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A little slice of foodie heaven

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ISSUE 66 SEPTEMBER 2017 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ONLINE EDITOR

DAN IZZARD dan.izzard@mediaclash.co.uk CONTRIBUTOR

MARK TAYLOR ART DIRECTOR

faLLen marrOw

TREVOR GILHAM ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY PRODUCTION MANAGER

KIRSTIE HOWE kirstie.howe@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 www.mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we got a new online editor, Dan! Dan is a long-time member of the Bristol food massive, and wants you to hit him up with news and feature ideas for the website!

large version

This month’s Hero Ingredient has sparked many a conversation at Crumbs HQ over the last few weeks. We hope there haven’t been any of said British allotment staples in earshot when these discussions were taking place, though – some of the comments chucked around were, well, less than complimentary. That said, marrow’s corner has been rightly fought, and it can now finally call itself a worthy (if perhaps controversial) Crumbs cover star. It’s one of those ingredients – like cauli, perhaps – that ignites unappetising childhood memories of mushy, overcooked, tasteless dinners that held us hostage at the table until we’d eaten every last mouthful. Now, though, it’s time to forgive and forget – and yep, that includes our parents, for their culinary sins – and take a fresh look at this green giant; it’s in plentiful supply this month, so the timing couldn’t be better. Another topic of conversation among the team, you won’t be shocked to learn, has been the Crumbs Awards entries, which we’ve seen fly into the office in their hundreds. Food and drink businesses of all shapes and sizes have thrown their hats into the ring in a bid to be crowned champions in October, and we couldn’t be more chuffed at the volume and quality of their entries. From finding out about unsung front-of-house heroes to discovering the amazing initiatives using food to help bring positive change, we’ve had countless reasons to feel proud of our little patch – read our update in the news pages to see where we’re at with the judging process. Elsewhere this issue, we’ve been exploring the foodie hangouts and riverside bars of Hotwells in Bristol (named for the hot springs that once made it Bath’s closest rival), and eating dinner up a crane (yup, really) with Elly Curshen. Tuck in.

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

Crumbs is now an app! You can read all editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, Cotswolds and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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Table of CContents Tabl nt nt STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT Green giants 12 OPENINGS ETC 17 TRIO Online grocery shops

CHEF!

28 Pork belly, by Nora Joo-Kovacs 31 Moroccan Pacific bowl, by Janice Heskett

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32 Veggie chilli con carne, by Adrian Jenkins 34 Vegan burger, by Rich Sheppard and Tom Edwards ADDITIONAL RECIPES

10 Slow-cooked marrow, by Freddy Bird

NO.66 SEPTEMBER 2017

KITCHEN ARMOURY

AFTERS

39 SUPPER CLUB A feast from Elly Curshen's ace new recipe book 46 WANT LIST Get the look from this month’s Supper Club

60 The Malago

MAINS

23 Chicken with citrus and olives, by Rachel Roddy

51 FEELING HOT(WELLS) A guide to this delicious patch of Bristol, right on the river

45 Hake tray bake, by Elly Curshen

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63 The Kendleshire 64 Romy’s Kitchen PLUS 66 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Tom Bowles reveals the local foodie joints where he likes to spend his downtime


START E RS INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

JAZZ NIGHTS THROUGHOUT AUGUST Check out Bath’s The Pump Room on a Wednesday evening in August and you’ll find not only summer cocktails flowing but also the sounds of live jazz between 6.30pm and 9pm; romanbaths.co.uk

ESPRESSOFEST 19-20 AUGUST This brand new coffee festival at The Passenger Shed, Bristol will see the 2017 United Kingdom Barista Championship winner crowned, while visitors will also be able to lap up loads of coffee education too; tickets £6 from espressofest.com

TIMBRELL’S YARD BANK HOLIDAY EVENT 27 AUGUST Billed as an evening of ‘Balearic beats, smoked meats and vegan treats’, this little BoA shindig will feature plenty of street food, pop up bars and live entertainment. From 4.30pm ’til late; timbrellsyard.com

Foodie Events

BOTTOmS uP! IT’S ALL ABOUT THE LIQUID REFRESHMENTS AT THESE UPCOMING LOCAL EVENTS…

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CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL 15-17 SEPTEMBER Try local brews, as well as creations from all over the world, at this all-in event at Motion – it’ll be all hands to the pumps to celebrate the craft of brewing. Tickets from £30; bristolcraftbeerfestival.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

mARROw THEY’RE EASY TO MOCK, PACKED WITH COMEDY VALUE AND HARD TO KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH – BUT WE’VE STILL GOT A SOFT SPOT FOR THE GALLUMPHING MARROW…

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o those brought up with saucy seaside postcards, there are few vegetables with the comic possibilities of the oversized, torpedoshaped marrow. “It’s a beautiful prize marrow, Mrs Peabody, and we all hope you’ll take it home and stuff it!”; “Four nice marrows you have there, Mrs. Ramsbottom!”; “He was streaking through the flower show – and got first prize in the marrow section!” (All quite genuine, of course, but we’re afraid you’re going to have to imagine the images that went with each caption yourselves.) For those spring chickens amongst us, however, marrows rarely figure at all. They’re too big, too bland, and forever in the shadow of the smaller, more versatile, less intimidating courgette. How unfair on the mighty marrow! (Not least because courgettes are essentially nothing more or less than baby marrows, anyway. You leave a courgette to grow a little longer and, bingo, you’ve got a marrow; and a marrow you pick too early, well, that’s just a courgette.) Because they take longer to get that big, marrow season runs August to September, with courgette season starting a couple of months before. The competition prize marrow, bent and knobbly and as heavy as a baby rhino, is not what you want for eating. These are creations all of their own, nurtured and shielded and designed to be heavy as well as big, for this is one of the chief criteria for judging oversized veg. The giant marrow grower’s big fear is not

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that his prize specimen’s flesh will be watery and bitter – it will be, as this is what all giant marrows are like – but that it will split four days before a show. All marrows have creamy flesh, edible seeds and tough (but just about edible) skin, and are easy to prepare; we’d generally get rid of the peel, scoop out the cotton wool core, then cut the pale flesh into rough chunks. What you really want is a little one – no bigger than your forearm, probably – which will make the perfect mild-and-creamy blank canvas in the kitchen. Marrows are happy to be steamed, fried, boiled, sautéd, baked or roasted, and are ready to team with strong flavours like chilli, garlic, rosemary or thyme. Marrow also works well with citrus fruit, spices and bacon; you can use them as a mash, bake them into cakes, turn them into a chutney or pickle, serve them in a white sauce, or stuff the whole thing with the likes of rice, lentils or mince. Other things to consider: cheese and pasta bakes, smooth soups, delicious ratatouille, assorted salads, or adding marrow to the parsnips et al in a beef roast. Or even try it in curries, where the marrow soaks up and amplifies other flavours; indeed, few things are as warming and filling as a marrow curry with coriander and garlic.

Marrows are cucurbits, a family we treat as a veggie – and also includes the likes of melons, pumpkins and cucumbers – but which are actually botanically fruit. (Don’t let it put you off, but this is basically the swollen ovary of the marrow flower.) The marrows we currently eat actually come from the Americas, and were mostly developed into the versions we know in northern

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Italy perhaps 150 years ago; before they arrived we still ate ‘marrows’, but they were something else, a cucurbit gourd from Africa that had been around since before the Romans. Generally, the world sees the marrow – with mild amusement – as very British thing, and most other countries have long preferred the sweeter, immature varieties, whether they’re called courgettes (in France, Holland and Britain, the diminutive of ‘courge’ for gourd) or zucchini (in Italy, Germany and America, the diminutive form of ‘zucca’, for… you guessed it). Only in South Africa is it called what it actually is, a ‘baby marrow’. In the UK, courgettes were rarely seen exotica until the ’60s, and though most of us have embraced them wholeheartedly since – courgettes are tender and more manageable, after all – don’t dismiss the marrow. Though neither contain much food energy, they do offer some useful goodies, like vitamin A and potassium – but can also, oddly enough, contain harmful toxins. Yes, these have been bred out of the species we eat, but still occur just enough to make the occasional, particularly bitter, courgette or marrow a mistake to chomp on. The other thing marrows are is super cheap, for their size means one marrow can easily feed four or so, and they grow easily enough that many an allotment (and supermarket shelf) will be overrun by the things in high season. So much so, in fact, that – despite our list of suggestions above – it can take some imagination knowing quite what to do with them. Luckily, Freddy has a cool suggestion just over the page…

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R E C I P E

FREDDY BIRD WASN’T ALWAYS A FAN OF THIS MONTH’S HERO INGREDIENT, BUT CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF IT NOW, ESPECIALLY IN THIS DISH… BEFORE I STARTED COOKING, the offer of marrow for my supper filled me with dread. Normally watery and stuffed with mince, it would be presented in the middle of the table like some kind of Fanny Craddock monstrosity. I remember rummaging through the vegetable garden and pulling out any marrows i could find and hurling them into the river… I’m glad to report, however, that this is no longer the case; the minute the marrow season starts kicking off, my veg man knows to call me. Apparently the Lido is his only marrow customer! If you’re not a fan of marrow, this recipe should change your mind – it goes down a storm at the restauant. Just remember, the salting process is imperative; if you don’t do it the marrow will be watery and flavourless. LIDO, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 933 9530; lidobristol.com

SLOW-COOKED MARROW SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 1 marrow (of good girth and length) ½ block of unsalted butter 4 red onions, sliced 1 head of garlic 2 tsp allspice 150g natural yoghurt 4 eggs Turkish pepper flakes large handful flat leaf parsley, chopped large handful walnuts, lightly toasted METHOD 1 First, peel, deseed and cut your marrow into 1-inch chunks. Sprinkle with salt (enough to season, no more) and set aside in a colander for a couple of hours. 2 In a pan, heat ⅔ of the butter and fry the marrow until lightly browned all over, then set aside. 3 In the same pan, slowly cook the onions and garlic (saving one clove) with a little salt and the allspice until lightly caramelised. 4 Return the marrow to the pan and continue to cook slowly for another 10 minutes. (The further you do this in advance, the better the flavour will be.) 5 Crush the remaining garlic clove in a pestle and mortar with a large pinch of salt and stir into the yoghurt. 6 Poach the eggs to your liking and serve on top of the warm marrow and onions. Drizzle with the garlic yoghurt and sprinkle with the Turkish pepper flakes, parsley and walnuts. 7 To finish, take the remaining butter and fry until rich and golden. Drizzle this over the top and serve immediately.

