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NO.62 MAY 2017

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NO.62 MAY 2017

you call at What d’ov ie abou scary msp routing? purple ccoli The Broic ture Horror Pw Sho !

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A little slice of foodie heaven

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CRUMBS

WEDDING

SAY ‘I D O ' IRKIE ST TO TH E QU CAT ERERs A ROUND


BROC PARTY

ANDROID

TIMEKEEPING HAS NEVER been a strength of mine. Everyone at Crumbs HQ will tell you that being early is just not my style. Instead, it’s arriving late, usually quite sweaty from the speedwalking, and introducing myself by way of a string of apologies for my tardiness. I tell you this not to warn you just in case we ever happen to make plans (always arrive at least 10 minutes after I’ve said to), but because I was all too close to having to make that same apology for this month’s Hero Ingredient. It’s not in season for much longer, is the thing, so I’m cutting it a little fine by putting it on the cover this month. (To be fair, it’s not like the season is exactly lengthy...) Luckily, though, we’re just in time to sing the praises of purple sprouting broccoli before it disappears from our greengrocers again. And good job too – it not only brightens up a dish’s colour palette, but it’s really ruddy good for us, being in the cruciferous family (meaning it spends Christmas with cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts). Stem, head and leaves – eat it all and eat it now. Talking of seasonal favourites, we’re making the most of them all right now, with British-grown peas and asparagus also featuring in the stonking collection of recipes we have for you this issue. It’s really worth getting the local stuff while you can, and eating it the same day; nothing can beat that kind of freshness. Also, we’ve revealed more information about our Crumbs Awards for you in the news section; nominations open soon, so you’d better ready yourselves...

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Jessica Carter, Editor jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk

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B ATH & B RIS TO L

Table of Contents

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NO.62 May 2017

STARTERS 08 HERO INGREDIENT Don’t mess with the broc 12 OPENINGS ETC News, chefs and shopping 20 SIX PACK Homegrown groceries

CHEF!

Amazing recipes from the region’s top kitchens 30 Pakoras, by Gen Taylor 32 Pho, by Griff Holland 35 Pork rillons, by Tristan Le Coustumer 36 Herb-marinated chicken salad, by Oliver Pratt 38 Poulet printanier, by Adam Townsley 40 Wiltshire lamb, by Simon Quarrie 42 Asparagus and pea risotto, by British Asparagus

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ADDITIONAL RECIPES

10 Purple sprouting broccoli, by Freddy Bird 24 Tandoori fish, by Dan Toombs

KITCHEN ARMOURY 46 HOUSE CALL Inside Aine Morris’ kitchen 55 THE WANT LIST Retro retail

MAINS

AFTERS

61 MARITAL MUNCHIES Some culinary inspiration from the pros for W-Day 68 SMALL WONDERS A low-maintenance kitchen garden project

New & notable restaurants, cafés, bars 76 Romanesca 78 Rudloe Arms 80 Bambalan PLUS 82 LITTLE BLACK BOOK It’s Anna Ralph’s turn to reveal all...

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START E RS INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

(28 APRIL) CAPTAIN’S DINNER Delicious food will be accompanied by live Irish music and a helping of history during this special evening onboard the famous ss Great Britain, where you’ll get to learn about the ship’s colourful past. Tickets are £65 each, Check out the website to book; ssgreatbritain.org (1 MAY) PICNIC AT THE PARK Ston Easton Park near Bath (left) is opening up its gardens for the day, allowing guests to explore its picturesque grounds and historic architecture, and enjoy a luxurious picnic hamper stuffed full of homemade food. For info and to book, visit the website; stoneaston.co.uk

Foodie Events

ChaNGe Of sCeNe THERE ARE SOME BELTING EVENTS GOING ON THIS MONTH TO GET YOU OUT AND ABOUT, CHOWING DOWN IN UNFAMILIAR TERRITORIES… crumbsmag.com

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(6 MAY) BANGERS & BIRDSONG FEAST Take a stroll through Long Ashton Woods, led by expert Ed Drewitt, to hear birdsong at its best, and feast on a supper of rare-breed-pork hot dogs, bangers and pulled pork from artisan charcutier Native Breeds. For more information and tickets, visit the website; feastwithachef.co.uk (13 MAY) OFF THE STREET This fundraising evening – organised by Bath Spa Uni students – will take place in Green Park Station (6pm-10pm), with street food stalls selling cuisine from around the globe, alongside live performances of music, dance and comedy. It’s all in support of Julian House and its work with the homeless.


PUrpLe sprOUTING BrOCCOLI ENJOYED SINCE ROMAN TIMES, THOUGH LITTLE WAS SEEN IN BRITAIN UNTIL THE LAST FEW DECADES, PURPLE SPROUTING BROCCOLI IS A WELCOME ADDITION TO THE SPRING LARDER, AND THE BRASSICA FAN’S VERSION OF CHOICE

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S T A R T E R S

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hink scruffy, skinny, brightly-headed purple sprouting broccoli is just some trendy, poshed-up version of the real thing? Think again! The more familiar green, bigheaded, ‘little tree’ variety that most of us call simply ‘broccoli’ is actually Calabrese broccoli – a cultivar named for the Italian town of Calabria, and loved by farmers for its long season and ease of harvesting – but it turns out that purple sprouting, with its many thin stalks and oodles of little heads, is the older version, and much closer to the wild plants all broccoli comes from. Broccoli – brassica oleracea, if you’re being posh – was brought from Asia Minor to Rome by the Etruscans, whose decedents dominate modern Tuscany and Umbria, and the familiar cultivars all started to take on their modern form thanks to careful breeding around the 6th century BC. The broccoli confusion continues with the fact that, as well as Calabrese and purple sprouting (and, indeed, white sprouting, its twin), there’s a third popular variety too, Romanesco broccoli. (This acts as a sort of genetic bridge to brassica oleracea’s close cousin, the cauliflower, and is also a handsome thing, but very much a subject for another day.) The fascinating thing about broccoli is that the flowers stop growing before they erupt from their buds, giving you the distinctive florets. But though Calabrese has much going for it, purple sprouting broccoli is, we would argue, the superior version: tastier, more tender, more delicately flavoured, and harvested in spring, when we’re more desperate for deliciousness. (Though available all year round, Calabrese broccoli is essentially a summer crop.) When you’ve had it with sprouts, but things like spring cabbage are still a little way off, purple sprouting bridges the gap manfully. That it’s cheap and plentiful too – at least from markets; supermarket availability is still patchy – doesn’t hurt. Buying is easy – you want a nice firm stalk, nothing too floppy, and tight heads (if the buds have burst and tiny little flowers have formed, it’s past its best). You’ll find the really good stuff from late January right up until the end of April and even into May, so pounce quickly: there’s no time to mess around. (The happy news, though, is that the later crop tends to be the most tender of all.) More happy news: this stuff is extremely good for you, a single portion providing half your daily carotenoid requirement, plus high levels of folic acid and vitamins A and C. Purple sprouting is no fan of freezing, and is only happy in the fridge for a few days, so buy it and eat it is the general rule – and if you live close to a farm shop, and can collect yours the day it was picked, all the better. Cooking is easy – split thicker stems so they’re the same size as the thin ones, then wash, chuck any tough or wilting leaves, and stir-fry or steam for just a few minutes until tender, no more. (As part of the cabbage family, PSB can get soggy and sulphurous if over-cooked.) If you can really be bothered, find a way to cook the thicker stems for slightly longer than the delicate heads, perhaps by cutting the heads off and adding them a little later, or dusting down the asparagus steamer and cooking them upright, so the stems boil and the heads merely steam. The result goes a treat with just about any meat or fish dish, but if you want to get more ambitious try roasting, or steaming PSB with hollandaise sauce or lemon butter. Though usually served quite plain as a side vegetable, it’s actually good enough to make a starter or side on its own – eat with your fingers, asparagus style, perhaps dipping the stalks in a little pot of melted butter – and is a happy participant in many a veggie-based main dish, too. Think pasta bakes, warm salads, quiches, noodle dishes, risottos, stir-fries et al. An umami hit – salty and deeply savoury – goes especially well with purple sprouting broccoli, so try teaming it with the likes of capers, soy sauce, anchovies or black olives. Or, of course, you could just eat the lot – leaves, heads and stalks – raw: it goes a treat with dips or cheese.

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R E C I P E

BATH & B R I S TO L

PURPLE SPROUTING BROCCOLI WITH CHILLI, GARLIC, ANCHOVIES AND ORECCHIETTE (SERVES 4)

crumbsmag.com

EDITOR

JESSICA CARTER jessica.carter@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ART DIRECTOR

FREDDY BIRD IS BACK, and he’s got a right good spring recipe to make use of this month’s Hero Ingredient... INGREDIENTS

800g thin-stemmed purple sprouting broccoli, leaves on 300-400g orecchiette pasta 1 head new season garlic, top layer peeled, finely chopped large pinch dried chilli flakes 50g-100g best quality salted anchovies, chopped extra virgin olive oil, for frying handful best quality Parmesan, grated handful toasted breadcrumbs METHOD

– Bring a pan of water to the boil. Chop the broccoli into 1-inch pieces and throw it in with a pinch of salt. Simmer until soft. – Cook the orecchiette until al dente. Once ready, strain and reserve some of the water. – While the pasta is cooking, gently fry the garlic, chilli and anchovies in a good gulg of extra virgin olive oil. The anchovies should melt, but don’t let the garlic brown. – Mix the pasta with the garlic, chilli and anchovies, and then add the broccoli. Toss it all together with the grated Parmesan, adding the hot pasta water as required to loosen it up until you get your desired consistency. – Serve up onto plates and sprinkle over the toasted breadcrumbs.

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© All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we explored Bath’s hidden indie gems (and tested our stomach capacity) on the Independent Bath Trail, and tasted our first English asparagus of the year at Box-E…

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S T A R T E R S

Openings etc PRECIOUS CARGO

More businesses have been announced for the Cargo 2 development at Wapping Wharf. The most recently confirmed additions include Gopal’s Curry Shack, The Bristol Cheesemonger (who’s moving from St Nicholas Street) and a venture from Brace & Browns. There’s also a brand new joint from one of the guys behind Rebel Roll, Alex Hayes. Lemonade will be about burgers, fries and (obvs) everyone’s favourite lemon-based drink. There will be around seven high-end burgers on the menu (think the St Werburger, which sees a chuck patty, Monterey Jack cheese, aioli, tomato relish and confit shallots get cosy inside a brioche bun) and a generous handful of different lemonades, including a vanilla and cardamon number. This next stage of Cargo is due to open in May, adding to the already popular hub of indie gaffs at Wapping Wharf.  ✱ wappingwharf.co.uk

SO STREET

There’s a new lunchtime streetfood market coming to town, guys. The Finzels Reach Market will launch in Bristol on 5 May, and run weekly. Taking place just across the river from Castle Park on Old Temple Street – the site of the old Courage brewery – it will pull all kinds of food stalls and hungry visitors into this redeveloped area. The first event will see top local traders flogging everything from Cantonese dumplings to falafel wraps, and there’ll be weekly changing guest stalls, too. Live music and party vibes at the first event will make sure it launches with a bang. It’s all a great excuse to use that jazzy new bridge, and explore this historic area, once home to sugar refineries and such. ✱ finzelsreach.com

SHELLING OUT

The Scallop Shell – Bath’s award-winning combination of fancy fish and chip takeaway and cool seafood restaurant – has opened its new upstairs dining room. This place has become quite a Crumbs favourite of late, so imagine our chagrin when it shut recently for a bit of a refurb, chiefly involving expanding the dining area into the office space above. The new-look downstairs now sports slightly different seating, a new staircase and something called ‘The Potato Room’ (you can peek in to see chips being prepared), but the really exciting action is upstairs, where a long rectangular space contains a mixture of banquets, booths and high tables, plus – coming soon – access to a hot weather terrace area. Queuing for a table here will hopefully be a thing of the past, now… ✱ thescallopshell.co.uk

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S T A R T E R S

Openings etc Proudest career achievement? Gaining my first Michelin star at 29 years old, in 2012. Back then, I was the youngest Michelin star chef in France.

CHOP, CHOP!

