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CRUMBS Cotswolds NO.56 JULY 2017

ZING SIPS A M K A N I P DR FROM TOW S E CAL CR O L L L A IT IN!

A little slice of foodie heaven

His bark is worse than his bite!

My dog eats lots of garlic

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NO.56 JULY 2017

£3 WHERE

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KnOCK STA -OUt ACROSS ReCipe es THE COTSWOLDS FrOm th reGiOn’s best cOOks

PRETTY IN STINK

ACTION STAWTIYOOU CNASN! HO HELP FIGHT WORLD HUNGER

STINKY & PERKY!

KitChen cOnfidentiaL Behind the sCenes at Le ChampiGnOn SauvaGe

GARLIC MAKES US ED Y-TAIL BRIGHT-EYED & BUSHPAR TY,

OLD BOATHOUSE  ROYAL OAK  4 GREAT FAMILY DAYS OUT

BUT DRACULA ATE IT AT A AND IT NEARLY KILLED HIM

ANOTHER VICTIM OF BUFFET, THE VAMPIRE SLAYER


The pOwer OF CLOve IT CAN BE ALL TOO EASY to take garlic for granted. If you’re anything like us, then there’s barely a day goes by that you’re not peeling, slicing, chopping or crushing a clove or two, all in the name of everyday cookery. But we really shouldn’t take these bulbs for granted, because they’re little miracle workers at heart. Not only do they taste ace, but they offer all kinds of health benefits, too. And this is absolutely the right time of year to be giving garlic some extra love, because it’s bang in season, and just ready and waiting to be used in its absolute freshest form. Go gentle with it, though – both in how much you use, and how you treat it. Go overboard and the flavour can be overpowering (no-one’s a fan of garlic breath!), and over heat it can be a matter of moments between it being deliciously soft and aromatic, and turning black and bitter. Once you’ve gone too far there’s no turning back either, and you’ll have to start all over again – so treat it with the respect it deserves. Elsewhere in this issue we experience first-hand what life’s like in a Michelin-starred kitchen, celebrate some of the best places in the area to enjoy a breakfast of champions, take a closer look at some of the pretty awesome drinks producers we have locally, and explain how eating well can help to combat hunger crises around the world. So yeah, there’s quite a lot to get stuck into. Enjoy!

Emma Dance Editor emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk

Crumbs is now an app! Search ‘Crumbs’, or go to crumbsmag.com

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crumbsmag.com

EDITOR

EMMA DANCE emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR

MATT BIELBY matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk ART DIRECTOR

TREVOR GILHAM DESIGN

VICKY MITCHARD ADVERTISING MANAGER

DANIELLE MORRIS danielle.morris@mediaclash.co.uk SALES EXECUTIVE

RYAN GOODMAN ryan.goodman@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY PRODUCTION MANAGER

Table of Contents

KIRSTIE HOWE kirstie.howe@mediaclash.co.uk

STARTERS

PRODUCTION DESIGNER

8 HERO INGREDIENT We go gaga for garlic

DAWN GOOLD dawn.goold@mediaclash.co.uk JANE INGHAM jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk CHIEF EXECUTIVE

GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk

MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW; 01225 475800 www.mediaclash.co.uk large version

29 Chocolate fondant, by Andrew Scott 31 Vegan blueberry muffins, by Celia Duplock

11 OPENINGS ETC This month’s hottest foodie happenings

CHIEF EXECUTIVE

ADDITIONAL RECIPES

13 IN THE LARDER So much garlicky goodness

10 Roast cauliflower gnocchi with sheep’s cheese, crispy garlic and lemon, by Riverford

16 AWESOME FOURSOME Four fabulous family days out

18 Adhrar prawn curry, by Atul Kochar

MAINS 50 CHEERS! Drinks to sup on this summer 54 HUNGER PANGS How you can help take Action Against Hunger 57 MUNCH BRUNCH Top spots for a killer brekkie

AFTERS

34 Chilled cucumber and mint soup, by Kathy Slack

New & notable restaurants, cafés, bars

Amazing recipes from the region’s top kitchens

43 Pork and rabbit rillettes, by David Everitt-Matthias

62 The Old Boathouse 64 The Royal Oak

22 Baby artichoke and blue potato salad with black truffle, by Pasquale Russo

KITCHEN ARMOURY

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© All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. MediaClash reserves the right to reject any material and to edit such prior to publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; printer is certified to ISO 14001 environmental management. This month we loved sharing the Crumbs love, and meeting readers, at Cheltenham Food & Drink Festival.

NO.56 JULY 2017

CHEF!

24 Lemon meringue ice cream, from The Ox

38 COOKS WITH In the kitchen at Le Champignon Sauvage

26 Herbed cucumber and yoghurt salad with edible flowers, by Gaven Fuller

46 THE WANT LIST It’s a strawberry celebration

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PLUS

66 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Simon Thomson of Talking Wines shares a few of his favourite local haunts


START E RS INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

eAtiNG bee-AutIFuLLY Let’s face it, bees are pretty darn important. Around a third of our food is pollination dependant – and that’s where these little critters come in, as they buzz about transferring pollen from plant to plant. Don’t think that it’s just the fruits and veg that we eat directly that need the bee, though. It’s also the livestock that we eat, because the bees pollinate foraging crops, like field beans and clover, that cows, sheep and so on need to keep them going in turn. They’re vital, then. (And, of course, let’s not forget the rather delicious honey that they make, too.) So, in celebration of the bee – and the symbiotic relationship between gardens, pollinators and plates – the good folk at Daylesford Organic have put together a short book of delicious summery recipes featuring bee-friendly plants and honey, which you can download free at daylesford.com/working-with-bees/ Go get it, why don’t cha? You can also check out one of the recipes, by turning to page 26.

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S T A R T E R S

GarLI C

IT’S A LOVE-IT-OR-HATE IT FLAVOUR – AND A LOVE-IT-OR-LOATHE-IT SMELL. BUT GARLIC’S BENEFITS ARE VIRTUALLY ENDLESS, AND ITS USES DITTO. AND – HAPPY DAYS! – WE HAPPEN TO ADORE IT, TOO...

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ew dishes revolve entirely around garlic – garlic bread, perhaps – but not many aren’t improved by it either. This pungent allium – not actually a herb or a spice, though we treat it like one – is cousin to the onion and shallot, and a crucial part of Mediterranean and Asian cuisine. But it’s also a nutritious, versatile addition to a wide range of dishes. Healthy, tasty, intriguing – what’s not to love? Actually, for some people, quite a lot. Garlic’s overdone in modern cuisine, they say. It overpowers everything. And it

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smells revolting. And it’s true that this is a love-it-or-hate-it sort of food, though – used in moderation – many naysayers can be won around. And it would be in their best interests to allow the garlic in, too. Here’s why... For a start, garlic’s virtually calorie-free bulbs contain lots of good stuff, not least tons of vitamins C and B6, manganese, and a bunch of antioxidants, including selenium. It’s been seen as healthy since pre-history, and modern evidence would tend to back that up, suggesting it usefully combats everything from colds to some cancers (bowel and stomach most obviously),

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not to mention high blood pressure, poor circulation and high cholesterol levels – in doing so warding off strokes and heart attacks. Allicin, a sulphur compound that acts as garlic’s defence mechanism when attacked by pests, gives it both that distinct smell and many of its beneficial qualities. One of the oldest cultivated plants there is, garlic’s long been credited with keeping people fit and strong. Sanskrit records of 5,000 years ago reference it; Egyptian slaves are said to have been fed it to power their building of the pyramids; and it’s been used to combat everything from smallpox to gangrene, cholera to dysentery. Though making hard-and-fast claims for its cure-all qualities would be recklessly bold, there’s definitely something going on here – and as an appealing natural do-gooder it takes some beating. And anyway, there’s another benefit – perhaps the most important of all. Y’see, garlic’s strong flavour means we generally use less salt in any dish that contains it... But enough of this worthy stuff. What to do with it? Well, not many desserts use garlic, it’s true, but in flatbreads and focaccia it’s a dream; in stir-fries and salads, stews and curries, it’s a joy; and with everything from mushrooms to mussels, pork to prawns, avocado to anchovy, it pairs up a treat. Chicken, cheese, potatoes and pasta are particular pals. Oh, and tomato and garlic are all over each other. Fresh garlic season runs from June through the summer, though the dried stuff is available all year round – although this is complicated by the fact that the stuff we treat as ‘fresh’ has actually been dried too, in the sun. Though garlic is grown in

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the UK – mostly on the extreme southern edge, in places like Dorset – the bulk of it is imported from the South of France. We can use the bulbs – comprised, handily, of 10 or 20 pinkish-grey cloves, a bit like the segments of an orange, each encased in a papery white or purple skin – whole, chopped or crushed. For chopped garlic, take a clove, peel off the skin, then slice; for crushed, leave the skin on and smash it in a garlic press (some frown upon this, saying it gives a more bitter taste) or under the flat of a knife blade. Alternatively, you can pick up garlic purée, salt or granules, particularly good for spice rubs. Garlic is mild and creamy when cooked – slow oven-baking makes it very mellow – but fiery when raw; in general, the more finely you’ve smashed it up, and the smaller the bulb you’ve used, the stronger it will taste. Before we go, it would be remiss of us not to mention one other thing. Yes, we’re talking about that other evil that garlic traditionally combats: vampires. Rub garlic on your keyhole, put it on your windowsill, wear it around your neck, and the bloodsuckers dare not enter (werewolves and other nasties are similarly repulsed by it). Thank garlic’s superhero rep, perhaps, on the fact that its strong smell repulses many more familiar creatures, from bunnies to deer. Though Bram Stoker’s Dracula made this connection famous – Van Helsing seals a room from Drac using just the techniques referenced above – it’s actually a long-standing belief everywhere, from Romania to China, so perhaps there’s something in it. Indeed, garlic-loving Crumbs has never suffered a vampire attack. Just saying...

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R E C I P E

ROAST CAUlIfLOwer GNOCCHI WITH SHEEP’S CHEESE, CRISPY GARLIC AND LEMON SERVES 2

Don’t be put off by the inclusion of a whole bulb of garlic in this recipe from the vegtastic Riverford peeps. By poaching the cloves the pungent notes are mellowed, and the whole lot becomes sweet and soft. They can then be lightly browned in the pan until slightly crisp and chewy, a process that would render them bitter if cooked from raw. INGREDIENTS 1 whole garlic bulb 1 tbsp capers 1 small cauliflower light oil (e.g. sunflower or light olive) 30g parsley 150g sheep’s cheese 1 lemon 250g potato gnocchi 25g butter salt and pepper

METHOD 1 Preheat your oven to 220C/425F/gas mark 8. 2 Put a large pan of salted water on to boil. Break the garlic bulb into separate cloves. Peel each one but keep them whole. Pop them in the water and simmer them gently for 20 minutes. 3 Meanwhile, put the capers into a small bowl of cold water to help get rid of some of the salt. 4 Remove the leaves and central stalk from the cauliflower. Cut the head into small bitesized florets. Place the florets in a roasting tray, coat them well with some light oil and season with salt and pepper, then put in the oven to roast for 10-12 minutes or until coloured and just cooked. 5 While the cauliflower roasts, wash half of the parsley, shake it dry, pick off the leaves and finely chop them. 6 Coarsely grate the pack of sheep’s cheese.

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Zest and juice the lemon. 7 Check the garlic: it is ready when it gives easily to the tip of a knife. Remove it from the pan with a slotted spoon. Keep the water boiling, though. 8 Split the larger cloves into quarters, lengthways, and split the smaller ones in half. 9 Drop the gnocchi into the same water and boil for 3-4 minutes until they begin to float. Drain and keep to one side. Put the frying pan on to heat. Add the butter and let it begin to foam. Add the garlic and fry on a medium heat for 2 minutes, until starting to colour. 10 Add the gnocchi. Fry for a further 2 minutes. Add the cauliflower and capers, cook for 1 more minute. Add the sheep’s cheese, parsley and a dash of lemon juice. Toss everything together and check the seasoning. 11 Divide between two bowls and garnish with a sprinkle of lemon zest and a few turns of pepper. riverford.co.uk/recipes


S T A R T E R S

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instA FEED

@thebottleofsauce Lush woodfired pizzas from The Bottle of Sauce at Cheltenham Food & Drink Festival

CLUB TOGETHER

Our friends at Gluts & Gluttony have joined forces with the rather lovely Temple Guiting Tearoom for a series of supper clubs. The evenings begin with a seasonal cocktail and nibble, followed by a threecourse meal inspired by the harvests from their allotment and the Cotswolds landscape. They will also be talking about the food, so you’ll leave not only full, but maybe with a bit more knowledge as well. Double winner. Tickets cost £45, and the next one is on July 27. glutsandgluttony.com @daylesfordfarm New season UK grown carrots are in – and so full of both flavour and vital beta carotene

IN IT TO WIN IT

Big congrats to two Cotswolds hotels, which are celebrating after being given accolades in the latest round of AA inspections. Both Cotswold House Hotel in Chipping Campden and The Close Hotel in Tetbury have been rated as four-star establishments, and been given two rosettes for their delish foodie offerings. Good work, guys! bespokehotels.com/cotswoldhouse cotswold-inns-hotels.co.uk/the-close-hotel

IN THE DIARY...

