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CRUMBS

A little slice of foodie heaven

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CRUMBS

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ISSUE NO.65 AUGUST 2017 EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR LEON DAY

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk CONTRIBUTOR

MARK TAYLOR ART DIRECTOR

TREVOR GILHAM

sweeT Cherry Pie

ADVERTISING MANAGER

KYLE PHILLIPS kyle.phillips@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY ADVERTISING MANAGER

NEIL SNOW neil.snow@mediaclash.co.uk ACCOUNT MANAGER

LORENA CUSSENS lorena.cussens@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER

DAWN GOOLD dawn.goold@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 www.mediaclash.co.uk © All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we took a foodie trip to north Devon, ate our way around Glastonbury, and got our judging on at Grillstock festival for the burger and hot wing rounds. (Yes, they were all kinds of hot – pass us the milk!)

large version

Over the last four weeks, as well as putting together this very issue – which I hope, with its summery Hero Ingredient, alfresco Supper Club shoot, and seasonal recipes, will inspire some sunny dispositions among you all, regardless of the weather’s current behavior – we’ve been working on the inaugural Crumbs Awards. (And, as you can see in the snap above, celebrating their launch with a gin in hand at Sub 13 in Bath.) We’re spoilt rotten on this patch when it comes to good food and drink, and for that we have to thank the huge number of amazing people who work across a bunch of different industries within food. Yes, the chefs are of course integral, but what about the suppliers who find and deliver their ingredients – and the farmers who grow and rear them to begin with? And then there are the front of house heroes, who have the power to make or break your experience, no matter how technically impressive the kitchen behind them may be. And what about the people who put together initiatives and events, too, and come up with innovative ways to bring great produce to us? After all, good food should be for everyone – not just those lucky enough to be able to visit top restaurants on the regular. Check out our news pages for more info on our inaugural (and fast-approaching) awards, as well as all the key dates. And don’t forget, dear reader, to keep an eye out for the list of finalists, which will be revealed on 25 July, so you can shout about your favourites on social media – our judges’ ears are well and truly open. With that, I’ll leave you to enjoy our August issue, and urge you to get your mitts on this month’s cover star while you can – the phrase ‘short and sweet’ was surely never more apt than when discussing British cherry season!

Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

Crumbs is now an app! You can read all editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, Cotswolds and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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Table of Contents STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT Cherry good! 12 OPENINGS ETC News and interviews 18 SIX PACK Eat, sleep, repeat

CHEF!

28 Mackerel with Caesar salad, by Pete Laurenson 31 Lamb sweetbreads, by Scott Galloway

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NO.65 AUGUST 2017

KITCHEN ARMOURY

32 Homemade spaghetti with chilli and garlic, by Giuseppe Gambardella

40 SUPPER CLUB A Texan feast, cooked low ’n’ slow in the great outdoors 48 WANT LIST Get barbecue ready

35 Spicy Colombian wings, by Lucien Gordon ADDITIONAL RECIPES

10 Clafoutis, by Freddy Bird

MAINS

20 Roast cauliflower, by Miles Kirby, Laura Harper-Hinton and Chris Ammermann

55 GOT BEEF A comprehensive round up of some of the best burgers to be found on our fine patch

47 Smoky barbecue beans, by Claire and Rob Dacey

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AFTERS 66 Le Poivrot 70 The Castle Inn 72 The Methuen Arms PLUS 74 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Musician Natalie Holmes reveals where she goes for her food fixes...


BONITI NATURAL STONE FLOORING | EVERHOT RANGE COOKERS TIMBER FLOORING | GARDEN FURNITURE

WWW.BONITI.COM | 01225 892 200 | SHOWROOM@BONITI.COM


START E RS INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

(15-30 JULY) BBQ FOR HEROES Charity Help for Heroes’ summer campaign is encouraging us all to get family and friends together for a bangin’ barbecue over this fortnight to raise funds for ill and injured veterans; more info on helpforheroes.org.uk

(27 JULY) BEYOND POPCORN: THE GRADUATE This food-themed screening of the Academy Awardwinning film is taking place at the wine cellars at Averys, and will involve three courses of Californian-inspired food and wine; tickets £60 from bristolfilmfestival.com

(12 & 13 AUGUST) BATH & BRISTOL FOOD FESTIVAL This brand new festival at Bath Racecourse will see more than 40 stall holders selling everything from gyros to gin, and wine to woodfired pizza, while chefs and food experts will be in attendance for talks and tastings; tickets £6 from fantasticbritishfoodfestivals.com

(19 & 20 AUGUST) SMOKED & UNCUT The stylish Pig Near Bath has put together an eclectic musical lineup for this year’s festival, which will also see guests enjoying top-quality street food, local beers, cocktails and an Italian banquet event by Angela Hartnett. Adult tickets start from £37.50; smokedanduncut.com

Foodie Events

sUnshine sCran FROM BRITISH BARBECUES TO CALIFORNIA-INSPIRED SPREADS, THESE UPCOMING EVENTS WILL GIVE YOU A SUNNY DISPOSITION…

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here’s something very naughty about the cherry, those plump little globes in their glorious glossy red – wouldn’t Genesis make much more sense, we can’t help but wonder, if these were what tempted Eve, not a boring old apple? There’s an unchaste quality to their taste and texture that turns all thoughts south, to the extent that Googling ‘cherry’ has become something of a risky game. The ironic thing, of course, is that they’re not really naughty at all. In fact, some claim, they’re our most sensual superfood. Sweet cherries mostly show up on the dessert trolly, of course: in cakes and muffins; in trifles and mousses; and not forgetting in the famous cherry pie, so beloved of eccentric FBI agent Dale Cooper of Twin Peaks fame. An even more iconic cherry-based dessert, though, has to be the classic Black Forest gâteau, with its layers of rich dark chocolate, cloud-like cream and kirsch liqueur. Alternatively, you can just eat cherries on

CheRRies ONE OF OUR MOST INNUENDOLADEN FRUITS IS ALSO ONE OF THE MOST DELICIOUS, AND MOST DECADENT. HAPPILY, IT’S SECRETLY MORE SAINT THAN SINNER…

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their own – perhaps then attempting to tie a knot in the stalk with your tongue, Sherilyn Fenn-style – or maybe stir them into a Greek-style yoghurt. But that’s not all they’re good for. While sweet cherries love the company of citrus fruits and cinnamon, chocolate and cream, peaches and plums, hazelnuts and almonds, their sour cousins give a thrilling sweet-tart zip to any number of Middle Eastern dishes, and make an excellent foil to fatty meats. Cherry sauce is a classic with duck, of course, and the fruit goes well with things like venison and pork too. But still that’s not all, for numerous cocktails (the Manhattan! The Pina Colada!) aren’t considered complete until topped with a preserved and sweetened maraschino cherry. (Okay, so these Frankenstein’s monsters of the fruit world have few health benefits – they’re heaving with sugar syrup, for one thing – but they’re so tiny, and so rarely eaten in great numbers, that it’s easy to forgive them, right?)

Cherries have, of course, been around forever. Certainly, the sweet cherry, Prunus avium, seems to have been eaten across most of Europe, western Asia and bits of North Africa since prehistoric times, and we know for certain that the Romans were growing them by 72BC, after they were brought to the city from the south coast of the Black Sea, in modern-day Turkey. (The name ‘cherry’, incidentally, comes from the ancient Greek name for Ceracus – today known as Giresun – which is a city there.) Indeed, Turkey and Iran remain two of the world’s top cherry growing nations, though commercial orchards pepper Italy, Spain and France too. Closer to home, Henry VIII liked them so much when he’d tasted them in Flanders that he had some trees brought over to England, where they were planted in Kent (and, indeed, became part of the coat of arms of Sittingbourne). Naturally, plenty of myth and fable have grown up around the cherry and its spectacularly blossomed trees. One of Japan’s national treasures, for instance, is a 400-year-old cherry tree growing right out of a giant boulder in the northern city of Morioka; indeed, so into cherry trees are the Japanese that the state of their brief flowerings are a staple of national TV news.

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Elsewhere, an unsubstantiated anecdote about first American President George Washington (that he cut down his dad’s favourite cherry tree, and on being questioned admitted he did it with a jaunty “I can’t tell a lie, Pa”) either illustrates his extreme honesty, his extreme thoughtlessness, or both, while Roman Catholic Popes traditionally eat cherries at the Feast of St Mark (25 April) in memory of Pope Gregory the Great. Greg was a famously frugal man, yet was once overwhelmed by an out-ofseason lust for cherries. Up popped St Mark in a cloud of fire, who blessed one tree to fruit early, and watched as the greedy pope “wasted no time in wolfing down a bellyful”. Hurrah!

Cherries remain relatively expensive – thank a combination of high demand, short season (in the UK, six weeks from midJuly to the end of August), how easily they can be damaged by rain and hail, how hard the trees are to grow and keep healthy, a high vulnerability to greedy flies and birds, and that handpicking is favoured to avoid damage to both fruit and trees. They’re worth all this, though, not just for their delicious taste and licentious trappings, but because they’re actually extremely good for us. High in fibre, low in calories, with plenty of vitamin C, potassium, carotenoids and more, they’re credited with helping to protect against dementia, strokes, cancer, hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, not to mention aiding with muscle soreness, weight loss, and a sound night’s sleep. Now, there is a caveat to all this: as the good stuff is in fairly low percentages, you’d have to eat an awful lot of cherries to get much of it, and in doing so you’d have also consumed an awful lot of sugar – but it’s hardly a deal breaker. Go easy on the cherries, but by all means eat them and enjoy them. There are few debauched delights that have quite as much angel in them as these little devils.

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R E C I P E

LIDO’S FREDDY BIRD IS BACK WITH OLD-SCHOOL INSPO ON HOW TO USE THIS MONTH’S HERO INGREDIENT IN THE KITCHEN… I TOLD MY KIDS the other day I was making them a clafoutis for their pudding. ‘What’s that?’ was their reply. I explained it’s like a sweet toad in the hole, with cherries, and got ‘What is toad in the hole, Daddy?’ in response. I couldn’t believe it: I had failed my kids! Every comfort dish from my childhood, it turns out, was unknown to them – including proper rice pudding, steamed sponge and custard, and all the other greats. They know all about percebes, scallops and jamon; they help me cut the heads off quail in the Lido kitchen; they have knowledge of the different seasons; and they have incredible restaurant etiquette – but they don’t know about the important stuff, the things that I have such fond memories of, the things that got me cooking in the first place. In short: proper comfort food. I’m now looking forward to every Sunday, rediscovering dishes from my childhood and hopefully creating a few memories for my own kids, having kicked off with this recipe. When I made it I thought it would feed five easily – it didn’t, but I am a pig... LIDO, Oakfield Place, Bristol BS8 2BJ; 0117 933 9530; lidobristol.com

CLAFOUTIS

SERVES 5(ISH!)

INGREDIENTS 500g cherries 100g caster sugar, plus a big pinch 50ml cherry brandy (it should be kirsch, but I had some left in my hip flask) large knob of salted butter 2 tbsp vanilla sugar 3 large free-range eggs zest of 1 lemon (use a microplane) 50g plain flour 275ml full fat milk METHOD 1 Crush the cherries slightly so the skins burst, and toss them in a big pinch of the caster sugar. Macerate them in the brandy for as long as you can be bothered – 1 hour minimum would be good. 2 Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. 3 Butter a shallow casserole pan or earthenware dish and then tip the vanilla sugar in. Roll the pan around until the sugar completely coats the edges. 4 Toss the cherries in – they should be spaced out and in a single layer. If you have too many, don’t be tempted to put them all in – save them for a later date or just enjoy them steeped in brandy. 5 Now make a batter: whisk the caster sugar, eggs and lemon zest together. Then add the flour and slowly pour in the milk, mixing as you go. Pour this mixture over the cherries so they’re just poking out the top. Bake for about 35-40 minutes. 6 Serve warm, not hot – it always tastes better when it’s cooled slightly.