A new bar has just opened on North Street in Bristol. The Old Butcher’s is a collaboration between The Old Bookshop – known for its top cocktails, delicious food and quirky, antique-look interior – and local brewery, Wiper & True. Beers are fresh from the brewery, and include limited edition numbers, exclusive brews and a monthly changing selection of bottles from around the world. The original wall and floor tiling – from the building’s former life as Collard’s Family Butchers – has been carefully restored, and the whole space designed to be bright and light, while in keeping with its sister site’s character. (And while we’re on the subject, that popular flagship joint has just launched a brand new brunch offering!) ✱ facebook.com/theoldbutchersbristol

CHEWED UP

Valley Fest is returning to Chew Valley, with a new date and new set up. This family-friendly festival, which will this year be taking place on the first weekend in August, has always been focused on quality, sustainable food, as it’s run by farming hero Luke Hasell on his organic farm. Now, though, the organisers have upped their game, and announced that all food on site will be organic. That’s not just the delicious hot offerings from the stalls, either, but also the grub served at the Midnight Feast and Sunday Picnic events, too. As well as top eats there will be music, talks, cookery demos, workshops and plenty of kids’ activities – all to be enjoyed alongside the awesome views across the lake at this gorgeous Somerset farm. ✱ valleyfest.co.uk

new Kid On the blOCK LET US INTRODUCE TO YOU MICHAEL NIZZERO, NEW EXEC CHEF AT THE BATH PRIORY

Hi, Michael. You’re brand new to Bath, but where are you from originally? I was born and grew up in Belgium, but have spent much of my working life in French kitchens. How would you describe your style of cookery, then? Modern classical French, with a delicate touch. And I aim for clean flavours. Diners will find the classic stocks and sauces they expect from a French style, but with plenty of citrus, for example, to lighten and lift. Tell us about you fondest foodie memories from your childhood. My mother’s onion Stoemp (Brussels’ potato and onion speciality) and my nonna’s tomato sauce. My dad was a very good cook too, so we always ate well at home. What was it that inspired you to make cooking a career? I think it was my dad; he was a Maître D’ for 45 years at The Hotel Amigo Grand Place in Brussels. I always loved the work stories he would tell, and that’s why I started at catering school.

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What attracted you to The Bath Priory? The size allows me to be close to our guests, and I’m able to do the food I want. The city is amazing and the hotel grounds are beautiful, plus The Bath Priory’s reputation is very good, so it was a good move for my career. How have you approached the menu?  The menu is prepared with seasonal ingredients, as local as possible, inspired by places I have worked – but twisted my own way.

What changes can we expect now that you’re at the helm?  We’re just working on our new spring menus now, which aim to bring updates of some favourite plates from the Waterside, Ritz and Hostellerie La Briqueterie, as well as some completely new dishes. I look forward to hearing what guests think! What is your favourite ingredient to work with at the moment?  We’re working with the first English asparagus of the spring, and the last French black truffle with faisan egg – this makes a great combination, and what makes it especially fun is that you can only enjoy it for a couple of weeks of the year. It’s a great feeling to work with amazing produce like this. Favourite suppliers? Groswell Farm. John is a local vegetable grower who has amazing produce. Foodie heroes?  In my career I’ve had different mentors, but the main one has to be Michel Roux. Current favourite flavour combination? Artichoke and liquorice. ✱ thebathpriory.co.uk

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S T A R T E R S

Openings etc CRuMBS AWARdS aRE a GO!

KEEPING UP WITh The JONESES

Lucknam Park has just relaunched its Michelin-starred restaurant with a new name and new menu. Restaurant Hywel Jones by Lucknam Park opened for its first service on 7 April, having added a new collection of three tasting menus; one focusing on seasonality, one containing all Hywel’s favourite dishes, and one entirely meat-free. The restaurant itself – which is located in the house’s former ballroom – has had a bit of a spruce up too, making it feel more contemporary, while keeping the hotel’s classic style in mind. Having been at the hotel for 14 years, Hywel, as you can imagine, is pretty chuffed, describing this as a ‘milestone’ in his career. ✱ lucknampark.co.uk

PUB-EdIT

Heard that The Wheatsheaf in Combe Hay has been named Somerset Dining Pub of the Year? The Good Pub Guide editors take to the road to seek out the best pub dining experiences across the entire country, and this rural village inn, just outside of Bath, was their pick for this county. The menu lists classic dishes made with local ingredients and West Country style; think venison, bacon and savoy cabbage faggot, and pheasant Ballotine with creamed cabbage. Wood-fired pizza is soon to be added to the culinary line up, too. ✱ wheatsheafcombehay.com

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IN CASE YOU’VE not got wind via the social sphere, let’s catch you up: Crumbs is launching its very own food awards for Bath and Bristol! Pretty exciting, no? We really wanted to create a new way of recognising and celebrating the total heroes that make our food and drink scene so epic – from growers and suppliers to front of house pros, event organisers and innovative thinkers. We’re totally committed to making these awards the most fair, respected and coveted in the local industry, so we’ve got some pretty awesome experts on board to judge. Entries will open early May, and you can nominate your own business or someone else’s. We’re looking for people and businesses who not only cook or serve great food, but also make responsible, ethical choices, and use food to bring about positive change. The awards ceremony itself will take place at the gorgeous Bristol Old Vic on 1 October, and is set to be a shindig of epic proportions, with plenty of merriment and entertainment – and without any of that stuffy black-tie malarkey. Check out the initial line-up of awards categories below, and keep your eyes peeled for more information!

›Food Hero ›Fine Fine Dining Restaurant ›Casual Casual Dining Restaurant ›Café ›Front of House ›Barista ›Food Producer ›Drinks Producer ›Cookery School ›Newcomer ›Food Retailer ›Kitchen › Kitchen and Interiors ›Food Supplier ›Food Event ›Food Trader ›Bar/Pub ›Food Initiative


S T A R T E R S

Openings etc Ask the waitress THIS IS TESSA LIDSTONE OF SHIPPING CONTAINER RESTAURANT, BOX-E

Hip shOps

front. As it took shape, it formed the Good Sixty website, which now has 50 Bristolian retailers on board – from breweries to butchers, delicatessens to distilleries. It works like this: customers can search for groceries via category, retailer, or map, and fill up their basket as they wish. The orders come directly from each retailer to the customer, either via a courier (which is also a small Bristol biz) or the retailer’s own delivery service. There’s also the What? Groceries option to swing by and collect your order. Where: Online “Customers deal direct with the When: You can order 24/7; check individual businesses through Good Sixty,” explains retailers’ profiles for delivery times Chris. “We want to help encourage the relationships between the retailer and the HAVING GROWN UP right by customer – that’s so important to the Gloucester Road in Bristol (which is businesses owners we speak to. They love famous for its unmatched stretch of knowing their customers by name and independent businesses), Good Sixty having that familiarity.” founder Chris Edwards has always been This model means that there’s no about the local indies. He noticed, though, financial risk for retailers, and shoppers that not everyone was able to make the don’t have to deal with a middle man. Good most of them. Sixty clearly isn’t a business with nothing “Friends of mine, although living a but dollar signs in its eyes, then. Instead, stone’s throw from an amazing it’s all about supporting the local area, by greengrocer or fishmonger, were ordering helping people discover local producers grocery deliveries from big, national and suppliers, and, in turn, boost the local businesses,” he tells us. “It was all about economy. It’s estimated that for every £1 convenience – not everyone has time to spent in a local independent business, 60p visit several different shops to get their of it goes back into the community, after groceries around their working hours.” all. (A-ha! That’s what the name means!) Having forged a career helping small Available across most of Bristol at the businesses with web agency work, Chris moment, Good Sixty is hoping that, one had the knowledge – and inclination – he day, it can roll out to other cities, helping needed to do something about this. So, he people across the UK make the most of began to develop an online shopping their local, independent grocery shops. But platform, giving private independent for now, all eyes on Bristol... businesses, selling food with a focus on ✱ goodsixty.co.uk quality and provenance, a collective shop

PHOTO S : JO S H P ER R ET T

GOOd sixty

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When did you and your husband (chef Elliott Lidstone) open Box-E? It was on 18 October last year; a random Tuesday evening. We still had boxes everywhere and so much to do, but I felt it was now or never! Best bit of working in the industy? Getting to meet new people every day; you never know who’s going to walk through your door. The kindness we’ve been shown by diners is really special. How many covers does Box-E have? Just 18, which includes four seats at our kitchen table, where we offer a tasting menu. We can double the covers with the outdoor terrace, though – so bring on the sunshine! What’s the most challenging part of working in such a confined space? Everything has to have a place. When things aren’t in their place it feels like the whole system breaks down. And I still regularly clonk my head on the hanging light bulbs! And what effect do you think the size has on the customers’ experience? It helps create a buzzing atmosphere because the kitchen is literally right there. It also means that diners feel able to ask about how their food is cooked and where produce comes from, which is great. How do you curate your drink list? It’s a collaboration with a friend who works in the wine trade and really got behind what we were trying to achieve, so it’s quite personal to us. Where have you visited recently where the service was excellent? Hanoi Coffee Company. I go in with our girls and, without me even having to ask, they’ve put less chilli in their food, and brought out theirs first. ✱ boxebristol.com

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For more details or to book call Bristol 01179 226699 Bath 01225 311232 KohThaiTapas

thaitapas

koh-thai.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

In the Larder

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sprinGtime scran

IT’S ABOUT GREAT PICNIC NIBBLES AND REFRESHING DRINKS THIS MONTH 1 PRESSING MATTERS Coldpress fruit and vegetable juices, £2.79/500ml This juice company recently launched some new nutrientpacked drinks. The USP? Well, the clue’s in the name. Coldpress doesn’t pasteurise its drinks (which involves heating them), meaning the ingredients retain all their natural goodness. The Berry Beets number (apple, beetroot, raspberry, pear and lemon) is well balanced in its earthy and sweet flavours. Available at Waitrose. ✱ coldpress.com

2 DEEPLY DIPPY Precious Pod Hummus, £2.99/180g This range of hummus, produced just outside of

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Bath, is made by hand using top organic ingredients. And you can taste the attention to detail, too. The range of delish flavours includes red pepper, harissa, kalamata olive, turmeric (our fave) and smoked hummus. They’re all free of diary and wheat, and are suitable for vegans and vegetarians. Available from Wild Oats in Bristol, and Hartley Farm Shop in Winsley.

to flavour, as well as benefits. Now there is a whole range, including everything from a herbal blend designed to help you sleep, to a twist on Earl Grey. We’ve been enjoying the bright, complex flavours of these teas, which come in biodegradable pyramid bags. Available from Taste of Bath. ✱ taste-of.co.uk

4 SUGAR AND SPICE The Preservation Society Rhubarb and Chilli Chutney, £3.60/205g This subtly sweet and gently spicy chutney is made just over the bridge in Chepstow – alongside other chutneys, preserves and ‘sirops’. It has been making itself at home in our fridge of late, and accompanying cheeses

✱ thepreciouspod.co.uk

3 TEA TIME Tea Huggers tea bags, from £4.30/15 bags Having quit her caffeine hits and turned to herbal infusions, Tea Huggers founder Esther Thompson set about creating blends that really delivered when it came

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and meats (including the pie below). Available online. ✱ the-preservation-society.com

5 TELLING PORKIES Roots & Wings Organic Pork Pie, from £6.15/340g Picnic season is just around the corner, and you’ll do well to get one of these bad boys in your basket. The lean, well-seasoned British pork shoulder meat is encased in water-crust pastry that’s been shaped using a traditional hand press, to ensure it’s thin and crisp. We loved the sweet flavour of the pork, as well as its smooth texture, and the golden pastry has a good chew to it, too. Available at Coombe Farm Organic, and online via Ocado. ✱ rootsandwingsorganic.com


S T A R T E R S

Six Pack 1 ALLINGTON

You’ll find Allington Farm Shop near Chippenham, in the same location it’s been hanging out in since it was founded in 1981. The family who run it has been on that turf for even longer, though, having been working Allington Bar Farm for three generations. In the shop you’ll not only find their own homegrown ingredients, as well as extras from local suppliers, but also ready-to-eat food, perfect if grab-and-go is your style. As well as the fruit and veg sections, there’s a butchery, deli counter and, if all that shopping is causing you to get a hunger on, there’s a café too, serving up lots of the farm’s produce. ✱ allingtonfarmshop.co.uk

ruRAl retAil SIX GREAT LOCAL FARM SHOPS TO VISIT FOR HOMEGROWN GROCERIES…

2 BROCKLEY

There’s been a shop on the Brockley Stores site on the A370 for 90 years, and it started out simply selling veg that was grown ’round the back. Nowadays you’ll find lots of homemade products, which the team create themselves each day using the local ingredients they get in – think quiches, pasties, nibbles and picnic bites, and Brockley Brownies. Of course, that veg is still on offer, although nowadays those groceries come from neighbouring famers and growers. Then there are products from local companies (most within 10 miles), such as Bradley’s Juice, Crossman’s cider, Dunleavy Wine, bread from Pullins, and more than 40 cheeses made by locals. This is a proper traditional farm shop, where the staff really know their produce. ✱ brockleystores.co.uk

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3 HARTLEY

is made on-site with organic milk from a mixture of Holstein and Jersey cows. West Country-heavy in its produce and practice, this place also sells seasonal vegetables and fruits, fresh bread and drinks, which the team source within 20 miles, meaning they do a great job of supporting neighbouring producers.

