you’d imagine.” It’s gochugaru that gives the kimchi its fab red colour, in fact. It also has a gentler heat, meaning you just won’t get the same result with regular chilli. Kimchi doesn’t have to be just a simple side, either; it can be used to cook with, and form the base of all kinds of dishes. “My favourite recipes to use kimchi in are the ones I teach on my classes at Demuth’s,” Lydia says. “Mungbean pancakes are a winner with everyone I’ve taught them to – delicious and nutritious and so simple. Also, you can use kimchi as the starting point of a dish in place of the usual onion, garlic, ginger combo. I gently fry off a couple of tablespoons of chopped kimchi, before adding other veg for stir fries or stews. It gives a fabulous depth of flavour, with that slightly sharp fermented tang which really freshens up a dish. It also makes the most amazing fried rice and, bizarrely, the best cheese toastie in the world! Hey, don’t knock it till you’ve tried it…” To find out about Demuth’s courses, including this fermentation one, visit demuths.co.uk 

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METHOD 1 Clean and sterilise your jar or jars. 2 Chop the cabbage into 3cm squares, discarding the stem and core. Place into a large glass or ceramic mixing bowl, and massage in the salt, ensuring it is evenly distributed throughout. Set aside for 1 hour. Meanwhile, blend the paste ingredients in a food processor until smooth. 3 When the cabbage is ready, tip it into a colander and rinse thoroughly. Drain well and allow to dry a little. It will feel quite limp and soft. 4 Place it back into the mixing bowl, and add the chopped onion, spring onions and gochugaru. Add the paste mix and, using clean hands, mix and massage it into the vegetables in order to combine everything thoroughly. 5 Pack the vegetable mix into the jar, pushing down well to compact it all and get rid of any air pockets. Leave several centimetres from the top of the jar empty to allow for expansion during the fermentation process. 6 Gently push a ramekin (or similar weight) down on top of the kimchi mixture until the liquid rises above the cabbage. Keep this weighted down until the kimchi has had its full fermentation time of 3-5 days. Close the lid on the jar but don’t fully seal it (the air will need to escape as it ferments), and place in a cool area of your kitchen out of direct sunlight. It’s a good idea to place the jar on a plate, in case of spillages that can occur when the liquid ferments and bubbles over the top of the jar. As the kimchi ferments, it can smell quite strong and ‘cabbagey’, so do warn your family or housemates, Follow Lucie and perhaps avoid making it if you have guests staying! (@fabfermented), 7 Check the jar daily for 3 days, pushing and Lydia the mix down to release any air pockets (@LydiaDowney) and allow the accumulated liquid to on Twitter come to the surface. It’s important that the vegetables are submerged beneath the liquid. Seal the lid to cover each day, then refrigerate after 3-5 days, at which point the kimchi should smell strong, sour and pickled – but not unpleasant. Taste the kimchi to decide if it needs more fermenting, then place in the fridge to store. 8 You can use the kimchi straight away, but may find the flavour needs a couple of weeks to develop enough to your liking. Once fully fermented, the kimchi will keep for up to six months (possibly longer) in the fridge, but do check it from time to time as it can go mouldy if there are any air pockets or the liquid evaporates away.


01225 313 987 larkhallbutchers.co.uk


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t

he edible flower market may be blossoming (ahem), but it would be a huge oversight to forget the original form of culinary flower power: the hop. Okay, it may not be as pretty as a few rose petals floating on a Martini, or as colourful as nasturtiums peppered over a plate of food, but it’s been working bloomin’ (these gags are just writing themselves) hard behind the scenes at breweries for thousands of years. The hop is the cone-shaped flower of the hop plant, and is one of the core ingredients of beer – alongside barley, yeast and water. Hops are stripped from the bine (the climbing vine-like stem from which they grow) at the very end of summer – meaning we’ve just seen the hop harvest here in the UK. The majority of these fresh hops will be dried in a kiln ( just like the pottery projects of schoolchildren) and then can be pelleted, stored and used all year round to create beers. These dried hops are added at the ‘boil’ stage of the brewing process, releasing their flavour into a lovely beery jacuzzi. They’re an integral part of the beer making process; hops provide the ‘body’ of the beer and that unmistakable bitterness. Beers jam-packed with hops – such as Indian pale ales – have strong, distinctive flavours and, right now, are more popular than ever. Why? Perhaps it was the rude awakening from decades British hops are becoming of fizzy lager that this lovely hoppiness gave us, more popular; smacking us in the chops and inspiring the craft especially with beer movement... the emergence With this strong hoppiness often comes of new strains, citrus or tropical notes, which can overshadow like the ones Moor Beer have other flavours in the beer. These big flavours been working on are common in hops from New Zealand and the United States, where the climates produce a potent crop. The provenance of beer ingredients can often be overlooked – the product is seen to originate from the place it is brewed – but our penchant for New World hops is meaning that import levels are higher than ever. That said, we’re seeing a resurgence in British hops too – led by breweries like Moor Beer in Bristol. Moor have been experimenting with native hops for a number of years, creating new strains that are more powerful than any previously. As well as helping to kick off the unfined beer movement in the UK, Moor worked with hop merchant Charles Faram on a hop development called Jester. This was an entirely new strain of hop that was created to try and impart a stronger flavour to beers, and create something closer to the New World varieties that are so popular. Moor were the first to use this turbocharged English hop in a beer fittingly titled Return of the Empire. Another beer, called JJJ, is also in the works, with this second iteration promising to be even better than the first. (As it happens, another local brewery, Wiper and True, has also just launched a new beer brewed with entirely British ingredients – check out Yorkshire Square on p18.)

GET FRESH

Hops don’t have to be dried, though – and herein lies our reason for this timely litte foray into the world of this crop. In fact, some of this year’s harvest is bypassing the kiln altogether, as Moor take on a brewing project involving fresh hops, in order to create a unique bew for this month’s Bristol Beer Week (14-21 October).

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The fresh hops arrive at the brewery, and it’s all hands on deck to get them processed as quickly as possible...

In mid-September, the Moor team took a trip up the M5 to Herefordshire to pick up their fresh hops, and invited brewing friends Get to know some of our and family to help make the beer native British varieties – itself on their return to the brewery. and their characteristics! (And to share a few frothy ones Admiral: resinous (which afterwards, obviously.) means reminiscent of the Getting as many hands on deck as aromas of pine or sap) possible turned out to be a very wise and citrusy plan; with dry hops all the water and Challenger: spicey, with moisture has evaporated and you are notes similar to that of left with a concentrated flavour in a green tea handily transportable, easy-to-store Jester: tropical fruits, most pellet form. Fresh hops, however, notably grapefruit retain all of those natural liquids and Flyer: spice, citrus biomatter, meaning that the flavour is and liquorice diluted. To counteract this, ten times the amount of hops were needed to make this fresh-hopped number, Envy, so it really was a case of the more the merrier at the brewery. Fresh-hopped beers (also known as wet- or green-hopped) have a brighter flavour than their dry counterparts. The oils that normally disappear during the drying process come out to play, leading to a fresher, lighter beer, with floral elements of grass and grain. These beers act as a stage for showcasing the hop itself, and are perfect for homegrown varieties. This way of harvesting and brewing brings an element of seasonality into beer production. As soon as you’ve picked the hops you’ll have around 24 hours before they start rotting and the natural oils start to oxidise, so you’ll need to be ready to brew as soon as the crop is good to go. Under that time pressure, the locality of the ingredients finally come into real focus, as we realised when speaking to Justin Hawke, Moor Beer’s owner and head brewer, and vice chair of the Society of Independent Brewers, who told us how much he loves going out into the hop fields, finding it “rejuvinating”. Once brewed and bottled (or canned, of course), though, freshhopped beers can actually last a reasonable amount of time.