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S T A R T E R S

Openings etc

SQUIDS IN

Thai restaurant group Giggling Squid is opening a new site in Bath. The 15-year-old business was founded by Pranee Laurillard and her husband Andrew, the idea being to recreate the flavours of Pranee’s home country over on these Western shores. The chefs will cook up all kinds of Asian-style food: curries, salads, noodle and rice dishes, and even Asian tapas. To be housed in a 19th-century building in Saw Close, the restaurant will complement its home’s history and style in its design, which will incorporate space for 150 diners, plus an extra 40 outside. gigglingsquid.com

A LOT TO GAIN

Having taken The Gainsborough to new culinary levels since joining as head chef 18 months ago, Dan Moon has given his name to the restaurant as part of its recent relaunch. With his contemporary, theatrical fare, Dan has become known for giving diners a multisensory experience, while championing local farmers and the tip-top produce of the South West. Working to push culinary boundaries and create innovative flavour combinations, this chef wants to make sure there will always be something new to discover on his guests’ next visit. The restaurant’s new name acknowledges Dan’s work, and reflects the stamp he’s put on the menu since taking the helm in the kitchen. thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk

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FRESH MEAT

The new Apex hotel is set to open in Bath this month – and that means a brand new restaurant will launch, too. Head chef Ben Abercrombie – who you might remember from last issue – is a Somerset native and, despite only being 26, already has a pretty impressive CV. At his new gig, he’ll lead a sizeable kitchen team in cooking not only for the contemporary restaurant, but also the bar and events. apexhotels.co.uk


FANTASTIC FEASTS

The Great Bath Feast is returning for 2017 – from 28 September to 8 October – and the programme is looking mighty fine. Special tours, tastings, markets and dinners are already penned into the diary, and there’s still more being added to the list an’ all. The Great Bath Feast has been running since 2012, and aims to showcase the quality and range of the food and drink scene in the city, so clear your calendar and grab a spoon! greatbathfeast.co.uk

new Kid On the blOCK

LOOK HERE: IT’S ALEX CRAWLEY, HEAD CHEF OF NEW CLEVEDON GAFF, PURO So Alex, what kind of vibe can we expect at this new restaurant? We want people to come and spend a whole evening with us; nothing’s rushed, so customers can take their time to enjoy everything we’ve created.

What are your favourite ingredients at the moment? At this time of year, tomatoes for sure, fresh or cooked, and I like to ferment some for the colder months, too. Radishes are amazingly good this season, and so refreshing in the heat!

What made you want to get involved? It’s great to have a fresh slate to start on. Also, the owner Dom is really enthusiastic and wants to push for big things.

Do you grow anything yourself? I’ve got lots of herbs going: bay, rosemary, lemon thyme… Had some nice rhubarb this year, and always get some quinces which I bloody love. There’s some cheeky rose hip on the go as well...

What did the launch involve for you, as head chef? Talking to suppliers, writing menus, starting a few ferments and preserves, getting Molly (our sourdough mother) going – and painting, of course! How have you approached the menu? We have a three-course set menu for lunch and early evening, which I’ve kept nice and simple. Then, for the a la carte, I’ve really pushed the Puro concept and focused on flavour combinations. Talk to us about your style of cooking. It’s about traditional methods and recipes, executed with modern thinking.

SOUTH FACING

A feast of pretty epic proportions is planned in south Bristol on 20 August. The Big Bedminster Banquet will take place along North Street – don’t worry, it’ll be closed to traffic! – and will see 500 meals served up from local traders for free. The event, which will also include entertainment, demos and activities for kids, has been organised to celebrate the heroes among the community – the Bedminster BID is calling for nominations on the website below, and the deserving community stars will receive a free meal ticket. You don’t have to be nominated to get in on the action, though – happily, everyone’s invited! bedminster.org.uk

Take us back to when it started: what first inspired you to cook professionally? My father. He always seemed happy when he was cooking. Also, the diversity of the catering world really intrigued me. Fondest foodie memories from your childhood? Big family dinners! The Sunday roasts, chilli nights, fajita nights… You can’t beat that stuff.  What makes you most proud at work? Whenever I get compliments from a table – my head grows a little each time! Which local restaurants do you like to eat in? My faves at the moment are The Pump House, The Pony & Trap, and The Ethicurean. I can’t get enough.

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Favourite suppliers you use for the restaurant? I use La Chasse for fresh veg; they are very informative and honest about what they have and can get in. Aaron, our fish supplier, is such a nice guy and has such great knowledge of the waters he fishes in. I’m using Buxton Butchers too, who provide some of the best meat in the area. Which piece of kitchen equipment couldn’t you live without? We have a huge old mixer in the kitchen which I have fallen in love with – it’s like owning a relic from kitchens past. What and where was the best meal you’ve eaten? That’s an easy one. I proposed to my wife at Coombes Head Farm, run by the legendary Tom Adams and April Bloomfield. We had 10 courses of the most humble, loved-filled food. It was heaven. Favourite cookery book? The Complete Nose to Tail by Fergus Henderson is the book I’ve read over and over again. I think it’s a book that should be in every kitchen! Current favourite flavour combo? Ricotta, apple, radish, sesame. Such a good palate pleaser! purorestaurant.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

Ask the waitress

MEET SARA SFILIGOI, FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGER AT MACDONALD BATH SPA HOTEL So Sara, been here long? One and half years. And where did you work before? In Italy in a small village restaurant near the mountains of Slovenia. It was especially beautiful in the winter when the mountains were covered with snow. Wow. Sounds gorgeous! What – apart from the amazing views – do you like most about working in the industry? I love the opportunity it gives me to meet and speak to people from all over the world, and to make sure that when guests stay here they leave with great memories.

THIS LITTLE PIGGY

Farms Not Factories has launched a new campaign to promote ethical farm-reared pigs over factory-produced pork – and it has the backing of top chefs and farmers from our very patch. Tom hunt of Poco, Sam Leach from Birch, and farmer Helen Browning have all signed up to help the cause, making videos which encourage shoppers to choose high welfare meat. And that’s for reasons concerning both ethics and quality: aside from the impact that short lifespan, cramped conditions and stress has on the meat, it’s thought the antibiotics which pigs are regularly plied with in factory conditions can also be detrimental to the quality of the pork. farmsnotfactories.org

PUNCHIN’

The Punch Bowl in Old Market in Bristol is the newest addition to the Wickwar Wessex Brewing Company. This indie brewery, based in the West Country, unveiled their new venue at the beginning of July. As you might expect from a brewery-owned boozer, there’s a decent range of beers available, including a couple of Wickwar Wessex Brewery staples and three monthly rotating ales. From homemade bar snacks (we do love a Scotch egg) to traditional pub grub, everything here is homemade – including the bread, which is baked on-site. wickwarbrewing.com

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You might not be surrounded by snowtopped mountains here, but what’s the best thing about your current job? Being part of such a passionate, dedicated team. And the most challenging part? It can be tiring being on your feet all day – but it does save on a gym membership! What kind of relationship does front of house have with the kitchen team here? We support each other – and we have fun, too. If the kitchen team is particularly busy we make sure we do what we can to help, and ensure guests have the best possible experience. What are the bestselling dishes at the moment? Our lobster with herb and garlic butter is very popular, as well as the Côte du Boeuf, which we carve and serve at the table. Cor, sounds good! What makes this place special, besides the food? The Vellore Restaurant is in the magnificent ballroom of the original house and has two AA rosettes for quality and service. We also focus on local, seasonal ingredients and have a great wine list. macdonaldhotels.co.uk


THE COTTAGE INN Welcome aboard! The Cottage Inn, Bristol has reopened its doors and welcomes you to come and try our brand-new seafood inspired menu which has been crafted to give you a perfect waterside experience. Weยนve even got a take away menu now available, so why not don your deck shoes and head on down to relax with us by the water. THE COTTAGE INN 01179 215256 Baltic Wharf, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG

www.butcombe.com


S T A R T E R S

CRUMBS AWARDS: THE BUILD UP

Hip shOps

THE FINAL COUNTDOWN We’re still pretty dazed after counting up the Crumbs Awards entries, and legit don’t know how our carrier pigeons have survived the last few weeks. We’re talking 421 entries overall, and of an utterly excellent standard, too (although we’d expect nothing less from this awesome patch, obvs). We really want to thank every single business that entered – finalists or not. It really hammered home how many hard working, creative and quality-driven food outfits there are around Bath and Bristol – and that there’s no cause to take any of them for granted. So, after a lot of reading, sifting, more reading, brow mopping, even more reading and some heated decision-making, we’ve got our list of 104 finalists. Make no mistake: it was tough – painfully so – to whittle them down. But the resulting list can now be found on the website, or on p18. So, you lovely readers, get shouting your support for your faves on social media and drumming up some noise, ’cause the judges are all ears... Want to come to the awards night? We’ve got a right good shindig planned at the Bristol Old Vic on 1 October, with drinks, nibbles and some crackin’ entertainment. Plus, everyone there will be the first to know who those 16 yet-to-beunveiled trophies go to. Tickets are available now on the website. crumbsmagawards.com

PALMER STREET BOTTLE

Wines, similarly, come from both home and WHEN YOU ASK a venue for its Wi-Fi away. Boxes of vino from Bristol biz More Wine password and are told ‘cheeseandwine’, you sit above empty vessels ready to be filled by know you’re onto a winner, right? A winner just like Palmer Street Bottle. It’s a three-month-old customers, while there’s rosé, white and sparking from local vineyard Aldwick Court, bottle shop-cum-deli-cum-bar, opened in where Simon’s cousin works. Frome by Simon Bowden. Also the man behind Wondering what’s really hot right travelling cheesemonger business The Whole Cheese now in the world of booze, though? What? Beer. Wine. (whose converted horse trailer “The Quello cans of sparkling wine Cheese. you might have spotted on have been really popular,” Simon tells us. When? Tues-Sat “Especially for taking to festivals; people George Clarke’s Amazing 11am-11pm; Sunday have come in and bought 10 at a time. Spaces ), Simon worked at Bath 1pm-5pm “There’s a lot of interest in sour beers Soft Cheese for a number of Where? 11 Palmer Street, Frome too – like gooseberry and orange – and years, so isn’t wholly (sorry) BA11 1DS double IPAs.” new to le fromage scene. And if you can’t wait to get your brew The cheeses available at the home, you can always drink here in the deli counter here are mostly cool, urban-look bar – at retail prices, an’ all. local: expect to find staples from Westcombe There’s also food on the go for lunch and and Bath Soft Cheese (obvs), as well as less familiar creations, like the new Renegade Monk dinner, and regular evening events. Before we wrap up our visit and leave Simon from Feltham’s Farm. Made from organic cow’s to it at the shop, we have to ask about that logo milk, this blue cheese’s rind is washed in Funky Monkey ale, and it’s going down a storm at the – a fuzzy cartoon bear, hugging a bottle. moment, Simon says. “My brother-in-law came up with it; he’s a As well as cheese, Palmer Street Bottle also graphic designer. I wanted it to be friendly to has, well, bottles. Duh. They contain wine, everyone – there’re so many families in Frome. spirits and, most predominantly, beer. There’s I didn’t want this just to be a blokey hangout.” Wiper and True, Electric Bear and lots of other Indeed, the industrial but comfortable space local varieties, as well as brews from further lends itself to chilling with a coffee in the afield, like Manchester’s Cloud Water, and some morning as much as cracking open a bottle of European offerings, too. There’s even a beer wine and getting stuck into some serious subscription available here, so you can stay up cheese action in the eve. We’re keen for both. to date with the best on the brewing scene. palmerstbottle.co.uk