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S T A R T E R S

Openings etc

HIGH SOCIETY

A new café and coffee shop has just opened on Bristol’s harbourside. Society Café began in Bath, where it now has two venues, alongside a newer site in Oxford. You’ll find an urban, industrial look inside the Narrow Quay caff, where great coffee is the name of the game, and guest coffees and seasonally changing house espressos are brewed. That said, there are plenty of teas and other bevs to choose from too, as well as fresh sandwiches, pastries, cakes, and other treats. society-cafe.com

GETTING CRABBY

AWaRdS UPdaTE!

The Old Butcher’s, which opened on Bristol’s North Street this year, has now launched a food offering. Carol’s Crab Kitchen is taking care of the culinary proceedings with a menu full of the likes of soft shell crab, gumbo, crab cakes, chicken wings and sharing trays. Sides come in the form of triple-cooked corn on the cob, sweetcorn chowder fries and pickled popcorn shrimp, among others. Wash it all down with the selection of Wiper and True beers on offer there, and you’ve got yourself a crackin’ (ahem) little feast. We’ve heard mentions of regular food events here too, so keep your eye on social media for any updates. facebook.com/theoldbutchersbristol

Entries for the Crumbs Awards will be closing on 21 July at noon – so if you’ve not got your hat in the ring yet you’d best get a wiggle on! Nominations have been rolling in, and so have the sponsorships: Fine Foods UK, Gregg Latchams and Allmanhall have recently been added to the lineup of sponsors, which already includes Yeo Valley Milk, Wogan Coffee, Total Produce, Budweiser Budvar, Pam Lloyd PR, Hospitality Gem, Marshfield Bakery and Robert Welch (and, breathe). Tickets to the big night itself (which will be on 1 October at the awesome Bristol Old Vic) are on sale... now! Snap ’em up while you can – it’s going to be a hella good shindig! crumbsmagawards.com

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VIVA ITALIA

Did you know Yammo has relaunched in Bath? The Italian restaurant closed down a number of months ago, but having been taken over by the guys behind Bristol’s Glassboat and Lido, it’s opening up again with a new lease of life. Housed in the same location as before, the restaurant has been treated to a total refurbishment and now has a new bar and dining area upstairs, an open kitchen in the courtyard out the back, and a private dining space. The friendly, casual Yammo vibes will be the same, and the Neapolitan-style menu pretty similar, although with some delicious new tweaks. The venue is open from breakfast until 1am at the weekends, serving drinks and bar food until late. yammo.co.uk

BAKING IT

The long-established Hobbs House – which has its flagship bakery in Chipping Sodbury – is opening not one, but two sites in Bristol. This bakery has been going for the best part of three decades, with the family behind it having history in the city. The first of the Bristol sites is set to open mid-July on Gloucester Road, with the second to follow in Southville in September. Expect organic bread and sourdough loaves, made with the family’s 62-year-old starter, as well as cakes, baked fresh in house, obvs, and Extract coffee. There will be areas in the bakeries for eating in, too, where the team will be serving up more substantial meals – think brekkies and lunches. They’re still working on the menu, but we’ve heard rumours of tartines, sourdough waffles and pizzas... hobbshousebakery.co.uk

new Kid On the blOCK

THIS IS BEN ABERCROMBIE, HEAD CHEF AT THE BRAND NEW APEX CITY OF BATH HOTEL So, Ben, what attracted you to this yet-to-open hotel? It’s going to be the biggest purpose-built city centre conference facility in Bath, and it’s already starting to draw interest from international events. There’s also no doubt it’ll attract tourists from the UK and beyond, so it’s an incredible opportunity to share the food I love with lots of people – of course including locals. What have you been getting up to during the build up to launch? We’ve been really busy ensuring we are ready to hit the ground running – so have been recruiting, developing menus and networking with fellow chefs, as well as local restaurants. What’s the concept of this new joint? The restaurant and bar will be very contemporary in style, with food based on British classics but made using the latest techniques. We’re just about to confirm the name, and will be announcing it very soon – watch this space! How have you approached the menu?  I want it to showcase the West Country’s incredible larder, utilising ingredients right on our doorstep: from incredible cheese to rapeseed oil that’s cold-pressed just five miles outside Bath. I’m a firm believer that you’re only as good as your produce and your final menu. When did you begin cooking, then? At the tender age of 15, in my local village pub. At that age, I thought working in the

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pub would be a good way to meet a nice girl – instead, I fell in love with cooking! What was your very first job in the industry? I was a kitchen porter. I’d always been very ambitious though, and wanted to feel more important, so my title ended up being changed to ‘underwater ceramic technician’! What’s the toughest job you’ve tackled so far? At HIX in Soho I was in charge of the garnish section, and responsible for all of the garnishes that accompanied each dish. It wasn’t a case of complexity, but was high-pressured, intense cooking – relentless and exhausting. Proudest career achievement? Winning the Morning Advertiser’s Young Chef of the Year award when I was 16, and achieving two AA Rosettes and a Michelin Bib Gourmand at 23. Now, at 26, I’m hungry to achieve even more. Which local restaurants do you like to eat in? I'm very fond of The Olive Tree and Allium. What and where was the best meal you’ve eaten? Casamia in Bristol is hands down the best place I’ve been. Every element of the meal was excellent. Current favourite flavour combination? My chilled leek and potato soup with Bath chap, quail’s egg and caviar. apexhotels.co.uk


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here COmes The JudGe

CRUMBS AWARDS: THE BUILD UP Meet LUKE HASELL: organic farmer, founder of The Story Organic and The Community Farm, part of Eat Drink Bristol Fashion, and creator of Valley Fest… How are you doing then, Luke; what’s going on with you?  I’ve been busy on the farm calving cows, planning the upcoming Valley Fest, and making sure I get my produce out to all our retail customers and restaurant clients. What’s your take on the food and drink scene in Bath and Bristol? Incredible – certainly one of, if not the, most vibrant areas for food outside the capital.

GET OUTTA TOWN

It’s not all about the cities, y’know; a new restaurant launched out in Clevedon recently, and it’s looking like a proper corker. Puro is all about combining the best service with refined, thoughtful food, all in a down-toearth, casual environment. The mainly British menu whispers of inspiration from around the world, although when it comes to ingredients, locality is king. There’s a seasonal a la carte and a regularly changing set menu, and plans for the first tasting menu are underway as we speak. Heading up the kitchen is Alex Crawley, previously of The Railway Inn, where he worked under Matt Hampshire – who’s now running Tare at Cargo. We can’t wait to see what this fresh young pro cooks up in his first head chef gig. purorestaurant.co.uk

YOU’RE BOOKED

A Bath-born cookbook has been awarded the title of Best Charity Cookbook in the World, at the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards 2017. Jenny Sowerby’s mother was Syrian, and hand-wrote recipe books for her daughters before her death in 2006. Jenny, who grew up in Larkhall and still lives in Bath, embarked upon a project to publish these recipes under the title of Taste of Freedom, in order to sell them to raise money for refugees and people affected by conflict around the world. The book has so far raised over £8,000, and can be bought on the website below. yalla-lets-eat.co.uk

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What makes you well qualified as a Crumbs Awards judge, then? I think it’s safe to say I know a fair bit about food; I’ve been farming for decades and also supply chefs, and have a hand in my own venues and food trading outfits. I also love to eat out – and do it as much as I can! What are you especially going to be looking for when judging these awards? I want to see real uniqueness of product or offering, and great quality not only in terms of the product, but also the individuals behind it. Got any tips for people entering? Keep your standards high; always strive to be the very best. The Bristol and Bath area is amazing for food, but what are we missing that a smart entrepreneur could bring to the party for next year? More innovative ways of selling and sharing surplus food and food waste, as well as more examples of inner city growing and indoor gardening systems.   What do you reckon are going to be some of the toughest categories to judge? Newcomer: trying to work out the best of such a large contemporary offering is going to be a challenge! Which categoies have you got the strongest personal interest in? Producer and supplier: I have close links to those as a farmer, and it is exciting to discover more about all the other people out there doing great things.   Nominations for the Crumbs Awards are open until noon on 21 July! Go to crumbsmagawards.co.uk for more information, nomination tips, and to enter


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1 Sign of the Angel This coaching inn, set in the medieval market village of Laycock, has been hosting hungry travellers for centuries – so it’s safe to say it knows what it’s doing by now. The team have taken the idea of the traditional inn and made the experience an up-to-date one that feels like a real treat. The West Country-inspired menu might see you kick off dinner with a sorbet of local mozzarella, beetroot, watermelon and tomato, followed by veal rump with fondant potato, wild mushrooms and mustard cream, and then a trio of chocolate desserts. When it comes to post-dinner snoozing, there are but a handful of rooms – five, to be exact – which all have their own quirks and style (expect lots of low beams and charmingly sloped floors). These rooms start at £110 per night, and all include breakfast – so don’t fill up too much on dinner! signoftheangel.co.uk

2 The Pear Tree Inn 1

Six Pack

PUT ’EM U P NO NEED TO DRAG YOUR FULL BELLY HOME AFTER DINNER; THESE RURAL FOODIE INNS CAN PUT YOU UP FOR THE NIGHT… 1862CRUMBSMAG.COM CRUMBSMAG.COM

Getting the balance between modern and classic just right is this oh-so likeable Wiltshire inn. It serves up contemporary-style food in the form of Moroccan lamb rump with aromatic couscous and pickled vegetables, and ‘chilli con vegetarian’ with saffron rice and avocado salad, while keeping its setting familiar and rustic. And that extends to the guest rooms; all eight are designed individually and are housed across the main building and the converted barn (four of them are pet-friendly, too). Prices start at £125 per night, and all rooms include breakfast. Speaking of which, that’ll include pork from Downland Farm, where the happy pigs are reared naturally by David; free-range eggs laid by chirpy chickens who live in Norton St Philip; freshly homebaked bread; and jams made onsite by the kitchen team. peartreewhitley.co.uk


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3 The Litton The classic English countryside acts not only as the backdrop for this Somerset inn, but also the inspiration. Having recently stripped the building back and reinstated its original character and charm, the guys here have created a restaurant and guesthouse that champions the rural landscape it calls home (rooms are even named after the ancient rivers and fields that surround it). Original beams, period-stye windows and high ceilings act as a respectful nod to the building’s history (which dates back to the 15th century), while thoughtful and professional design gives the restaurant and guest rooms a kooky, boutique feel, and brings it gracefully into the new millennium. Originally a mill, this place has a real connection with local food – something that is reflected on the seasonal, sustainable menus, on which you might find fillet of bream with cured ham, stuffed chilli pepper and preserved lemon, and free-range bacon chop with fennel purée and artichoke. thelitton.co.uk

4 The Redan Inn Well-known local chef Tony Casey takes care of the food at the Redan, and works to make the best of our top South West produce in his thoughtful and accessible dishes. With no shortage of experience in the industry, Tony and his kitchen team know exactly where to find the best ingredients, and grow a lot of what they use themselves in the kitchen garden, as well as capitalising on their rural location by foraging in nearby hedgerows and fields. Choose to eat from the a la carte, or the local tasting menu. The individual, retro style of the bar and restaurant is also carried through all the guest rooms. With huge beds, rainforest showers and products from Somerset’s Bramley, a stay here is a right treat. The Redan’s Chilcompton location makes it a great base from which to explore

Wells, Nunney Castle, and Chew Valley Lake – as well, of course, as the pretty village itself. theredaninn.co.uk

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5 Timbrell’s Yard Formerly of River Cottage, Tom Blake now brings his refreshingly simple, seasonal cooking to this inn, which perches on the edge of the River Avon. Not only is all the food served here traceable back to its roots, but the team are keen to make sure the prices are equally as accessible, with meals ranging from nibbles and small plates to cheese boards and impressive a la carte options. Among the latter you might see the likes of chargrilled Old Spot pork chop with beans, haricot, aubergine, feta and mint, as well as slow-cooked aubergine, tomato and broad beans with crispy chickpeas, pickled raisins and pine nuts. The 17 rooms for accommodation in this Grade II listed Bradford-on-Avon gaff – which was completely renovated back in 2015 – feature reclaimed furniture, neutral, dusty hues of white and grey, and statement wallpaper for an eclectic and well thought out look. Bag yourself room 106, if you can; it’s in the oldest part of the building and has beamed ceilings, a lovely free-standing cast iron bath and views of the River Avon. timbrellsyard.com