TOP OF ThE hOPS

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Although, if you want to get the best flavour and quality from ’em, then drink them sooner rather than later, we’re told by the brewers. Dried hops normally go into the brew kettle, but due to the sheer mass that had to be used in the fresh-hopping process, this just wasn’t possible on brewing day at Moor. So, the team had to adapt part of the brewery equipment to make it happen, repurposing the mash tun to become the hopback, to get the hops through the system. The whole brewing process takes around 30 days, fermenting for around two weeks, before going through a fortnight of conditioning. If our calculations are correct, then, this new brew will be finished just in time for the start of Bristol Beer Week – we love it when a plan comes together.

Bristol Beer Week is 14-21 October, and will see Moor Beer’s Envy served at selected venues around the city on draught and in cans; moorbeer.co.uk

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LUNCH & DINNER VEGAN • VEGGIE • MEAT • FISH LOCAL PRODUCE, WORLD FLAVOURS Lunch Tuesday-Saturday, 12-3pm Dinner Monday-Thursday 5.30pm-9.30pm, Friday & Saturday 5-9pm Sunday 12-4pm www.oldmarketassembly.co.uk


THE SALAMANDER

BATH

Our hidden gem, tucked away in Bath’s City Centre - it’s small, snug but oh so special. You’ll find The Salamander just off Queen Square in the heart of the Georgian city of Bath. The premises consist of a well-stocked bar on the ground floor, cosy corners to sit and eat, and plenty more seating upstairs.

3 JOHN STREET, BATH, BA1 2JL 01225 428 889 SALAMANDER@PKPUBCO.COM

THE SWAN

BATH

Our family-friendly country pub with a modern face and a traditional heart. If you’re looking for a country pub in a rural setting - and one that’s only ten minutes away from the busy Bath centre - then you really can’t do much better than The Swan. BATH ROAD, SWINEFORD, BS30 6LN 0117 932 3101 SWAN@PKPUBCO.COM

THE HOP POLE

BATH

Our cosy country pub in the heart of Bath with its secret courtyard garden. The Hop Pole is a firm favourite with lovers of good food - and where better to eat than in a pub that offers suitably wellkept cask ales and a wine selection to suit all tastes. You can dine in the rooms around the bar, in the pub’s restaurant or, when the weather allows, in the spacious beer garden. In fact, the garden is one of the pub’s most popular features - no wonder people call The Hop Pole a country pub in the heart of the city!

7 ALBION BUILDINGS, UPPER BRISTOL ROAD, BATH, BA1 3AR. 01225 446 327 HOPPOLE@PKPUBCO.COM


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FANCY a JOINT?

THESE LOCAL ROAST LUNCHES WILL HAVE YOUR WEEKEND FINISHING ON A HIGH...

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BATH AQUA (also in Bristol!) Sure, an Italian gaff isn’t the most obvious place to head for a roast, but it could well be a winner this Sunday. Porchetta and spatchcock chicken are on offer alongside the classic beef – with all the trimmings, natch. aqua-restaurant.com

THE GAINSBOROUGH BATH SPA With chef Dan Moon at the helm, and meat from Walter Rose & Son in the oven, you know a roast here is going to be good. A cranberry and sage nut roast with pommery mustard cream makes sure vegetarians don’t miss out, either. The three-course menu includes a complimentary glass of fizz, too. Fancy. thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk

GPT SMOKEHOUSE Somerset lamb, 10-hour-roasted pork, Aberdeen Angus beef and Castlemead free-range chicken are what Sundays are all about at GPT. Unless you’re going meat-free; owner Robbie loves his mum’s nut roast so much that he’s put it on the menu. It’s all served with Bath-grown veg and fromscratch gravy. gptbath.com

HARE & HOUNDS This much-loved pub, with belting views across the Bath countryside, is quite rightly a favourite for Sunday lunch. The likes of Wiltshire pork belly, Ruby Red sirloin, and mushroom and pine nut Wellington with cep velouté are among the choices here, which all come with honey carrots, braised red cabbage and red wine gravy, as well as those all-important roasties. hareandhoundsbath.com

HOMEWOOD PARK The roast rib of beef, served pink and juicy, is a popular choice, and comes from the well-known Bartlett & Sons butchers. Served with red onion marmalade and lashings

Aqua (top) may not be the most obvious choice for a roast, but it’s worth checking out; Dan Moon at The Gainsborough (above left) rustles up a pretty spesh Sunday lunch

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BRISTOL THE ALMA TAVERN

of red wine gravy, it’s hardly difficult to understand why, we reckon. homewoodpark.co.uk

KING WILLIAM INN The star of the the show here is the roast Newton Farm sirloin of beef (all the meat comes from the Newton St Loe farm), which is served blushing, with crispy roasies. You’ve only got a three-hour window each Sunday to experience it though, so you may want to book! kingwilliaminn.co.uk

Homewood Park (above) is all about the roast rib of beef, while Backwell House (above right) has just been awarded 2 AA rosettes...

ROSE AND CROWN There are whole roast chickens for two to share at this Larkhall pub, which gets its meat from a neighbouring butchers. And we mean neighbouring; its literally a few metres down the road. If you’re not into sharing then there’s beef and pork on offer, too. roseandcrownlarkhall.co.uk

This popular Clifton pub and theatre is a great place to hunker down with a hearty roast this autumn – no wonder they advise booking. Rump of beef, porchetta and garlicroasted chicken are among the lunches on offer (as is a vegetarian Wellington), which come with that all-important cauliflower cheese. almatavernandtheatre.co.uk

BACKWELL HOUSE With this place having recently bagged itself a pair of AA rosettes, there’s probably no better time to check out its Sunday offerings. The pork here comes from Backwell House’s own pigs – can’t get fewer food miles that that, can you? – and the beef sirloin (from Powells of Olveston) is a fave of the chefs’. backwellhouse.co.uk

THE BANK TAVERN As well as the classic beef and pork, the chefs do like to get a bit of game on the go of a Sunday, too – think venison, pigeon or rabbit. Landlord Sam is a keen shooter, and keeps the kitchen nicely stocked up, especially at this time of year, when game is coming into its own. The beefdripping roasties are another reason why you’ve probably already heard about the Sunday lunches at this kooky yet traditional city centre watering hole. banktavern.com

THE SALAMANDER Can’t decide between topside of beef, pork belly or lamb shoulder? Good news: you don’t have to. The ‘trio of roasts’ here features three meats, as well as a Yorkie and all the trimmings. Tucked away in the centre of Bath, this classic pub is a great Sunday hangout. bathales.com

THE DUCK AND WILLOW Why have one course when you can have two – for £16.95? Maybe warm up with a goats’ cheese mousse with beetroot, apple and candied walnut, before getting stuck into a pretty special rib of beef to share, with all the traditional roast trimmings (we’re talking roasties, veg, cauliflower purée, red cabbage, savoy cabbage, Yorkshire pud and gravy). theduckandwillowbristol.co.uk

VICTORIA PUB AND KITCHEN Treat yerself to the full three-courses here this Sunday for £23.95. Sandwiched between the likes of pork and apricot terrine and banoffee pie are a choice of roast joints: topside of beef, rolled pork belly, leg of lamb, and chicken breast. victoriabath.co.uk