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M A I N S

S T A R T E R S

FRESH RANGE

Founded in 2014 to help combat the uneconomical and unfair practices of large food retailers, this online shop’s purpose is to shorten the journey of food between producer and consumer, and make sure everyone gets a fair deal. Sounds like a great idea – but a pretty tall order, no? Well, this Keynsham-based business is rising to the challenge by using both technology and new logistic processes. This means that when customers order their groceries, there’s a good chance the veg is yet to be picked, the eggs not laid, and the bread no more than raw ingredients. Fresh Range also supplies commercial kitchens and schools, helping to get produce from small, independent businesses to plates all over Bath and Bristol. Not only does this mean freshness and quality for the consumer, and a pleasingly low number of food miles for Mother Earth, but it means support for the local food economy in giving growers, farmers, and artisans a platform to sell their goods at fair prices. We’re talking producers such as urban grower The Severn Project, organic farm Farrington’s, and family bakery Hobbs House. And the damage? Well, there are delivery options for but a quid. fresh-range.com

CLICKY EaTERS HERE ARE THREE ONLINE GROCERY WEBSITES THAT ALLOW YOU TO HAVE LOCALLY PRODUCED FOOD DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR DOOR…

GOOD SIXTY

THREE BAGS FULL

Cargobikes are already pretty common with delivery companies on mainland Europe: favoured for not only their green credentials, they also avoid congestion in busy cities. Living on a polluted and congested main road in Bath himself, founder Stephen Paul wanted to introduce them here (although he knew they’d have to be electric – have you seen the hills in these parts?). Stephen knew that Bath is rich in fantastic local producers, but that food miles are still an issue, with people having to prioritise convenience over ethics and quality. Hence, the idea for Three Bags Full was born. Brands currently supplied include Bertinet, Bath Soft Cheese Co, Hartley Farm, and Ivy House Farm Dairy, and delivery is completely free (yup, free) from Tuesday to Saturday in Bath, by electric cargobike. Can’t argue with that! threebagsfulldelivery.co.uk

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Good Sixty is making local, independent shops available to consumers who just can’t get to them during conventional opening hours. The website acts as an online high street for indie retailers, giving each of them a virtual shop front, and giving customers a new, more convenient channel through which to get to know them and buy their goods. Since the website’s launch in 2016, its community of retailers has grown to 54 – meaning you can get everything from locally made booze to West Country cheese, ethical meats to artisanal sweets. Each retailer can take full control of its own deliveries and logistics too, allowing it to make sure it’s catering to its specific customer base. Good Sixty aims to help connect up and add value to communities – for every £1 that is spent with businesses like the ones on its books, it’s thought that 60 pence goes back into the local economy. goodsixty.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

In the Larder 2 4

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FeeL GOOd FOOd

WHETHER IT’S DOING GOOD STUFF FOR YOUR BODY, HELPING A GOOD CAUSE OR GIVING YOU A COMFORT FOOD FIX, WE’RE INTO GRUB TO MAKE YOU FEEL GREAT THIS MONTH 1 ALE BE SEEING YOU Wickwar Wessex Brewing Co Gift Box, £12/4x500ml The West Country ales from this Gloucestershire brewery are still made with the traditional methods that were common practice when the business was founded in 1860. That said, the beers whisper of more contemporary influences, meaning you’ll get a great quality tipple which balances classic and more imaginative elements. We’ve been enjoying the fruity Cotswold Way with a good old Friday night Ruby Murray. Available at Gloucester services and online. wickwarbrewing.com 2 BEAN OF HEARTS Easy Bean Chickpea Crispbread, £2.95/110g Made in Somerset using chickpea flour as opposed

to wheat, these all-natural crispbreads are gluten-free as well as high in fibre and vegetarian friendly. What we really care about, though, is the taste, right? There’s little comparison to their cardboardlike cousins; the thick, substantial breads are well seasoned and topped generously with nutty seeds, with punch coming from real West Country Cheddar. A satisfying crunch is helped by the addition of polenta, too. From Brockley Stores in Bristol and The Galleries Shop in Bath, as well as others. easybean.co.uk 3 INSIDE SCOOP Jude’s Honey and Almond Ice Cream, £4.50/500ml Ice cream maker Jude’s has come up with a brand new tub in collaboration with #CookForSyria. Taking inspiration from the flavours of Syria itself,

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the ice cream is studded with real flakes of almond and marbled with swirls of honey. The result is a nutty, subtly sweet scoop with a good bit of crunch. It’s being used to help raise funds for the children caught up in the Syrian crisis, too; £1 from the sale of each tub will be donated. Buy it online via Ocado. judes.co.uk 4 HEAR ME RAW Squirrel Sisters Coconut and Cashew Raw Energy Bar, £1.99/2x20g Founded and run by two sisters who grew up in Bath, this biz makes snack bars that are big on nourishment as well as flavour – it’s all about complementing our busy, erratic lifestyles by balancing fun with virtuous. Free of gluten and dairy, this coconut and cashew number is light and natural-tasting, but

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substantial enough to curb those hunger pangs and give you a bit of a boost. The bars are new to Ocado as of this month. squirrelsisters.com 5 RICE ONE Watmuff & Beckett Risottos, £2.99/400g These heat-and-eat risottos are just the ticket for when you’ve run out of time to cook but still want a hearty feed. We’re especially fond of the Wild Mushroom pot; earthy and nutty, it features porcini and chestnut mushrooms as well as Italian cheese, and is lifted with thyme and a twist of lemon. Founded by two locals and based in Frome, this company knows how to do convenience food well. Available from Prior Park Farm Shop in Bath and Whiterow Farm Shop, among others. watmuffandbeckett.co.uk


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MARK TAYLOR HAS BEEN GETTING PLENTY OF GLOBAL INSPIRATION FROM THIS NEW BATCH OF COOKERY BOOKS…

TWO KITCHENS: FAMILY RECIPES FROM SICILY AND ROME Rachel Roddy Headline Home, £25

The chef and cookbook author Simon Hopkinson recently said ‘Rachel Roddy describing how to boil potatoes would inspire me’, which is high praise indeed. And it’s completely justified too, for Roddy is a unique new voice in food writing and the closest we’ve had to Elizabeth David since the legendary food writer herself. For the past decade, Londoner Roddy has immersed herself in the culture of Italian cooking, mainly Rome, but also Sicily, where her partner is from. Splitting time between the two places, Roddy cooks family meals and sticks religiously to the seasons. Whether it’s a summery tomato and salted ricotta salad or a hearty potato, chickpea, courgette and rosemary soup, this is Italian home cooking at its best, and this charming book is a classic in the making.

CHICKEN WITH CITRUS AND OLIVES SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

2 unwaxed oranges 1 unwaxed lemon 6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for brushing 1 clove garlic 1 free-range chicken, jointed (or 8 thighs) 100g green olives sprig of fresh oregano or marjoram METHOD

1 In a bowl, whisk together the zest and juice of 1 orange and the juice of the lemon with the oil. Season with salt and pepper. 2 Crush the garlic gently with the back of a knife so that it remains whole, and add to the marinade along with the chicken, making sure each piece is covered. Cover with cling film and leave it for 4 hours, or overnight, in the fridge.

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3 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/ gas mark 6. 4 Brush with oil an ovenproof dish or roasting tin that will hold the chicken in a single layer. Add the chicken and pour over the marinade, which will come about halfway up the chicken. Add the olives and oregano, then slice the remaining orange and tuck the slices in between the chicken. Roast for 45 minutes. If the tops look as if they are browning too fast, cover the dish loosely with foil.  5 Once the chicken is cooked, assess the amount of liquid that remains. If there is a lot, lift out the chicken pieces and reduce the liquid to a thicker sauce in the roasting tin, or tip it into a pan and boil it hard until it is as thick as you would like, then pour it back over the chicken. I sometimes return the chicken to the oven while the sauce reduces to give colour to the undersides. 


S T A R T E R S

THE PERFECT SCOOP

David Lebovitz Jacqui Small, £16.99

SABOR: FLAVOURS FROM A SPANISH KITCHEN

LISBON: RECIPES FROM THE HEART OF PORTUGAL

TRULLO THE COOKBOOK

Published just ahead of the launch of her highly anticipated new Mayfair restaurant of the same name, Sabor is the first solo book from Michelinstarred Spanish chef Nieves Barragan Mohaco, who worked for London’s Barrafina chain for 14 years. Born in the Basque region of Spain, in the capital city of Bilbao, Nieves goes back to the food she grew up with in this beautifully illustrated and colourful book. These are the rustic, regional dishes she cooks back home with family and friends, from hearty braised Iberian pork ribs and chorizo and potato stew to lighter summer dishes like grilled seafood skewers, clams in salsa verde and walnut and sultana ice cream in PX sherry. A vibrant collection of traditional Spanish dishes.

A city with a long and rich history, Lisbon is now one of the most visited food destinations, with more than 10 million visitors in 2016 alone. In this book, food writer Rebecca Seal and photographer Steven Joyce take to the streets of Lisbon to uncover why this old coastal city delivers such an incredible food experience, meeting cooks and chefs committed to preserving the city’s food traditions. From tapas-like ‘pesticos’ of salt cod fritters and marinated pork sandwich with piri piri sauce to purslane and peach salad or roasted octopus, smoked paprika, parsley and lemon, these are deeply flavoursome dishes influenced by a multitude of cuisines and cultures. A chapter of desserts, including milk tarts and doughnuts, makes for a deliciously indulgent finale.

Complete with a brilliantly crafted foreword by Fergus Henderson and glowing quotes from Nigel Slater and Jamie Oliver, Trullo The Cookbook is one of the eagerly awaited releases of the year. Since 2010, this Islington trattoria (and its hip Borough Market sibling, Padella), run by ex-Moro and Fifteen chef Tim Siadatan and Jordan Frieda, has become one of London’s most popular places for Italian food with a British twist. Neither owner is Italian, but that hasn’t stopped them serving a range of creative antipasti and bold pasta dishes that won’t blow the budget. The book features signature dishes such as pici cacio e pepe (cheese and pepper pasta); grilled ox heart, baked borlotti beans and salsa rossa; and braised hispi cabbage, clams, chilli and oregano.

