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CRUMBS Cotswolds NO.55 JUNE 2017

! L L H FU LIS WINE S G N E

GREAT BRITISH FOR SUN-KISSED SIPPING

A little slice of foodie heaven I like a balanced diet

bEEF up!

Yes, a beer in each hand!

NO.55 JUNE 2017

GET IN!



WITH RICHARD

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Crumbs is now an app! You can read all editions of Crumbs – Bath and Bristol, Cotswolds and Devon – on iTunes or Android. Scan the QR codes above, search ‘Crumbs’ or go to crumbsmag.com

hOp TO IT! I’M LIVING IN THE ETERNAL HOPE that summer will arrive eventually. Yes, I know it’s only June, and I know there was that brief interlude in April when the sun came out and we all rushed outside, en masse, to catch some of those golden rays, but in true Oliver Twist style, I want more! Because, let’s face it, summer is a pretty awesome time in foodie terms. First off, it’s the season of food festivals, which are totally fab for many, many reasons. For one thing, they give us an actual reason to scoff all day – because otherwise how are we possibly going to taste all the deliciousness on offer? – but they’re also a chance to come face-to-face with some culinary heroes and get useful tips on how to up our culinary game. And we’re lucky here in the Cotswolds, particularly, as there’s so much going on. Check out page 7 for a few of our fave foodie happenings this summer. Of course, when the sun does come out there’s all the fun that comes with al fresco dining, too. I don’t know about you, but eating outdoors is one of my real joys in life. Check out page 50 for some great kit that’ll help you throw a divine garden party, or – if you’re happy to let someone else do the work – then on page 55 we’ve put together a list of some of the area’s top places for eating and drinking outdoors. Also, this month we’re celebrating beer. Of course, it’s a wonderful drink – not much beats a cold beer on a hot day, right? – but it’s pretty handy as an ingredient too, as it turns out. Yes, there are many reasons to love beer. And, I’m hoping, you find just as many reasons to love this issue of Crumbs!

Emma Dance Editor emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk

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Table of Contents Table of Contents

crumbsmag.com

NO.55 JUNE 2017

crumbsmag.com

NO.53 APRIL 2017

EDITOR

EMMA DANCE

emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk EDITOR EMMA DANCEEDITOR DEVELOPMENT emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk MATT BIELBY

matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk DEVELOPMENT EDITOR MATT BIELBY ART DIRECTOR matt.bielby@mediaclash.co.uk TREVOR GILHAM ART DIRECTOR DESIGN

TREVOR GILHAM VICKY MITCHARD

DESIGN ADVERTISING MANAGER VICKY MITCHARD

DANIELLE MORRIS

ADVERTISING MANAGER danielle.morris@mediaclash.co.uk

DANIELLE MORRIS SALES EXECUTIVE danielle.morris@mediaclash.co.uk RYAN GOODMAN SALES EXECUTIVE ryan.goodman@mediaclash.co.uk RYAN GOODMAN ryan.goodman@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGER PRODUCTION AND SARAH KINGSTON DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk SARAH KINGSTON sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk DEPUTY PRODUCTION MANAGER KIRSTIE HOWE DEPUTY PRODUCTION MANAGER / kirstie.howe@mediaclash.co.uk PRODUCTION DESIGNER CHRISTINA PRODUCTIONWEST DESIGNER christina.west@mediaclash.co.uk DAWN GOOLD CHIEF EXECUTIVE dawn.goold@mediaclash.co.uk JANE INGHAM CHIEF EXECUTIVE jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk JANE INGHAM CHIEF EXECUTIVE jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk GREG INGHAM CHIEF EXECUTIVE greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk GREG INGHAM greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk large version

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MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW; 01225 475800Circus Mews House, MediaClash, www.mediaclash.co.uk Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW; 01225 475800 © All rights reserved. May not be www.mediaclash.co.uk large version

reproduced without written permission of MediaClash. © All rights reserved. May nottobe MediaClash reserves the right reject reproduced without written permission any material and to edit such prior to of MediaClash. publication. Opinions are those of individual authors. MediaClash reserves the right to reject Printed on paper a well-managed any material andfrom to edit such prior to source. Inks are vegetable-based; publication. Opinions are those of printer is certified to ISO 14001 individual authors. environmental management. Printed on paper from a well-managed source. Inks are vegetable-based; This month we’ve printer is certifiedmostly to ISObeen 14001 munching on tasting menus and environmental management. splashing about in spas. All this eating is hard work, you know... This month we tasted the best steak we've ever eaten! (Yes, really truly!)

STARTERS STARTERS 10 HERO INGREDIENT

Prawn to be wild! 8 HERO INGREDIENT 12 OPENINGS ETC Right beer, right now Food news to peruse 12 OPENINGS ETC 14much ASK THE EXPERT So to eat, so little time The superstars of NationalStar 14 IN THE LARDER 18 IN THE LARDER A celebration of English wine Stock up on Easter treats. (Warning: 16 TRIO contains chocolate) A20 trioASK of goodies to help your THE SOMMELIER barbecue goSommelier with a bang! The Roving himself

ADDITIONAL RECIPES

10 A Brewer’s Garden Pizza, by The Fabulous Baker Brothers

shares tips and expertise

23 Aubergine fetteh,

CHEF! 24 TRIO

ADDITIONAL RECIPES by Itab Azzam and

Amazing from the The finestrecipes cheesemongers region’s top kitchens (and makers) in the Cotswolds

MAINS 55 OUT THERE MAINS

Gorgeous gardens and terrific for al fresco dining 55terraces COOL KITCHENS Spruce yours up! 62 SHOP TILL YOU DROP 63ACIRENCESTER LOVE few of our favourite Sospecialist many delicious shopsreasons (and why to we visitlove Cirencester them so!)

Dina Mousawi 27 Spiced sea bass with citrus sauce, by Catherine Phipps 34 Roast radish, spelt and feta 72 TASTY TASTY salad, by Kathy Slack AFTERS 38 Sweet and savoury choux Tasting menus to tempt you buns, by Kathy Slackrib, New & notable 46 Smoked prime restaurants, cafés, bars bySeed Richard Turner 48 of Life Bread, AFTERS by Jamie Raftery New & notable 68 The Bellcafés, at Ramsbury bars KITCHEN ARMOURY restaurants, 70 La Belle Assiette 78 Three Choirs Vineyard KITCHEN ARMOURY 72 Acanthus 43 SUPPER CLUB 80 East India Cafe 43 COOKS WITH PLUS Getting beefy at The PLUS Jamie Raftery shares Chequers with King his of love 74 LITTLE BLACK BOOK of fermented Richard foods Turner Carnivores, 82 LITTLE BLACK BOOK Ashley Jennings of Simon Butland of Pittville 49 CaterCrew picks some 50THE THEWANT WANTLIST LIST Kitchens shares his faves Getting inspired by nature of his fave hangouts All you need to dine outdoors

28 Double chocolate plump CHEF! raspberry Amazing cheesecake, recipes from the by Roberttop Goves region’s kitchens 30 Hay smoked mackerel, 30 Crispy and lamb’s breast Greek cucumber lemon purée, salad, by Lucas Mitchell by Chris White 32 Chilled pea and asparagus 32 Grilled Oddington soup, by Robert Goves asparagus with duck egg 34 Roastand legsmoked of springduck lamb, custard, by Judy breast, byHancox Kuba Winkowski 36Amazake Sauerkraut green rolls, 34 berry shake, by Celia Duplock by Celia Duplock

01242 505 416 | hello@catercrew.com crumbsmag.com

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START E RS INNOVATIONS, REVELATIONS AND TASTY AMUSE-BOUCHES

CHELTENHAM FOOD & DRINK FESTIVAL When: June 9-11 Where: Montpellier Gardens, Cheltenham GL50 1SD What to expect: Celebrity chef demos, food talks, wine tastings and entertainment – and you can come and visit us on the Crumbs stand, too! cheltenham-food-festival.gardenevents.com COTSWOLD SHOW When: July 1 -2 Where: Cirencester Park What to expect: As well as lots of lovely food, there are also falconry displays, dog shows, demos of countryside pursuits and even jousting. cotswoldshow.co.uk GLOUCESTER QUAYS FOOD FESTIVAL When: July 28-30 Where: Gloucester Quays, next to Gloucester Historic Docks What to expect: The programme hasn’t been released yet, but if last year’s event is anything to go by you can expect a sizzling mix of celebrity chefs, cooking demos, music, street food and pop-up bars. gloucesterquays.co.uk

THE BIG FEASTIVAL When: August 25-27 Where: Churchill Heath Farm, Kingham OX7 6UJ What to expect: Lots and lots of foodie activities for young and old, with demos, tastings, street food stands and celebrity chefs galore. Oh, and there’s also a pretty great music line-up. uk.thebigfeastival.com

festIvaL feveR

ABERGAVENNY FOOD FESTIVAL When: September 16-17 Where: Abergavenny, Wales What to expect: A star-studded line-up of chefs, a Producer’s Market, a night market on Saturday night and an edible education space for kids. (Loads of stuff, basically.) abergavennyfoodfestival.com

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SUMMER’S HERE AND THAT CAN ONLY MEAN ONE THING. YEP! IT’S FOOD FESTIVAL TIME! HERE’RE SOME OF OUR FAVES…


S T A R T E R S

BEER

THE HUMAN RACE QUAFFS MORE WATER AND TEA, SURE, BUT BEER’S THE THIRD MOST POPULAR DRINK IN THE WORLD AND… WHAT’S THAT? (“IT’S THE BEST TOO,” WE HEARD SOMEONE SHOUT)

B

eer is, of course, the oldest alcoholic beverage we know of. It’s far and away the most widely drunk, too. Some of our oldest literature deals with the stuff, and it’s been intrinsic to the building (and, quite possibly, the collapse) of countless civilisations. (When the pyramids were being put up in Egypt – think 2500BC – each worker was fed four or five litres of beer a day.) That sounds a long time ago, right? And it is, but beer brewing goes back way further than that – perhaps as

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far as 9500BC, when villages existed, pottery didn’t, and people were first learning to farm cereal. Around 7000BC the Chinese were making beer from rice and fruit, and the basic concept had reached the Germanic and Celtic tribes by 3000BC – not that the stuff that they made would do much for us today. It would be far too sweet and fruity, for one thing, with honey and spices in it, and certainly no hops – we don’t hear of these being added, giving beer its distinctive bitterness, until around 1000AD. The modern drink really got defined around 1516,

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when William IV – the Duke of Bavaria – introduced new laws defining beer as a product of water, hops and barley malt. By this point, monasteries were handling much bigscale brewing – in parallel with smaller cottage industry stuff – and things got more technical with the industrial revolution. From then on, beer became more varied, more reliably consistent – and nicer. But what is beer? Well, what you’re basically doing is converting a starch (malted barley, most likely) to sugars, then fermenting those (with help of lots of water, a brewer’s yeast and a flavouring, usually hops) to create beer: a refreshing alcoholic drink that’s not too strong nor too weak but, like Baby Bear’s porridge, just right. The water used influences the end results hugely – hard water works well for stouts, soft water for pilsners, say – as does the amount you’ve ‘malted’ (soaked, then roasted in a kiln) your grain. The making of beer is basically the only thing hops – the flower of the hop vine – are good for, but their bitter nature combines perfectly with the sweet of the malt; when you get floral, citrus or herbal flavours in a beer, it’s the hops what done it. Not just a northern European drink – though these countries excel at it – beer is made all over, a vast global industry that’s seen two parallel trends in recent years: big breweries absorbing smaller ones, and the growth of tiny microbreweries, often producing limited amounts of high quality ‘craft’ beer. It’s also seen an explosion of interest in many different beer types – pale ales and wheat beers, bitters and milds, stouts and lagers – with hefty revivals for some long-forgotten strains. The British beer landscape of even the recent past, when two tribes – the mainstream

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fans of homogenised, gassy commercial lagers, and the enthusiast lovers of real ales, defined as traditional, unfiltered, unpasteurised beers still active on the yeast – squared off against each other, now looks refreshingly simple. Not least, in fact, as CAMRA (the Campaign For Real Ale) doesn’t recognise most of the more recent craft beers which, you’d think, would be natural allies. New battle lines are being drawn, and it feels a bit like a family feud at times; certainly, heated discussions at the bar have the potential to run well into the night. But we don’t just drink beer; we cook with it too, of course. And it’s surprisingly versatile. You can glaze white fish with it (Guinness is good; it gives a sort of molasses flavour), or deep fry the same in crispy ale-batter. Dark beer works in chilli, and lighter beers on sticky ribs; regular ales adore stews and pot roasts; and cheese and beer even team-up well in soup, best of all with bacon and jalapeños stirred in. Mussels can be cooked in lager just as successfully as they can cider or white wine, and lager also works in gravy – or as part of a creamy risotto. Stout and chocolate chum up in a tiramisu; spicy beer mustard goes well with mighty German sausages; and you can make a delicious IPA vinaigrette for salads. And so it goes on. As well as being useful to enhance flavour – generally, the more malty and hoppy the beer is, the more you’ll taste it in food – it can also do everything from marinade meat to braise veggies, like carrots. But the best thing about beerbased food, of course, is that the drink matching is easy – just open up another can, bottle or keg.