6 King William This might appear to be your average country pub from the outside, but make your way in and you’ll find a light and fun, shabby chicstyle pub and restaurant that makes you feel right at home. Speaking of which, you’re welcome to get comfortable for the whole

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night in one of the three double bedrooms the pub houses. These cosy, modern guest rooms cost just £80 a night for two to stay in, with brekkie carrying a £7.50 surcharge per person. Before you sample the morning meal, though, you’ll want to check out the evening menu: the chefs change the list of dishes all the time, in order to make sure they’re capitalising on the best local ingredients. Good news for those who don’t get on with gluten, too: most of the menu is gluten-free – including a good choice of puddings. Hurrah! Be sure to make the most of the surrounding countryside and access to Bath city centre while you’re here, an’ all. kingwilliaminn.co.uk


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In the Larder feelinG hOt, hOt, hOt

THINGS ARE HEATING UP IN THE CRUMBS LARDER THIS MONTH, WITH GREAT FOOD AND DRINK THAT’S IDEAL FOR THE SUNNY SEASON

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1 ICE ICE BABY Yeo Valley Ice Cream, £4/500ml The guys at Somerset’s Yeo Valley Farm use their organic milk for all sorts of products, but these ice creams are our new favourite. They come in four flavours: vanilla, strawberries and cream, double chocolate, and the dangerously moreish salted caramel. Made with double cream, they’re all silky smooth and subtly sweet, with pleasingly natural-tasting flavours. Grab a spoon! Available at Waitrose. yeovalley.co.uk 2 BOTTLED IT Bristol’s Kombucha Pioneer, from £2.25/330ml This refreshing craft kombucha is a naturally fermented concoction, with full flavour

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and a gentle fizz. Raw and unpasteurised, it has a light alcoholic content of 1.6% ABV, and is a great sip in its own right, as well as a top alternative to lager. We’ll be drinking it nice and chilled this summer. Available at Better Food and Wild Oats in Bristol. bristols.org 3 JAMMIN’ Tracklements Hot Habanero Jam, £3.80/250g Like your barbecues to get really fired up? This spicy new condiment from Wiltshire-based Tracklements is not only great as a bit of extra relish in your burgers and hotdogs, but will also make for a great marinade for meats before they get thrown onto the flames. We’re really into the fresh heat and sticky

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fruitiness of this punchy jam, and will be spicing up our summer tables with it. Available online direct from the producer, as well as in independent delis across our patch. tracklements.co.uk 4 LET’S SALSA Gran Luchito Salsas, £2.49/300g These new salsas are made in Mexico with fresh, natural and native produce, meaning they have authentic flavour in abundance. We’ve been scooping the smoky chipotle number onto tortilla chips as a snack, but it’d also be a dream in fajitas, adding deep, smoky notes. There are also tomatillo and red pepper varieties, as well as the colourful and fiery mango habanero. Use them to spice up sauces, for dipping, and to put

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the finishing touches to Mexicanstyle feasts. From Otomi in Clifton Arcade, Bristol. luchito.com 5 BREWTIFUL Minor Figures Cold Brew Coffee Nitro, £2.60/200ml Yep, cold brew – in a can. Opened with a ringpull, these cans give off a little ‘pop’ as all the tiny nitrogen bubbles fizz and make the dark liquid appear a little like draft – poured out, it doesn’t look dissimilar to a thin Guinness, with a small head. It’s smooth and refreshing, and has been doing its thing on our hangovers this month. Made using single origin Brazilian beans brewed in cold water, this new sip is a great shout for coffee lovers over the warmer months. dontmakecoffee.com


B O O K

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MARK TAYLOR HAS SURE BEEN GETTING HIS FIVE-A-DAY, THANKS TO THESE VEGETABLE-FOCUSED READS...

CARAVAN DINING ALL DAY

Miles Kirby, Laura Harper-Hinton and Chris Ammermann (Vintage, £25) This is the long-waited first recipe book from New Zealanders Miles Kirby, Laura Harper-Hinton and Chris Ammermann, founders of London’s award-winning Caravan restaurants and Caravan Coffee Roasters. This entrepreneurial trio is responsible for bringing the Antipodean all-day dining culture to the UK, and their stylish cookbook features more than 100 recipes that reflect Caravan’s global food ethos. Using vibrant and healthy ingredients with an emphasis on grains, vegetables and innovative ingredient combinations, recipes include jalapeño cornbread, chipotle butter, coriander and lime; aubergine purée with preserved lemon gremolata and poached eggs, and chargrilled lamb cutlets and chermoula. There’s also a chapter dedicated to coffee and how to make the perfect brew at home without the need to buy an expensive espresso machine.

SPICED ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH HARISSA AND POMEGRANATE YOGHURT

SERVES 4

The harissa and pomegranate yoghurt give the dish that extra hit of flavour, and makes for lovely presentation too. INGREDIENTS

1 large cauliflower 4 tbsp rapeseed oil or neutral-flavoured oil 1 tbsp olive oil 25g garam masala 75g Greek yoghurt 15g pomegranate molasses 100g harissa 1 tbsp nigella seeds 2 tbsp pomegranate seeds small bunch coriander cress, to garnish (or use picked coriander leaves)

METHOD

1 Preheat the oven to 180/350F/gas mark 4. 2 Cut the cauliflower into quarters and

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then cut each quarter in half, so you have 8 wedges of cauliflower. Heat the rapeseed oil in a large frying pan and fry 4 pieces of cauliflower on each side until golden brown. Remove from pan and repeat with the remaining 4 pieces. 3 Place the cauliflower into a large bowl, pour in the olive oil and garam masala and toss to ensure a good coating on all sides, then tip the cauliflower onto a large roasting tray and place in the oven for 8-10 minutes. 4 Meanwhile, combine the Greek yoghurt with the pomegranate molasses in a small bowl and season with salt; set aside. 5 Spread 1 tbsp of harissa over the base of each serving plate, then place a couple of wedges of cauliflower on top of that. Dollop on spoonfuls of the pomegranate molasses yoghurt and sprinkle with nigella seeds and pomegranate seeds. Finally, garnish with coriander cress or leaves and serve.


THE COTTAGE INN Welcome aboard! The Cottage Inn, Bristol has reopened its doors and welcomes you to come and try our brand-new seafood inspired menu which has been crafted to give you a perfect waterside experience. Weยนve even got a take away menu now available, so why not don your deck shoes and head on down to relax with us by the water. THE COTTAGE INN 01179 215256 Baltic Wharf, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG

www.butcombe.com


S T A R T E R S

VENETO: SIX RECIPES FROM SEASONS: AN ITALIAN A NEW COUNTRY WAY WITH KITCHEN VEGETABLES Valeria Necchio Faber, £20

Italian-born food photographer and writer Valeria Necchio captures the spirit and flavours of North Eastern Italy in her first cookbook, which was inspired by her popular recipe blog. This is essentially a book of Venetian home cooking, with ideas inspired by what’s good at the local markets. The recipes are straightforward and comforting – think tagliatelle with rabbit ragu, barbecued pork ribs, pancetta and sausage with rosemary, and stir-fried fine beans with basil and garlic. For those with a sweet tooth there are some delights including almond polenta shortbread tart, baked peaches with mascarpone cream, and lemon sorbet with Prosecco and grappa. It’s all brought together with some beautiful photographs that will make you want to jump on the next plane to Veneto.

Joshua McFadden with Martha Holmberg Artisan, £30

Chef Joshua McFadden spent years cooking in some of the finest kitchens in New York, Chicago and San Francisco, but it was his two years on a farm in Maine that changed his understanding of how to make vegetables taste extraordinary. Divided into six seasons, rather than the traditional four, to give a more accurate reflection of what’s happening in the fields, this book is a groundbreaking look at cooking with vegetables. Each chapter opens with recipes that feature raw vegetables straight out of the soil and, as each chapter progresses, McFadden uses grilling, steaming, sautés, panroasts, braises and stews. An important book, its highlights include pasta carbonara with English peas; green bean, tuna and mushroom ‘casserole’; cauliflower ragu; and roasted beet, citrus and olive salad with horseradish.

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VEGAN RECIPES FROM THE MIDDLE EAST

EAT, DRINK, LIVE

Fran Warde Ryland Peters & Small, £14.99

Parvin Razavi Grub Street, £18.99

Iranian-born Parvin Razavi says the starting points that inspired this book were ‘enjoyment, hospitality, tradition, creativity, sustainability and joy of life’, which certainly seems to have most things covered when it comes to home cooking for family and friends. Think of Middle Eastern cuisine and you may immediately think of meat, but vegetables are treated with the utmost respect and this book makes them the star. Taking the varied cuisines of Iran, Armenia, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Morocco and Turkey, many of the dishes in the book are based around grains, nuts, vegetables and fruits. The recipes include cool and fragrant soups, delicate preserves, pilaff, breads, pickles, relishes and pastries. We particularly like the stuffed aubergines with walnut and pomegranate, and the roast cauliflower with tahini dip.

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Chef Fran Warde’s philosophy is ‘to give people the confidence to cook and laugh in their own kitchens’, using ingredients that are readily available at the local supermarket. The 150 simple recipes are designed to leave time for sharing with friends and family, with inspirational ideas for table decorating. From weekend brunches with friends and roast dinner with the family to romantic dinners for two and summer picnics, the range of recipes includes Middle Eastern barbecued lamb with preserved lemon and tomato pickle, Turkish toasted bread and watermelon and rosewater salad, and potato and watercress salad with mustard seeds. Backed up with some stunning lifestyle photography from Debi Treloar, this is an invaluable book for those who want to eat well despite having busy lives.


Tamil Nadu tasting menu available throughout July and August

10 The Mall | Clifton | BS8 4DR | 0117 360 0288 | info@nutmegbristol.com | www.nutmegbristol.com


t: 0117 952 1391 w: www.innonthegreenbristol.com e: iotgbristol@hotmail.com Inn On The Green, 2 Filton Road, Horfield, Bristol BS7 0PA


CH E F ! There’s a particular sense of triumph that comes with making your own pasta – it’s well worth giving it a go

WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

H I G H L I G H T S

HAIL, CAESAR Chargrilled mackerel with crisp lettuce and Caesar dressing, coming right up Page 28

HONEY TO THE BEE

An impressive dish of glazed lamb sweetbreads and hispi cabbage Page 31

HOT STUFF

Super simple and spicy spaghetti, made from scratch with ingredients we bet you already have Page 32

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SPREAD YOUR WINGS, says Andy Clarke


C H E F !

ParK LIFe PETE LAURENSON SHOWS US HOW TO CREATE A TASTY SUMMER SALAD… 28

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Pete has been a chef for 17 years, working in kitchens not only around Bristol, but in such far-flung locations as Paris too. He joined the team at The Victoria Park pub back in March, and has since been working hard to create some top menus. This mackerel Caesar salad was born when some wonderful freshly caught mackerel was brought into the restaurant by Dean – one of the owners – after a fishing trip. It’s a great twist on the traditional dish, and is a really summery meal that can be made either in the kitchen or on the barbecue – weather permitting! There’s enough Ceasar dressing in the recipe for six portions, so you can save the rest for another day, or up the quantities of everything else to feed a half-dozen.