Nieves Barragan Mohaco Fig Tree, £25 David Lebovitz is one of the world’s leading pastry chefs, having been trained as a baker in France and then working for 12 years at the influential California restaurant Chez Panisse. Now a successful food writer and blogger based in Paris, Lebovitz has turned his attention to ice creams, sorbets and granitas for his latest book. Using ripe seasonal fruits, toasted nuts and fragrant spices, the frozen delights in the book are accompanied by advice on equipment and tips on buying the best ingredients. Alongside simple, easy to follow recipes for classic lemon sorbet and rum and raisin ice cream, the more unusual scoops include Guinness milk chocolate ice cream and banana and blueberry sorbet. An essential book for the summer holidays.

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Tim Siadatan Square Peg, £25

Rebecca Seal Hardie Grant, £25

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HOURS Tuesday to Saturday 10am - 10pm Sunday 10am - 4pm FIND US 225 Gloucester Road, Bristol,BS7 8NR. Telephone: 0117 239 6506

www.bomboloni.net


CH E F ! WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

Studies have shown time and again just how good spices are for us – including the humble chilli pepper, which stars in two recipes this month...

H I G H L I G H T S

BOWLED OVER

Here’s a nutritious and satisfying bowl of Moroccaninspired goodness Page 31

GOT THE HOTS

A vegan-friendly, veg-packed take on super-comforting chilli con carne Page 32

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BARBIE WORLD How to please those meat-free mates at your barbecues this summer Page 34


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CRISPY SKINNED PORK BELLY WITH APPLE AND ONION VELOUTE SERVES 6

INGREDIENTS 5 garlic gloves 100ml pomice oil handful rosemary, chopped handful thyme, chopped pork belly (about 2kg), ribs off ½ pint cider knob of butter 4 shallots chopped 3 apples, cored, peeled and sliced 200ml double cream 12 baby potatoes 12 baby leeks

LOOK WhO’S PORKING

NORA JOO-KOVACS SHOWS US HOW TO TREAT A QUALITY CUT OF PORK IN THE MANNER THAT IT DESERVES…

The guys at Framptons Café Bar and Kitchen are all about the ingredients, and won’t mind us calling them picky when it comes to suppliers. All the meat served at this ace little spot in Bath comes from Ruby & White, whose butchers get them the very best locally produced meat – they won’t shop anywhere else. Chef Nora is originally from Hungary, and has been cooking for a living for 11 years. She makes restaurant-quality food at this laid-back venue, using all that top-drawer produce. FRAMPTONS, The Empire, Grand Parade, Bath BA2 4DF; 01225 313680; framptonsbar.co.uk

METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 210C/415F/gas mark 6. 2 Chop or crush the garlic and mix it with the oil before adding the chopped rosemary and thyme. 3 Brush the pork belly all over with the mixture (apart from on the skin) and season it with salt and pepper. 4 Put it in the oven, skin side up, for 10 minutes. Then pour the cider on the pork belly, put baking paper on the top of the skin, and cover the tray with foil. Turn down the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4 and let it cook for 90 minutes. 5 Once the pork is ready (the skin should be golden brown) remove from the oven and leave it to cool. Then, press the pork – use an oven tray with something heavy on top – and refrigerate for a minimum of 12 hours. The next day the pork belly is ready to get portioned. 6 For the veloute, heat the butter in a pan and add the shallots and the apples to sweat down until soft. This should take about 10 minutes. When they are soft, add the cream. Take the pan off the heat and, using a food processor or a hand blender, purée the mixture. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 7 Chop the new potatoes in half and boil until they are soft. Heat some butter in a pan and fry the baby leeks. Just before they’re ready, add the new potatoes, and season. 8 Once the veloute and vegetables are almost ready, heat some oil in a pan and preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Salt the skin side of each portion of pork belly and place in the pan, skin side down. Fry for 5 minutes before putting in the oven for 10 minutes to warm the meat through. 9 To serve, spread 1 tbsp of veloute across the plate, put the new potatoes and the baby leeks on top and, when the pork belly is nice and crispy, put it on the top of the vegetables as the hero of the dish. We like to decorate the dish with some microherbs.

a Grape match! Ken Forrester’s Reserve Chenin blanc 2016 £11.95, Great Western Wine Chenin blanc is always a great match for pork with apple, so opt for this multi award winner, which combines a creamy richness of flavour with bold apricot and baked apple character, balancing perfectly with the intensity of the veloute, and the fresh acidity of the apple and herbs.

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BREAKFAST | LUNCH | DINNER | DRINKS | FAMILY RUN

JOIN US FORKellaway OUR 3RD Avenue, BIRTHDAY! 138-140 Horfield, Bristol BS6 7YQ BBQ hello@theoldspotbristol.co.uk | Live music from 3pm until late| Tel: 0117 924 7693 Open until 1am with a DJ finishing off the WWW.THEOLDSPOTBRISTOL.CO.UK night | Kids entertainer Fun for all the family!

138-140 Kellaway Avenue, Horfield, Bristol BS6 7YQ hello@theoldspotbristol.co.uk | Tel: 0117 924 7693

WWW.THEOLDSPOTBRISTOL.CO.UK


C H E F !

hOLLYwOOd BOwL

HERE’S A BOWL FULL OF STYLE AND SUBSTANCE, BY JANICE HESKET

At Café Matariki (which you’ll find just over Bristol’s new Castle Bridge), head chef and manager Janice draws on her experiences as a deli owner and kitchen manager to come up with her colourful, everchanging menus. Passionate about organic, seasonal ingredients, the kitchen team here are perhaps best known for their Pacific bowls; based around the idea of a Buddah bowl, these balanced lunches contain a grain, vegetable and a protein, and change weekly.

MOROCCAN-INSPIRED PACIFIC BOWL SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS glug of olive oil 2 tsp sweet paprika 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp ground coriander 8 organic chicken thighs, boned and skinned (reserve the skin) 4 tomatoes, cut in half 2 tbsp harissa paste 2 medium-sweet potatoes 1 tbsp ras-el-hanout 1 x 400g tin chickpeas 200g couscous bunch mint, chopped bunch coriander, chopped

handful flat leaf parsley, chopped 1 red onion juice of 1 lime 1 pomegranate, seeds only 250ml organic natural yoghurt handful of dill, chopped garlic clove, grated generous handful of baby spinach per bowl 1 red chilli, finely chopped ½ lemon, juice only

a Grape match! Planeta Rosé 2016 £10.95, Great Western Wine Dry rosés are perfect with this style of Middle Eastern food. This one’s strawberry and pink grapefruit flavours pick up the delicate and varied character of the fresh herbs, crunchy pomegranate and sweet ras-al-hanout spice. Vibrant and refreshing, this is the very taste of summer.

METHOD 1 Mix the olive oil with 1 tsp of the sweet paprika, the ground cumin and ground coriander. Season the mixture, and cover the chicken in it. Leave to marinade, ideally overnight. 2 Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6. 3 Roast the thighs for 25 minutes or until cooked through. 4 Season the skin and place on a tray between 2 sheets of greaseproof paper. place another tray on top and roast for 20 minutes or until crispy. 5 Meanwhile, season the tomatoes with salt and pepper and mix with the harissa paste. Roast this in the oven too, for about 20 minutes. 6 Once there’s room in the oven, roast the sweet potatoes in the rasel-hanout with olive oil, salt and pepper. 7 Drain and rinse the chickpeas, before drying them and laying them on a baking tray. Roast in the oven; they can take anywhere from 40 minutes to an hour to become crunchy and golden. 8 Meanwhile, make the couscous. Put the grain in a bowl, sprinkle over 1 tsp sweet paprika, add a little olive oil and cover with boiling water. Cover with cling film and leave for 15 minutes. When it’s ready, fluff with a fork and mix in a handful each of mint, coriander and parsley. 9 Thinly slice the red onion and add to a bowl. Squeeze over the lime juice and add a pinch of salt, and mix. The onions will soften and slightly pickle/cook in the acidity. Add the pomegranate seeds and leave to let the flavours infuse. 10 Mix the yoghurt with another handful each of chopped mint, coriander and dill, and the garlic. Stir to combine. 11 To assemble, place the couscous in each bowl and scatter over the chickpeas and sweet potatoes. Next, add a handful of spinach on one side, and the tomatoes the other. Slice the chicken thighs and place two in each bowl. Top with the yoghurt dressing and pomegranate and red onion salsa and crumble over the crispy chicken skin. Finish off with the sliced chilli and lemon juice. TIP: To make this vegetarian, use feta and avocado instead of chicken.

CAFE MATARIKI, The Brewhouse, Bath Street, Bristol BS1 6LA; 0117 321 5445; pacificyoga.co.uk/cafe

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C H E F !

FAT ChILLIS

ADRIAN JENKINS TAKES A CLASSIC MEATY DISH AND MAKES IT NEW WITH THIS VEGAN RECIPE… Adrian is in charge of culinary proceedings at The Pear Tree in Whitley, and has spent more than 25 years in professional kitchens. He likes to use seasonal, locally sourced ingredients in fun and experimental versions of traditional dishes. Much like this one: his take on a classic, comforting dish that everyone’s familiar with. “This is a great recipe for all lovers of good old chilli con carne,” says Adrian. “Whether meat eaters or not, it goes down really well on our current menu.”

CHILLI CON VEGAN, SAFFRON RICE, AVOCADO & LIME SALAD

2 Meanwhile, toast the coriander and cumin seeds together on a medium heat, then bash them in a pestle and mortar. 3 Add the spices, dried herbs and a good grating of nutmeg to the large pan and fry for 2 more minutes – if it’s a little dry at this point, add a splash of water to help it out. Stir in the tomato purée and cook for a further 2 minutes. 4 Stir in the lentils. Drain, rinse and stir in the beans, followed by the tomatoes, chopped coriander stalks and the stock (I try to use homemade stock, but if you’ve only got stock cubes, that’s fine too). 5 Bring it all to the boil slowly, then reduce to a low heat and let it bubble away for at least 1 hour, or until thickened and reduced, stirring every 15-20 minutes. Season to taste. 6 For the saffron rice, put the rice in a pan with twice the amount of cold water, add a few strands of saffron and season well. Bring to the boil gently, and simmer until the water is nearly gone and the rice is light and fluffy, with a little bite. 7 When ready to serve, combine the lime zest and juice with the tomatoes, avocado, coriander leaves, and mixed salad leaves. 8 Serve the chilli with the rice, and top with the salad and sour cream.