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R E C I P E

A Brewer’s GARDEN PIzzA SERVES 4

This beer pizza recipe is from Fabulous Baker Brothers: Bite of Britain TV show. The beer they used was Thornbridge Jaipur IPA, though any good pale ale will be fine. In the programme, Henry gets carried away topping the pizza with the finest garden produce – honey, nasturtium leaves and flowers, borage flowers and fennel fronds – and there’s no reason why you can’t do the same to your beer pizza when it comes out of the oven! This is a perfect summer pizza, so would be great baked on the barbecue – or in a pizza oven, if you have one!

INGREDIENTS For the base: 320ml pale ale 7g dried yeast 500g strong white flour 8g salt rapeseed oil semolina For the topping: 3 tbsp rapeseed oil 1 large onion 3 large Swiss chard leaves, stalks sliced 100ml pale ale 200g blue cheese 4 figs, quartered METHOD For the base: 1 Add the yeast to the beer and stir until it is all dissolved. 2 Tip the flour into a bowl and add the salt and rapeseed oil. 3 Add the yeast mixture to the flour mix and bring together. 4 Knead for 5 minutes, then place in a greased bowl and leave to rise until doubled in size, around 60-90 minutes.

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5 Remove from its bowl and knock out by kneading for two minutes, then set aside to rest for another 10 minutes, 6 Scatter a clean surface with semolina and roll out either two pizza bases or, if you prefer, four smaller ones. For the topping: 1 Heat the oil in the pan over a medium heat and, when hot, add the onion and cook for a further 5 minutes. 2 Pour in the beer and allow it to simmer until it goes syrupy. 3 Add the chard stalks and cook for 5 more minutes. 4 Add the chard leaves and a pinch of salt, then take off the heat so they wilt in the residual heat. 5 Spoon the chard and onion mix over the pizza base. 6 Crumble the cheese over the pizza and scatter the fig quarters on top. 7 Slide the pizza into an oven, or over a barbecue (make sure it is stoked as hot as it is able to go), and cook for 8-12 minutes until the dough is golden. hobbshousebakery.co.uk


S T A R T E R S

PERMANENT FIXTURE

We are super-excited that the Koj pop-up is now a permanent fixture on Regent Street in Cheltenham. The 2012 MasterChef champ, Andrew Kojima, opened Koj as a pop-up at the end of last year, but thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign it’s now here to stay. The lunch menu features ramen noodles, pokedon rice bowls and steamed buns, while in the evening there are grazing plates, like Koj fried chicken, miso-glazed aubergine and squid okonomiyaki, to chomp on. And when it comes to drinks, the bar’s stocked with a vast selection of sake, Japanese beer and Japanese-inspired cocktails. Kampai! kojcheltenham.co.uk

OPEN HOUSE

The Bower House restaurant and rooms has opened in the centre of Shipston-on-Stour. The ground floor of this glorious Georgian town house has been transformed into a 75-seater restaurant, and five wonderfully comfortable bedrooms are scheduled to open upstairs any day now. Heading up the kitchen team is Darren Brown, most recently Development Chef at The Lucky Onion, who won a Michelin star when Head Chef at West Stoke House. The menu will reflect his cooking style, which he describes as “modern British with a French accent”. The emphasis will be on producing good food consistently, using seasonal produce that’s available locally. Go and check it out asap! thebowerhouseshipston.com

BIG IDEAS

Helen Browning’s Royal Oak in Bishopstone has just got bigger – and better! The Arkell’s Brewery-owned pub, which is set in the centre of an organic farm, has extended its kitchen and bar area to allow even more people to enjoy the fabulous fodder, all based on the produce grown on its doorstep. The pub has also opened 12 gorgeous new rooms, which are all named (and themed) after fields on the farm, so you can practically roll into bed after dinner! helenbrowningorganics.co.uk

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GOING DIRECT

Martin Burge (fomer exec chef at Whatley Manor) has taken on an exciting new role as culinary director of Farncombe Estate. Which basically means he’s in charge of the foodie offering at Foxhill Manor, Dormy House and The Fish, which have five dining establishments between them. So a pretty important job, by all accounts. “I’m thrilled to be part of such an exceptional team,” Martin says. “In Farncombe I believe I have found a company that is the perfect match to my values and aspirations. It is hugely exciting to be part of the next chapter and, together with the team, see the estate reach its full culinary potential.” farncombeestate.co.uk


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instA FEED

COUNTRY LIFE

A former pub in South Leigh, once a hangout for the likes of Raymond Blanc and Marco Pierre White, has just reopened as Mr Hanbury’s Masons Arms. The pub with rooms is the fourth in the award-winning Artist Residence hotel group, and owners Justin and Charlotte Salisbury have again worked their magic, restoring many original features and choosing a personally curated collection of artwork. Overseeing the kitchen activities is Leon Smith, who honed his skills at the Michelin-starred The Pony and Trap near Bristol and The Royal Oak at Paley Street in Maidenhead. Leon’s enthusiastic approach to locally sourced produce and using nature’s bounty is a key component to his cooking so expect dishes like wild nettle gnocchi with purple sprouting broccoli and foraged sorrel and venison with leg suet pie, BBQ radish, salt baked celeriac and juniper. Lush. artistresidenceoxford.co.uk

ON THE BOX

We’re already big fans of BBC2’s Great British Menu, but we’re especially looking forward to the Central heat, which is due to air later this month. Why? Well, Nick Deverell-Smith, head chef of the Churchill Arms in Paxton, will be taking part, repping the Cotswolds and its great local produce. He’s up against Pip Lacey from Murano in London, and Ryan Simpson from Orwells in Oxfordshire – tough competition! Make sure you see how he gets on! churchillarms.co

@luciennesimpson We love the look of these GF grapefruit and rosemary carrot cakes

@secretsupper Marinated chicken, slow cooked in the oven then finished on the barbecue with hickory wood chips. Utterly delish

IN THE DIARY... (June 10) COCKTAILS, CORDIALS AND INFUSIONS Inspired by the season and the kitchen garden, this two-hour class at Thyme will take you on a journey of flavour with a combination of demos and handson activities. You’ll be introduced to alcohols infused with herbs and fruits, shrubs, cordials, syrups and bitters, as well as seasonal recipes. All for £75pp. thyme.co.uk (June 24) LÉOUBE MASTERCLASS Head to Daylesford Organic for a unique opportunity to meet Château Léoube’s Master Winemaker, Romain Ott. A third generation winemaker, Mr Ott will introduce you to the beautiful Léoube estate and take you on a journey through its history. You will taste and learn how they produce their award-winning rosés, and have time to speak with Mr Ott about his passion and inspiration. Tickets cost £30pp. daylesford.com

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S T A R T E R S

In the Larder

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Raise a GLass

IT’S ENGLISH WINE WEEK FROM MAY 27-JUNE 4, BUT THESE BEAUTS ARE SO GOOD YOU DON’T NEED AN EXCUSE TO GET QUAFFING…. 1 Poulton Hill Phoenix Still White 2014, £12.99/70cl Based on our patch, not far from Cirencester, this vineyard is producing some seriously sippable wines. This particular little number is made from 100% Phoenix grapes, a hybrid grape bred in Germany and known for producing excellent quality fruit. Crisp and dry, it’s wonderfully aromatic with herbaceous notes and hints of cut grass. Available direct from the vineyard or from local indie retailers, including Gloucester Services and Jesse Smith Farm Shop & Café. poultonhillestate.co.uk 2 Woodchester Valley Pinot Noir Rosé 2015, £10.99/70cl Woodchester Valley Vineyard was established by the Shiner family in 2007. A boutique estate across three vineyard

sites at Amberley, Doverow, and Woodchester, it specialises in producing white, rosé and sparkling wines from vines planted on the limestone soils of the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. We’re big fans of this rosé, and the flavours and aromas of raspberries and strawberries makes it just the ideal summer sip. Get it direct from the cellar door, or visit the website for a full list of stockists. woodchestervalleyvineyard.co.uk 3 Three Choirs Wickham Oak Aged Red 2015, £12.15/70cl England isn’t known for the high quality of its reds, but if anyone is going to produce a good one, it’ll be Gloucestershire’s Three Choirs Vineyard, which is one of the West Country’s best known wine producers. And they’ve

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certainly proved that creating a good red on these shores isn’t impossible. This one is made with a blend of Rondo and Triomphe grapes; see if you can pick up the aromas of dark cherries, subtle oak and pine cones on the nose, and the flavours of damson and plum when you take a glug. three-choirs-vineyards.co.uk 4 Sixteen Ridges Vineyard 2013 Pinot Noir Sparkling Rosé, £27.49/70cl With a whole host of awards under its belt (or should that be label?), this is a world class pink sparkler, made just outside the Cotswolds in Worcestershire. With a sumptuously rich palate of strawberry, cherry, redcurrant and raspberry, it’s basically summer pudding in a glass. Sip it as an aperitif, with a bowl of strawberries, or just because

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you want to. Get it direct from the vineyard (where you can join in tours and tastings too), or go online for stockists. sixteenridges.co.uk 5 Camel Valley 2013 ‘Cornwall’ Brut, £24.95/70cl Camel Valley is Cornwall’s largest, and probably best known, vineyard and this is their flagship sparkling. A lot of effort goes in to retaining the unique fruit characters of the English grapes here, and it really shows. The scent is evocative of hedgerow, and there’s a whisper of citrus (and just a touch of honey) making this a complex and properly grown up bottle of fizz that we think is just as good, if not better, than any French Champers. You can buy it at The Grape Escape in Cheltenham. camelvalley.com


Book Now 01242 515 119

Complimenta Pre-Dinner Cocktail Quote C1 at Booking

Cheltenham’s Best Kept Secret Two Course £30

Prix Fixe

Three Course £35

Cotswol d Grange Hot e l , P i t t v i l l e C i rcu s Ro a d, C h e l t e n h a m , G L52 2Q H

ry


M A I N S

S T A R T E R S

TODENHAM MANOR FARM

COTSWOLD BBQ HUTS

Let’s face it, you can’t always rely on the weather to play ball when you’re planning an al fresco get together. But installing a Cotswold BBQ Hut in your garden means that you can barbecue in comfort all year round. These Scandiinspired huts are made from top-grade timber using traditional methods, and all of them feature a central barbecue grill with a table around it. They even come with snuggly deer skins or cushions and an authentic Finnish accessory pack, which includes cutlery, utensils and even a match box holder. The smallest seats up to 10 people, but if you’re seriously into entertaining then the extra large version takes up to 25 and has enough dancing room for 30 – and they’re all big enough to sleep in, too! cotswoldbbqhuts.co.uk

Todenham Manor Farm has relaunched its ultimate high-welfare meat box – the BBQ King Box – just in time for National Barbecue Week, which runs from May 29-June 4. Featuring an array of awardwinning meats, including rare breed rump steaks, free range chicken thighs, pedigree beef and lamb burgers and traditional and merguez sausages, all of which have been bred on the farm in Gloucestershire and reared to the highest animal welfare standards, there’s something for everyone. The boxes can also be tailored to your taste, too, so you’re guaranteed a selection that’s perfect for your particular celebration. The Butchery, Lower Farm, Todenham, Moreton-in-Marsh GL56 9PQ; todenhammanorfarm.co.uk

Firestarter

WHEN THE SUN COMES OUT, THERE’S ONLY ONE THING FOR IT – IT’S TIME FOR A BARBIE! HERE ARE A FEW IDEAS TO GET YOUR SUMMER SIZZLING

JESSE SMITH FARM SHOP & COFFEE HOUSE

Jesse Smith is a stalwart of the Cotswolds food scene, having first opened in 1808 in the centre of Cirencester. These days they also have an urban farm shop and café, just a short distance from the butchery, which showcases the best in food and innovation from the Cotswolds – including some goodies just right for a barbecue. Like, for example, their own range of sausages, burgers and marinated meats, which have been created especially for barbecue cooking. And they also have condiments, salads, breads, local wine, beers and ciders, and even coal and briquettes. Basically, everything you could possibly need. 19 Love Lane, Cirencester GL7 1RJ; jessesmith.co.uk

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S T A R T E R S

Ask the General Manager Who knows the menu best? Who makes the greatest impact on your experience? Who knows the menu best? Who is makes the greatest impact on your Front-of-house your friend! experience? Front-of-house is your friend!

Hi Lauren! So how long have you been at Asparagasm? I’ve been here from the very start! I began by assisting with the whole setting up of the company back in May 2015, and then we opened in the October. Where did you work before? Whilst finishing my degree I worked at The Royal Oak in Tetbury and The Organic Farm shop near Cirencester – both were amazing at using great local produce in delicious ways. So what’s the best thing about working at Asparagasm? Every day is different – we offer private catering, events and cake orders as well as being a deli and diner, so there is a lot of freedom and creativity. Plus, over the last year we have grown into a really lovely team full of creative people, so each day is a joy. What’s the most challenging part of the job? Having enough hours in the day! I make everything from scratch – using seasonal produce with flourishes of superfoods and ingredients that boost nutrition and flavour. It may take us up to five days to make an amazing fermented raw cheesecake, but it’s so worth it! What skills have you learnt since coming here? The main things are how to manage a small team and how to run a kitchen. It’s been an amazing learning curve starting up Asparagasm from scratch, but I definitely have become much more organised as a consequence. What sort of customers do you get? We have a really diverse range, actually, from hard core vegan activists to groups of local mums, plus families, people with food allergies, and plenty of people who just appreciate good, seasonal and organic food. I love to chat to customers answering questions and sharing recipes – it’s all about trying to inspire people to enjoy their veggies and their food in general, and find new ways to look after themselves and their families. What are the best-selling dishes at the moment? Current favourites on the menu include an artichoke and beetroot gratin with cashew cream and a cavolo nero pesto, and for dessert it’s all about a whipped coffee (cashew) cheesecake, made using our own coldbrew coffee pressed from Roundhill Roastery beans.

dOUbLinG uP SAY HELLO TO LAUREN LOVATT, GENERAL MANAGER AND HEAD CHEF OF ASPARAGASM

asparagasm.com

THIS COULD BE YOU! Contact emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk

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The Inn for All Seasons, is a former 16th century coaching inn set in the heart of the Cotswolds. A warm and friendly hotel with a relaxed bar and a renowned restaurant offering the best of British and local produce including the freshest ďŹ sh sourced directly from Devon and Cornwall. The Inn offers comfortable en-suite accommodation, free parking & dogs are welcome.