(July 4) INDEPENDENCE DAY Celebrate American Independence Day at The Tavern In Cheltenham with a day-long extravaganza of Statesidestyle feasting. Think bourbon cocktails, boozy slushies, epic BBQ ribs, triple slider specials and honey bourbon wings galore; theluckyonion.com

VITAL WINES

Woodchester Valley Vineyard has scooped not one, not two, but three medals at the UK National Wine Awards. A gold medal was awarded to the Pinot Noir Rose 2016, a silver went to the Bacchus 2016, and a bronze to the Culver Hill 2016. The success is no mean feat when you consider that the awards are judged by a panel of real experts, including BBC1 Saturday Kitchen presenter Susie Barrie and wine writer Oz Clarke. Time to raise a celebratory glass, we think! Cheers! woodchestervalleyvineyard.co.uk

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(July 20) BREAD MAKING AT THYME Learn the secrets of sourdough and boost your bread making skills during this full day course at Thyme’s stunning cookery school. You’ll explore how to nurture the ferment that makes the ‘sour’ in sourdough, and make a specialty loaf with flavours from the garden and a sweet yeast bake. You can even add to the experience with a luxurious stay the night before (or after) with the Cook and Stay mid-week offer; thyme.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

Ask the Events Manager Who knows the menu best? Who makes the greatest impact on your experience? Who knows the venue Front-of-house and the menu inside out? Who knows how to make your is your friend! party go with a bang? The events manager is your friend!

Party time

SAY HELLO TO RYAN DEAN, EVENTS MANAGER AT COTSWOLD FOOD CLUB’S THE OLD LODGE Hi there, Ryan! So, how long have you worked The Old Lodge? I’ve been here for about 18 months now. And where did you work before? The mainstay of my career has been working for The Calcot Collection [owners of Calcot, Barnsley House et al], so at this point I know the Cotswolds very well! What sort of events do you arrange at The Old Lodge? We’ve hosted weddings, christenings, anniversaries, wakes, birthdays, staff parties, Christmas shindigs… Basically, we can do anything you want! What’s the best thing part of your job? In events you never get the same day twice – each wedding is unique, and that’s what’s so magical. The buzz you get from planning bespoke events, and seeing the smiles on your clients’ faces – knowing they have a day they’ll remember – makes the hard work behind the scenes so worthwhile. What’s the most challenging part of the job? Definitely the weather! We like to offer outdoor events, but that’s not always possible with the unpredictable British climate. It’s a challenge to juggle a back-up sometimes, but that’s part of the job. What skills have you learnt since coming here? As we offer many different events, your skills have to adapt to the occasion; some events can be more informal than others, while some require you to show a more compassionate side. What are the most popular dishes you serve? A current favourite for this year’s bookings is pan fried fillet of sea bass with red peppers, French beans, crushed new potatoes and salsa verde. Next year we seem to have a lot of events with barbecues and more casual dining. What are the bestselling drinks? I have to say, Aperol Spritz is hugely popular right now.

What’s the most unusual request you’ve ever had? At one wedding the groom wanted to arrive by helicopter – not an everyday request, but something that was achievable, given our location. If you were a customer, what would you order at The Old Lodge? It has to be a large G&T made with Monkey 47 gin, FeverTree tonic, loads of ice, and garnished with blood orange. Perfect! What do you think makes great customer service? Getting to know the customer, spending time with them, and making sure you give them what they want. We always aim to offer a unique experience, and it’s important to make guests feel that we genuinely want to cater to their needs. Finally, what makes Cotswold Food Club events special? The company has a ‘can do’ attitude, so we work as hard as possible to live up to that. The Old Lodge has a unique location, in the middle of common land overlooking the valley, and the environment is very relaxed, which helps give a great experience. food-club.com

Have you noticed a change in the sort of dishes people are requesting? More parties are looking for menus that suit different allergens, and the good thing about what we offer is that most menus are bespoke, so we can adapt to everyone’s needs.

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THIS COULD BE YOU! Contact emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk


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GOrGinG On GArLiC IT MIGHT BE A BIT OF A STINKER, BUT WE LOVE IT!

1 SALT SELLER Cornish Sea Salt Garlic Sea Salt, £2.60/55g The beauty of this flavoured salt is in its simplicity. Garlic bulbs are slow roasted, then added to flakes of Cornish sea salt to create a seasoning that’s full of mellow sweetness. Just a pinch and a scrunch is all it takes to release the gorgeous garlicky flavours. Easy! It’s available from Broadway Deli, or online. cornishseasalt.co.uk 2 MAYO, MAYO Daylesford Organic Garlic Mayonnaise, £2.49/160g We love the subtle garlic flavour with just a hint of lemon in this light and creamy mayo. Slather it on sandwiches, use it to pimp up

a salad, or simply dip your chips in it – basically, it should be your go-to condiment of choice this summer! Get it from Daylesford Organic farm shop, or online. daylesford.com 3 STRIKING GOLD Cotswold Gold Garlic Infusion, £4.95/250ml We’re long time fans of Cotswold Gold rapeseed oil, which is made right here in Broadway, but at the moment we’re properly diggin’ this version: the Garlic Infusion. The oil is cold pressed, and then naturally infused, and can be used to give a fresh dimension to your food through dressings, marinades, roasting, frying, baking…. Pretty much anything you can think of! And,

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if you’re feeling extra creative, you could even try blending it with one of the six other flavours available! Pick some up at Roots & Fruits or The Cheese Works in Cheltenham, or order online. cotswoldgold.co.uk 4 SPIRIT LEVEL The Garlic Farm Garlic Vodka, £19.95/20cl Garlic and vodka might not be the most obvious combo, but the garlic-loving chaps and chapesses at The Garlic Farm on the Isle of Wight have somehow made it work. They’ve used heat-aged black garlic to create a dramatic black vodka with sweet liquorice and caramel tones and a great garlicky kick. It makes a kick-ass Bloody Mary,

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but is also surprisingly good in an Espresso Martini, too! Find it at Teddington Stores or The Daffodil in Cheltenham, or go online for more stockists. thegarlicfarm.co.uk 5 SAY CHEESE! Sharpham Rustic Chive and Garlic Cheese, £7/450g Garlic and cheese make perfect bedfellows, as this cheese proves! A semi-hard cheese made with Jersey cow milk, it has a real savoury depth of flavour, with the fresh puréed garlic really complementing the creamy character of the cheese. Needless to say, we’re big fans. For stockists, or to order online, visit the Sharpham website. sharpham.com


Welcome to The Royal Oak Come for a glass of wine and relax in the library or enjoy your freshly prepared food in our historic restaurant, featuring a medieval well. We offer private dining for large groups for that special occasion Our experienced Chef and his team are passionate about cooking for you. We promote creativity in the kitchen, where our Chef Chris will express this through regular menu changes and interesting ‘Specials’. We pride ourselves on using traceable, locally sourced produce, prepared to an exceptional standard. Our exceptional food is complimented by our extensive range of Wine, Champagne, and Gin. Hosting a range of local Real Ales, Lager and Cider with regular Guest Ales available. Booking advisable to avoid disappointment.

Cromhall, Gloucestershire, GL12 8AD goodtimes@theroyaloakcromhall.co.uk

w w w. t he ro y a l o a k cro m h a l l . co . u k | 01454 430993


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Awesome Foursome daYTRiPPer

IT’S THE SCHOOL HOLS, SO CHECK OUT ONE OF THESE ACE DAYS OUT (THAT THE WHOLE FAMILY WILL ENJOY) COTSWOLD FARM PARK

TADSTOCK

With beautiful countryside views and interactive animal encounters at every turn, visitors of all ages can learn about farming – past and present – in a relaxed and fun environment at Cotswold Farm Park. The park is now run by farmer and TV presenter Adam Henson, but was first opened by his father, Joe, in 1971. It’s now home to more than 50 breeds of farm animal, with daily bottle feeding, demonstrations, and tractor and trailer rides around the farm, alongside lots of play opportunities. A new animal barn is due to open this summer. There’s something for everyone, then, but children in particular will love the extra ‘summer of adventure’ activities over the school holidays. Check the website before your visit to see what’s on, and pre-book online for discounted tickets. Adam Henson’s Cotswold Farm Park, Cotswold Farm Park, Guiting Power, Cheltenham GL54 5UG; cotswoldfarmpark.co.uk

Set in the heart of the Cotswolds (between Burford and Lechlade), and powered by solar energy – unusual! – Tadstock will take place on the weekend running Friday, August 25 to Sunday, August 28. There will be a number of bands and musicians performing at the festival, including Other Animals and Troy Ellis & The King Soloman Band. When it comes to food, there’ll be plenty to enjoy here too, including delicious (and locally sourced) vegetarian food provided by Tracy Sadler from Raw Happy. Sally Tivey will be bringing along her recycled and refurbished classic Citroen HY van, named ‘Agatha’, from which she sells a range of treats, and Vinnie & Anya will once again provide their ever popular ‘alternative bar.’ To find out more about Tadstock, and to take advantage of the early bird discount offers on tickets, please visit the website. Tadstock, Kencot Hill Farm GL7 3QY; tadstock.co.uk

NEW BREWERY ARTS

Brewery Arts has been championing craft in the Cotswolds since 1978, when the old Cirencester Brewery was converted into a vibrant space for craft with exhibitions, education workshops, on-site studios (where you can see craft being created and buy direct from the makers), and a thriving artisan café and craft shop offering unique one-off pieces. Open year-round, New Brewery Arts offers workshops and courses for both adults and children in a wide variety of crafts, and this summer there are week-long craft clubs and an exhibition looking at medieval and contemporary stone work. New Brewery Arts, Brewery Court, Cirencester GL7 1JH; newbreweryarts.co.uk

PAINSWICK ROCOCO GARDEN

Laid out in a hidden valley around Painswick House, the Rococo garden is now the country’s only complete surviving example. Designed in the 1740s as an English country gentleman’s pleasure garden, it’s still a fanciful place, ripe for riotous pleasure and romance. You can drink in the vista from the Eagle House, sit in the Doric seat, climb the narrow steps to the octagonal Pigeon House, have your photo taken in the Gothic Alcove, and battle to find the centre of the unusual maze. And, of course, enjoy delicious homemade food in the cosy cafe afterwards. The garden also makes a great spot for outdoor theatre, and over the August bank holiday weekend there will be performances of Alice in Wonderland and Three Men in a Boat.  Painswick Rococo Garden, Gloucester Road, Painswick, Gloucestershire GL6 6TH; rococogarden.org.uk

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CAFEÉ  ANTIQUES  VINTAGE HOMEWARE  GARDEN EVERYTHING YOU NEED UNDER ONE ROOF The Falcon commands the most wonderful position in the picturesque town of Painswick, known as “The Queen of the Cotswolds”.

BREAKFAST FROM 8:30AM MON-SAT & 10AM ON SUN

11 individual ensuite bedrooms. Restaurant open all day from 8am to 10pm for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Wonderful menus created by our chef, who uses fresh local ingredients where possible. A popular bar. Loved by locals and residents, serving a variety of beers, lagers and real ales.

Always a warm welcome FULL TETBURY BREAKFAST

THE FINEST COFFEE IN TOWN

LARGE VARIETY OF HOMEMADE CAKES

COUNTRY STYLE DINING IN THE HEART OF TETBURY

FRESHLY PREPARED LOCAL FOOD

FAMILIES WELCOME

53 LONG STREET, TETBURY, GL8 8AA CAFE 53 01666 502020  CAFE53.CO.UK DOMESTIC SCIENCE 01666 503667 WWW.DOMESTIC-SCIENCE-HOME.CO.UK FIND US ON FACEBOOK & TWITTER

NAILSWORT & TETBURYH

POP IN AND SEE US AT DOMESTIC SCIENCE WHERE WE OFFER HANDPICKED VINTAGE PIECES AND CONTEMPORARY HOMEWARES IDEAL FOR FABULOUS AND UNUSUAL PRESENTS

New Street, Painswick, Glos GL6 6UN Tel: 01452 814222 • info@falconpainswick.co.uk www.falconpainswick.co.uk


B O O K

O F

T H E

M O N T H

HOTLY ANTICIPATED DEBUTS AND BOOKS WE DIDN’T EVEN KNOW WE NEEDED; MARK TAYLOR HAS ROUNDED THEM ALL UP FOR US…

30 MINUTE CURRIES Atul Kochhar Absolute Press, £26

Indian chef Atul Kochhar may be best known for his Michelin-starred dishes, but this book shows readers how to create simple curries at home in just half an hour from start to finish – or in the same time it might take you to heat a ready meal curry in the oven. With stunning photos from Bristol-based photographer Mike Cooper, this collection of 90 recipes includes Kochhar’s trademark style of using the best British produce for fresh and modern Indian cuisine. From aubergine and lentil curry, and spiced potatoes and coconut, to chicken with coriander and spinach chutney, and Hyderabadi lamb curry, this is a book packed with vibrant, spicy dishes. Now cooking restaurant-quality curries at home will surely never be daunting again.