SERVES 10

INGREDIENTS 2 medium onions, finely diced 4 garlic cloves, grated 1 medium leek, finely sliced 3 red chillis, finely sliced 5 tbsp premium rapeseed oil 3 heaped tbsp coriander seeds 3 heaped tbsp cumin seeds 3 tbsp smoked paprika 1 tsp ground cinnamon 3 tbsp dried oregano 6 lime leaves, chopped 1 whole nutmeg, for grating 3 tbsp tomato purée 250g dried green lentils 250g dried red lentils 2 x 400g tins red kidney beans 2 x 400g tins black beans 3 x 400g tins chopped tomatoes bunch coriander, stalks and leaves separated and chopped 1.2 ltrs vegetable stock 1kg easy cook rice good pinch of saffron 5 limes (zest of all, juice of 3) 1kg cherry tomatoes, halved 4 avocados, peeled stoned and sliced mixed salad leaves sour cream, to serve

THE PEAR TREE, Top Lane, Whitley, Melksham SN12 8QX; 01225 704966; peartreewhitley.co.uk

a Grape match!

METHOD 1 For the chilli, place the onion, garlic, leek and chilli into your largest, heavy-based pan over a medium heat with 3 tbsp rapeseed oil. Fry for about 5 minutes, or until softened.

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Trapiche Melodias Malbec 2016 £7.95, Great Western Wine There’s a whole stack of spicy flavours going on in this dish, so a soft, spicy red is the way to go. This is a fresher, lighter style of Malbec, full of bright, cherry and plum fruit, with hints of cocoa and vanilla; it’s lively enough to cope with the heady combination of chilli, smoked paprika and cinnamon in the mix.

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HARVEST BURGERS SERVES 2

INGREDIENTS thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger ½ garlic clove 250ml toasted sesame oil 100ml cider vinegar 100ml tamari 1 block of smoked or plain tofu 2 large Portabello mushrooms 1 avocado 2 bread rolls of your choice 1 pack of Violife vegan smoked gouda 2 handfuls of rocket (we use Castle Farm) METHOD 1 First, knock together the marinade by grating in the ginger and the garlic and combining with the sesame oil, vinegar and tamari in a bowl. 2 Cut the tofu block lengthways and put that and the mushrooms into the marinade. Cover and leave overnight. 3 Whack the tofu and mushroom on the barbecue. 4 Mash ½ the avocado onto each roll. 5 Turn the tofu, making sure its gone a little bit crispy. You don’t want jelly-like tofu, but you don’t want to cook it so much it goes like rubber, either. There’s a fine line – don’t cross it! 6 Once the tofu is cooked, put two slices of the smoked gouda on top and let it melt for 20 seconds. 7 Stack up the tofu, a handful of rocket leaves, and the mushroom inside the bun – and enjoy!

C H E F !

AvO GO aT ThIS!

HARVEST NATURAL FOODS, 37 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BN; 01225 465519; facebook.com/Harvest-Bath

RICH SHEPPARD AND TOM EDWARDS FROM HARVEST NATURAL FOODS SHARE A VEGAN BARBECUE RECIPE “We are often asked for advice on what to do for a vegan or vegetarian barbecue option,” Tom and Rich tell us, “so we thought we would share one of our favourite summer recipes. This can be prepared in bulk for an enormous vegan barbecue, or as a single serving if there’s just one vegan at your meat fest – just adjust quantities as appropriate.”

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a Grape match! Columbia Valley Estate Riesling 2015 £11.75, Great Western Wine The Asian-style marinade here calls for a chilled, aromatic white. This elegant, fruity version from Washington State brims with green apple, lime zest and nectarine, so it has the fruitiness to cope with the sweet and sour flavours.

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Tamil Nadu tasting menu available throughout August

10 The Mall | Clifton | BS8 4DR | 0117 360 0288 | info@nutmegbristol.com | www.nutmegbristol.com


Choose your weapons Blimey, I hate it when people become evangelists for something. They discover some new box set, or unspoilt holiday destination, or the bacon replacement that will finally let them go veggie, and they insist on sharing it with all of us. Just shut up already! Wow, someone got out of bed on the wrong side this morning. In the spirit of sharing – not your favourite concept, I realise – let me point out one thing new converts are right to get excited about: homemade ice cream. It’s fun and easy to make, and way more delicious than even the poshest bought stuff. We’re hardly short of ice-cream makers on the market though, are we? Everyone’s making them these days. True enough, but not necessarily like this one. It’s called the Buffalo, and it’s available from Nisbets. What’s great about this thing is how fast and easy it is to use, churning out 1.5 litres of ice cream – or sorbet, frozen yoghurt or gelato; your choice – in as little as 45 minutes. How’s it so fast? Well, it has a built-in freezer, so you don’t have to freeze a bowl overnight. Why’s it so easy? Well, the lid has a built-in pouring chute, so you can add ingredients – chocolate, maybe, or crushed almonds – while your ice cream is churning. And if you’re smart, when you buy it you’ll also pick up the Vogue Ice Cream Scoop, which comes in a range of sizes and is filled with a conductive liquid that transmits the heat from your hand to the scoop, allowing the ice cream to be bowled up lickety-split. Forgive me, but I’ve got absolutely no idea what Nisbets is… It’s a big catering supply company, selling to both the public and trade; these guys are all about value, and adding a bit of professional edge to the home kitchen. And they’re local – boss Andrew Nisbet started it in Bristol in 1983, initially to sell knives and chefs’ whites to catering students. Though they’re mostly online these days, you can still pop along to shops at their Avonmouth HQ and in the centre of town. So it’s sturdy, its fast, it doesn’t cost too much, and it makes good ice cream? That’s about the size of it. I’d better go and tell everyone! Who’s evangelising now?

ThE CREAM TEAM FANCY JOINING THE GANG WHO MAKE THEIR OWN ICE CREAM? THE GUYS AT NISBETS HAVE A COOL WAY TO DO IT: MATT BIELBY’S GOT THE SCOOP… The Buffalo Ice Cream Maker costs £215.98; the Vogue Ice Cream Scoop £6.99. Find them at Nisbets at Avonmouth and Bristol, or at nisbets.co.uk

THIS MONTH • ICE TO SEE YOU • CASTLE IN THE SKY • CROCKERY GOALS

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heAd in the CLOUds

HOW DOES ELLY CURSHEN CELEBRATE THE LAUNCH OF HER NEW BOOK? BY COOKING DINNER UP A CRANE, OBVIOUSLY… WORDS BY JESSICA CARTER PHOTOS BY EMLI BENDIXEN

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lly Curshen (y’know, her from The Pear Café, who we bet you already follow on Instagram) unveiled a brand new book in June. Elly Pear’s Let’s Eat is something of a how-to manual for eating well in this contemporary world where time is precious and stress is already abundant, outside of the kitchen. And we don’t just mean ‘well’ in terms of nutritian either, but excitement too. The pages of this volume are lined with imaginative, colourful dishes: there are creations to batch cook and turn into novel weeknight dinners, as well as whole menus for special occasions and dinner parties. All with a pleasingly low-maintenance sell. “I want things that aren’t going to stress me out,” Elly writes. “I want to use produce that is easy to get hold of, and maybe a few bits that might be new discoveries for my guests. I want to wow them with the food, but also with the fact that I’m not having a breakdown trying to get it all on the table.” In short, she’s a busy woman; she wants to enjoy feeding a bunch of mates without sporting a sweaty brow as she does so. And, after this dinner, it seems to us that she’s more than capable of pulling it off, too. After all, how better to demonstrate just how achievable your dishes are than by preparing them for a dinner party in a tiny treehouse with no cooking equipment...? Crane 29 is the newest venue from Canopy & Stars – a travel company specialising in unusual and kooky accommodation – and takes the form of a cosy cabin built around one of the riverside cranes outside the M Shed. With a seriously modest amount of floorspace, its quirkiness is elevated by loads of clever spacesaving hacks, as well as its visible ethical principles and sustainable ethos. Make your way up the exterior stairs – grabbing your first views across the water to the Arnolfini and beyond as you do so – and you’ll find a fairy tale-like cabin, built of wood, and heaving with all manner of greenery. Plants spill out of pots, are suspended from the ceiling, stand five-foot tall, and, along with plenty of raw wood, do a stylish job of blending the outdoors with the in. There’s even a wooden path that snakes through a ‘garden’ of wood chippings and foliage to take you from the kitchen space to the living and dining area.

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Speaking of the kitchen (which consists of a ceramic Belfast-style sink and a very modest amount of worktop space – that’s about your lot), its cosiness means that Elly has done much of the food prep in advance, just as she advises in her shiny new hardback. Said advance prep doesn’t seem to have stressed her, either. Having arrived back from Barcelona the night before, she greets us with perfectly done hair, a massive smile and, perhaps most inviting of all, a bottle of chilled Fino (we’re well stocked with sherry tonight, courtesy of Gonzalez Byass). We have a nosey around her digs for the night (the lucky thing wasn’t going to have to travel far to bed that evening), and catch up with the other guests. As well as Elly’s mum, Kathy, and mate Jemma, who’d travelled from Brighton and London for the celebrations, there are some of Elly’s local pals: drinks writer Fiona Beckett; manager of Grillstock at St Nick’s Market Dan Vaux-Nobes; and food and drink PR (and organiser of lives) Caroline Peel. The tiny dining table is stacked high with some of Anthropologie’s finest wares – gorgeous teal crockery, ceramic platters and gold-tipped cutlery – to which Elly adds a few nibbles (the most insane, juicy olives and some moreish salted almonds) to warm up our appetites. This has come from Viandas Spanish Deli on Park Row, she tells us, and – if we needed any further convincing to visit there with a few empty tote bags – she soon emerges with tumblers of its gazpacho, while also brandishing the bottle she’d bought it in. “I’ve literally just drizzled some sherry vinegar and olive oil on the top,” she tells us. “Why stress yourself out when you can get amazing stuff like this ready to go?” She very much has a point; it’s delicious, serves eight of us easily (our photographer was getting well fed too, for those who’ve eagerly done the maths), and is about as lowmaintenance as you could get. Loosely following the Kitchen Table Dinner for Four from her book, Elly also brings out manchego cheese with membrillo (quince jelly); mojama (cured and dried

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C L U B


INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND RUN • SOUTH BRISTOL’S BEST STEAKHOUSE