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THE KENSINGTON ARMS The cauli cheese is a highlight at this Redland gaff, where you can get two courses for £21 or three for £25 on Sundays. Among the classic roast options is slowcooked shoulder of salt marsh lamb, doused in lamb gravy. Rare sirloin and saddleback pork belly are also in attendance, and everything comes with plenty of veg. thekensingtonarms.co.uk

THE MALAGO This newly established neighbourhood restaurant on North Street has just launched its roasts. Served from 2pm until 8pm, they’re great for those who love an extended lie in on Sundays (raise of hands, please). Beef, pork and homemade nut roasts are all on the menu, which features loads of local ingredients. themalago.club

THE OLD BOOKSHOP THE GRACE The Sunday lunch menu at this pub begins, quite rightly, with a Grace Bloody Mary; an ideal way to get your head in the game for the main show (especially if it’s a little foggy from the night before). Choose from beef rump, rolled pork belly with apricot and apple, and lemon and thyme chicken (as well as a fish and veggie options), which come with dripping roast potatoes. thegracebristol.uk

Don't miss out on the top side dishes at The Ox (top left); The Jetty proves it’s not just about the seafood

After some time off, roasts are back at The Old Bookshop, people. But what to choose? The salt marsh lamb rump with braised shoulder and mint sauce; the 48-day-aged beef rump with braised beef rib and horseradish; or the freerange chicken supreme with stuffing? There’s a quandary... theoldbookshop.co.uk

THE OX Given the name, it’ll be no surprise to find out that beef runs the show on Sundays (and every day) at this Bristol gaff, which has branches on Corn Street and on Whiteladies Road. Both restaurants’ Sunday menus differ, but you’ll be sure to get a rockin’ roast rump whichever you visit. When it comes to sides, the leeks and greens and braised red cabbage are the way to go. theoxbristol.com

THE JETTY The roast pork at the Bristol Harbour Hotel’s restaurant is a particular winner; you get melt-in-the-mouth, slow-cooked belly, herb-roasted tenderloin, black pudding parfait and first-rate crackling, all on one plate of porky joy. Of course, there are other options too: strip loin of beef with red wine sauce, and roast chicken with thyme jus. Three courses come in at just under 20 quid an’ all, so you can top and tail that main event. bristol-harbour-hotel.co.uk

THE PUMP HOUSE Goose fat roasties, anyone? Yeah, thought you’d be keen. Those terrific tatties sit alongside the likes of dry-aged

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roasted rump, pulled shoulder of pork with black pudding and apple sauce, and roasted leg of Mendip lamb with salsa verde. Everything at this riverside pub is, of course, homemade by the kitchen team, who are led by celebrated chef, Toby Gritten. Love a Yorkie? Whack an extra on for a quid, why don’t you? the-pumphouse.com

THE PUNCH BOWL This newly relaunched spot knows what its punters want, serving its huge Yorkies with all roasts (’cause why should beef get all the fun?). Both the dry-aged Hereford beef and slow-roasted pork belly (from the ethically minded Powells of Olveston) also come with duck fat roast potatoes (the cashew and almond nut roast gets veggie versions, obvs), and fresh, seasonal veg. Top all that with red wine jus, and you have yourself a happy Sunday afternoon, no? wickwarbrewing.co.uk

THE RUMMER The chefs here are all about dressing up their meat to the max: the topside of Hereford beef is served with beetroot purée, the Wiltshire pork with apple and saffron purée, and rolled leg of lamb with mint and pea purée. If you often feel a bit hazy on a Sunday, try the Bloody Mary: they sous vide the tomatoes with herbs, spices and seasoning overnight to make their base for this cure-all cocktail. therummer.net

THE VICTORIA PARK These guys are serious about their gravy, which is made from scratch in the kitchen each week. It’s the all-important finishing touch to the popular Sunday roasts at this familyfriendly venue, which include overnight-roast topside of beef with horseradish and dill cream; free-range chicken breast with celeriac bread sauce; 18-hour cider-braised pork belly with apple and cider sauce; and lentil, nut and vegetable cake with hazelnut pesto. All the above come with roast potatoes, Yorkshire pudding, herby greens, and carrot purée. Total yum. thevictoriapark.co.uk

The Swan’s roasts (above) are impressive constructions, while the newlook Punchbowl (right) has new roasts on the go

THE WELLINGTON The beef joints that are used for these roasts are dry-aged for 28 days by Ruby & White Butchers – who supply the pub with a lot of its meat – making for a deeply flavoured, succulent result. And the potatoes are pretty banging too; cooked in real beef dripping, they’ve become deputy manager Ike’s favourite – even over her Grandma’s. (Best keep that info to ourselves...) bathales.com

WESTBURY PARK

Calling all students! There’s a free Bloody Mary with any roast for those with a valid NUS card at this Henleaze pub. (Thought that might get your attention.) Sunday lunches come in the form of half a thyme-roasted chicken, beef rump with horseradish, or pork with apple sauce, and they’re all topped off with plenty of veg, crisp roasties and rich gravy. westburyparkpub.co.uk

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Eat. Drink. Smile.

�

Great Sunday lunch, fabulous people and service every time. A little bright spot in that part of town.

44-45 Lower Bristol Rd Bath BA2 3BD 01225 429509 info@gptbath.com www.gptbath.com


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OUT OF TOW N THE CATHERINE WHEEL

This 17th-century pub knows what’s up when it comes to a Sunday roast. All the meats get their own accompaniments: Yorkies for beef, cracking for pork, onion sauce for lamb and stuffing for chicken. There’s a nut roast too, if you’re not feeling a joint. thecatherinewheel.co.uk

THE RESTAURANT AT CENTURION

These guys in Midsomer Norton know that Sunday lunch is a time for going all out – so they use strip loin cuts of beef for their roasts, which come from local family butcher Paul Loader. When it comes to veg there are six different types on offer, plus cauliflower cheese. centurionhotel.co.uk

THE LONGS ARMS Can we interest you in foot-long crackling sticks? Find them at this celebrated South Wraxall pub, along with roasted joints of meat from its ethical, tracable and Fairtrade supplier Aubrey Allen – think dry aged sirloin of beef and St Margaret’s Farm free-range pork. thelongsarms.com

PEAR TREE INN

Whether you go for the beef, lamb or bird (which all come from a local butcher), or the organic pork from Downland Farm, you’ll get meat-specific gravy, cooked up in-house using homemade stock. The roasties are made with beef fat and butter too (phwaor), and much of the greenery is home grown. peartreewhitley.co.uk

THE PONY AND TRAP

Chef-owner of this Michelin-starred pub, Josh Eggleton, is the first to tell you that “meat isn’t the star of the show on a great roast, it’s all about the veg,” which is why you can expect top-drawer trimmings. Think cauliflower cheese, glazed carrots, roasted beetroot and fresh greens. The roast sirloin, which is served rare, certainly won’t go unnoticed, though... theponyandtrap.co.uk

THE REDAN INN

This lovely village watering hole is serious about its food, meaning you can get crackin’ restaurant-standard grub with a local pub atmosphere. Choose from the likes of dry-aged beef, leg of lamb, and pork shoulder (with crackling, natch). The veg is about as fresh as it gets too, having been grown in the pub’s garden. theredaninn.co.uk

YURT LUSH

The gravy that crowns these Sunday roasts are three days in the making – and you’ll find plenty of it over your generous portion of ethically sourced beef and big, crisp Yorkshire pud. Pork is also on offer, as is dessert for just £2 extra! There’s a bargain if ever we saw one. eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk

The Pear Tree’s cosy and rustic interior makes a top setting for chilling out on a Sunday with a roast lunch

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THE SWAN Every meat at this Swineford pub comes paired up with its own special platefellow; chicken supreme with a walnut and herb stuffing; belly of pork with crackling and apple purée; topside of beef with Yorkshire pudding; and leg of lamb with salsa verde. bathales.com


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The quId dId GOOd

STREETSMART IS LOOKING FOR MORE RESTAURANTS THROUGHOUT OUR REGION TO SIGN UP TO ITS ACE ANNUAL FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN – AND IT REALLY COULDN’T BE EASIER...