ANDHRA PRAWN CURRY Andhraiites typically eat fiery hot food, but this prawn curry packs a lot of flavours too! SERVES 4 INGREDIENTS

500g raw tiger prawns, peeled 6 green cardamom pods bunch of fresh coriander sprigs 2 tbsp vegetable oil 4 cloves 1 tsp fennel seeds 4 tbsp onion paste 4 tsp ground coriander 1 tsp red chilli powder, or to taste 125ml passata 250ml water METHOD

1 Remove and discard the prawn tails, if necessary. Lightly crush the cardamom pods to loosen the seeds. Rinse and chop enough coriander sprigs to make about 2 tbsp worth, and set aside a few sprigs for a garnish. 2 Heat the vegetable oil over a mediumhigh heat in a large sauté or frying pan.

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Add the cardamom pods and the seeds, the cloves and fennel seeds, and stir until the spices crackle. Add the onion paste and stir it into the oil for 30 seconds. Add the ground coriander, chilli powder and passata. Season with salt and stir for 30-60 seconds to cook the spices. The mixture will have a paste-like texture. Watch closely so the spices do not burn. 3 Add the chopped coriander, prawns and water. Bring to a simmering point, stirring for 30 seconds, or until the prawns turn pink. Adjust the seasoning with salt, if necessary. Garnish with coriander sprigs to serve. Atul’s time-saving tips: Buy raw prawns that have already been shelled, and this warming and satisfying curry will be on the table in less than 15 minutes. That’s quicker than the time it takes to heat the oven and cook a ready meal. If the prawns need thawing, however, put them in a large colander or sieve and run lukewarm water over them until they thaw.


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TABLE

Ryland Peters & Small, £19.99

Although there is no author credit for this book, a full list of contributors at the back includes a number of wellknown writers and chefs including Ursula Ferrigno, Jenny Linford, Ghillie Bassan and Matt Follas. These 150 summer recipes are divided into ‘snacks and plates to share’, ‘salads and summer soups’, ‘best-ever BBQ’, ‘sunshine lunches’, ‘al fresco’ and ‘desserts and drinks’, and they are all certain to provide plenty of inspiration for every occasion over the summer months. Highlights include squid, chorizo, feta and asparagus salad; orzo with courgette and tomato dressing; orange and apricot gelato; and panna cotta with rose petal syrup. This book is brimming with sunshine flavours and simple dishes ideal for al fresco meals this summer.

ON THE SIDE

THE LITTLE BOOK OF BRUNCH

Ed Smith Bloomsbury, £20

Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing Square Peg, £16

One of the most eagerly awaited cookbook debuts of the year, On The Side arrives with plenty of celebrity endorsements from the likes of Yotam Ottolenghi and Nigel Slater. Former lawyer Ed Smith retrained as a chef and is the author of highly regarded food blog Rocket & Squash. The book certainly lives up to all the hype, the simple premise being that Smith makes innovative side dishes the star of the meal. The 140 recipes are eloquently written and his methodical style recalls the likes of Simon Hopkinson. Chorizo roast potatoes; red wine, anise and orange lentils; black bean, coriander and lime rice; and sweet potato, celeriac and porcini bake are just a snapshot of why this is one of the most important cookbooks of 2017.

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Following The Cornershop Cookbook and The Little Book of Lunch, food writers and stylists Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing now turn their focus on the increasingly popular meal that is brunch. Brunch encapsulates everything a meal should be – easy, delicious and adaptable – and, according to the authors, it is still the most fun meal of all. From Middle Eastern shakshuka and Indian-style potato bhaji with chickpea chapatis to traditional English savouries like eggs Benedict and sausage and egg muffin, the 100 quick and easy-to-follow recipes cover the globe. And for those with a sweeter tooth, try the blueberry and rhubarb muffins or the porridge with rum-caramelised banana, perhaps washed down with a boozy marmalade Martini.

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PASTA SECRETS

Laura Santtini Ryland Peters & Small, £16.99

Just when you thought you had all the pasta recipes you could possibly need, along comes another book bursting with new ideas and twists on old favourites. Award-winning Italian writer and chef Laura Santtini has pulled together more than 70 recipes here, from authentic Italian classics to contemporary dishes for people leading busy lives but still looking for healthy eating. Santtini’s photographer husband Christoper Scholey has provided the beautiful images for the book; every page screams ‘cook me’ and ‘eat me’, from the creamy carbonara and spaghetti to the light and summery asparagus and peas with garganelli pasta, both of which are child-friendly. More grown-up dishes include a vodka-flavoured sauce with penne, and a super-healthy wholewheat fusilli with olive, anchovy and kale.


CH E F ! WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT, DIRECT FROM OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

When life gives you lemons.... make lemon meringue ice cream! Turn to page 24 for the recipe

H I G H L I G H T S

SPUD-U-LIKE

Indulge in a luxurious truffle-laced potato salad Page 22

COOL AS A CUCUMBER

A summer salad that’s light, refreshing, and oh-so-pretty Page 26

FOND OF FONDANT

Melty, chocolatey deliciousness Page 29

P L U S

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31 MUFFINS packed with blueberries and other good stuff CRUMBSMAG.COM


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Head chef Pasquale Russo oversees the kitchens serving the two restaurants at Chipping Campden’s luxurious Cotswold House Hotel. The Bistro on the Square offers an informal setting in which to enjoy sharing platters and tapas, while Fig Restaurant, recently awarded 2 AA Rosettes, encapsulates fine dining and enables the kitchen team to demonstrate their flair and imagination. The guys here take their inspiration from the generous local larder, and source ingredients from passionate producers based nearby.

BABY ARTICHOKE AND BLUE POTATO SALAD WITH BLACK TRUFFLE SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 1 sprig of thyme 1 sprig of mint 1 clove of garlic 1 glass of white wine sea salt 12 baby artichokes 8 small blue potatoes 200g Jerusalem artichokes, washed and peeled (keep 1 for crisps) 1 shallot, finely chopped 50g butter 275ml milk handful of shaved Parmesan cheese 1 small fresh black truffle 100g of rocket salad olive oil, to dress METHOD 1 Prepare a stock with 1 litre of water, along with the thyme, mint, garlic, wine and some sea salt. 2 Next, peel and trim the baby artichokes and scoop out the insides, before cooking them in the boiling stock for a minute, then turning the gas off and leaving them to cool in the liquid. 3 Boil the potatoes until cooked, drain and reserve for later. 4 Cut the Jerusalem artichokes (reserving one to make artichoke crisps), place them in the pan with the shallot and butter, and cook on a low heat until soft. Cover with the milk and keep cooking until the liquid has reduced by half. Blitz to a purée consistency and pass through a fine mesh, then keep warm. 5 Cut the baby artichokes into quarters and slice the potatoes finely. Then toss everything except the purée in a bowl, sprinkling with a bit of Parmesan, a few truffle shavings, some rocket, sea salt and olive oil. 6 Finally, slice the shaved Jerusalem artichoke with a mandolin lengthwise and fry in a hot oil until crispy. Sprinkle with salt and keep on a sheet of kitchen paper. 7 To serve, place a spoon of purée in the centre of the plate and arrange the salad in the middle. Top it with the remaining rocket and Parmesan. Shave more truffle on top, add a little more olive oil, and finish with the artichoke crisps.

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BLaCK & BLUe

BLACK TRUFFLE ADDS A LUXURY TOUCH TO THIS SUMMERY DISH BY PASQUALE RUSSO, HEAD CHEF AT COTSWOLD HOUSE HOTEL bespokehotels.com/cotswoldhouse

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C H E F !

iCe COOL THIS LIGHT AND ZESTY DESSERT FROM THE OX IN CHELTENHAM IS SURE TO BE A HIT ALL SUMMER LONG

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Tucked away in a basement on Cambray Place, The Ox Cheltenham is a bastion of excellent food and drink, and since opening in 2015 has fast built a reputation as purveyor of some of the best steak and cocktails in the Cotswolds. The menu comprises prime cuts of steak, all cooked to perfection in the famous Josper oven; beautiful small plates; delectable desserts; and one of the best Sunday roasts in town. The team at The Ox has shared this recipe for a stunning summery dessert.

LEMON MERINGUE ICE CREAM SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS For the lemon ice cream: 600ml double cream 600ml full fat milk zest of 2 lemons, peeled not grated 1 vanilla pod 220g caster sugar 12 egg yolks

METHOD To make the ice cream: 1 Heat the cream, milk and lemon zest until it’s just about to boil over, then take off the heat and leave to infuse for 1 hour. 2 Split the vanilla pod and scrape into large mixing bowl with sugar and egg yolks. Beat mixture until fully combined and pale in colour. 3 Heat the milk and cream mixture and pass through a sieve onto the egg yolk mixture, whisking as you go. 4 Return to a low heat and stir gently until it reaches 82C on a temperature probe. 5 Pass through a sieve into clean container and chill. Churn in an ice cream machine and leave in the freezer, ready to ripple.

For the meringue: 4 large egg whites, room temperature 115g caster sugar 115g icing sugar (Alternatively, just buy a packet from the shop!) For the lemon curd: zest and juice of 4 lemons 220g sugar 110g unsalted butter 3 whole eggs and 1 egg yolk

To make the meringue: 6 Pre-heat the oven to 100C/210F/gas mark ½. 7 Line a baking tray with parchment. 8 Put egg whites in clean non-plastic mixing bowl and beat with an electric whisk until stiff peaks form. Turn up the speed and add the caster sugar little by little, beating after each addition until the mixture is thick and glossy. 9 Sift the icing sugar, a little at a time, and gently fold into the mix. 10 Spoon the mixture onto the lined tray and bake for around one hour until crisp, then leave to cool. To make the lemon curd: 11 Put lemon juice, zest, sugar and butter in a metal bowl, set over a pan of simmering water. Heat until the butter is melted and the sugar has dissolved. 12 Beat the eggs and add to the mixture, then whisk gently until it is thick and custardy. 13 Pass through a sieve and leave in the fridge to chill. To ripple: 14 Put the ice cream in a bowl at room temperature until soft enough to work. Smash the meringue into it, and then about half the quantity of lemon curd as you have ice cream. Fold mix over only 2 or 3 times to achieve a ripple, then return to the freezer. theoxcheltenham.com

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SaLad days

THIS SUMMERY RECIPE BY DAYLESFORD ORGANIC CHEF GAVEN FULLER, WHICH FEATURES IN DAYLESFORD’S NEW ONLINE RECIPE BOOK, INCLUDES PLENTY OF PLANTS WHICH WILL DRAW BEES TO YOUR GARDEN… “Simple, light and utterly refreshing, this is truly a salad for summer,” says Gaven. “We like to use bee-friendly herbs and flowers as garnishes, so try chive flowers, borage, fennel tops or thyme. In the Daylesford market garden, we support our bees by growing flowering crops and allowing our salad brassicas to flower. Just as the bees rely on our efforts, we depend on their ability and hard work to pollinate our crops. By maintaining a growing diversity, we create a source of nectar to keep these valuable pollinators on site.”