CHARGRILLED WHOLE MACKEREL CAESAR SALAD WITH PECORINO SERVES 1

INGREDIENTS For the dressing: 6 anchovy fillets packed in oil, drained 1 small garlic clove 2 large egg yolks 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice ¾ tsp Dijon mustard 2-3 drops Tabasco splash sherry vinegar 1 tsp honey 2 tbsp olive oil 100ml vegetable oil 3 tbsp Parmesan, finely grated For the croutons: 1 thick slice of bread glug olive oil 1 tbsp thyme, chopped For the mackerel: 1 whole fresh mackerel, trimmed and cleaned with the head and fins taken off glug of rapeseed oil juice of ½ lemon To serve: cos lettuce pecorino 2 pickled quail’s eggs 3 anchovy fillets

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METHOD 1 For the dressing, chop the anchovies and the garlic. Combine and add a pinch of salt. Use the side of a knife blade to crush this into a paste, then scrape into a medium bowl. 2 Whisk in the egg yolks, lemon juice, mustard, Tabasco, sherry vinegar and honey. Then, very gradually, whisk in the olive oil, then vegetable oil, going drop-by-drop to start. Whisk everything until it forms a thick and glossy dressing, then mix in the Parmesan and season with salt, pepper, and more lemon juice, if desired. This is better made 1 day ahead, so the flavours can fuse. 3 For the croutons, preheat oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Cut the bread into 1 inch cubes and toss with olive oil on a baking sheet, seasoning with salt and pepper. Bake for 10-15 minutes until golden, tossing occasionally. Add the thyme near the end of cooking to ensure it does not burn and you maintain the fresh flavour. 4 Heat a chargrill or griddle pan. 5 Once the mackerel is trimmed and cleaned, rub it with the rapeseed oil and lemon juice, then season with salt and pepper. 6 Place on the chargrill or griddle pan, and cook on both sides until the skin is golden and crispy with char lines. Try to regulate the temperature so you can complete the cooking process on the grill, but if you’re unsure just finish it in the oven. 7 Strip 2 of the larger leaves from the lettuce, tear them up, and toss them in some of the dressing. Then take 3 smaller leaves from the lettuce and, keeping them whole, place on the plate in the 12 o’clock, 4 o’clock and 8 o’clock positions. Place the tossed leaves in the middle. 8 Halve the pickled quail’s eggs and scatter on the cos leaves with the salted anchovies. 9 Once cooked, place the mackerel on top, scatter over the croutons and, with a vegetable peeler, shave slivers of the pecorino around the salad. Finally, sprinkle with sea salt and maybe serve with a small bowl of extra dressing. THE VICTORIA PARK, 66 Raymend Road, Bristol BS3 4QW; 0117 330 6043; thevictoriapark.co.uk

a Grape match! Franc Arman Malvasija 2015 £14.50, Novel Wines “This is a properly unique white wine from Croatia. A zesty Mediterranean white, it’s full of juicy guava and a bittersweet citrus finish, making it a delicious match for both the flavours of mackerel and its chargrilled notes. Great for the sunshine, too!”

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C H E F !

ShEEP IMPACT

HOMEWOOD PARK’S SCOTT GALLOWAY SHOWS WHAT WE SHOULD BE DOING WITH SWEETBREADS THIS SUMMER…

“This is an ideal light dish for a hot summer’s day using lamb sweetbreads,” says Scott. “They’re a very cheap and underused ingredient and, when cooked correctly, can be very flavoursome.”

HONEY GLAZED LAMB SWEETBREADS WITH CHARRED HISPI CABBAGE AND BLUE CHEESE SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS For the blue cheese dressing: 50ml white wine vinegar 60g blue cheese 60g Parmesan 50g mayonnaise  100ml vegetable oil For the blue cheese croquettes:  50g butter 50g plain flour 250g warm milk 60g blue cheese 60g Parmesan  50g flour 1 egg, beaten 50g breadcrumbs For the leek ash mayo: 2 leeks (the dark green part only) 150g mayonnaise juice of ½ lemon

For the charred cabbage: 1 hispi cabbage, outer leaves removed 100g butter 1 sprig rosemary 1 garlic clove For the sweetbreads: 125g butter 500g lamb sweetbreads  3 rosemary sprigs 2 garlic cloves, crushed honey  picked watercress leaves, to finish

a Grape match! Kayra Kalecik Karasi 2015 £13.50, Novel Wines “This assembly of delicious food needs a gorgeous and versatile red wine like this succulent Turkish one from Anatolia. It’s silky textured with notes of ginger flower, plums and ripe red berries.”

METHOD 1 For the blue cheese dressing, place the vinegar, blue cheese, Parmesan and mayo into the blender and turn on. Slowly pour in the oil and finish with salt and pepper to taste. Keep in the fridge for later. 2 For the croquettes, melt the butter in a thick-bottomed pan, then slowly stir in the flower so it forms a paste. Then, a little at a time, mix in the milk. Then add in the blue cheese and Parmesan and cook for 2 minutes on a low heat. 3 Remove and place the mix into a piping bag. On a tray covered with greaseproof paper, pipe out the mix into lines and place in the freezer. 4 Once set, cut into 3cm long tubes. Put the flour, beaten egg and breadcrumbs into seperate bowls, and pass the croquettes through each, so they have an even breadcrumb coating. Return to the fridge. 5 For the leek ash mayo, preheat the oven to 240C/475F/gas mark 9. Bake the leeks in the oven until completely burnt black and dried all over. Add to a food processer and blend into a powder before passing through a fine sieve. 6 Mix 5g of this leek ash with the mayonnaise, then season with salt, pepper and a touch of lemon juice. Set aside in the fridge. 7 Cut the cabbage into quarters and remove as much of the stalk as possible without the cabbage falling apart. Bring a pot of water to the boil and blanch for 30 secconds. Remove and pat dry. Heat a frying pan and place the cabbage, face down, in the dry pan. This will give it the charred look. Once achieved, add the butter, rosemary and garlic, and cook the cabbage all the way through. 8 For the sweetbreads, gently heat the butter in a frying pan until it’s brown and foaming, then season the sweetbreads and add them to the rosemary and garlic. Keep turning and basting until golden brown in colour, then add in a good glug of honey to finish. Keep turning them to achieve a nice, even glaze. 9 To assemble the dish, swipe a spoonful of the ash mayo across the bottom of a bowl, then place the cabbage heart on top. Add 3 croquettes and 3 sweetbreads. Drizzle the blue cheese dressing across the cabbage. Dust the remaining leek ash across the plate and finish by garnishing with watercress leaves. HOMEWOOD PARK, Abbey Lane, Freshford, Bath BA2 7TB; 01225 723731; homewoodpark.co.uk

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C H E F !

LOOkIN’ fOR SOME hOT STUFF

CUPBOARDS LOOKING BARE? YOU NEED THIS SIMPLE PASTA RECIPE BY GIUSEPPE GAMBARDELLA…

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Well known for its alternative pizza menu, Dough in Bath has recently widened its offering to include more Italian classics, from carpaccio to panzerottini and plenty of homemade pasta, courtesy of new Calabrian chef, Giuseppe Gambardella. It was Giuseppe’s mum who taught him to cook as a young boy and inspired him to go to cookery college from the age of 14. He’s travelled the length and breadth of Italy discovering the different culinary cultures, and was most recently a head chef in a hotel and then a restaurant in Trentino and Emilia-Romagna respectively, before coming to the UK two years ago. He’s passionate about great ingredients whatever he’s creating, though fresh pasta and slow-cooked sauces made with love are a particular specialism of his. For Mediterranean style cooking – especially of the Southern Italian variety – and dishes filled with sunshine, you can't get much better than Dough in Bath. A speciality pasta dish from South West Italy, spaghetti aglio, olio e peperoncino (spaghetti with garlic, oil and hot peppers) is super simple, tasty, and quick to make, and is a staple late-night dish for Italian students, post-clubbing. It’s also the ideal midweek supper! For the authentic version, with homemade spaghetti, breadcrumbs and parsley, go try it out at Dough. book and roll it out again. Continue folding and rolling 3 or 4 times, and finally roll out until it’s 1-2mm thick. 4 Using a pasta roller or a length of taut fishing line, cut the spaghetti into 25-30cm lengths. Cook in salted boiling water for 4-5 minutes, until just tender, and leave to drain in a colander while you get on with making the sauce. 5 Gently heat the extra virgin olive oil in a non-stick pan. Add the garlic, chilli and chopped parsley, and cook for around 20-30 seconds on a medium heat until just beginning to brown and toast. 6 Add the pasta into the pan and incorporate the sauce with your spaghetti. Serve on warm plates, and garnish with the toasted breadcrumbs. Add an extra drizzle of olive oil to serve.

SPAGHETTI AGLIO, OLIO E PEPERONCINO SERVES 2

INGREDIENTS For the pasta: 200g ‘00’ flour 1 free-range egg, plus one yolk 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil For the sauce: 2 garlic cloves 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil ½ fresh Scotch bonnet chilli (or favourite fresh chilli) 1 tbsp flat-leaf parsley, chopped 1 tbsp breadcrumbs, toasted, to garnish

DOUGH, 14-16 The Corridor, Bath BA1 5AP; 01225 443686; doughpizzarestaurant.co.uk

METHOD 1 Sieve the flour onto a clean worksurface. Make a well and break in the eggs, then add the olive oil and a pinch of salt. Combine slowly and knead for 5-10 minutes until the dough is smooth and forms a neat ball. If it’s sticky, add a bit more flour. 2 Cover with a damp cloth or clingfilm, and leave in a warm, dry place for 1 hour. 3 Flour a work surface and roll out your dough. Fold it in half like a

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a Grape match! Sette by Masi Piero 2012 £18.50, Novel Wines “Try this authentic Italian dish with this Sangiovese/ Cabernet Sauvignon blend from Italian winemaker Masi Piero – with a twist! Made in India, Sette is a signature blend with notes of ripe plums, blackberry and coffee. It’s bold and flavoursome, and will stand up to those chillis.”

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Top Lane, Whitley, Wiltshire SN12 8QX 01225 704966 T f @peartreewhitley

www.peartreewhitley.co.uk


T H E

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wING aNd a prayer ANDY CLARKE IS RATHER TAKEN BY ONE OF THE BOLD SIDE DISHES AT BRISTOL NEWBIE, ASADO…

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orced to spend a few days each week away from the glorious West, I’m in constant danger of missing out. Living in these thriving parts means that being absent for even a small length of time can see you returning to a culinary scene that often looks and tastes different to how it did when you left. It’s hard to keep track of all the new openings, let alone have time to revisit the established places you always loved. But thanks to an army of enthusiastic foodies writing up their culinary conquests, I can plan my meals from afar, and tuck in when I’m home. The burger seems to have taken Bristol by storm recently. You can’t swing a fork on Twitter or Instagram without hitting drool-enducing snaps of juicy patties, glazed buns and imaginative sides. So, just when you thought your to-eat list couldn’t get any longer, cue Asado,

the latest (maybe not by the time you read this, knowing Bristol!) place to offer up an awesome take on homemade burgers. Based on Colston Street, Asado cooks up locally sourced, environmentally friendly burgers and sides for hungry revelers, prepared on the wood-fired grill and adorned with South American twists. The man in charge is Lucien Gordon, who, like so many self-respecting foodies, has moved back to Bristol from London where he was a chef at the now infamous burger destination Patty & Bun. When thinking about a match that I wanted to share with you lovely lot from here, I had plenty to choose from. Yes, the burgers are great – succulent beef made into melt-in-the-mouth patties – but my love of chicken on the bone was re-ignited when I tried the spicy oak-grilled Columbian wings.