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or more than two decades, StreetSmart has been raising funds to support the homeless and vulnerable, and is now entering its twelfth year in Bristol. The charity has seen great support in this area, from both restaurants and their customers – but we know we can do even more. The idea is pretty simple; a voluntary £1 donation is added to diners’ bills at participating restaurants, throughout the festive months of November and December. Every single penny of every single £1 donated is distributed by StreetSmart to local charities that work to combat homelessness. That means that when customers donate, the money stays in that town or city. This is possible because 100 percent of the running and operational costs of StreetSmart are covered by its sponsor, Deutsche Bank, so none of the money raised need be spent on admin or marketing. Since its launch in 1998, the charity has raised over £8.2 million for some of the most marginalised members of our society, thanks to the support of their ever-growing family of restaurants across the entire UK. Many local charities really rely on the donations they get from StreetSmart, as it can often be their sole source of external funding.

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Now, with those harsh winter months on the horizon, StreetSmart is looking to sign up as many restaurants as possible across Bath and Bristol to take part in the scheme and offer their punters the chance to help fellow residents who are struggling with homelessness and lack the support they need. A host of eateries have already got involved for this year, including Chandos Road restaurant, No Man’s Grace. “We are delighted to be supporting StreetSmart this year,” says head chef and owner John Watson. “It’s such an easy process, adding £1 to the end of every bill, that it seems like a no brainer. By giving diners There is a big homeless problem in Bristol and we the option want to help however we can.” of adding Richard Boon, owner of Hubbox, which recently a voluntary donation of £1 launched in Bristol, grew up in the city and knows onto their bill, all too well how important StreetSmart is. local restaurants “It’s a great concept,” he says, “and we love that have helped every single penny raised goes directly to those countless local who need it the most. I grew up in Bristol, and homeless people know there is a big problem with homelessness.” Another new business that has been quick to sign up is Gloucester Road Italian, Bomboloni. “I’m dead chuffed to be in a position to support StreetSmart now that Bomboloni is open,” says chef-owner Andrew Griffen. “It’s easy to run and I’ve found in the past that restaurant customers are only too happy to pay a quid to help homeless people in our city. “As a restaurant community with so many indies that have the autonomy to decide to get involved, I don’t understand why everyone isn’t doing it. Here’s what I think: all Bristol restaurants need to put a StreetSmart button on their till this November and December and get raising cash for these guys who badly need it. Just do it, you have nothing to lose and the homeless in Bristol have everything to gain.” Indeed, the StreetSmart family here in Bristol and Bath really does need more restaurants to sign up this year – and pronto. So, if you have a restaurant and would like to get in on the whole thing this time around, drop an email to fresh@pamlloyd.com, or visit streetsmart.org.uk and get your name down. It’s easy to operate, customers respect it and, well, it’s the right thing to do. And as for us hungry customers, we should be keeping an eye out for the StreetSmart logo at local restaurants this November and December, and doing good deeds over dinner.

RESTAURANTS SUPPORTING STREETSMART IN BRISTOL IN 2017 INCLUDE: Bomboloni, 225 Gloucester Road, BS7 8NR; bomboloni.net Fishers, 35 Princess Victoria Street, BS8 4BX; fishers-restaurant.com Flour & Ash, 203B Cheltenham Road, BS6 5QX; flourandash.co.uk The Gallimaufry, 26-28 Gloucester Road, BS7 8AL; thegallimaufry.co.uk Hubbox, 113 Whiteladies Road, BS8 2PB; hubbox.co.uk MEATliquor, Stokes Croft, Bristol BS1 3RD; meatliquor.com No Man’s Grace, 6 Chandos Road, BS6 6PE; nomansgrace.com Pasta Loco, 37A Cotham Hill, BS6 6JY; pastaloco.co.uk Polpo, 50 Whiteladies Road, BS8 2NH; polpo.co.uk Second Floor Restaurant at Harvey Nichols, Quakers Friars, BS1 3BZ; harveynichols.com Souk Kitchen, 277 North Street, BS3 1JP; soukitchen.co.uk Wilks, 1B Chandos Road, BS6 6PG; wilksrestaurant.co.uk Wilsons, 24 Chandos Road, BS6 6PF; wilsonsrestaurant.co.uk

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Set Lunch Menu

Available Monday-Saturday

2 courses £16.50 3 courses £19

Celebrate Christmas with us this year Group bookings now being taken 1st-23rd December

Set Dinner Menu

Available Tuesday-Saturday

2 courses £22 3 courses £25


GRILLED

a

JOsé PizarrO JESSICA CARTER CATCHES UP WITH THIS INTERNATIONALLY CELEBRATED CHEF, TO TALK ABOUT BUYING OLIVE OIL FROM A PHARMACY, HOW NO TWO ITALIAN NEIGHBOURHOODS WILL AGREE ON A RECIPE, AND HOW BREXIT IS SHAPING HIS MENUS...

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bout a year and a half ago, Spanish chef José’s award-winning book Basque was published, packed with recipes from this specific region of Spain. Next, he set his sights on Catalonia, and spent weeks travelling the area extensively to deepen his knowledge of its history, climate and ingredients, as well as – perhaps most importantly for this friendly Spaniard – meet the people. Even with this volume having not yet been released at the time we speak, José’s already talking about the next one, telling me he’s decided on the region it’ll focus on. It seems this chef isn’t one to take a break willingly. “It’s better to be busy than quiet, otherwise I’m in trouble!” he says. “I love it.” Running four London restaurants, though, he’s back in the kitchen at the first opportunity – when he’s not writing or touring, that is. “It’s what I love. With my chefs, my family. We spend so much time together, we’re family. And the team behind it, they’re amazing.” Writing the new book, though – Catalonia: Recipes from Barcelona and Beyond – took José out of his beloved restaurants to spend time in this autonomous community of Spain, travelling, researching and cooking with locals. “I was there for quite a few weeks, I cannot complain. This is research; eating and drinking is research!” he jokes, making it clear that he can barely believe his luck to be able to do all this in the name of ‘work’. “It’s not just about authentic recipes,” he explains. “It’s about the cuisine, the style of cooking. The recipes are very simple but really great, and they reflect the style of the area. “In Catalonia there are many influences from Italy, from the peninsula, from the rest of Spain, and one thing I love about the cuisine of Catalonia is how they mix a lot seafood and fish with meat: sea and mountain, together. And that really works, I just love it. For many, many years I’ve been cooking meatballs with cuttlefish, or chicken with langoustines. That is, I think, very important in Catalonian cooking. I love it. I love it!” Both of those recipes of course appear in the book, alongside more examples of ‘sea and mountain’, like razor clams with jamón and cava vinaigrette, and arroz negro with cuttlefish and butifarra sausage. It wasn’t all just flouncing around, eating and having a jolly ol’ time though, José says. “Often, you go to one place, another place, another place; you shoot something and have to leave. It’s amazing but it’s quite sad at the same