HERBED CUCUMBER AND YOGHURT SALAD WITH EDIBLE FLOWERS SERVES 3-4 AS A SIDE DISH

INGREDIENTS For the salad: 1 large cucumber (roughly 500g), seeded, centre removed ½ red onion, peeled and finely sliced For the dressing: 100g organic natural yoghurt 2½ tbsps lemon juice ¼ tsp apple cider vinegar 1 tbsp dill, finely chopped 1 tbsp mint, finely chopped ¼ tsp salt generous twist of black pepper For the garnish: nigella seeds or freshly chopped chives edible flowers, such as chive tops, borage or fennel flowers METHOD 1 Slice (and peel if you wish) the cucumber on an angle into strips about 0.5cm thick. 2 Transfer the cucumber to a bowl with the red onion and toss together. 3 Put all of the ingredients for the dressing into a separate bowl and whisk thoroughly to combine. 4 Pour the dressing over the cucumber and toss until evenly coated. 5 Sprinkle with the nigella seeds and edible flowers before enjoying straight away. Serve with a bottle of chilled Lalonde from Château Léoube (Daylesford’s sister estate in France!) daylesford.com

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NORTH COTSWOLD CAMRA PUB OF THE YEAR, 2017 (RUNNER UP) Character Pub with stone walls and flagstone floors Casual Dining – Excellent food served all day Passionate about well kept ales Famous Inn located on the Fosse Way (A429) Stunning riverside garden – Al Fresco dining 9 beautiful en-suite bedrooms and two holiday cottages

01285 720721 Fossebridge | Cheltenham | GL54 3JS reservations@innatfossebridge.co.uk

www.fossebridgeinn.co.uk

Breakfast from 9:00am .................................... Lunch from 11:30am .................................... Selection cakes all day .................................... Friday evenings in the Cafe drinks from 6pm & dinner from 7pm

.................................... To book a table: 01386 701411 Bell Lane, Blockley, Moreton-in-Marsh . GL56 9BB

• Candlelit dinners in the garden • Terrific wines including Woodchester • Serving olives & Prosecco from 5pm www.theolivetree-nailsworth.com 28 George Street, Nailsworth, Gloucestershire, GL6 0AG 01453 834802


C H E F !

DarK matter DECADENT, DARK AND DELICIOUS, THIS CHOCOLATE FONDANT BY ANDREW SCOTT FROM SUDBURY HOUSE HOTEL IS A SUREFIRE WINNER

CHOCOLATE FONDANT MAKES 16

Andrew Scott has spent his entire career in Michelin-starred kitchens, training initially at Mallory Court, Lords of the Manor and L’Enclume. In 2014 he joined Sudbury House in Faringdon, Oxfordshire, as Executive Head Chef. This exciting project included the opening of Restaurant 56, a modern fine dining concept housed in the hotel's Grade II-listed building. Andrew and his team have put the restaurant on the culinary map by gaining 3 AA Rosettes in just 18 months, and winning Best Gastronomic Restaurant at the Oxfordshire Restaurant Awards for two years running. Alongside Restaurant 56, Andrew also oversees the Magnolia Brasserie, which was recently awarded 2 AA Rosettes. In 2016, Andrew achieved a life-long dream of taking part in the Great British Menu, representing the Central Region and winning a great many fans on his journey.

INGREDIENTS cocoa powder (enough to dust the insides of the moulds) 250g dark chocolate 250g butter (plus a little extra to line the moulds) 5 egg yolks 5 whole eggs 125g caster sugar 50g plain flour (sifted) METHOD 1 Preheat oven to 160C/325F/gas mark 3. 2 Line Ramekins or Dariole moulds with soft butter, and then coat with cocoa powder. Tap out any excess. 3 Melt chocolate and butter together over a bain-marie. 4 Whisk egg yolks, eggs and sugar with an electric mixer until they’re light and fluffy. 5 Fold the chocolate and butter mixture into the whisked egg and sugar. 6 Fold in the flour, being careful not to lose too much air from the mix. 7 Bake for 8-9 minutes. The centre should still look un-baked. 8 Allow to rest in the moulds for 1 minute. before turning out and serving with your favorite ice cream. Top Tip: These can be made in advance and stored in the fridge, even overnight. Just add an extra minute onto the cooking time. restaurant56.co.uk

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The Inn for All Seasons, is a former 16th century coaching inn set in the heart of the Cotswolds. A warm and friendly hotel with a relaxed bar and a renowned restaurant offering the best of British and local produce including the freshest ďŹ sh sourced directly from Devon and Cornwall. The Inn offers comfortable en-suite accommodation, free parking & dogs are welcome.

The Inn for All Seasons | Little Barrington | Burford | Oxfordshire | OX18 4TN T: 01451 844324 | W: www.theinnforallseasons.co.uk THE INN IS NOW OPEN 7 DAYS PER WEEK FROM 8AM – 10PM

THE

HAND AND SHEARS A warm welcome awaits in our family run pub. We are a small pub with a big heart. We offer light bites, lunch or dinner. And classic Sunday roasts.

eat, drink & relax Church Hanborough,Witney Oxfordshire OX29 8AB Telephone 01993 881392

www.handandshearswitney.co.uk


C H E F !

Berry niCe

MACROBIOTIC COOK AND COUNSELLOR CELIA DUPLOCK HAS SHARED THIS TASTY MUFFIN RECIPE Everyone enjoys a little cake from time to time, writes Celia, and here’s a healthy way to satisfy those sweet cravings naturally. Free from eggs, dairy and refined sugar, these delicious muffins are bursting with juicy blueberries and natural sweetness, making them a healthier option for all the family. Blueberries are amongst the most antioxidant rich foods in the world, and are high in vitamin C, vitamin K and manganese. Eating a portion of blueberries every day is reported to help reduce blood pressure and protect against heart disease. The wholewheat flour in this recipe helps to balance blood sugar levels due to its high fibre content, which is digested more slowly leaving you feeling satisfied for longer. It also contains more vitamins and minerals than white flour. The chestnut flour brings an additional sweetness to the muffins, and is also highly nutritious. For a gluten free option, try replacing the wholewheat flour with a mixture of quinoa and brown rice flour. Replacing refined sugar with natural sweeteners, such as maple syrup in cakes and desserts, helps to reduce the blood sugar spikes that can leave you feeling tired and lethargic. Eating too much of any sweet food will have a similar effect on the body, but using less processed alternatives will help to reduce the impact on your energy levels considerably. These muffins are quick and easy to make, and great for picnics and lunch boxes, or as a dessert, served warm with a fresh, summer berry coulis and a dollop of dairy free natural yoghurt. Celia is running a workshop on Cooking with Fermented Foods at the Organic Farm Shop in Cirencester on Wednesday, September 27. For macrobiotic consultations, food coaching, menu planning and cooking lessons, please contact Celia on 07831 342214 or enquiries@cotswold-macrobiotics.com; cotswold-macrobiotics.com

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VEGAN BLUEBERRY MUFFINS MAKES 6 LARGE MUFFINS

INGREDIENTS 150g of wholewheat flour 50g chestnut flour (replace with almond flour if unavailable) 1 tbsp baking powder (aluminum free) Âź tsp sea salt 1 tsp nutmeg zest of an orange 50ml light oil, such as ground nut or rapeseed 100ml maple syrup, date syrup or coconut blossom nectar 1 tsp vanilla extract 130ml soya or almond milk, or apple juice (add a little more if the mixture is too thick) 150g blueberries METHOD 1 Preheat oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. 2 Mix dry ingredients together. 3 Whisk wet ingredients and then add to the dry mixture. 4 Fold in blueberries with minimal strokes, so as not to activate gluten. 5 Transfer batter to paper muffin cups or tray, filling each one to near the brim. 6 Bake for 20-30 minutes until golden brown. 7 Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

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COOKING SCHOOL | VENUE HIRE | TEAM BUILDING University Survival - DOFE Gold residential cookery courses. 17+ Junior Chef Academy - baking, international, healthy eating.

www.foodworkscookeryschool.co.uk

01242 870538 | Colesbourne Park, Nr. Cheltenham, GL53 9NP

PLEASE QUOTE DISCOUNT CODE ‘TS17 CRM’ WHEN BOOKING


( adverti sing feature )

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THE DRINKS CABINET presented by The Craft Drink Co.

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3 Elderflower Infused Gin from Warner Edwards Only fresh handpicked elderflowers are used here. The petals are separated and added to batches of Warner Edwards’ Harrington Dry Gin and the result is a fabulous and subtle infusion which can be drunk neat or a in a delicate G&T.

6 Elderflower & Rose Pressé from Lovely Drinks This delicate twist on the English classic combines two great English floral flavours in one drink, resulting in what must be the most quintessential English fizz. Winner of two Gold Stars at the 2016 Great Taste Awards, and Silver in the Taste of the West Food Awards 2015

1 Elderflower Liqueur from Bramley & Gage Made in small batches with hand-picked elderflowers, this classic English country liqueur is so versatile. Enjoy as a long drink when mixed with a dry vermouth, soda water and ice, use in cocktails or mist over Bramley & Gage’s own 6 O’Clock Gin.

4 Elderflower Cordial from Nurses Cottage Few cordials match the intensity of this truly cottage creation. Lucy and Andrew Rowlett of Nurse’s Cottage Drinks having been picking wild elderflower on Bredon Hill for nearly 20 years, creating this exceptional cordial which forms the basis of all their pressés. An essential for any drinks cabinet.

7 Alederflower from Stroud Brewery Stroud Brewery is one of the UK's only entirely organic breweries. Alederflower is an English pale ale infused with organic elderflowers and hopped with organic Cascade and Nelson Sauvin hops.

2 Wild Elder Cider from Hogan’s Wild Elder is one of the ‘innovation blends’ developed by Hogan’s Cider. Delicately sweet hand-foraged elderflower is expertly blended with Hogan’s 100% fresh pressed cider. A naturally rural hedgerow aroma is followed by a brilliantly bittersweet English cider taste. Refreshing for hot summer days.

5 Bensons Elderflower & Apple Juice Light and delicious; seasonal British apple juice is gently infused with the fragrant elderflower to create a classically British drink reminiscent of long lazy summer days. It's 100% juice, Red Tractor accredited and made without any artificial colouring, flavourings or preservatives.

lderflower is surely the most perfect floral taste of England’s summer and features in many drinks. This year’s harvest should be completed by the end of June, resulting in a burst of elderflower essence from July onwards. Almost all elderflower is hand-picked, typically from hedgerow trees so we celebrate the foraged harvest of this quintessentially English ingredient with a selection of delicious elderflower drinks.

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The Craft Drink Co. is a speciality craft drinks distributor, supplying independent businesses with exceptional craft drinks sourced from makers across The Cotswolds and Central England region. For more information, please visit: craftdrink.co.uk


C H E F !

Veg Out

COOL as a CUCUmBEr

BLOGGER, PRIVATE CHEF AND KEEN KITCHEN GARDENER KATHY SLACK OF GLUTS & GLUTTONY TELLS YOU WHAT TO GROW AND HOW TO COOK IT. THIS MONTH, SHE’S CRAZY FOR CUCUMBERS… 34

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lanting six cucumber plants was, it turns out, excessive. No matter how much cucumber soup you intend to make. Indeed, I have been swamped by them for weeks now. Thriving as they do in warm, wet conditions, they’ve taken to this muggy early summer of ours like a duck to water – or should that be a cucurbit to the jungle? (No? Well, you’re probably right.) Mine are in the greenhouse, and I’ve grown Diva and  Iznik varieties this year. There’s some fiddliness about which varieties can be grown indoors versus outdoors and some additional, and related, complexities about which have all-female flowers and which have a mix of male and female. It’s all a step beyond my poor showing in school biology, but I’ve found the all-female varieties work wonderfully in greenhouses (presumably it’s a pollination thing) and require little care.  In fact, the only care I really give them, apart from water and feed, is pretty tough love. They are so vigorous that an almost bi-weekly hacking is required to remove extra vines that are intent on colonising the greenhouse. The cucumber, like most squashes, is a creeper so, left unchecked, it will send out as many runners as it can. The (old fogey) allotment books tell you to pinch out all but two of the vines and train them up a wire, but I’ve found that all the shoots bear fruit, and pruning is a matter of space management rather than crop maximisation. I tether a few to vertical stakes, but many ramble around the greenhouse and seem quite happy. Oh no, maximisation of harvest is not an issue at all. By my reckoning, last year each plant had produced roughly 20 cucumbers by the end of August, and they showed no sign of slowing down as September set in. But there is only so much Hendricks, cucumber and tonics a girl can drink (yes, even this one), so some have gone in the freezer for smoothies, and many have gone into making this chilled cucumber soup.

Kathy Slack host supper clubs and writes the food blog, Gluts & Gluttony, about the gluts she gets from her veg patch and the ensuing gluttony in the kitchen. Her next is on Saturday, July 8 at The Classic Motor Hub, Bibury where she’ll be celebrating the season’s harvest with a detour into the golden age of motoring. See glutsandgluttony.com/events for more, and follow Gluts & Gluttony on Twitter and Instagram @gluts_gluttony

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ROAST CHILLED CUCUMBER AND MINT SOUP SERVES 2

INGREDIENTS 4 cucumbers (roughly 4 inches long each) 1 clove garlic 4 tbsp plain yogurt salt ½ lemon handful mint, chopped METHOD 1 Peel two of the cucumbers and roughly chop them all. Some peel is good for colour, but too much makes for a grainy soup, which is not good! 2 Pop the cucumber in a blender together with a dash of water and the crushed garlic. A NutriBullet is ideal for this, as it gives a silky smooth finish, but you’ll need to do it in batches. 3 Tip the mixture into a large bowl. Add the yogurt and enough water to give the soup roughly the consistency of double cream. 4 Season well with salt, lemon juice and the chopped mint. It’s surprising how much salt this dish can take, and remember to over season as, once chilled, the flavours will be deadened. 5 Chill until needed, then serve with an ice-cube and a slice of cucumber.