The Ashville Steakhouse, 15 Leigh Street, Bristol BS3 1SN • Tel: 0117 939 6897 • Email: info@theashvillesteakhouse.co.uk

www.theashvillesteakhouse.co.uk


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hAKE TRAY BAKE SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 1 ramiro pepper (long pointed red pepper, approx 120g) 1 red onion, peeled and cut into wedges 1 tbsp olive oil 400g ripe tomatoes (a mixture of colours and sizes is great, but use whatever you can find) 50g black olives, stone in 60g stale bread (ciabatta is perfect), torn into small chunks 200g passata handful of thyme, leaves picked 1 small handful of basil, leaves torn (keep some small ones whole to garnish) 1 tbsp red wine vinegar 4 hake fillets, skin on pinch of sweet smoked paprika pinch of pul biber (mild Turkish chilli flakes) For the crumb: 40g fresh breadcrumbs 40g blanched almonds 40g whole hazelnuts 1 small handful of flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked 2 tbsp olive oil 2 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped

slivers of tuna); and chicory, orange and almond salad. The chicory leaves act as crisp little cups in which rest the ingredients they’ve been tossed with: olives, juicy orange segments, pickled red onion, and more of those almonds. The orange and sherry vinegar dressing nails the sweetsour balance, and ties all the components together. So, there’s a bit of a story to the main course. As we’ve touched on already, there is no oven in this compact little treehouse, which would make cooking a traybake a tad tricky – at best. Luckily, Elly has some mates nearby with an oven; said mates only being Tessa and Elliott Lidstone, of shipping container restaurant, Box-E. The finished dish is delivered courtesy of Caroline and Jemma, who pop over to Cargo to pick up perhaps the restaurant’s first takeaway. Elliott had clearly been keeping a good eye on it ’cause, up in her treehouse in the sky, Elly peeled back the foil on perfectly cooked chunks of hake, sat in a ratatouille-style mix of tomato and veg and coated with a crunchy, nutty crumb. That’s what you call a team effort, right? The fish is pearly white inside and soft as you like, flaking into juicy chunks under our forks. Dessert also comes by delivery; this time, though, via a (rather unassuming) Deliveroo man, who we suspect (by the look on his face) was not expecting to be dropping off a litre of Swoon gelato to a treehouse... “I had no idea what I was going to do for dessert. There’s no freezer here to keep anything in – so Deliveroo it was!” Having overcome the final logistical hurdle of cooking up a crane without even breaking a sweat, this cool hostess serves the gelato in tumblers – but not before she’s poured a generous swig of PX over the scoops, obvs…

METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. 2 Slice the pepper into 1cm-wide rings. Place in a deep 20x30cm ovenproof dish with the onion wedges, drizzle over the olive oil and season well with flaked sea salt and a good grind of black pepper. Roast in the centre of the hot oven for 30 minutes until softened and golden brown. 3 Once cooked, tip the veg into a large bowl. Halve any cherry tomatoes and quarter any larger tomatoes and add to the roasted veg with the olives, bread, passata, herbs and red wine vinegar. Season with flaked sea salt and freshly ground black

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pepper and stir it all together to combine. Tip the mixture back into the roasting tin. Lay the hake fillets skin side down on a plate and sprinkle with the sweet smoked paprika, pul biber and a little flaked sea salt. Lay the fillets, skin side up, on top of the tomato mixture and put the whole thing back into the oven for 10 minutes. 4 Meanwhile, put all the crumb ingredients into a mini food processor and pulse until you have a coarse crumb. After 10 minutes, remove the fish from the oven, then peel off the skin (it should come off very easily) and discard. Spoon the crumb mixture over the fish fillets and into little piles around them. Place back in the oven to cook for a further 5 minutes. To check the fish is cooked through, use a very sharp knife to cut into the core of the thickest piece; it should be white, opaque and hot. 5 Sprinkle over the remaining basil leaves and serve. Recipe from Elly Pear’s Let’s Eat (Harper Collins, £20)


K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List

2

1

WE FELL A LITTLE BIT IN LOVE WITH THE ’WARE AT ELLY’S SUPPER CLUB, SO WE’VE BEEN BUSY RECREATING THE LOOK… 3

4 5

1 MANGO WOOD BOARD £24.95 Fairtrade and made from the wood of discarded fruit trees, this board reps great ethics as well as great style. Sold by ethical Somerset e-tailer, Decorator’s Notebook. decoratorsnotebook.co.uk 2 GOLD TIPPED CUTLERY £32 With a 24k gold plating, these tools will help food get from table to tongue in style. Find the five-piece set at Anthropologie in Bath. anthropologie.com 3 OVAL GLAZED PLATE £16.99 This handmade platter has come all the way from Portugal to display your salads, like Elly’s chicory and orange number. Find it at Vinegar Hill in Bristol and Bath. vinegarhill.co.uk 4 SET OF FOUR LARGE AMBER GLASSES £21.95 Part of the Modern Home range by Magpie, these will look right at home among contemporary coloured crockery. Find them in Fig1 at Wapping Wharf, Bristol. fig1.co.uk 5 LE CREUSET STONEWARE BOWL £14 This bit o’ crock will last you a lifetime, and inject some colour into your collection. Buy it (and the rest of the range, if the mood takes you) online. lecreuset.co.uk

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We are a friendly, family owned inn offering hearty home cooked food, in a small country village setting. Whether you are local or travelling from further afield, you are guaranteed a warm welcome. PUB • RESTAURANT • FUNCTION ROOM • ACCOMMODATION

Tunley Road, Tunley BA2 0EB • 01761 470408 Email: kingwilliamtunley@live.com • f T @kingwilliam84 www.kingwilliaminn.co.uk

Best Western Plus Centurion Hotel Charlton Lane, Midsomer Norton, Nr Bath BA3 4BD | 01761 417711

@seanhorwood

RestAtCent

www.centurionhotel.co.uk


M AI N S TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS, AND PEOPLE THAT MATTER

Find out why we reckon this converted barge was destined to become a foodie venue...

H I G H L I G H T S

HOT LIKE WELL

We’re biggin’ up Hotwells in Bristol this month – let us show you why Page 51

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Lockside Lockside is a waterfront cafe offering casual dining on the edge of the Avon Gorge with great views of the Clifton Suspension Bridge. An ideal meeting place in relaxed setting. We offer a friendly informal atmosphere providing a varied menu for all day breakfast and lunch at competitive prices 7 days a week. To book a table please call

0117 9255 800

Lockside, No.1 Brunel Lock Road, Cumberland Basin, Bristol BS1 6XS

www.lockside.net

Quote BS� “CRUM ring e d r o n e wh way a takea e a eiv and rec tar y en complim a parath

Upstairs seating area now open!

Chai Shai Kitchen | Lunch & Dinner 4 Jacobs Wells Road Bristol BS8 1EA | 0117 925 0754 www.chaishaikitchen.co.uk 11am to 11pm Monday to Saturday


M A I N S

HOT SHOTS!

12 REASONS TO GET TH YSELF TO HOTWELLS THIS PATCH OF BRISTOL, COSIED UP NICELY TO THE RIVER, REALLY COMES INTO ITS OWN IN SUMMER – BUT THERE’S A HELLA GOOD FOOD AND DRINK SCENE THERE ALL YEAR ROUND…

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(1) GET AN EARLY START

AT LOCKSIDE Ready to roll at 7am every weekday (8am and 9am on Saturdays and Sundays), the guys at Lockside sure are morning people. And if the early start isn’t evidence enough of that, there are the top brekkies they cook up. As well as the classic full E on the sizeable morning menu, you’ll find plates like roasted tomatoes on toast with rocket, pancetta, and basil pesto, and smoked salmon with poached eggs, bubble and squeak and hollandaise. Not only well-known for its morning meals, this place is also pretty popular for its views, stretching out to the Clifton Suspension Bridge, which you don’t have to be up for breakfast to make the most of. In fact, fully licensed, this place is a good shout for a liquid lunch, an’ all. lockside.net

(2) SEE SOME BRISTORY

ON BOARD BRUNEL’S SS GREAT BRITAIN From Brunel Lock Road to Brunel’s ocean liner – this ship is another reason to get on board (sorry, not sorry) with Hotwells. One of the most famous, game-changing ships in the world, Brunel’s ss Great Britain is now retired from making long and dangerous trips half way across the globe, and instead enjoys its days hosting visitors and special popup events. Most recently was an alfresco dining evening with a menu themed around the ship’s past destinations, and tasters and talks from Bristol Gin. The Dockyard Café Bar, meanwhile, serves up food and drink every day, alongside more views of the mighty boat and harbour, and is open late every Friday and Saturday throughout summer. ssgreatbritain.org

(3) FILL UP ON PUB GRUB

AT THE COTTAGE Originally built in the 19th century for storing timber from the Baltic, this pub is now part of the Butcombe family, and has been treated to a pretty extensive makeover. Not that you’ll be sitting inside if the weather’s good, of course. With its cracking location on Baltic Wharf, it perches at the top of some river steps, which you can sit out on if the small alfresco area is full, and admire the views of the colourful houses that Bristol is famous for. This traditional pub is well stocked when it comes to the good old beer pumps, and the kitchen cooks up food along the same classic lines. The menu lists beer battered fish and chips, pie of the day, mac ’n’ cheese, and ham, egg and chips – albeit cider and honey roasted ham, duck egg and chips... butcombe.com

(4) HIT THE DECK

AT GRAIN BARGE Grab an open air table on this converted barge and enjoy some craft beer and really decent grub. The likes of potted pork with apple and date chutney, and hazelnut-crusted cod with Israeli couscous, chorizo and roasted red pepper, join the barge’s imaginative homemade pies (aubergine, courgette, olive and tomato, anyone?) on the regularly changing menu. Look up from your plate every now and again, though; the views over the river and across to the

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M A I N S

ss Great Britain deserve some proper attention. (If the weather’s not on your side, take cover inside the cosy bar and restaurant; its wraparound windows will see you’re not deprived of that river scenery.) Grain Barge was converted in 2007, but its history – and its connection with food – goes back to 1936, when (fun fact) it was built to transport barley and wheat to Cardiff. grainbarge.com

(5) WITNESS THE GIN COLLECTION

OF THE PUMP HOUSE  As another repurposed venue in this former industrial hub, The Pump House originally housed the hydraulic pump that provided power for the bridges and lock systems of Bristol. Now, though, it houses the city’s biggest gin collection, used to power all the thirsty residents of Bristol. The guys behind its latest reincarnation – Dan Obern and chef Toby Gritten – have just made it a decade at this boxticking pub, and are still going strong. Test the bar staff on their gin knowledge and order some nibbles (pulled pork and cider croquettes with apple sauce, or smoked cod’s roe, perhaps); chill out on a sofa with handpicked Cornish crab with shaved fennel and English apples; or get comfortable in the restaurant for a tip-top, full-on threecourser. the-pumphouse.com

Brightly painted neighbourhoods can be spotted from outside The Cottage (top); and gin lovers will be in no short supply of choice at The Pump House, with 400 varieties on offer (above)

(6) GRAB A TEA (AND MORE)