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G R I L L E D

time that you can’t stay and enjoy it. It’s a lot of travelling, but it was a lovely, lovely, lovely time. I love people, and meeting the people is important. “For me, it’s all about the people. I was travelling all over Catalonia meeting new people who were giving me recipes, and I got to cook with them in the kitchen, which is something very, very special. “It means you get the stories behind the recipes. There are so many histories I learnt that I think I need to write another book about the histories! People are really fascinated about this; they take it very seriously. “That’s the point; the history of the food, the love people put into the food, the ingredients of the area...” Of course, the food you’ll find across the Med varies hugely from region to region – even just from village to village – depending on the climate, what ingredients are available, and what the people need. “Always, I say, Spain is 17 countries in one. In the north of Spain they have to eat stews and warm things – you know, it’s cold – but if you go to the south it’s sunny and lighter. So it’s all related to the climate, and the climate makes the people. It’s as simple as that. “And the regions make the food. Catalonia, they have money there, so of course it’s going to be different from somewhere where it’s more working, more land, where people need to work very hard to get the food.” José came to the UK 18 years ago, and was faced with a very different culinary landscape to that which we have today. In less than two decades, he’s witnessed a complete turn-around

when it comes to people’s knowledge and experience of Spanish food. “Definitely things have changed a lot. People now recognise Spanish food. Now you can see a Basque restaurant, a Catalan restaurant – this is amazing. If you asked me 18 years ago whether we would now be in the position that we are, I would say, ‘It’s possible, but I’m really not sure’.” “When I came, the customer was not ready for this cuisine, they didn’t know about the ingredients. Spain’s not just about paella, Rioja, things like that – they are just basic. There is a lot more behind it, and people – my customers – now do understand that. And I think the country is ready for even more. “We’re so lucky with people wanting to try more things, new ingredients, new cooking techniques, new cuisines – and Spain is bringing them now to this country.” Safe to say, this hasn’t always been the case, though... “Fifteen years ago I went to do a cooking demo in Manchester. I was cooking with olive oil, and many people looked at me like I was crazy – because they thought olive oil is just to clean your ears with! And we are not talking 50 years ago, we are talking about 15,

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16 years ago. Customers didn’t even want to try the food, because it was made with olive oil! When I tell that to people in Spain they don’t believe it, but, before, some people would go to the pharmacy to buy it here.” IT’S NOT JUST OLIVE OIL that’s – thankfully – been assimilated into our British store cupboards, though; you can’t go into a deli, farm shop or supermarket without noticing all the Spanish ingredients which now line the shelves. “We are lucky that we can get any ingredient that we want; we have everything possible. I can order food now from Spain before 12 here in the UK, and I have it tomorrow at nine o’clock in the morning.” How about 18 years ago, though; wasn’t it difficult to try and create proper Spanish food without such easy availability? “It was more challenging; you had to accommodate the availability around you in your menu. But I use a lot from here now, because I believe in the community: you have to support your community and your country, as your community supports you. “But still I need to be using more, even more, produce from Britain. Because, you know, the pricing’s crazy at the moment – its crazy. The pound and the euro are almost the same. It’s challenging. It’s changing now to create your menu. In fact, I think it’s more challenging now than it was six or seven years ago.” But it’s still far from difficult to recreate those authentic Mediterranean flavours in these less exotic climes; José’s most important Spanish store cupboard staples are all pretty simple to get your mitts on, it turns out. “Always I’d say olive oil, and paprika, of course,” he says. “Then you have the

saffron. That, for me, is the base of everything: good olive oil, good paprika… They use it to flavour and to preserve, you know – think of chorizo. Oh, and the sherry vinegars, they’re important too...” And if you’re lucky enough to be visiting Catalonia in the not-to-distant future? Don’t miss out on some of their best ingredients: “The gambas, the prawns, are stunning. And the anchovies, they are so, so beautiful, so meaty.” But the thing that, for José, really makes Catalan food so distinctive and appealing? Can you guess? “For me, meeting the people is important. I love people.”

Catalonia: Recipes from Barcelona and Beyond is out on 19 Oct (Hardie Grant, £25), and José will be at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on 1 Nov; toppingbooks.co.uk; josepizarro.com; photography by Laura Edwards

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TRY OUR

SUNDAY LUNCH SERVED BETWEEN NOON-5PM

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The Catherine Wheel Marshfield, Bath SN14 8LR 01225 892220 roo@thecatherinewheel.co.uk www.thecatherinewheel.co.uk

Roast turkey breast filled with cranberry stuffing, wrapped in bacon, with a light red wine jus Baked sweet potato, quinoa, tomato & spinach salad, popped black beans & basil dressing (v, gf) Pan-fried cod w/ chorizo & puy lentils (gf)

PUDDINGS Traditional Christmas pudding w/ brandy sauce Lemon panna cotta w/ mixed berries & shortbread biscuit (gf) Chocolate torte w/ crushed amaretti biscuits Available from Friday 1st December to Sunday 31st December (excl 25th & 26th Dec)


Make your customers experience that little bit sweeter.. INDEPENDENTLY OWNED FOR OVER 30 YEARS. THIS COSY CAFE HAS BEEN A FAVOURITE OF LOCALS AND VISITORS ALIKE. The Courtyard Cafe is situated just a stone’s throw away from Bath Abbey in the historic Lilliput Court.

We take pride in baking indulgent Flapjack and Shortbread miniature treats, ideal for all hospitality and catering needs. Using the finest, carefully selected ingredients the bite size biscuits are jam packed with delicious flavour.

The home made food is hearty and chef Kirsty’s cakes are quite moorish, making this cafe a great spot for breakfast, lunch, or a quick stop for a little something sweet.

Wishing all finalists good luck! Premium handmade products Regionally sourced ingredients Family recipes Improving the hospitality experience Over 30 years experience Ideal , ce events ffi o for rty a p , rs u o fav wedding des ri s & cycle bags, walk tea... or for on & afterno ret supply. sec n w o your

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INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND RUN • SOUTH BRISTOL’S BEST STEAKHOUSE

The Ashville Steakhouse, 15 Leigh Street, Bristol BS3 1SN • Tel: 0117 939 6897 • Email: info@theashvillesteakhouse.co.uk

www.theashvillesteakhouse.co.uk


THAI CORNER

24 Kellaway Ave, Redland Bristol BS6 7XR

0117 924 5450

Opening hours

Monday: Closed Tuesday - Friday: 10am - 2:30pm, 4pm - 11pm Saturday: 10am - 11pm Sunday: 10am - 9:30pm


Country pub

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THE LONGS ARMS South Wraxall

Charming country pub * Smoked foods lovingly produced in our very own Smokehouse * Warm & friendly atmosphere * Lovely walled garden * Function room available

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South Wraxall | Bradford on Avon | Wiltshire | BA15 2SB TheLongsArms @thelongsarms Tel: 01225 864450 | www.thelongsarms.com

Festive Menus 2017

Festive Celebration Lunch Three courses £25.00pp Festive Celebration Dinner Three courses £35.00pp Christmas Day Lunch Seven courses £120.00pp New Year’s Eve Gala Black Tie Celebration Dinner Seven courses £165.00pp Please ask about our bespoke exclusive use packages. Homewood Park Hotel, Restaurant and Spa is the perfect destination for your Bath Christmas Celebrations. To book, or for more information, please call 01225 723731 or email info@homewoodpark.co.uk and quote FEST 17

Abbey Lane, Freshford, Bath, BA2 7TB www.homewoodpark.co.uk


Christmas at Zanky's!