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Big Bake Off, Small Clean Off. Miele’s New Discovery Ovens offer more space to occupy all your baking at one time. With PerfectClean or Pyrolytic models, scrubbing and abrasive cleaners are a thing of the past. Telescopic runners, intuitive controls and status display makes them precise and easy to use too. Miele Discovery Ovens from £599. Pop into our Evesham showroom to see one for yourself and plan your summer baking.

54 Cheltenham Road, Evesham, WR11 2JZ | 01386 76 59 59 www.thevalegroup.com | info@thevalegroup.com

www.cotswoldgrange.co.uk

t: 01242 515 119

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Choose your weapons

The BIG red One

KITCHENAIDS HAVE LONG SENT US WEAK AT THE KNEES. WE’D SELL OUR HOUSES FOR THEM. AND NOW THAT’S OKAY, SAYS MATT BIELBY, ’COS HERE’S ONE BIG ENOUGH TO LIVE IN… Blooming ’eck, that looks like a phone box! A little bit, yes, but thankfully without the broken widows, interesting literature, and, you know, less-thanpleasant smell. It’s actually a fridge, and a damn posh one. I know, I saw the writing on the handle. That means I won’t be able to afford it, right? Maybe yes, maybe no. KitchenAid’s new Artisan Fridge sells for £1,300, which isn’t cheap, but imagine all the oohs and ahh you’ll hear when green-eyed visitors spot it in your pantry. It comes in three of the most popular colours for KitchenAid’s iconic mixers – black, cream and this vibrant fella, Empire Red – and you can get it with the door opening to either side, so it’ll slot right in whatever your kitchen layout. These guys have been making mixers for almost 100 years, so they’ve taken their time branching out, haven’t they? In fairness, they’ve also been making kettles and coffee machines for a bit now, and even dishwashers and fridges, but this is the first time one of their major appliances has aped the distinctive look and feel of the mixers quite so closely. KitchenAid stand mixers as we know them were first introduced in the ’30s, designed by the celebrated Egmont Arens – one-time art editor of Vanity Fair magazine, and a lover of bright reds on much of what he designed, whether it was for Coca-Cola or Anheuser-Busch (makers of Budweiser) – and the style of this thing mirrors his aesthetic perfectly. It looks a bit basic, though. No, no, no! It’s big and sturdy, yes – very much so, with 221 litres capacity inside – but you’ll also find it bristling with up-to-date innovations, like a touch user interface, and a sophisticated temperature and air monitoring system. Plus, it has the very clever Fast Cool, which lowers the inside temperature immediately when you need it to (like, say, when you’ve just filled it with an Ocado delivery). Sounds good. And, unlike its street corner lookalike, I imagine it doesn’t smell of… you know. No, though occasionally it might reek of something worse. (You do know about my obsession with Stinking Bishop cheese, don’t you…?)

THIS MONTH • MICHELIN STARS • BERRY NICE • ON THE PASS

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The new KitchenAid Iconic Fridge costs £1,300. Find it at Obsidian in Cheltenham, or branches of Currys; kitchenaid.co.uk


C R U M B S

C O O K S

W I T H

WORDS: EMMA DANCE PHOTOGRAPHY: KIRSTIE YOUNG

STar i TUrN WHEN DAVID EVERITT-MATTHIAS SAID WE COULD JOIN THE BRIGADE AT LE CHAMPIGNON SAUVAGE FOR A DAY, WE JUST COULDN’T SAY NO! 38

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always knew that working in a professional kitchen is hard work. I’ve met enough chefs, done enough kitchen tours, and watched enough cooking shows to realise that the platefuls of deliciousness that I devour on a regular basis haven’t happened by magic. But, for me, it’s all too easy to get caught up in the moment and forget that the culinary masterpiece that has taken me a matter of minutes to eat is the result of hours, if not days or even weeks, of painstaking work to take it from just an idea to a complete dish. Or, at least, it was too easy. Because since spending a morning in the kitchen at the two-Michelin-starred Le Champignon Sauvage in Cheltenham, I have a whole new respect for chefs and the work they do. For a start, the hours they put in are, to anyone used to a nine to five job, bordering on the insane. When I rock up just before 9am, the six-strong kitchen team has already been hard at work for more than two hours. And it’s not like there’s any breaks, either. From the moment they start, until lunch service ends at around 2.30pm, there’s


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no let up. And even though for most of us that would be a day’s work in itself, they then have to come back in the evening to do it all again. Tough, no? But if any of the guys are tired or fed up it certainly doesn’t show, and there’s a really upbeat and relaxed atmosphere in the kitchen – something which I’m exceptionally glad about because, I’m not gonna lie, I’m pretty terrified about what’s about to happen. I mean, I can cook an’ all, but making dinner for my mates or a culinary-challenged husband is hardly the same thing as working for paying customers expecting one of the best meals of their lives. Plus, I’ve seen those episodes of MasterChef which start with amateur chefs being let loose in a kitchen and finish with a red-faced chef almost bursting with frustration when an interloper ruins yet another prize piece of turbot, or a plate gets returned because the guinea fowl is raw in the middle – and I have no desire to be that interloper. It’s almost as if David Everitt-Matthias (owner, head chef and the misguided individual who thinks that

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having me in his prestigious kitchen is going to be a good idea) has read my mind, as he offers plenty of reassurance as he introduces me to the team. “It’s a very relaxed kitchen,” he says. “There’s no shouting or screaming. Everyone knows what they’re doing and we all just get on with it. It’s nothing like you see on television!” I’m told I’m going to spend time with every member of the five-strong team, ensuring I get experience on every section, but, to my relief, we’re not prepping for that day’s service, but for test runs of new dishes that, if they’re good enough, will be on the next week’s menu.

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irst up, I’m working alongside Chris Monk making some parsley farfalle. We blanch the herb, blitz it, and add it to pasta dough, transforming it almost instantly from beige to a vibrant green. It needs time to rest, though, before it’s ready to work with, so in true Blue Peter fashion Chris produces a batch that he’d made earlier. We pass it through the pasta maker – me, very clumsily; him, infinitely more deftly – until we have silky sheets. It’s cut into ribbons and Chris shows me how to pinch it to create the bow shapes. I get to work and soon find a rhythm, and my shapes gradually become more uniform. I’m pretty pleased with myself, until I realise that Chris has made at least twice as many as me in the same amount of time. Clearly, I need more practice. It’s going to have to be at home, though, because David signals that it’s time for me to join him in jointing a leg of lamb.

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C R U M B S

“Women are usually good at butchery,” he tells me. But I fear that he’s going to be disappointed, because none of my previous attempts have ever suggested that I have any talent in this regard. Still, if David is getting frustrated at my efforts it doesn’t show, and he patiently guides me through the process as we bit-by-bit dismember the limb into its individual muscle groups. I suspect, though, I may have changed his mind about female knife skills… My next task is making wild garlic gnocchi with sous chef Yusuf Lovett. We begin by taking freshly baked potatoes, scooping out the insides and passing them through a sieve. “You always want to use baked potatoes for gnocchi,” Yusuf tells me. “If you boil them, they’ll be too wet.” That might be true, but handling the scalding spuds is no easy task. I’d heard that chefs have ‘asbestos fingers’ and it turned out to be absolutely true, as Yusuf barely seems to notice the heat, while my fingers are red and throbbing. We add flour and eggs and the wild garlic, then roll and slice the mixture to make the little pillows of gnocchi. Yusuf cooks one for me to taste and it’s delicious, full of the fresh tang of wild garlic, and I resolve to try to recreate it at home.

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C O O K S

W I T H


Over on the pastry section, I join Daniel Adkin who’s making beetroot meringue. I’m given instructions on exactly how much beetroot juice to add, while Daniel gets on with another task. I add fraction too much, but cross my fingers that it won’t ruin the recipe. But as we spread the mix onto trays ready to bake, it all seems to be going to plan and I breathe a mental sigh of relief. When David says it’s time to prepare for service I can hardly believe it – the hours have flown by. I’d been lulled into a sense of security, in the knowledge that nothing I had prepared that morning would be going out that day, so at least if there were any issues I wouldn’t have to witness them. But then David tells me that I’m going to help plate for service, and I can practically feel the blood draining from my face and all the earlier terror returns. I relax a little, though, as I help Adam Smith garnish the canapés using small dots of sauce to affix micro leaves to seaweed sponges. They look great, and I feel proud that I’ve had a (albeit very small) hand in it. As we wait for the orders to come in, David tells me about the work that’s been done in the kitchen over the years – the equipment that’s been replaced and upgraded, and where it’s been extended. It’s so compact, though, that it’s hard to believe that it was ever even smaller. The checks arrive and we start to dress plates, David directing me just how to place leaves and sauces to create the right effect. I’ve never taken so much care in putting food on a plate,

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C R U M B S

C O O K S

W I T H

PORK AND RABBIT RILLETTES SERVES 6-8

David Everitt-Matthias has shared this recipe, which is one of his favourites to cook at home. ”This is a lovely little starter for a group of friends, or something to be taken on a picnic,” he says. “Whenever I am in France and go to the markets, I cannot stop myself from buying some rillettes. Pork, duck or rabbit – they are all lovely. And served with some cornichons, crusty bread and a good glug of red wine to accompany, you’ve got something rather wonderful!”

but I’m painfully aware the recipient of said dish is paying good money and expecting a certain standard, and I’m desperate not to let the team down. As service gets into full swing it becomes apparent just how tight this team are. The way they all move around the kitchen is almost like a carefully choreographed dance routine; everyone knows exactly where everyone else is, and exactly what they’re doing – vital when there’s so little space to play with – and no-one puts a foot wrong. It’s all very calm and collected – there’s no visible stress or panic – but before long it’s all over and, to my relief, nothing’s been sent back to the kitchen. It’s only when the my adrenalin rush has subsided that I realise that my feet are aching and not only am I physically tired, but I’m mentally drained too. What these guys do, day after day, is hard. Like, really, really hard. I’ll certainly never take a plate of food for granted again.

INGREDIENTS 500g pork belly (fat on, rind removed) 75g pork backfat 750g rabbit legs 100g white wine 2 sprigs of thyme 2 sprigs of rosemary 3 bay leaves 10 juniper berries 2 star anise 3 cloves garlic 20g grain mustard good pinch of nutmeg salt and pepper

lechampignonsauvage.co.uk

METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 140C/275F/ gas mark 1. 2 Cut the pork belly and backfat into 2cm pieces and place it in a casserole with the rabbit legs. 3 Add the wine and just 200g water to cover. 4 Place the thyme, rosemary, bay leaves, juniper berries and star anise in a muslin bag and bury this deep in the centre of the casserole,

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then add the garlic cloves. 5 Place a lid on the dish and cook in the oven for 4 hours until the meat is falling off the bones. 6 Separate the meat from the juices using a sieve, making sure to keep the juices. Then pass the liquid through a fine muslin to strain. 7 When the meat has cooled, pick the meat from the bones. Shred the fat, pork and rabbit with 2 forks. 8 Separate the fat from the stock; it should be easy, as the fat will lay on top of the liquid when cool. 9 Add 50g of the stock and 30g of the fat to the rabbit, mix well, add the grain mustard. Keep the remaining fat for later. 10 Mash the cooked garlic cloves and add them, along with the nutmeg, to the shredded meats and season well. 11 Push the mixture into little terrine dishes, making sure that there are no gaps. 12 Cool, and then chill. When cold, spoon a little of the fat onto the top of the rillettes to form a seal.


AT THE HEART OF THE COTSWOLDS LIES A LOCATION OF PURE BEAUTY AND TRANQUILLITY THAT WILL SURPASS YOUR FINEST DREAMS! Whatever your occasion, be it a small intimate Wedding or an Exclusive Use event or Civil Partnership we have the perfect venue to make your day come true.