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T H E

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My obsession with chicken on the bone probably goes back to my love of Miss Millie’s as a kid (no judgement, please!), but the wings at Asado are another level. Spicy, succulent and hard to resist, they’re served sprinkled with pickled red chilies and a creamy, tangy coriander and mint dressing, which complements their unctuous, smoky heat. With flavours this lively, I have to go to South America for my drinks matches. If I had a cocktail in hand, it’d have to be a Pisco Sour, which would smash every flavour in this dish with its Peruvian beauty. This fave of mine is classically made with Pisco, a distilled grape liquor, along with freshly squeezed lime juice, sweet syrup, egg white for texture and Angostura bitters. And just down the road (well, down the famous Christmas Steps) is Weber & Tring’s, which specialises in absolutely everything needed to make cocktails at home, from equipment to fab liqueurs. Their 1615 Quebranta Pisco would be great here.  I’ve also got a couple of summery, thirst quenching white wines to enjoy with this recipe, from Averys. My favourite tipple with this sort of food is usually a Chilean Chardonnay, and their Los Vascos Chardonnay is a treat. It has vibrant and slightly petrol-like nose. In the mouth it’s bright and mouth-watering, which is great with the green elements of the dressing, and yet has a smooth and luxurious texture. The twist of sweet lime on the finish is great with those pickled chilies.  But an even better match is one of the best bargains Averys sells: Casa Silva Chardonnay Semillion. This wine from the most awarded Chilean winery of the 21st century has a fresh, lemony nose which hints at the tang that follows. It has a really alluring bite to it with a dash of both sweet and savoury. Its nuttiness is ideal for those oak grilled wings. It has an uplifting finish, which complements the zing of the pickled chillies as well as the cooling dressing.  The first rule of good food and drink matching is to keep it local. Flavours, textures and ingredients from a certain area are often matched by drinks from the same place. No wonder, then, that this research has got me hankering for a holiday in South America. On the other hand, though, I can’t bear to think of all the new West Country restaurant openings I’d miss…

SPICY COLOMBIAN WINGS INGREDIENTS 500g chicken wings 150ml hoppy beer (Lucien uses Wiper & True’s Quintet) 25ml fresh lime juice 25ml rapeseed oil (or olive oil) 25g spring onion, finely chopped 25g fresh coriander, finely chopped 5g habanero chilies, finely chopped (you could also use Scotch bonnet) 15g long green chilies, finely chopped 25g garlic, finely chopped

Andy Clarke is a freelance TV producer and writer. Follow him on Twitter @TVsAndyClarke; one4thetable.com

METHOD 1 Blend all the marinade ingredients together with a pinch of salt and pepper, and rub over the wings. 2 Leave for 6 hours in the fridge for the best flavour. If you don’t have time for this, a couple of hours will do. 3 Whack on the barbecue and grill until the skin has caramelised and the meat is cooked through and piping hot. 4 Serve with a cooling yoghurt-based sauce and pickled chillies. asadobristol.com

Drink up!

• 1615 Quebranta Pisco, £35.60/70cl, from Weber & Trings • Los Vascos Chardonnay, £9.49/75cl, from Averys • Casa Silva Chardonnay Semillion, £8.99/75cl, from Averys

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The King Street Brew House is an urban style city centre pub with its very own micro-brewery. We create our own range of cask and keg beers which complement our selection of ever changing guest craft brews. We serve a delicious array of modern classic pub food all day from lunchtime until late, all prepared using fresh ingredients. Reserve a table for getting together with friends, family or colleagues, or hire our Tank Room on our lower ground floor for private dining, parties or watching live sports.

13 Welsh Back, Bristol BS1 4RR 0117 405 8948

Brewery tours and Brewery experience days can be booked in advance if you’d like to learn more about the beers we make and the general brewing process. Gift vouchers are available, so whether you’d like to have a look around our brewery, or go the whole hog and brew a batch of beer with Simon, our head brewer, then get in touch!

www.k i n g st r eet b r ew h o u s e.c o.u k

The Prince Street Social is a very welcoming modern style city centre bar & restaurant. Open 10am til late 7 days a week delivering an exceptional food menu be it breakfast, lunch or dinner throughout the day until late evening, complimented with a wonderful wine, beer & cocktail collection. All dishes freshly prepared on site using the best local ingredients where possible. If it’s just a drink you’re after, then relax with one of our house original cocktails, a wine from our discerning wine list or one of our beers brewed just around the corner by our sister venue the King Street Brewhouse. Perfectly situated close by to the picturesque Queens Square, harbour side, all of the theatres, hotels, shopping areas with car parking facilities on our doorstep for all of those colleague, family and friends social occasions. info@princestreetsocial.com www.theprincestreetsocial.com 0117 4058949 The Prince Street Social, Prince Street, Bristol BS1 4PS

Twitter - @princestsocial Instagram - prince_street_social Facebook - @princestreetsocial


Choose your weapons

ONe FOR The POT

THE MUCH-LOVED FALCON ENAMELWEAR HAS COME UP WITH SOMETHING NEW: A POT! IT COULD BE LESS INNOVATIVE, SAYS MATT BIELBY, CHANNELING HIS INNER EEYORE. NOT SURE HOW, BUT IT COULD BE… You remember Eeyore’s birthday, don’t you? Eeyore? What, the grumpy grey donkey in Winnie-the-Pooh? The very same! A right old misery guts he was, even though his friends were always trying to do nice things for him. Trying and failing. Remember the time Pooh and Piglet destroyed his house because they mistook it for a rotten old pile of sticks? They did build him a new one. True enough. And they did get him a birthday present – which is what I was actually getting at in the first place. What was it again? An old empty honey pot to keep things in, even though he didn’t own anything much, except that old red balloon that was popped?

And what did he do? Put the balloon in the pot, then took it out again. Hours of fun. And that’s what this thing reminds me of. A pot, which you can put things into, then take them out again. Brilliant. It is a pot, granted. And you can put things inside it, true enough. And you can take them out again. The thing is, though, it’s not just any old pot, but a Falcon Enamelwear pot – their new utensil pot, in fact – and, as such, is highly covetable. It comes in four of their most popular colours (white with blue trim, red, grey and black), and will easily hold all three of their also-new utensils (a spoon, a slotted spoon and a ladle). Imagine how much fun Eeyore would have with that little lot! C’mon, Eeyore didn’t care about cookware –not even old-school design classics. Sturdy, functional, timelessly elegant old school design classics, I’ll have you know, which are chemical resistant, impossible to

burn and will never shatter, but just chip – at worst – even if you treat them horrendously (and then, of course, look better than ever). Regardless, I still don’t know what he needs kitchen utensils for… C’mon, he must have eaten something. He did. Thistles. Raw, spiky thistles. No wonder he was so miserable. I suppose he could have taken a thistle, put it in this pot, then taken it out again... Indeed! Now we’re getting somewhere. And we’ll soon get him cooking, I promise you. In fact, I can feel a Hero Ingredient on thistles coming on… The Falcon utensil pot is £22; the kitchen utensils £12 each. Find ’em at Kitchens Cookshop in Bath and Bristol. For more, falconenamelware.com

THIS MONTH • POT STUFF • SMOKE SIGNALS • GRILL SEEKER

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S U P P E R

C L U B

smOkeLOre WHEN CLAIRE AND ROB DACEY, FOUNDERS OF SMOKE CATERING, INVITE Y’ALL ROUND FOR A BARBIE, YOU KNOW THERE’LL BE NO DODGY BANGERS OR STALE BAPS IN SIGHT…

WORDS BY JESSICA CARTER PHOTOS BY MARK BENHAM

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he beast of a half-ton smoker that Rob and Claire Dacey own is enough to throw any domestic barbecue into the depths of an existential crisis. This beautiful 12-foot monster was made bespoke for the pair in Texas – which is where they picked up the smoking bug – and contains four large compartments for hot smoking. The heat comes courtesy of the fire that Rob is tending to when we arrive; housed in a compartment at the front and fuelled with oak and ash wood, it feeds the ovens through a large pipe which runs inside through the length of the smoker. When Rob opens each oven to check on the meat, there’s no stopping us sticking our heads in to coo over the impressive joints – there’s brisket, short rib and a side of salmon on the go when we arrive – and fill our lungs with that awesome-smelling smoke that rendered our sat nav redundant on the way here, so distinctive and far travelling is it. Brings a whole new meanining to the idea of smoke signals, no?

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I N

T H E

S T U D I O

We’re at Rob’s parent’s home for dinner and, set just outside Bristol in the Chew Valley, it offers quite the backdrop. The rural three-storey house sits on a generous patch of greenery, and we can see cows grazing in the next field. Around the side is a garden room, which Claire tells us used to be an outhouse. It’s been converted into a cosy, rustic-looking room with slate floors, painted brick and wooden furniture, that the family uses for all sorts – including as a dining room and guest room. Kings of Leon plays out from its windowed lean-to – you couldn’t have picked a better soundtrack than one from this Tennessee-born rock band, their distinct Southern American sound having me thinking I can already taste that seven-hour-cooked brisket... It’s safe to say that Claire and Rob are pretty well travelled – Rob’s parents are American, and the family have lived all over. Now settled in the West Country, the pair often swap Southern England for the deep south of the USA, as Rob’s brother lives in Texas. “The first time we went over it was a trip of discovery, really,” says Rob. “Then we went back, having already got our smoker, and spent some time with the guy who made it for us, really getting to grips with how to use it.” These guys are hardly short of anecdotes from their travels (we hear about everything from saloons to shooting), and they keep us guests plenty entertained. Alongside Crumbs on the guest list is Claire’s sister – “she’s been such a great help to us,” says Claire – and a few mates from the local area, all of whom have sampled the fruits of this smoker in the past, and spend the lead-up to the meal raving about it. The group naturally gravitates to the smoker, and soon everyone is gathered around to admire its form (as well as catch a glimpse of the meat inside, natch). Beers are sipped as questions are fired (ahem) at Rob, about this rather unique oven. Meanwhile, Claire starts to bring out bowls of colourful sides as drinks are topped up

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S U P P E R

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C L U B


S U P P E R

C L U B

SLOW-COOKED BBQ BeaNS We use our homemade barbecue sauce in this recipe, but if you’re going for a shop-bought one, try to get something that’s sweet but not too sticky! SERVES 10 INGREDIENTS 220g dried black beans 220g dried pinto beans ½ onion 2 garlic cloves 60ml ketchup 50g brown sugar (we use soft light brown) 1 bay leaf 1 cinnamon stick 1 tbsp smooth Dijon mustard 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce ½ tsp chilli powder (or to taste) 1 tsp salt 1 ½ tsp paprika ¾ tsp cumin 60ml barbecue sauce

METHOD 1 Soak the beans overnight – we usually give them at least 9 hours. 2 When ready to cook, preheat the oven to about 140C/275F/ gas mark 1 and drain the beans. 3 Chop the onion relatively finely and then crush and chop the garlic. 4 Add everything into a mixing bowl along with the soaked and drained beans and pop into an ovenproof dish (we use a Le Creuset one, just because it’s oven friendly and holds the heat well – and it doesn’t stick). 5 Add enough water to cover the beans, then pop into the oven. We tend to check them every 45 minutes or so to make sure the water levels are good. They’ll take a good 8-9 hours to cook, depending on how much you have in there. When they’re cooked through and soft, they’re ready to serve. 6 To add a little more smoky flavour, we transfer them to a shallow tray and pop them in the smoker for at least an hour – but this isn’t essential!

and the table moved outside – the country views are not something we’ll be wasting tonight. The beautifully blackened brisket and rib is carved up and served alongside 9-hour-cooked pulled pork, and the impressive side of salmon. We help ourselves to sides of mac ’n’ cheese, roasted cauli, smoky beans, and two colourful ’slaws. On the table are jars of pickled cucumber and jalapeños (the latter piled high on some plates despite warning that they were still relatively fresh – some sharp inhilations ensued) and a glass bottle of Claire and Rob’s homemade barbecue sauce. The brisket – which we’re told is the most popular cut these guys do – has a gorgeously thick, blackened crust, thanks to an aromatic spice rub. This protects the impossibly tender, flavoursome meat inside, which falls away along the grain with the most measly of efforts from the knife, the fat having rendered and seeped into it to provide both moisture and flavour. The same story is true of the rib, which has also been coated in the spice blend containing paprika, cayenne pepper and cumin. The beans are pretty bangin’: smoky and soft, they get doused (by us) in more of that awesome barbecue sauce, which has a nicely balanced kick to it. We chat about the different events these guys have rocked up at to cook for – from festivals to weddings and company dos – and feel our eyes light up when they casusally drop into conversation the possibility of getting a second smoker to up their capacity; they’re already getting booked up for 2018, after all… smokecatering.com

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K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List THAT SUPPER CLUB WAS SO DARN GOOD THAT WE’RE RUSHING OUT TO BUY ALL THE ESSENTIALS TO THROW OUR OWN BANGING’ BARBIE…

