Issuu on Google+

Food/Arts/Entertainment/Shopping/Property ISSUE 333 / 17 FEBRUARY – 3 MARCH 2017/ £3

@BathLifeMag

CELEBRATING THE BEST OF THE CITY

ISSUE 333 / 17 FEBRUARY – 3 MARCH 2017 / PART Y ON

INSPIRED BY HER REDEFINING GENDER

SMALL PLATES BIG AMBITIONS

THROUGH ART

DINING AT CORKAGE

AROUND THE CLOISTERS

EXPLORE ABBEY QUARTER

MATERIAL GIRLS

TWO EXPERTS ON BATH’S LACE IN FASHION

PARTY POLITICS AMANDA ABBINGTON

TALKS TRUMP AND FEMINISM AHEAD OF STARRING IN ABIGAIL’S PARTY AT THE THEATRE ROYAL BATH

IN THE RUNNING BATH HALF MUST-HAVES


EDITOR’S LETTER / ISSUE 333 / 17 FEBRUARY – 3 MARCH 2017

#BeBoldForChange

52

ONE TO ONE

We get into the party spirit with Amanda Abbington

With International Women’s Day coming up on 8 March, this issue of Bath Life is dedicated to celebrating the achievements of women. We start with our cover star, Amanda Abbington, who will star in the 40-year anniversary tour of Abigail’s Party which opens at the Theatre Royal Bath in March. On page 52, the Sherlock actress, who will take on the role of Beverly, discusses sexism and social change – themes which she perceives to be the undercurrent of the script – and gives us her thoughts on Trump, feminism and Bath while she’s at it. In our special seven-page arts feature, we question the definition of femininity and ask Bath’s artists and gallerists – both male and female – to respond visually (page 36). Each response is so varied, it goes some way to show how the meaning of the noun differs so vastly through individual experience and opinion. We’ve also spoken with someone who is making history (quite literally) when it comes to her career in fashion. Elly Summers, the curator at the Fashion Museum, Bath, has discovered what is possibly the only dress in the world which once belonged to Queen Charlotte. See the museum’s latest exhibition, Lace in Fashion, on page 58 where you’ll also find our chat with one of the country’s most prestigious designers, Emmy Scarterfield, whose worked for the likes of Giorgio Armani and Bottega Veneta. With all that plus an in-depth look at Bath’s Abbey Quarter, a restaurant review at Corkage on Walcot Street, and bumper society section, we hope there will be something in this issue for every reader to enjoy. See you in a fortnight when we can finally start talking about spring… Lisa Evans, Editor Follow us on Twitter: @BathLifeMag Follow us on Instagram:@bathlifemag


FEATURES / ISSUE 333 / 17 FEBRUARY – 3 MARCH 2017

82

STREET LIFE

We catch up with the traders responsible for putting the magic into Bath’s Abbey Quarter

114 Bath Lives

Artist Perry Harris talks post-punk sub-cults and illustrating Bath


REGULARS / ISSUE 333 / 17 FEBRUARY – 3 MARCH 2017

58

THE ARTS 36 Art galleries The creatives of Bath visually define their view of femininity

45 Arts intro Dame Elisabeth Frink’s Tribute Heads have blown our minds

46 What’s on Arts, gigs, plays and shows – time to update the events diary

58 Fashion The new exhibition at Bath’s Fashion Museum uncovers the secrets and importance of lace

Editor Lisa Evans lisa.evans@mediaclash.co.uk Managing editor Deri Robins deri.robins@mediaclash.co.uk Assistant editor Sarah Moolla sarah.moolla@mediaclash.co.uk Senior art editor Andrew Richmond Graphic design Megan Allison Cover design Trevor Gilham Contributors: David Flatman, Philippa May and Nic Bottomley Group advertising manager Pat White pat.white@mediaclash.co.uk Deputy advertising manager Justine Walker justine.walker@mediaclash.co.uk Sales executive Sophie Speakman sophie.speakman@mediaclash.co.uk Production and distribution manager Sarah Kingston sarah.kingston@mediaclash.co.uk Deputy production manager Christina West christina.west@mediaclash.co.uk Production designer Charlie Pinder charlie.pinder@mediaclash.co.uk

63 Books Nic Bottomley explores real tales of true determination

Chief executive Jane Ingham jane.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk Chief executive Greg Ingham greg.ingham@mediaclash.co.uk Commercial director Steve Hawkins steve.hawkins@mediaclash.co.uk

FOOD 66 Restaurant We enjoy a corking good night at Corkage

Bath Life, MediaClash, Circus Mews House, Circus Mews, Bath BA1 2PW 01225 475800 www.mediaclash.co.uk @The MediaClash

75 Food & drink news Brissi gets a café, and the Mount Somerset Hotel wins three AA Rosettes

© All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission of MediaClash.

SHOPPING 77 Shopping intro Time to invest in a classic watch from Mallory

M E ET T H E T EAM

BUSINESS

DEPARTMENTS

78 Editor’s choice

89 Business insider

Our choice of personal bests, in honour of the Bath Half

News, views and interviews from the region’s professionals

9 12 29 31

Spotlight Society A man’s world Girl about town

About MediaClash We’re a Bath-based publisher, creative agency and event organiser Magazines Our portfolio of regional magazines celebrates the best of local living: Bath, Bristol, Cardiff, Exeter and Salisbury. We also publish foodie mag Crumbs. (www.crumbsmag.com, @CrumbsMag) and wedding title Vow (@VowMag). Agency From the design and build of websites to digital marketing and creating company magazines, we can help. Events We create, market, promote and operate a wide variety of events both for MediaClash and our clients Contact: info@mediaclash.co.uk

PROPERT Y 98 Property showcase A fresh look at The Old Laundry country house near Bath

On the cover Amanda Abbington stars in Abigail’s Party at the Theatre Royal Bath in March. See page 52 for our exclusive interview with her


BATH: ITS LIFE AND TIMES

Mark Foster, Stephen Baddeley and Ged Roddy

UNIVERSITY OF BATH

GOOD SPORTS Five-time Olympic swimmer and now TV pundit Mark Foster, and the University of Bath’s former director of sport Ged Roddy, became the first inductees of 2017 into the University of Bath Hall of Fame for Sport during a joint ceremony. Mark, who won 51 major international medals during an illustrious 23-year career, and Ged who helped establish the University of Bath as one of the country’s leading sporting institutions and famously managed Team Bath FC to the first round proper of the FA Cup in 2002, both attended the celebration on 27 January. The current director of sport, Stephen Baddeley, says, “It is a great pleasure to welcome Mark and Ged into the Hall of Fame for Sport – both are more than worthy recipients of that honour.” For more: www.bath.ac.uk

T050

The Silver Swans introduce a new way of curtseying

ROYAL VISIT

DANCING QUEENS HRH The Duchess of Cornwall recently visited Bath to officially open the newly refurbished Rosenberg House in Chapel Row, owned by the charity, St John’s Foundation Est.1174, who have changed their name from St John’s Hospital. During her visit, Camilla, who is the organisation’s patron, also met with community groups who use the facilities, including members of the Silver Swans

dance class, as well as attending a reception for residents and supporters. Sue Porto, the charity’s chief executive, says, “The Duchess of Cornwall’s visit is a timely opportunity for our patron to see first-hand the positive impact our work is having in the community, and to celebrate this significant milestone for Bath’s oldest charity.” For more: www.stjohnshospitalfoundation.org


SPOTLIGHT

ROYAL CRESCENT

GEORGIAN HOUSE PARTY The Bath Preservation Trust will be leading a city-wide project throughout 2017, to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Royal Crescent. The foundation stone for this masterpiece of 18th century design was laid on 19 May 1767 and has since become one of the most famous buildings in Britain. The project, which has received a grant of £69,200 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, will include six exhibitions across No. 1 Royal Crescent, The Museum of Bath

Architecture and the Herschel Museum of Astronomy, along with 60 events that will offer the opportunity for walks, talks, tours, workshops, debates and activities. Caroline Kay, chief executive of Bath Preservation Trust, says, “We are delighted to have received the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund which allows us to move forward with our ambitious programme of exhibitions, projects and community engagement.” For more: www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk

This terrace housing was always ahead of the curve

The Abbey is bursting with the celebration of migration

BATH ABBEY

TAKES FLIGHT Last summer Bath Abbey was all of a-flutter with hundreds of colourful paper butterflies and now they’re back for a year-long installation. The large scale sculpture called iMigration 2 is by Bath-based artist, Anthony Head, who says, “In today’s world of human migration and its reporting, it’s easy to forget how unique each person is, to reduce people to anonymous groups, stereotypes, or just numbers. My hope is that once the viewer has had a chance to enjoy looking at the swarm of butterflies as a whole, they will be drawn to look closer at each one.” For more: www.bathabbey.org


BONITI NATURAL STONE FLOORING | EVERHOT RANGE COOKERS TIMBER FLOORING | GARDEN FURNITURE

WWW.BONITI.COM | 01225 892 200 | SHOWROOM@BONITI.COM


Adventures in party-going

Alexandra Whittaker and Stephanie Howarth

SCENE AC ROS S B AT H , O N E S H I N D I G AT A T I M E

THE FINAL APPROACH

Celia Adams and Zulekha Afzal

Stacey Toulson and Melanie Crump

Around 150 people gathered in The Gainsborough Bath Spa on 2 February to celebrate making the shortlist of this year’s Bath Life Awards and becoming a coveted finalist. The guests and sponsors enjoyed canapÊs, wine and networking. There was also a memorable dragon performance by Chinese Lion Dance Troupe from the University of Bristol to help mark the Year of the Rooster, plus speeches updating on Bath Life Awards activity ahead of the prestigious event itself on 23 February. Pictures by Chris Wakefield www.crescent-photography.com

Amanda Brown, Silkyh Richardson and Zara Perry

Entertainment from the Chinese Lion Dance Troupe

Gerald Addicott and Emily Addicott Sauvao

12 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

Gemma Wilkes, John Hewitt, Paul Younger and Melisser Hillier


SOCIETY

Huw Jones and Ian Sandham

Rachel Hornsby and Laura Walker

Helen Rich, Belinda Bradley and Cathy Foster

Jonathan and Lynn Lee

Dave Dixon and Nicola McHale Paul Tagent and Charlie Dewery Holly Tarquini, Richard Brookes and Mike Strathdee

Claire Anelo, Cathy Adcock and Karen Ramirez Nick Gane and Tony Abbott

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 13


SOCIETY

Ebonie Norris and Michael Eavis

FESTIVAL OF ARTS

Hetty Dupays and Peter Salt

Legendary Glastonbury farmer Michael Eavis helped host a presentation night on 10 January at the Ustinov theatre, which saw the Theatre Royal Bath’s Creative Fund share out more than £34,000 worth of grants across a number of local projects, including Theatre Bath Bus and Changing Tunes. Photos by Chris Daw www.chrisdawphotography.com

Rebekah Searle, Mel Jacob and Sarah Penny

Jamie Luck and Kate Cross

Anna Lord and Aimi Kuhlke

Zoe Bailey and Lydia Marsh

Eugene Hibbert and Lucy Walker

Ian McGlynn and Peter Boddy 14 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


SOCIETY Alix Ainsley and Diane Mitchell

WA X WORKS

Alison Young and Mark Jones

It was a full house at Komedia Bath on 14 January for the Ruby Wax event, organised by Topping & Company Booksellers and hosted by TV presenter Ali Vowles. The entertaining, enlightening comedian talked openly and honestly, with trademark wit, about her new book, Mindfulness For The Frazzled. Photos by Philip Shone www.philipshone.wixsite.com/photography

A packed house for Ruby at Komedia Bath

Helen Murphy and Sam Jones

Cornelia Topping and Hugh Topping

Ruby Wax and Ali Vowles

Julie Lewis and Suzanne Clark

Tammy Rogers and Leyla Tugwell

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 17


SOCIETY

SWEET THINGS

Jools Scott and Matt Sheeran

The short film Dr. Sugarloaf, which recently premiered at Cannes Short Film Corner, was screened at The Little Theatre in Bath on 12 January. Key cast members of the romantic black comedy were in attendance, including actors Olivia Murray and Anna Herzog, composer Matt Sheeran and writer and director Sarah Mallabar. Photos by Tim Woolf www.woolfandrogersphotography.com

Rosie Foy Olivia Murray

Sarah McCluskey

Karen Damiano and Sarah Mallabar

David Nassim and Lisa Brooking-Clark

Brittany McComas and Anna Herzog

18 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


Trusted. Local. Affordable ! e v a s d n a s r LOCAL Bring these vouche VETS FO Puppy and kitten starter packs £45

LOCAL PETS

#

Pack consists of Primary vacc course (2 injections), initial flea & worm treatment, Microchip, discount voucher on a bag of food & one months free membership when you join our Pet Health Club. Offer valid 1 February - 30 April 2017. Only available at participating practices.

#

Best value vaccination £14.99 For dogs, cats and rabbits. Applies to a one off vaccine. Excludes rabies, chlamydia and kennel cough. Offer valid 1 February - 30 April 2017. Only available at participating practices.

#

Your first consultation is on us FREE Available to all new clients or new pets. Applies to the cost of the appointment only. Does not apply to any necessary meds, prescriptions or vaccinations.

Offers available at Bath Vets Surgeries below: Station Road Surgery 15a Station Road Lower Weston BA1 3DY TEL 01225 428921

Beaufort Surgery 4 Beaufort East London Road BA1 6QD TEL: 01225 312061

Park Road Vets 11 Park Rod Keynsham BS31 1BX TEL 0117 9339933

Oldfield Park Surgery 4 Third Avenue Oldfield Park BA2 3NY TEL 01225 423652

R


SOCIETY

Trevor Osborne, Sharon Wiseman and Jaydee Emery

CLUB TOGETHER The Bath Percent Club, which encourages and supports philanthropy in business, recently hosted an evening at Cleveland House. Local charity Southside and Bath Philharmonia gave presentations to club members and guests, while Bath Mind volunteers served Food for Thought canapĂŠs. Photos by Neil Watson www.neilwatsonphotography.co.uk

Simone Homes, Charles Wiffen and Jason Thornton

Lynda Bevan and Jo Duncan

Charlotte Langley and Richard Waldron

Richard and Yasmin Hall

Karen Brennand with Rob and Abby Moore Tim Matthews with the Natural Theatre Company

Lindsay and Ted Brewster

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 21


SOCIETY

Pete Downes and Annabel Jackson

ROOM SERVICE The Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa played host to the Bath Life Business Club on 23 January, when Ian Taylor was the latest speaker to address members. Over a fine dining twocourse lunch, the owner of luxury Bath hotels Abbey Hotel, Villa at Henrietta Park and No. 15 Great Pulteney talked and answered questions about his successful career in hospitality. Turn to page 93 for the full report. Photos by Derryn Vranch www.derrynvranch.com

Ian Taylor

Xxxxxxx Christa Taylor

Ben White and Rosanna Hood

Dave Dixon and Peter James Stephen Graver and Paul Daniels

Mari Karu and Grant Atkinson

22 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

Tim Moss, Joe Cussens and Mark Lucas


FREE NEW YORK BREAK With every kitchen instruction placed before 28 February 2017* *T&Cs Apply

SHAKER & MAY BESPOKE HANDMADE KITCHENS 01373 764345 L11 Commerce Park Frome BA11 2FB www.shakerandmay.co.uk


SOCIETY

TEAM TALK More than 100 business contacts, private clients and lawyers gathered at Brasserie Blanc, off Queen Square, for Royds Withy King’s annual Meet The Team social event. Managing partner, Graham Street, gave a short welcoming address and spoke about the opportunities created by Withy King’s merger with city of London practice Royds.

Graham Street and Sue Turner

Photos by Guy Traynor www.guytraynorphoto.com

Hazel Phillips and Rob Kinsman Jiten Deshi and Steve Pratt

Angie Calvert-Jones, Ian Wilson and Simon Calvert Jones

A GOOD FOUNDATION On 19 January, Bath Rugby Foundation hosted one of its regular Friends of the Foundation evenings. The event saw representatives from numerous Bath businesses meet at legal firm, Thrings in Queen Square, to hear from the Foundation about their employability programmes, designed to help participants get back into employment or training.

Halena Coury, Allison Parks-Norris and David Trick Wayne Palmer and Dan Hipkiss

Photos by Jeni Meade www.jeni-meade-photography.com

Tony Larkman and Lucy Ferris

Joseph Turnbull and Paul Short

24 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


SOCIETY

MONEY TALKS The second Bath Investment Management Conference was held on 19 January at the Assembly Rooms, Bath. The forum, which was attended by 160 people, provided a chance for locally-based industry participants and investors to network and listen to presentations on a range of subjects, including asset allocation.