The beef that Hartley Farm rears is sold at its butcher’s counter alongside meat from other, carefully chosen farms, meaning everything can be traced right back to exactly whence it came – and you’ll be hard pushed to think of a cut that these guys can’t get you. Other local produce includes sourdough from The Oven, salad and veggies from Grown Green, ale from micro-brewery Willy Good Ale and coffee from Easy José Coffee. Then you’ve got homemade pies, Scotch eggs, pastries, freshly baked cakes and plenty of cheese and store cupboard staples. Now owned and farmed by the fifth generation of the same family, this Bradford-on-Avon farm and shop is about as responsible and sustainable as it gets, working hard to keep the connection strong between farmers and consumers.

themselves to make sure it’s of the best quality, and that they can advise all their customers as helpfully as possible. There’s a nursery too, which, as well as bedding plants, shrubs and potted flowers, has fruit and vegetable plants.

✱ hartley-farm.co.uk

✱ meadgatefarmshop.co.uk

The newest out of this lot, Meadgate Farm Shop opened in March 2016 as a small, indie, family-run biz. The friendly store, which you’ll find in Timsbury, has received a fantastic amount of support from locals already, and has a band of regular customers. Aiming to recreate those neighbourhood grocery shops of yore, it’s got traditional values, providing the community with fresh and local produce. As well as fruit and vegetables, stock includes Bath Harvest oils, local preserves, bread and cakes, free-range local eggs, meat, dairy, local juice, and Marshfield ice cream. Everything these guys sell they’ve personally sampled

Located just outside Weston-superMare in Hewish, Puxton Farm Shop is celebrating the big 1-0 this year. It opened as part of tourist attraction Puxton Park, and is keeping tradition alive with its cheesemaking and butchery. The butcher stocks pork, lamb and beef – some of which comes from the very organic pastures the shop is set in, and the rest is sourced within a five mile radius. Meanwhile, the milk from Puxton’s dairy herds is transported through a pipeline directly into vats where it’s turned into curds, and pressed by hand to produce cheese. In fact, the multi-award winning Gorwydd Caerphilly

4 MEADGATE

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✱ puxton.co.uk

6 WHITE ROW

5 PUXTON

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White Row has been home to pigs and crops for four decades, with owners Steve and Heather Tucker diversifying with a shop back in the ’90s. This store is run by these same farmers, who started it with the aim of being producers of as much of what they sell as possible. While they still uphold that ethos, Steve and Heather are careful not to overproduce, and keep their farm as sustainable as possible. The pork you’ll find at the shop is from these guys’ own pigs – you won’t see it anywhere else. There’re also homegrown vegetables and fruits, eggs from the farm’s hens, and even the bread has their flour in it. Outside suppliers are all local, and include the likes of Ivy Farm, Marshfield and Tom Wheeler. ✱ whiterowfarm.co.uk


Eat, Drink & Relax THE COTTAGE INN 01179 215256 Baltic Wharf, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG

THE LAMB HOTEL 01934 732253 The Square, Axbridge BS26 2AP

THE OLD RESTORATION 01242 522792 55-57 High Street, Cheltenham GL50 1DX

THE MILL AT RODE 01373 831100 Rode, Frome BA11 6AG

THE SWAN INN 01934 852371 Rowberrow, Winscombe BS25 1QL

www.butcombe.com

THE PELICAN INN 01275 331777 10 South Parade, Chew Magna, Bristol BS40 8SL

THE WOOLPACK INN 01934 521670 Shepherds Way, St Georges, Westonsuper-Mare BS22 7XE


S T A R T E R S

FROM LONG-ESTABLISHED CHEFS TO NEWBIE BLOGGERS – MARK TAYLOR CHECKS OUT ALL THEIR LATEST LITERARY OFFERINGS FOR US THIS MONTH…

PRIME: THE BEEF COOKBOOK

ONE POUND MEALS

Richard H.Turner Mitchell Beazley, £25

Miguel Barclay Headline, £14.99

Classically trained by the Roux brothers, Pierre Koffmann and Marco Pierre White, chef Richard H. Turner is better known these days for his part in restaurants like Pitt Cue Co and Hawksmoor, but he’s also one half of London butcher Turner & George, as well as the Meatopia festivals. An ode to all things beef, this hefty book features over 180 meaty recipes for burgers, roasts, steaks and just about every conceivable beef dish from around the world. It also has lots of handy tips on butchering and buying your meat as well as features on bovine breeds. Standout recipes in this beefy bible include Sichuan beef, braised ox tongue salad, British Army beef curry and the ultimate Cornish pasty.

In May 2016, amateur chef Miguel Barclay took to Instagram to share the gourmet recipes he had produced for less than £1 per portion. He has since amassed over 11k Instagram followers, with each video seen by 25,000 viewers in less than an hour, and he has appeared on national TV to demo his recipes. In his first book, One Pound Meals, Barclay has created a collection of tempting recipes, whose ingredients all cost £1 or less. Quick, simple and full of flavour, there are recipes for every occasion, from chicken katsu curry and beef lasagne to smoked mackerel fish cake and Dijon sauce or Moroccan spiced vegetables, hummus and flatbread. An innovative book that makes good food affordable for all.

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HOME COOK Thomasina Miers Guardian Faber, £25

SRI LANKA: THE LOCALS COOKBOOK Jon Lewin thelocalscookbook.com £20

Former MasterChef winner, and co-founder of the Wahaca restaurant chain, Thomasina Miers has also gained a loyal following for her weekly column in The Guardian. This book is a collection of her most-loved recipes: recipes that she has fed her friends and family at her ever-busy kitchen table; creations derived from family classics; food inspired by her travels; and dishes informed by the work of some of her favourite food writers and chefs. Bursting with imaginative ideas, big flavours and personality, the irresistible recipes range from marmalade and poppy seed muffins and show-stopping paella to enticing Mexican crab mayo and upside down rhubarb cake. A wonderful collection of fuss-free, family-friendly recipes.

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The first book from Bristol photographer, chef and surfer Jon Lewin documents his extensive travels around Sri Lanka. It’s a highly personal account of his time spent with the locals, as well as a comprehensive look at the cuisine. Due to its diverse climate and history, Sri Lankan food has been influenced by the cooking of South India, Portugal, Britain and other countries, and Lewin looks at the dishes served in Sri homes as well as the street food stalls. With stunning pics and a clean, uncluttered design, recipes are given plenty of space. As well as signature Sri Lankan dishes like hoppers, sambols and parathas, there are numerous fish, meat and vegetarian curries, as well as stir-fries, and even some refreshing drinks.


B O O K

O F

T H E

M O N T H

From: TANDOORI WHOLE FISH FROM THE CURRY GUY BY DAN TOOMBS (Quadrille, £12.99) Photography © Kris Kirkham 

THE CURRY GUY

Dan Toombs Quadrille, £12.99

In just five years, blogger Dan Toombs has turned The Curry Guy into a trusted brand, with 130,000 curry fans visiting his blog each month. In writing his first book, Toombs took recipe testing to the extreme, feeding his family nothing but curry for two whole years. (Now that’s what we call proper dedication.) The result is over 100 recipes aimed at home cooks to recreate what the author describes as British Indian Restaurant (BIR) dishes. This means recipes for all the classic curry sauces used in Indian restaurants – from korma and pasanda to jalfrezi and madras – and all the classic dishes, including chicken tikka masala and lamb saag. There are also recipes for vegetable side dishes and accompaniments, including how to cook the perfect pilau.

TANDOORI WHOLE FISH (SERVES 2)

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

2 whole bream or sea bass, cleaned 1 tbsp garlic and ginger paste (see below)  4 tbsp white wine vinegar 1 tsp rapeseed oil 1 tsp chilli powder 2 tbsp tandoori masala 1 tsp garam masala  1 ½ tbsp plain yoghurt  1 lemon, quartered 

– For the garlic and ginger paste, put both ingredients in a food processor or pestle and mortar and blend with just enough water to make a smooth paste. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to three days. – Make shallow slits on each side of the fish. Put the garlic and ginger paste, vinegar, oil, chilli powder, tandoori masala, garam masala and yoghurt in a bowl and whisk into a marinade. Season with salt to taste then

For the garlic and ginger paste: 150g garlic, chopped 150g ginger, chopped

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rub the marinade all over the fish, inside and out, and leave to marinate for about 30 minutes. – Meanwhile, prepare your barbecue for direct grilling. – Remove the fish from the marinade and place in a metal grill fish basket, or thread a couple of skewers through to hold it in place. Cook, turning regularly, until the skin is nicely charred and the fish is cooked through. Serve with a squeeze of lemon. 

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s Wedd7i5n.g00 from ÂŁ RSON E PER P

Are you organising a small intimate wedding or a large family affair? Homewood Park Hotel & Spa is the ideal venue. Set in ten acres of wonderful gardens and parklands, we have the perfect setting for your special day. Contact our wedding planner on 01225 723731 or email weddings@homewoodpark.co.uk to arrange a personal viewing.

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now open in clifton village 29 Regent Street, Bristol BS8 4HR 01179 092 770 • info@boscoclifton.co.uk www.boscopizzeria.co.uk


C HE F ! WHAT TO MAKE, AND HOW TO MAKE IT – DIRECT FROM THE KITCHENS OF OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

It’s that time o’ year once again: British asparagus is back, baby!

Highlights RETURN OF THE PAK

These pakoras make for a top veggie snack Page 30

HOW PHO CAN YOU GO? This light, nutritious Asian bowl will put a smile on your face

GRAZE ANATOMY

A classic French snack, great for a starter Page 35

Page 32

Plus

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5 WINE MATCHES by Ben Franks of Novel Wines


Chef !

fry haRd VE TAYLOR’S NEW BOOK, WE TAKE A PEEK INSIDE GENEVIE RUV BAKER… TO PINCH A GREAT RECIPE BY DH

There are two cuisines that could convince me to become vegetarian – Italian and Indian – and this recipe is a perfect example of why I have listed Indian as one of the two, writes Genevieve Taylor. It’s delicious, simple to prepare with ingredients you most likely have in your fridge and storecupboard, and wonderfully evocative of Indian street food. Try different vegetables, different ratios of spices and various heat levels. And always double up on the mint and coriander chutney – there just never seems to be enough to go around!

Original recipe by Dhruv Baker, MasterChef UK 2010 Champion

METHOD

200g gram flour 50g self-raising flour 1 tsp garam masala ½ tsp ground coriander ½ tsp ground cumin 1 tsp ground turmeric ½ tsp ajwain seeds (use cumin seeds if you haven’t any ajwain) 1 tsp fennel seeds ¼ tsp chilli powder ½ tsp salt 1 fresh green chilli, finely chopped 1 tsp ginger, grated ½ tsp crushed garlic 250ml water 1 small bunch coriander, finely chopped 1 onion, very finely sliced 2 medium potatoes, coarsely grated ½ small head of cauliflower, cut into little florets 1 tsp chaat masala ½ lime, juice only

– To make the chutney, place all the ingredients except the yoghurt in a blender. Blend until smooth, then stir through the yoghurt and season to taste. Set aside. – Place the flours, spices, salt, fresh chilli, ginger and garlic in a large bowl and combine thoroughly. Add the water, little by little, until you have a lovely thick batter (you may need more or less water than 250ml). Stir through half the chopped coriander, the sliced onion, grated potato and cauliflower florets. – Heat the oil in a deep fat fryer to 170C-180C/325F-350F. Test the temperature by adding 1 tsp of the mixture – when it bubbles, floats and turns golden brown in 45-60 seconds, you are good to go. – Drop tablespoon-sized amounts of the mixture into the oil and fry for 2-3 minutes until golden brown and cooked all the way through. Once ready, remove each with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. – Season with the chaat masala, a squeeze of lime juice and some salt, and scatter with the remaining coriander. – Serve the piping hot pakoras with the chutney alongside.

For the chutney: 1 small bunch fresh coriander 3-4 tbsp mint leaves 1 tsp runny honey or caster sugar 1 lime, juice only 50ml water 1 garlic clove, peeled ½ green chilli 50ml thick Greek yoghurt

✱ Recipe taken from MasterChef Street Food of the World by Genevieve Taylor (Absolute Press, £26) Photography © David Loftus

PAKORAS with MINT and CORIANDER CHUTNEY (SERVES 4)

INGREDIENTS

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gut 15 £1 Wein nlois’ 20 atic e g r arom a s o f e ‘L t in p o lW to n Nove quick ner h Asia e are rieties wit good Gru m o a “S a a v , h e it n a m w Germ e but, for very time ydew e cuisin er wins e this. Hon lp to n e Veltli r dish like acidity h dish.” y t lighte and juic is vibran n h t lo o e t m more bring


Four-course Punjabi tasting menu available March-April

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A SMALL ARTISAN PIZZERIA IN BRISTOL’S WONDERFUL GLOUCESTER ROAD Our pizzas are inspired by Pizza al Taglio in Rome and will melt in your mouth. They have a base that is not only crispy, but also light and airy. We use the highest quality ingredients available and many of our pizzas are finished with fresh seasonal produce that will titillate your taste buds and leaving you longing for more.