FROM CHAI SHAI  This family-run Indian street food joint opened three years ago, and made it clear from the outset that it wouldn’t let itself be pigeonholed as a standard curry house. With its name translating to ‘tea and more’, Chai Shai brings Indian and Pakistani-style dining to Jacobs Wells Road, using fresh ingredients, traditional cookery methods and family

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recipes. The cosy little restauant has an open kitchen, allowing diners to see into the area where everything is made from scratch – including spice blends and even cheese. From dals to curries, pakoras to flatbreads, and (of course) traditional masala tea, the whole menu is available to eat in or take away. facebook.com/chaishaikitchen

(7) GET ALL THAI’D UP

WITH SIAM HARBOURSIDE This friendly Thai joint serves up comforting, good value food. Whether you’re after low-key feed or want to go all out with dinner before walking it off along the river, the familiar Thai offering here hits the spot nicely. Casual and welcoming with no airs and graces, it’s a good shout for groups too. siam-harbourside.co.uk


The Malago is a friendly bar and restaurant with a focus on fresh, locally sourced, quality food. Our dishes offer something for everyone. Our menu is inclusive of vegetarians and vegans, we have a delicious, freshly prepared children’s menu, and our chefs can cater for all dietary requirements. We look forward to welcoming you to The Malago.  Open Monday to Saturday 9am to 11pm Sunday 9am to 10pm Our kitchen is open daily serving brunch 9-3pm, lunch 12-3pm and dinner 5.30-9.30pm (5.30-9pm on Sundays).

www.themalago.club  eatout@themalago.club 220 North Street, Southville, BS3 1JD  01179639044


M A I N S

(8) GO GHOST HUNTING

AT THE ROSE OF DENMARK  Pints have been pulled here since the 1800s, and historic accounts say that it was a hangout for all sorts – smugglers, ladies of the night, ghosts… Nowadays, though, you’ll find a bit of a different crowd (note: we’ve yet to confirm if the ghosts are still in residence), who mainly come for the Cask Marque accredited ales and award-winning menu of altogether more contemporary fare. Think sundried tomato and thyme beef burger with celeriac slaw, 8oz Guinness marinated rib-eye, and ginger and lime grey mullet with sweet potato and harissa sauce. roseofdenmark.co.uk

(9) CHECK OUT THE EVENTS

AT SALT CAFÉ  Not just a caff, this is also an events space, which hosts everything from riverside parties to music performances, film screenings to art classes. Daytimes during the week, though, see this bright and airy space serving up breakfast and lunch, as well as snacks and cakes, and organic wines and craft beers. Fennel and chilli sauage roll with a couple of fresh salads, washed down by a Wiper and True IPA? We wouldn’t say no. On Friday nights, Salt puts on events of its own too, which usually revolve around food or music – so keep your eye on its website and social pages. saltcafebristol.co.uk

The bright and airy Salt Café (top left) doubles up as a top events space; there are plenty of places to get a good roast in Hotwells, and The Rose of Denmark is one of ’em (above)

(10) CATCH A LATE BRUNCH

AT SPOKE & STRINGER  Brunch is a leisurely affair at Spoke & Stringer, which sits in a litte recess of the harbour where boats dock and people eat outside in the sun. So much so that it goes on until 3pm, meaning you can still get a decent lie in – and then some. That said, poached eggs and smashed avo with chilli, tomato and pesto; shakshuka with sourdough; and banana and oat pancakes with toasted coconut, pecans and maple syrup are all worth getting out of your pit for. Come the evening, it’s all about the pintxos: quail’s egg with Serrano ham and asparagus; beetroot-cured salmon gravadlax with horseradish; and mushroom truffle Scotch egg. Just to give you a taster. spokeandstringer.com

(11) SHARE YOUR FOOD

AT BROKEN DOCK Having reopened in its latest guise back in May, and sharing the same little inlet as Spoke & Stringer, this place is all about modern British grub with interesting little twists. Check out the lunch bowls and the sharing planks (choose from meat, fish or veg), or the chef’s own version of the classic ploughman’s with cheese, homemade pickles and pig’s cheek. Come the evening, extra dishes are added to the culinary lineup, and everything gets a bit romantic – oo-er! – with dimmed lights and a great view across the river as the sun sets. brokendock.co.uk

(12) TAP UP

BOATHOUSE BAR AND PANTRY The third foodie resident of this habour inlet, Boathouse is an industrial-style bar and restaurant, designed around social eating and drinking, with sharing boards on the menu and lots of comfy sofas for lounging around. As well as beers and ales from around the world and a sizeable wine list, the well-stocked bar also has small-batch conditioned cocktails on tap. Grab one and chill out either inside the cool bar with its barrel-top tables, or out on the wall of the boat mooring. boathousebristol.co.uk

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Top Lane, Whitley, Wiltshire SN12 8QX 01225 704966 T f @peartreewhitley

www.peartreewhitley.co.uk

Advert Designer & Production Coordinator MediaClash are currently looking for an advert designer and production coordinator, who will be responsible for the advert design and production on a number of our city-based magazines. The role will involve advert setting, proofing, page layout, liaising with advertisers and working closely with our sales teams. You will be highly organised and able to work to multiple deadlines in an efficient manner. Other duties will include checking the flatplans and liaising with the printers on a daily basis. Along with being creative and having a keen eye for detail you will be vigilant at keeping an organised database. You will be used to dealing with high volumes of work and capable of working to deadlines in a fast-paced environment. You will have worked in a similar role and must be trained in InDesign and Photoshop. If you think you have the qualities and experience for this role, please send your CV to: sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk

www.mediaclash.co.uk

Would you like to work in Media Sales? We are always looking to hear from talented individuals who would like to work for MediaClash, presenting advertising opportunities and marketing solutions across our portfolio of fantastic local titles. We are a growing business and anticipate there being various opportunities over the next few months. If you would like to join our continuing success story please email your CV to steve.hawkins@mediaclash.co.uk or give us a call anytime on 01225 475800 for a chat about the company, our magazines and available positions.

www.mediaclash.co.uk


Enjoy Bath’s finest & freshest local produce delivered to your door. By bike. For free.

THREE

BAGS

FULL

– IT’S BETTER BY BIKE

www.threebagsfulldelivery.co.uk | 07415 841841


INSTALLATION | SERVICE | MAINTENANCE

AIR CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION ELECTRICAL PLUMBING & RENEWABLES AIR CONDITIONING FOR HOMES, SHOPS, OFFICES & FACTORIES CALL US ON FREEPHONE 08000 720 101 Specialists in Cold Rooms, Storage Chillers, Display Chillers, Freezers and Refrigerated Trailer Hire. w: www.ianhobbs.com t: 01225 444171 e: info@ianhobbs.com /ianhobbstech @ianhobbstech

Unit 8, Charlton Business Park, Westfield Industrial Estate, Radstock, BA3 4BE


A F T E RS

NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

H I G H L I G H T S

NORTH STAR

We check out a new North Street resident, The Malago Page 60

It took just a handful of days for this restaurant to be transformed inside before reopening...

TO A TEE

Golf club and events venue The Kendleshire also caters for drop-ins, as we find out Page 63

SPICE WORLD

Dinner at Romy’s, an Indian restaurant with a difference Page 64

P L U S

HART FELT

Hartley Farm’s Tom Bowles shares his fave haunts

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(R E - BO R N R E STAU R A NTS)

THE MALAGO FOLLOWING ZAZU’S KITCHEN’S CLOSURE, JESSICA CARTER VISITS THE NORTH STREET SITE TO CHECK OUT ITS INTRIGUING REPLACEMENT

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A F T E R S

t

he transition of this Southville restaurant from a branch of Zazu’s Kitchen to The Malago was a speedy one. Having been closed for less than a working week for the necessary work, it reopened on 26 May, with brotherand-sister team John Carnegie and Helly Highland having taken the helm. Prior to that, Helly had been working as head chef here for a year and a half, meaning she already knew her way around the kitchen – and this is still where you’ll likely find her. John, meanwhile, has a background in engineering and works front of house. Almost the entire team have stayed to work with Helly and John and, along with the similar-concept menu and décor, have maintained the cool, relaxed and comfortable vibe that inhabited the place under the rule of Zazu’s. The food is largely modern British in style, although it’s not hard to find whispers of French and Italian influences among the dishes, too. Open from morning until late into the evening, The Malago has a few different menus to see customers through the day. Brunch is served from 9am until a lie-in-friendly 3pm, and ranges from eggs Benedict to American pancakes; the bar selection (served from 5.30pm) is made up of sharing boards and pub classics like fish and chips and steak; and the evening menu offers a handful of starters, mains and puds. That’s all complemented by a comprehensive list of wines and cocktails. Seeing as the sun had donned his hat for the day when we pop in, seats in the alfresco area are in demand – there’s nothing stopping you from dropping in just for a drink in the sun – but we carry on inside to the airy, Scandi-style dining room, and sit near the open bi-fold doors. Starters range from six to eight quid – we go for the artichoke and olive ravioli (£7) and pancetta-wrapped monkfish tail (£7.50). The former sees delicately thin pasta encase a fresh, Mediterraneantasting filling, while a smooth velouté sauce is made vibrant green with in-season courgette. The plump, meaty fish, meanwhile, is seasoned wonderfully by the pancetta, while the fennel and radish salad it sat on took the edge off the saltiness.

Next, a stuffed and braised lamb shoulder (£19) is the course that my dinner mate has been waiting for. Generous in size, it sees the tender meat encase a punchy mix of anchovy and caper, which cut through the lamb’s inherent lardiness really well. A proper-sized helping of mash has a touch of mustard about it, and peas and baby gem keep the plate fresh. There are stark contrasts in the components of the hazelnut gnocchi (£14), making it a really interesting plate of food. The earthy, savoury flavours of the little fried dumplings and nuts come together with the sweet, punchy characteristics of the pickled carrot, while their converse textures added extra curiosity to each mouthful I shovel in by the forkload. Portions are generous and, although the prices might not render the place an everyday go-to, they’re fair, and you don’t need multiple courses. I mean, we certainly don’t need dessert after all that. Didn’t stop us from having one though, did it? Puds are matched to a digestif or cocktail each, should the fancy take you. The passion fruit parfait (£7.50) is bold and zingy, and comes with vanilla fruit salad, droplets of meringue and a crisp poppy seed tuille. The mint choc chip number (£7) looks like a quenelle of chocolate mousse, with a delicate fresh mintiness to it, on a chocolate crumb. Choc isn’t usually my finale of choice, but the richness has definitely been rounded off by the cool mint, and it’s far lighter than I thought it was going to be. So, The Malago isn’t a million miles away from what Zazu’s was, but that’s hardly a shocker with the same head chef at the helm. What this place is, though, is a really decent, independent neighbourhood restaurant which is cool and casual, and that you’ll always feel at home in, whether you rock up in a hoodie because you can’t be bothered to cook, or suited and booted for a special meal. And we look forward to seeing how it evolves from here, too.