Emma Harris and Josh Harding-Wyatt

Photos by Jeni Meade www.jeni-meade-photography.com

Fabian Richter, Joseph David, Luka Gakic and Dick Jenkins

TAKING CARE

Henrietta Brown, Rob Perks and Mandy Paterson

Guy Pullen, Mark Lazenby and Michelle Boothby

Sue Sampson and Emma Warren

The RUH New Year’s Honours Awards Ceremony was held at the Assembly Rooms, Bath on 27 January, and was compered by special guest, actress Alison Steadman OBE. The black tie event recognises, and celebrates, the exceptional care and compassion shown by the hospital’s staff. Photos by Giulia Spadafora www.soul-media.co.uk

James Scott and Alison Steadman

Alyssa Smith and Hayley Williams

Sarah Hexham and Daniel Wilson 26 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


Transform your day... everyday. We have inspirational room sets displaying exclusive brands such as The Original Thomas Crapper as well as designer ranges Laura Ashley and Ben De Lisi. We know the art of bathrooms and can help you design yours! Call for a site survey or visit our showroom

Brassmill Lane Trading Estate, Bath BA1 3JF Tel 01225 462727 www.totalbathrooms.co.uk


A MAN’S WORLD

DAVID FLATMAN

HUSBAND OF THE YEAR As International Women’s Day approaches, Flats wonders how to make the occasion a special one for Mrs F…

C

hez nous, there is an unofficial list of jobs that are divided strictly between me – a man – and Mrs F – a woman. This division of labour is so archaic in its gender-based delegation that recording it permanently on these pages may prove to be a mistake, but it is what it is and we’re all grown ups. For example, Mrs F does all laundry. Only once have I operated our washing machine, and that was just last month when things got desperate. I’m not proud of this, but it’s true. Only Mrs F vacuums our house. Well, the cleaner does a bit as well, but the point is that I do not. Mrs F changes all bed linen, my dustprovoked asthma proving a worthy get-out. So far, so bad. However, I do the bins. And if I am working away from home on bin day, the wheelie bin is simply not wheeled into position. The pile simply grows. Not her job, you see. I do the dogs. Mrs F loves animals, but will she walk them? No. Not once. Not ever. So I do it, whatever the weather and if I’m away then I pay a dog walker to collect them and run them to exhaustion, whether their female keeper is home or not. It’s just not her job. This annoys me a little bit, I’ll concede, as it costs rather a lot of money and, quite often, said non-walker is at home and at leisure, but there is laundry to be done! I only mention all of this as International Women’s Day looms, and I can’t quite work out how to mark the occasion. Taking the

route less considered, I’ve offered to undertake all of her chores for the day, giving her a day on the sofa in appreciation of her seemingly endless efforts and selflessness, but I’ve been turned down flat. You see, as I offered to clean the house and wash all of our clothes I reminded her that, as she well knows, these tasks will take up all of my free time, so she’d have to take the dogs out for an hour and a half in the mud, before washing and drying them upon their return. Thoughts of this empathetic gesture ended right there as she told me, in predictably frank terms, that I wasn’t in line for husband of the year. I am from a very male, very macho world, but in our world we were always taught to respect intelligence, insight, frankness, and empathy. To this end, I can’t remember a single man even mentioning the gender of a physiotherapist, a sports psychologist, or a coach. We didn’t care, as long as they were the best at what they did. With actual equality the aim, I wonder if actively ignoring gender and selecting the best individuals to perform certain tasks is the way forward. I’m just not bothered whether a man or a woman does a job, so long as the best candidate is selected. Following this simple approach would, I expect, see men matched or even outnumbered by women in positions of influence. Not on the bins, though, that’s man’s work.

I’VE OFFERED TO UNDERTAKE ALL OF HER CHORES FOR THE DAY, GIVING HER A DAY ON THE SOFA IN APPRECIATION OF HER SEEMINGLY ENDLESS EFFORT

David Flatman is an ex-Bath and England rugby star turned TV pundit and rent-o-mic. Follow him on Twitter @davidflatman


GIRL ABOUT TOWN

PHILIPPA MAY

MODERN WOMEN

IN SUCH A SPECIAL CITY AS BATH, EVERY OPPORTUNITY IS OPEN TO ME AND THERE ARE SO MANY INSPIRING WOMEN TO LOOK UP TO

Glass ceiling? What glass ceiling? This week, Philippa talks having it all...

W

e’ve pulled through the guilt ridden post-Christmas, Dry January is not much more than a bad memory, and the office gossips have given up checking on New Year’s resolutions. I, like many others, am often caught up in the frenzy: new gym kit, a new fitness regime that is sure to work better than the last, and the latest five-point plan for business success; although these first few months of the year are traditionally the time for reflection, many a modern woman pulls herself into reflection most days of the year. Whether it be the promise to go on that run tomorrow, eat better

next week or spend more time with the kids this summer, we all feel like we could be doing better all the time. When did we become not enough? Every year losing weight, getting fitter and eating more healthily tops our resolution lists, and yet, come June, how many have we actually stuck to? As Bath becomes a buzzing hub for the cosmopolitan woman, many fleeing the stress of big cities and opting for a more personal city like Bath, I’m looking at completely forgetting about sticking to resolutions and just enjoying whatever comes my way. After indulging in a lovely cheese platter and a drop of English wine at The Dark Horse in Bath’s Kingsmead Square on a casual Friday night, I felt the guilt and booked myself in for a morning class of hot yoga at The Bath Yoga Studio. I was weary at first, but it ended up being the perfect remedy to a successful Friday evening. Diane is amazing and throws you straight into the mix with great enthusiasm. She is welcoming, friendly, remembers your name and has the perfect sense of humour to get you through the sweat-fest that ensues. This class was tough, in a good way, and ensured past guilty pleasures were repented. At the end of the class, in true yoga style, you sit and reflect. What are you thankful for today? A simple question with a not so simple answer. This is when you can contemplate your goals, and what you are thankful for; it may be a superficial response – you’re pretty content, so you’re just thankful that today you got an easy parking spot – or you may be feeling a bit deep and this is the perfect opportunity to reflect on the really good stuff. That was me. Recently, my time for reflection has been marred with worries, work that needs doing, family that needs attention... and yet, all of this seems remarkably trivial when you realise you have everything to be grateful for, especially in the era of a certain world leader. With International Women’s Day coming up soon I’m feeling grateful to be in such a special city as Bath, where I for one, feel every opportunity is open to me and there are so many inspiring women to look up to – starting, running, and thriving in business and family life all around Bath and showing us women can have it all and that is something to be really proud of whether you’ve been successful with resolutions or not. Philippa May is an interiors enthusiast and the designer and brand creative manager for accessories label Abbott Lyon. Follow her on Instagram @_ philippamay_

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 31


ENQUIRIES events@mediaclash.co.uk or call us on 01225 475 860


ARTS

GALLERIES

The F WORD

As International Women’s Day is on the horizon (8 March), we asked Bath’s artists and gallerists to respond visually to what their view of femininity is…

G

lam-ma, YouTuber and Brexit are just a few of the 500 new words which have entered the dictionary this quarter, but despite the constant modernisation of language, the meanings of some nouns are still old-fashioned and are in need of revising. Specifically, when you look up the definition of femininity, you’ll find the following contextual description: The quality of being female; womanliness: ‘she celebrates her femininity by wearing make-up and high heels’. As its definition lies in personal experience and opinion, there is no solitary description of femininity, but what we can say, with confidence, is that its meaning reaches far beyond this reductive dictionary portrayal of external appearance. As each and every person will have a different interpretation of the word, we wanted to reach out to individuals in the city to gain their unique perspectives. But, as text sometimes can’t express depth of meaning, we turned to Bath’s artists and gallerists and asked them to respond visually. Through sculpture, photography, screen prints and paintings, these creative minds explore the concept of femininity and aim to expand its definition.

36 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

By L I SA E VA NS

NURTURE

by Henrietta Dubrey

Edgar Modern’s director, Rachael Read, considers this cubist oil on canvas to champion and project the female voice. “In a male-dominated art world, too many strong female artists go unrecognised,” says Rachel. “This artist is mother, daughter, wife and lover, and from this awareness of womanliness she arrives at her explorations in paint. In this piece, an archetypal couple are depicted on a domestic stage. Their child, although fledged, expresses a desire to experience the nurture and warmth provided by the parent. The pale shape envelops the child like a duvet as she nestles within the womb-like security of the home.” Muse, Henrietta Dubrey’s solo exhibition, previews in London on International Women’s Day before arriving at Edgar Modern on 18 March. Edgar Modern, Bartlett Street, Bath; www.edgarmodern.com


TOTEM DEVI

by Johnathan Reiner

This screen print was selected by Rebecca Darch, gallery manager at Rostra Gallery, as a work she believes to challenge both the historical and contemporary representations of female beauty. “What begins as a figure portrayed as fragile or tormented, is transformed and empowered by the artist’s embellishment,” says Rebecca. “I see femininity as a celebration of women however they wish to lead their lives – it’s the ability to embrace who you are and share your achievements with the rest of the world. Reiner’s work dissects objective and universal ideals, and reveals them to be socially constructed concepts. He shows how these concepts are not hard-wired into our brains, but imposed on us by the culture we live in. Using found materials, which range from early 20th century pornography to contemporary fashion magazines, Reiner contrasts western notions of beauty with those of native and tribal beauty. In doing so he explores the idea that the concept of ‘beauty’ is fluid, and liable to change according to time, place and context.” Johnathan Reiner’s work will feature at the Love Rostra exhibition until 27 February, and his Solo Show can be seen in September. Rostra Gallery, 5 George Street, Bath; www.rostragallery.co.uk w

USING FOUND MATERIALS, SUCH AS PORNOGRAPHY, REINER CONTRASTS WESTERN NOTIONS OF BEAUTY WITH THOSE OF NATIVE AND TRIBAL BEAUTY


ARTS

GALLERIES

AUGUSTA OF SAXE-GOTHA

by Jeremiah Davison

From the collection at the Victoria Art Gallery, Katharine Wall, the gallery’s collections manager, selects this portrait of Augusta of Saxe-Gotha (1719-1772) as one she believes embodies womanhood. This painting has hung in the Guildhall for around 250 years because Augusta and her husband commissioned their portraits as a gift to Bath. It is currently on loan to the Yale Center for British Art in the USA, in an Enlightened Princesses exhibition which celebrates the achievements of three generations of royal women. “Augusta was the mother of King George III and would have become queen had her husband, Frederick, not died unexpectedly aged 44,” says Katherine. “As well as being a royal wife with all the pressure to live up to the demanding ideal that entailed, she brought up a future king and seven other children. She simultaneously made a significant contribution to British intellectual life. Her lasting legacy is Kew Gardens, which she, in effect, founded. She led a remarkable life, loved Bath, and made her mark on the world, but like so many women in history, has been largely forgotten.” Augusta will be back on display at the Guildhall, Bath, on 15 May. Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath; www.victoriagal.org.uk

SHE EPITOMISES THE UNABASHED ELEGANCE OF HER MODELS. ‘WHY SHOULDN’T WOMEN BE SEXY AND CLEVER?’, SHE ASKS LADY IN THE FLOWER PRINT DRESS by Iryna Yermolova

Bridget Sterling, gallery director at Bath Contemporary, believes that this use of paint – sometimes concentrated, sometimes laid bare – symbolises layers of womanhood. “Iryna shamelessly explores the sensuality of women and what we culturally consider beautiful,” says Bridget. “The artist herself is tall and has flawless skin, but, beyond this, she’s intelligent and ambitious; she epitomises the unabashed elegance and beauty of her models. ‘Why shouldn’t women be sexy and clever?’, she asks. This artwork is on display now, and, come 7 April, more of Iryna Yermolova’s work will feature at the gallery’s Pure Colour mixed exhibition. Bath Contemporary, 35 Gay Street, Bath; www.bathcontemporary.com 38 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

w


nick cudworth gallery

December Stile – South Devon Signed, Limited Edition Prints from Nick’s original Pastel

WINTER WORKS 1 – 28 February

An exhibition of paintings and prints by Nick that capture the light and beauty to be found in winter landscapes.

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

Devoted to Original Art for 20 Years Charlotte Farmer, Susie Grindey, Janine Roper, Helen Rowe, Kim Styles & more

February 3rd-27th 2017

5 George St Bath BA1 2EJ 01225 448121


ARTS

GALLERIES

STILL LIFE WITH PORTUGUESE BOWL by Relton Marine

When Jeni Weinberger, the director of the Art Salon, came across this acrylic on canvas, it called to her as a piece which embodied equality, not for it’s aesthetic, but due to the artists who painted it. “Relton Marine are a husband and wife duo who have painted on the same canvas for 30 years now,” says Jeni. “It’s this working equality where the female is as recognised in the same vein as the male in a professional scenario, which has been hard-fought and still not yet won worldwide.” This artwork can be seen at the gallery until 20 March. Art Salon, 21 Broad Street, Bath; www.artsalon.co.uk

CHERRY BLOSSOM

by Aili Purdy

This brush painting appeals to Rachel Yuan, a manager at the Museum of East Asian Art, because the significance of the cherry blossom tree in Japanese culture goes back hundreds of years, and is a reminder that life is beautiful but that it is also tragically short. “The vibrant and subtle contrast of colours represent different facets of womanhood, feminism and motherhood, and the cherry blossom represents the beauty of life. As March sees diary dates such as International Women’s Day, Japanese Girl’s Day, and Mothering Sunday occur, we will dedicate the whole of March to Mother and Daughter season. The artist, Aili Purdy, will host a Mother’s Day Chinese painting workshop on 18 March. Museum of East Asian Art, 12 Bennett Street, Bath; www.meaa.org.uk

NIPPER FAMILY

by James Capper

Subverting the ‘heels and makeup’ view of femininity, Alex Roberts, a tutor at Edge Arts, selected this seemingly work-in-progress industrial piece. “I see overlapping themes of courage and sensitivity in this piece,” says Alex. “The theme of working hard to build something echoes the day-to-day occurrences faced by many women; they toil in the workplace, and still seek equality. Women often are in a constant process, where many embrace their vulnerability.” James Capper’s Sculpture and Hydraulics exhibition can be seen at Edge Arts until 8 April. The Edge, University of Bath, Bath; www.edgearts.org 40 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


GALLERIES

ARTS

CHOICES by Nick Cudworth

We asked the Bath artist Nick Cudworth to select a work from his own collection that he identifies as ‘female’. He chose this oil on canvas, explaining that it depicts the freedom of the right to choose. “This piece, with its contrast between the beautiful long legs and the short skirt placed against red stiletto shoes or more masculine working boots, evokes a definition of femininity for me,” he says. “A work of art should always contain these contrasts; a technical mastery seducing me into the work which then carries a memorable kick of some kind.” See this piece at Nick’s My Way exhibition from 1 March. Nick Cudworth Gallery, The Gallery, 5 London Street, Bath; www.nickcudworth.co.uk

IT’S THIS WORKING EQUALITY WHICH HAS BEEN HARDFOUGHT AND NOT YET WON WORLDWIDE GRAVITY AND GRACE

by Jason Keeley

Jessica Lloyd-Smith, director of the Bath-based online gallery Modern ArtBuyer, is drawn to this screen print above as, to her, it signifies both the power and poise of a woman. “Femininity is representative of a balance of gentleness combined with strength,” she says. “Traditionally, it used to mean ‘girlishness’, but now it is much more associated with understanding what it means to be an individual female – a combination of nurturing, empathy and courage. For me, this print depicts elegance and force in one image.” This piece is available on the Modern ArtBuyer website; modernartbuyer.com

FOR ALWAYS

by Alexandra Spyratos

The founder of the soon-to-be-opened Gallery & Barrow contemporary art space, Heidi Laughton, considers this piece to be evocative of motherhood. “Living in Kenya, the artist’s giant renditions of African safari animals with metallic leaf, start as sketches made with strong, powerful strokes,” says Heidi. “Many of her paintings evoke a feminine tenderness which is evident in the swish of a baby elephant’s tail as it follows its mother in this piece.” The gallery will open at the end of March, but its artworks are currently available for purchase online. Gallery & Barrow, 118 Walcot Street, Bath; www.galleryandbarrow.com w

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 41


ARTS

GALLERIES

MULTICOLOUR GIRL

by Kit Glaisyer

Kit feels that his drip-figure painting displays the juxtaposition between both the introvert and extrovert qualities that everyone has inside them. “Women express their femininity in unique ways,” says Kit. “Like the word ‘art’, ‘femininity’ defies easy definition. To me, the feminine is naturally mysterious. This inspires my vague and suggestive painting technique which aims to capture the model’s enigmatic quality and enchanting presence.” Kit’s paintings will be on display during his Open Studio Weekend, from 24 to 26 February. The gallery is open by appointment at other times. Kit Glaisyer studio, No.1 Garden Flat, Great Pulteney Street, Bath; www.kitglaisyer.com

MANY BEAUTIFUL DEPICTIONS OF WOMEN WERE MADE BY MEN AND FOR MALE COLLECTORS

ROSES AT THE HOLBURNE by Shane Feeney

Nicola Murphy, co-owner of Imagianation Gallery is drawn to the traditional quality of this oil painting. “This impressionist painting captures and embodies feminine qualities,” says Nicola. “Bath artist Shane often paints soft, full flowers and creates images of all-embracing light, harmony and a sensual serenity – womanly qualities embodied by a terrific male talent.” Shane’s work is part of a mixed exhibition which can be viewed until April. Imagianation, 5 Terrace Walk, Bath; online.imagianation.com