1 2 3

5

4

1 LINUM KITTEL MITT £35 Not using tea towels to protect those hands, are you? You’re playing a dangerous game. This cool mitt will make you look the part and keep you burn-free. From Salcombe Trading in Bath. salcombetrading.co.uk 2 CAMERONS GOURMET MINI SMOKER £39.95 You can use this little guy on your indoor hob as well as barbecue to smoke fish, meat, cheese – and just about anything you can fit in it. From Sous Chef. souschef.co.uk 3 VINTAGE GOLD CORK SCREW £18.95 Crack open a good bottle of red to pair up with that meaty feast you’ve just grilled – this corkscrew by ethical South West trader Nkuku will do the job. From fig1 in Bristol. fig1.co.uk   4 I GENIETTI SPICE INFUSER £11.99 Stuff your favourite herbs into the little chamber at the top, and insert the skewer into your meat as it cooks. Et voila: your meat gets infused with all those fresh flavours. Buy it online from Steamer Trading. steamer.co.uk 5 CAST IRON MEAT MINCER £28.99 Make burgers and sausage fillings for the barbie with your choice of meaty cuts using this handy mincer that clamps to the table. From Lakeland in Bath and Bristol. lakeland.co.uk

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Enjoy Afternoon Tea in the Drawing Room in the 18th Century settings of the Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel. Whether it’s for an informal gathering of friends or a celebratory occasion our Afternoon Tea suits all. We offer a selection of freshly prepared Finger Sandwiches, Scones with Fresh Clotted Cream and Cakes served with a selection of Teas and Coffee from £25.00 per person

For a Celebration Afternoon Tea for those special occasions we offer a Glass of Champagne with the above for £35.00 per person Looking for something a little lighter, we offer a Cream Tea. A freshly baked Scone served with Jam and Fresh Clotted Cream served with Tea or Coffee @ £15.00 per person

We can cater for all dietary requirements please advise us on booking. Afternoon Teas are served Daily from 14.30 to 17.30 To book or for further information please contact the Event Team on 01225 476892 or email specialevents.bathspa@macdonald-hotels.co.uk


Lunch isn’t just a meal, it’s a little space in the middle of your day. Fill that time sharing with friends, discovering something new and relaxing for the first time since waking. Our head chef Steven Yates has drawn on 7 years of Michelin starred experience to produce a menu full of magical touches you’ll want to share, linger over and dwell upon. It’s about taking a little time, kicking back and making the most of that little break. We offer small plates to share, soup, and a simple set lunch menu to cater for all tastes and needs.

LUNCH SET MENU 2 courses 17.95 | 3 courses 22.95

STARTERS 6.50 each Split Pea Soup with a wedge of sourdough (VG/GF option available) Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes with a rich toasted sunflower seed butter & pink grapefruit (VG/GF) Chioggia Beetroot Slivers with aged cashew purée, beetroot vierge & local salads (VG/GF/N)

MAINS 11.95 each Sautéed Cauliflower Heart with cauliflower puree, onion bhajis, potato, cauliflower rice, raisin & lemon (VG/GF/N) Slow Cooked Winter Squash with a pine nut risotto, gently cooked brussel sprouts, garlic & a touch of lemon zest (VG/GF) Leek and PotatoCharred leeks with melusine cheese dauphinoise, leek & garlic sauce & smoked potato

DESSERTS 5.95 each Salted Chocolate Tart with peanut butter sorbet (VG/N) White Chocolate Panna Cotta with poached beetroot, blood orange and a light beetroot icecream (GF/N) Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb with almond amaretto cream, fennel sorbet and almond

crumb (VG/GF/N)

SMALL PLATES Burnt Leek With Smoked Potato Puree And Several Kinds Of Cabbage (GF) 7.95 Pine Nut Risotto With Slow Cooked Brussel Sprouts (VG/N/GF) 7.50 Calabrese Broccoli Dressed With Fresh Truffle Cauliflower Panna Cotta And Pickled Kohlrabi (N/GF) 8.95 Walnut Agnoletti In A Rich Mushroom Emulsion (N) 7.95 Roast Carrot With Seeded Spelt, Chervil Puree And Carrot And Cashew Puree (VG/N) 8.95 Blue Vinny Cheese with Pear Chutney & Digestives (GF option) 4.95 Peanut Butter Sorbet (VG/GF/N) 4.50


‘SERATA SPECIALE’ Don’t fancy cooking midweek? Need a little treat to tide you over till the weekend? Each week we choose some of our favorite regional Italian dishes, give them a little twist and offer them to you at the special price of  £12.50 for 2 courses or £15 for 3 courses. Available 6pm -7.45pm Tuesday-Thursday.  Full a la carte menu also available.  For more details visit www.rosemarino.co.uk


M AI N S TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS, AND PEOPLE THAT MATTER

Are you a lessis-more kind of burger lover, or does bigger mean better?

H I G H L I G H T S

NICE BUNS

Grab a pen: we’re about to guide you through the local burger scene, and you’ll be wanting to add to your to-visit list... Page 55

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at

Home of the historic Stanton Drew Stone Circles and Cove. Recently under new management with a firm local and tourist following. A truly spectacular open log fire and cosy atmosphere to be experienced by all. Serving good food & an array of drinks in relaxed, welcoming surroundings. Enclosed child-friendly garden. Local ales & cider. Fresh, seasonal menus. Visit our website for more info on our events! www.thedruidsarms.co.uk • 01275332230 The Druid’s Arms, 10 Bromley Road, Stanton Drew BS39 4EJ


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WH AT’S YOU R BEEF? BURGERS ARE BIG NEWS RIGHT NOW; EACH TIME WE THINK WE COULDN’T POSSIBLY SQUEEZE ANOTHER SPECIALIST GAFF ONTO OUR ALREADY CROWDED PATCH, WE’RE PROVEN WRONG WITH ANOTHER GREAT NEWBIE. HERE ARE JUST SOME OF OUR PATCH’S FINEST PATTIES...

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BA BATH BR BRISTOL

ABBEY HOTEL

BA

The Aged Angus Burger (£15), served throughout the hotel in Allium, ArtBar and out on the terrace, comes dressed for the occasion with dill pickles, gem lettuce and Monterey Jack, all inside a brioche roll and with triple-cooked chips on the side. abbeyhotelbath.co.uk

ASADO

BR

This brand new gaff puts pink and juicy on its patty priority list – as well as ethics. All the beef here is organic and from West Country cows, and is put to ace use in the likes of the El Don (£8.50) with local Cheddar, pancetta barbecue onions and confit garlic mayo. asadobristol.com

BOCABAR

BR

You could go for a butterfly king prawn gumbo burger, a Blagdon Butchers lamb burger, or even veggie sliders here, but if you want the signature number then get your chops around the Bocaburger (£10.50). A 6oz patty of Style Farm beef, it’s topped with pickled cucumber, Monteray Jack, sweet jalapeño and house burger sauce. On the side you’ll find mustard coleslaw and skin-on fries too, just in case you had any room left. bristol.bocabar.co.uk

BURGER JOINT

BR

Not a destination for the indecisive, this restaurant gives you the chance to build your own unique burger, choosing from the different patties, buns, fillings and sauces on offer. The combo of beef with bacon, Cheddar, relish, garlic mayo and fries (£10.55) is a classic fave, but if you fancy going to town, then your imagination is your only limit... theburgerjoint.co.uk

BURGER THEORY

BR

These guys occupy the kitchens at Kongs on King Street and The Golden Lion on Gloucester Road – and are soon

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M A I N S

CHOMP

BR

+ BA

The Smokestack Burger (£8.50) here is pretty tough to overlook on the meat-focused menu: it’s made up of a 5oz beef patty that’s piled high with pulled pork, cheese, house pickles and juke sauce, and comes with skin-on fries. Everything here is smoked in-house over hickory wood, and sauces are made to a highly-prized house recipe. grillstock.co.uk

HANDMADE BURGER CO

BR

Beef and bourbon, anyone? Take care of the former with the Dirty Classic (£13): a straight up, fuss-free burger featuring a top-drawer patty with sweet fried onion, bacon, American cheese and pickles, served with fries and ’slaw. We’ll leave the latter up to you... chompgrill.co.uk

GPT SMOKEHOUSE

GRILLSTOCK

BA

A relative newcomer to the Bath restaurant scene, this family of burger gaffs use Scotch Aberdeen Angus beef to make their patties on site each day – and offer around 40 different burgers to choose from. Need some help deciding what to go for? How about a Dirty Burger Fried Onion (£7.55)? Picture American cheese, house sauce, fried onions, and jalapeño ’slaw alongside that patty in a buttermilk bun. handmadeburger.co.uk

BA

Low and slow is the name of the game here, with GTP’s quality ingredients getting the treatment from a handmade smoker created in Oklahoma. The GPT Smokehoue Dirty Burger (£13.50) is a popular example of what these guys have on offer. The beef patty – made from minced cuts of steak – buddies up with pulled pork, American-style cheese, and crisp rashers of smoked bacon. gptbath.com

HOBGOBLIN

BR

The beef at this Gloucester Road joint comes from Bristol butcher Ruby & White, meaning it’s from a small group of local farms that specialise in rearing Ruby Red Devon and British White cows. The butcher grinds up the steak trim, which the kitchen team then make into burgers

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BA BATH BR BRISTOL

Asado, left, is one of the newest additions to Bristol's already bangin' burger scene...

to open a new site on St Stephens Street in mid-August. Their burgers come served in jumbo demi brioche baps, with sesame seeds and a shiny glaze, from local baker Dariusz and his bakery Proper Bread. The most popular is probably the Cheese Theory (from £8.75), made with a well-seasoned beef patty, melted Cheddar, homemade curry ketchup, Burger Theory house pickled cucumbers and crispy smoked bacon. burgertheory.co.uk


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in-house. The most in demand here is The Squealer (£11.95): it’s a bacon and cheese burger topped with plenty of house-smoked barbecued pulled pork. facebook.com/hobgoblin.bristol

This new kid on the Bristol block has branched out from its Devon home to open a new urban diner on our patch. We’ll be making the Pit Burger (£9.50) our first order: the beef brisket, barbecue sauce and burger cheese fillings have sold it to us... hubbox.co.uk

KING ST BREW HOUSE

BR

These guys’ trusted butcher Birtwhistles make the 6oz and 8oz patties for the new burger menu that’s been on offer here since the start of summer. Newbies include a lamb burger with crispy leek and Welsh rarebit, and the Luigi vegetarian burger with a three-bean patty. But if you’re all about the beef, the Brew House Porter Burger will see you right: an 8oz patty is topped with Cheddar cheese and beef brisket which is slowly braised in the pub’s porter Shaft, made in its own microbrewery. kingstreetbrewhouse.co.uk

MEATBUSTERS

MEATLIQUOR

BR

A London-born brand that’s set up shop on Gloucester Road, this place likes its burgers dirty. Take the signature Dead Hippie; it involves not one, but two mustard-fried burgers – served slightly pink – with pickles, onion and secret-recipe Dead Hippie sauce. meatliquor.com

OOWEE DINER

BR

You might well have heard talk of this Bristol burger gaff when it opened at the end of last year – it was pretty tough to avoid. The patties are made from a mix of chuck, rib and brisket, supplied by Devises butcher Walter Rose & Son, and get sandwiched in a Hokkaido Japanese milk roll, made by a family just outside of Bristol. The Big Cheese (£7.95) sees two beef patties piled with American, Swiss and Monterey Jack cheeses, as well as ‘baconnaise’ and gherkin. Keen. facebook.com/ooweediner

PRINCE STREET SOCIAL

BA

BR

Calling all burger lovers: check out this place on a Wednesday night, when you can satisfy your beefy cravings for just £6, plus £1 each for toppings, allowing you to build your own creation. If you’re straight-up about your burgers, then go for the house Prince Street Beef Burger (£12.95), with bacon, cheese and relish, and a bun baked at Joe’s Bakery on Gloucester Road. princestreetsocial.com

Formerly Burgers and Barrels, this Bathonian restaurant uses a secret family recipe to make its burgers onsite, using mince from local S & L Banable butchers. The Django Burger (£9.95) is a sure-fire winner: a classic patty gets smothered in homemade chilli beef and Cheddar cheese, and topped with sweet jalapeños, onions and homemade garlic habanero mayo. meatbusters.co.uk

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BA BATH BR BRISTOL

HUBBOX

Oowee’s does a ton of tempting stuff, from the spectacular Burger Trio (left) to a baconpacked number (top right) and (bottom right) well-covered Mexican fries

BR


s Wedd7i5n.g00 from £ RSON E PER P

Are you organising a small intimate wedding or a large family affair? Homewood Park Hotel & Spa is the ideal venue. Set in ten acres of wonderful gardens and parklands, we have the perfect setting for your special day. Contact our wedding planner on 01225 723731 or email weddings@homewoodpark.co.uk to arrange a personal viewing.