WEDDING OPEN DAY

Sunday 19th February 11am - 4pm Come and have a look at our picturesque location.  For more information contact  weddingsandevents@cotswoldhouse.com

For more information on planning your bespoke wedding or civil ceremonies call your dedicated Wedding Planner at Cotswold House Hotel on 01386 840330 Visit our website for special offers and all-inclusive packages for 2017

The Square, Chipping Campden, GL55 6AN

www.cotswoldhouse.com


( advertising feature )

Meet the FARMER From field to fork

Rich Clive

Irayne Paikin

Simon Weaver

Patrick Bourns

Farmer Upton Upon Severn, clivesfruitfarm.co.uk

Farmer Todenham Manor Farm

Farmer Kirkham Farm simonweaver.net

Farmer Cackleberry Farm. cacklebean.com

How long have you been a farmer? Our family has been farming here since 1917 so you could say I have been a farmer since I was born! The farm has changed over the years and so has what we grow and how we sell.

How long have you been a farmer? I think of myself as an ‘accidental farmer’, even after 10 years. Farming found me having lived my previous 40 years firmly as a city girl.

How long have you been a farmer? Boringly I have been a farmer all my life. Although I run my own business rather than having a family farm, we can trace our ancestry back to the late 1500s and they all appear to have been peasants, so no change really!

How did you get in to farming? My dad was a farmer. I went to college and studied Poultry Production and Management. I worked from the very bottom. We were then lucky enough to be able to buy and develop our own land. Without ever changing our ethics, we continue to grow now.

How did you get into the industry? I always wanted to drive tractors and be part of this way of life.

What do you find most challenging? Really, it’s seeing how hard it is now for young, talented farm workers to grow, and take on their own farms. Land is just so expensive for them now. We would love nothing more, than to see everybody, near and far succeed and be given the opportunities that they deserve.

What do you farm? We currently grow eight different types of fruits and about 50 varieties including apples, pears, plums, strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, cherries and damsons. This means we have a long season in that the strawberries start in late May and then we are picking apples and pears all the way through to November. We begin juicing in August. Can the public visit the farm? The farm is open all year round and we have a farm shop and café selling our own fruit as well as produce and meat. In the PYO season, which runs from late May until November, anyone can pick whatever is in season straight from the plants or trees. What¹s the most challenging part of the job? Ensuring that all of the fruits are to the highest quality, even when Mother Nature tries not to help!

todenhammanorfarm.co.uk

What do you farm? Pedigree Aberdeen Angus, South Devon cattle and outdoor reared rare breed pigs – Gloucester Old Spots and Middle Whites. What makes your produce unique? Having our own on-site butchery and dry ageing chiller means that all processes can happen right here on the farm. Our butchers handprepare orders specifically for each customer, whether that’s coarse or fine mince, or inch thick steaks cut to order.

What do you farm? We have a very varied business which is mostly organic. This includes arable crops, sheep and dairy cows. We started our cheese business at a low point in organic dairy fortunes when we couldn’t sell our milk but wanted to commit to an organic system for the cows.

What’s your favourite part of the job? Watching healthy calves eating their way through copious amounts of grass and tiny piglets running around causing havoc. Also, the pleasure of meeting those who enjoy our product and those whose first foray into eating our properly aged beef and rare breed pork is clearly not going to be their last!

What makes your produce interesting? Everything from our wonderful landscape, to our organic cows and the milk they produce! We are particularly proud of our ‘Freedom Milking System’ at Greystones Farm, which is an amazing historic site at Bourton-on-the-Water owned by the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust. It has a farming timeline of 6,000 years!

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Do you operate tours? Not official, paid for tours however, anyone can pop in, and we’ll always be very happy to show you around. What do you enjoy the most? The welfare of the animals, and seeing the finished product on the shelf. Watching people eat and enjoy our produce. We do what we do because we’re passionate about it, and people love the end result. So thanks to our great customers, we continue to do what we love.

crumbsmag.com


K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List

1

THESE JUICY, FRUITY STRAWBERRY DESIGNS WILL BE TASTY ADDITIONS TO YOUR KITCHEN THIS SUMMER!

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4 1 STRAWBERRY PRINT COLANDER £8 Perfect for giving those freshlypicked strawberries a rinse (or indeed washing leaves, draining pasta or any of your other usual colander-based activities), this will add a bright, fruity flavour to the proceedings. Get yours from John Lewis in Bristol or Swindon. johnlewis.com

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2 WILD STRAWBERRY SEEDS £1.95 No matter how bijou your garden, there’s always space for some wild strawberries, as these sweet little berries can thrive even in small containers like pots and baskets. Buy the seeds at Burford Garden Company. burford.co.uk 3 WEDGEWOOD WILD STRAWBERRY JAM POT £50 Wedgewood’s Wild Strawberry design is an oldie but a goodie, having been around for more than 50 years. There’s a whole range of fine china available featuring the print, but we love this jam pot best! Find one in House of Fraser in Cheltenham. wedgewood.co.uk 4 CHEF’N STEMGEM STRAWBERRY HULLER £7.49 Hulling strawberries is never a pleasure, always a chore. (Are we right?) Except no longer, thanks to this nifty little gadget which hulls with ease. Oh, and it works on tomatoes, too. Pick one up from Lakeland in Cheltenham. lakeland.co.uk 5 SILICON BOWL COVER £11.99 Keep your strawberries (or anything else) fresh as the day they were picked with this airtight silicon strawberry bowl cover. Available from Steamer Trading in Broadway. steamer.co.uk

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Food Fanatics Food Hall

Stocking a range of local, regional and international foods. From every day necessities to that little indulgence. Whilst you are browsing, why not stop for a sweet or savoury snack in our coffee shop and soak up the surroundings. OPEN EVERY DAY 12 North Street, Winchcombe, Gloucestershire GL54 5LH

01242 604466


‘What we do’

Here at Scrubditch Care Farm we provide therapeutic farm based training and activities for vulnerable people. We focus on increasing confidence, building independence and promoting good health and wellbeing.

The care farm began in October 2010 and a variety of people have used our facilities and felt the benefits. We have regular weekly students, group visits and we run Holiday Activity Schemes for children of all abilities. We currently have spaces for more regular students to join our ranks and we’re always open to ideas for further projects. Scrubditch Care Farm is a small registered charity providing a secure and safe environment where our students feel at home. They work hard, and have a real sense of pride with their achievements. The care farm offers rural vocational training which aims to build confidence and develop social and practical skills.

The care farm provides farming-based activities for adults and young people with learning difficulties, challenging behaviour, or mental health problems. Students partake in a variety of activities including working with animals, growing vegetables, fruit and flowers, cooking and learning basic woodworking skills. The Care Farm is a ‘day’ facility – we are open from 10am to 3pm during term times. We offer a ‘taster’ session for prospective students so they can try us out before they decide to sign up to coming regularly. We always welcome new volunteers and new students to our farm.

www.scrubditchcarefarm.org.uk Scrubditch Care Farm North Cerney, Cirencester Gloucestershire GL7 7DZ

emma@costley-white.com gerryfouracres@hotmail.co.uk 01285 831 750


M AI N S

TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS & PEOPLE THAT MATTER

O V E R

T H E

P A G E

DRINK IT IN

Top summery slurps from the Cotswolds Page 50

ACTION HEROES Do your bit for Action Against Hunger Page 54

BREAKFAST CLUB

Favourite spots to grab a killer brekkie Page 57 How much do you want one of these right now? Yeah, us too...

INCLUDING

9

great spots to start your day

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M A I N S

DRINK UP! FROM REFRESHING FRUIT JUICES TO AWESOME ALES AND WORLD CLASS GINS, THE COTSWOLDS HAS GOT IT ALL…

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BEARD & SABRE CIDER COMPANY You’ve heard of craft beer (obvs). Well, Beard & Sabre are all about craft cider. According to director Angus Sales, “Beard & Sabre is founded on the principles and love of traditional cider making, and we use these skills to launch craft cider into the modern era. “Our award-winning ciders are lovingly created to breath life back into Britain’s cidermaking heritage, and our visionary fruit ciders offer an exciting and delicious twist on the bland and ordinary.” If you’d like to find out more about Beard & Sabre, they’ll be out and about throughout the summer at events in Gloucestershire, and the team will be only too happy to chat! What should we drink this summer? “Beard & Sabre's flagship session cider, Yardarm, is always a good barbecue staple,” they say. “It’s made with 100% pressed cider apples and, served chilled, it’s perfect for a relaxing summer day with friends and family.” beardandsabre.co.uk

STROUD BREWERY You’ve doubtless seen some of Stroud Brewery’s range at your favourite hostelry, but if you haven’t tried any yet we’d recommend you change that pretty sharpish. The most popular brew is called Budding – a pale ale with grassy bitterness, sweet malt and a luscious floral aroma – that’s named after Edwin Beard Budding from Stroud, who invented the lawnmower. What makes Stroud Brewery extraspecial is that everything they produce is 100% organic. “As well as having clear biodiversity, health and social benefits, we believe that the organic standards are the perfect basis on which to produce high quality products,” says owner and managing director Greg Pilley. “We are noticing more and more that customers are wanting drinks with integrity and provenance. They want to know the real story, and the people behind them. Our organic beers certainly offer this, as well as burst with flavour!” What’s new? Stroud Brewery recently launched their first organic canned products: Alederflower is a subtle elderflower-infused pale ale, while their the I.P.A. is a juicy, hop-forward IPA. stroudbrewery.co.uk

CHASE DISTILLERY

CLIVE’S FRUIT FARM

Chase Distillery’s potato vodka and gin are soooo good that they’re known the world over (in 54 countries, to be exact) and have scooped tons of awards over the years. But success hasn’t changed them – everything is still grown, produced and bottled on the family farm in Herefordshire. A recent, and extremely delicious, addition to the range is a limited edition Espresso Vodka, made with locallyroasted Ethiopian coffee beans that’s available exclusively through John Lewis. Tell us a fun fact about Chase? “We’ve got two! • Chase has the tallest rectifying column (used as part of the distilling process) in the world. • Each bottle of original Chase vodka is made from 250 potatoes.” chasedistillery.co.uk

Clive’s Fruit Farm, nestled between the Malvern Hills and the River Severn, has been run by the same family since 1917. There are many different fruits grown at the farm (think strawberries, raspberries, cherries and plums), which the public can come and pick, but most of their apples and pears are made into their award-winning juices. The single-variety apple and pear juices are always hugely popular, but the mulled apple juice was a big Christmas hit, and they’re also seeing an increase in demand for blended juices, such as apple and raspberry. In fact, the apple and summer berry variety, which was only introduced in April, has proved so popular that production is increasing to meet the demand. Can you give us a great serving suggestion? “The apple and summer fruit juice, served over ice with a splash of gin and some fresh mint, is the perfect drink for a warm summer’s day!” clivesfruitfarm.co.uk

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M A I N S

COTSWOLDS DISTILLERY Cotswolds Distillery has been making outstanding natural spirits at their Shipstonon-Stour distillery since 2014. “It’s traditional distilling with a modern attitude,” says owner Ryan Szor. “Quality is at the heart of everything we make, and we do everything by hand – from peeling the grapefruits to running the stills. We love to show people our distilling in action, so our small-but-perfectly-formed distillery is open for tours seven days a week!” The Cotswolds Dry London Gin is the most popular product, but Ryan says they’re seeing a real appetite for seasonal smallbatch liqueurs, with the Rhubarb and Gin Liqueur flying off the shelves. What’s new? Next month they're releasing their very own Cotswolds Summer Cup – perfect with ginger ale, it’s a delicious twist on the usual Summer Cup offering. And every single element of it has been made by Cotswolds Distillery, from the gin to the vermouth and the spice infusion. Also, Cotswolds Single Malt Whisky (which has been maturing for three years in the distillery's warehouse) will be released in October – the first single malt ever distilled in the Cotswolds! cotswoldsdistillery.com

SIBLING DISTILLERY This is a big year for Sibling Distillery. The brand was started just three years ago by four brothers and sisters (hence the name!) – Felix, Clarice, Cicely and Digby ElliottBerry – operating from a makeshift distillery at the family farm. However, since Digby, the youngest, was just 15 when it all began, he has not been able to work full-time with his siblings – and because the eldest, Felix, was just 22, none of them were legally able to promote the brand themselves! This year, however, sees Digby celebrate his 18th birthday, and Felix will turn 25 – the legal age for advertising alcohol. But not only that, the young entrepreneurs have just opened a new distillery in Cheltenham too, and are planning some unique seasonal flavours to sit alongside their Sibling Triple Distilled Gin. The foursome handle every part of the process themselves, and the end result combines botanicals such as Madagascan vanilla and fresh blueberries with fresh orange and lemon zests. Any fun facts? The family has complete control over the whole process. They make their own alcohol base from scratch slowly – even taking turns to mix it and mash the cane sugar, using a canoe paddle! siblingdistillery.com