42 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


LOUISE BROOKS ON THE SET OF THE FILM PRIX DE BEAUTÉ as photographed by James Abbe

Kate Hebert, chief curator at the American Museum in Britain, was struck by this vintage photograph as one which depicts a change in how women were viewed. “The 1920s saw the rise of the modern woman,” says Kate. “Flappers were the epitome of the modern woman at this time. Typical of the look were short, beaded dresses and bobbed hair. Although in this photo Louise Brooks has a classic, feminine look, it was considered very shocking at the time.” See this piece at the museum’s 1920s Jazz Age: Fashion and Photographs exhibition from 18 March. American Museum in Britain, Claverton Manor, Bath; www.americanmuseum.org

CROUCHING VENUS BRONZE by Antonio Susini

Catrin Jones, curator of decorative arts at The Holburne Museum, thinks that the very contrast between what the view of this sculpture would have been when it was made, compared to the view of it today makes it a talking point. “This elegantly twisting figure, which once belonged to Louis XIV of France, derives from ancient sculptures of the bathing Venus,” says Catrin. “Many Renaissance sculptures celebrated the female form through the lens of mythology, and many beautiful depictions of women were made by men and for male collectors. We can now celebrate the ingenuity of makers of the past even though our understanding of women is very different today.” This piece is part of The Holburne’s permanent collection which is currently on display. The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street, Bath; www.holburne.org

E

by Riccardo Guasco

Katie O’Brien, project manager at 44AD Studio, perceives this comical illustration to embrace the quirk and absurdity of spelling and pronunciation, reminding her that no one should take themselves too seriously. “To me, this image represents a couple of aspects of femininity – gentility and style,” says Katie. “But, at the same time it’s a play on letters and phonetics, so it’s ‘er’s as in ‘hers’, reminding us that all is not always as it seems. The artist – whose work has appeared in The New Yorker and Vogue – beautifully amplifies the humour and occasional pathos of Bath-based writer Jonathan Hope’s playful verse. The A is for Donkeys exhibition can be seen, by appointment, until 24 February. 44AD Studio, 4 Abbey Street, Bath; www.44ad.net


NEW SHOP NOW OPEN

27 Belvedere • Lansdown Road • Bath • BA1 5HR

Bespoke wedding specialists For all enquiries please call us on 01225 920884 www.flowersofbath.co.uk


Music/theatre/film/more

WAR HEADS

The latest Hauser & Wirth Somerset exhibition is a collection by the late Dame Elisabeth Jean Frink, an English sculptor and printmaker. Her immensely powerful work includes predatory birdlike figures, commanding and compelling animal heads, which, in her later work, morphed into men – often brutish and scarred in appearance. Her art is said to reflect a preoccupation with war and brutality; she was nine years old when her rural idyllic childhood in Suffolk became a backdrop to war. Living near an airfield, she often witnessed World War II bombers fighting in the skies directly overhead, and her father fought at Dunkirk. Until her death in 1993, Frink returned time and again to the male nude – stating many times that she had no interest in portraying women. For her, the male nude was the ultimate vehicle for expressing a range of emotions, most notably the contrast of strength and vulnerability, reflecting the complexity of man’s nature. Elisabeth Frink is pictured by the photographer Jorge Lewinski in her Southwark studio in 1975 with her Tribute Heads. Elisabeth Frink: Transformations at Hauser & Wirth Somerset continues until 7 May; www.hauserwirthsomerset.com

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 45


18 February – 18 March

Kora player Jally Kebba Susso brings his distinctive West Africa-meets-funk sound to the Chapel Arts Centre on 10 March; At Komedia on 27 February, grumpy old woman Jenny Eclair explains how to be both sane and middle-aged; See the award-winning The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time at Theatre Royal Bath

Exhibitions UNTIL 24 FEBRUARY

A IS FOR DONKEYS This exhibition features the combined talents of Jonathan Hope and Riccardo Guasco who together have created the stylish and quirky alphabet book A is for Donkeys, which is also on sale at the gallery. 44AD; www.44ad.net UNTIL 27 FEBRUARY

LOVE ROSTRA Celebrate Rostra Gallery’s 20-year anniversary with an exhibition celebrating the theme of love, and highlighting their renowned collection of artists including Janine Roper, Susie Grindey and Charlotte Farmer. Rostra Gallery; www.rostragallery.co.uk

watercolour, drawing, etching and linocut prints. David Simon Contemporary; www. davidsimoncontemporary.com UNTIL 28 FEBRUARY

WINTER WORKS An exhibition of paintings and prints by Bath-based artist Nick Cudworth that capture the light and beauty to be found in winter landscapes. Nick Cudworth Gallery; www.nickcudworth.co.uk UNTIL 28 FEBRUARY

WARM EARTH A collection of paintings from award-winning local artist Emma Rose, celebrating the power of land, sea and sky. Emma Rose Art Works; www.emmaroseartworks.com UNTIL 28 FEBRUARY

UNTIL 27 FEBRUARY

IMPRESSIONS ON PAPER An exhibition devoted to works of art on paper through

ceramics by Gary Wood, jewellery by Annie Beardsley plus many other affordable artists. One Two Five gallery; www.onetwofivegallery.co.uk

CAROLE WALLER Alongside art-to-wear clothes by Bath-artist Carole Waller, the ongoing exhibition includes

46 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

UNTIL 28 FEBRUARY

KIT GLAISYER: THE CINEMATIC LANDSCAPE On display in his new Bath studio are Kit Glaisyer’s evocative paintings of Dorset landscapes and atmospheric Bath scenes. Open by appointment. 48 Great Pulteney Street; www.kitglaisyer.com UNTIL 5 MARCH

DJORDJE OZBOLT: THE GRAND DETOUR By ‘invading’ the grounds of The Holburne Museum, Ozbolt, the Serbian artist, creates new works from old collections, and leads us to discover and consider exciting, fresh perspectives on the past. The Holburne Museum; www.holburne.org

UNTIL 12 MARCH

DRAWN TO THE LAND This ongoing and exploratory project by award-winning documentary photographer Sophie Gerrard takes an intimate and stark look at the contemporary Scottish landscape, through a series of fascinating photographs of female farmers. Fox Talbot Museum, Lacock Abbey; www.nationaltrust.org.uk UNTIL 8 APRIL

JAMES CAPPER: SCULPTURE & HYDRAULICS The works of artist James Capper demonstrate his passion for hydraulic engineering, fascination with technology and references land art and insects. The Edge; www.edgearts.org UNTIL 28 APRIL

IMAGINED WORLDS Curated by Somerset Art Works on behalf of The Friends of


W H AT ’ S O N

ARTS

Coleridge Society, the exhibition features the work of 20 contemporary artists inspired by Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s visionary poem Kubla Khan, and coincides with the bicentenary of the poem’s first publication. Art at the Heart of the RUH; www.artatruh.org UNTIL 28 APRIL

PHOTO © STUART FRANKLIN/MAGNUM PHOTOS

HILARY PAYNTER: AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT A striking new body of wood-engraving work by Hilary Paynter, specifically commissioned by Devon Guild of Craftsmen, on the subject of ageing. Art at the Heart of the RUH; www.artatruh.org UNTIL 17 MAY

TRANSFORMATION A major solo exhibition of sculpture in the pioneering gallery and arts centre based in Bruton, by the late Elisabeth Frink, that comprises a selection of her distinctive bronzes, alongside a series of drawings that highlight her considerable skill as a draughtswoman. See page 45 for more. Hauser & Wirth Somerset; www.hauserwirthsomerset.com UNTIL 30 MAY

#IGERSBATH Celebrate some of the best photography of Bath, by the talented people of Bath, with this Instagrammers exhibition supported by The Bath Pizza Co. Green Park Brasserie; www. bathpizzaco.com/exhibition UNTIL 4 JUNE

BRUEGEL: DEFINING A DYNASTY This exciting new exhibition not only shines a light on the quality of The Holburne Museum’s Flemish paintings, but also on the great wealth of paintings by the Bruegel (also known as Brueghel) dynasty in the UK. The Holburne Museum; www.holburne.org

UNTIL 1 JANUARY 2019

A HISTORY OF FASHION IN 100 OBJECTS The Fashion Museum presents 100 ‘star’ objects that illustrate a fascinating history of fashion from the 1600s to the present day. Fashion Museum; www.fashionmuseum.co.uk 25 FEBRUARY – 10 MAY

HISTORY THROUGH A LENS: ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE INCITE PROJECT This show focuses on single iconic images and their power, profiling over 75 photographs taken from the Incite Project that have changed public perception of world events. They include the assassination of John F Kennedy, a rare shot of the Normandy D-Day landings and Nelson Mandela in his cell on Robben Island. Victoria Art Gallery; www.victoriagal.org.uk 25 FEBRUARY – 10 MAY

UNTIL 1 JANUARY 2018

LACE IN FASHION From rare, fine luxury garments worn by royals and the aristocracy to machinemade items for everyday use, this exhibition showcases over 50 lace pieces, some dating from the time of Shakespeare. Fashion Museum; www. fashionmuseum.co.uk

TOM HICKMAN: FOLLOWING THE THREAD Using reclaimed Harris Tweed wools, self-taught artist Tom Hickman stitches complex high relief stump-work embroidery, as well as jovial images of local crofters’ sheep. On 10 March, Tom will be visiting the gallery to talk about his work. Victoria Art Gallery; www.victoriagal.org.uk w

Top to bottom: Powerful photos, such as 1989 Tiananmen Square, are exhibited at Victoria Art Gallery; see Bronwen Bradshaw’s Sacred River at the RUH

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 47


ARTS

W H AT ’ S O N

stars from their garden in 18th century Bath. 7.30pm, £8. The Mission Theatre; www.missiontheatre.co.uk

25 FEBRUARY – 2 JULY

HONG LING: SELECTED Hong Ling is a contemporary Chinese artist, whose work unites the distinct yet delicate essence of traditional Chinese landscape painting with refined oil painting, technical precision, ambitious breadth of scale and subject. Museum of East Asian Art; www.meaa.org.uk

10 MARCH

RICHARD HERRING – THE BEST From his deconstruction of the genealogy of Christ to proving that racists are less racist than liberals, with a few knob jokes thrown in along the way – Richard Herring delivers his personal highlights. 6.30pm, £15. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk

Plays/Shows 24 FEBRUARY

THE MINISTRY OF BURLESQUE’S TWISTED CABARET An uproarious revue of razor-wit and frisky burlesque featuring showgirls, sirens and comiccabaret masters. 8pm, £17. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk

14 – 25 MARCH

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME Winner of seven Olivier Awards and five Tony Awards, this National Theatre production is an original, humorous and compassionate insight of Mark Haddon’s novel about a teenage boy with Asperger’s Syndrome. £22-£38. Theatre Royal Bath; www.theatreroyal.org.uk

27 FEBRUARY

JENNY ECLAIR Professional grumpy old woman, Splash survivor, amateur soupmaker, and novice knitter, Jenny Eclair is younger than Madonna but eats crisps and likes wine. Here she explains how to be a middle-aged woman (without going insane). 7.30pm, £17.50. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk

Music 23 FEBRUARY

THE MEMBRANES After a 26-year break, the post-punk band from Blackpool released a hugely critically acclaimed album in 2015 – Dark Matter/Dark Energy –and supported The Stranglers on their recent tour. 7pm, £15. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk

1 – 11 MARCH

ABIGAIL’S PARTY Amanda Abbington stars as Beverly in Mike Leigh’s edgy classic comedy dealing with 1970s suburban cruelty, cheesy-pineapples and retro drinks. Turn to page 52 for our exclusive interview with Amanda. £19.50-£33.50. Theatre Royal Bath; www.theatreroyal.org.uk

24 FEBRUARY

Top to bottom: Post-punksters The Membranes play Komedia on 24 February; enjoy the wealth of Bruegel paintings at the Holburne Museum

2 – 4 MARCH

OLD TIME MUSIC HALL The Bath Gilbert & Sullivan Society bring the magic of the old time music hall nights back to life for our light entertainment. £11. The Mission Theatre; www.missiontheatre.co.uk 2 MARCH

STUART GOLDSMITH The host of the Comedian’s Comedian podcast, with over six million downloads, shakes off an invigoratingly misspent youth and is press-ganged into a pastoral existence by a cunning girl; but how much compromise

is too much? 7.30pm, £10. Widcombe Social Club; www.bathcomedy.com 3 MARCH

SCUMMY MUMMIES SHOW Comedy duo Helen Thorne and Ellie Gibson cover a wide range of parenting topics, from pelvic floors and play-dates to farting and fish fingers. 7.30pm, £22. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk 9 MARCH

DR. PHIL’S HEALTH REVOLUTION Dr Phil Hammond is an

48 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

NHS doctor, an investigative journalist, a TV game show panelist and a pretty good comedian, who’s standing up and asking us to reclaim the NHS. 6.30pm, £15. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk

STEVE KNIGHTLEY Following the successful Grow Your Own Gig and All At Sea tours, Steve Knightley, who The Guardian described as a ‘folk hero embracing love and history’, travels around the country with his brand new Landlocked tour. 8pm, £18. Chapel Arts Centre; www.chapelarts.org 1 MARCH

9 – 10 MARCH

LINA The play Lina explores the lives and obsessions of brother and sister William and Caroline Herschel. Both talented musicians and celebrated astronomers, they studied the universe and mapped the

SIMON & GARFUNKEL REVIVAL BAND Paying musical respect to the original duo’s 60-year anniversary, this acclaimed tribute act will perform some of their most beautiful songs. 7.30pm, £15. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk w


COME AND MEET Frederick Augustus the cat..............at

OLD BANK ANTIQUES CENTRE 16-17 Walcot Buildings, London Road, Bath BA1 6AD

Tel. 01225 338813

The largest antiques retailer in Bath & voted in the top 50 antiques shops in Britain, by the Independent on Sunday

No, he’s not stuffed... Maybe even find time to look at some antiques... we’ve got everything from 17th century furniture to 1970s retro and kitchenalia, spread through lots of showrooms. We’re on the A4, London Road, near Morrisons. About 15 minutes walk from the bottom of Walcot Street. We’re open 10-6 Monday to Saturday. 11-5 on Sunday. We have our own parking at the rear, accessed via Bedford Street.

alexatmontague@aol.com / www.oldbankantiquescentre.com


ARTS

W H AT ’ S O N

2 MARCH

SCOTT MATTHEWS Bold, critically-acclaimed mix of folk, rock, blues and Easterninspired songwriting from the Ivor Novello award-winner. 7pm, £12. Komedia; www.komedia.co.uk 2 MARCH

STOMPIN’ DAVE With 25 years of performing experience, Stompin’ Dave is a vocalist, multi-instrumentalist and tap dancer with a penchant for bluegrass, blues, country, folk and rock’n’roll. 7.30pm, £12. Chapel Arts Centre; www.chapelarts.org

Valley include grow-your-own beanstalk crafts, storytelling, movies, a special fairy trail and the fairy tale parade. £2-£9. Avon Valley Adventure & Wildlife Park; www.avonvalley.co.uk 18 MARCH

CREATE: TALES FOR TOTS An interactive workshop designed to introduce 3-4 yearolds to the wonders of stories, beginning with the beautifully illustrated and heartwarming classic, The Snail and the Whale by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler. 10.30am-11.15am & 11.30am-12.15pm, £7.50 for parent and child. The Edge, www.edgearts.org

10 MARCH

JALLY KEBBA SUSSO UK-based Gambian kora player and composer who, by the time he was 13 years old, was touring internationally across West Africa, Belgium, Holland and UK. He commands the kora’s 21-strings in his own distinctive style and with his band, blends these sounds with a strong groove – bass, guitar and percussion – into a live show like no other. 8pm, £12. Chapel Arts Centre; www.chapelarts.org 14 MARCH

THE BATH ORCHESTRAL GALA CONCERT Along with Jason Thornton, the conductor of Bath Philharmonia, 20 members of the professional orchestra will play side-by-side with King Edward’s School pupils in an accessible programme of exciting repertoire, themed around enchanted musical journeys. 6.30pm, £14/£5. Banqueting Room, The Guildhall; www.kesbath.com

Family fun UNTIL 26 FEBRUARY

BEASTY BABY Using an inspired mix of puppetry and live music, Beasty Baby is a chaotic and laughterfilled story about three people embarking on a wild adventure to bring up a very mischievous and totally loveable child. £8.50. the egg; www.theatreroyal.org.uk UNTIL 28 FEBRUARY

FAIRYTALE FEBRUARY Magical activities at Avon

18 – 19 MARCH

THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG When a very lonely frog offers to retrieve the princess’s golden ball in exchange for her company, she is far from keen and what follows is an enchanting story about friendship in this magical and original ballet. £8.50/£7.50. the egg; www.theatreroyal.org.uk

Other 26 FEBRUARY

EBIKETIPS LIVE The inaugural ebiketips event offers, along with electric bikes, a huge selection of road bikes for testing. 9.30am-4.30pm, £30. Odd Down cycle track; www.eventbrite.co.uk 3 – 5 MARCH