GREAT BURGERS FRESH LOCALLY SOURCED PRODUCE DELICIOUS COCKTAILS

MeatBusters Previously Burgers and Barrels

2 Victoria Buildings, Lower Bristol Road, Bath, BA2 3EH www.burgersnbarrels.co.uk b a


M A I N S

BA BATH BR BRISTOL

SMASHBURGER

BA

The USP of this newly opened Bath diner is the way it ‘smashes’ its balls of British beef mince onto a hot and buttered grill – a method which it reckons helps sear in all the lovely juices and flavours of the quality meat. These burgers, which are always made fresh each day, have endless potential with the huge choice of fresh toppings, sauces and add-ons. Never been before? Start with the Classic Smash (£6.25), which showcases the quality of the beef and the cooking technique, and sees the patty topped with cheese, Smash Sauce, pickles and onion. smashburger.com

LION AT CLIFTONWOOD

BR

Here, minced beef is seasoned with slow-cooked balsamic shallot, and the buns – half way between focaccia and a Scottish bap, they’ve been described to us as – are all baked on-site daily. Take a look at the special burger menu and you might be a little overwhelmed, but we think you’ll have found a winner in the Chilli Blue Cheese Burger (£8.50), with a blue cheese centre, sour cream, avo, and sweet chilli sauce. thelioncliftonwood.co.uk

THE OX CLIFTON

The burger options at Bath’s new Smashburger are pretty boundless (top left and right), while The Ox in Clifton has gone cool and casual with a new burger offering (bottom)

BR

The Ox sure knows its beef, and the Clifton branch is putting it to great use in the burgers on its new, more casual menu. The meat is mainly from local Buxtons Butchers; Nigel sources most of his beef from Somerset and Cornwall, then ages it to the chefs’ requirements. The patties are made on-site from fillet and bavette, along with a fattier cut such as short rib. Check out the Double Beef and Cheese (£12.50); it’s a tad more dirty than you may be used to of the food here, and fully customisable with toppings, too. We’re game. theoxclifton.com

THREE BROTHERS

BR

Hop aboard this boat-turned-restaurant and get stuck into the burger menu, which showcases Hereford beef patties, made to a secret recipe with a mixture of herbs and spices. The choice is vast, but you can’t go wrong with a Smokey Bro Burger (£8.25), which consists of a 5oz beef patty, house-made barbecue relish, smoked applewood Cheddar, sweet cured bacon and crispy onions. (Deal alert: get the classic or Portobello mushroom burger, with fries, for £5 until 5pm every day!)

Have we missed out your favourite local burger? Tweet us a snap @crumbsmag!

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THE GARDEN

CAFE - BAR - GRILL

THE LION Cliftonwood

Quality * honest * independent

THE GARDEN TROWBRIDGE TOWN CENTRE TEL: 01225 767511 chippenham town centre TEL: 01249 465672 NEW & INDEPENDENT BAR & RESTAURANT Visit us: www.thegardenuk.co.uk Follow us: /thegardentrowbridge /thegardenchippenham

We are a small and quirky family run pub in deepest darkest Cliftonwood Bristol. Our menu is mainly gluten free and  offers something for everyone, including vegan and vegetarian options. 19 Church Ln, Bristol BS8 4TX Phone: 07867 796961 www.thelioncliftonwood.co.uk

Available to download www.mediaclash.co.uk


( Advertising Feature )

Our weekly changing lunch, dinner and tapas menu is superbly put together using the finest local ingredients.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS – A tasty trip to the jewel of the Empire with “Curry and a Drink” offer

THURSDAYS – Our famous Burger Night A tasty homemade burger and a pint for £10! SUNDAYS – Award-winning roasts from 12-6pm and after 6pm marinated ribs and a pint for £10.

6 DOWRY PLACE | HOTWELLS | BRISTOL | BS8 4QL PHONE: 01173 290 352 WWW.ROSEOFDENMARK.CO.UK

SUMMERTIME PITCHERS

Amazing hot weather mocktails from Frobishers

W

ant something refreshing to serve at your next barbecue or family gathering? Then slake your summertime thirst with a family-friendly Frobishers Cordials Party Jug. Made with Frobishers Sloe & Raspberry and Lemon & Mint Cordials, it always goes down a treat amongst little ’uns and big ’uns alike – and, best of all, it’s dead simple to make…

SUMMER FRUIT PITCHER YOU WILL NEED 1 x large jug (1 litre or more) 50ml Frobishers Sloe & Raspberry Cordial 50ml Frobishers Lemon & Mint Cordial 600ml bitter lemon sparkling water ice METHOD – Pour the Sloe & Raspberry and Lemon & Mint Cordials, along with the bitter lemon, over ice into your jug. Top with sparkling water and give a gentle stir with a long spoon. – Decorate with raspberries, slices of lemon and fresh mint. Tip: To add a little more punch, a good glug of gin or vodka (around 100ml) can transform this mocktail into a cocktail! For more easy cocktail and mocktail inspiration, head to www.frobisherscordials.com to find a range of recipes featuring all of their flavours, including zingy Lemon & Mint, exotic Pomegranate & Rose, fruity Sloe & Raspberry, smooth Coconut & Kaffir Lime and juicy Peach & Lychee. Stock up on Frobishers Cordials this summer at Waitrose, with bottles on offer at £2.50 (RRP £3.25) from 12th July to 18th August.

www.frobisherscordials.com


Best Western Plus Centurion Hotel Charlton Lane, Midsomer Norton, Nr Bath BA3 4BD | 01761 417711

@seanhorwood

RestAtCent

www.centurionhotel.co.uk

We are a friendly, family owned inn offering hearty home cooked food, in a small country village setting. Whether you are local or travelling from further afield, you are guaranteed a warm welcome. PUB • RESTAURANT • FUNCTION ROOM • ACCOMMODATION

The Malago is friendly bar and restaurant with a focus on fresh, locally sourced, quality food. Our dishes offer something for everyone. Our menu is inclusive of vegetarians and vegans, we have a delicious, freshly prepared children’s menu, and our chefs can cater for all dietary requirements. We all looking forward to welcoming you to The Malago. 

Tunley Road, Tunley BA2 0EB • 01761 470408 Email: kingwilliamtunley@live.com • f T @kingwilliam84 www.kingwilliaminn.co.uk

Open Monday to Saturday 9am to 11pm Sunday 9am to 10pm Our kitchen is open daily serving brunch 9-3pm, lunch 12-3pm and dinner 5.30-9.30pm.

www.themalago.club  eatout@themalago.club 220 North Street, Southville, BS3 1JD  01179639044


A F T E RS

NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

H I G H L I G H T S

PLANET OF THE GRAPES

A new Bristol wine bar promises to do more than just quench your thirst Page 66

KING OF THE CASTLE

This brilliant boozer teaches us a few life lessons about books and their covers... Page 70

It may not look much from the outside, but this pub has some cool interior vibes going on – especially with this wallpaper...

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DAD’S THE WORD

We crash Fathers’ Day celebrations for dinner at this Corsham gastropub Page 72


( W I C K E D W I N E BA RS)

LE POIVROT YOU DON’T HAVE TO HIKE FAR UP THE HILL OF COLSTON STREET BEFORE YOU’RE REWARDED WITH THIS LITTLE BEAUTY, FINDS JESSICA CARTER

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S

afe to say, the guys behind this Colston Street gaff know a thing or two about their booze. This is their third team venture, following the kooky Weber & Trings off-license and hidden cocktail bar Red Light. Anyone who’s been to either of those will not be expecting this new wine bar to fall in line with the average. Indeed, this joint feels cool and modern but with a low-maintenance vibe. It’s spacious and bright – thanks to the huge windows at the front that let the sun stream in – but also has a second, more intimate space, tucked away in a large alcove. Stool seating at the bar and windows supplement the tables and chairs that are scattered about the place for couples and small groups. Colours are all blues and gold, and textures are mixed – think ceramic tiles,


A F T E R S

metal trimmings, wooden floors and leather seating. The result is a fresh but classic look. The name itself is another big giveaway of the bar’s concept and style – le poivrot basically means wino, or drunkard. A fun little contradiction to the classy facade – itself an elegant dusty blue with handpainted windows – on which it’s displayed. Although the bar opened in early April, it wasn’t until June that the full-sized kitchen offering launched. I say full-sized, but it’s still pleasingly snappy and to the point, made up of five dishes, three sharing boards (fish, charcuterie and cheese), and a couple of snacks. Speaking of which, we got the smoked almonds (£3.50) in right away. Although skewed towards French varieties, the wine list does include a smattering of Italian, Spanish and Austrian creations. As varied as it is, it still manages to share one sheet of A4 with the food and aperitif selections – saving guests thumbing through pages and pages of probably unfamiliar names. Plenty are available by the glass or carafe – including fizz, white,

red, orange, rosé and sherry – while bottles start at around £25 and go up to £158 (don’t panic, that is for a jazzy magnum). A pretty decent range, then, and not necessarily an intimidating one, either – not when it’s served by the friendly and chilled-out team, who, it seems, would love nothing more than to talk wine with you as long as you’ll let them, to help you make a decision. A glass of properly chilled Bourgogne Aligote was a crisp and really nicely balanced white – full-flavoured but easy drinking – which was extremely welcome on the hot June evening it was being sipped. Okay, can I talk about the food now? The main dishes have been carefully thought through. Fresh, distinct flavours make them a joy to match with wine, and the portion sizes – larger than a small plate, but not so big that you couldn’t try a couple if you wanted – are spot on. The quality of the ingredients and way they’re cooked, though, mean that even if you do stick to one dish, you’re still going to feel satisfied and like you’ve had a proper feed. The heirloom tomato salad (£8) gave renewed meaning to the phrase ‘less is more’. The four ingredients on the plate (tomato, goat’s cheese, basil and black olive) were distinct, simply prepared and in total harmony with each other. Sure, that’s not going to be news to anyone – tomato and basil are hardly just casual acquaintances, after all – but the quality of the produce really elevated the combinations to a whole new level. Red and green tommies (which came from The Tomato Stall on the Isle of Wight) were out of this world just on their own, let alone with the fat, vibrant leaves of fresh basil and creamy goat’s cheese mousse, which was subtle enough in flavour to not fight against the rich, sweet

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tomatoes. And the whole lot was seasoned cleverly with black olive crumb. The steak tartare (£10) was made up of tiny, super-tender chunks of chopped beef, interspersed with caperberries to cut through the richness of both the meat and oozing confit egg yolk it was topped with. Watercress and slivers of radish brought freshness with them and rounded off a really well done – but still refreshingly unfussed-over – dish. We finished off with glasses of Fino and the rest of those smoked almonds – an accidental pairing that I’d visit for again in its own right. Despite this city already being full of good boozers and restaurants, this cool, low-key wine bar certainly has its place, having filled an unoccupied niche. Taking the pretentiousness out of wine, it’s an ace spot for chilling out after work or whiling away whole afternoons (which, be warned, will inevitably turn into evenings…). LE POIVROT, 47 Colston Street, Bristol BS1 5AX; 0117 373 1530; lepoivrot.co.uk


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p ( G R E AT P U B S )

THE CASTLE INN   HERE’S AN UNASSUMING BOOZER THAT HAS A BELTING VIEW AND SERVES UP A MIGHTY FINE FEED, SAYS CHARLIE LYON

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ub prejudices: don’t deny you’ve got a few. Whether it’s not going much on the paint job, the fact there are too many Discoverys in the car park, or that it always looks rammed – even if you’re not aware of it, you’re probably judging pubs on a daily basis without taking a step inside. I’ll hold my hands up: it’s always been a bit like that for me with The Castle Inn, just outside Bradford-on-Avon. Grandma used to live in Wiltshire and loved a day out in Bradford. She loved a pint, too (god help the barman who presumed she’d be drinking halves) and this pub, perched at the top of the hill in Mount Pleasant with amazing views, would have been perfect. But with its location on a roundabout and parking looking tricky we always sailed on by. What a shame! All it would have taken was a little further investigation to discover that there are plenty of spots to park in neighbouring residential streets, and we could have enjoyed 10 years of excellent eating and drinking, for this is how long it’s been under the control of its current owners, who also have the Battleaxes pub in Wraxall, Bristol. Anyway, better late than never, we rock up on the hottest day of the year. Despite most of the staff being off at Glastonbury, the front of house duo are keeping it cool and working through the bar queues quickly, keeping on top of the clutter created by the post-work drinkers and diners (who fill the pretty garden, half the bar and a good chunk of the restaurant). We order pints of Bybrook Bitter from Castle Combe, and Barbury Castle (are you noticing a theme here?) from Pewsey, to quench our thirst. It’s good to see Freedom lager and Goose IPA taps on the bar too, for those who like things fashionably hoppy.