The Inn for All Seasons | Little Barrington | Burford | Oxfordshire | OX18 4TN T: 01451 844324 | W: www.theinnforallseasons.co.uk THE INN IS NOW OPEN 7 DAYS PER WEEK FROM 8AM – 10PM


also S T A R T E R S

How many of are there in the kitchen team? There are eight of us. How have you approached the menu? I try to keep things as simple as possible to let the ingredients really speak for themselves. Which other local restaurants do you like to eat in? For a real treat, I don’t think you can beat Le Champignon Sauvage in Cheltenham – the food is always incredible there. What do you think makes the local foodie scene so great? Quite simply, the variety. We are lucky to have so many establishments serving such a wide range of food. What are your favourite ingredients at the moment? I love the new season lamb, as well as kale and new potatoes. Do you grow anything yourself? Herbs, for sure – I have a selection, including mint, thyme and basil. Do you have any favourite suppliers you use for the restaurant? New Wave Seafood – their fish and so on is second to none. What kind of meals do you cook at home?  Usually I just prepare something light and simple, like perhaps a salad.

frOm the hart PLEASE MEET VLADAN DANKOVIC; HE’S ONLY HEAD CHEF AT THE WHITE HART INN, WINCHCOMBE

Hi Vlad! So tell us, when did you begin cooking? My career started 30 years ago at Café Mims in London. I started off as a kitchen porter and it all went from there. What first inspired you to cook professionally, then? I’d have to say working with Ali Al-Sersy at Café Mims. It was a great experience. What are your fondest foodie memories from your childhood? That’s easy – the quince jam that my grandmother used to make.

And what’s your proudest career achievement? An empty plate! When a plate comes back clean you know the customer has really enjoyed their food and, ultimately, that’s what this job is all about. Might we know you from anywhere locally? I used to work at Brasserie HPJ in Cheltenham. How would you describe your style of cooking? I’m very influenced by the flavours of the Mediterranean.

Which piece of kitchen equipment could you really not live without? Definitely my mandoline. What and where was the best meal you’ve eaten? You know, everything I’ve ever had at Le Champignon Sauvage has been amazing. I couldn’t pick just one dish! What are your top 5-a-day? Avocado, tomato, apple, banana, grapes. Do you have a favourite cookery book?  I couldn’t be without Larousse Gastronomique, a gigantic encyclopedia of French cuisine. What about foodie heroes?  Sorry to be repetitive, but I do really admire David EverittMatthias from Le Champignon Sauvage. What’s your current favourite flavour combination? Rack of new season lamb, wild garlic and forest mushrooms. whitehartwinchcombe.co.uk

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Welcome to The Royal Oak Come for a glass of wine and relax in the library or enjoy your freshly prepared food in our historic restaurant, featuring a medieval well. We offer private dining for large groups for that special occasion Our experienced Chef and his team are passionate about cooking for you. We promote creativity in the kitchen, where our Chef Chris will express this through regular menu changes and interesting ‘Specials’. We pride ourselves on using traceable, locally sourced produce, prepared to an exceptional standard. Our exceptional food is complimented by our extensive range of Wine, Champagne, and Gin. Hosting a range of local Real Ales, Lager and Cider with regular Guest Ales available. Booking advisable to avoid disappointment.

Cromhall, Gloucestershire, GL12 8AD

w w w. t he ro y a l o a k cro m h a l l . co . u k | 01454 430993


The Old Passage The seafood restaurant beside the River Severn Situated on the banks of the Severn overlooking the Forest of Dean and the pretty town of Newnham on Severn. You’ll feel like you’ve been transported to another world, even though we’re only be 20 minutes from J13 on the M5. Enjoy our delicious oysters and lobsters, that are almost always available from our own holding tanks, or choose the freshest fish which is delivered daily from Devon and Cornwall, or why not try our amazing fish and chips?

Lunch 12noon to 2.00pm, Dinner 7.00pm to 9.00pm Passage Road, Arlingham, Gloucestershire, GL2 7JR T: 01452 740547 • W: theoldpassage.com • E: oldpassage@btconnect.com


B O O K

O F

T H E

M O N T H

MARK TAYLOR’S TURNED OVER A NEW LEAF THIS MONTH – IN FACT, HE’S TURNED OVER QUITE A FEW, TO GET THROUGH ALL THESE BOOKS...

SYRIA: RECIPES FROM HOME Itab Azzam and Dina Mousawi Trapeze, £25

Syria has always been a marketplace for the most delicious ingredients from East and West, a fragrant meeting point for travellers and traders, where spices and sweetness collide. Now based in the UK, British-Iraqi actress Dina Mousawi and Syrian-born filmmaker and theatre producer Itab Azzam met Syrian women in the Middle East and Europe to collect the very best dishes, spending months cooking with them, learning their recipes and listening to their stories. The result is a fascinating and delicious insight into one of the world’s greatest food cultures. From courgettes in tahini sauce, and broad beans with coriander and garlic, to meatballs in tomato and pepper stew, and turmeric cake, this is a wonderful celebration of the taste and culture of Syria.

AUBERGINE FETTEH SERVES 4 AS PART OF A MEZZE

Layering food on toasted bread with a yoghurt sauce is a distinctly Syrian speciality. As far as Syrians are concerned, no flavour has yet been found that can’t be enhanced by the addition of garlicky yoghurt and a bit of crunch. Fetteh – literally ‘breadcrumbs’ – is such a popular dish, and can be made with chickpeas, aubergines, chicken or lamb. Whenever we make aubergine fetteh for friends it is always everyone’s favourite dish on the table. INGREDIENTS

3 aubergines olive oil, for roasting and drizzling 2 flatbreads or pittas 500g plain yoghurt 2 small garlic cloves, crushed 2 tbsp lemon juice handful of parsley, roughly chopped handful of pomegranate seeds 50g pine nuts, toasted

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METHOD

1 Heat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. 2 Cut the aubergines into quarters, lengthways, and then slice them into 1cm chunks and place in a baking tray. Pour over a generous helping of olive oil and a sprinkle of salt, then roast in the oven for approximately 40 minutes, or until the aubergines are soft. 3 Brush the bread with olive oil and toast in the oven for about 10 minutes until nice and crispy. Then break it up into pieces. 4 In a bowl, combine the yoghurt, garlic and lemon juice. 5 When the aubergines are ready, take them out of the oven and allow to cool. Place them in a shallow bowl then pour the yoghurt mix on top. 6 When ready to serve, sprinkle with the crispy bread, parsley, pomegranate seeds and toasted pine nuts.


S T A R T E R S

THE SAVVY SHOPPER’S COOKBOOK Amy Sheppard Ebury, £14.99

JUNK FOOD JAPAN Scott Hallsworth Absolute Press, £26

LOLA’S: A CAKE JOURNEY AROUND THE WORLD

LEMONS AND LIMES

Ursula Ferrigno Ryland Peters & Small, £14.99

Lola’s bakers with Julia Head Ryland Peters & Small, £18.99

Since starting her blog last year, Cornwall-based mum of two Amy Sheppard has had more than 100,000 page views. Dubbed the ‘budget cooking queen’ because she shops only at discount supermarkets, her blog showcases creative and healthy meals aimed at cooks trying to tighten their belts. This, the follow-up to her best-selling Aldi Lover’s Cookbook, features more than 80 delicious, money-saving recipes including cheese, potato and onion rostis; curried mackerel rice with toasted almonds; Moroccan chickpea curry; and chilli and lime chicken. Featuring simple dishes created from basic ingredients and leftovers, and making good use of frozen and tinned food as well as fresh, this is a smart recipe collection that will save time as well as money.

Having made his name as head chef at legendary London restaurant Nobu before opening another Nobu in Melbourne in his native Australia, Scott Hallsworth has been at the cutting edge of Japanese cuisine for the past 20 years. He now runs Kurobuta in London, and this book brings together 100 recipes from the restaurant, which has become a firm favourite with critics and foodies alike. Hallsworth’s wild and inventive take on Japanese food includes signature dishes like barbecued pork belly, tea-smoked lamb and komburoasted Chilean sea bass. With superb photography from David Loftus (who takes the pictures in the Jamie Oliver books), innovative new dishes include tuna sashimi pizza, Wagyu beef sliders, and iced passion fruit and sake parfait.

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Boutique London bakery Lola’s is famous for selling an international range of cakes in all shapes and sizes, and this beautifully designed book brings together 70 examples from all over the world. The mouthwatering selection of recipes has been created by Julia Head alongside the talented team at Lola’s. Detailed, precise and well tested, the recipes are aimed at the more experienced home baker, and range from classics like English Victoria sponge and Welsh bara brith to more exotic offerings such as Cuban coconut rum cake and Indian sesame seed cake. We particularly like the sticky orange and almond cake from Spain; the dairy-free Greek lemon olive oil cake; and the summery Italian Genoise sponge with raspberries.

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Ursula Ferrigno might be one of the leading authorities on Italian food, but she looks beyond the Mediterranean in this global collection of citrus recipes. Celebrating the unique sharp and aromatic burst of lemons and limes, the 75 recipes here are interspersed with essays on the history and culture of citrus fruits, their health benefits, and tips on how to grow, preserve and pickle your own. A squeeze of lemon or lime can lift and transform a dish, and this is certainly the case with recipes such as grilled lemon sea bass with roasted red pepper and basil butter, and spiced roasted chicken with chickpeas, carrots and preserved lemon. Peruvian key lime pie and lemon cardamom and raspberry torte bring things to a sweet conclusion.


m Manor Fa a h n rm de

To GLOUCESTERSHIRE

Todenham Manor Farm specialises in producing high quality, outdoor-reared pork and beef. Our pasture land, situated in the Gloucestershire countryside, is grazed by our Aberdeen Angus and South Devon cattle and our generous outdoor pig pens are happily occupied by Gloucester Old Spot, Middle White and Saddleback pigs. Just in time for summer, Todenham Manor Farm has launched a speciality BBQ Box, featuring an array of award-winning meat including rare breed rump steaks, free range chicken thighs, pedigree beef and lamb burgers and traditional and merguez sausages.   To book your BBQ Box please visit the website to easily order online or pop in to see the onsite butchery which is open Monday to Friday from 8am to 2pm.

01608 654 341 info@todenhammanorfarm.co.uk www.todenhammanorfarm.co.uk


CH E F !

Beer we GO

WHAT TO MAKE AND HOW TO MAKE IT, DIRECT FROM OUR FAVOURITE FOODIES

Shandin Rickard-Hughes grew up in Oregon, but now lives in Cheltenham. She’s the founder of Brewerism, which offers brewery tours and guided tastings around the Cotswolds, showcasing the best local beers around, and in this issue she’s matched some of those brews to our recipes! All of the beers can be found at Favourite Beers in Cheltenham. Cheers! brewerism.co.uk

There’s no doubt that mackerel is a pretty fish. And it’s a pretty tasty one, too!

H I G H L I G H T S

DREAMY DESSERT

FISHY DISHY

Try this truly heavenly cheesecake Page 28

Full of light and bright summer flavours Page 30

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SEASONAL SPEARS New season asparagus takes centre stage Page 32

P L U S

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expertly matched beers to enhance this month’s dishes!


ChOCs AwAY

RASPBERRIES AND DARK AND WHITE CHOCOLATE MAKE A DIVINE TRIO IN THIS DESSERT BY ROBERT GOVES OF RELISH EVENT CATERING Robert says: “We are heading into the raspberry season, which will be in full flourish from the beginning of June. This time of year always takes me back to when I was a child going raspberry picking with my family at the local farms. We’d always starting the day with clean clothes and end it with huge raspberry stains! “Relish works very closely with Bottle Green, who have just released their brand new Plump Summer Raspberry cordial. The flavours of white chocolate and raspberries are a great match, and this is an excellent new product, so what better way to incorporate it into a dish? To cut through the sweet flavours we have included a dark chocolate base.”

DOUBLE CHOCOLATE PLUMP RASPBERRY CHEESECAKE SERVES 10

INGREDIENTS For the base: 300g digestive biscuits 150g salted butter 30g cocoa powder For the filling: 400g mascarpone cheese 400g cream cheese 400g double cream 600g white chocolate For the jelly topping: 250ml Bottle Green Plump Summer Raspberry cordial 4g gelatine

Sam Smith’s Organic Raspberry Fruit Beer, £2.75/330ml Beers made with real fruit juice tend not to have much hop bitterness, so the sweet malt is dominant. Malty beers lend themselves to desserts with biscuit or bread elements, like the base of the cheesecake, as they’re both grain based. The beer’s carbonation cuts through the fat from the creamy dairy and cocoa butter in the chocolate, lifting the lipids and refreshing the palate. The tart, sweet raspberry will enhance the summery feel of this pud.