BATH DECORATIVE ANTIQUES FAIR The 28th fair of its kind, and with around 45 exhibitors attending, this promises to be a delightful trove of unique treasures, art, furniture and artifacts. £5. The Pavilion, North Parade Road; www. bathdecorativeantiquesfair.co.uk 5 MARCH

FIRE & ICE WALK Brave enough to walk over broken glass and then tread on hot embers, all for the good cause of RUH’s Forever Friends Appeal. 6pm, £30. Bath Recreation Ground. Please register at www. foreverfriendsappeal.co.uk

50 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

It’s the age-old enchanting story of friendly dancing frog meets ballerina princess in The Princess and The Frog at the egg on 18 – 19 March 12 MARCH

VITALITY BATH HALF MARATHON This two-lap 13.1 mile course, now in its 36th year, starts and finishes in Great Pulteney Street with more than 15,000 runners taking part and around 40,000 spectators expected. There’s also a Battle of the Bands competition playing at various race points, plus the family run. 11am start. See also page 89. For more info visit www.bathhalf.co.uk 16 MARCH

SCIENCE SHOW-OFF Geek comedian Steve Cross hosts some of Bath’s top science,

comedy and performance talent in a night of clever and chaotic cabaret. 7.30pm, £10. The Edge; www.edgearts.org 18 MARCH

THE BATH MEN’S WALK 2017 Bath Rugby Foundation and Dorothy House Hospice Care are hoping a record number of men will take to the walkways of Bath to raise funds and show their support. It starts with registration at Dorothy House Hospice Care in Winsley and finishes at the Rec, in time to watch the thrilling Six Nations action. www.bathmenswalk.co.uk


Modern Furniture. Designed over decades. Find out more at www.foresttohome.com william@foresttohome.com


ONE TO ONE

PARTY TIME To celebrate its 40th anniversary, a new UK tour of Abigail’s Party opens in Bath in March. Here, star of the show, Sherlock’s Amanda Abbington talks to LISA EVANS about Trump, tarantulas and the Thermae Spa…

52 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


PHOTO BY RICK PUSHINSKY

ONE TO ONE

I

t’s been 40 years since the appalling Beverly first put Donna Summer on the turntable, stacked a plate with little ‘cheesey-pineapple ones’, plied her guests with alcohol, cigarettes and Demis Roussos and slow-danced her way across the shag-pile into theatrical history. However the new star of Abigail’s Party feels that the play’s hidden messages are more prevalent than ever in the modern day. That star is Amanda Abbington, and what she determines as the play’s undercurrents are women’s rights, sexism, and social change – themes which she feels have resurfaced with Trump’s America. “The play was originally staged just before Margaret Thatcher came into power,” says Amanda, who’ll be treading the Theatre Royal Bath’s boards as Beverly in March. “The play hints at wanting more possessions and needing your own houses. At this time everything was changing socially; women’s rights are definitely bubbling under the surface of the play. It was almost a warning of the Thatcherism to come, of the greed and of the elevation of material objects. “As you dissect the play you realise that the women are second class citizens, and not much has changed in the present day,” adds the Sherlock and Mr Selfridge actress. “I still feel as if we’re deemed lesser. The fact that Trump was voted to be placed on the most powerful platform in the world is an enormous red flag, and whirlwinds of racism and sexism are cropping up everywhere you look.” Amanda’s on-stage character blames ‘women’s lib’ for what’s going wrong with the world, and is a force of nature, as Amanda explains, “Beverly is challenging but utterly enthralling to play.

Opposite page: Amanda as Mary Watson née Morstan in BBC One’s Sherlock; this page, top to bottom clockwise: with former partner and Sherlock co-star Martin Freeman; looking pretty in pink; as the disciplined head of accessories, Miss Mardle in ITV1’s Mr Selfridge; the enigmatic Mary Watson made Amanda a household name

She’s confident, cheeky, spoiled, flirty, naughty and controlling, but she’s not monstrous; you still gravitate towards her. I’m not as hard or overbearing as her, but there are elements of her personality I think everyone can relate to.” Hilarious, horribly compelling and an undisputed classic, Mike Leigh’s Abigail’s Party remains one of the most painfully funny and satirically sharp plays ever devised. In 1970s suburbia, the drinks party from hell begins when Beverly and her estate agent husband Laurence invite round new neighbours, Tony and Ange, along with nervous divorcee Sue, jittery about the bash her teenage daughter, Abigail, is throwing just up the road. As that party gets out of hand, this one too descends into chaos, comedy, drama and tragedy. “I think the challenge is to put my own stamp on the character,” says Amanda, who will star alongside Call the Midwife’s Ben Caplan. “As everyone thinks of Alison Steadman’s classic portrayal of Bev, I want to save as much of that as possible while simultaneously making it my own.” Amanda considers herself lucky to be able to step on the stage and do the job she does, and perhaps that feeling in her is heightened because of the fact her life could have been very different. “I used to do lots of front of house in West End theatres,” she says. “And it was really sad because you were watching performances every night and seeing people doing what you wanted to do, and you weren’t doing it.” There were times she considered giving up acting, and it’s only after she toiled for two decades that she got what she describes as her “big breaks” with BBC One’s BAFTA and Emmy award winning Sherlock and ITV’s popular drama Mr Selfridge. w www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 53


ONE TO ONE “Appearing in Mr Selfridge changed people’s perception of me,” says Amanda of her Miss Mardle role. “It was a huge phenomenon.” She adds that playing alongside Benedict Cumberbatch in Sherlock as Mary Watson – the on-screen wife of Martin Freeman, who is her real-life former partner – has been the best fun she has had in her life. “It was difficult before those two shows,” she says. “There were many long periods when no work was coming my way, but I went through some steep learning curves which still resonate with me to this day. I learnt to stand up for myself and never to lower my standards for a part. “There was one moment, which I don’t want to go too deep into, which was very dark for me,” she adds. “It involved a sex scene when I was a young, vulnerable actress. I won’t accept any crap off a director now, and I never want any other young actresses to come away from a set feeling violated. I make it my duty to look after the young girls I work with and explain to them, as I wish someone had done for me, that they should be mindful, and they don’t have to do anything they don’t want to – like take off their tops.” She hadn’t initially planned to act at all; having taken dance lessons since the age of five, she’d assumed that she would pursue her hobby on a professional level, but at 17 she ripped her groin muscles doing the splits and her ambition fell flat. “My teachers encouraged me to try out acting instead,” she says. “So, in hindsight, the injury was more of a blessing in disguise. My career may have taken a completely different turn altogether, though, because I was going to train as a midwife, I even applied. But I think I made the right decision in the end, and I’m very excited for this upcoming tour.” She’s eager to come back to visit Bath – where the Abigail’s Party tour opens – and says she has wonderful memories of the city, both personally and professionally.

Top: Amanda’s having a ball rehearsing for Abigail’s Party with Ciarán Owens, who plays Tony; below left: In full drinking and smoking Beverly mode

AS EVERYONE

THINKS

OF ALISON STEADMAN’S

CLASSIC PORTRAYAL OF BEV, I WANT TO SAVE AS

MUCH OF THAT AS POSSIBLE

WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY MAKING IT MY OWN

“I recently filmed on location there for Another Mother’s Son,” she says of the biographical drama – scheduled for release in March – about an escaped Russian prisoner of war on the Nazioccupied island of Jersey. “I visited many times in my early days as an actress and have been on plenty of mini breaks. “I visited the Bath Thermae Spa with my ex partner once,” she adds. “I love beautiful Bath; I’ll hopefully discover parts on my upcoming visit that I haven’t seen before, and walk around as much as possible. I’m planning on staying in a little cottage on the edge of the city; I’m quite a solitary person so I’d like the whole place to myself. Well, in an ideal world I’d bring all my pets with me, actually.” At home she has what’s developing into a “menagerie of animals” including two geckos, two rats, three dogs, a cat, and a friendly tarantula named Ariana. “The spider is like a rock with legs,” says Amanda. “She’s harmless and actually quite cute. My dad has told me I’m not to get any more animals, but if I had my way, my house would be filled with them.” If she had to give up the acting now, she thinks she’d put her passion for animal welfare and rescue to good use. “I’d most probably work for Greenpeace,” she says. “Animal abuse makes me so angry because you feel so redundant. You can’t do anything other than signing petitions and sending money. If I could, I’d go to every country and save them all.” If only there was time for this philanthropy, but as Amanda will be embarking on a two-month tour with the Abigail’s Party cast, her life as a peripatetic animal rescuer may have to wait. See Amanda Abbington in Abigail’s Party at the Theatre Royal Bath from 1-11 March. For more, visit www.theatreroyal.org.uk

54 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


COME AND JOIN US AT OUR OPEN DAYS FOR FREE COOKING DEMOS AND TASTY TREATS...

10% OFF NEFF APPLIANCES with this advert* *Offer ends 31st March 2017

We'll be joined by award-winning local chef Bini Ludlow who will be creating mouth-watering culinary delights live in our kitchen showroom using the latest range of NEFF appliances such as the Pyrolytic Slide & Hide Oven and the 5 Zone FlexInduction Hob. Fri 10 – Sat 11 March 2017 Please see our website for more information about the open days

FREE ESTIMATES • FULL INSTALLATION AND CAD DESIGN SERVICE • 1,400 SQFT SHOWROOM WITH FULL DISPLAYS Radstock Road, Midsomer Norton, Radstock BA3 2AD Opening hours: Mon 12pm - 5pm Tues - Fri 9am - 5pm Sat 9am - 3pm T: 01761 419114 E: enquiries@firenzaltd.co.uk www.firenzaltd.co.uk


EXHIBITION

PHOTO BY ANNA BARCLAY

FA S H I O N

The Society Favourites display features 1930s British couture evening dresses

EMBRACE LACE From 16th century luxury garments worn by royals, to modern, machine-made designs for celebrities on the red carpet, the Bath Fashion Museum’s brand new exhibition Lace in Fashion reveals the techniques and top names that have made lace such an enduring fashion trend By L I SA E VA NS 58 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


EXHIBITION

FA S H I O N

T

hroughout her 13 years at the Fashion Museum, Bath, it was only when curating its brand new Lace in Fashion exhibition that Elly Summers discovered the “most thrilling find” of her career. It was the culmination of a three-year project to catalogue the museum’s extensive archives of lace, alongside much research into the history of the fabric, that led the exhibition curator to notice a particular dress, one which had already been on display at the museum for quite some time, and the importance of which had, until now, been overlooked. “It had been in our collection for years, but we hadn’t appreciated its significance,” she says, not able to take her eyes off the ensemble draping elegantly over a mannequin behind protective glass. “Not until I began undertaking in-depth research into lace did I spot how special it was.”

This modern Christopher Kane design can be seen at the exhibition

Elly Summers has made the most exciting discovery of her career at the Fashion Museum, Bath

The garment in question is, evidence strongly suggests, the world’s sole remaining item of clothing which once belonged to Queen Charlotte. “The dress is possibly the only surviving garment of the wife of George III,” says Elly, whose lace studies, and the exhibition as a whole, have been supported by the Arts Council England, along with experts from The Lace Guild. “It’s made from an extensive quantity of exquisite European bobbin lace and handmade fine silk net – this was the first clue that it must have been a royal commission, as the material represents a great deal of wealth. “It dates back to around 1805 and the donor of the dress left a letter at the museum claiming it had been passed down to her through the eldest daughters in Queen Charlotte’s family, since that time,” she adds. “Another clue was examining a portrait of Charlotte belonging to the Royal Collection Trust, in which she wears a very similar column-like, decorated, cream dress, so we know that was her ‘style’. In the portrait, she also has an ample bust, and we know the bust measurement of this dress is large, so, I believe we’re very close to confirming it was once hers.” It’s on display alongside other apparel worn by those within royal households once upon a time – from a cap-back adorned with the royal coat of arms of Queen Anne, to a Norman Hartnell evening dress belonging to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother – and Elly explains that lace has been a royal favourite since its origins as a luxury fabric in the late 1500s. “It was not unusual for monarchs and the nobility to spend thousands on exquisite, handmade lace to decorate and adorn their clothes,” she says. “It was a way for them to demonstrate their wealth, rank and prestige to their subjects. As a handcrafted textile, it has always had an element of luxury and exclusivity. It’s a beautiful and versatile fabric, and through mechanisation it has become affordable, giving w www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 59


EXHIBITION

everyone the opportunity to wear it.” The exhibition, which Elly kindly gave us a private tour of ahead of the official opening at the beginning of February, also features modern-day lace items worn by celebrities on the red carpet, such as a Karl Lagerfeld number worn by Linda Evangelista, and a embroidered Jacques Azagury frock donned by Helen Mirren. Lace in Fashion features 50 treasures in total, its aim being to showcase the skill and seduction of this fashionable fabric from the time of Shakespeare to the present day. “We have everything from examples of 19th century dresses that are a fusion of handmade and machine-made lace,” says Elly. “ To a fantastic 1970s dress made from a Nottingham lace curtain, and 20th century Parisian and British couture, including dresses by Molyneux, Balenciaga and John Cavanagh.” Our museum tour was preceded earlier in the day by a talk given by the founder of shoe and accessory boutique Emmy London, Emmy Scarterfield, at The Gainsborough Bath Spa. Due to her extensive knowledge and experience in luxury design, as well as her understanding of the time, work and skill that goes into creating exquisite items, the Q&A session was the ideal way, along with lunch provided by the Gainsborough’s head chef Dan Moon, to start the exhibition’s private view. Emmy, who grew up near Bath, has established herself as one of the country’s most prestigious fashion designers. From beginning her career in Milan working for Giorgio Armani and Bottega Veneta, to opening her flagship store in Chelsea, her story is one that encompasses

THE DRESS IS POSSIBLY THE ONLY SURVIVING

GARMENT OF THE WIFE OF GEORGE III

ALL OVER THE LACE, WITH ELLY SUMMERS… • Lace was frequently smuggled, and was often prized above jewels by thieves. You could always be certain that lace was the real thing, but jewels could be fake and made of paste. • Women’s lace headdresses were often stolen by 18th century highwaymen who would slash open the leather back of a carriage and grab the whole wig – which was known as ‘taking a lady’s head’. • With new techniques such as laser printing and laser cutting, modern designers are using lace in affordable ways. Our exhibition includes a laser-printed lace dress which the donor purchased in a sale for just £1. • The oldest item the exhibition is a smock dating from around 1580 with Flemish bobbin lace on the sleeves and collar, one of the earliest pieces in the entire museum.

One of the country’s most prestigious fashion designers, Emmy Scarterfield 60 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

• One of our rarest treasures is the 1660s Silver Tissue Dress. It’s trimmed with parchment lace, a delicate fabric made of tiny strips of paper wrapped in silk.

This garment is quite possibly the only existing garment which was once owned by Queen Charlotte

PHOTO BY ANNA BARCLAY

FA S H I O N

undeniable beauty, bespoke craftsmanship and quintessentially British style, and, to her, lace is one of the most luxurious fabrics in the world. “Lace is inherently feminine, delicate and timeless,” she says. “It still plays a huge role in bridal fashion. The botanical references are echoed in the details and the illusion trend is driven by lace sections creating beautiful, organic, vine-like silhouettes. “Lace’s desirability and charm is unlimited,” she adds. “Because it’s such a work of art and labour of love, lace historically was only ever worn by people of substantial wealth; that aspiration of lace creating heirloom pieces continues to be relevant in today’s fashion.” For more: See Lace in Fashion at the Fashion Museum, Bath, until 1 January, 2018, and in the summer, look out for workshops teaching two lace-making techniques: needle lace and bobbin lace. www.fashionmuseum.co.uk


“Amazing success” in returning pupils to mainstream education (Good Schools Guide) • Co-educational day school for pupils aged 6-13 with dyslexia and other specific learning/language difficulties. • Located in Wiltshire between Bath and Chippenham. CReSTeD approved. • Fully qualified specialist teachers with maximum class size of eight - reducing to one-to-one as required.