THE MALAGO, 220 North Street, Bristol BS3 1JD; 0117 963 9044; themalago.club

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Our weekly changing lunch, dinner and tapas menu is superbly put together using the finest local ingredients.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS – A tasty trip to the jewel of the Empire with “Curry and a Drink” offer

THURSDAYS – Our famous Burger Night A tasty homemade burger and a pint for £10! SUNDAYS – Award-winning roasts from 12-6pm and after 6pm marinated ribs and a pint for £10.

6 DOWRY PLACE | HOTWELLS | BRISTOL | BS8 4QL PHONE: 01173 290 352 WWW.ROSEOFDENMARK.CO.UK


A F T E R S

( F O O D I E V E N U E S )

THE KENDLESHIRE   YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE ATTENDING A WEDDING, OR EVEN PLAYING A FULL 18, TO EAT HERE, SAYS JESSICA CARTER

R

ichard Guest has been working in The Kendleshire’s kitchen for more than four years, and has spent the last two as head chef. He loves this North Bristol venue, but hasn’t got the easiest gig here; y’see, this isn’t just a straight-up restaurant or bar... The site was built as a golf club in 1997, and its two courses are still at the heart of it; there are about 800 members, we’re told. And it also sees weddings and all kinds of parties and events take place in its function rooms and out on the terrace. This means that Rich and his brigade of two not only have a clubhouse to cater for, but also a range of different kinds of dos, from birthday buffets to sit-down wedding breakfasts and everything in between. And all for different sized parties and budgets. That’s a lot of menus to write (and learn). Regardless, though, he’s not into shortcuts.

For instance, among Rich’s current portfolio of dishes are the likes of goat’s cheese bon bons with smoked beetroot purée, and lemon and thyme-stuffed chicken with dauphinois and crispy egg (which you’ll see on the fine dining party menu), and burgers, mussels, and risotto on the everyday bar menu. There are also sarnies and jackets on a list of low-key snacks, ideal for hungry golfers who need a bit of a refuel. Rich also puts together a list of specials for drop-in diners, and there’s a really decent Sunday lunch on the go at the weekend too (I’ve heard great things from a fellow Crumb). The dining and drinking area looks out onto the rolling greenery of the golf course, and while there’s a room for a good few guests in here, most of the seating is out on the patio, which stretches all across the back of the building, wrapping around and

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ending in an enclosed terrace and lawn. When I swing (ahem) by, there are plenty of golfers enjoying a pint outside. I’m here for the food, though, so grab a seat and a menu. A black pudding Scotch egg (£4.50) arrives halved, revealing the bright orange, perfectly soft-boiled yolk. The richness of the black pudding that’s packed around it is sliced through by the tangy strips of pickled carrot, peppered with sesame seeds. A really good value dish. The club sarnie (£7.50) arrives as a mountainous stack of chargrilled meat with tomato and lettuce, while the seared mackerel (£8.50) features fillets with a crisp, golden skin, plump roast tommies, and pickled cucumber. As well as party fare, this team offer straight up, fuss free food for people who are simply celebrating mealtime. THE KENDLESHIRE, Henfield Road, Coalpit Heath BS36 2UY; 0117 956 7007; kendleshire.com


( I N G E N I O U S I N D I A N R E S TA U R A N T S )

ROMY’S KITCHEN   THIS HUMBLE THORNBURY RESTAURANT IS HOME TO SOME PRETTY VIBRANT FOOD, FINDS JESSICA CARTER

O

riginally from India’s West Bengal, Romy Gill set up her restaurant in Thornbury back in 2013, and her profile has been growing ever since. A Guardian residency in April last year was followed by the announcement of her MBE title, earned through her services to hospitality. Despite keeping a busy diary, chocca with pop-up events, creative collaborations and fundraisers, this chef can still most often be found in the restaurant’s kitchen, working a busy service.   

And that’s exactly where she was when we took a jaunt to Thornbury for dinner one Friday night. Sat on Castle Street, the restaurant is housed in a sweet, homely old building with bay windows and charmingly crooked lines. Instead of being open plan, the dining area is spread between a couple of rooms, which keeps things feeling cosy. Romy often ventures out of the kitchen to check on diners and chat to regulars, and this reinforces that friendly, familiar kind of vibe. As you can imagine, then, the atmosphere is relaxed and the clientele mixed; couples on dates, groups of mates

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A F T E R S

out celebrating, and families who perhaps just don’t have much in the fridge at home were all scattered about the dining areas.   Already, it’s pretty clear that this isn’t your average curry house (if you ever had that impression to begin with), but the menu further cements Romy’s as something a little special. Firstly, it’s refreshingly concise – no need for a biblesized catalogue of dishes here. Secondly, you won’t catch any sight of your go-to takeaway curry. (Sorry, not sorry.)    Romy grew up with a range of regional cuisines – Punjabi, West Bengali, Gujarati and south Indian – and these, together with the British ingredients available to her here, are what informs her cookery. So, instead of trying to recreate exact dishes from an exact place, Romy works to introduce people to the flavours and character of the food she loves so much, while capitalising on what’s available locally for her to stock up on in her larder.    Game, for instance, is something that she particularly likes to work with. So, among the neat handful of starters, it wasn’t too much of a surprise to see her much-Instagrammed tandoori quali (£6). The bird sports skin that’s golden with flavour, having been marinated in ginger, garlic, yoghurt and a blend of tandoori masala spices. These fresh flavours are echoed in the tangy pickled red cabbage which it sits on, and the accompanying vibrant green coriander and mint sauce. The precisely cooked meat is juicy and flavoursome inside, too.    There’s also a lovely marinated paneer (£6.50), which happily takes on

the flavours of its light, sticky glaze of honey and soy, and comes served with soft, sweet caramelised onions; a soft crab pâté (£6.50) with a thoughtfully delicate spice to it; and an octopus tentacle (£8), cooked with tamrind and sat on a bed of sweet potato and ghee mash, peppered with pomegranate seeds. The sweet and savoury balance in these dishes are achieved with freshness and precision, meaning nothing becomes samey or sickly (quite the opposite, in fact) as Anglicised Indian food can often be. Main courses come in all shapes and sizes. Malawi prawn curry (£16) involves a generous amount of plump and juicy prawns swimming in a lightly spiced sauce; sheikh haryali (£16) is an earthy green mix of tandoor-cooked minced lamb, spinach, fenugreek leaves, cream chilli and spices; and the chicken makhani (£12.50) has hunks of marinated meat that had been cooked in the tandoor at a high

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temperature to achieve a light char on the outside while keeping the inside juicy and soft. There was a shahi gosht, too (£16.50); perhaps my favourite of the mains, it combined Romy’s spice blend with pomegranate molasses and tender lamb.   Alongside was fluffy basmati rice (it comes as standard with some of the mains) that had been cooked to a tee, and crisp, bubbly naan with a proper good chew to it.   The fresh and colourful food at Romy’s Kitchen is an exciting taste of modern Indian cookery, which nods gracefully to Britain’s seasonal larder. ROMY’S KITCHEN, 2 Castle Street, Thornbury, Bristol BS35 1HB; 01454 416728; romyskitchen.co.uk


L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

TOM BOWLES THIS FIFTH GENERATION FARMER, BEHIND BOTH NESTON AND HARTLEY FARMS, SURE KNOWS GOOD GRUB WHEN HE EATS IT… Breakfast? Our brunch needs have changed over the years; now with two young kids, we want somewhere with space. We tend to head to Boston Tea Party on Alfred Street in Bath, as it’s got a great vibe and a top brunch menu.

With friends? We had a great time at The Bunch of Grapes in Bradford-onAvon recently with a group of friends. I love their concept of country-style French food in a pub, reminiscent of summer family holidays – but right on my doorstep!

Best brew? Good coffee is a bit of a non-negotiable, so I’ll go out of my way to grab one from Society Café or Colonna & Small’s. There are obviously other great options, but these guys have been firm favourites of mine over the years.

Comfort food? I love a bit of barbecue and cook a lot on my Big Green Egg at home. For my barbecue hit when heading out, I’ll go to Grillstock. Big smoky flavours and a big feed – it always does the job. 

Sunday lunch? The most important meal of the week. Most of the time we are at home with the family, but if we head out we do tend to go to either Hartley or Neston Farm Shop for a top feed and a bit of a busman’s holiday. A run around for the kids after is a big attraction for us at that stage of the day, too!

With the family? My good friend’s pub, Sign of the Angel in Lacock. The food and venue are both just brilliant, and definitely make it well worth a visit.

Quick pint? I'm not a big drinker these days, so if I’m catching up with friends we usually head to Hunter & Sons for quality over quantity. Great choice, and always something new to try. Cheeky cocktail? An Old Fashioned at the Dark Horse – nothing more needs to be said here! Hidden gem? Tucked away on Bartlett Street is the best sushi; the guys at Yen Sushi do an amazing job, another firm favourite of ours. 

Something sweet? I’m not a man with a sweet tooth, but I’m being tempted more than ever by John’s baking at Didi Cakes on Walcot Street – his creations are on another level! Super steak? For special occasions, we always head to Hudson Steakhouse. They have been on top of their game for so long – really impressive. Alfresco feasting? Being sat out on the street watching the world go by with a wood-fired pizza and Wiper and True beer at The Oven is a hard-to-beat eating experience!

QUICK! Now add this little lot to your contacts book • Boston Tea Party, Bath BA1 2QU; bostonteaparty.co.uk • Society Café, Bath BA1 2AB; society-cafe.com • Colonna & Small’s, Bath BA1 1HN; colonnaandsmalls.co.uk • Hartley Farm Shop and Kitchen, Winsley BA15 2JB; hartley-farm.co.uk • Neston Farm Shop and Kitchen, Atworth SN12 8HP; nestonfarmshop.co.uk • Hunter & Sons, Bath BA1 1BZ; hunter-sons.co.uk • The Dark Horse, Bath BA1 2AB; darkhorsebar.co.uk • Yen Sushi, Bath BA1 2QZ; yensushi.co.uk • The Bunch of Grapes, Bradford-on-Avon; BA15 1JY; thebunchofgrapes.com • Grillstock, Bath BA1 1SX; grillstock.co.uk • Sign of the Angel, Lacock SN15 2LB; signoftheangel.co.uk • Didi Cakes, Bath BA1 5BG; didicakesbath.com • Hudson Steak House, Bath BA1 5BU; hudsonsteakhouse.co.uk • The Oven, Bath BA1 1EY; theovenpizzeria.co.uk

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Crumbs Bath & Bristol - Issue 66  
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