A F T E R S

“We’re trying to be something for everyone here,” says manager Tom. It’s a bold ambition, but one, we go on to discover, they are actually achieving. There’s certainly ‘something for everyone’ on the menu – from sharing plates and well-considered specials to burgers and steaks. It’s a menu size that suggests average fodder, but another lesson learnt tonight is that you can’t always judge the food by the menu. The small plates we order as starters (£4.60 each) trailblaze the way to a stonking (as Grandma would have said) meal. Whitebait with a translucent skin of batter have real bite. They’re crisp, and all the fresh fishy flavours ring loud. A good kick of chilli is balanced by the creamy mayo. There’s a bit of heat, too, in the courgette fritter, which is dense and juicy. Verdant courgette and pistachio garnish make it picture perfect. Homemade hummus is light and moreishly smooth. We lick clean our plates, empty our glasses and look forward to the mains, wondering if they’ll match up. My hake (£16.50) is a meaty offering, nicely salty with a crisp crust. There’s heat in the crab and lime cake it’s perched on – nice to see the chef doesn’t shy away from big flavours – and the coconut in the squash

purée adds the hit of exoticism the dish needs to make it memorable. Bright green sugar snaps, fuchsia-skinned radishes and vivid orange pickled fennel give this dish jewel-like presentation. Across the table, belly of pork (£15.95) comes in a huge wodge – soft and piggy with a crunchy, salty top. The rings of crackling are air-light, and fought over by everyone on the table. The chicken that’s been ‘supreme’d’ (£14.50) pulls easily apart at the touch of a fork. The dish is brought up to the minute by its plate-fellows – a pile of lentils, rich with umami flavour thanks to their stout braising, celeriac purée, and pretty courgette flowers. All three mains have the flavours of fine restaurant fodder, but in pleasing pub-sized portions. Puddings are rather apologetic in comparison to the main menu, but a pear and ginger creation hits the spot and is plenty big enough to share. Although the walk back to the car is short, we wish we’d booked into one of the four guest rooms. Never mind, we’ll be back. (We need to make up for lost time...) THE CASTLE INN, Mount Pleasant, Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire BA15 1SJ; 01225 865 657; flatcappers.co.uk

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( R E - B O R N R E S TA U R A N T S )

w

THE METHUEN ARMS   JESSICA CARTER CRASHES FATHER’S DAY AT THIS REJUVENATED CORSHAM INN

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hen we rock up at The Methuen Arms for a feed, it’s only been five weeks since new managers Abi and Ash took over, following the pub being adopted by the Butcombe family. Two of those five weeks had been spent with no gas supply, too – thank the lord for the Big Green Egg! – so things are only just about returning to normal. Not that there’s a single indication of anything having been awry. Chef Leigh Evans – who has previously worked his magic at The Chequers and Combe Grove Manor – arrived at The Methuen Arms a couple of months before all of this, bringing with him the inventive precision cooking that he’s so well known for – as well as his loyal kitchen team. Having such a solid brigade manning the ovens from the outset has resulted in what seems to be a professional and gracefully executed transition, with the menus at this award-winning restaurant remaining sturdy. The fine dining pub sits at the end of the High Street in Corsham; a pretty market town located just outside of Bath, it echoes that city’s handsome Georgian charm, but is rather more quiet and relaxed. The inn has sat here, next to Corsham Court, for


A F T E R S

hundreds of years. Its story goes all the way back to the 15th century, but it wasn’t until the 18th that it became The Methuen Arms, and it’s about to enter into yet another chapter with its latest redesign (work is underway in the garden and will be moving though the restaurant and guest rooms).   Sat in a small alcove at a repurposed Singer sewing machine table, we order a bottle of a crisp, dry white – just what we’re craving on this scorcher of an afternoon. It’s actually Father’s Day and, looking over our menus, we notice Abi giving out gift boxes of Butcombe beer to all the dads who are marking the occasion here. Nice touch.   There are two menus on the go: a bar and grill menu listing the likes of burgers, fish and chips and steak, and the a la carte, populated by a handful each of starters, mains and desserts. Having eaten this team’s food elsewhere before, the usually stressful decision-making process (to call me indecisive would be a hefty understatement) is a breeze, and we both feel at ease with the ambitious but accessible menu. The Bloody Mary gazpacho (£7.50) is the ideal remedy for the hot drive up the M4 we’d just endured, sans air con. The chilled soup is fresh and zingy, and is poured by our server around an arrangement of peeled cherry tomatoes in red and green, small drops of creamy, salty goat’s cheese, and tangy pickled cucumber. Nasturtiums add extra colour and subtle pepperiness to this already vibrant assembly. In short: it’s faultless, with each component earning its place on the well-balanced plate. I think my pal across the table would say the same about her own choice. The leek and potato salad (£6) proves to be a creative mix of elements: silky slices of buttery ratte

potatoes combine well with the smokiness of charred leek and subtle heat of mustard mayo. Another really decent starter.   To follow comes lamb short rib (£22) with seared loin and the fresh, summery flavours of pea, broadbean and mint – the greenery giving real lightness to this meaty main. The lamb is bang on the money, the chefs having played to the strengths of each cut in their preparation to achieve the most tender texture and maximum flavour. The crispy hen’s egg (£15) seems intended precisely for warm summer days like this one. The crisp golden coating envelops the silky egg white and sunny, oozing yolk, while tomato polenta and basil up the sunshine factor, and seasoning comes in the form of black olive. To finish, impressive desserts of white chocolate cheesecake (£7) and chocolate delice (£8) combine the same attention to detail and elements of surprise. Despite the kitchen team being so new, and having faced hefty technical issues of late, and being without their head chef this evening, they consistently fire out the sort of faultless food that forms the backbone of a really great gastopub experience.

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THE METHUEN ARMS, 2 High Street, Corsham SN13 0HB; 01249 717060; themethuenarms.com 


L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

NATALIE HOLMES THIS BRISTOL-BASED MUSICIAN CAN OFTEN BE FOUND IN ONE OF THESE LOCAL HAUNTS… Breakfast? Ironworks Supply Co. Their Mushroom Royale might just be one of the best flavour sensations I’ve experienced. Everything is made from scratch in the kitchen downstairs, including the bread. Best brew? It was a lovely surprise when I stumbled into Stokes Croft’s fairly new addition, Ceres; my tastebuds were taken by surprise by the unfamiliar flavours from London-based Square Mile roasters. Quick pint? King William Ale House. I love the organic wheat beer here: you can often only find the Belgian or German kinds imported, so it’s nice to have the more locally brewed option that they serve at this place. Food on the go? I love wandering down to St Nick’s market, even just to ogle the food. Every single food stall here is worth trying, but I would recommend Moorish Café and Eat a Pitta, for sure! Alfresco feasting? Beatroot Café is hidden on Lower Park Row, and although it looks small, it has a wonderful courtyard which, when we’re lucky enough to have sun, traps it like no other. The coffee is Extract, and the food is all made in-house. Hidden gem? I discovered Café Matariki through the wonder that is Wriggle. Situated across the river from Castle Park, it’s part of

the Pacific Yoga building. The food and cakes are all made by the staff, and they use local roasters Little & Long. Their food ties in with their yoga roots and is hugely nourishing and focused on well-being, but is also inventive and full of unexpectedly great combinations. One to watch? Milk Teeth. Tucked away on Portland Square, it was born just this year. Currently run single-handedly by the super passionate Josh Bowker, it serves Extract coffee, Bristol Tea Company teas, cakes from Pearly King and pastries from Farro Bakery. It also stocks Ginger Beard preserves, Hives & Herbals oils and vinegars, and more – it’s full of positive vibes. With friends? Tincan Coffee Co started a while back in Southville, but has just this year opened a Clare Street branch. It’s a great central meeting point with friends, as it caters for the coffee connoisseur or the big cappuccino lover, as well as having a great brunch and lunch menu. Best curry? Oh! Calcutta on Gloucester Road rarely looks busy when I go past it, yet it is where I had the best curry ever. As well as doing BYO, they have a great menu choice, and the red snapper fish curry I once had was heaven. Best atmosphere? The Canteen. This place is like a student union for all ages, filled with the

typical accepting, chilled, creative and smiley Bristol vibes. No matter what time of day or what you’re feeling, this place can adapt. Something sweet? Bakers & Co does beautiful homemade cakes. I tried a blueberry, courgette and lemon cake here once, expecting it to be sickly, but it was absolute bliss. Top street food? Biblos is hearty, good value and healthy in a not-so-obvious way. Try one of their hugely filling ‘regular’ sized wraps, packed with things like jerk chicken, roasted sweet potato, halloumi, roasted vegetables, pulled pork, falafel, hummus, salads and dressings. It’s ‘fast food’ but homemade, sourced locally, and leaves you feeling great. Best value? Roll for the Soul is a vegetarian place that will make sure carnivores don’t miss meat. Whatever you get you’ll be satisfied for hours, without a doubt. I love the veggie Soul Burger! Belting burger? The Burger Joint. I’m not a huge red meat eater, and if you have a variety of preferences this place is perfect. With a build-your-own menu, they have about 10 choices of burgers with some great veggie options, plus tons of sides, toppings and sauces. natalieholmes.co.uk

QUICK! Now add this little lot to your contacts book • Ironworks Supply Co, Bristol BS1 2EP; ironworkssupply.co.uk • Ceres, Bristol BS1 3QD; cerescoffee.co • King William Ale House, Bristol BS1 4EF; 0117 926 8672 • Moorish Café, Bristol BS1 1LJ; 07826 065 583 • Eat a Pitta, Bristol BS1 1LJ; eatapitta.co.uk • Beatroot Café, Bristol BS1 5BN; facebook.com/beatrootcafe • Café Matariki, Bristol BS1 6LA; pacificyoga.co.uk/cafe • Milk Teeth, Bristol BS2 8SJ; milkteethportlandsq.co.uk • Tincan Coffee Co, Bristol BS3 1JD; tincancoffee.co.uk • Oh! Calcutta, Bristol BS6 5QU; ohcalcutta.co.uk • The Canteen, Bristol BS1 3QY; canteenbristol.co.uk • Bakers & Co, Bristol BS7 8BG; bakersbristol.co.uk • Biblos, Bristol BS1 3QU; biblos.co.uk • Roll for the Soul, Bristol BS1 2JL; rollforthesoul.org • The Burger Joint, Bristol BS3 1JD; theburgerjoint.co.uk

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Crumbs Bath & Bristol Issue 65  
Crumbs Bath & Bristol Issue 65  
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