Carina Baverstock couture www.carinabcouture.com


BOOKS

ARTS

THE INCREDIBLE TALES OF ENDURANCE THAT THEY CONTAIN MAKE YOU FEEL WEARY JUST CONTEMPLATING WHAT THE ADVENTURERS HAVE GONE THROUGH

JOURNEYS OF A LIFETIME If you’re in need of motivation of any sort, these true tales of irrepressibly strong individuals accomplishing once-in-a-lifetime feats will no doubt spur you on By N IC BO T T OM L E Y

T

his has been my most prolific start to a reading year for a very long time. It turns out that there’s nothing like judging three different literary prizes – all which will have been decided upon by the time you read this column – to get my personal reading-rate up. Last night I attended the ceremony for the Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards at Olympia, for which I’d been a member of the judging panel in two different categories. Next time, I’ll tell you about the books I read for the ‘Fiction with a Sense of Place’ category, but first some more extreme travel escapades which were honoured through the ‘Wanderlust Adventure Travel Book of the Year’. Just reading the half-dozen books shortlisted for this adventure travel category was utterly exhausting – not due to any shortcomings in the writing, you understand, but just because the incredible tales of endurance that they contain make you feel weary just contemplating what the adventurers have gone through. Take Sean Conway who in Cycling the Earth (Ebury, £12.99) described his decision to quit life as a photographer and have a crack at the record for circumnavigating the globe on

two wheels; or Mark Beaumont who in Africa Solo (Transworld, £9.99) cycles the length of Africa from Cairo to Cape Town in just 41 days. And then there’s the unfathomably resilient Sarah Outen who in her inspirational book Dare to Do (Hodder, £18.99) describes her more than four-year effort to complete an unbroken circuit of the world travelling entirely under her own power. You are in awe of her when, in the opening chapters, she describes kayaking from Tower Bridge to France. By the time she’s pedalled across Europe and Asia you’ve lost all reference points by which to judge what she’s achieving. Once she’s rowed the Pacific, kayaked along the Aleutian Islands, cycled the Americas and got back into her rowing boat to take on the Atlantic, you’re left wondering how this can be real. But it is, and whilst the book didn’t win, it’s perhaps the most astonishing in terms of the author’s personal achievement. In the end the winning book in this category was Walking the Himalayas by Levison Wood (Hodder, £9.99). I had a degree of scepticism when I first began this book, fearing that it might be a hastily-put-together text that wrapped up the experience depicted on the accompanying TV series. It turns out though that Levison Wood is every bit as confident

with a keyboard in front of him as he is with a cameraman. Wood’s superb bit of travel writing begins by explaining his reluctance to embark on another huge trip at all (after his epic walk along the Nile) and how his mind was changed thanks to a long-standing promise to revisit a Nepalese man who had helped him during a gap year many years earlier. Once Wood’s epic walk begins, his descriptions of the foothills, valleys and peaks of the Himalayas are evocative, and through his encounters with locals, he manages to get across historical and political context without ever getting in the way of the adventure narrative. Wood’s account of the traumatic mountainside car crash (one of the only moments he gets inside a vehicle on the entire journey) that interrupts his journey for several months are horrendous but truly compelling. This book was a revelation and a great example of why you can’t always judge a book by its TV tie-in cover. Finally a word about a very different adventure travel book. Climbing Days by Bath-based Dan Richards (Faber, £16.99) just missed out on a prize but was awarded a high commendation, primarily because it is such an exciting reinvention of this sub-genre of travel writing. Richards weaves together family history, exploration history and personal endeavour to create a fragmented but somehow cohesive tale of his decision to follow in the cramponed bootsteps of Dorothy Pilley, his illustrious grandmother. Pilley was a celebrated female mountaineer who (amongst many other achievements), in 1928, made the first ascent of the north ridge of the Dent Blanche in the Alps. Richards’ own attempts to make the same climb is brilliantly captured – as are a few hilariously inept preparatory misadventures – but the book is particularly memorable for its exploration of the nature of adventure itself, and the questions it raises about what drives on the single-minded folk who make these climbs and journeys.

Nic Bottomley is the general manager of Mr B’s Emporium of Reading Delights, 14/15 John Street, Bath; 01225 331155; www.mrbsemporium.com

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 63


High Quality Dry Cleaning and Laundry Services Roadside parking outside shop for loading/unloading

CURTAIN CLEANING 20% DISCOUNT Van service available 6 Monmouth Place, Bath BA1 2AU Tel 01225 311595

Crafting beautiful homes in stunning locations Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswolds | Dorset

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk


A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E C H A R I T Y

HELP HIM RECORD THEIR SUCCESS STORIES

This International Women’s Day, support local photographer PHILIP FIELD as he joins forces with AFRICAN INITIATIVES to document their success in Tanzania for the last 20 years

T

his year, local charity African Initiatives will be celebrating their 20th Anniversary, supporting projects in Africa. These projects range from girls’ education and women’s health rights, through to sustainable livelihoods and land rights, with expertise in working with the Maasai. To coincide with International Women’s Day on 8 March, your help is needed to collect images that tell the stories of ordinary women whose lives have been changed forever. In March 2017, African Initiatives will be sending their communications officer, Ellie Richold to Tanzania to document the impact they have had on the lives of Maasai women and girls in northern Tanzania. In addition, they are hoping to send Bath-based photographer Philip Field out to capture the trip. Upon landing in Arusha, the pair will travel to the remote village of Loliondo situated in Ngorongoro District of Northern Tanzania. Their aim is to illustrate through interviews and photography the story of Simoine, a Maasai women who escaped forced marriage at a young age and was offered a scholarship by African Initiatives’ partner organisation, the Pastoral Women’s Council (PWC). Simoine, like many young girls, was promised to a much older man because her family could not afford to send her to secondary school, believing it was better to exchange her for cattle before she became pregnant. She was expected to give up on any dreams of an education and to become a mother, wife and property of her husband. However, when PWC stepped in, her life took a different route. She

A Maasai woman in traditional dress

Photographer Philip Field with African Initiatives' Ellie Richold

“SIMOINE HAS BECOME A ROLE MODEL TO MANY YOUNG GIRLS” was provided a secondary education, she excelled and went on to become a teacher herself. Simoine is now the deputy head of Emanyatta, the top performing school in Ngorongoro – and unique in that over 65 per cent of its students are girls. She has become a role model to many young girls and women and is a glowing example of how girls’ education can contribute to a virtuous circle. Philip and Ellie’s aim is to document the struggle many girls in Northern Tanzania undergo just to receive an education. Meeting with Simoine, they will observe and capture both the work she does today as well as revisiting her past and her struggle. African Initiatives pride themselves on sending 94 pence from every pound they fundraise direct to overseas projects. It’s an impressive statistic, but such a tight budget means they do not have the funds to fly a professional photographer to the field and back. Not even on their 20th anniversary. Philip has generously offered to donate his time and

expertise free of charge, but is now seeking the support of Bath Life readers to help him raise the funds needed to document Simoine’s story and those of others whose lives have been changed by African Initiatives. With the endorsement of African Initiatives, Philip has set up a crowd funding page on his website to help raise the £1,200 travel costs required to join the trip. Any support, no matter how small, would go a long way. In true crowd funding style, Philip will be offering a tiered selection of rewards for the generous backers and any money raised over the target will be donated in full to African Initiatives. The campaign deadline is 13 March 2017

For full details and to pledge your support, head over to www.philipfield.com/Tanzania 07538 075784; pf@philipfield.com

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 65


66 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


Corkage

R E S TA U R A N T

FOOD

You don’t have to be a wine expert to enjoy the carefully selected tipples at this independent wine bar and shop on Walcot Street, and don’t be surprised if the small plates with big ambitions threaten to steal the spotlight… By L I SA E VA NS

T

he waitress has politely chuckled at the same bad joke from three different customers; “we’ll take one of everything please!” the guests on the table next to us chorus at her after she’s meticulously described this evening’s menu, all from memory. It’s a wisecrack I, ashamedly, made five minutes earlier, and one which keeps cropping up from others throughout the evening. The purpose of our joint buffoonery, you see, is to distract her from realising that we haven’t digested a word she’s said. The sole menu in the restaurant, which is carried to each table individually, is a blackboard chalked with one-word options, such as ‘bream’, ‘beef’ and ‘lentils’, so you must mainly rely on remembering the waitress’s impressively in-depth narrative. But when there are 13 lengthy descriptions to retain, trust us, you too will end up employing the ‘joke’, followed by a politer version of “now repeat literally everything you just said.” The food, though, isn’t supposed to be the main focus here at Corkage, so we needn’t feel too embarrassed. As the appellation suggests, it’s first and foremost a wine bar, so the tapas-style dishes should essentially be seen as a succession of fancy snacks for wineswilling compadres to nibble on. So, in an establishment where shelves of more than a hundred wines, carefully selected and sourced directly from the producers, adorn the walls, anxiety sets in as you wonder what vino to order. The first thing to note is that you don’t have to be a connoisseur to visit, mainly because you don’t choose anything yourself. Co-owner Marty Grant, a serious wine enthusiast with an encyclopaedic knowledge, makes it his goal to select the perfect wine for you and, as he browses the shelves inquisitively, he reminds me of Sir John Hurt in the role of Ollivander, selecting the ideal wand for Harry Potter. His ethos is simple: make great wine accessible and remove the mystique surrounding it. Instead of looking at a wine list, you have an informal chat with Marty – patron of Bath’s Gascoyne Place – as he believes that menus lock people down to styles they generically order; no list, new experiences. So, out of 55 by-the-glass measures (not including the extra 50 or so bottles, carafes and off-sales options), Marty selects a Gewürztraminer Hospices de Colmar for me. Its history, the tale of its producers, and its many complexities all roll off

THERE ARE NO APRONED SOMMELIERS OR BOW-TIED STAFF, IT’S ALL PLAID SHIRTS AND JEANS

his tongue effortlessly, without a pause, and he can do this trick with every other bottle in the place. He brushes our awe off his woolly cardie and totters off to have a thoroughly unpretentious natter with our neighbours. With this much effort going into the wine, you may assume the food will be somewhat of an afterthought. You’d be mistaken. The talent in the open kitchen is co-owner Richard Knighting, an award winning chef who used to work at Marco Pierre White’s Michelin-starred London kitchen, Mirabelle. He was also formerly the head chef at the Marlborough Tavern in Bath and has worked at other local establishments from Clayton’s Kitchen to Sam’s Kitchen. There are no standard ‘courses’ here, the dishes are simply brought to your table when they’re ready, echoing the laidback vibe of the convivial venue. There are no aproned sommeliers or bow-tied staff, it’s all plaid shirts and jeans, and the venue certainly fits with the wider atmosphere of the location it’s in – the vibrant artisan quarter of Walcot Street. My comrade and I overzealously choose eight small plates between us, ranging from belly pork to aubergine curry – the aim of the menu being to challenge Marty’s wine-pairing skills. The colourful ‘merguez’ is the stand-out dish for my dining partner; the North African spiced lamb sausages are served in a pitta bread with feta, pomegranate, red onion salsa and root vegetable and red cabbage slaw. And his silver medal goes to the Cuban pork crowned with bronzed crackling; it rests on a base of chickpeas and sweetcorn which is tossed through with coriander, orange, lime, garlic and chilli, all giving the taste buds a good wallop, somehow without overpowering the tender meat that has been slow-cooking for six hours. To balance out the meat, we go for aubergine marinated in a rich tandoori masala, served on a subtly herby bulgur wheat base, and a two-cheese tart with red onions and leeks. Richard does his utmost to ensure that each small plate is exciting, and our decision to order ‘kale’ – the blandest of the superfoods – is simply to see how he can perk it up. The answer: he roasts it, adds fennel, beetroot and a dollop of paprika crème fraîche, and finishes it with toasted almonds. Even after several hours of grazing, we manage to save room for a petite serving of chocolate fudge cake with accents of coffee and cardamom and a liberal scoop of Chantilly cream, which always makes everything better. The only negative comment we feel we must make about the food is that, as the menu changes daily, there’s slim chance of ordering your favourite dish a second time. But that’s what the venue is all about – being adventurous, and stepping outside your comfort zone rather than sticking to what you know. We feel positively liberated.

DINING DETAILS Corkage, 132a Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BG; 01225 422577; www.corkagebath.com Prices Small plates range from £3.50 to 8.50; the most expensive glass of wine is £9, while the most expensive bottle reaches £70 Vegetarian choice Almost half the menu is vegetarian (but the options change daily) and can be made vegan upon request Wine list There is no written list, Marty listens and matches Service/atmosphere Approachable, social and down to earth/ lively and gregarious

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 67


D I N I N G A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

DINING in BATH Bath Life’s selection of the best places to eat out in Bath and the surrounding area

BRITISH

CAFÉS & COFFEE SHOPS

THE BATH PRIORY Weston Rd, Bath; 01225 331922; www.thebathpriory.co.uk Michelin starred fine dining overlooking hotels award-winning gardens

CAFÉ LUCCA 1-2 Bartlett Street, Bath; 01225 335394; www.cafelucca.co.uk Stylish contemporary café situated at The Loft on Bartlett Street offering a Mediterranean inspired menu with barista coffee and sumptuous homemade cakes

THE BEAUFORT 1 Beaufort, London Road, Bath; 01225 422033; www.thebeaufortbath.com Family run restaurant in the heart of Larkhall cooking creative, seasonal food CIRCUS RESTAURANT 34 Brock Street, Bath; 01225 466020; www.thecircusrestaurant.co.uk Voted number four in the UK in The Times “20 secret restaurants that foodies love” CLIFTON SAUSAGE 5 Bladud Buildings, Bath; 01225 433633; www.cliftonsausage.co.uk Upmarket sausage and mash restaurant and bar newly opened in Bath THE DOWER HOUSE, ROYAL CRESCENT HOTEL 16 Royal Crescent, Bath; 01225 823333; www.royalcrescent.co.uk/dining AA 3 rosette fine dining at one of Bath’s most iconic locations

GREEN BIRD CAFÉ 11 Margaret's Buildings, Bath; 01225 487846; www.greenbirdcafe.co.uk Independently run cafe located between the Circus & Royal Crescent THE KINGSMEAD KITCHEN 1 Kingsmead St, Kingsmead Square, Bath; 01225 329002; www.fieldfireandfeast.co.uk Laid-back, modern cafe-bar open daily from 8am until 6pm for breakfast, brunch, lunch and tea using own farm produce

CALIFORNIAN THE FIREHOUSE ROTISSERIE 2 John St, Bath; 01225 482070; www.firehouserotisserie.co.uk Californian and Tex-Mex dishes, prepared over a wood-fired grill in a rustic setting

serving a modern British menu based on west country produce THE CHEQUERS 50 Rivers St, Bath; 01225 360017; www.thechequersbath.com Inventive British food served in a welcoming pub atmosphere close to the Royal Crescent THE CURFEW 11 Cleveland Pl, Bath; 01225 313747 www.thecurfewbath.co.uk Friendly central pub under new ownership. Bar food with locally sourced ingredients THE GARRICKS HEAD 7-8 St John's Rd, City Centre, Bath; 01225 318368; www.garricksheadpub.com City centre pub and dining room next to Theatre Royal THE HARE AND HOUNDS Lansdown Rd, Avon, Bath; 01225 482682; www.hareandhoundsbath.com Airy, relaxed spot with modern British gastropub menu, extensive wine list and scenic outdoor area

FRENCH

THE LOCKSBROOK INN 103 Locksbrook Rd, Bath; 01225 427119; www.thelocksbrookinn.com Recently opened canal side gastropub in Bath, open every day for drinks, brunch, coffee, lunch, evening meals and grazing in between

HENRYS 4 Saville Row, Bath; 01225 780055; www.henrysrestaurantbath.com Imaginative modern dining offering a classic menu and also full vegetarian and vegan menus

LE BISTROT PIERRE Princes Buildings, 4 George St, Bath; 01225 321840; www. lebistrotpierre.co.uk/bath Regional French dishes

THE MARLBOROUGH TAVERN 35 Marlborough Buildings; 01225 423731; www.marlborough-tavern.com Award winning gastropub using seasonal local produce

JOHANN LAFER, THE GAINSBOROUGH Beau St, Bath; 01225 358888; www.thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk Menus inspired by Johann Lafer’s “Dining Without Borders” philosophy

WOODS 9-13 Alfred St, Bath; 01225 314812; www.woodsrestaurant.com One of Bath’s oldest restaurants serving French influenced British cuisine

THE RICHMOND ARMS 7 Richmond Place, Bath; 01225 316725; www.therichmondarmsbath.com Hearty dishes with menu changing on a daily basis

MENU GORDON JONES 2 Wellsway, Bath; 01225 480871; www.menugordonjones.co.uk Multi award winning fine dining with constantly changing surprise tasting menu

GASTROPUBS

INDIAN

GPT SMOKEHOUSE 44-45 Lower Bristol Rd, Bath; 01225 429509; www.gptbath.com “Dude Food” menu cooked with authentic handmade American hot smoker

THE EASTERN EYE 8a Quiet St, Bath; 01225 422323; www.easterneye.com Classic traditional Bengali cuisine in grand Georgian interior space

KING WILLIAM 36 Thomas St, Bath; 01225 428096; www.kingwilliampub.com Pub with an upstairs dining room

THE MINT ROOM Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Rd, Bath; 01225 446656; www.themintroom.co.uk Award winning contemporary Indian fine dining

THE OLIVE TREE RESTAURANT, THE QUEENSBERRY HOTEL Russell St, Bath; 01225 447928; www.thequeensberry.co.uk One of Bath’s longest established restaurants, overseen by Chris Cleghorn with 3 AA rosettes 68 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E D I N I N G

ITALIAN MARTINI RESTAURANT 8-9 George St, Bath; 01225 460818; www.martinirestaurant.co.uk Traditional Italian food served in a cosy atmosphere PONTE VECCHIO Spring Gardens Rd, Bath; 01225 466833; www.pontevecchiobath.com Fantastic central location next to Pulteney Bridge

THE OVEN 21 Westgate St, Bath; 01225 311181; www.theovenpizzeria.co.uk Neapolitan artisan pizza using local and Italian imported produce REAL ITALIAN PIZZA CO 16 York St, Bath; 01225 330121; www.realitalianpizza.co.uk Family owned pizzeria. Wood fired pizza with fresh authentic ingredients