Book now for your Christmas party Treat yourself with authentic Sardinian/ Italian feast Only freshly homemade at Zanky's! For all enquiries or reservations call 0117 904 7646 or email zankysbristol@gmail.com

CHRISTMAS BOOKINGS NOW BEING TAKEN

26 Filton Road, Bristol BS7 0PA www.zankysbristol.co.uk

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The Malago is a friendly bar and restaurant with a focus on fresh, locally sourced, quality food. Our dishes offer something for everyone. Our menu is inclusive of vegetarians and vegans, we have a delicious, freshly prepared children’s menu, and our chefs can cater for all dietary requirements. Now serving freshly prepared roasts every Sunday, 2-8pm. Meat, vegetarian and vegan options available. Booking advised! Open Monday to Saturday 9am to 11pm, Sunday 9am to 10pm Our kitchen is open daily serving brunch 9-3pm, lunch 12-3pm, and dinner 5.30-9.30pm (5.30-9pm on Sundays).

www.themalago.club  eatout@themalago.club 220 North Street, Southville, BS3 1JD  0117 963 9044


PUXTON BUTCHERS LOCAL FOOD WITH FLAVOUR

Classic cuts, sensational seasoning At Puxton the butchers make and season all their burgers, award-winning sausages and marinated cuts here on site.

zero food miles | farm fresh | totally traceable Puxton Park, Cowslip Lane, Hewish, BS24 6AH 01934 523505

www.puxton.co.uk


Celebration Menu 2 or 3 course, £23 or £28 per person

EAT, DRINK & BE MERRY

Top Lane, Whitley, Wiltshire SN12 8QX 01225 704966 T f @peartreewhitley

www.peartreewhitley.co.uk


A F T E RS RESTAURANTS / CAFÉS / BARS

This Gloucester Road restaurant has got itself a blindin’ rep – but does it live up to the hype?

H I G H L I G H T S

DOUGHNUT EVEN THINK ABOUT IT Dinner at Bomboloni can only end one way... Page 134

THAT’S A WRAP

The Athenian does kebabs, but not as you know ’em Page 136

ANIMAL FARM A right proper brekkie at Windmill Hill City Farm’s Café Page 142

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( N E W I S H R E S TA U R A N T S )  

BOMBOLONI    THIS FRIENDLY, BUZZY RESTAURANT GIVES YOU DELICIOUS AND COMFORTING BANG FOR YOUR BUCK, RECKONS JESSICA CARTER 

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stalwart of the Bristol food scene, Andrew Griffin has worked in many of its kitchens over the years – think Prego, and Tart Café and Foodstore, to name just a couple. This summer, though, he opened his very own place, putting his invaluable knowledge and experience – not only of running kitchens but also of the city’s diners and their wonts – to smashing use. So, it’s hardly a fluke that he seems to have hit upon a real culinary sweet spot with his new Italian venture on Gloucester Road. The epitome of a neighbourhood restaurant, this family-run gaff (Andrew’s

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daughter, who he trained at Tart Café, and wife work alongside him here) is laid-back and friendly, with a straightforward list of good-quality, wholesome dishes. No need for frills or embellishments, no asking the staff to explain or translate the menu, and no self-consciously hushed conversations. The atmosphere was jolly and buzzy on the Tuesday night we visited. Every table seemed to be using the restaurant differently: for family meals, social get togethers, quiet date nights, and even just somewhere to grab a bit of dinner to save cooking at home. That’s the beauty of this place, and of all good neighbourhood restaurants – they can


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be all things to all people. Indeed, open six days a week from 10am until 10pm (4pm on Sundays), it’s a place for breakfast, a quick coffee, a leisurely cuppa and cake, lunch and dinner, and caters for everything from celebrations to feeding you at a reasonable price when there’s just nothing appetising left in the fridge.   A firm believer that a house wine can be helpfully telling of a restaurant, that’s exactly what I order. The white. And the news was positive – a light and easy-drinking wine that’s as friendly to the wallet as is it would be to probably any dish on the menu. Speaking of dishes from the menu, the spinach, goat’s cheese and pine nut arancini (£6.95) was a hearty starter, the golden crumbed balls packed with plump, silky risotto. They sat on a wonderfully rich tomato sauce that I’d absolutely buy in jars if ever they were to start selling it (there’s a hint in there, somewhere), and were peppered with finely chopped basil. Bang on the money. The grilled octopus (£7.50) was confidently charred on the outside and cooked well within. It came with slices of soft and smooth potato, and was pepped up with capers, tomato and herbs.   Main courses range from slow-cooked beef shin ragu with parpadelle (£11.95) to whole Dover sole with basil, parsley and pine nuts (£15), and homemade pork and beef meatballs in tomato sauce (£11.95). Wholesome and comforting food. It was the seafood linguine (£12.95) that won out in the end, though. It came packed with

fat, juicy mussels, plump prawns and small, meaty parlourde clams. That lot was all tangled up in nicely al dente linguine, and the whole thing coated in a light and garlicky tomato sauce, golden with saffron and fresh with chopped herbs.  There was also overnight lamb shoulder (£13), that had been stripped from the bone, compressed into neat discs, then panfried for a lovely dark brown crust. A nicely chunky and pokey salsa verde balanced the richness of the tender meat, which rested on top of cannellini beans. It’s a dish that most of us will have had a few times before in different guises, but this version is probably my favourite to date.    We could hardly visit a restaurant that’s named after a sweet without trying said sweet, so that’s what we ended with. The soft, spongy and sugar-coated bomboloni doughnuts (£6.95) were miniature in size and generous in number. Instead of being filled, they came with boozy cherries and mascarpone that had been lifted with a whisper of orange.    The quality of the ingredients, the clear care they’re cooked with, and the keen portion sizes give the impression of a team that quite simply enjoys feeding people. And that attitude permeates the whole outfit, informing the atmosphere, the menu and the service. This is a really welcome and relevant restaurant – although, taking into account the number of people we were joined by for dinner, it seems everyone already knows that.

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Bomboloni, 225 Gloucester Road, Bristol BS7 8NR; 0117 239 6506; bomboloni.net 


A F T E R S

( F A B F O O D T O G O )  

THE ATHENIAN      DAN IZZARD COULD HAVE DONE WITH A FEW MORE NAPKINS DURING LUNCH HERE... 

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he disappointment of it all: that late night kebab that looks like a solid 10 from distance, but is actually more like a three up close, and thousands of years of culinary culture culminating in you dripping an unidentifiable condiment down yourself. What you really want is souvlaki (which is named after the cooking method, translating to ‘little skewer’): grilled meats, salad, and often chips, all stuffed into a warm pita wrap. And The Athenian may just be the closest thing us locals can get to authentic souvlaki. Without getting a budget airline involved, anyway.  The irony of using imported Greek ingredients while sat in a shipping container is not lost. It’s a compact unit, but bright and uncluttered. Along the far side is the grill and salad bar – with a fresh display of fillings. Along another wall, a large fridge unit packed with Greek wine and beer. Picking up the bottle opener from the side, I crack open a couple of cold ones, pretending to be contemplating a salad while I take a swig.  