365 Gloucester Road, Bristol • Tel: 0117 329 5990 • www.romanesca.co.uk


Chef !

ER TAKES INSPIRATION TRISTAN LE COUSTUM TRY FOR THIS TENDER FROM HIS HOME COUN PORK BELLY…

frenCh FanCy Tristan has been at the helm of the kitchen at Graze in Bristol for more than two years. He started his cooking career in France – his place of birth – and gained experience working in traditional bistros, having been inspired to get in the kitchen by his mum’s fantastic cooking. Having grown up in Brittany, Tristan has a particular interest in growing fruit and vegetables. Now, at Graze, he combines his French influence with the very best locallysourced ingredients. He prides himself on putting a twist on classic dishes and traditional techniques. Graze, which has branches in both Bristol and Bath, has a strong focus on British meats, but there are also small plates, fish and shellfish, and vegetarian options on offer, as well as seasonal specials. At the bar, diners can choose from a selection of local beers from Bath Ales and a hand-picked wine list. This is a traditional dish from Touraine in France, where Tristan worked a couple of summer seasons. The crispy pork rillons can be served as a salad with a few fresh leaves, croutons and a poached egg. At Graze, Tristan serves it with pork scratchings and apple purée as a starter.

a Grape match! Sula Dindori Reserve Viognier 2015 £11.50, Novel Wines “As crazy an idea as it may be, this dish would match incredibly well with this Indian white wine from Sula Vineyards. The wine has everything pork longs for: hinted sweetness from ripe red apple and tropical fruits, with cream and spices on the finish.”

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TIP! The pork can be stored in the liquid in the fridge for up to two days before panfrying and eating

SLOW-COOKED PORK RILLONS (SERVES 2 AS A STARTER) INGREDIENTS

20g sea salt flakes pinch smoked paprika 500g pork belly, skin removed and diced into 3cm chunks 200g lard (beef dripping or duck fat also work well) 100ml water 100ml white wine 3 garlic cloves, crushed 2 springs thyme 2 sprigs rosemary ✱ GRAZE, 63 Queen Square, Bristol BS1 4JZ; 0117 927 6706; bathales.com

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METHOD

– Rub the salt and smoked paprika into the pork belly. Cover and leave to marinate overnight in the fridge. – To cook the pork, preheat the oven to 150C/300F/gas mark 2. – Rinse the pork thoroughly and pat dry. Heat a frying pan on the hob until hot, then add the pork and fry with a bit of the lard until it’s nice and brown on all sides. – Transfer into a deep oven tray and cover with the rest of the lard, water and wine, and add the garlic and herbs. – Cover the tray with foil and cook in the oven for around 1 ½ hours, until the meat is tender. – When ready to serve, simply pan-fry until crispy, and plate up with apple purée for a sharing snack, or with fresh salad leaves and a poached egg.


OLIVER PRATT COMES UP TRUMPSIDEAL WITH A LIGHT BUT FILLING SALAD,OIRE… FOR OUR SUMMER MEAL REPERT

LettUce COOK

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Chef !

Oliver is the new exec chef of local cafébar group, Grounded. He’s bringing a fresh, seasonal approach to the menus, adding dishes like this chicken salad. It’s a great meal to enjoy alfresco as the weather gets warmer, with its wellbalanced flavour combinations of herby chicken, creamy Gorgonzola and salty smoked bacon.

HERB-MARINATED CHICKEN, SMOKED BACON and GORGONZOLA SALAD with NEW POTATOES and CRISPY CHICKEN SKIN (SERVES 2)

INGREDIENTS

For the herb oil: 1 garlic clove 50ml olive oil large sprig fresh parsley (approx 25g) sprig fresh rosemary (approx 10g)  sprig fresh thyme (approx 10g) For the salad: 1 large chicken breast, skin on 200g new potatoes, washed  8 rashers smoked streaky bacon  100g Gorgonzola cheese 2 large or 3 small baby gem lettuce  10g fresh tarragon  For the lemon dressing: 1 lemon, juice only 6 tbsp olive oil METHOD

– Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/ gas mark 4. – Make the herb oil by blending together the garlic, olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper in a food processer. Then roughly chop the herbs and add to the blender. Blend again until everything is well combined and the oil turns green, then strain through a sieve. – Remove the skin from the chicken and keep to one side. Slice the fillet lengthways so that you have two flat fillets. – Rub and coat each fillet with the herb oil. Cover with cling film and return to the fridge for later.

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– Roll out a sheet of greaseproof paper. Take the chicken skin and stretch it out (keeping the outer side up) on the paper. Lightly dust with salt, pepper and a few picked thyme leaves. – Lay another sheet of greaseproof paper on top and put another baking tray on top of that to keep it flat. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes, or until it the skin turns a light golden brown. Once cooked and crisp, drain off the fat and set aside (avoiding the temptation to have a nibble; there will be none left if you do!). – Meanwhile, wash the new potatoes and cut each into 6 equal-sized cubes. – Add the potato to a pan of lightly salted cold water. Bring to the boil then turn down to a gentle simmer. Cook for 2-3 minutes until just tender – be careful not to overcook. – Once ready, run the potatoes under cold water until chilled, drain well and set aside for later. – Grill the smoked streaky bacon until it is cooked and crispy on both sides. Allow to cool and then cut into approx 1 ½ cm pieces. Set aside for later. – Remove any large pieces of unwanted rind from the cheese, and dice into approx 1 ½ cm cubes. – Cut the bases off the gem lettuces, wash the leaves and drain well. Slice the biggest leaves into chunks, keeping the smaller ones whole.  – Squeeze about 2 tbsp of lemon juice into a small bowl. Add the olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper, and whisk up with a fork. – Using a griddle pan (or non-stick frying pan), cook the chicken fillets on a high heat until well cooked on both sides, then set aside to cool. – In a large mixing bowl, add the lettuce, bacon, potato and Gorgonzola. Slice the fresh tarragon finely and add to the bowl. Slice the chicken into strips and toss together with the salad. – Serve onto flat plates, keeping height in the salad. Whisk the lemon dressing again and drizzle lightly over each plate. – Slice the crispy chicken skin into 4 strips and use it to decorate the top of the salads. ✱ CAFÉ GROUNDED, cafegrounded.co.uk

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a Grape match! Sixteen Ridges Early Pinot Noir 2014 £15.95, Novel Wines “It’s easy to jump for white wine at the sight of a salad, but serving this English Pinot Noir slightly chilled is bliss with Oliver’s dish. It has pungeant ripe cherries and hints of raspberry with a soft oak finish, like a young Bourgogne.”


ChiCKen tOniGht MAY WELL THIS RECIPE BY ADAM TOWNSLEY GULAR… BECOME YOUR NEW FAVOURITE RE

Adam is group executive chef for Bistrot Pierre, a family of French bistro-style restaurants which have a couple of branches on our patch; one in Bath and one a little further out, in Weston-superMare, right on the seafront. Adam’s given us the recipe for one of his classic dishes, which shows off just how well chicken and mushroom go together. It features chicken breast, panfried and served with a fricassee of wild mushrooms. It also makes great used of asparagus, which is in season until June – make the most of the British stuff while you can! This is a great meal to serve at a dinner party; the succulent chicken accompanied by the creamy, earthy sauce and fresh greens make it pretty irresistible, this chef reckons…

POULET PRINTANIER (SERVES 4)

INGREDIENTS

4 chicken breast fillets 12g garlic, finely chopped 80g button mushrooms 40g oyster mushrooms 40g shiitake mushrooms 30g onion, finely chopped 16ml white wine vinegar 120ml white cooking wine 120ml chicken stock 240ml whipping cream 16g fresh tarragon leaves, finely chopped ½g cornflour 20ml white truffle oil 60g asparagus 40g garden peas white truffle oil, to serve spring onions, sliced, to garnish

METHOD

– Rub the chicken with salt, pepper and half of the garlic. Leave to marinade for an hour. – Preheat the oven to 190C/375F/ gas mark 5. – Wash and slice all the mushrooms, then lay on a baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and roast in the oven for 6 to 10 minutes. Once cooked, drain off any juices and reserve for the sauce. –  Sauté the rest of the garlic until lightly brown, add the onions and continue to sauté for 5 minutes. –  Heat the chicken stock, and add the vinegar, white wine and mushroom stock. Keep over the heat until it’s reduced by half, then add the cream and let it simmer for 20 minutes – it should start to slightly thicken. Mix the cornflour with a little cold water until you have a loose paste, and stir into the sauce to achieve a light coating consistency. – Add the mushrooms to the sauce and simmer for a further 5-10 minutes. – Preheat the oven to 190C/375F/ gas mark 5. –  Sauté the chicken on the griddle for 3-4 minutes, until golden, then finish in the oven for further 8-10 minutes, until cooked through but still juicy. Rest for 8-10 minutes. –  Cut the asparagus into 2cm pieces and steam for 1 minute, then add with the peas to the sauce just before serving. – Slice the meat and arrange on the plates. Pour over the sauce and garnish with the remaining chopped tarragon and a drizzle of white truffle oil. ✱ BISTROT PIERRE, 4 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED; 01225 321 840; bistrotpierre.co.uk

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Chef !

a Grape match!

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Szent Donat Kekfrankos ‘Magma’ 2015 £19.95, Novel Wines “Matching the juicy chicken, pungeant mushroom and truffle notes requires a special wine like this one. Grown on the limestone soils near Lake Balaton in Hungary, it is a medium-bodied red with a lovely mineral finish.”


Chef !

TRIO OF WILTSHIRE LAMB with HOTPOT POTATOES and RIOJA JUS (SERVES 6)

INGREDIENTS

2 garlic cloves 2 sprigs fresh rosemary 1 breast of lamb, boned 1 onion, roughly chopped 1 carrot, roughly chopped 2 sticks of celery, roughly chopped 500ml beef or lamb stock 350ml Rioja 6 lamb cutlets 6 lamb sausages (we uses a lamb, mint and apricot sausage) For the hotpot potatoes: 6 potatoes, peeled 100g butter, melted 1 onion, finely sliced 1 carrot, finely sliced spring fresh rosemary METHOD

BANGIN’ SIMON QUARRIE SHOWS THAT IT’S ABOUT THE BANGERS AT THE CLIFTNOT ALL ON SAUSAGE… This recipe is from the current spring menu at The Clifton Sausage, and was created by the restaurant’s owner Simon Quarrie. The Clifton Sausage – established in Bristol in 2002 and now also open in Bath – focuses on great quality classic British food. The sausages are made to the kitchen’s own recipe by a butcher in Weston-super-Mare. ✱ THE CLIFTON SAUSAGE, 5 Bladud Buildings, The Paragon, Bath BA1 5LS; 01225 433 633; cliftonsausage.co.uk

a Grape match! Kayra Okuzgozu 2013 £16.50, Novel Wines “This richly textured and spicy red is an undiscovered treasure of Turkey, brimming with red cherry. It would beautifully complement the lamb while standing up to the hearty flavours in Simon’s dish.”

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– Preheat the oven to 140C/275F/ gas mark 1. – Finely chop the garlic and the rosemary leaves. Sprinkle over the flesh side of the lamb breast and season well. Roll the lamb breast up and tie with butchers twine. – Put the onion, carrot and celery into a casserole pot or baking dish along with the stock and wine. Put the lamb breast on top and cover with a lid or foil. Cook for 3 hours. – When ready, remove the lamb from the baking dish and strain the liquor into a saucepan. Reduce over heat until it reaches your desired a sauce consistency. – For the potatoes, preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Slice the potatoes thinly and put in a bowl with the butter and season well. Mix it all together. – In a baking dish or ovenproof frying pan, neatly arrange a layer of potatoes on the bottom. Put half of the carrot and onion on top of the potatoes along with a sprinkling of fresh rosemary. Cover with another layer of potato and repeat with the remaining carrot and onion. Cover with a final layer of potatoes and then foil, and bake in the oven for approx 1 hour, until the potatoes are tender. – When they’re nearly ready, heat the grill to medium and grill the sausages until cooked, and the cutlets for 6-7 minutes. – Carve the lamb breast and slice the hotpot potato. Serve with the Rioja jus and vegetables (we serve with braised red cabbage).

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SPRINGTIME AT STANTON MANOR

Afternoon Tea

Steak & Strawberries

Severn & Wye Smoked Salmon Wrap Cucumber Finger Sandwich Ham Hock & Cider Chutney Sourdough Roll

Enjoy a succulent steak, cooked to your liking followed by fresh strawberries and pouring cream for a remarkable

Homemade Cakes & Sweet Treats Freshly baked Fruit & Plain Scones Chefs own Preserves & Clotted Cream Tea or Coffee

This offer is available every day from noon until seven pm throughout April and May including the Bank Holidays!

£14.95* Sparkling Afternoon Tea with a glass of Prosecco

£18.95*

£ 17.95 Don’t fancy a Steak? Have a Salmon Fillet instead!