STEAK HOUSES

SOTTO SOTTO 10 N Parade, Bath; 01225 330236; www.sottosotto.co.uk Classic Italian menu with a contemporary twist in candlelit vaulted cellars

THE HERD 12a Argyle St, Bath; 01225 316583; www.theherdrestaurant.co.uk Locally sourced meat of the finest provenance alongside a simple, seasonal menu

PIZZA

HUDSON STEAKHOUSE 14 London St, Bath; 01225 332323; www.hudsonsteakhouse.co.uk Award winning steakhouse in listed building specialising in prime aged steaks and delicious starters with a fusion twist

DOUGH The Corridor, Bath; 01225 443686; www.doughpizzarestaurant.co.uk World class pizza from Massimo Nucaro

TAPAS MADRID 5 Chapel Row, Bath; 01225 423417; www.madrid-tapas-bath.com Bringing a taste of Madrid to Bath – traditional Spanish tapas with a modern twist OLÉ TAPAS 1 John Street, Bath; 01225 466440; www.oletapas.co.uk Charming, authentic Spanish tapas – one of Bath’s best kept secrets

THAI KOH THAI TAPAS 36 Broad St, Bath; 01225 311232; www.koh-thai.co.uk Award winning small Thai tapas plates and cocktails THAI BY THE WEIR 16 Argyle St, Bath; 01225 444834; www.thaibytheweir.co.uk Restaurant overlooking the weir, serving a classic Thai menu

OUTSIDE of BATH BRITISH THE FIELD KITCHEN 1 Brook Ln, Holt BA14 6RL; 01225 784081; www.glovefactorystudios.com/kitchen Serving fresh seasonal dishes within the Glove Factory Studios THE GREENHOUSE RESTAURANT The Pavilion, Wadswick Green, Corsham SN13 9RD; 01225 585880; www.thegreenhousewg.co.uk Smart, stylish and relaxed new dining destination

COUNTRY HOUSE HOTELS LUCKNAM PARK Colerne, Wilts, SN14 8AZ; 01225 742777; www.lucknampark.co.uk Michelin Star fine dining at the renowned Park restaurant and more informal dining at the stylish contemporary brasserie at 5 star country house hotel WIDBROOK GRANGE HOTEL Trowbridge Rd, Bradford-on-Avon

BA15 1UH; 01225 864750; www.widbrookgrange.co.uk Modern farmhouse cuisine, locally sourced and freshly prepared

GASTROPUBS BIDDESTONE ARMS Biddestone, Wilts SN14 7DG; 01249 714377; www.biddestonearms.co.uk Whitewashed country pub with upmarket, robust British fare in a beautiful Cotswold stone village BUNCH OF GRAPES 14 Silver St, Bradford-on-Avon BA15 1JY; 01225 938088; www.thebunchofgrapes.com Bar and restaurant inspired by the village bistros of South West France THE LAMB ON THE STRAND 99 The Strand, Semington, Trowbridge BA14 6LL; 01380 870263; www.thelambonthestrand.co.uk Classic British menus and real ales in a family-run pub and restaurant, plus a garden with kids' playground

THE LONGS ARMS Upper South Wraxall, Wilts, BA15 2SB; 01225 864450; www.thelongsarms.com Award winning modern British food and cask ales in country inn THE PEAR TREE INN Top Ln, Whitely, Wilts, SN12 8QX; 01225 704966; www.peartreewhitley.co.uk An elegant revamped country inn with an acclaimed restaurant and contemporary rustic-chic bedrooms THE WHEELWRIGHTS ARMS Church Lane, Monkton Combe, BA2 7HB; 01225 722287; www.wheelwrightsarms.co.uk Pub featuring modern takes on British classics, plus understated, individually decorated guestrooms

FARM SHOPS ALLINGTON FARM SHOP Allington Bar Farm, Allington, Chippenham SN14 6LJ; 01249 658112; www.allingtonfarmshop.co.uk Shop and Café selling local produce

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 69


A cut above...

Quality food • Great location • Free delivery

Order your sushi takeaway online and get it delivered* www.bathsushi.co.uk 01225 330508 3 Victoria Buildings, Bath BA2 3EH *minimum order £25

Try our Tour of India tasting menu Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB Tel: 01225 446656 12-16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 01173 291300 Email: info@themintroom.co.uk www.themintroom.co.uk

fa


Stylish country inn & rural retreat just a mile and a half from Bath city centre

Recommended by The Michelin Guide 2017 “We would like to congratulate David and his team at the Wheelwrights Arms on their listing in The Michelin Guide. Some of us have been associated with the Wheelwrights Arms for ten years and hope to be for many more.�


Jars Meze

Greek food made fresh on site by the family Enjoy a new taste experience! Visit our website to see the full menu. 6 Northumberland Place, Bath BA1 5AR 01225 471 434

www.jarsmeze.com

GREAT BURGERS FRESH LOCALLY SOURCED PRODUCE DELICIOUS COCKTAILS

Burgers and Barrels 2 Victoria Buildings, Lower Bristol Road, Bath, BA2 3EH www.burgersnbarrels.co.uk b a

EXPERIENCE TRADITIONAL FARMHOUSE COOKING WITH A GASTRO TWIST AT OUR COUNTRYSIDE HOTEL IN BRADFORD ON AVON. BRADFORD ON AVON, TROWBRIDGE ROAD BA15 1UH 01225 864750 WWW.WIDBROOKGRANGE.CO.UK


FOOD & DRINK W H AT ’ S M A K I N G T H E G O U R M E T N E W S I N B AT H

Arianna and Siobhan embraced the idea of a Brissi café

CHANGING SPACES It’s all about the flavour for award winning Mark Potts

COOKING POTTS Head chef Mark Potts has helped The Somerset Dining Room at The Mount Somerset Hotel & Spa in Taunton secure a prestigious three AA Rosettes for its culinary excellence. Dishes such as langoustine and pork belly, grilled and tartare with Granny Smith apple and crackling, which is one of the most popular menu choices, is served up “with an ethos of using prime ingredients,” explains head chef Mark, “which are cooked to perfection to extract as much flavour as possible.” Other favourites, which have helped

the Regency country house hotel gain its outstanding foodie reputation, include white chocolate and elderflower cheesecake with blueberry sorbet. AA senior hotel and restaurant inspector, Garry Baldwin, comments, “Mark’s cuisine is… a simplicity of flavours with the ultimate respect for ingredients from the local South West larder. As with all chefs cooking at this level, Mark brings his own unique imagination and skill to make the dining experience truly memorable.” For more: www.themountsomersethotelandspa.com

When Brissi owners Arianna Brissi and Siobhan McKeating decided they were going to incorporate a café in the Milsom Street homeware shop, they knew it had to be something pretty special. “We wanted to make the most of the outside space with an area that embodied everything Brissi whilst being outdoor,” explains Siobhan. “We decided to invest by building a decked area on stilts, bringing the space up to the store’s ground floor level and creating a beautiful, tranquil area surrounded by Bath stone.” And as Brissi products are inspired by heritage and beautiful places, they took the same approach with Embrace, the name for their eatery, which opened in October last year. “Sitting there on the outdoor sofas with a warm drink in hand, you can see the hints of Chamonix and Meribel mixed with local Bath charm.” Siobhan adds, “The space will change with the seasons, so it continues to inspire the look and feel of Brissi.” For more: www.brissi.com


Provided by

Give your teen the opportunity of a lifetime this Summer! Over 4 weeks they’ll meet incredible people, develop some great skills and make a real difference to their community - all for £50! Sign up today at NCSWEST.CO.UK or call 07779 972 418


Fashion/gifts/stores/more

PRECIOUS TIME

The Spanish philosopher Baltasar Gracián noted back in the 16th century, “All that really belongs to us is time; even he who has nothing else, has that.” From the beautiful simplicity of a sundial to the high precision engineering of a luxury wristwatch, and from the small whisper of a cased pocket watch to the sturdy reassurance of a grandfather clock, each generation celebrates the marking of time and, in doing so, creates heirlooms for those that follow. The Ladies Chopard Steel and Rose Gold Imperiale Automatic Watch is one such timepiece. The sculptural play of curves and straight lines is expressed in a sophisticated blend of materials. The subtle combination of stainless steel and 18-carat rose gold on the case along with the delicate mother-of-pearl on the dial make this not only a sophisticated classic, but also a timeless legacy. Ladies Chopard Steel and Rose Gold Imperiale Automatic Watch, £4,900, available at Mallory, 1-5 Bridge Street, Bath; www.mallory-jewellers.com

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 77


PERSONAL BESTS AS THE BATH HALF MARATHON IS COMING UP ON 12 MARCH, BOLT TO THE CITY’S INDEPENDENT SHOPS TO FIND THESE PRE- AND POST-RUN LUXURIES, AS WELL AS GIFTS TO AWARD YOUR SPORTY SELF WITH…

3

4

1

2

5

1. QUICK READ

2. FOOTLOOSE

3. SHOCK ABSORBER

4. DRINK UP

5. SHINE BRIGHT

It’s a Hill, Get Over it, by Steve Chilton, £9.99 An illuminating and entertaining history of one of athletics’ most demanding sports From Mr B’s Emporium of Reading Delights, 14/15 John Street, Bath; www.mrbsemporium.com

Trollbeads Power Runners charm, £17.50 With this artfully designed sterling silver trainer bead, you can personalise your wrist-wear with a symbol of your passion for the race From Fabulous, 17 St Lawrence Street, SouthGate, Bath; www. fabulouscollections.co.uk

Victory Run bra, £45 Meet the queen of supportive sports bras designed for high support and fitted with breathable mesh panels, supportive straps and padding for a flattering shape From Sweaty Betty, 13 Northgate Street, Bath; www.sweatybetty.com

Copper water bottle, £19.99 This triple-insulated drinks canteen keeps your water icy cold (or hot, if for some reason, you’re partial to a coffee while on a run) From Vinegar Hill, 16 Milsom Street, Bath; www.vinegarhill.co.uk

Light-up alphabet letters, £13.95 each Add a little bit of twinkle to your home with these individual LED letters which, as well as ‘run’, can spell out any word you’d like From French Grey Interiors, 1 Burton Street, Bath; www. frenchgreyinteriors.co.uk

78 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


ED’S CHOICE

7

SHOPPING

8

6

10

9

6. JOG ON

7. SMOOTH SILHOUETTE

8.NATURAL BEAUTY

9. NAILED IT

10. AND RELAX

Boudavida leggings, £45.50 This Somerset-based sportswear brand creates funky active wear, like these geometric print leggings, and donates five per cent of all profits back into supporting women’s sport projects From Kilver Court Designer Village, Kilver Street, Shepton Mallet; www.kilvercourt.com

LNDR Breeze top, £80 This long-sleeved running top has a slim-fit, lightweight design, perfect for wearing whilst pounding the pavements From Found, 17 Argyle Street, Bath; www.foundbath.co.uk

Organic Body Oil, £22 For use on weary feet alone, or all over the skin for an indulgent pampering experience, this fastabsorbing blend of oils leaves skin nourished, soft and velvety From Bath Spa Skincare, 2 Westhall Road, Bath, www.bathspaskincare.co.uk

Nailmatic set, £25 Treat your feet to a colourful pedicure after race day with this unique, fast-drying nail lacquer From Anthropologie, 1-4 New Bond Street, Bath; www.anthropologie.com

Bramley lavender and geranium bath salts, £14 No race would be complete without a post-run soak in the tub. Help soothe tired muscles and aching joints with these sweet-smelling salts made in Wiltshire From Rossiters of Bath, 38-41 Broad Street, Bath; www.rossitersofbath.com

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE LIFE II 79 www.mediaclash.co.uk I CLIFTON 69


T h e C u r ta i n E x c h a n g e For the best dressed windows

IN BATH

11 Widcombe Parade, Bath, BA2 4JT | Tel: 01225 422078 | Email: curtainexchange@live.co.uk www.curtainexchangebath.co.uk


A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E S E R V I C E S

PUTTING THE CARE INTO CLOTHES When it comes to looking after your clothes, with their attention to detail, their expertise and years of experience, SMARTY DRY CLEANING are the smarter choice

S

marty Dry Cleaners are an independently owned group of dry cleaning shops with branches in Julian Road Bath, Bradford on Avon and Keynsham. Smarty is committed to providing the highest standards of professionalism, expertise and state of the art equipment for dry cleaning with all members of the

team fully trained and available to discuss their customers specific needs. Each item passes through at least six stages before final inspection. By using skilled craftsmen at every stage, they achieve the best possible results with each and every item brought to them. They specialise in cleaning couture and high value garments that many other cleaners cannot handle. They advise on all areas of fabric care with the nature and age of any stain, combined with the colour and construction of the fabric very much dictates the end result. For example, the dye in some fabrics is more soluble than the stain. Removing the stain will remove the dye. Stains are dealt by hand prior to dry cleaning. Smarty operate within strict safety margins, limiting the end results in the removal of problematic stains. As well as general dry cleaning, Smarty provides other services including clothing alterations and repairs, wedding dress

services, laundry services, ready to wear shirt services and collection and delivery services. Smarty also provide a contract service for hotels and B&B’s with a daily valet and guest staff service.

SMARTY DRY CLEANING Smarty Dry, Bath 11 River Street Place, Julian Road, Bath BA1 2RS 01225 444666; www.smartydrycleaning.co.uk Smarty Dry, Bradford on Avon Elms Cross Shopping Centre (next door to Sainsbury’s), Bradford on Avon, BA15 2AZ 01225 862964; www.smartyofbradford.co.uk Smarty Dry, Keynsham 2 Charlton Road, Keynsham, Bristol BS31 2JA 01179 864878; www.keepitcleandc.co.uk

Specialists in bathroom safety With time you may find your bathroom becomes more difficult to use safely, however there are a range of options and products available to make life easier, for example; • Change your bath for a large shower or walk in bath • Create a wet room with a completely flat surface • Redesign your layout to make best use of space • Increase storage with built in units • Install underfloor heating to keep the floor dry • Add grab rails and fold away shower seats

Save 20% VAT*

Before

Lifestyle BATHROOMS

After

Above is an example of a recent project where the customer replaced their old bath and shower with a tiled wet room, suitable for a wheelchair user with a young family. *If you need to make changes to your bathroom due to disability or a medical condition, we are able to supply your bathroom VAT free, saving you 20%. Please ask for details.

For a free home visit, contact Rex on 07496 057281 or 01453 884167 Visit our website www.lifestylebathrooms.net for more information 30+ years of experience • Free design service & advice • Tiles, wallboards, mirrors & accessories supplied • Experienced polite installers


STREET LIFE

HEART of the

CITY We delve beneath the surface of Abbey Quarter and ask its independent business traders for their tales, legends and stories of the historic area‌ By L I SA E VA NS

The view from the top of Bath Abbey is enough to induce acrophobia 82 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


STREET LIFE

CROWNED

AND WHERE MARY SHELLEY

WROTE HER FINAL DRAFT OF

FRANKENSTEIN

W

FIRST, A LITTLE BACKGROUND

Bath’s history is rich and awe-inspiring, and with each little corner and crevice of the city comes another outstanding sight, but, in the heart of the city, the magnificent structure that is Bath Abbey is one of the most remarkable. It has the city’s tallest tower and is visited by 420,000 people every year, such is its beauty. “The Abbey is the last great medieval cathedral to have been built in England,” says Reverend Stephen Girling, a vicar at the Abbey. “Building work on it began around 1499, but was not completed for 120 years. Before that, two other churches have occupied the site; first, an Anglo-Saxon monastery and Abbey where Edgar, the first King of All England, was crowned in 973 AD; then a Norman cathedral which was begun in about 1090 but lay in ruins by late 15th century. “The Abbey itself has undergone many changes over the last thousand years, surviving architectural and religious reforms and two world wars,” he adds. “And today, it faces a new set of challenges because, as it’s situated at the heart of a thriving city, it’s under pressure due to the demands placed upon it.” Massive investments are now being put into the Abbey’s Footprint Project – a £19.3 million transformative programme to restore the Abbey’s historic floor and create additional space, starting this autumn. The wider aim is to give the Abbey’s visitors a better experience, and, in turn, entice more people to the Abbey Quarter. w

SWEET TREATS

PHOTO BY EDWIN JONES WWW.EDWINJONESPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

THIS IS WHERE THE FIRST KING OF ALL ENGLAND WAS

ith Bath Abbey at its heart, the Abbey Quarter of the city is bursting with historical wonders, fascinating tales and creative independent businesses. We shine a spotlight on its destinations such as Abbey Green, North Parade and York Street to discover what’s new in the area, and its most famous spots including where the first king of All England was crowned, and where Mary Shelley wrote her final draft of Frankenstein.