METHOD 1 Line the base of a 10inch springform tin with greaseproof paper. 2 Blend the digestive biscuits with the cocoa powder in a food processor to the texture of bread crumbs, and transfer to a bowl. 3 Melt the butter and pour onto the prepared biscuit mix. Combine this mixture well and then press into the base of the springform tin. Put this in the fridge while you prepare the filling. 4 Combine the mascarpone and cream cheese in a bowl with a whisk. 5 In a separate bowl, whip the double cream to soft peaks. 6 Melt the white chocolate over a bain marie, then add to the cream cheese mix and combine thoroughly. Then fold the whipped cream through the cream cheese mix. 7 Pour the completed mix into the springform tin. Be sure to spread it thoroughly with a palette knife to create a smooth surface to pour the jelly topping onto later. Put it in the fridge to set for around 30 minutes. 8 To make the jelly topping, heat the cordial in a saucepan and dissolve the gelatine (as per packing instructions) into it. Allow this to cool, and then pour onto the cheesecake. 9 Set this for around two hours, then slice and serve!

Beer match!

RELISH EVENT CATERING; 01285 658444; relishevent.co.uk

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C H E F !

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C H E F !

hOLY maCKereL YOU’LL BE SINGING THE PRAISES OF THIS TASTY MACKEREL DISH BY CHRIS WHITE, CHEF DIRECTOR OF THE WHITE SPOON IN CHELTENHAM

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Since opening in 2015, The White Spoon, Cheltenham, has gained a glowing reputation, both locally and nationally. The dream of Chef Director Chris White, this small restaurant sits overlooking the oldest church in the town. It offers an exceptional standard of food, in a relaxed environment and an atmosphere that suits both formal and informal occasions. The menus demonstrate a passion for showcasing the diversity of ways in which ingredients can be prepared and enjoyed. In this case the humble mackerel is transformed into a spectacular fresh dish accompanied by cucumber and lemon, perfect as a starter or light lunch.

HAY SMOKED MACKEREL, CUCUMBER AND LEMON PURÉE SERVES 8

INGREDIENTS 8 fillets of mackerel, skin removed handful of chopped parsley, dill and chive 50g capers 50g crème fraiche zest and juice of ½ lemon and ½ lime 1 cucumber (plus a few extra slices for garnish – optional) 2 unwaxed lemons 1l water 80g sugar agar agar nasturtium leaves to garnish (optional)

METHOD 1 Line a deep, heat-proof baking try with hay and burn until flames are minimal. 2 Meanwhile, slice the fillets in half, length ways. And lay belly side down on a perforated tray covered with tin foil. 3 Place tray over the hay and heat until the mackerel is lightly cooked, then remove. 4 Lightly salt the other side of the mackerel, leave for for 10 minutes, and then wash to remove the salt. 5 Take half of the mackerel, break into flakes and mix with the parsley, dill, chives, crème fraiche, capers, lemon and lime, then season to taste. 6 Use clingfilm to roll the mackerel mix into a ballotine and place in the fridge for at least an hour to set. 7 Once set, cut into 5cm lengths then return to the fridge until the cucumber jelly is ready. 8 To make the jelly, blitz the cucumber in a food processor and pass through a fine cloth into a bowl. 9 Weigh the liquid and calculate what 1% of the volume is. Add this amount of agar agar and bring to the boil. 10 Allow to cool to approximately 60C, then spread thinly on a nonstick tray and put in the fridge to set. 11 Once the jelly is set, cut and wrap around the mackerel ballotine, removing the clingfilm first. 12 To make the purée, chop the lemons and add to a pan of 1l of water with the sugar. Bring to the boil and then simmer until the lemons soften and all the water has reduced by two thirds. 13 Purée in a food processor, then season and add fresh lemon juice to taste. 14 Pass through a fine cloth or sieve. 15 To plate, ensure the ballotine has reached reach room temperature, then scorch the mackerel fillets with a blow torch or under the grill. 16 Place the fish and the ballotine on the plate and dress with lemon purée, extra scorched cucumber pieces and nasturtium leaves to garnish. thewhitespoon.co.uk

Wild Beer Co Sleeping Lemons (gose), £2.93/330ml The beer’s carbonation cuts through the fat from the natural oiliness of the mackerel, helping to refresh the palate. The citric acidity of this beer pairs beautifully with the lemon, lime, cucumber and tang of the crème fraiche, taking some of the tartness out of the beer. Gose is beer brewed with salt and coriander, and this particular gose is made with preserved lemons. The salt and lemon used in both the food and beer will pair nicely.

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Beer match!


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C H E F !

Brit spears

KUBA WINKOWSKI, HEAD CHEF OF THE FEATHERED NEST INN, HAS SHARED THIS DISH, WHICH IS A TRUE CELEBRATION OF LOCAL PRODUCE Kuba works closely with local farmers and producers to get the best ingredients, and in this recipe the star ingredient is the green asparagus grown by Alan Cox in Oddington (just a few miles away) and delivered every day straight from the field. Cream and eggs are also sourced from the Cotswolds. This is great little dish to celebrate amazing English asparagus, and it’s a showstopper at any dinner party, with the added advantage that it can all be prepared well in advance and re-heated to order. Comforting duck egg and Parmesan custard, smoked duck ham and hollandaise sauce are the perfect match.

GRILLED ODDINGTON ASPRAGUS WITH DUCK EGG CUSTARD, SMOKED DUCK BREAST, PARMESAN AND HOLLANDAISE SAUCE SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 28 spears of English green asparagus 4 duck eggs 175g whipping cream 50g Parmesan cheese, finely grated 1g salt 20g white wine vinegar 100g extra virgin rapeseed oil 1 pack of Kataifi pastry (optional) 100g baby spinach 1 smoked duck breast 20g chives, finely chopped

Beer match!

Buxton Brewery Old World Saison, £3.50/330ml The saison, also called a farmhouse ale, was traditionally brewed in France and Belgium early in the year and supplied to farm hands throughout the summer months. It is crisp, refreshing, complex and ‘funky’. It’s commonly paired with earthy, rich and complex dishes, as well as strong flavours such as gamey meat and mature cheese. This summer beer will handle the many elements of this brilliant summer dish with ease, standing up to the smoked duck whilst complementing the delicate custard, sauce and greens.

METHOD 1 Preheat the oven to 140C/275F/gas mark 1. 2 Prepare asparagus by snapping and trimming the ends. Cut neatly to the same length. Set aside. 3 With an egg cutter, carefully cut the top of the egg and tip the whites and the yolks into a bowl. Repeat with the rest of the eggs and the keep the shells to cook the custard in (a small ramekin or shot glass could be a great replacement). 4 Make the custard mix by whisking the cream with finely grated Parmesan, one whole egg, 1 egg yolk and salt (keep 2 leftover egg yolks for the hollandaise sauce). 5 Put the empty egg shells back in the egg box, so they stay upright, and pour in the custard mix, leaving a 1cm space at the top. 6 Cook the filled egg shells in the oven for about 30 minutes, until the egg is just starting to set – it needs still to have a wobble. (Remember, it will continue to cook while cooling down!) 7 Prepare the hollandaise sauce by whisking two leftover egg yolks with white wine vinegar over the pan of boiling water until thick and glossy. Then slowly pour in the extra virgin rapeseed oil, whisking constantly, just to make an emulsion. Season with salt and pepper and keep warm. 8 Make little nests of Kataifi pastry by deep frying it on 180C and using two ladles to shape it. This is optional, but it adds texture and wow factor to the presentation. 9 When ready to serve, grill the asparagus for about 3 minutes until just cooked, wilt the spinach in a little butter, warm up the custards for few minutes in the oven, and thinly slice the smoked duck breasts. 10 When the asparagus is cooked and the eggs are warm, top them with hollandaise sauce, sprinkle with chives and arrange upright, like soft boiled egg, on top of the duck and the pastry nest, using the drained, wilted spinach as a support. Place asparagus next to it, and enjoy! thefeatherednestinn.co.uk

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C H E F !

ShaKe it Off

GIVE YOUR DAY A KICK START WITH THIS SUPER SMOOTHIE FROM CELIA DUPLOCK It’s berry season again and, as well as being delicious, berries are packed with vitamins and antioxidants that help to keep you healthy. Here’s a quick, simple and highly nutritious recipe that not only tastes great, but will help up your fruit and vegetable count for the day! And if that’s not enough good news, this berry shake includes another exciting and highly nutritious ingredient that you may not be familiar with – amazake. Amazake is a fermented food made from grains such as rice, millet and oats, and has a rich, natural sweetness. A traditional Japanese food, it dates from the Kofun period (250538AD) and is deeply rooted in Japanese culture. Rich in enzymes and probiotics due to the fermentation process, amazake is gentle on the system and very easy to digest, making it an excellent food for young children and people with poor digestion. Amazake can be used in desserts or smoothies and can either be eaten hot or cold. Because of its mellow flavour it acts as a natural sweetener, reducing the need to use sugar, which helps if you’re counting calories. This recipe is great at any time of day, but particularly good in the mornings as a breakfast smoothie. You can use any seasonal fruit and any milk, although this is traditionally a vegan recipe. And if you haven’t got time for breakfast, adding ground nuts and seeds will increase the healthy fats and protein content, making it a substantial meal replacement.

Celia runs regular workshops at the Organic Farm Shop in Cirencester and offers Macrobiotic consultations, food coaching, menu planning and cooking lessons for individuals in their own homes or for small groups by appointment. To contact Celia, call 07831 342214 or email enquiries@cotswold-macrobiotics.com

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AMAZAKE BERRY SHAKE SERVES 3-4

INGREDIENTS 250g seasonal mixed berries (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries) 380g jar millet, oat or rice amazake 200ml water 300ml soya, rice or almond milk 1 small pinch salt 1 dstspn maple syrup, or alternative sweetener to taste Optional: 2-3 tbsp oat flakes, musesli or cooked grain 1 dstspn ground seeds or almonds METHOD 1 Wash the berries and blend all the ingredients together in a liquidiser to form a rich and smooth shake. Chill and serve cold. 2 For a hot version of the shake, put the ingredients in a pan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 5 minutes, blend and serve. 3 For a thicker version, add 2-3 tbsp of soaked oat flakes, muesli, or cooked grain such as millet or soft rice. This is good if you are looking for a more substantial drink or a meal replacement. 4 For added nutritional value, add 1 dstspn of ground seeds or almonds to the mixture before blending.

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With a central grill and chimney flue ringed by bench seats, the Cotswold BBQ Hut has a distinctly Scandinavian feel. Dress it up with sumptuous fabrics and cushions, or keep the wooden finish natural and recline on cosy reindeer skins. The central barbecue warms the BBQ Hut to give yearround warmth, whilst providing a versatile cooking platform for any type of meal. From Christmas lunches, to informal meals with friends and summer parties in the rain; your options are only limited by your imagination. Cotswold BBQ Huts have an unrivalled reputation for Quality, Safety, and Customer Service. They are warm in the winter and cool in the summer, so provide a great extra entertaining space. The unique ‘sloping-wall’ design makes a BBQ Hut a stylish addition to any garden. To find out how a Cotswold BBQ Huts could change your life for the better call us for an informal chat or to arrange a FREE site visit.

www.cotswoldbbqhuts.co.uk 0115 932 8888


M A I N S

Veg Out

sO RAd!

BLOGGER, PRIVATE CHEF AND KEEN KITCHEN GARDENER KATHY SLACK OF GLUTS & GLUTTONY TELLS YOU WHAT TO GROW AND HOW TO COOK IT. THIS MONTH, SHE’S RAVING ABOUT RADISHES…

I

’m quite an impatient gardener. I like crops that just get on with it. Veg that grows quickly and dishes up a reliable, colourful harvest without a fuss. I like a good bang for my buck. That’s why radishes are top of my list at this time of year. They grow incredibly quickly, with little effort, and they are virtually fool proof. Plus, they bring a brash red gaudiness to the veg patch which, secretly, I quite admire. To grow radishes, simply sow the seeds thinly into a 1cm deep drill and cover. Then wait. Within six weeks, maybe even four, you will have little ruby jewels ready to harvest. Their only stipulation is water, so if the weather is very dry, give them a soak now and then or they will turn woody and send up a flowering stem before the red root has set, rendering them inedible. The poor radish is often overlooked these days for reasons I cannot fathom. It can be a bit spicy for some people, and home-grown harvests will be far more opinionated than their bland supermarket cousins. Should this punchy flavour not be to your taste, I recommend roasting them. It might seem a bit loopy to roast radishes at first, but it’s pleasingly alliterative quality hints at the delightful taste which results from roasting a radish(!). They become sweet, mellow and an almost irresistible shade of rose pink.

Kathy Slack writes the food blog, Gluts & Gluttony, about the gluts she gets from her veg patch and the ensuing gluttony in her kitchen. She hosts regular Thursday night pop-ups at Temple Guiting Shop & Tearoom, offering a cocktail and seasonal three-course meal inspired by harvests from the allotment; upcoming dates are July 27 and September 14. See glutsandgluttony.com/events for more. Twitter and Instagram: @gluts_gluttony

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C H E F !