ELECTRIC BEAR BREWING CO Electric Bear creates an eclectic range of craft beers, which have been designed to excite the bold and the curious. “We aim to take our customers on a journey of beer discovery,” says sales manager Ryan Read. “From the first time they see our great artwork, the first sip to pass their lips and on to the next beer they choose to pick up, they should always be able to appreciate the thought, effort and high quality ingredients which go in to every step of each beer we create. We do not cut corners, and only wish to produce the best quality and most interesting beers possible.” What trends have you noticed? “They have been building in popularity for the last two years, but we definitely see canned beers becoming more and more popular this year," says Ryan. "This, along with the improved quality, environmental and transport benefits of cans, was a strong factor in our decision to install our own canning line at the brewery in April this year. " electricbearbrewing.com

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M A I N S

FROBISHERS JUICES The team at Frobishers search the globe for the finest fruit to use in their juices, smoothies and cordials, and there are absolutely no concentrates or added sugar in the end results. According to sales and marketing director Steve Carter, there’s an increasing demand for soft drinks that appeal to adults, and those with less sugar and lower calorific values. He says: “Our Frobishers Classics sparkling juice drink range burst onto the premium soft drink scene in 2015, and has since taken the sector by storm. With less than 85 calories per bottle, it’s bang on trend in terms of today’s more health and sugar conscious customer, whilst at the same time offering flavour combinations that appeal to the more adult palate, such as our zingy sparkling ginger, or the quintessentially British apple, pear and elderflower.” The cordials offer a range of unique and adventurous flavours, such as lemon and mint, pomegranate and rose, or coconut and kaffir lime, which can make refreshing soft drinks, but which also make really rather lush summer cocktails. Go on then, give us an easy cocktail recipe! “Pour 25ml of lemon and mint cordial into a tall glass or Kilner jar, add 25ml of white rum, and then top with chilled soda water and ice, and finish with a few sprigs of mint (or muddle them further down in the glass). And voilá – you’ve got a Lemon and Mint Mojito!” frobishers.com

WOMERSLEY FRUIT AND HERB VINEGARS Okay, so vinegar probably isn’t your first thought when you think of a refreshing summer drink, but stick with us! You see, the combination of acids and sweet fruits is actually much sought after by mixologists, and that blend is exactly what makes Womersley Fruit and Herb Vinegars special. Owner and MD Rupert Parsons says: “I learnt from my father – whose exuberant concoctions were notorious – that you should never miss an opportunity to sample something new. Increasingly, I’m finding our fruit vinegars being adopted by inventive bartenders to add an unexpected dimension to even the most conventional cocktails.” So how should we use it? The Cotswolds Distillery Gin blends very well with the lime, black pepper and lavender vinegar, as the botanicals are well matched, we’re told. Womersley has also joined forces with the Simply Good Food TV app, which has a massive database of recipes, some of which include the fruit vinegars. womersleyfoods.com

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J. ASE NB R E NNE R OVA

M A I N S

M A I N S

liGhts, CameRa, aCtiOn! ACTION AGAINST HUNGER IS GEARING UP FOR ITS LOVE FOOD GIVE FOOD CAMPAIGN, WRITES JESSICA CARTER, AND IT KNOWS THE SOUTH WEST WILL DO IT PROUD…

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N. PE E T

Lucknam Park (above) and Ellenborough Park (below right) are two local gaffs that are already supporting Action Against Hunger’s Love Food Give Food campaign

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A . GA RC I A

nce again, it’s almost time for Action Against Hunger’s annual fundraising campaign to kick off. Each year, the months of September and October see restaurants from all over our region – heck, all over the country – join forces to help support the vital work that this 40-year old charity does across the world. Our South West patch might be small, but it’s mighty when it comes to doing its bit to help fight hunger and malnutrition. The Love Food Give Food campaign sees a voluntary £1 donation added to punters’ bills at participating restaurants and cafés, or included in the cost of a best-selling dish. For each £1 that gets donated, 87p is injected straight into the charity’s global projects, which include everything from creating food security to providing drinking water and responding to crises such as droughts and earthquakes. The restaurant team ring this money through the till (that’s if any tills actually still ring?) as a non-VAT item, so they can track how much they take over the two-month period of the campaign, and then transfer it over to Action Against Hunger. Right now, the charity’s South West team is busy telling restaurants all about this initiative, and getting them signed up. There are a couple of Cotswolds venues on the list, including Ellenborough Park in Cheltenham and Lucknam Park near Colerne, but the team is keen to get more venues in the area involved. Think that £1 ain’t gonna do much? How about £470,00? That’s what the campaign raised last year, thanks to 400 restaurants and their punters, who donated just £1 at a time. And it seems that the cause has really struck a chord with foodies in the area. “Being a chef, food is an integral part of my life that has brought me much happiness and joy. It saddens me to think that there are parts of our society where hunger and starvation still exist,” says Hywel Jones, executive chef at Lucknam Park. “Action against Hunger aims to provide all children and their families with the basic nutritious food they require simply to survive. I, and the entire team at Lucknam Park, feel honoured to support such a great cause.” And his sentiment is echoed by Oliver Williams, general manager at Ellenborough Park. “We know that Action against Hunger is a charity close to many people’s hearts, including a large number of our team members and guests, and as such Ellenborough Park are proud to support such an important and vital campaign. With the help of our guests, and the support of our team, we hope to provide malnourished children across the world with access to the nutrition needed in order to help them grow and develop.” Romy Gill, who is based in Thornbury, is another local food hero who has been inspired to take action for the cause, and has seen, first hand, where the funds go. “We went to Burma and saw how the work done by AAH helps and builds communities,” she says. “For instance, with clean water tanks, and projects to help new mums.” As many as one in eight children go to bed hungry each night worldwide – and while thankfully that average comes way down when you look at our local patch, it’s an undeniable problem. Luckily, it’s one that we can not only help solve, but help solve while keeping our own bellies full, too…

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WAYS TO GET INVOLVED EAT AT restaurants supporting the Love Food Give Food campaign during September and October and donate with your bill. RAISE FUNDS for Action Against Hunger yourself by by taking part in a local sponsored event. STEP UP to the plate and hold a dinner party with a difference as part of The Great Get Together. Gather your friends and family, serve them a tasty meal and get them donating in return. (For more information and to receive your digital dinner party pack, e-mail community@ actionagainsthunger.org.uk) actionagainsthunger.org.uk


Introducing our new exquisite range of handmade Belgian Chocolates

We are a small cafĂŠ by day serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and a Caribbean restaurant in the evening. All food is freshly prepared and we use local suppliers wherever possible.

Why not come down the rabbit hole to our magical Alice in Wonderland basement? From breakfast to lunch, or our speciality teas Large groups catered for... Booking Essential.

Open 9.30am - 4.30pm Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat. 9.30 - 4pm Weds. Closed Sundays & bank Holidays unless advertised. Evening and Sunday group bookings taken by prior arrangement

16-17 Vine Mews, Evesham,Worcestershire, WR11 4RE. info@jellypicklejam.co.uk | www.jellypicklejam.co.uk

www.hummingbird-cafe.co.uk

43 Parsonage Street, Dursley, GL11 4BP 01453 299276

EV ENT C ATERING SPEC IAL ISTS LOC ALLY SOURC ED PRODUCE

The Talbot Wide range of Real Ales and Ciders Food served daily From light bites to British classics and tasty puddings Why not check out our weekly Quiz Night every Tuesday? The Square, Stow on the Wold, Gloucestershire, GL54 1BQ 01451 870934

www.talbotstowonthewold.co.uk thetalbotstow@outlook.com

51 C AST L E ST R E E T C I R E N C E ST E R GLOS GL 7 1QD

in fo @ relis h ma il.co. u k | @ Re l i s hEve nts U K www. relis h even t .co. u k | 01 28 5 6 5 8 4 4 4


M A I N S

GET YOUR DAY OFF TO THE YUMMIEST OF STARTS AT ONE OF THESE ACE BREKKIE HOTSPOTS…

Everyone knows that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but if you’re anything like us then all too often it’s all you can do to wolf down a bowl of cereal or grab a piece of toast as you fly out the door. You feel us, right? So when there is time to sit back, take it easy and have a proper leisurely breakfast, we don’t think there are many things better. And on those rare and lovely occasions, here are a few of the places where we’ll be heading…

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M A I N S

LYNWOOD & CO

 You can grab a breakfast at Lynwood & Co any day of the week, but it’s at the weekend, when the full brunch menu is available, that it really comes into its own. Many of the dishes are based around Sourdough Revolution bread (which is made just around the corner), and head chef Josh Oram works on the principle that it’s best to create simple, seasonal dishes that use as much local produce as possible. Oh, and the coffees are pretty awesome, too! What should we order? Shakshuka with Merguez sausages – spicy North African sausages in a sauce of tomatoes, peppers, onions and cumin, with two poached eggs. Lynwood & Co, Apsley House, Market Square, Lechlade GL7 3AD; facebook.com/lynwoodandcocafe

THE OLIVE TREE

 The Olive Tree might be a Mediterranean restaurant, but when it comes to breakfast there’s plenty of British influence on display. F’rinstance, the Olive Tree Breakfast (which is basically a full English) is the most popular dish, while we’re big fans of the poached eggs (they use Sherston Eggs) with Hollandaise sauce on toasted muffins, which you can customise by adding bacon, spinach or mushrooms to make your own variation on eggs Benedict. Anything else? All the breakfasts are available as takeaway options – just phone in your order and, if you can convince someone to pick it up for you, you won’t even have to get out of bed! The Olive Tree Mediterranean Restaurant and Pizzeria, 28 George Street, Nailsworth GL6 0AG; theolivetree-nailsworth.com

STARBISTRO

Top: Just one of the delectable dishes on Lynwood & Co's breakfast menu; above: Baked ham, egg and tomato vinaigrette from Whatley Manor

Left: Eggs Royale at The Olive Tree. (What a way to start a day!)

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 It’s all about the locally sourced ingredients at StarBistro in Cheltenham. The eggs are sourced from Cacklebean Farm in Stow-on-the-Wold, and the locally-reared bacon comes from the nearby Bath Road Butchers. Put those two awesome ingredients together, and add some lovely made-to-order Hollandaise, and you’ll get yourself a flippin’ awesome eggs Benedict! What’s the next big thing in breakfasts? Cloud eggs seem to be dominating Instagram right now, but we believe you can’t better a classic, like (yes) eggs Benedict! StarBistro, 12 Royal Crescent, Cheltenham GL50 3DA; starbistro.org

WHATLEY MANOR

 For a real Sunday morning treat, head to the uber-pretty Whatley Manor for a very special brunch. All the food is sourced as locally as possible, with their eggs coming from nearby Sherston. If it’s sunny, you can sit on the terrace and enjoy views of the kitchen garden as you while away the morning, and you can even make it a real celebration by adding a glass of Champagne! What should we order? Grilled sourdough, avocado, crème fraiche, tomato salsa and fried eggs. It’s really tasty – and looks Instagram-worthy, too! Whatley Manor Hotel & Spa, Easton Grey, Malmesbury SN16 0RB; whatleymanor.com

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HUMMINGBIRD CAFÉ

 At the Hummingbird Café you can build your own breakfast, so you’ll get exactly what you want. Whatever you do, though, don’t miss the apple and sage sausages from the local butcher. What’s the next big thing in breakfast? Caribbean breakfasts, such as Akee and saltfish, and porridge with a twist. Hummingbird Café, Bar and Restaurant, 43 Parsonage Street, Dursley GL11 4BP; hummingbird-café.co.uk

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MRS MASSEY’S DELICIOUS DINER

Above: Brunch at Lynwood & Co; top centre: BLT bagel from JellyPickleJam; top right: Brunch at Mrs Massey's Delicious Diner

 There are so many lush dishes on the menu at Mrs Massey’s that you’ll be spoilt for choice. From eggs Benedict made with home-baked ham, to boiled eggs with Marmite soldiers, there’s deffo something that will get your day off to an awesome start. For us, though, it’s the American-style pancakes that will do it every time! Anything else? You can bring your pooch along to share your brunch. After all, good company is almost as important as good food when it comes to the perfect breakfast! Mrs Massey’s Delicious Diner, Unit 5-7 Frampton Industrial Estate, Bridge Road, Frampton on Severn GL2 7HE; mrsmasseysdeliciousdiner.com

Below: Eggs Benedict is a star dish at StarBistro

JELLYPICKLEJAM

 Community is at the heart of this Evesham café. All the preserves (and most of the soups) are made using fruits and vegetables from an award-winning Community Crop Scheme. The produce is harvested from local gardens, then the owner is offered either half the harvest, a jar of preserve for every 3kg harvested, or the chance to donate 10% of the proceeds from their batch to a local charity. There are naturally traditional breakfast options (like a full English) on offer, but if you fancy an afternoon tea at 10.30am, then that’s available too! Anything else? Give your day a really magical start in the Alice in Wonderland-themed basement. JellyPickleJam, 16-17 Vine Mews, Evesham WR11 4RE; jellypicklejam.co.uk