*Mention this advert and get an Afternoon Tea for only £10 or Sparkling Afternoon Tea for only £12.95! (Offer valid throughout April & May)

Sunday Lunch 12 – 3pm Freshly Roasted joints of local meat with all the traditional accompaniments served in the fabulous surroundings of this Hidden Cotswold Gem! Two Courses - £22 Three Courses - £25 Reservations essential! 01666 837 552

Stanton St Quintin, Near Chippenham, Wiltshire SN14 6DQ • 01666 837552 • Reception@stantonmanor.co.uk

www.stantonmanor.co.uk


Chef !

IS A GREAT THIS LOW-MAINTENANCE RISOTTOWORK WAY TO PUT FRESH PRODUCE TO

sPEAr GeNIUs We always get excited at this time of year, when those fresh spears start appearing in greengrocers and on restaurant menus. And we’re ready and primed to make the most of them too – after all, blink at the wrong time and you’ll miss the entire asparagus season. This super-seasonal recipe also makes use of British peas, which are just about to come into their own as well. Using fresh produce that’s grown nearby and is at its best will elevate this risotto to a whole new level – so get picky about your ingredients! ✱ british-asparagus.co.uk

BRITISH ASPARAGUS AND PEA RISOTTO with LEMON and CRÈME FRAÎCHÉ (SERVES 6)

INGREDIENTS

600ml chicken or vegetable stock 25g butter 4 spring onions, finely sliced 2 cloves garlic, crushed and chopped ½ green chilli, de-seeded and finely chopped 150g Arborio rice ½ glass white wine

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½ bundle (approx 125g) British asparagus 100g British peas 2 tbsp Parmesan, grated 3 tbsp crème fraîché 1 small lemon (juice and zest) handful of chives, finely chopped METHOD

– Place the stock on a low heat and keep it there whilst you make the risotto. – In a separate large pan, melt the butter and then add the spring onion, garlic and chilli and sweat for 5 minutes, until soft. – Then add the arborio rice and mix around well so it absorbs all the flavours and is well coated in butter. Cook for a minute then add the white wine. – When the white wine has been absorbed, add the asparagus spears and start adding the stock ladleful by ladleful, adding the next one when the one before has been absorbed. – After 15 minutes of continual stirring and adding the stock, taste and adjust the seasoning and then add the peas. – After a further 5 minutes turn the heat off, add the Parmesan and crème fraiche, lemon zest and juice and let them melt in before plating up and finishing off with the chives.

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BRADLEY’S JUICE COMPANY Box Bush Farm, Somerset BS24 6UA Tel: 01934 822356 Email: info@bradleysjuice.co.uk Find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram www.bradleysjuice.co.uk


CHOOSE YOUR WEAPONS

BRIGHT COLOURS MAKE YOU HAPPY: FACT. AND NOT MUCH WOULD MAKE US HAPPIER, RECKONS MATT BIELBY, THAN ONE OF SMEG’S ZINGY NEW COOKERS… Summer’s all about cooking outside, and ‘throwing another shrimp on the barbie’, right? It is and, regrettably, it isn’t. Most of our outdoor cooking set-ups are pretty limited, after all, and there’s always the real C-word – yes, cloudbursts – to contend with. Perhaps the best way to cope is to make your indoor cooking area as sunny and outdoorsy as possible, and we’ve seen few better ways to do that than build it around the latest cooker collection from Smeg. Called Portofino – after the famous little fishing village that’s become the chief celeb and tourist magnet of the Italian Riviera – it comes in three punchy brights (sunshine yellow, deep red, burnt orange), plus olive green, anthracite, black, white, or classic stainless steel. Portofino is famous for its brightly coloured cookers, then? Not so much, no. But it does have an amazingly picturesque semi-circular waterfront, lined with pastel-coloured houses – yes, it’s a sort of Latin Balamory – and it’s these that have inspired the Smeggers. So these cookers are just cheerfully painted – is that it? Not even! They’re usefully compact too – at 90cm wide – so will fit into most kitchens, but they’re big inside (126 litres) and, uniquely amongst range cookers, the main oven has no fewer than three fans, for knockout results each time. Despite

THIS MONTH crumbsmag.com

the slightly retro vibe, they’re actually Smeg’s most advanced range to date, offering closeddoor grilling, an A+ energy rating, five cooking levels, and 12 additional functions, from time defrost to Sabbath mode. (Far too complicated to go into here, this is super-handy for Shabbat observant Jews.) On top you get a six-burner hob – with an induction hob option, if you prefer – and there are matching cooker hoods too, to add a dramatic look to your kitchen. Not just a pretty face, then? Seems not. And your Portofino will keep pretty for longer than most too, with the main oven’s enamel interior making it especially easy to keep clean.

THAT RIVIERA TOUCH

They’re not cheap, I take it? Think £2,399 for the gas hob version, an extra £500 quid if you want induction hobs, and another £599 for the matching hood. Is that really that much to pay for the most striking kitchen centrepiece ever (especially if it makes you feel so happy whenever you see it)? It doesn’t take much to make you happy, does it? Nope! Around three grand’s worth of bright orange cooker should do it! ✱ You can find Smeg cookers like this one at Gardiner Haskins in Bristol, Coopers in Bath, and branches of Currys and B&Q; smeguk.com

COOK SHARP

BRUNCH IN ’BURGHS

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OLD-SCHOOL STYLE


House call

wiCKed werburGhs WE GIVE AINE MORRIS, CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF BRISTOL FOOD CONNECTIONS, A KNOCK, FOR A NOSEY AROUND HER KITCHEN AND A SPOT OF BRUNCH – WITH A SIDE OF GOSSIP, NATCH

WORDS BY JESSICA CARTER PHOTOS BY KIRSTIE YOUNG

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Bar • Kitchen Dining AFTERNOON TEA

SUNDAY ROAST IN THE GARDEN

Friday, Saturday 12 noon to 4pm and Sunday Whole roast chicken for a family 3pm to 5pm • £15 per head of 4 with all the trimmings £40 Homemade cakes and Come and join us for an amazing Sunday roast in pastries, Selection of our country pub on the edge of Bradford-on-Avon. hand cut sandwiches Get your friends and family together and and unlimited tea and relax out in our beautiful garden. coffee. Booking essential. Children and dogs welcome.

TO BOOK CALL

PRIX FIXE LUNCH MENU Monday – Saturday Two courses £15.95 Three courses £17.95 (also available Monday and Tuesday evenings)

01225 865650

67 Woolley St, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1AQ • info@thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk • thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk

BREAKFAST | LUNCH | DINNER | COFFEE | DRINKS | CHILD & DOG FRIENDLY | FAMILY RUN

AMAZING

SUNDAY ROASTS

IZ U Q B U P

EVERY TUESDAY STARTS AT 8PM

NOW OPEN

138-140 Kellaway Avenue, Horfield, Bristol BS6 7YQ hello@theoldspotbristol.co.uk | Tel: 0117 924 7693

64 Downend Rd, Downend, Bristol BS16 5UE hello@theduckandwillowbristol.co.uk | Tel: 0117 956 6843

WWW.THEOLDSPOTBRISTOL.CO.UK

WWW.THEDUCKANDWILLOWBRISTOL.CO.UK


( house call )

ine only recently moved into this terraced house in St Werburghs, and what a find it was. The place was given a lot of TLC before she got the keys and relocated herself and her two children back to Bristol. The alcove in the kitchen, where the fire would have once been, sports new blue and while Moroccan-style tiles, and houses a large range cooker, where we happily spy some bacon ready for grilling... The walls, which are wood panelled for a traditional country look, are painted in cream, while the cupboards, also wood, are coated in a matt pastel blue, and underfoot we notice gorgeous old square terracotta tiles. Step down from the cooking area onto the wooden floorboards, and you’re in an extension of the original building, which has French doors at the back and a skylight in the slanted roof. This lightfilled space is where the dining table sits. “It was definitely the kitchen that sold me on the house,” says Aine, who is pretty smitten with her new central location. “I knew that when I moved back to Bristol I wanted to live in St Werburghs. And this is the most social street I’ve ever lived on; when I moved in the neighbours came around with a sausage and bean casserole, and I had flapjacks brought over, too. I mentioned to a neighbour that I wanted to some chickens to keep in the garden, and she’s already found me a coop!” It’s a wonder that Aine has any time to enjoy her new digs, though, as she heads up two sizable food festivals and is currently juggling the organisation of both at the same time. The first is Bristol Food Connections, that annual celebration of the city’s fab food scene; its opening has been marked by the BBC Food and Farming Awards these last few years. “This year, we’ve been doing a lot of work on what Food Connections is, and what it isn’t,” Aine tells us. “It’s never going to run huge projects; what we do is showcase what’s already here

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Top Lane, Whitley, Wiltshire SN12 8QX 01225 704966 T f @peartreewhitley

www.peartreewhitley.co.uk


( house call )

in the city. We curate all this stuff from what’s already happening, whether that’s putting food in unique places, facilitating collaborations or encouraging communication. The festival will only ever be as strong as Bristol’s food offering – and that’s what makes it so special.” Despite the national press and reputation the city is gaining these for its culinary landscape, there’s still plenty of work to be done, thinks Aine. “I think Bristol needs to be careful – we do have a great food scene, but it needs to be accessible for everyone. There’s real disparity in the city; there are both very wealthy and very deprived communities here. Food Connections needs to take the whole city with it on this journey.” This year, Bristol Food Connections is happening in a very different form. Instead of programming activities and events, spanning over the usual nine days, it’s taking the form of a special conference at City Hall on 9 June, to address some of the most important topics concerning our food landscape. The aim is to get people from all corners of the industry to share their views and experiences, ready

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“Wonderfully fresh flavours... inherently satisfying dishes; staff are cool and calm and the atmosphere terrific.” MICHELIN GUIDE 2016

Lunch isn’t just a meal, it’s a little space in the middle of your day. Fill that time sharing with friends, discovering something new and relaxing for the first time since waking. Our head chef Steven Yates has drawn on 7 years of Michelin starred experience to produce a menu full of magical touches you’ll want to share, linger over and dwell upon. It’s about taking a little time, kicking back and making the most of that little break. We offer small plates to share, soup, and a simple set lunch menu to cater for all tastes and needs.

LUNCH SET MENU 2 courses 17.95 | 3 courses 22.95

STARTERS 6.50 each Split Pea Soup with a wedge of sourdough (VG/GF option available) Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes with a rich toasted sunflower seed butter & pink grapefruit (VG/GF) Chioggia Beetroot Slivers with aged cashew purée, beetroot vierge & local salads (VG/GF/N)

MAINS 11.95 each Sautéed Cauliflower Heart with cauliflower puree, onion bhajis, potato, cauliflower rice, raisin & lemon (VG/GF/N) Slow Cooked Winter Squash with a pine nut risotto, gently cooked brussel sprouts, garlic & a touch of lemon zest (VG/GF) Leek and PotatoCharred leeks with melusine cheese dauphinoise, leek & garlic sauce & smoked potato

DESSERTS 5.95 each Salted Chocolate Tart with peanut butter sorbet (VG/N) White Chocolate Panna Cotta with poached beetroot, blood orange and a light beetroot icecream (GF/N) Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb with almond amaretto cream, fennel sorbet and almond crumb (VG/GF/N)

COMPLIMENTARY SPRITZ for you and your guests when dining To redeem, simply quote ‘crumbs’ on arrival Polpo Bristol 50 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2NH 0117 973 3100 www.polpo.co.uk


( house call )

KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL Name: Aine Morris Hometown: Bristol Occupation: Chief executive of Abergavenny Food Festival, and creative director of Bristol Food Connections You love the taste of… a cold gin and tonic on a hot sunny day Coffee or tea? Coffee Beer or cider? Beer Five people you’d invite to your dinner party, dead or alive: Elizabeth David, Harold McGee, Frida Kahlo, Alice Waters, Nigel Slater  Go-to recipe: Pasta ragu  The look of your kitchen in three words: Messy, cosy, home If you could change one thing about your kitchen it would be… more wine storage! Preferred midnight nosh: Whatever nibble of leftovers is in the fridge  Your kitchen is awesome because… it’s got badass Moroccan tiles and a great big Rangemaster too One thing that your kitchen is used for that’s not food-related: Small boys playing with Lego Secret skills: I’m a gastronomic scientist and super taster Most prized item: My grandmother’s copy of Elizabeth David’s English Bread and Yeast Cookery What are you going to cook/bake this weekend? Belly pork with wild garlic salsa verde Unexpected item in your kitchen cupboard: A secret stockpile of Belazu’s rose harissa   Favourite condiment: Sriracha If your kitchen could talk, it’d say… Please clean me more! 