ROAST RADISH, SPELT AND FETA SALAD SERVES 4

This warm salad is a healthy supper in its own right, but also goes beautifully with barbecued lamb or roast chicken. INGREDIENTS 2 bunches radish (approx 300g) slug olive oil salt and pepper 2-3 tbsp balsamic vinegar 200g pearled spelt 200g feta handful peashoots 3 spring onions, finely chopped 100g mange tout or sugar snaps 1tbsp pumpkin seeds 1tbsp sunflower seeds 2 tbsp pine nuts, roasted METHOD 1 Pre-heat the oven to 200C/400F/ gas mark 6. 2 Trim the green from the radishes and toss them in olive oil, salt and pepper. Arrange on a roasting tray, making sure they aren’t too cramped, then pop the tray in the oven for 15 minutes. 3 Meanwhile, put the spelt in a saucepan filled with cold water, bring to the boil and simmer for 15 minutes until just cooked. Drain well. 4 After the radishes have had their 15 minutes, remove the tray, douse the radishes with balsamic vinegar and return to the oven for 5 minutes, or until the radishes are wrinkled and the balsamic jammy. 5 Tip the cooked spelt into the warm radish tray and toss in all the cooking juices. Add the feta, peashoots, spring onions, mange tout, seeds and nuts and give everything a really good mix. Check the seasoning (it might need salt, olive oil and a dash of vinegar) and then serve.

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AT THE HEART OF THE COTSWOLDS LIES A LOCATION OF PURE BEAUTY AND TRANQUILLITY THAT WILL SURPASS YOUR FINEST DREAMS! Whatever your occasion, be it a small intimate Wedding or an Exclusive Use event or Civil Partnership we have the perfect venue to make your day come true.

WEDDING OPEN DAY 9th July 11-3 pm Suppliers, Free Entry, BBQ

For more information on planning your bespoke wedding or civil ceremonies call your dedicated Wedding Planner at Cotswold House Hotel on 01386 840330 Visit our website for special offers and all-inclusive packages for 2017

The Square, Chipping Campden, GL55 6AN

www.cotswoldhouse.com


Big Bake Off, Small Clean Off. Miele’s New Discovery Ovens offer more space to occupy all your baking at one time. With PerfectClean or Pyrolytic models, scrubbing and abrasive cleaners are a thing of the past. Telescopic runners, intuitive controls and status display makes them precise and easy to use too. Miele Discovery Ovens from £599. Pop into our Evesham showroom to see one for yourself and plan your summer baking.

54 Cheltenham Road, Evesham, WR11 2JZ | 01386 76 59 59 www.thevalegroup.com | info@thevalegroup.com


Choose your weapons What on earth is that? It looks like a weird spare part for some gigantic gizmo I wouldn’t understand. Just the thing if your oil rig has stopped working, but useless on its own. As always, how wrong you are! You know how barbecue season’s in full swing? Well, this is the piece of kit you want in order to make the most of it: the new version of the Uuni wood-fired oven that’s been getting outdoor cooking enthusiasts excited since 2012. No slouches, the Uuni guys soon introduced an improved model, and now it’s time for the Uuni 3, another upgrade with exciting new features.

have never been glamour-pusses so much as laymanfriendly, go-anywhere workhorses: fast, portable, easy to use and pretty damn cheap. (Even the wood pellets it runs on cost next to nowt, and soon there’ll be a bolt-on option to run it on gas too, if you prefer.) And anyway, wouldn’t you rather have something that worked than something that looks good? I’d rather have both. Then let’s concentrate on the beauty of what this thing does. The old Uuni 2S would cook a proper wood-fired pizza in a couple of minutes; this one will do it in just 60 seconds, and only takes 10 minutes to get up to 500C. It has a simpler way of loading the wood pellets; a new insulated body for better temperature regulation; and now stands on three legs, rather than four, with each having extrawide feet. Why, you may ask?

They couldn’t have made ‘sexy styling’ one of those features, I take it…? Come on, be fair. I like the way this thing looks: sort of sturdy and utilitarian, and made of corrosion-resistant stainless steel. The Uuni ovens

TOrCh wOOd

I do! Why? Because this way it’s easier to set up in the great outdoors. (Three legs actually give better stability on uneven surfaces.) You know what, I’m kind of over pizza these days. (Such a liar.) But okay, the Uuni 3’s super-short cooking times can be applied to loads of other dishes, too: steaks, salmon, veggies, flatbreads, whatever. You said it’s cheap, but I don’t believe you. Nothing you show me ever is… Not true! And this thing’s under £200, would you believe? The whole idea has always been to reduce the weight, size, cost and hassle of owning a real wood-fired oven, and the Uuni 3 does that better than ever. Job done, I reckon.

OUTDOOR WOOD-FIRED PIZZA OVENS ARE COOL BUT A FAFF – AND EXPENSIVE TOO, RIGHT? NOT SO FAST, SAYS MATT BIELBY

The Uuni 3 costs £199; find it at cuckooland.com, or check it out at uk.uuni.net

THIS MONTH •BEEF IT UP •GETTING GRILLED •PICNIC TIME

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So much more than contemporary German kitchens‌.

Working closely with the leading brands in kitchen innovation and design, we have been helping clients create their dream kitchens and living spaces since 2010. We offer a superb selection of high quality kitchen furniture and appliances, from the best British and European suppliers, including Masterclass, Hacker, Siemens, Gaggenau, Silestone, Corian and many more. To discover more, come in and see us at our beautiful boutique showroom in the heart of Cheltenham.

www.pittville.co.uk Pittville Kitchens 35 Prestbury Rd Cheltenham GL52 2PP 01242 251113


GOt beef S U P P E R

C L U B

KING OF CARNIVORES RICHARD H TURNER VISITS THE CHEQUERS IN CHURCHILL FOR A MEAT-A-LICIOUS SUPPER CLUB

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WORDS: EMMA DANCE PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW CALLAGHAN


t

here ain’t many men who know their meat better than Richard H Turner. Over the last decade or so he’s built up a proper meaty empire in London, with his independent butcher Turner & George, as well as involvement in three restaurant brands (Hawksmoor, Pitt Cue Co and Blacklock), not to mention establishing NYC’s annual carnivorous carnival, Meatopia, in the UK, Spain and beyond – or the fact that he’s written two cook books. Tonight, though, Richard’s swapped the capital for the Cotswolds – The Chequers

in Churchill, to be exact – where he’s taken over the kitchen for a Lucky Onion Supper Club. Cue the meat sweats, then. As all the guests gather, sipping on glasses of ‘Shakey Pete’s Ginger Brew’ – a frothy, frosty cocktail made with real ale, gin, ginger and lemon, and that seems considerably pokier than it tastes – there are some seriously good aromas already wafting out from the kitchen, and I’m grateful the chatter and general hubbub is drowning out my growling stomach. One look at the menu for the evening and it’s clear that this is going to be one helluva beefy bonanza. And probably not the place for a vegetarian. First up is beef tea and bread and beef dripping.

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“Beef tea is Victorian in origin,” says Richard, who’s emerged from behind the grill to give us a bit of background about what we’re slurping. “It was originally fed to invalids in hospital. At Hawksmoor, though, we pimp it up with Madeira and some herbs – so it’s no longer just for ill people!” The tea is served in pretty vintage teapots, but while the presentation might be delicate, the flavour is rich and meaty and comforting. It’s the sort of thing you just want to keep consuming because it tastes so good, and I can’t help thinking that if the Victorians had had access to Richard’s version of beef tea then their average life expectancy would almost certainly have been a bit longer!


S U P P E R

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C L U B


C L U B

PAUL W INCH-FUR NE SS

S U P P E R

There’s a brief gap in the proceedings for a light, fresh dish of scallops roasted in fennel butter before it’s back to beefy business. “I use pure bred Galloway and White Park beef,” Richard tells us. “They are slow grown, older animals which have been fed on pasture and not much else. I really love them. “That’s going to be served with mash – which is one of my favourite veg – with pigs’ trotters. The trotter has been braised down in Madeira, making it unctuous and lovely. There’s some creamed spinach to help it down – oh, and there’s a tomato along the way. to provide some relief!” Yep, it’s clear that veg are definitely just supporting players this evening. And it’s soon clear why, because nothing could upstage the meat that’s being brought to the table in giant sharing platters. There are ruby red slices of rib, so rare that you’d be forgiven for thinking that a good vet might be able to get it moo-ing again, although the hint of a dark, smoky crust suggests a flirtation with the grill just long enough to put pay to any hopes of resuscitation. It’s soft as butter, practically melting in the mouth, and is probably the best beef I’ve ever eaten. It only retains this title for a couple of minutes, however, because then I try the Porterhouse T-bone that comes next. This is serious meat for serious meat lovers. The first lot disappears in a matter of moments and we beg for more. We’re being unashamedly gluttonous and we don’t care – who knows when, or even if, steak this good will cross our paths again. It’s so easy to get mesmerised by the beef that the side dishes could easily have gone unnoticed, which would be doing them a disservice for sure.

The mash is smooth and buttery (I wouldn’t have been surprised if the potatoes had been matched, weight for weight, with the butter), and the addition of the trotter is a revelation. The tomato, served simply halved, is well seasoned and dressed, while Richard’s worked his magic on the creamed spinach, packing it with intense umami flavours that sing a fabulous duet with the meat. The finale is a sticky toffee sundae. “It’s not exactly what you’d call light,” says Richard. “But I think everyone will like it.” He’s not wrong (on either count), but then, what’s not to like? There are fluffy cubes of the sweet pud muddled with ice cream and a thick toffee sauce. Like many of the best things in life, it’s oh-so-wrong, but also oh-sovery-very-right. This was a night of many, many meaty pleasures (and a couple of not-so-meaty ones, too!), and it’s clear why Richard has earned the reputation as London’s King of Carnivores. Judging by the comments I heard, it’s not just me that will be judging all in future against that magnificent beast of a Porterhouse. There’s one thing for it. Richard has to come back and do it all again.

HAVING A PARTY? This section of Crumbs is all about foodie celebrations with style. Could you do it better than these guys, or any of our other recent Supper Club hosts? If so, send venue pics and 50 words on why you’re the host with the most to: emma.dance@mediaclash.co.uk

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SMOKED PRIME RIB SERVES 6

INGREDIENTS 3-bone prime rib, chined but untrimmed, around 3kg (6lb 8oz) in weight 70g Maldon sea salt flakes 10g (¼oz) freshly ground black pepper (You will also need a meat thermometer) METHOD 1 Preheat your smoker to 115C/240F. 2 Remove the beef from the fridge 1-2 hours before cooking and let it reach room temperature. 3 Season the meat heavily all over with the salt and pepper, and colour on all sides over a charcoal grill. Place in the smoker with oak wood or chips. 4 Preheat a smoker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 5 Smoke for 2-3 hours, or until the internal temperature of the meat reaches 60C/140F – the perfect temperature for prime rib. (As a guide, for medium-rare cook to 55-60C/130-140F; medium: 60-65C/140-150F; or medium-well done: 65-70C/150-160F). 6 Remove the rib from the smoker and rest in a warm place for at least 30 minutes (the ideal resting temperature is 58-60C/136-140F), then carve into single-bone portions, each big enough for 2 to share. 7 Serve with grilled portobello mushrooms, smashed grilled beets, kale Caesar salad and roast potatoes. Prime: The Beef Cookbook by Richard H. Turner is published by Mitchell Beazley, £25; octopusbooks.co.uk


The Falcon

Commands the most wonderful position in the picturesque town of Painswick, known as “The Queen of the Cotswolds”.

The Oak

Perfect watering hole in the heart of Painswick, open fire and a warm welcome, sister to The Falcon.

11 individual ensuite bedrooms. Restaurant open all day from 8am to 10pm for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

The openfire provides a snug retreat in winter and the sunny courtyard a stunning space in summer. Muddy wellies, soggy dogs and children welcome.

Wonderful menus created by our chef, who uses fresh local ingredients where possible. A popular bar. Loved by locals and residents, serving a variety of beers, lagers and real ales.

Open daily, we have a selection of real ales and a menu that takes influence from hearty traditional pub food with a hint of gusto.

New Street, Painswick, Glos GL6 6UN Tel: 01452 814222 • info@falconpainswick.co.uk www.falconpainswick.co.uk

St Mary’s St, Painswick GL6 6QG • Tel: 01452 813129 •


The Talbot A PLACE TO EAT WITH FRIENDS & FAMILY

Wide range of Real Ales and Ciders Food served daily From light bites to British classics and tasty puddings Why not check out our weekly Quiz Night every Tuesday?

Come and choose your spice and let us do the rest!

The Square, Stow on the Wold, Gloucestershire, GL54 1BQ 01451 870934

With a selection of different flavourings, you can go hot or extremely mild, and finish of with one of our great desserts!

thetalbotstow@outlook.com

Now open six days a week (Tuesday - Sunday). The Loaded Grill, 37 Castle Street, Cirencester GL7 1QD Tel: 01285 641195 Email: info@loadedgrill.co.uk

www.loadedgrill.co.uk

www.talbotstowonthewold.co.uk


FAMOUS COMMUNITY PUB

At the heart of fashionable Montpellier, Cheltenham NOMINATED FOR AWARD

The recently refurbished Beehive is one of Cheltenhamยนs famous institutions and always ranks in the top 3 pubs in the town. Nominated by its customers in the prestigious Great British Pub of the Year, The Beehive is a neighbourhood pub and itยนs a definite favourite for locals and visitors alike, situated at the heart of the community, even providing transport to locals during the famous Cheltenham Races. Bags of events, great beer and food, and a really friendly welcome whoever you might be.The Beehive has a real buzz about it. This local institution is renowned for its warm and social ambience. Customers from near and far all feel welcome and return time and time again.The Beehive combines all the ingredients for the perfect British Pubยน, the pubยนs new gin shelf is thoughtfully stocked with a comprehensive variety of gins, mixers and garnishes. Its great beer and freshly prepared food, cooked by locally known chef Belinda using only the finest local ingredients and seasonal dishes to reflect the very best of modern British cooking. Belindaยนs brownie is a must try. The Beehive walled garden is the perfect place to eat, meet and relax throughout the Spring and Summer.