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 Owner David Nicholls believes that service and surroundings are just as important as great food, so expect a warm welcome and friendly staff along with your freshly cooked breakfast. There’s plenty of choice on offer, from lighter bites such as granola with Greek yoghurt and fruit, all the way through to a big American brekkie. What should we order? The Avo-Egg Breakfast. With eggs, avocado, baby leaf spinach and baked cherry tomatoes, it’s packed with all the right ingredients to supercharge your day! Café 53, 53 Long Street, Tetbury GL8 8AA; cafe53.co.uk

THE INN FOR ALL SEASONS

 The Inn for All Seasons specialises in fish, and the breakfast menu is no exception; their kippers and smoked salmon come from the Upton Smokery, just up the road. If you’re not a fish eater, though, don’t worry, as there are plenty of other choices, including a really rather good Cotswolds breakfast! What should we order? Definitely the freshly cooked kippers, we’re saying. The Inn for All Seasons, Little Barrington, Burford OX18 4TN; theinnforallseasons.co.uk


A F T E RS NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

H I G H L I G H T S

LAKE SUPERIOR Checking out the new menu at The Old Boathouse Page 62

MIGHTY OAK

We chow down on some top grub in a traditional village pub Page 64

I N C L U D I N G

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very different, but equally lovely, pubs! CRUMBSMAG.COM


(NEW MENU)

THE OLD BOATHOUSE EMMA DANCE CHECKS OUT THE NEW MENU AT THE OLD BOATHOUSE 62

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A F T E R S

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he Old Boathouse is in a pretty dreamy setting. Right on the edge of a lake (Lake 6, to be precise) in the Cotswold Water Park, it has great views over the water, which are made yet more picturesque by the antics of the frolicking waterfowl that have made the waterpark their home. It’s a little late in the day to enjoy the lakeside terrace when we arrive, but no matter, since full-length windows still allow us to take advantage of the setting as the sun goes down. Part of the deVere Cotswold Water Park Hotel, The Old Boathouse has the inevitable sheen that comes from being part of such a big corporate entity. Not that that’s necessarily a bad thing, as it usually guarantees a certain level of quality and service – and effort has clearly has been made to give the place some individuality and character, including some novel decorative touches (such as the boat suspended from the ceiling). The menu is made up of pretty standard pub fare – there are no boundaries being pushed here – but what it delivers, it delivers very well. A Scotch egg has a bright almost-orange yolk, just the right side of runny, with soft, well-seasoned sausage meat and a crunchy coating, and the whole dish is far prettier than by rights it should be. Across the table, a silver sliver of grilled mackerel fillet comes perched atop a mound of creamy potato salad, with watercress adding a dash of colour. It’s a simple dish, but there’s a good balance of flavours and it’s more than munchable.

It’s recommended that I try the smoked haddock, pea and spring onion fishcake, and it’s a good call. The fishcake is packed with smoky fish, with the peas adding a touch of sweetness and the spring onion a peppery bite. There’s a poached egg on top too, which gives way at the merest hint of cutlery to release the rich, liquid yolk, and a wholegrain mustard velouté adds a subtle tang to the dish. Husband’s steak and ale suet pudding brings no surprises, which is a good thing. Some things should not be messed with, and a steak and ale suet pudding is one of them. There’s plenty of meat hidden beneath the crust, a rich gravy and creamy mash – everything you could really want – so he’s a very happy man indeed. My hot chocolate sundae is a proper chocolatey smack around the chops, with chocolate ice cream, chocolate brownie chunks, marshmallows and whipped cream, all drenched in thick chocolate sauce. It’s sweet and sticky, and the kind of dessert that just makes you smile. The white chocolate and raspberry torte, however, is a far more elegant affair. It’s pretty as you like, and the sweetness of the white chocolate is tempered by the sharpness of the berries. The Old Boathouse is never going to be a gastronomic destination as such. But it is somewhere that you’d want to go to meet friends over a dinner and a bottle or two of wine or two, or where you’d perhaps head for a family celebration. Basically, it’s somewhere where you know you’ll have good food and a great time, and you’ll leaving smiling.

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THE OLD BOATHOUSE, Lake 6, South Cerney GL7 5FP; phcompany.com/de-vere/ cotswold-water-park-hotel/


A F T E R S

(PUBS WE LOVE)

THE ROYAL OAK THIS IS THE KIND OF PLACE THAT WILL KEEP YOU COMING BACK FOR MORE, SAYS EMMA DANCE

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here are too many pubs around these days that aren’t really pubs any more. They might call themselves pubs and, from the outside at least, they might look like pubs, but step inside and they’ve been primed and polished so much that there’s no trace of the original boozer left, and what you’re actually left with is a restaurant. The Royal Oak at Cromhall, though, is still very much a pub. There are bitters on tap, the bar is piled with boxes of locally-brewed cider, and at the heart of the place there’s even a glass-topped table which has been built over a 38ft deep medieval well. Probably not a table you’re gonna want to risk dancing on, then… But the fact that it’s proudly maintained its pub-ness doesn’t mean that the food

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at The Royal Oak isn’t good, because it is. And it proves that you can still be a proper boozer and serve up grub that people are going to make the effort to come and eat. The man behind the menu is head chef Chris Winsborough, who is a relative newcomer, having taken the helm in the kitchen in the latter part of last year. It’s a small-ish menu, one that changes with the seasons and showcases great British ingredients with just a hint of Mediterranean-influenced flavours. When we visit on a lunch time there’s a very reasonable set menu on offer, too (one course for £9.95, two for £12.50, or three for £14.50), featuring classics like gammon, egg and chips and a Ploughman’s. We stick with the more creative à la carte, though, and both of us head seawards for the starter. My mound of mussels are sweet and plump, and come drenched in a rich creamy sauce. It’s billed as a chilli, ginger and garlic sauce, and I can detect a hint of garlic, but although there are bright red flecks of chilli visible, I’m not getting any heat and the ginger is lost. That doesn’t mean that I don’t enjoy it, though – I do, and even ask for a spoon, so I don’t miss out on any of it. But it’s not quite what I thought I was getting. Meanwhile, my companion’s crispy deepfried seafood raviolo with lobster bisque is very well received. The bisque is silky and luxurious, bursting with flavours of the sea, and the raviolo is packed with fishy goodness, while deep-frying it has given the dish another layer of texture. My lamb arrives – three large slices of

blushing pink meat perched atop a leek and potato rosti and surrounded by roasted garlic and baby tomatoes in a honey jus. There’s a lot of garlic – in whole cloves – but all the harshness has been cooked out of it, and it’s sweet and soft and delicious. Everything on the plate has been wellcooked, in fact, but everything’s also a little bit sweet. It all goes together very well, but it feels as if there’s something missing that would lift it and really make it sing. Across the table, there’s slow roasted pork belly on a bed of poi lentil with sage and cashew nut pesto. The lentils are wellseasoned, with the bacon adding a lovely salty note, and the belly is soft; there’s a good crunch on the crackling, too, while the pesto adds a subtle herby note. Desserts, though not necessarily the most imaginative selection, are exactly the kind of things you want to eat – although not necessarily after the two enormous courses we’ve just devoured. An almond and apricot bread and butter pudding is moist and moreish and not too sweet, while my gooey chocolate Brownie, although not quite as gooey as it might have been, ticks all the boxes when it comes to a chocoholic’s flavour wish-list. Friendly staff, a welcoming atmosphere, and tasty food that makes you feel good, makes The Royal Oak a pub that you’ll want to return to time and time again. Just like a proper pub should. THE ROYAL OAK, Cromhall GL12 7AD; theroyaloakcromhall.co.uk

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L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

SIMON ThOMSON

HE’S MANAGING DIRECTOR OF CIRENCESTER’S TALKING WINES. AND WHEN HE’S NOT TALKING WINES, HERE’S WHERE YOU’RE LIKELY TO FIND HIM HANGING OUT… Breakfast? Made By Bob in Cirencester, as it’s the best food in town for breakfast and lunch. Best brew? That’s got to be an Italian Job black coffee from Rave Coffee. It’s a great blend, and comes from a team who really know what they’re doing. Best wine merchant? Oh, come on. I might be a bit biased, but it’s Talking Wines, of course! Sunday lunch? I love the Biddestone Arms. It’s classic pub food, but done to an exceptional standard. Quick pint? I always head to The Crown for a buzzing atmosphere in the heart of Cirencester. Cheeky cocktail? The amazing Henry at Wild Garlic in Nailsworth has a very imaginative range of fabulous cocktails, and he’ll even mix a new one especially for you!

Posh nosh? I don’t think you can do better than Wilder in Nailsworth. It’s fine dining, done to a very high standard, with a tasting menu and wellmatched wine flight. Perfect.

Comfort food? I’m a big fan of The Weighbridge Brewhouse in Swindon. It’s a wonderful building in the heart of the town, serving classic dishes in a great atmosphere.

Food on the go? The Made By Bob Deli in Cirencester – they use the best ingredients, so the takeaway dishes are always really tasty.

With the family? We all like Colosseo in Fairford, just because it’s so friendly!

Alfresco feasting? I like The Red Lion in Cricklade. You can sit out back in the garden by the brewery, eating and drinking their great offerings. Hidden gem? The Crown, Frampton Mansell. It’s tucked away off the beaten track, but it’s a really cosy pub in the Stroud Valley. One to watch? The Vault in Nailsworth. It opened last year in the converted bank building, and offers something quite different. With friends? That’s easy. Morans in Cheltenham is a perennial favourite.

Child friendly? There’s a great atmosphere at The Priory Inn in Tetbury, and kids love the pizzas. Best curry? I’m always given a warm welcome at the Raj Doot in Cirencester. My top tip – make sure you try the lamb Rajastani! Best atmosphere? The Lakeside Brasserie at the Cotswold Water Park is always great for any big sporting occasion, and you can also sit by the lake and enjoy the view from the deck. talkingwines.co.uk

QUICK! Add this little lot to your contacts book... Made by Bob, Unit 4 The Corn Hall, 26 Market Place, Cirencester GL7 2NY; foodmadebybob.con • Rave Coffee, 7 Stirling Works, Love Lane, Cirencester GL7 1YG; ravecoffee.co.uk • Talking Wines, 3 Emmervale Court, Midland Road, Cirencester GL7 1PZ; talkingwines.co.uk • Biddestone Arms, The Green, Biddestone, Nr Chippenham SN14 7DG; biddestonearms.co.uk • The Crown, 17 West Market Place, Cirencester GL7 2NH; crownciren.com • Wild Garlic, 3 Cossack Court, Cossacks Square, Nailsworth GL6 0DB; wild-garlic.co.uk • Wilder, Market Street, Nailsworth GL6 0BX; dinewilder.co.uk • The Red Lion, 74 High Street, Cricklade SN6 6DD; theredlioncricklade.co.uk • The Crown Inn, Frampton Mansell GL6 8JG; thecrowninn-cotswolds.co.uk • The Vault, Waterloo House, Nailsworth GL6 0AQ; thevaultnailsworth.co.uk • Morans Eating House, 123-129 Bath Road, Cheltenham GL53 7LS; moranseatinghouse.co.uk • The Weighbridge Brewhouse, Penzance Drive, Swindon SN5 7JL; weighbridgebrewhouse.co.uk • Colosseo, 1 London Street, Fairford GL7 4AH; colosseofairford.com • The Priory Inn, London Road, Tetbury GL8 8JJ; theprioryinn.co.uk • Raj Doot, 35 Castle Street, Cirencester GL7 1QD; raj-doot.co.uk • Lakeside Brasserie, The Watermark, Spring Lake, Station Road, South Cerney GL7 5TH; lakeside-bar.co.uk

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Stores

Teddington Food Hall & Butchery - Wine Merchant - Coffee Shop

For fine food from the Cotswolds and beyond…. Our traditional butchery specialises in local free range meats and dry aged beef. Our deli counter has a lovely selection of local cheeses and those from further afield. Visit our coffee shop for delicious coffees and light meals.

www.teddingtonstores.co.uk enquiries@teddingtonstores.co.uk

Situated just north of Cheltenham on the junction between the A46, A435 and B4077. Plenty of free parking. Just turn in behind the fuel station. Open 7 days a week. Mon to Fri 08.30 to 18.30 Sat 09.00 to 18.00 and Sun 10.00 to 16.00

Teddington Hands, Evesham Road, Teddington, Gloucestershire GL20 8NE 01386 725400


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Crumbs Cotswold 56  
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