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 83


When it comes to other buildings with a colourful history in the Abbey Quarter, no one has more insider knowledge about them than the people who are in them every day – the owners of Bath’s independent businesses, that is. Sally Lunn’s Historic Eating House & Museum on North Parade Passage is believed, by owner Jonathan Overton, to be Bath’s oldest house. “For 100 years, a date of 1482 has been used,” he says. “But recent archaeology has suggested a date of around 1100 – this would indicate it was built before the Abbey. “Legend has it that a Huguenot refugee, Solange Luyon – who became known as Sally Lunn – brought her baking skills to 1680s Bath,” he adds. “Part bun, part bread, part cake, her secret recipe for the bun was passed on to us with the deeds to Sally’s house.” Sugar seems to be a recurring theme in this area, so the Fudge Kitchen on Abbey Churchyard and the San Francisco Fudge Factory on Church Street fit right in. The team at the latter hand-make each piece of their fudge the old-fashioned way on their premises. Maureen Lechmere, who co-owns the business with her husband, Mark, is passionate about making her products with natural ingredients, as she’s done since she ran her first shop in California with her father in 1985. After an earthquake left its mark on her U.S. shop in 1989, she moved the business to Bath and says the city shares many similar characteristics with San Francisco.

MEET THE MAKERS

Sticking with the homemade theme, there are an abundance of businesses in the area in which products, from rare gemstone jewellery to carved wooden gifts, are made by the owners’ fair hands. One example is Timber Treasures on Abbey Green, a shop which was founded by David Gladden who stepped off the career ladder as a history lecturer in 1995, determined to pursue his hobby of woodturning and carving. He’s been co-running his business with his wife, Susan, in Bath since 2005

PHOTO BY DERRYN VRANCH

STREET LIFE

Above: Gary Wood at One Two Five Gallery where every item is one of a kind; below: Jewellery designer and maker Jody Cory

BE ASTOUNDED BY… “The room above the shop next to ours is where Mary Shelley wrote the final draft of Frankenstein in 1817.” Carole Waller of One Two Five Gallery on Abbey Green “The building our shop is in, used to be the gatehouse to the Abbey. It is very possible characters like Jane Austen, Admiral Nelson, and Mary Shelley spent time in Abbey Green, and walked beneath the leafy shade of the now huge plane tree.” David Gladden of Timber Treasures on Abbey Green “During the 1930s restoration of this building, a secret cupboard in a fireplace on the ground floor was discovered in which the recipe for the Sally Lunn Bun was said to have been found.” Jonathan Overton of Sally Lunn’s Historic Eating House & Museum on North Parade Passage

PHOTO BY DERRYN VRANCH

“The British drama series Pie in the Sky was filmed here and our building is shown in one of the episodes. There is also a mention in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice of the view of the Pump Rooms from a window, suggesting it was set right here, where we are today.” Jody Cory of Jody Cory Goldsmiths in Abbey Churchyard

84 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

from one of the oldest continuously trading shops in the U.K. “Our shop has been used for all sorts in the past – from a confectioner to a brothel and inn,” he says. “This list follows the building’s identity from the 1600s, but its origins date back to the 1400s.” Another crafter whose passion led her to opening her own specialist business is Jody Cory, owner of Jody Cory Goldsmiths in Abbey Churchyard. At her shop and on-site workshop, Jody creates bespoke pieces of jewellery from rare stones such as briolette diamonds and star sapphires . “I’ve always been fascinated by unusual gems,” she says. “It’s great to be able to do it from such a beautiful place; I love the amazing architecture of the Roman Baths.” The founder of Bath Aqua Glass, Annette Dolan – a stalwart of the Bath indie scene – agrees that the Abbey Quarter is a special place to work, adding that the buskers give it a lively atmosphere. The business specialises in glass-blowing and stained glass fusing, and every delicate piece is perfected by hand in their Theatre of Glass workshop on Walcot Street. The draw of the area is too powerful for many to resist, as husband and wife Sara and Nick Loxton know all too well. They moved their business, Leather Chairs of Bath – which specialises in traditional, handmade leather furniture – from Bath to London four years ago only to return last summer to set up shop in the place they know and love. “We adore being in the historic heart of Bath,” says Sara. “Our beautiful building on York Street is attached to the Roman Baths by an elaborate 19th century bridge built to carry the hot water from the thermal springs to the laundry in Swallow Street. Even more magical is the fact that we are sitting on top of a Roman Street with shops, paving, columns and an entry to the baths. You can still walk along this street and there are plans for Bath Heritage to open this up one day.”

FOOD & DRINK

Although she started her business years ago, Silvana de Soissons became the new kid on the block when she moved her Foodie Bugle Shop from Margaret’s Buildings to Abbey Street a few months ago. “Every day I walk past Bath Abbey on my w


Handmade in the heart of Bath New Spring Collection Peacock

Beautiful Diamonds, Sparkling Garnets and Cabochon Aquamarines, handcrafted and inspired by nature

10 York Street, Bath BA1 1NH 01225 447920 leatherchairs.co.uk

9 Abbey Churchyard, Bath BA1 1LY 01225 460072 jodycory.co.uk

W W W. N I C K B R A I N H A I R D R E S S I N G . C O M 01225 462676

|

01225 421125


commute and I cannot believe I work near such a magnificent building,” says Silvana, who, alongside serving artisan food and drink in her tearoom, also sells everything from vintage kitchenalia to greeting cards from the same premises. “Our shop in Elton House overlooks Abbey Green, a square filled with quirky shops, tearooms and restaurants. It’s my favourite part of Bath because it feels like a small village and the neighbouring traders are so welcoming – especially Laurence and Nina Swan at The Georgian Tea Rooms.” Mark Goldsmith, the owner of Café Retro on York Street, agrees that the bond between the independent business owners is strong in the area. “The deep history combined with the fact it is a place filled with local traders gives it a different feeling to the main drag,” he says. “You can also feel the past around you and almost hear the conversations of bygone Georgians. Our premises stands on what would have been, in medieval times, the monks orchards attached to the Abbey.” On York Street, you’ll also find The Real Italian Pizza Company which has been bringing the flavours of Italy to the city for over a decade. “We are the original authentic wood-fired pizza restaurant in Bath,” says Timothy Coffey, who owns the business with his wife Francesca Addabbo. “We opened following the success of The Real Italian Ice Cream Company next door. Within our ice cream business, we wanted to recreate the taste of authentic gelato, so, to make this possible I studied at the gelato university in Bologna. This ended up working out so well we thought we should give our customers truly authentic Italian pizza too.” Rob Cartwright, the manager of Nick Brain Hairdressing salons, which are both on York Street and have been trading in Bath for over 35 years, says that Tim’s restaurant is “without a doubt” the best pizza place in Bath. “On a Friday evening after a busy day in the salon, there’s nothing better than a pizza and a beer,” he says. “The Pump Room is the best place for lunch. Being a Discovery Card holder you can go in for nothing and even jump the queues.”

PHOTO BY DERRYN VRANCH

STREET LIFE

Above: Nick Loxton at Leather Chairs of Bath is glad he moved back to the city; below: The Hideout general manager Callum Rixson, claims lawless reprobates once frequented Lilliput Court

BE ASTOUNDED BY… “Abbey Green was once the site of an orchard managed by monks for the Bishop’s Palace in the 13th and 14th centuries. And when it comes to the building my shop is now in, locals can recount when it was used as the location for Felicity Kendal’s sitcom The Mistress.” Silvana de Soissons of The Foodie Bugle Shop in Abbey Street “Our building was the original Ralph Allen building and the British postal system was started from our rooms. The first stamp was sold over our doorstep.” Richard Buckley of Acorn Vegetarian Kitchen on North Parade Passage “There are so many interesting facts about the Abbey. The bells have been rung there since before the 16th century, and this tradition is carried on to this day. When Bath was bombed during the Second World War, the Abbey’s east window was shattered and a soldier from Canada picked up some of the pieces and this was built into a new window in a church in Canada; and in the 1990s thousands of toothbrushes were used to clean the stonework that was black from hundreds of years of soot and pollution.” Reverend Stephen Girling, a vicar at the Abbey

86 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

ART & GIFTS

Tim and Francesca also own Pinkart on the same street, which sells gifts as well as fused glasswork made by Francesca. She travels to design fairs across Europe for ideas, and many items are unique in Bath, with some not available anywhere in the U.K. The theme of exclusivity is also relevant at Pitch26 on Church Street. Owned by artist Robert Kann, the gallery displays his contemporary, intricate architectural illustrations which are inspired by Bath’s wealth of Georgian buildings and structures. And at One Two Five Gallery on the cobbled square of Abbey Green, you will also find the work of the gallery owners, Carole Waller and Gary Wood, on display. They have been making and selling their work internationally for 30 years and each item at their gallery is one of a kind.

AFTER DARK

With a choice ranging from the ArtBar and The Huntsman to the Crystal Palace, plus many more in between, there are plenty of places to enjoy an after-work tipple. Having opened just before Christmas, The Hideout whisky bar on Lilliput Court is tucked away in a historical lane and has a folktale surrounding it, so we’re told. “Legend tells us this was a hoard for thieves and highwaymen; a smuggler’s first port of call after hauling bounty down the river to the secret caves of Bath,” says Callum Rixson general manager, who runs the venue with bar manager Ross Mullins. “It was a meeting place for lawless reprobates; now it’s a place in which stories are told and drinks are shared.” And when it comes to staying in the area, the family-run Three Abbey Green guest house, owned by husband and wife Alan and Nici Jones, is an indie favourite. Their venue offers myriad surprises; Lord Nelson supposedly stayed in one of the rooms, one of the foundation walls of the building dates back to 1689, and a secret Narnia-esque space, now used as an office by the owners, was discovered behind a cupboard. “It’s a fantastic position in which to be based,” says Nici. “When it’s dark and the Abbey is lit up and then you hear choral songs and music floating across into the square, it’s truly magical.”


Join the Madness! We are a family run tea room located right in the heart of the beautiful city of Bath. Offering cream teas, homemade cakes, snacks, the finest selection of Lavazza coffee and Teapigs. You’d be mad not to visit us!

The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party 5 Orange Grove, Bath BA1 1LP

Near the

01225 466 733 Abbey www.madhattersbath.co.uk Bath

Bath’s leading marble & Granite co. for over 30 years Free no obligation site survey for quotation purposes

• Sinks and taps now available at competitive prices • Kitchen worktops • Bathrooms • Fireplaces • Flooring • Natural stone tiles & memorials • Bespoke templating and fitting service Office and Showroom open 8am - 5pm Monday to Friday and Saturday 9am - 1pm Tel: 01761 412934 • Fax: 01761 417068 • hobbsmarblegranite@btinternet.com Radstock Road, Midsomer Norton, Bath, BA3 2AA • www.hobbsmarbleandgranite.co.uk


Shake-ups/launches/intel/promotions

B AT H G E T S S ER I O US SPONSORED BY:

Comics Rob Deering and Paul Tonkinson will be making an appearance at this year’s Bath Half

QUOTE OF THE ISSUE

BATH HALF

RUNNING IS A SERIOUS BUSINESS The Bath Half Corporate Challenge sees local firms, including Komedia Bath, make it their business to raise money for good causes It looks like the runners competing in the Vitality Bath Half Marathon on 12 March will be in good company. The Bath Half Corporate Challenge sold out this year with a record 36 teams entering, all representing a wide cross-section of Bath’s industries including banking, education, retail, gardening and even comedy. With 500 of the 15,000 places in the race specifically reserved for entrants representing business teams, this is a hugely popular and slightly competitive part of race day, which last year raised nearly £80,000 for a wide variety of charities. Along with local law rivals such as Mowbray Woodwards and Royds Withy King keeping an eye out for each other’s challenges, there’s also some funny business going on over at Komedia Bath. Hoping to raise cash instead of the usual laughs, and running in aid of Parkinson’s UK and Dorothy House, are comedians Alistair Barrie, Barry Castagnola, Rob Deering and Paul Tonkinson, all of whom are the full line-up from the previous night’s Krater Comedy Club. Paul is hoping for a super-fast time of 86 minutes

and admits to “becoming completely obsessed with marathons”, having run six so far. He explains: “Running is fun of an intense kind – and I get slightly more anxious about races now than stand-up – purely because I haven’t done as many races as I have gigs, so I’m a little out of my comfort zone. But the pleasure is more private when you’re running – and hopefully, when you’re running people aren’t laughing, but they’re cheering. “Very rarely do you get heckled – if you do get heckled, then that’s a bad community spirit!” Paul is also doing a podcast with fellow comedian and runner Rob Deering. “It’s called Running Commentary, where we are round and about on the day with our microphones, chatting to various people and each other,” he explains. “We don’t chat during the marathon because we’ll be racing against each other, and to talk as well means our breathing would be out of control.” For more: www.bathhalf.co.uk

“I THOUGHT I WAS DESTINED TO BE A FARMER; ONE OF THE THINGS I HAD TO DO BEFORE GOING TO SCHOOL WAS COLLECT THE EGGS AND MUCK OUT THE HENS” Some might say running hotels is a similar calling to which hotelier’s early chores? Turn to page 93 to find out...

20k THE BIG NUMBER

This is how many ‘peeps’ have so far proved they want to be helpful on a new community-minded website. Turn to page 91 for the full story

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 89


SPONSORED BY:

MOVERS, SHAKERS, ETC

Jo’s Bath Racecourse is racing ahead

Learning can be scrum!

BATH RUGBY NEWS Bringing you the latest from Bath Rugby headquarters

Ever had a school report that said you should try harder? Well now you really can. The Bath Rugby skills clinics return in April, with the sessions providing those taking part the opportunity to learn about some of the most essential moves and techniques needed in rugby. The classes, which are held at Bath Rugby’s Recreation Ground, will focus on intricate skills in rugby such as kicking, tackling, the breakdown, scrummaging and scrum-half play. In previous years, the sessions have been supported by Bath Rugby first team stars George Ford, Matt Banahan, Guy Mercer and Tom Dunn, who have passed on their knowledge, expertise and first-hand

experience across a number of areas. Bath Rugby’s commercial community manager, James Newbigin, says: “Our skills clinics are a fantastic opportunity to develop the core fundamental skill set necessary within specialised areas of rugby. Our strong relationship with our first team allows us to call upon professional players, allowing children to experience a unique environment.” The clinics include classes for both girls and boys and are aimed at those aged between 12–18. For more: www.bathrugby.com

BUSINESS MATTERS DIARY From city centre conferences to networking breakfasts, make a note of these dates and make them work for you VARIOUS DATES

Bath Business Club offers the opportunity to meet up with likeminded individuals once a week. 7.30am, £10. www.bathbc.com 21 FEBRUARY

Netwalking in the Great Outdoors: Entrepreneurial business owners do their networking along the banks of the Avon Valley Canal. 11am-1pm, £5.90. www.eventbrite.co.uk 23 FEBRUARY

Bath Life Awards ceremony: A unique and joyous opportunity to celebrate the very best of Bath

90 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

at Bath Assembly Rooms. www.bathlifeawards.co.uk

16 MARCH

The Bath Business Expo 2017, one of the largest business exhibitions 8 MARCH and networking opportunities An informal networking event in the region, takes place at the celebrating International Women’s Assembly Rooms. 10am - 3pm, Day at the Roman Baths and free. www.bathexpo.co.uk Pump Room. 6.45pm-9.30pm, £25. 22 MARCH events.bath@searcys.co.uk Inspire with Why Not Inspires 10 MARCH at Curo Group: A chance to hear A new ladies networking event three speakers renowned for their has been launched in Chipping enthusiasm, passion and drive for Sodbury, which meets the second creating outstanding cultures with Friday of every month at The purpose. 9am-5.30pm, for prices Horseshoe pub. For more info, see www.whynotinspires.co.uk contact writetoreb@gmail.com

ODDS ON FAVOURITE Investment in the new facilities is already delivering results at Bath Racecourse, with increased conference business being cited as the primary reason for a 58 per cent increase in non-raceday sales. Jo Hall, executive director, says: “Off the back of a record Christmas party season with over 2,000 guests enjoying festivities in our party marquee, and a number of new clients enjoying exclusive parties in the new stand, we have been impressed by the way our new facilities have been received.” www.bath-racecourse.co.uk

PURPLE REIGN Bath’s safe and popular night time scene has secured the city its seventh Purple Flag accreditation. Louise Prynne, chief executive of the Bath Business Improvement District, says: “That we have succeeded in securing Purple Flag status for a seventh year is testament to the combined efforts of all involved, and indeed the businesses of Bath that work so hard to ensure a compelling, vibrant and safe experience.” www.bathbid.co.uk

LAW MAN Ed Chapman has joined the team at Royds Withy King from TLT in Bristol, where he worked on a range of transactions including mergers and acquisitions. He says: “I was looking to join a progressive, growing team with the sector expertise to undertake interesting corporate and commercial work, and Royds Withy King fits the bill on every level.” www.roydswithyking.com


SPONSORED BY:

BUSINESS INSIDER

BREAKING NEWS

TREMENDOUS TRIO

PHOTO BY WAYNE FARRELL

Nothing, but nothing, beats being there…

Simon explains: “We both felt that there was a lack of a sense of community in most cities, and a need to bring back community spirit in an increasingly disconnected world. We also wanted to highlight the value of human capital, because every individual has something to offer each other and society at large, based on their skills and passions.” So far, the response has been overwhelmingly positive, with almost 20,000 Bristol and Bath users signed up, and over 1,500 requests posted with 1,200 offers of help received. “We want Helpfulpeeps to be a vehicle to impact positive change,” continues Simon. “Our ultimate vision is to create a global community with millions of people helping each other every day.”