It’s casual as you like. There’s, of course, no booking – just rock up with an appetite. Scattered benches inside and out are lined with a constant stream of office workers and tourists, but you can take away too, obvs. We take the opportunity to soak up the last few rays of sun overlooking the rest of Cargo 2. A great spot for people watching over a mezze board.   Said mezze makes a great sharer: £13 gets you several pita breads, cucumber, four dips and two beers to wash it down with. The oregano dusted over the slate promptly blows away in the wind, like a fragrant herb storm, but the dips are happily hardier in the September breeze. Spicy tyrokafteri – a smooth cheese-based dip with hot peppers – has me reaching for the cool relief of my crisp Greek lager, and the tapenade too has a lovely intense and concentrated olive flavour.   For the souvlaki, you can go for one grilled filling (chicken, pork, lamb or halloumi at £5.50); a filling and halloumi (£6.90); or double meat (£7.40). We go for the pork, given it’s the traditional option, and added halloumi too. Also joining

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the party: tomatoes, parsley, red onion, chips, oregano and a squeeze of lemon juice. You can get the wraps deconstructed as a salad box which are slightly pricier, but I’m hardly about to miss out on the tasty handmade pita.  There’s a decent amount of juicy grilled pork packed into the wrap, and it’s flanked with slabs of cheese (which is actually a variation on halloumi called talagani from southern Greece – softer and creamier than your standard kind). Obviously, the first thing I do, though, is nick a chip from the top, dipping it in the cool, fresh tzatziki.   The pita comes from Chasiotis, a familyrun Greek bakery that’s more than 70 years old, and its soft, chewy texture contrasts nicely with the crisp, crunchy salad. It’s a neat little package of a meal – albeit one I did spill everywhere – and is certainly a filling feed, on the go.

The Athenian, Cargo 2, Unit 16, First Floor, Goal Ferry Steps, Bristol BS1 6WD; theathenian.co.uk 


01225 832296

E: info@hopeandanchormidford.co.uk Midford Road, Midford, BA2 7DD (nr Bath) www.hopeandanchormidford.co.uk

SUNDAY LUNCH AT THE HOPE AND ANCHOR Full regular lunch menu Specials including at least one roast – usually Rib of Beef with all the trimmings £13.50 adult / £7.50 child Selection of delicious homemade puds available for that Sunday treat Booking is strongly advised We are 10 minutes south of Bath by car, or if you’re feeling fit, an easy 20 minute bike ride / 50 minute stroll along the Two Tunnels cycle path which leads straight into our car park. OPEN ALL DAY AT WEEKENDS & BANK HOLIDAYS FROM 11AM Lunch 12 -3pm Dinner 6-9.30pm • Snacks available in the afternoons Mon-Fri OPEN 11.30-3pm & 6-10.30pm • Food 12-2pm and 6-9.30pm Dogs welcome in the bar

The

Guildhall Delicatessen

Situated in Bath’s famous indoor market

emersonliving contemporary kitchen spaces Visit our showroom in Bath 01225 571943 www.emersonliving.co.uk

We stock a wide range of vegan, vegetarian and meat based products as well as delicious cakes and Bath Buns. Ideal for lunches, any time snacks or picnics. Come and order your food and collect it when you need it. We can even cater for small business lunches. Our range includes: Vegan, lamb or chicken samosas, veggie or meat pasties, bhajis, vegan or pork sausage rolls and veggie or pork scotch eggs. We also stock a range of speciality scotch eggs, pies and vegetarian quiches. Why not add a Lovely juice drink to your lunch time selection.

Open Mon - Sat, 9.30 - 17.00

8 Guildhall Market, Bath BA2 4AW • Tel: 01225 427195 email: guildhall-deli@hotmail.co.uk twitter: @GuildhallDeli


Award Winning, Family Run Farm Shop Established for over 30 years Selling Quality Local Produce Open Daily 9am-6pm 10am-5pm on Sundays

HOME & LOCALLY REARED FRESH MEAT, POULTRY & GAME HOMEMADE SAUSAGES, BURGERS & FAGGOTS

Interiors & Homewares Handmade Fairtrade Reclaimed Vintage Gifts & Cards

LOCAL CHEESES & HOME COOKED MEATS LOCALLY GROWN VEGETABLES, FRUIT & SALAD HOMEMADE CAKES & PIES LOCALLY MADE CHOCOLATES & FUDGE PRESERVES & CHUTNEYS LOCAL ALES, CIDERS & FINE WINES GIFT HAMPERS

Christmas meat orders now being taken

TEL: 01249 658112 www.allingtonfarmshop.co.uk

The Ground Floor, The Brewhouse, Georges Square, Bristol BS1 6LA (Over the new bridge opposite Castle Park)

Tel: 0117 321 5445

10 Margaret's Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP homefrontinteriors.co.uk T: 01225 571711 E: info@homefrontinteriors.co.uk


A F T E R S

( R E J U V E D P U B S )

THE MILL    SAT RIGHT ON THE RIVER FROME, THIS RURAL GASTROPUB SURE IS A LOOKER, THINKS JESSICA CARTER

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aving not long been refurbed, thanks to a sizeable cash injection from its growing parent company Butcombe, The Mill feels like a fresh, modern pub, although it’s been carefully designed with rustic touches to keep some traditional character. Outside is a network of decked seating areas, underneath which the River Frome quietly passes. This picturesque alfresco space has probably seen the last of its action for the year, but spent the summer packed out, we were told – and we believe it.   As well as a fancy renovation, the pub also received a few new additions to the kitchen team, including a new, experienced head chef. As a result, the menus have

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increased in their range, meaning the pub classics are accompanied by less traditional dishes with resturant-style finesse – such as a salad of courgette, aubergine, red onion, vine tomatoes and local mozzarella, and whole crab with watercress mayonnaise and fir apple potato salad. Homemade tomato and caramelised onion focaccia with dukkah (£3.50) went down a treat as a little warm up while we read the sizeable menu. A large venue catering for the pub and restaurant, casual and celebration crowds, efforts have been made to keep all kinds of punters happy, with a selection of classic pub dishes, a good few alternative mains, and salads.  With the menu having just been updated with the turn of the season, the scallop


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starter (£9.50) had swapped its summery watermelon platefellow for more autumnal butternut squash gnocchi. The preciselycooked scallops were light and creamy in texture and flavour, and sat on a bed of subtle sweetcorn purée, with shards of crispy salmon skin adding bite. The gnocchi wasn’t great; dry and stodgy, it took some chewing, but the other elements were good – and of a generous portion. The second starter was described as ‘roast beef carpaccio’ (£8), so not carpaccio as you’d traditionally encounter it (as raw meat). Instead, rare-cooked beef was sliced super-thinly in that way that’s so difficult to achieve in a domestic kitchen at home. Lined up in a row, the slices were topped with pickled shallots, herby salsa verde, Old Winchester cheese and drizzles of a light, lemony sauce. Despite my chum later admitting that he missed the thrill and texture of the raw meat he was hoping for (someone hadn’t read the description properly), he swiftly wolfed this starter down in a handful of mouthfuls, the balanced tang of the salsa verde and pickled shallots cutting through the meat and forming a pokey, balanced mix of flavours.  Next, the sweet potato and spinach cannelloni (£14.50) carried a hefty, crunchy herb crust on top of it, while a mix of aubergine and pine nut hid beneath. The idea was a nice one; a mix of sweet, bitter and earthy flavours, with crunch from the pine nut and that lightly browned crust. The filling-to-pasta ratio was perhaps not in my favour, though; there was a lot of sweet

potato to get through inside the single layer of pasta. Perhaps a few smaller filled tubes would have worked better than a large, single cannellone. Across the table, the locally caught hake from the specials board (£16) was the favourite dish of the meal; the fish itself was great-quality, came covered in a thick herb crust and had been cooked really nicely. It was presented in an intriguing fashion, surrounded by hasselback potatoes – their golden, flavoursome skin fanning out impressively – and sat on a purée of lesserspotted parsley root. This veg, which the chef happily incorporated into his dishes following a local glut, had also been sliced, pickled, and presented as crunchy curls on the side. A good and interesting dish.  This place has an experienced pastry chef, and the resulting puds have been created to fit in well with the rest of the menu and the concept of the dining experience. The rich and spongy sticky toffee and Butcombe ale pudding (£6.25) was a good quality version of the pub classic, while the pistachio treacle tart with crème fraiche and candied orange powder (£6.50) repped the more restaurantstyle offering. The Mill is a handsome, friendly pub with great staff and a more ambitious menu than your average watering hole. We’ll be keeping an eye on how it develops as part of this growing family of pubs.