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to inform the planning of the 2018 event, which will see the festival return with a vengeance, albeit potentially in a slightly difference guise. “This year we’ll be bringing together 350 people – not just chefs, but growers, producers, community projects... We’ll be talking about issues such as feeding the UK, post-Brexit (a substantial proportion of our food currently comes from Europe, but the hope is that this will make way for new, exciting UK producerss) and feeding and educating kids. There are also some great collaborations planned, and we’ll be supporting Young Chef and Young Baker of the Year, by Bristol Healthy Schools.” And by expanding the project board and getting the likes of Sara Vann, Adrian Kirikmaa and Fiona Beckett involved, Food Connections is shaping up nicely to return in full form next year. Remember that bacon we spied earlier? Well, Aine serves it up to us with avocado and scrambled egg, and even presents a photo of the pigs it came from.

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“It’s from Martha Roberts, who has a small holding in Abergavenny. She keeps incredibly happy, high-welfare pigs.” Speaking of Aber, although you might think Aine has got enough going on with Food Connections, you’d be wrong. Remember we said she runs two festivals? Well, she’s also heading up Abergavenny Food Festival, which happens in September. The programme is coming along nicely, we hear, with Crumbs regulars Andy Clarke and Freddy Bird among the exciting list of names appearing, which also includes the likes of Tom Kerridge, Darina Allen and Olia Hercules. As we tuck into our first meal of the day, we’re more excited than ever about this summer’s foodie festivities... ✱ bristolfoodconnections.com; abergavennyfoodfestival.com


P UB • R ES TAUR A N T

The Ashville, 15 Leigh Street, Bristol BS3 1SN • Tel: 0117 939 6897 • Email: info@theashville.co.uk www.theashville.co.uk

Behind its grandly imposing Victorian frontage at the top of Blackboy Hill, The Kings Arms offers a wonderfully diverse experience. With its café bar, dining rooms and lounges spread over several levels, there is room for everyone – even a Party Hall for those special occasions. The emphasis on the menu is home-made. Using genuinely sourced ingredients from local producers – including the family farm – it ranges from great pub classics to tasty tapas. Weekly specials use the best of what is seasonal and the burgers are legendary, with the chutneys and smoked cheeses all prepared in the Kings Arms kitchen.

The 2.4.1 weekday burger deal and a mouthwatering range of deli sandwiches makes this as much a lunch destination as an evening. Or just pop in for coffee and cake. The Sunday roasts are extremely popular, so booking is advisable, and the affordable wine list has something to suit every palette. Carefully made cocktails are available for the more adventurous – try the ‘Giddy Henry’, the House cocktail served in a tea-cup! Sit out on our sun-trap terrace – perfect for sunnier days.

The Kings Arms, 168 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2XZ Telephone: 0117 973 5922 Email: info:kingsarmsbristol.com

www.kingsarmsbristol.com


T H E WA N T LI S T 2

1

WE’RE TURNING BACK TIME WITH THESE RETRO LOCAL FINDS…

3 4 5 1 MILK BOTTLE £2.79 These are great as part of a tea set, to serve juice in at the table, or as quirky cocktail glasses with retro paper straws. Pick them up at Lakeland in Bath and Bristol Cribbs Causeway. ✱ lakeland.co.uk 2 FALCON ENAMELWARE PREP SET £54.99 This brand has been producing classic British kitchenware for almost a century, and it’s yet to fall out of fashion. This prep set includes five different sized mixing bowls and a colander, and can be found at The Foodie Bugle in Bath. ✱ thefoodiebugleshop.com 3 HOUSE DOCTOR LUNCHBOX £6.50 So what if you’re not going off to work on a building site in the ’50s? This tin lunchbox deserves to be shown off in the office, too. Find it at Mon Pote in Bristol. ✱ monpote.co.uk 4 CASA RETRO MECHANICAL KITCHEN SCALES £12.50 We’re not only keen on these stainless steel scales ’cause they’d look great in our kitchen, but also because they’re half price at Leekes – bonus. Find them at the Melksham store. ✱ leekes.co.uk 5 RETRO PINK FLOUR SIFTER £7.50 Don’t just break this out for baking, as it should be on display in the kitchen at all times… Get yours from Rossiters in Bath. ✱ rossitersofbath.com

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CHEZ DOMINIQUE Modern French Dining in Bath

AFTER WORKS PERKS 15% OFF ALL DRINKS 5PM – 7PM Mon – Thursday

SUNDAY QUIZ 8.30PM AFTER THE BIG ROASTING WE HAVE THE LARGEST

GARDEN

À la carte • Prix fixe • Sunday roast chezdominique.co.uk 15 Argyle Street, Bath, BA2 4BQ 01225 463482

IN REDLAND FOR THOSE SUNNY DAYS BOOK A SPACE EITHER INSIDE OR OUT FOR YOUR

SPECIAL OCCASION WE LOVE

DOGS AND CHILDREN

DINNER from 6pm Wednesday to Saturday

LUNCH

from noon Friday to Sunday SMASHING

ROASTS

ON SUNDAYS! The Cambridge Arms, Coldharbour Road, Redland, Bristol BS6 7JS 01179 739 786 cambridgearms@fullers.co.uk www.cambridgearms.co.uk @CambridgeArmsBr CambridgeArms

Tel: 0117 382 2235 3a Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4HW Shop3Bistro @Shop3Bistro


A cut above...

Try our new tasting menu Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB Tel: 01225 446656 12-16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 01173 291300 Email: info@themintroom.co.uk www.themintroom.co.uk

fa


Weddings at the Centurion Hotel At the Centurion Hotel we are here to help make your Wedding Day dreams come true. We can tailor a bespoke package to suit your needs and our dedicated and professional team will be able to help you every step of the way, whether it is a small intimate gathering or a large celebration.

Glass Slipper Package Civil Ceremony room Wedding Breakfast (3 course menu for 50 guests) Drinks package Evening buffet (100 guests) Bridal Suite for the night of the Wedding Wedding dress Groom suit hire

Photographer Wedding car Wedding cake Flowers Balloons Place setting and table plan DJ (for evening reception) Chair covers with sash Optional bolt on Honeymoon

Total Cost for the package £6,000

The perfect package for the perfect price

Glass Slipper Deluxe Package 65 × day guests included Gold drinks package 3 Course Wedding Breakfast 100 × evening guests – butties or pasties Bridal Suite for the night of the Wedding No extra venue hire Chair covers and sash Printing of place cards and table plan Photography Coverage from brides preparations to the first dance. 10×10” 30 page album of your choice Copyright to all edited Hi Res images put onto Disc/USB Private online gallery for photos to be viewed by guests Funky nights evening photos to include 50 8x6” mounted free prints

Total cost for the package £9,975

Flowers 2 × Column pedestal arrangements 1 × Cascading waterfall arrangement 6 × Bespoke table centres 1 × Bridal bouquet 6 × Buttonholes 2 × Corsages

Solitaire Brides Bridal dress (to keep) and groom suit hire

Wedding Car Elite Balloons Disco and DJ 3 Tier Cake £500 towards a honeymoon specialist

Charlton Lane | Midsomer Norton | Nr BATH | Somerset | BA3 4BD www.centurionhotel.co.uk | E: enquiries@centurionhotel.co.uk T: (0)1761 417711 | F: (0)1761 418357 | Club Tel: (0)1761 412214


MAINS

TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS, & PEOPLE THAT MATTER

This is wedding food, but not as you know it,,,

Highlights WED LIGHT

DAVID GRIFEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Hear these pros out before deciding on your wedding fare

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SHORT WORK

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Why – and how – you should get growing microgreens Page 68

Including…

3

CUISINES at one wedding...


The Sweet Tricycle, providing Sweets, Prosecco, Pimms and Hot Chocolate. This beautiful tricycle adds that extra special touch to any event. For all enquires please contact Helen on 07951 205409 / helen@thesweettricycle.co.uk

www.thesweettricycle.co.uk

#thesweettricycle

Wholesome, home-cooked food is the magic ingredient in Kate’s Kitchen There’s nothing like a feast of freshly sourced, lovingly-prepared food to add sparkle to the biggest day of your life. With years of wedding catering experience behind us, we know what it takes to make your wedding day special. We will create an interesting menu based on your needs and desires and take all the hassle out of the preparation so you can relax and enjoy your big day whilst we then serve you in both a discrete and polite manner. Telephone 0117 3308189 Email events@kateskitchenbristol.co.uk www.kateskitchenbristol.co.uk


Mains

EAT TO THEIR OWN THE ONE THING ALL WEDDINGS HAVE IN COMMON IS THEIR AIM TO BE DIFFERENT – MEANING IT, IRONICALLY, BECOMES PRETTY TOUGH TO BE UNIQUE. SO, WE’VE SPOKEN TO LOCAL CATERERS AND VENUES TO FIND OUT ABOUT THE WEDDINGS THEY FIND THE MOST MEMORABLE… crumbsmag.com

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( feature )

THE MULTICULTURAL WEDDING Mixing up different cultures, traditions and, best of all, cuisines is always going to make for a pretty memorable wedding, and North Somerset venue Clevedon Hall has hosted a colourful range of them. “Weddings which merge two different cultures or religions, taking elements and influences from both, are often really interesting,” says John McCarthy, sales and marketing director. “The most memorable of all would have to be a wedding we held which was a meeting of three different cultures: Judaism, Hinduism and Jainism.” This do started at 8am in the garden, with guests sitting down at lunchtime to a three-hour feast. So, what does the kitchen come up with for events like this? “Couples often ask for alternating courses,” says John, “so, for example, a starter that is English, followed by an Indian main and so on. In the instance of this particular wedding, we did actually bring in a specialist chef from London with an expertise in Jain cuisine; it is a religious requirement, and we could not risk getting anything wrong. The food was just incredible, particularly some of the Indian desserts like the gulab jamuns and other sweets. “Our chef Alan and event manager Verity work closely with the couples to find out their requirements and wishes. Alan draws up some draft menus for the couples to choose from, based on the time of year and the best seasonal produce available. Verity is responsible for creating a bespoke drinks menu.” As this joint is dedicated to weddings and events (they’re its sole use), it can go all out with creating totally bespoke meals – ideal for those with super-specific requirements or ideas. ✱ clevedonhall.co.uk

THE BANQUET WEDDING Having been in the biz for a decade, Kate Ploughman – founder of Kate’s Kitchen – has catered for all kinds of weddings, serving up her food in marquees, village halls, tipis and, of course, cemeteries (well, one – Arnos Vale, where the Kate’s Kitchen café is located). With a local, seasonal approach, this catering business themes its menus around the time of year.

“Arnos Vale is a particularly popular venue around Halloween,” says Kate. “We offer autumnal produce such as Bradders local cider punch, seasonal warming hot pots and warming desserts.” Kate’s Kitchen has a strong set of values – seasonality is just the start – and a great celebratory style in its food. One particular couple whose wedding the team catered for shared their exact ethos when it came to the grub. That’s a match made in heaven. Kate explains: “They wanted hearty food, locally sourced, in table feast style. The exact food brief was chunky, hearty canapés, then big sharing bowls of meat and veg for mains.   “We then came up with a menu which nailed the brief and was a bit different. They loved it.” Think salmon ceviche, Cumberland sausages with harissa drizzle, Spanish tortilla, grilled mackerel fillets with chilli and lime dressing and chorizo Scotch eggs, all on sharing boards. The main event saw different breads served with

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(

hummus, babbaganoush, harissa, olives and oils to nibble on, before big bowls of roast lamb with salsa verde sauce, dauphinoise potatoes, and seasonal vegetables arrived. Sounds good, no? Well it looked just as impressive too, as Kate has great presentation game, using edible flowers to add colour and intrigue. ✱ kateskitchenbristol.co.uk

THE HISTORIC WEDDING The new central Bristol Harbour Hotel – which opened at the end of the last year – is set in two adjoining former banks. The hotel group carefully restored the luxurious, classical style of the historic Venetian-inspired buildings, both inside and out. And they have a great location, right in Bristol’s cobbled Old City. “Being based on the historical Corn Street we are also very lucky to be able to offer guests unique settings for photos outside of the hotel, including Castle Park, St Nicks Market and a range of graffiti art, all within a few minutes’ walk,” says sales manager, Anna O’Shea. “We are also due to open our beautiful Vaults function room underneath the hotel, located – as the name suggests – in the original banking vaults. This room is perfect for more intimate ceremonies.” And the food? “We offer a choice of seasonal menus for couples to sample beforehand, with the chef of course present to answer any questions should they wish to discuss anything. We can also tailor offerings for each wedding, like we have for an Italianinspired menu which we have coming up

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later in the year.” (A pretty apt theme for a building where the architecture was so heavily influenced by an Italian library.) Example wedding meals might start with cannelloni of smoked salmon with smoked salmon mousse, or baked goat’s cheese with pickled vegetables and herb oil dressing, before moving on to guinea fowl with sage and potato rosti, and caramelised tomato tart tatin. “We’re excited to see all the themes and plans for the rest of this year’s weddings. It’s an absolute honour that these two former banks can play host to our couples’ special days.” ✱ bristol-harbour-hotel.co.uk

THE LAID-BACK WEDDING Often, less is more. And Mark Manley, general manager of Centurion Hotel – just near Midsomer Norton and the Mendip Hills – is inclined to agree. “The wedding that does stand out was one of the most down to earth; the main meal was fish and chips,” he says. “We did serve this on plates, but with newspaperstyle greaseproof paper for effect. Then, in the middle of the table, the bride and groom wanted mushy peas, curry sauce and pickled eggs. It was good fun to be doing something quite different, and the guests thought it was brilliant! Definitely one to remember. “The couple already had very specific ideas on the meal, so it was just a case of then organising it to work operationally for their number of guests. The main challenge was getting the main course out with all the extras in a timely fashion; it is not a normal main course for


Exchange your Vows at The Holburne Museum  If you are looking for a unique venue for your special day, the Holburne Museum can provide history, elegance and atmosphere for the most memorable day of your life. We pride ourselves on tailoring our packages to meet your needs and budget. From simple ceremonies to lavish receptions.