The Beehive will be at the Cheltenham Food & Drink Festival 9th - 11th June 2017

Montpellier Villas | Cheltenham | GL50 2XE 01242 702270 | www.thebeehivemontpellier.com


K I T C H E N

A R M O U R Y

The Want List GET SET FOR STYLISH AL FRESCO DINING 1 DAISY BUNCH PLASTIC TUMBLER £5 Whatever your tipple of choice, your drinks will be super-pretty in one of these cute tumblers. Available from Cath Kidston in Cheltenham. cathkidston.com 2 TALKING TABLES FLUORESCENT FLORAL PAPER PLATES £4.25 for 12 Paper plates most definitely do not have to be white and boring! These spectacular examples will brighten up any picnic with their neat and funky designs. Get yours from Cotswold Trading in Broadway. cotswoldtrading.com

2 2

1

2

2

4 3 5

3 EPICUREAN WICKER PICNIC HAMPER £49.95 It’s not a real picnic without a proper picnic hamper, and this one has everything you need for dining in the sun. Pick your one up from Steamer Trading in Broadway. steamer.co.uk 4 LOTUSGRILL BBQ £145 Nothing says summer quite like a barbecue, and the LotusGrill makes outdoor cooking a doddle. It’s easy to carry around, and when you’re finished cooking you can put it in a dishwasher for just the easiest barbecue clean ever! Grab one from Attwoolls Camping & Leisure in Whitminster. lotusgrilluk.com 5 TWEEDMILL ZIP POCKET PICNIC RUG £49.99 With a soft woven wool surface and a waterproof backing, which makes it ideal for the damp grass that the British summer can bring, this lightweight rug folds up into itself when you’re done, and has a handy zipped pocket. From Lakeland in Cheltenham. lakeland.co.uk

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www.coriniumhotel.co.uk

info@coriniumhotel.co.uk 12 Gloucester Street, Cirencester, Gloucestershire GL7 2DG

Where you can always be assured of a warm welcome…

Locally renowned for our great food, warm hospitality and attentive service.

Restaurant open lunch & dinner Popular Sunday roasts from £12.95 Bar open all day • Camra member Al fresco dining in our pretty garden Functions & Special Occasions Ample free parking

Bookings or enquiries 01285 659711

Lynwood & Co is an amazing new café now open in the heart of Lechlade, the inspiration of Robert Broadbent and his wife Kats. ‘We are committed to providing Lechlade and surrounding villages a place where people can meet and enjoy amazing coffee, homemade cakes, in house artisan bread and a menu driven by seasonality.’ Open 8am - 4pm Mon-Friday, 8am-4pm Saturday, 8am-2pm Sunday (Brunch) Lynwood & Co, Apsley House, Market Square, Lechlade, Glouscestershire GL7 3AD 01367 253 707

NOW open in Fairford!


The Angel Hotel 47 High Street Wootton Bassett Wiltshire SN4 7AQ Tel: 01793 851161 Email: TheAngel.WBassett@arkells.com

Our ball room is perfect for your wedding reception or event. We serve food: Monday – Thursday 12:00 – 14:30 and 18:00 – 21:00 Friday – Saturday 12:00 – 15:00 and 18:00 – 21.30 Sunday 12:00 – 15:00

www.theangelhotelwoottonbassett.co.uk

NORTH COTSWOLD CAMRA PUB OF THE YEAR, 2017 (RUNNER UP) Character Pub with stone walls and flagstone floors Casual Dining – Excellent food served all day Passionate about well kept ales Famous Inn located on the Fosse Way (A429) Stunning riverside garden – Al Fresco dining 9 beautiful en-suite bedrooms and two holiday cottages

01285 720721 Fossebridge | Cheltenham | GL54 3JS reservations@innatfossebridge.co.uk

www.fossebridgeinn.co.uk


M AI N S

TOP CULINARY CAUSES, FAB FOOD DESTINATIONS & PEOPLE THAT MATTER

O V E R

T H E

P A G E

STEP OUTSIDE

Fab spots for noshing in the fresh air this summer Page 55

TOP SHOPS

Summer dining goals right here...

Because everyone deserves a little retail therapy sometimes Page 62

INCLUDING

12

lush al fresco dining venues

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Pick your own starting with strawberries from early June

Nestled at the base of the Malvern Hills, within walking distance of the popular festival town of Upton upon Severn, you will find Clive’s Fruit Farm. We are a family run farm, famous for growing fruit which is handpicked, pressed and bottled on site. We produce a large selection of single variety apple and pear juices and have extended our range by fusing flavours such as fiery ginger & pear or our delicious new apple & mango. These are all available in our farm shop, online and also many local stockists. Why not come and try our juices and, if you’re brave enough, our traditionally produced farmhouse cider and perry “Wobblejuice”! There is a children’s play area, café serving homemade treats, PYO in season and a well-stocked farm shop with deli counter and butchery. Monday - Saturday 9am - 5pm • Sundays & Bank Holidays 10am - 4pm

Upper Hook Road, Upton upon Severn, Worcs. WR8 0SA

01684 592664

www.clivesfruitfarm.co.uk

www.mediaclash.co.uk


M A I N S

The Great OUtdOOrs IN THIS COUNTRY WE’RE NOT BLESSED WITH A LOT OF SUNNY DAYS. BUT WHEN THE SUN DOES DECIDE TO COME OUT TO PLAY, WE REALLY LIKE TO MAKE THE MOST OF IT. AND WHERE BETTER TO CATCH SOME RAYS, WHILE ENJOYING SOME TOP CLASS FOOD AND DRINKS, THAN ONE OF THESE AL FRESCO HOTSPOTS?

The Inn at Welland might be your new fave al fresco hang out

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K AY RA N S OM PH OTOG RA P HY

Okay, so it’s possible we’re a little bit biased, but we tend to think that the Cotswolds might be one of the prettiest places in the country, so when summer’s here there are few things more lovely than dining outdoors and enjoying the view. Whether you’re looking for pizza, a Prosecco picnic, or a full on slap-up dinner, we’ve got it covered with these insider (or should that be outsider?) picks...


M A I N S

GREAT GARDEN

BISLEY HOUSE CAFÉ

The terraced back garden at Bisley House is a gorgeous sun trap, and the ideal spot for sipping a Ruggeri Prosecco or a cool refreshing lager. Flower beds, herbs and home grown vegetables add colour and fragrance to the setting too, making it so lovely you might never want to leave. So, what about the food? The Bisley House summer menu is bursting with seasonal produce, and champions regional delights such as grilled meats from a local Gloucestershire butcher, Bibury trout and Cotswold crayfish. On Sundays you can tuck into a traditional Sunday roast, and there are also gourmet burgers, weekly fish specials and plenty of choice of vegetarians, too. Middle Street, Stroud GL5 1DZ; bisleyhousecafe.co.uk

VARIETY PACK

J O NNY B A RR AT T P H OTO GRA P H Y

COTSWOLD FOOD CLUB

The Cotswold Food Club boasts four stunning properties across the Stroud valley, all with glorious al fresco dining areas. Each venue is different in style, but they all stick to the same ethos of offering high quality, locally sourced food and drink in a relaxed and friendly environment. The group's own farm in Woodchester supplies a limited amount of lamb and Gloucester Old Spot pork and venison, supplemented from farms in Gloucestershire, therefore offering only traceable, free range meat. Whether you’re looking for a relaxed pie and a pint, or an elegant wedding venue, Cotswold Food Club has the place for you. Where are they? Fostons Ash is in the Slad Valley, right in the heart of Cider With Rosie country. You’ll find The Old Lodge on Minchinhampton Common, where free range cattle roam, while The Britannia is in the centre of Nailsworth and The Old Fleece is between Nailsworth and Stroud. food-club.com NEW LOOK

ANGEL AT BURFORD

The Angel was voted Cotswold Pub of the Year in 2015 and 2016 in The Cotswold Awards, and it’s also won an AA rosette and been named as a four-star gold AA inn too, so it’s not exactly a secret that it’s pretty darn good. It’s getting even better, though, thanks to a major garden refurbishment, complete with a gazebo seating area, which is due to be

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finished later this month. It's the perfect place to enjoy the delish menu, which is served outside all day, every day. Anything else going on this summer? In short – yes! The Angel is holding a summer festival from August 18-20, with live music, family entertainment, al fresco dining and even a beer festival. 14 Witney Street, Burford OX18 4SN; theangelatburford.co.uk AMAZING VIEWS

THE INN AT WELLAND

The Inn at Welland might technically be outside the Cotswolds, but we think it’s definitely worth the trip. There’s so much to love about this country inn, from the fine grub to the friendly atmosphere and, of course, its outdoor terraces, where you can enjoy killer views of the Malvern Hills while you dine, sip cocktails or try the triple gin flight! What’s the USP? A weatherproof glass veranda and outdoor fireplace means that you can make the most of the setting, whatever the weather. Hook Bank, Drake Street, Malvern, Worcestershire WR13 6LN; theinnatwelland.co.uk PARTY TIME

THE MAYTIME INN

Benches on the grass, cushioned seating on the terrace, full al fresco restaurant service and gorgeous views… what more could you want from a pub garden? How about a giant


chair? Or a petanque pitch, perhaps? Well, you’re in luck, because The Maytime has it all! What’s the haps this summer? There’s live music in the garden (or inside if it’s raining) every Sunday from 3pm to 5pm, with acts including finalists and semi-finalists from TV show The Voice. Every other Thursday evening there’s a petanque tournament (might as well make good use of that pitch, right?), and there's an annual summer party and cider festival with more than 15 ciders, 100 gins, petanque tournament and music on Saturday, July 22. Asthall, Burford OX18 4HW; themaytime.com URBAN OASIS

THE OLIVE TREE

The sun-drenched courtyard at The Olive Tree is an oasis of calm in the busy market town of Nailsworth. Sit and watch the world go by while enjoying Mediterranean-style cuisine – you might even be able to pretend you actually are in the Med! Anything else? On June 2 there’s a wine tasting evening with Woodchester Valley Vineyard (which is just three miles from the restaurant), timed to coincide with English Wine Week. 28 George Street, Nailsworth GL6 0AG; olivetree-nailsworth.com

TERRIFIC TERRACE

THE OX

The Ox Cheltenham may be known for its eclectic décor indoors, but when the sun comes out the beautiful outdoor terrace really comes into its own. With seating for up to 30 people, diners can enjoy The Ox’s signature steaks or lighter seasonal summer dishes, just right for al fresco dining. What’s new? There’s a brand new summer cocktail menu celebrating the best of British spirits, liqueurs and produce – we’re especially excited about the Cornish Spritz, made with Tarquin’s Cornish Pastis and bramley apple shrub and elderflower cordial churned with lemon tonic. The Ox is also partnering up with nearby wine bar The Grape Escape for a series of wine and food matching events, including an American barbecue. 10 Cambray Place, Cheltenham GL50 1JS; theoxcheltenham.com RURAL RETREAT

FIELDFARE CAFÉ AT THISTELDOWN FARM

If you’re looking for a wealth of outdoor space then you can’t do much better than the Fieldfare Café, which is set in no less than 70 acres of meadows and woodlands.

From sandwiches to steaks, from pizzas to picnics, or from fishy dishies to delish desserts, there’s an al fresco dining option to suit you

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M A I N S

Right: the sunny terrace and gorgeous gardens at Sudbury House Hotel; bottom: the Old Passage has a great terrace, where you can sit and devour their seafood specialities

A full eight of those acres, including a pond and a stone circle, are available for lucky visitors to stroll around. What’s the USP? The conservatory houses an open kitchen with a wood-fired clay oven and charcoal barbecue, while smart bi-fold doors open out onto the terrace, creating a covered seating area with views over the Woodchester valley. Every Friday and Saturday until lateSeptember there are pizza evenings (but make sure you book!), sometimes with live music. Other events over the summer include barbecue evenings, yoga classes and gin and wine tastings. Thistledown Farm, Tinkley Lane, Nympsfield, Stroud GL10 3UH; thistledown.org.uk PICNIC TIME

SUDBURY HOUSE HOTEL

With spacious patios where you can catch the sun or sit shaded by pretty magnolias, and secluded gardens, perfect for strolling in after indulgent dining (and believe us, the food is so good you will deffo want to indulge!), there are few more pleasant spots to wile away a sunny afternoon than Sudbury House. What’s new? Make the most of the beautiful landscaped gardens and enjoy an afternoon tea hamper with a selection of sweet and savoury delights, all washed down with a refreshing chilled bottle of Prosecco. It’s

available from Sunday to Thursday until the end of August. 56 London Street, Faringdon SN7 7AA; sudburyhouse.co.uk WATERSIDE WONDER

THE INN AT FOSSEBRIDGE

Where the Fosse Way drops into the Cotswolds valley of the River Coln you’ll find The Inn at Fossebridge. And what a really rather splendid setting it is! The glorious terrace overlooks a pretty garden, with the lake and river away in the background making it one of the most Instaworthy al fresco settings we think you’ll find.