The Mill, Rode, Somerset BA11 6AG; 01373 831100; butcombe.com

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h

aving a rather switched-on and energetic five-year-old for a nephew, pre-planned activities are a bit of a must when he comes to visit. So, having Windmill Hill City Farm a fiveminute walk away from my flat has come in pretty useful on several occasions. After checking out all the animals (the ducks get multiple visits each time – they’re a particular favourite, apparently), the greenhouse and the veg patches, I get to have my treat. (Lunch in the café, in case that wasn’t clear.)   Having undergone some substantial work earlier this year, the dining area reopened recently, with much more indoor seating and a new little retail section, where it sells everything from eggs (which come from the farm’s chickens) to seasonal veg (also from the farm) and homemade condiments. When we last went along, there was many a jar of pickled cucumber on the shelves, the kitchen having made good use of the seasonal glut they were harvesting. There are also wares from other small, carefully chosen producers, including fresh bread and organic dairy.   The offering at the caff is concise and family friendly. Breakfasts and sarnies sit alongside a seasonal soup and stew on the blackboard, with options for both kids and adults. No fish fingers or burgers in sight. The team are great at accommodating the kids and their culinary peculiarities, too – because what five-year-old could possibly eat a cheese sandwich without a sausage on the side? (Legit previous order, there.)  The counter is well-stocked too, with salads, a frittata of the day, Scotch eggs, homemade sausage rolls et al. There are a number of freshly baked cakes on display too, which we can rarely avoid going back for after lunch.   Of course, many of the ingredients used in the kitchen are grown and reared on the farm, but these need to be supplemented – there are only so many eggs you can lay in a day, as the hens will tell you. What is bought in adheres to the same principles as that of the farm: bacon comes from Sandridge Farm in Wiltshire, for instance, and those extra eggs come from happy, local, free-range hens (the ones from the farm are sold, as opposed to used in the kitchen). 

( F A B F A M I LY C A F É S )  

WINDMILL HILL CITY FARM CAFÉ     DON’T TELL HER NEPHEW, BUT WHILE HE WAS AT SCHOOL, JESSICA CARTER VISITED HIS MUCH-LOVED CITY FARM WITHOUT HIM...  Breakfast was the order of the day at my most recent visit, which was sans fiveyear-old. This time, I was the child instead, with Mrs C in tow.   The City Farmer (£7.95 for adults) is the café’s own version of a full English. That Sandridge bacon was thick cut and wellcooked, and the sausages lean and wellseasoned. The fried eggs had wonderfully sunny orange yolks, and the mushrooms were served plump and with bite. Baked beans, grilled tommies and rich, meaty spinach (the latter two having been grown on the farm) give the brekkie some fivea-day value, too. Everything was very clearly fresh and carefully cooked; it hit the spot, basically. There was a City Grower too (£7.50 for adults), which is the veggie version. On this

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plate, the meat was substituted for a couple of good-quality veggie sausages.  Some of those homemade condiments are available for café diners to make use of, too – so I forwent the brown sauce in favour of hot chilli jam, which contained the farm’s own birds eye chillies. There was sweetness and spice all in good measure.   It just happens that Windmill Hill City Farm celebrated its 40th birthday last year – a notable achievement for a charity-run outfit – and remains a great place to tire out the kids. Happily, it’s also pretty good for refuelling all of you afterwards. 

Windmill Hill City Farm Café, Philip Street, Bristol BS3 4EA; 0117 963 3252; windmillhillcityfarm.org.uk 


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L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

BEN WhITE THIS HUNGRY MEMBER OF THE MARSHFIELD BAKERY TEAM SHARES HIS FAVOURITE FOODIE HIDEOUTS...

Favourite grocery shop? Larkhall Farm Shop always has a good array of local fresh fruit and veg, as well as flowers. The service there is always with a smile, too. Best wine merchant? Tasting Room. I go quite often – in fact, far too often! There are some fantastic featured wines and spirits, and I’ve also been to a few tasting events there which are well run and really informative.

Best curry? For simple classics, Curry Mahal is my fave, to takeaway or eat in. Posh nosh? The Circus (not mega posh, but still lovely). Best atmosphere? Graze, Bath. I love this place for drinks with mates or a meal in a lively spot. Always seems to be busy, and the service is great.

Quick pint? The Rose and Crown, Larkhall. It’s literally paces from my house, and the new owners have done a great job. A quick pint often leads to more… With friends? The Beaufort. This has been a great addition to the Larkhall area. Laid back, friendly but no compromise on quality.   With the family? Alice Park Café – taking the kids to the park and then enjoying a quick bite is ideal. Well located, safe and always a friendly vibe.

Breakfast? Wild Café in Bath – great vibe, especially for a Saturday brunch. Good range of breakfasts, but I tend to go for the classic full English. Alfresco feasting? Avon Gorge Hotel in Bristol: the view cannot really be bettered. Looking down the Avon at the Clifton Suspension Bridge, whilst eating and drinking, is fab!   Belting burger? Three Brothers Burgers. I went there recently after work – wow. Simply great burgers, and a generally cool place.

Best brew?                               Boston Tea Party. I love the layout and feel in the Alfred Street site, especially. Good place for business meetings too, and I think they serve the best tea.

One to watch?                         Pintxo. Bath has a good tapas scene, and this could be the next great addition. Really well done food, and good range of sherry. marshfieldbakery.co.uk

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QUICK! Now add this little lot to your contacts book Larkhall Farm Shop, Bath BA1 6SD; bathboxes.co.uk Tasting Room, Bath BA1 2JY; tastingroom.co.uk The Rose and Crown, Bath BA1 6SJ; roseandcrownlarkhall.co.uk The Beaufort, Bath BA1 6QB; thebeaufortbath.com Alice Park Café, Bath BA1 7BL; alicepark.co.uk Boston Tea Party, Bath BA1 2QU; bostonteaparty.co.uk Curry Mahal, Bath BA1 5HR; currymahal.net The Circus, Bath BA1 2LN; thecircusrestaurant.co.uk Graze, Bath BA1 1SX; bathales.com Wild Café, Bath BA1 1HE; wildcafe.co.uk Avon Gorge Hotel, Bristol BS8 4LD; theavongorgehotel.com Three Brothers Burgers, Bristol BS1 4SB; threebrothersburgers.co.uk Pintxo, Bath BA1 1HG; pintxo.co.uk


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Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 68  
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