For more information please contact Spencer Hancock Privatehire@holburne.org and 01225 388569


( feature )

a large function! So the timings were crucial to make sure everything was hot when reaching the guests – but all was fine on the day.” Phew. So, does Mark reckon they could take on some even quirkier briefs? “I think with the right planning we could turn our hands to most things. It’s all just about being flexible and listening to what the bride and groom want from their big day.”

The kitchen team here are more than experienced in creating quirky themed menus, thanks to the regularly changing tasting menu projects that they create for the restaurant (the most recent of which just so happened to be gin-themed, too…). It’s not just about the kitchen, mind; the bar is an equally as important element to a Rummer wedding, with the team’s own signature concoctions, served on arrival, being unsurprisingly popular.

✱ centurionhotel.co.uk

✱ therummer.net

THE GIN-LOVER’S WEDDING

THE ARTSY WEDDING

The listed Rummer Hotel has plenty of history and character. Run independently and located right in the heart of the city, among the old cobbled streets lined with some of Bristol’s oldest buildings, this place also has a micro-distillery onsite, the team having decided to make their own spirits down in the old cellars. They now create great-quality gins and vodka, which are sold in their popular cocktail bar. This is something that’s been picked up on by a couple who are currently planning W-Day there… “Our next wedding is gin-themed,” Gemma Fernandez tells us. “This lovely couple came and distilled their own gin in the cellar, and are going to give it to their guests as favours. What a great idea!” Don’t know about you, but this is sounding like our kind of wedding. It gets even better when it comes to the grub... “Their food menu is also gin based; we’re going to be serving gin-cured salmon with pickled cucumber, and duck breast glazed with gin. It’s amazing.”

The Holburne Museum can be found on the handsome stretch of Georgian townhouses we (and everyone else) like to call Great Pulteney Street. Home to the collection of fine art and decorative works that belonged to an 18th-century Bathonian, Sir William Holburne, it also plays host to temporary exhibitions, which not only make for excellent backdrops to weddings, but also offer inspiration for the food. Katie Jenkins from the museum tells us all about one such example. “One couple, inspired by our Silver: Light and Shade exhibition, enjoyed their drinks reception in the Davidson Picture Gallery, and a party in our Garden Café, where they had silver cocktails and food with a silver theme. It was all both beautiful and delicious – a literally sparkling array of food and drink! “We are incredibly lucky to work with a team of extremely creative event caterers – Eat Five Star – who can tailor menus to our client’s needs. They also offer event

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styling, and work with some very talented chefs and mixologists. Before each of our exhibitions we discuss ideas with them based on the themes of the show. They then create really incredible menus to reflect this.” For example, the menu they came up with for the Stubbs and the Wild exhibition – made up of portraits and studies of beasts – fully embraced the wildlife theme, Katie tells us. “The drinks included Moscow Mule, Tiger Paw, and Rooster Tail,” she says, “while the canapés were braised ox cheek with garlic crumbs and pickled shallot, tiger prawns with ginger, chilli and coriander, and goat’s cheese ‘moose’.” Animal magic on a plate! ✱ holburne.org


Award Winning, Family Run Farm Shop Established for over 30 years Selling Quality Local Produce Open Daily 9am-6pm (10am-5pm on Sundays)

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Combining our classical culinary training with a passion for food from the good ol’ US of A to create delicious, flavourful dishes using only the best local produce. We’re bringing down home comfort food to the parties, weddings and festivals of Blighty, all served from our vintage horse trailer ‘Bonnie’.

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orn in Texas, raised in Bristol. This is Smoke Catering, an authentic Texan barbecue catering company, created by Rob and Claire Dacey from Somerset. The pair, together with their 12ft smoker, pitch up at locations all over to cook using the Texan methods taught to them by one of the best pitmasters in Texas. The nine-hour smoked beef brisket is a particular favourite of theirs – it’s so juicy and buttery it practically just melts in your mouth, and has a light crunch from a special spice rub. The sevenhour smoked pulled pork shoulder (from the award-winning Newton Farm near Bath), meanwhile, is splashed with barbecue sauce right before serving, and the handmade beef and chilli sausages also come from Newton (and are great with the maplesmoked bacon that Smoke Catering produce, too). It’s not all for the die-hard meat-eaters though; fish fans listen up. These guys hot smoke salmon sides over cedar planks, before sprinkling with their homemade rub and finishing with a hit of maple to bring out the sweetness and the heatness for ya’ll! All their food is homemade; from the rubs and pickles to the barbecue sauce and all the sides. The big boy smoker offers a great conversation piece, always draws interest and even acts as a heater during the colder months – bonus! This is truly a labour of love, with Rob and Claire spending up to 12 hours tending to the fire to ensure the food comes out with a beautiful hint of spice, gentle smoke, and pretty unique flavour. This pair have a combined total of over 30 years in the hospitality industry from cheffing, waitressing and bar management to eventual hotel and event management, so they’re fully equipped to help with planning any function you need! Find them at smokecatering.com, on Twitter (@catering_smoke) and on Instagram (/Smoke.Catering)


Mains

SPROUT’S HONOUR IF YOU’RE LOOKING TO START SMALL WITH YOUR GARDENING ACTIVITIES THIS YEAR, MATTHEW WILLIAM HARRIS HAS THE IDEAL PROJECT FOR YOU…

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he start of spring and re-emergence of the sun has us excited for the new season’s harvests, and getting some much-missed colour back onto our plates, writes Michael William Harris. Prime time to get growing then, eh? Thing is, those April showers put a bit of a dampener on spending time in the garden. Chances are, you don’t really fancy going outside and double digging the vegetable patch, because you know how it will pan out if you do. You’ll start by haplessly hopping around the kitchen trying to wrestle into your waterproof trousers, then embrace the elements for all of 10 minutes before deciding that you’ve done enough to reward yourself with a brew. And, before you know it, that’s it for the day. It might not even be the inconvenient showers inhibiting your horticultural exercises, either; perhaps, like so many city dwellers, you don’t have a garden to get out in. Regardless of the excuses, it’s time to flex those green fingers and get growing – because you can do it indoors. Now, I’m not talking about turfing out all your living room furniture to establish an allotment where the sofa used to be (as fun as that sounds); instead, make good use of all those window ledges throughout your home by creating your very own microgreen farm. You’ve probably encountered these little green shoots sitting on top of a rather colourful ’slaw from your local deli, or maybe hanging out in Whole Foods, asking the question, what the heck am I? A microgreen is a very young edible plant – most 1 Find a south-facing window with often a vegetable or herb – harvested plenty of sunlight. when it is about an inch to an inch2 Place an inch of potting soil in the and-a-half long, including the stem bottom of a shallow tray or planter, and leaves. Not only do these little smoothing it out to make sure it’s as sprouts add colour to a dish, but also even as possible. interesting subtle flavours – not to 3 Scatter the seeds over the surface mention a good boost of nutrition. of the soil evenly. Tip: soaking the And it gets better: they’re super seeds overnight before this step will easy to grow. First, gather a few choice speed up sprouting time, but make it packs of seeds – literally any edible more difficult to scatter them. plant will work, but some popular 4 Cover the seeds with a think layer varieties to use for this include basil, of soil and spray the surface with beets, broccoli, cabbage, celery, water (I use an old bottle with a chard, chervil, kale, kohlrabi, pak misting spray top). choi, mustard, parsley, peas, radish, rocket and sorrel. You’re certainly not 5 Mist the seeds a couple of times a day. You want to keep the soil limited to these though, so go crazy. evenly moist while waiting for the For newcomers to the garden(ing) seeds to germinate. party, I recommend going with pea shoots; their muted sweet pea flavours 6 The greens will usually be ready are amazing in salads and soups. to harvest in two to four weeks, Grab the Dwarf Gray Sugar Snap Pea depending on the type of seed used. Simply cut as close to the soil seed variety. as you can with a pair of scissors. You’ll also need a shallow tray and Some might even regrow. some soil...

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7 Eat. Repeat.

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Visit us: www.thegardenuk.co.uk Follow us: /thegardentrowbridge /thegardenchippenham


A FT E RS NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

Highlights

WHEN IN ROME

Or, indeed, Bristol – Romanesca is doing as the Romans do when it comes to pizza Page 76

WON’T DO NO ’ARM In fact, a trip to the Rudloe Arms might do you a lot of good Page 78

ALRIGHT ’BAB?

Sunshine scran on a dull day at the colourful Bambalan Page 80

We’re gearing up to make the most of Bambalan’s ace roof terrace this summer...

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Af ters

(NEIGHBOURHOOD NEWBIES)

ROMANESCA

THIS NEW PIZZA PLACE HAS FOUND ITS FEET PRETTY SHARPISH, RECKONS JESSICA CARTER

“Y

ou know what we’re lacking in this city? Pizza joints” – words no Bristolian has uttered since at least 2013. In fact, both Bristol and Bath are flooded with the Italian staple. That said, we don’t hear anyone moaning that there’s too many of ’em, either – they’ve each got their own style and a different vibe, meaning

the scene is far from repetitive. From the dough to the toppings, the cooking methods to the restaurant style, no two pizzerias do it the same, meaning our patch has all bases (ahem) covered. And that is even truer now that we have Romanesca on Gloucester Road. You see, when it comes to pizza, it’s not all about Naples. That puffy, doughy base, with its thick, bubbly crust and less-is-

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more rule when it comes to toppings is but one way of doing things – it sure isn’t the only way. This was owner Greg Hyne’s realisation, when he decided to open his own pizza restaurant. No one was doing as the Romans do – and he felt this was quite the oversight. A keen amateur baker who’s been working with sourdough for around 20 years, Greg left his office-based job to open his first restaurant, launching Romanesca at the very end of 2016. It took a year’s worth of recipe development and fermentation experiments to get the perfect Romanstyle sourdough base: light and airy, but crisp and firm enough to hold a decent amount of toppings. Greg makes all the bases himself, working a day in advance so he can retard the dough, allowing it to develop extra flavour. Then it’s baked in a hot electric oven for five or six minutes, not being suited to a 90-second blast in a wood-fired oven, Naples style. Romanesca is housed in a former Chinese takeaway, which had been empty for some months before being taken over. As part of its makeover, it had some proper Bristolian street art treatment; a mural on the back walls combines landmarks from both Rome and Bristol to form a flying phoenix. The menu is pretty straightforward; a handful of good-value starters (all around a fiver) give you the option to try the kitchen’s take on fresh Italian dishes, and then lead into the main event of pizza. Lots of the ingredients come from an Italian deli close to where Greg lives, meaning that much of what the kitchen’s working with has come from Italy. To start was the burratina (£5.25). The fresh, creamy cheese – topped with chopped basil – oozed happily when it was sliced into, and came with rich dried tomatoes, spicy nduja and slices of crisp, bubbly sourdough. Those fresh flavours had Italy written through them like a stick of rock. The freschella (£4.95) saw soft, crumbly cheese drizzed with olive oil and served alongside little balsamic onions, good quality olives and – yes! – more sourdough. And so to the pizza. The signature Romanesca (£13) is a white pizza – i.e.

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sans tomato sauce – with roasted baby plum tomatoes dotted among the melted fior di latte and Gorgonzola cheeses. The juicy, skinless toms burst in the mouth with rich, sweet flavour. Salty anchovies provided plenty of punch, and soft nduja a gentle spice. The Rosa (£13), named after the Nepalese cook who makes some of the toppings, came wearing the classic tomato mozzarella and basil, as well as Italian sausage and friarielli – tender leafy greens. The Cavalo Nero (£13) proved itself to be an ace veggie option, with hunks of sweet, earthy beetroot and caramelised onion balanced by creamy freschella cheese. The lack of tomato sauce means you can appreciate those delicate flavours. The Sicilianish (£13) is a good pescatarian choice, pokey with capers and soft, melting anchovy fillets.