What’s so special? After enjoying some delicious food and drink you can go for a walk, spotting swans and other wildlife. Stow Road (A429), Fossebridge GL54 3JS; fossebridgeinn.co.uk DOWN BY THE RIVER

THE OLD PASSAGE

Situated on the banks of the Severn, the delightful terrace at The Old Passage is a great spot for catching a few rays while enjoying food and drink, not to mention the view of the river and on to the pretty town of Newnham on Severn and the Forest of Dean. What’s on the menu? The Old Passage specialises in fish and seafood, and although salmon and elvers that were once plentiful in the river are now in short supply, chef John Lane takes pride in using sustainably sourced produce. Freshly shucked oysters and impressive Fruit de Mers platters are a particular speciality. Passage Road, Arlingham GL2 7JR; theoldpassage.com PLAY TIME

BAKERS ARMS

The Bakers Arms is a good honest pub, with proper ales and traditional pub grub. The garden is huge, and very kid-friendly with swings and enough room for youngsters to have a game of footie while you relax. Everyone’s a winner, then. Anything else going on? Wednesday is pie and a pint night; Thursdays is steak night. Broad Campden, Nr Chipping Campden GL55 6UR; bakersarmscampden.com

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• Sun drenched courtyard • Excellent reputation for food & service • No.1 restaurant in Nailsworth (Trip Advisor) www.theolivetree-nailsworth.com 28 George Street, Nailsworth, Gloucestershire, GL6 0AG 01453 834802

THE

HAND AND SHEARS A warm welcome awaits in our family run pub. We are a small pub with a big heart. We offer light bites, lunch or dinner. And classic Sunday roasts.

eat, drink & relax Church Hanborough,Witney Oxfordshire OX29 8AB Telephone 01993 881392

www.handandshearswitney.co.uk

Lovely Fresh Milk & Cheese CertiFied Organic by The Organic Soil Association (and the only organic goat herd in the Cotswolds and Gloucestershire).

Suppliers to local retailers and resturants Home Farm, Quenington, Netherton, Cirencester GL7 5DD Tel: 01285 750236 MOB:07584 323439

www.nannylanders.co.uk


10% discount off food on production of this advert.

delicious diner

A warm welcome awaits you in our family run pub with rooms, situated in the picturesque Cotswolds.

We are quirkily found in the heart of an industrial estate in a beautiful quaker style building, we offer breakfasts, lunches and afternoon teas from 10am till 4pm. We welcome dogs and have a lovely indoor corner for children

The Swan Inn High Street | Moreton-in-Marsh Gloucestershire | GL56 0LL

01608 650711

E-mail: info@swanmoreton.co.uk Web: www.swanmoreton.co.uk

Also available for private party hire Bring your own alcohol with no corkage fee Mrs Massey can prepare a menu of your choice Unit 5 - 7 // Frampton Industrial Estate // Bridge Road Frampton on Severn // Gloucestershire // GL2 7HE www.mrsmasseysdeliciousdiner.com 01452 740016 // lovefrommrsmassey@icloud.com


M A I N S

A BIT SPECIAL

WE’VE BEEN INDULGING IN A LITTLE RETAIL THERAPY AT SOME OF OUR FAVOURITE COTSWOLDS STORES…

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Left: the butchery counter at Fillet & Bone is stocked with local produce; above: just some of the great goodies on offer at Food Fanatics; right: Robert Welch’s Chipping Campden store

a

few years ago there was a whole lot of talk about how supermarkets were killing the high street and small shops – the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker, those guys – were being forced to close. It feels, though, as if the tide may be turning, with more and more people prioritising provenance over price, and wanting to support their smaller local stores. And there are more advantages to the shopper than just the superior quality of produce; there are also the higher levels of knowledge of those working in each shop, ready to help you make the right choices.

FEEL AT HOME

Take Robert Welch Designs, for example, in Chipping Campden. The studio shop first opened almost 50 years ago in 1969, and has long been a destination for fans of his functional and stylish ranges of kitchenware, cutlery and homeware. It’s a real family affair, too: the designs were originally created by Robert, and now his children, Alice and Rupert, are continuing the business with the help of their design team. Manager Claire Murphy says: “Everything for sale in the shop has been designed just around the corner at the Old Silk Mill in Chipping Campden. A lot of the products found here are multi-award winning, and can be seen on the tables of top restaurants around the world. Look at the cutlery you’re eating with next time you’re out to dinner; chances are it’s been designed by Robert Welch.” Robert Welch designs (and many others too!) are also stocked at Gardiner Haskins Homecentre in Cirencester, a real Aladdin’s cave of a shop, with everything you could possibly need for your whole home – not just your kitchen. Manager Andy Stockwell says: “Many visitors are lured in by our fantastic cook shop, then are amazed to discover just how big the store is. I’ve heard it described as a Tardis many times – which is always amusing, as we actually have one of those as well! Our cook shop stocks everything an aspiring foodie could possibly need, and there’s a clear philosophy that every product must do what it is designed to do and represent good value for money. There’s also an emphasis on British suppliers and products.” Supporting the local community is also an important part of the Gardiner Haskins ethos, and they now provide a drop-off point for donations to Longfield Hospice, and are big supporters of the Cirencester Hare Festival and the Cotswold Hare Trail.

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NATURAL BEAUTY

The Natural Grocery Store in Cheltenham is a one-stop shop for groceries that are free from chemical nasties. “None of our products – not one – contain artificial flavours, colours or preservatives,” says director Paul Fisher, proudly. “We’ve been trading for 19 years, and wouldn’t risk our reputation, or the trust our customers have in us, by letting this buying policy slip away. So much of what people buy is processed, and packed with chemical colours preservatives and flavour enhancers, and we at the Natural Grocery Store don’t see why it should be that way. It’s become a cliché to say, ‘you are what you eat’, but it really is that fundamental.” “Seventy per cent of our products are organic,” adds fellow director Mike Fisher. “And where we can, we stock our shelves from local suppliers. Not only does this mean we know exactly how it’s made or reared, but we also know the people involved and how much they care about their work. And we can tell our customers about it, too. “There used to be a perception that ‘natural’ food meant heavy, chewy stuff that was worthy and good for you but incredibly dull. We never see it that way. To us, there’s no point in eating something unless you enjoy it. That’s why we stock things that, quite simply, taste much better.” The Natural Grocery Store is also putting paid to the notion that natural food has to be more expensive than a supermarket alternative. “It’s just not true,” says Paul. “We aim to be as competitive as we can be on price, and we often manage to undercut some of our supermarket chain neighbours.”

DELI BELLY

There’s a wealth of fabulous produce coming out of the Cotswolds, and delis and farm shops are great places to discover new and delicious goodies made locally (and sometimes further afield). Food Fanatics Food Hall in Winchcombe has been providing an array of local, regional and international food and drink to its customers for more than 13 years. The stock changes regularly, but it’s all personally selected, from more than 90 suppliers, by managing partner Martin Williams and his team. You can always be assured, though, that the deli counter will be laden with an extensive range of cheeses, Scotch eggs, olives, patés and charcuterie, and the food hall is always stocked with a great range of cooking ingredients and

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M A I N S

Top right: Williams Food Hall specialises in fresh fish; below right: tasty tipples galore at Teddington Stores

locally produced tipples. There’s a coffee shop on site, too, in case you need a break from all the shopping! Having only opened earlier this year, Fillet & Bone in Chipping Campden is a relative newcomer to the Cotswolds foodie scene. It’s already making its mark, though, and has reportedly caught the eye of restaurateur, cook, and now judge of Channel 4’s Great British Bake Off, Prue Leith, with its dazzling array of locally sourced butchery, cheeses, and fruit and veg, as well seafood delivered less than 24 hours after being caught in Cornwall. There’s also a wide selection cakes, biscuits, oils and vinegars. Also championing local produce is Teddington Stores, a family business that has been open for a little more than two years and which specialises in food, wines, spirits and ales from the Cotswolds and beyond. Of particular note is the butchery with its dry-ager, which allows customers to choose how long they would like their joint to be aged for. Owner Deborah Thompson says: “We believe that buying local food is better for ensuring higher standards of food provenance. Local food is also better for us because of less deterioration in its journey, and is better for our environment due to fewer food miles and increased crop diversity. It is also better for our local rural economy, as more money stays within our communities.” Williams Food Hall in Nailsworth stocks just about everything a gastronome’s heart could desire, with an extensive range of cheeses, game, cured meats, terrines, fruits and vegetables, as well as range of ready-made dishes, such as homemade Gravadlax, fish pies and beef bourguignon, to take away. It’s little wonder, then, that it’s been named one of Rick Stein’s ‘Food Heroes’, and that Matthew Fort chose it as one of his five favourite places to shop. It’s the seafood offering, though, that has really put Williams Food Hall on the map. The fish and shellfish are delivered daily from the Cornish day boats, and there’s an adjoining seafood restaurant and oyster bar too, if you want to let someone else do all the hard work!

ON THE FARM

Much of the produce at Court Farm Shop in Stoke Orchard near Cheltenham comes direct from their own farm, so there’s barely any food miles and you know exactly where it’s come from. The butchery is especially impressive, with more than 30 different flavours of handmade sausages and the intriguingly named ‘Chicken Cushions’ and ‘Chicken Pillows’. It’s not just about the shop here, though, as owner Lisa Grayson explains. “We are passionate about promoting home, farm and local produce, as well as educating young people and promoting the farming industry, rural practices and the value of the countryside,” she says. “As well as having our animal area open, we work hard to attend and run a number of events through the year to give children and adults access to our farming way of life, so they can see for themselves what’s involved, how we take care of our animals, and how food is produced. For example, we hosted a live lambing event during February half term, and we have an Open Farm Sunday on June 11. “As producers ourselves, we are also really passionate about supporting other like-minded producers, and we are really lucky to be in an area with so many suppliers producing good quality products which we are able to showcase on our shelves.”

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So what are you waiting for? Make a note of this little lot PDQ… • Robert Welch Designs, Lower High Street, Chipping Campden GL55 6DY; robertwelch.com • Gardiner Hasking Homecentre, 68-72 Dyer Street, Cirencester GL7 2PF; gardinerhaskins.co.uk • The Natural Grocery Store, 150-156 Bath Road, Cheltenham GL53 7NG; naturalgrocery.co.uk • Food Fanatics Food Hall, 12 North Street, Winchcombe GL54 5LH; food-fanatics.co.uk • Fillet & Bone, High Street, Chipping Campden GL55 6AT; filletandbone.co.uk • Teddington Stores, Teddington Hands, Evesham Road, Teddington, Gloucestershire GL20 8NE; teddingtonstores.co.uk Williams Food Hall, 3 Fountain Street, Nailsworth GL6 0BL; williamsfoodhall.co.uk • Court Farm Shop, Stoke Road, Stoke Orchard, Cheltenham GL52 7RY; courtfarmshop.co.uk

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Live better naturally

Natural. 70% of our products are organic. Local. Where we can, we stock our shelves from local suppliers. Tasty. To us, there’s no point eating something unless you enjoy it. Value . We aim to be as competitive as we can be on price. Here to serve. Our store is open every day of the week from 8am through to 10pm. The Natural Grocery Store || 150 - 156 Bath Road, Cheltenham GL53 7NG || Tel 01242 243737 www.naturalgrocery.co.uk

Perfect for a get-together, a celebration or just a treat!

Evening and Sunday group bookings taken by prior arrangement

JellyPick leJa m 16-17 Vine Mews, Evesha m, Worcestershire, WR11 4R E. in fo@jellypick leja m.co.uk www.jellypick leja m.co.uk

Food Fanatics Food Hall

Stocking a range of local, regional and international foods. From every day necessities to that little indulgence. Whilst you are browsing, why not stop for a sweet or savoury snack in our coffee shop and soak up the surroundings. OPEN EVERY DAY 12 North Street, Winchcombe, Gloucestershire GL54 5LH

01242 604466


A F T E RS NEW RESTAURANTS DEVOURED, NEW CAFÉS FREQUENTED, NEW BARS CRAWLED, AND THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT WE THOUGHT OF THEM

H I G H L I G H T S

CITY STYLE

Dining at Oxford icon the Macdonald Randolph Page 68

RING MY BELL

We discover a whole new level of pub grub at The Bell at Ramsbury Page 70

HOME COMFORT A restaurant in your own home? Yes, please! Page 72

Including…

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FINE WINES matched by The Grape Escape CRUMBSMAG.COM


A F T E R S

(PERFECT PUBS)

THE BELL AT RAMSBURY THIS IS NO RUN-OF-THE-MILL VILLAGE PUB, AS EMMA DANCE FINDS OUT…

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G

etting a village pub right shouldn’t be that hard. Friendly staff, relaxed atmosphere, a decent drinks selection and great grub is pretty much all you need. It’s a mystery, then, how so many places get it so wrong. Not so The Bell at Ramsbury, though. They’ve got it all right. Inside, there are soothing Farrow & Ball tones aplenty (including in the nine bedrooms), with a relaxed bar area for drinking and low-key dining, and a light and airy restaurant for more serious noshing. The staff are cheerful and genuinely enthusiastic about what they are serving, and as soon as our food arrives it’s easy to see why. The menu reads pretty much like your standard Cotswolds gastropub offering. Soup, smoked salmon and scallops all make an appearance oin the starters section, and there’s lamb, pork chops, a burger and fish and chips in the mains. It all looks good, but not necessarily like it’s going to set your world on fire. When the plates arrive, however, it soon becomes apparent that this is a long, long way from your average pub grub. The smoked salmon, hung ewe’s milk yoghurt and beetroot is nothing short of a work of art. And it tastes as good as it looks. There are no thin, slippery slices of salmon here; instead, there’s a meaty piece of delicately smoked fish, dusted with a vibrant beetroot powder while sweet, earthy curls of beetroot conceal tangy yoghurt. The crispy chicken wing is by far the most elegantly presented fowl limb I’ve ever seen. Succulent meat is encased in a well-seasoned crunchy coating, and there’s

a silky sweetcorn purée adding sweetness. There’s yet more texture from a scattering of seeds, while burnt gem lettuce brings a note of bitterness, and the yolk of a cured hen’s egg grated over it all adds richness but not heaviness. It’s a very clever dish, both elegant and playful and, most importantly, completely delicious. Pan-fried stone bass with crushed Jersey Royals, asparagus, citrus velouté and crispy chicken skin is mouthful after mouthful of pure joy – the fish perfectly cooked and the flavours working in well-tuned harmony. The skin on the fish could have been slightly crispier, but that’s really picking holes in an otherwise sublime dish. Across the table there’s a hay-baked lamb rump, which is meltingly soft with a wonderful light smokiness that plays beautifully with the natural sweetness of the meat, and I have to beg to be allowed to try even the smallest mouthful. The carrot cake I choose for dessert is based on a recipe by head chef Jonas Lodge’s mother and, I’m told, she was brought in to taste it before it was allowed to make it onto the menu. It’s good; really, really good, but the real revelation on the plate is a quenelle of carrot sorbet, which is light and refreshing and so smooth it almost strays into the creamy category. Even the husband, who refuses to eat carrots, has to admit that it’s mighty fine, which is praise indeed. He, by the way, has chosen a passionfruit posset with pistachio crumb and mango sorbet, which just bursts with the flavours of summer and sunshine, and declares it a wonderful finale to the meal. Yes, The Bell at Ramsbury is a traditional village pub, but it’s certainly not your average traditional village pub.