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Romanesca offers take away too, and you can order your grub for delivery via Deliveroo. And, thanks to their Romanstyle bases, I imagine these guys might travel even better than their Nepalese cousins. (That’s based not only on the fact that they’re served as street food in Rome, and so are made specifically to be taken away, but also the current condition of last night’s leftover slices, which I’m happily chewing on right now.) As a first venture from someone with no professional food background, we’re rather impressed with this place, and keen to see how it’s going to progress and develop over time.

✱ ROMANESCA, 365 Gloucester Road, Bristol BS7 8TN; 0117 329 5990; romanesca.co.uk


Af ters

(RESURGENT HOTELS)

RUDLOE ARMS THEY SAY YOU SHOULDN’T HAVE A FAVOURITE CHILD, SAYS JESSICA CARTER, BUT – OF ALL HIS EMPIRE – THIS PLACE CLEARLY HOLDS THE LION’S SHARE OF MARCO PIERRE WHITE’S AFFECTIONS

A

lthough this hotel has been under Marco Pierre White’s reign for some years, it’s recently become a bit of a talking point. You see, Marco – whose name is put to countless venues across the UK – has become particularly taken with this specific estate. Sat in 14 acres of rural grounds – which encompasses preened gardens, wild woodland, and a smallholding – this historic building has been receiving a lot of love. Lost time being more than made up for (it’s not had much attention for a while; in fact, it’s quite understandable

if you’ve not heard of it before now), it’s had the works; the restoration project has been vast and impressive, with attention paid to the most minor of details. The aim is to bring the building back to what it once was, opening up old doorways, reinstating former layouts, and exposing hidden features. Even cobbled floors are being laid outside by hand in the traditional manner. That’s not to say this hotel is heading down the well-trodden path of classic English country manor, mind. The inside is fun and eclectic, full of bright spaces, darker, moody rooms, countless works of

78

art from Marco’s collection, and kooky artifacts. Really, you could be forgiven for mistaking the entire venue as the home of an art exhibition. We begin with a drink in one of the lounges. The afternoon sun streamed in to cast yellow-orange patterns on the retro photographs on the opposite wall and light up the golden stag (yep, golden stag – standard) that stood on the table. Then it was a stroll around the smallholding to spot the pigs and admire the old shepherd’s huts. The restaurant has some sort of medieval feel to it, with its stone floors,

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wooden ceiling, red velvet seating and tall gold candlesticks. As with the rest of the hotel, though, the old has been mixed with the new: more modern marble tabletops lighten the space, and contemporary art covers almost every inch of each wall – a couple of Damien Hirsts even looked out over us while we ate dinner. Y’know, casual. Young head chef Phil Bayliss arrived here from Pierre Koffmann’s kitchen in London (the Big Smoke to Corsham – quite the change of scene, no?) to take the culinary helm. Marco has, of course, long since washed his hands of professional cookery, but his ideas and experience feed into the work of the kitchen team. Phil’s menu is classic and – just as you’d expect – has strong French roots, although it is pleasingly accessible; it’s almost Ivy-like in its balance of comfort and elegance. Our first course came in the form of snail ravioli (£8.50). Delicately thin pasta encased each earthy, meaty snail, which sat in a vivid green, herby persillade sauce, punchy with garlic. That lot was crowned by French cured ham. There was also calamari tagliatelle (£8.50), which saw ribbons of calamari, precisely cooked with just the right amount of bite, topped with a tomato ragu. The seafood was fresh and the ragu not too overpowering for those delicate strips of flesh. Main courses followed suit. These guys sure know how to nail a shepherd’s

pie (£17.50); the finely minced meat was really well cooked (soft, chewy mince does not my perfect pie make), giving the filling a pleasingly crumbly texture to go with its rich flavour. Meanwhile, the sea bass (£17.50) took the form of a fat, juicy hunk of wild Cornish bass, the plump flesh accompanied by a delicate mousseline sauce, gentle enough in flavour and light enough in texture to allow the fish to speak over it. Dessert (all £7.50) wasn’t something we were about to pass up; not with the likes of rice pudding and baba au kirsch

among the choices. The former was sweet with vanilla and came topped with Armagnac prunes, while the latter involved a light sponge saturated in kirsch syrup (what’s not to like?). The kooky Rudloe Arms is designed to encourage its guests to stop and smell the roses – by which I mean admire the views, stroll around the 14 acres of land, take in the huge and varied collection of art, or enjoy three courses of classic, comforting food. We’d recommend doing as much of the above as possible while you’re there, too. ✱ RUDLOE ARMS, Leafy Lane, Corsham, Wiltshire SN13 0PA; 01225 810 555; rudloearms.com

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Af ters

( feature )

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here was quite a lot of excitement when this bar and restaurant launched last year. Yes, partly because it comes from the guys behind The Ox and Pata Negra, meaning we had high hopes for the food and cocktail offering, but partly because it opened at the beginning of summer and just so happens to be up in Colston Tower, sporting a pretty ace roof terrace looking over Broad Quay. Said terrace became a popular go-to whenever the sun made an appearance that summer. We had rather different priorities when we returned in March, though; namely staying well and truly inside (spring had yet to, er, spring), and warming up with some hearty grub that made us think of far more exotic climes. The food here is positioned pretty nicely in the Mediterranean Sea – not literally, obvs – by which I mean the menu touches upon all those North African, Middle Eastern and Southern European countries that border the water. Think mezze plates (£5 each), flatbreads with dips (£4) and kebabs (£9). Speaking of which, the good-value lunch offer sees kebabs with chicken and za’atar, and flafel and hummus, priced at a fiver between 12pm and 2pm. Drinks include local brews, mainly from Wild Beer (I had me a Bibble), as

(HIP HANGOUTS)

BAMBALAN

SHE DIDN’T GET TO MAKE USE OF THE ROOF TERRACE, BUT JESSICA CARTER THOUGHT IT WAS PLENTY SUNNY ENOUGH INSIDE THIS CENTRAL BRISTOL RESTAURANT 80

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well as wines, cocktails, and hot bevs, including chai. Inside, the casual drinking and dining area pops with bright colours, making you feel like you’re somewhere altogether more fanciful than above a crater-ridden city centre, teeming as it was at the time with drills, hard hats and orange cones. Raw wood, painted metal, plenty of greenery and mismatched retro furniture, combined with floor-to-ceiling windows, make for a bright, fun space, which enhances the restaurant’s cool, casual vibe. It was a cheery venue for lunch on a particularly miserable, grey day. We planted ourselves on retro schoolstyle chairs in a bright spot next to the window. A couple of those mezze dishes made good starters: the first was discs of grilled aubergine, sporting lovely

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charred edges, topped with super-creamy goat’s curd and thin curls of crisp onion. A dressing of date syrup balanced the slightly bitter aubergine and kick of chilli with its moreish sweetness. The rotisserie celeriac, meanwhile, had a dark, pleasingly caramelised outer, and came with a fiery green harissa and cooling bed of labneh. Good stuff. Mains came from the ‘grill’ section of the menu. The wheel of rolled charcoalroasted lamb (£14) had a crisp coating and tender inner, the fat having softened and melted into the meat during its time on the rotisserie. It came with a nicely thick and chunky muhammara (pepper dip), hot with spice, and a dollop of extinguishing tahini. Meanwhile, the Imam Bayildi (£12) saw half an aubergine loaded with spicy tomato and topped with generous crumbs of salty feta. Baba ganoush and a tangy garlic yoghurt bulked this confident meat-free dish out further. Both the lamb and the aubergine came with fresh fattoush and a gently spiced mix of rice and peas. In the spirit of being greedy, we threw an extra side dish into the mix: the salad of radish, apple, fig, walnut and feta

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(£4.50) sounded too good to ignore. The mixture of flavours (earthy, sweet, salty, fresh) and textures made it a hit. To finish? A baklava sundae (£5.50) and slice of chestnut cake (£6). The soft, warm sponge of the latter had a gentle spice to it, and sat alongside slices of sweet poached pear and a pool of caramel sauce. In the sundae, meanwhile, sandwiched between layers of silky ice cream were chunks of chewy baklava, all topped with crushed pistachios and pomegranate seeds. This relaxed bar and restaurant is a great informal hangout, with plenty of space for groups. And, if you’re eating before a visit to the Colston Hall just opposite, you can even grab 20 per cent off your food bill by showing your tickets. Just keep your eye on the time if you are; it’s easy to lose track of it here. ✱ BAMBALAN, Colston Tower, Colston Avenue, Bristol BS1 4XE; 0117 922 1880; bambalan.co.uk


Little black book

THIS IS ANNA RALPH, CAFÉ MANAGER AT WINDMILL HILL CITY FARM, AND THESE PLACES ARE WHERE SHE LIKES TO GET HER FOODIE FIX WHEN SHE’S OUT AND ABOUT… BREAKFAST?

WITH THE FAMILY?

Souk Kitchen’s shakshuka with extra feta and merguez sausage is a proper morning treat. It’s even better if I get to eat it without three kids in tow, for optimum enjoyment – and digestion!

When family visit, we nearly always take them to The Famous Royal Navy Volunteer on King Street. The staff are really welcoming, the food is great and there’s a chess board and backgammon which keeps the younger ones busy while we catch up.

QUICK PINT?

Quick!

Now add this little lot to your contacts book Souk Kitchen, Bristol BS3 1JP; soukitchen.co.uk Yurt Lush, Bristol BS1 6QH; eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk/yurtlush Flow, Bristol BS1 3LN; flowbristol.co.uk Birch, Bristol BS3 1QS; birchbristol.co Falafel King, Bristol BS1 4DJ; falafelkingbristol.com Kate’s Kitchen at Arnos Vale, Bristol BS4 3EW; kateskitchenbristol.co.uk Feast with a Chef; clarehargreaves.co.uk/feast-with-a-chef Lido, Bristol BS8 2JB; lidobristol.com Famous Royal Navy Volunteer, Bristol BS1 4EF; navyvolunteer.co.uk Bocabar, Bristol BS4 3EH; bristol.bocabar.co.uk Windmill Hill City Farm, Bristol BS3 4EA; windmillhillcityfarm.org.uk Al’s Tikka Grill, Bristol BS3 2EG; alstikkagrill.com Pizza Workshop, Bristol BS3 1JD; pizzaworkshop.co.uk Mark’s Bread, Bristol BS3 1JU; marksbread.co.uk Rare Butchers, Bristol BS3 1JD; facebook.com/RareMeatButchersofSouthville The Fish Shop, Bristol BS3 1JA; lovethefishshop.co.uk Southville Deli, Bristol BS3 1JA; southvilledeli.com Ashton Fruit Shop, Bristol BS3 1JN Corks of North Street, Bristol BS3 1ES; corksofbristol.com

Yurt Lush is perfectly placed to meet friends after work. It’s a short walk from the farm, and convenient for meeting people coming off the train. It’s so cosy that a quick pint (or glass of wine) turns into a late night quite easily. POSH NOSH?

I love the food at Flow. I’m not sure I’d call it posh, but it feels special, and the service there is perfect. I love Birch too. Unpretentious, but really exceptional. FOOD ON THE GO?

Has to be Falafel King in the city centre. It’s a bargain for a very generous portion, and absolutely delicious. ALFRESCO FEASTING?

I really enjoy taking the kids to Arnos Vale for a walk and a bit of history, and now Kate’s Kitchen has taken over the café there it’s a lovely place for a cake and a coffee, too. HIDDEN GEM?

I’ve been to a few Feast with a Chef events at Long Ashton Village Hall, and they’re always great. You eat at two long tables, and the atmosphere is really sociable. We’ve been cooked for there by the likes of Ramael Scully from NOPI. WITH FRIENDS?

Definitely the Lido. I had a very memorable birthday treat here when a lovely friend took me for a spa day, with tapas and cocktails for lunch, and lobster for dinner. I’d definitely do that every weekend if I could!

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CHILD FRIENDLY?

That’s us! Our café at Windmill Hill City Farm has won awards for being so family friendly, which we’re very proud of. My own kids always have a good time at Bocabar too; they serve lovely pizzas and it’s got a nice laid-back atmosphere. BEST CURRY?

If I get a takeaway it’s always Al’s Tikka Grill on Ashton Road. I’ve tried others, but always come back to this one. Their tarka dal is delicious with a chilli naan.  PRE-THEATRE FEED?

Pizza Workshop on North Street has a great choice of wines and is convenient for the Tobacco Factory Theatre. FAVOURITE GROCERY SHOP?

I’m going to cheat a bit here, and say the whole of North Street in Southville. It’s on my way home from work, and is home to Mark’s Bread, Rare Butchers, The Fish Shop, Southville Deli and Ashton Fruit, which covers most of my family’s needs. BEST WINE MERCHANT? 

Corks – also on North Street! It’s great for something special, but there’s good value to be found too, and the staff are always happy to recommend something if you’re not sure what you’re looking for. ✱ windmillhillcityfarm.org.uk

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