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THE BELL AT RAMSBURY, The Square, High Street, Ramsbury, Wiltshire SN8 2PE; thebellramsbury.com


A F T E R S

( D E L I C I O U S D I N N E R PA R T I E S )

LA BELLE ASSIETTE EMMA DANCE DISCOVERS A TOTALLY STRESSFREE WAY TO HOST A DINNER PARTY

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d

inner with friends is always fun, right? But there are some inevitable stresses that come with hosting a party at home… There’s dealing with dietary requirements; the inevitable realisation that you’ve forgotten a vital ingredient, and just as the nearest shop is shutting; trying to juggle entertaining guests and creating perfect dishes; plus, of course, all the clearing up afterwards. La Belle Assiette, though, has found a way to remove all of the hassle. They supply a top quality chef to come to your home, cook a meal for your guests and clean up afterwards. They even send you printed menus, and deal with getting in touch with your guests beforehand to check if there’s anything people can’t/won’t eat. All you have to do is provide a venue, drinks and the cutlery, crockery and so on – then sit back and relax! La Belle Assiette operates all over the country and new chefs are coming on board all the time, so we headed to Cheltenham to put one of the newest recruits, Jamie Raftery, through his paces. Now, full disclosure: I wasn’t actually hosting this meal. Instead, food blogger and


Gloucestershire Young Foodie of the Year, Lucienne Simpson, had invited us, along with Ant Davies and Zoe Fisher – owners of Cheltenham’s fabulous Grape Escape wine bar – around to the town centre flat she shares with her then fiancé/now husband, Scott Thompson, for the foodie shindig. When we arrive, the couple seem very relaxed. Much more relaxed than your average dinner party hosts. But then Jamie’s in the kitchen, cooking and prepping and making sure everything runs according to schedule. Plenty of time, then, for us to enjoy an aperitif before dinner – without anyone having to rush off to check that nothing’s burning or boiling over. Dinner begins with an appetiser of watercress and spinach soup elixir with Jamie’s ‘Seed of Life’ bread. A bright and vibrant green, it looks wonderful and tastes just as good, with a hint of orange just lifting the flavours. The bread, which is made almost entirely from seeds and nuts, is a massive hit with everyone and there’s barely a crumb left. With two veg-a-phobes at the table, the starter of courgette linguine – avocado, live cabbage kraut, pumpkin seed pesto, Brazil nut Parmesan, black garlic and tomato –

could have posed a bit of a challenge. One bite in, however, and all their reservations disappear. It’s one of the most flavoursome bowls of veg I’ve ever eaten, with the little nuggets of black garlic adding an extra delicious surprise, and it’s complemented beautifully by the Felton Road Pinot Gris that’s been selected by Ant and Zoe to match the flavours. Jamie specialises in raw, vegan food, but with his Michelin-starred background he’s a dab hand at everything really, and this evening he’s cooking us duck with “orange and spice and all things nice” accompanied by Ayurvedic sweet potato, cauliflower and leafy spring greens. It’s another big hit, with freshness of the vegetables balancing the richness of the juicy, pink duck. And the Grape Escape duo hit on another winning combo, with their choice of Jean-Marc Burgaud Beaujolais Villages for us to all quaff alongside. Raspberry and coconut kefir mousse, raw almond butter and ceremonial cacao biscuit, chia seed and orange jam and hibiscus tea sorbet is light and fresh, and just indulgent enough to feel like a treat, and the accompanying Riesling proves to be a heavenly match.

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Throughout the evening Jamie glides between the table and the kitchen, clearing plates and bringing out the next dishes. It’s great having the chef on hand to ask about both the ingredients (especially when some of them are somewhat unusual) and the cooking techniques, and Jamie reads the situation perfectly, being friendly and chatty, but never invasive. Sure, it can be fun catering for your own dinner party, but there’s definitely something to be said for being able to enjoy a restaurant experience in your own home, too… labelleassiette.co.uk


A F T E R S

( G O O D R E S TA U R A N T S )

ACANTHUS AT THE MACDONALD RANDOLPH EMMA DANCE PAYS A VISIT TO A TRUE OXFORD ICON…

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he Macdonald Randolph hotel is something of an Oxford landmark – quite a feat, when you consider all the spires and colleges and historic spectacles it’s competing with. But there’s no doubt that the 150-year-old neo-Gothic building, designed by architect William Wilkinson, is impressive, and with its plum spot, right slap-bang in the centre of the city, overlooking the Ashmolean museum – not to mention the fact that it’s a favoured watering hole of TV’s Inspector Morse – it’s not hard to see the draw. The Acanthus restaurant is a new-ish addition, opening last year as part of a major £6.5mill refurb of the hotel that was prompted by a fire which ripped through three floors back in 2015, when the flambé of a beef stroganoff went awry. Needless to say, there’s no stroganoff on the menu now.

What is on the menu, however, are exactly the sort of dishes you’d expect from an upmarket city centre bistro. There’s the likes of French onion soup, shrimp cocktail, fish pie, steak frites and poached chicken supreme, as well as an eggs Benedict with chips – all good safe dishes with a good broad appeal. I start with crab arancini, which are fine enough. The textures are all there – a good crunch to the coating and a creamy centre, with the rice holding its texture – but there’s only really a hint of crab, not the whack of sweet shellfish flavour I’m hoping for. Tea smoked duck breast, though, is more of a success, with just enough smokiness to deliver on its promise without overpowering the soft, delicate duck. Slow braised pork cheeks just melt in the mouth, a butternut squash purée is perfectly smooth, and fondant potato is soft and buttery. It’s all very good, but the addition of something to cut through the sweetness and richness would elevate the dish to another level. A fillet of sea bream is sensitively cooked with crisp skin, and there’s a pile of salty, fresh samphire, all drenched in a wonderful shrimp butter. A dessert of peanut butter cheesecake isn’t exactly elegant, but it’s got that essential sweet/salty balance spot on and is, in my book, a total winner. Meanwhile, across the table, an Amalfi lemon tart is devoured with some genuine enthusiasm. When you’re catering for a market that’s,

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let’s face it, probably going to be mostly tourists, it’s inevitable that the menu isn’t going to be full of surprises or challenging flavours, because it’s got to appeal to so many, and the Acanthus does that very well. Everything’s good – but I want it to be as fabulous as the setting. It’s not far off, to be fair, and if the kitchen team could be a little bit bolder and turn up the flavour a notch, it could be great. ACANTHUS AT MACDONALD RANDOLPH HOTEL, Beaumont Street, Oxford OX1 2LN; macdonaldhotels.co.uk


L I T T L E

B L A C K

B O O K

AShLeY JeNNINGS HE’S HOSPITALITY DIVISION MANAGER AT CATERCREW AND, WHEN HE’S NOT WORKING, HERE’S WHERE YOU’LL FIND HIM…

Breakfast? I love the Farmshop at Gloucester Services. It’s a really high quality breakfast serving, with fresh local produce. And there’s even an option for haggis!

Alfresco feasting? No 131 on the Promenade in Cheltenham. Nothing beats sitting outside with a glass of Champagne and a light snack while watching the world the go by.

Best brew? For me it’s Brew & Bake on the Bath Road in Cheltenham. The clue is in the name really, isn’t it? Mark, who owns it, used to do some work for me; he’s a great guy, and he serves even better coffee (not to mention the cakes).

Hidden gem? Defintiely KIBOUsushi. I love this place. There’s a great array of fresh and exciting sushi here, in an informal (but classy) set-up.

Favourite grocery shop? I like the Natural Grocery Story for its Fairtrade, ethical and local produce.

One to watch? Montpellier Lodge is setting the standards with food. Kevin and Dom are two great chefs with lots of passion.

Quick pint? Can’t do better than going just across the road from our offices to The Bottle of Sauce for a great craft beer.

With friends? Bar & Wok – it’s a favourite of mine and many others. You'll never go hungry with the great portions of authentic Chinese cuisine you get here. The spicy beef patties are a must-try.

Posh nosh? It’s got to be The Daffodil. Tom Rains’ food is awesome, and the setting in the old cinema tops it off.

Comfort food? Fish and chips from The Big Fish on the Bath Road. Always fresh, brilliant service, and my kids love their ice cream.

Food on the go? Real Burger – the name says it all! Maybe not an everyday bite, but well worth sinking your teeth into. I think it’s the best burger in town.

With the family? The Kings Arms in Stow. It’s an unpretentious Cotswolds inn where good food and relaxed atmosphere create the perfect place to be with my crew.

Child friendly? The Langton is a great family pub with food to suit all tastes. My kids love their pizzas and fish and chips. Best curry? East India Café. It’s a small, very unassuming restaurant, but with the best Indian food in town. It’s not your everyday Indian curry, but somewhere to go for something a bit special. Best atmosphere? I like The Clarence Social. It’s a discrete bar serving an eclectic array of wines by the glass, cocktails and beers. You’re always guaranteed a good night out here. Something sweet? You know, it's hard not to get tempted by the array of cakes at Vanilla Pod Bakery. Pre-theatre feed? The Ox in Cheltenham for a quick steak and a glass of wine before watching a show. Come on, what could be better? catercrew.com

QUICK! Add this little lot to your contacts book... Farmshop at Gloucester Services, M5 (between junction 12 and 11a), Brookthorpe, Gloucester GL4 0DN; gloucesterservices.com • Brew & Bake, 217 Bath Road, Cheltenham GL53 7NA; brewandbake.coffee • Natural Grocery Store, 150-156 Bath Road, Cheltenham GL53 7NG; naturalgrocery.co.uk • The Bottle of Sauce, 67 Cranham Street, Cheltenham GL50 3LH; thebottleofsauce.com • The Daffodil, 18-20 Suffolk Parade, Cheltenham GL50 2AE; thedaffodil.com • Real Burger, 49 Winchcombe Street, Cheltenham GL52 2NE; realburgercheltenham.com • No 131, 131 Promenade, Cheltenham GL50 1NW; theluckyonion.com • KIBOUsushi, 18 Regent Street, Cheltenham GL50 1HE; kibousushi.com • Montpellier Lodge, Montpellier Walk, Cheltenham GL50 1S; montpellier-lodge.co.uk • Bar & Wok, 288 High Street, Cheltenham GL50 3HQ; barandwok.com • The Big Fish, 166 Bath Road, Cheltenham GL53 7NF; bathroadbigfish.co.uk • The Kings Arms, Market Square, Stow-on-the-Wold GL54 1AF; kingsarmsstow.co.uk • The Langton, 189-191 London Road, Charlton Kings, Cheltenham GL52 6H; thelangton.co.uk • East India Café, 103 Promenade, Cheltenham GL50 1NW; eastindiacafe.com • The Clarence Social, 1 Clarence Parade, Cheltenham GL50 3NY; theclarence.social • Vanilla Pod Bakery; vanillapodbakery.com • The Ox Cheltenham, 10 Cambray Place, Cheltenham GL50 1JS; theoxcheltenham.com

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Stores

Teddington Food Hall & Butchery - Wine Merchant - Coffee Shop

For fine food from the Cotswolds and beyond…. Our traditional butchery specialises in local free range meats and dry aged beef. Our deli counter has a lovely selection of local cheeses and those from further afield. Visit our coffee shop for delicious coffees and light meals.

www.teddingtonstores.co.uk enquiries@teddingtonstores.co.uk

Situated just north of Cheltenham on the junction between the A46, A435 and B4077. Plenty of free parking. Just turn in behind the fuel station. Open 7 days a week. Mon to Fri 08.30 to 18.30 Sat 09.00 to 18.00 and Sun 10.00 to 16.00

Teddington Hands, Evesham Road, Teddington, Gloucestershire GL20 8NE 01386 725400

Crumbs Cotswolds - Issue 55  
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