The winners have been chosen, the judges have decided – and all will be revealed at the glittering ceremony of the Bath Life Awards on 23 February at the Assembly Rooms. As we went to press, excitement was mounting ahead of the big night, with all 500 tickets sold out and a remarkable 133-and-counting on the waiting list. “Bath companies put so much into these Awards,” says Steph Dodd, events manager for MediaClash, Bath Life’s publisher. “We’ve never had so many nominations nor such careful entries – which made the job of our judges even harder. We’re confident that they’ve made excellent choices and can’t wait until all is revealed in just a few days. “We’ve been overwhelmed with ticket applications and, short of putting in a mezzanine level at the Assembly Rooms, simply couldn’t fit everyone in. Our only option has been to juggle carefully between the requirements of finalists, sponsors and interested parties. “We’ve even been asked about organising an extra location to live-screen the Awards! Not this year, but we’ll definitely consider it for 2018. Meantime, please follow us on the night on Twitter for the live announcement of the winners.” The Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa is the Headline Sponsor of the Awards with its brand partner, Taittinger. Bristol Airport is sponsor of the Platinum Award – the Winner of Winners on the night. Sponsors include: Apex Hotels, Kersfield, Bath Rugby, First Bus, Hawker Joinery, University of Bath, Fidelius, Stone King, Bath Audi, Novia, Savills, Tile & Flooring, Bath Volkswagen, Bluefin, Bryers, Circo, Clifton Marquee Company, Enlightened Lighting, SearchStar, Vistage and Minuteman Press. Silver-level Associate Sponsors include: Thrings, Epoch, Woodhouse & Law, RBS, Kaleidoscope (Abbey Hotel, No. 15), Mogers Drewett, Bath Holiday Rentals, Victoria Pub, Cumberwell Golf and Kambiz Shayegan’s restaurant group.

For more: www.helpfulpeeps.com

For more: www.bathlifeawards.co.uk, @BathLifeAwards

Bath businesses – make some noise!

DRUMMING UP SUPPORT Bath Carnival, who have been awarded a conditional grant of £15,000 from Arts Council England, are now looking to match-fund the project with sponsorship via their 100-4-100 Campaign. One of the festival organisers, Stuart Matson, explains, “We are inviting 100 local businesses and individuals to support Bath Carnival with a minimum contribution of £100. They will have their logo and name added to the 100-4-100 Supporters Matrix on our website, have their support announced online and be invited to an exclusive networking event

with carnival entertainment organised by Bath Carnival.” The carnival and procession, which is due to take place 15 July, is expected to attract more than 10,000 attendees and already has community sponsors such as Sun Kissed Campers on board. The firm’s managing director Stuart Shotton says: “Sponsoring events such as the Bath Carnival, which is a vital part of the community, is a great way to establish your brand as a business.” For more: www.bathcarnival.co.uk

COMMUNITY MINDED In these days of economic uncertainty, a new online company, Helpfulpeeps, hopes that karma is the new currency. Founded by Simon Hills and Saf Nazeer, it’s a new social network where people share their time, skills and knowledge for free to help each other, and can include anything from lifts to the railway station to learning a new language.

Saf and Simon believe in using social media for social care

IT’S THE FINAL COUNTDOWN

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 91

PHOTO BY PAOLO FERLA

Our pick of the most exciting, intriguing or important local business stories right now


OFFICE SUPPLIES OFFICE FURNITURE

Ian Hobbs Technical Services offer an array of commercial & industrial service solutions, all under one roof

OFFICE MACHINES

DELIVERIES TO YOUR DOOR... TEL: 01249 444777 EMAIL: SALES@WOODSOFFICE.CO.UK WWW.WOODSOFFICE.CO.UK

Air Conditioning

Refrigeration

Plumbing & Heating

Woods the stationers

Electrical

Renewables

w: www.ianhobbs.com t: 01225 444171 e: info@ianhobbs.com /ianhobbstech @ianhobbstech

OUR SHOP HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED IN BATH FOR OVER 200 YEARS

Come in for all your day to day and gift stationery

12 Old Bond Street, Bath Tel: 01225 445 347

bath business expo

16th March 2017

Visit the Bath Business Expo 2017 Thursday 16th March 10am - 3pm The Assembly Rooms, Bennett St, Bath The Bath Business Expo is a general business exhibition, its prime aim being a useful resource for local and regional business people.

The South West region is renowned for entrepreneurial spirit and business success – which is one of the key reasons as to why we chose this location as our first regional office for Climb Online. Attending events like the up and coming Bath Business Expo provides an excellent opportunity for businesses to continue their growth in forging new relationships, securing new contacts and learning about the importance of digital marketing for driving sales and growth. Lyndsay is a key team member of Climb Online and her seminar at the Expo will not disappoint! Lord Sugar

GET YOUR FREE TICKETS NOW W W W. B AT H E X P O . C O . U K


SPONSORED BY:

BUSINESS INSIDER

BATH LIFE BUSINESS CLUB

CHECKING IN WITH IAN TAYLOR

T

o anybody who has been to No. 15 Great Pulteney, it might come as a shock to hear that when Ian Taylor bought what was then called the Carfax Hotel, he simply planned to “paint the rooms and live with the bathrooms.” To anybody who hasn’t been, then you really must. From the doll’s house reception to the stencilled bed canopies, from the gramophone trumpet sculpture to the kaleidoscope collection, this boutique hotel has the feel of a carefullycurated, modern art exhibition. Along with the Abbey Hotel and the Villa at Henrietta Park, No. 15 is the third hotel owned by Ian and his wife Christa, and given the décor, innovation and imagination evident in this latest project, you could be forgiven for not expecting the softly-spoken and seemingly modest man who addresses the Bath Life Business Club. The accent is a gentle County Antrim lilt, which hints at his rural upbringing. “I thought I was destined to be a farmer,” he says. “One of the things I had to do before going to school was collect the eggs and muck out the hens.” But Ian knew his talents lay elsewhere. “I always had this ability to be able to look at a room and organise it, to put furniture into different layouts and know how that would actually look.” He went to do an ONC, which gave him the opportunity to work in

Ian Taylor, owner of Bath’s luxury hotels Abbey Hotel, Villa at Henrietta Park and No. 15 Great Pulteney, was the latest speaker to address members of the Bath Life Business Club at The Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa an upmarket hotel in Switzerland. However, the work placement back in the UK was very different. “I was sent to this little place in Teesdale – the hygiene was unbelievable – where I actually saw a little mouse run over a turkey breast.” It was these varying experiences in the hospitality trade that helped shape Ian’s vision and direction. After 17 years in the corporate world, working for Bass, and on projects such as the 463-bedroom Crown Plaza Hotel in Heathrow Airport (where he met his now business partner Jonathan Walker), Ian and Christa went their own way. “We settled in Chipping Camden and bought the Cotswold House, which we owned for eight years,” says Ian. “It did very well and we sold just at the right time, so we took four years off.” In that time, the couple travelled a lot, did up their Cheltenham house, played golf, skied, and also looked at 33 different hotels in different regions, before deciding on the Abbey Hotel in Bath. “The hotel was trading at 75 per cent, so there was reasonable business coming through,” Ian says. “I did see very clearly we could do something with the restaurant at the front. After getting chef Chris Staines, employing a superb team and making the place look great, we did zero covers. This went on for nearly three months.” However, reputations have now been firmly established and, as well as their hotels

making waves with tourists, the Allium bar and restaurant, Igloo bar, and the seasonal Après Ski Bar are also becoming increasingly popular with local residents. One of the reasons Ian cites repeatedly for his and Christa’s success is his great team of people. He says the corporate world helped hone his interviewing skills (“When was the last time you lost your temper, and why?”) and his approach to his workforce is one of praise. The only immediate concerns he does admit to is Brexit causing a staff shortage. But, despite this, Ian admits he likes the challenge of both competition and complication, and hints at plans to expand their property portfolio soon. “If you have a very positive view, then you’re going to find a way to deal with some of the problems,” he says. “It’s being able to see the spaces, not the trees.” For more: www.no15greatpulteney.co.uk

FRESH THINKING OVER A FINE LUNCH

The Bath Life Business Club is a select group of senior business people. It features a leading speaker – for example, Glastonbury Festival founder Michael Eavis – and a fine two-course lunch. The next meeting is on 27 March 2017 with chief executive of Bristol Airport, Robert Sinclair – if you’d like to join, please contact Stephanie Dodd (Stephanie.Dodd@mediaclash.co.uk). These events sell out quickly, so look out for the emails...

The Bath Life Business Club is sponsored by Bishop Fleming

vistage.co.uk/nicola-mchale


SPONSORED BY:

BUSINESS INSIDER

PHOTO BY RICH HOWMAN

PHOTO BY PAOLO FERLA

Left: Team tickets include food and drink; Below: Bath Boules is cooking up to be a huge hit this year

BATH BOULES

BATH BOULES IS ROLLING BACK, BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER Bath Boules 2017 team tickets go on sale on 10 March at midday. But Bath companies will have to be quick off the mark – last year sold out in an astonishing six minutes...

PHOTO BY ANDREW DODD

Not only does Bath Boules raise big sums for local charities, it promises to deliver even more of a feelgood party in the city, with Queen Square once again closed to traffic on two sides from 9–11 June to allow for a street food market. Bath Boules is free to everyone to attend and is headline sponsored by Royds Withy King. For those wishing to play, tickets are available for a minimum of three players per team at £240, including food and drink. They are sold via the website on a strictly first come, first served basis. Following an increase in demand every year, an extra day, Le Bunk-Off Friday,

UP A MASSIVE 43 PER CENT, BATH BOULES RAISED £41,424 FOR MANY LOCAL BATH CHARITIES

The force of Bath Boules is strong 94 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

also joined the party in 2015, and is expected to be a complete sell-out. One way companies can guarantee a ticket is to become a Little Boules Sponsor. Teams are also encouraged to have their groups sponsored, so that even more money can be raised for local charities. The company with the highest amount raised each day of the Boules will receive an idiosyncratic Boules appellation, along the lines of the Légion d’Honneur. “Every year, the Bath Boules just gets better and better, as so many Bath people and organisations get involved,” said Greg Ingham from event organisers, MediaClash. “Weekend tickets just flew last time, like a mini-Glasto. We would like to thank B&NES Council for its unwavering and commendable support on the closure of Queen Square – never in doubt!” Last year, Bath Boules raised £41,424 (up a massive 43 per cent on the previous year) for many local Bath charities such as the Carer’s Centre, Three Ways School and Julian House. As well as headline sponsor Royds Withy King, other sponsors already include Novia, Lovehoney, Apex Hotels, Champagne Jacquart, Great Western Wine, Redwood Marketing, Bath Life, Minuteman Press, Bath Building Society, DMC Canotec, Synergy Property Consultants, Sovereign Wealth Management, Mogers Drewett, Bath Chronicle, Bonhams, Reside and Claritum. For more: www.bathboules.com


A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E L E G A L F O C U S

A HOME FROM HOME While it can be a difficult decision to move an ageing loved one into a home, as solicitor HELEN STARKIE knows from experience, it can often bring them renewed happiness

I

am writing this from the Scottish isle of Arran, where I am visiting an eighty-four year old aunt of mine who sadly now suffers from advanced dementia and for whom I hold a Lasting Power of Attorney. ‘Anne’ (not her real name but a very real aunt!) was the fourth of five siblings. The others all had children; Anne never did – but she has always been the favourite aunt of all eight of her nieces and nephews (and now of their children and grandchildren) so, whilst she is now widowed, Anne is not ‘alone’ in the sense of having family support. We all had wonderful holidays with Anne and her late husband in our childhood and in later years she visited all of us a good deal, too. Although spread across the globe, we all still visit often and, despite the challenge of geography, have worked together to ensure that Anne has been able to stay in her

“IT IS EVIDENT THAT ‘HOME’ IS NO LONGER ‘HOME’ FOR HER”

own home for as long as possible. But having held things together for Anne in this way for as long as we can we have reached the stage where we have to take the step of arranging residential care for her – a situation with which many of my clients will be familiar. How does one know that ‘the time has come’? Well, in this case, although Anne is physically still spry and, with company, enjoys a brisk walk in the countryside (the scenery and wildlife in Arran having prompted her and her husband to move there), she is now so confused that she cannot retain new facts even for a few seconds. She cannot process information at all and is now entirely dependent upon others for her daily needs. Her brother and I are her attorneys and we ensure that her home is kept clean and in good repair, bills are paid and she receives appropriate medical and personal care, but it is her emotional needs which have driven our decision. Anne has a team of really lovely qualified carers (and they really do care), who visit her three times a day ensuring that she takes her medication and is properly washed, dressed and fed – but it is evident that ‘home’ is no longer ‘home’ for her.

Home is, after all, the place where those you love most are to be found and / or where one feels safe and secure because of its familiarity and memories – and where one can enjoy a good laugh, as Anne always has. None of these criteria applies now to her. She cannot judge, if left alone, how long she has been without company – and minutes seem like hours. Panic sets in. She does not know, unless told, whether it is day or night. Her bungalow has a slight familiarity, but she regularly mistakes the door to one room with the door to another. She cannot find things and panics about that, too (seven searches for keys and / or handbag in one hour yesterday afternoon). She has a bee in her bonnet about switching off all electrical equipment at the wall to save money and be safe – a good basic rule, but in her case it includes the heating in the middle of the night. The house is freezing in the morning. She can no longer use the cooker since her way of testing if something is ‘done’ is to put the flat of her hand on the side of the pan. If ‘home’ is no longer ‘home’ then it is time to find somewhere which is – where there is company, warmth, familiarity (one room not several cold ones to find one’s way around) stimulus, routine and security. We have researched what will be exactly the right choice of care home for Anne and chosen one with qualified dementia specialists, friendly staff who will not talk down to her, ensuring that she feels valued and respected, comfortable (but not particularly grand) surroundings with accompanied country walks available, good, non-institutional food – and company – including the opportunity to reminisce with contemporaries (she still has a pretty good long-term memory). And of course somewhere where we can all continue to visit and laugh with ‘the old Anne’ again!

Helen Starkie Solicitor 5 Gay Street, Bath BA1 2PH 01225 442353 www.helenstarkie.co.uk

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 97


PROPERTY

SHOWCASE

THE OLD LAUNDRY

112 I CLIFTON LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk


SHOWCASE

PROPERTY

This beautiful country house situated on a private lane in Wingfield, near Bath, combines elegance, grace and a unique style… w By E V E LY N GR E E N

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 99


PROPERTY

SHOWCASE

The kitchen dining area is a Scandinavian-inspired design, with a predominately grey and white colour palette

THE HOME HAS BEEN THE SUBJECT OF AN EXTENSIVE

REFURBISHMENT PROGRAMME BY THE CURRENT OWNERS

100 LIFELIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk 114 II BATH CLIFTON I www.mediaclash.co.uk


SHOWCASE

PROPERTY

I

f you’ve ever visited luxury homeware store Brissi on Milsom Street in Bath, you’ll know how instantly recognisable their signature style is – a grey and white colour palette, and Scandinavian-inspired design with a Notting Hill tastefulness. You’ll notice a similar aesthetic throughout the stylishly designed interior of The Old Laundry, a property on the market 10 miles from Bath. With its spacious, airy appeal, it caught our attention immediately, but, of course, no matter how beautiful and exquisite the furniture and subdued the paint colours are, that is, at the end of the day, superficial. Thankfully, then, with its imposing stone build and slate tiled roof, the exterior is just as handsome. w

www.mediaclash.co.uk I BATH LIFE I 101


PROPERTY

SHOWCASE

The detached Georgian property’s location is yet another selling point. You’ll find it situated towards the front of a large level plot on a no-through private lane between Farleigh Hungerford and the highly sought-after village of Wingfield. The captivating views from the rear span towards Farleigh House and Farleigh Castle and a wellregarded primary school, along with a church, and pub with its own cricket pitch and team, sit close by. And with the market town of Trowbridge approximately three miles east, and the Saxon town of Bradford on Avon three miles to the north, there are plenty of attractive entertaining options nearby. On entering the house through its striking, arched, Boniti stone doorway, the high level of finish and sense of light throughout is immediately apparent. The home has been the subject of an extensive refurbishment programme by the current owners, and the abundance of bespoke wooden sash windows and French doors – combined with fine decorating and attention to detail – create a graceful and elegant feel throughout. The welcoming entrance hall continues through into the adjacent study, with its original replace with stone surround, and two steps from the study lead you down to the spacious sitting room with a wood-burning stove and large dual-aspect sash windows. This room flows effortlessly into the kitchen-cum-family-room, offering a superb layout with a relaxed seating area and woodburning stove with an exposed stone chimney. The bespoke Stephen Graver/Richard Baker kitchen boasts an array of handcrafted storage, a central island with butler sink, marble worktops and exposed painted beams, as well as an impressive Wolf Range cooker. Both the kitchen and sitting room benefit from views onto the garden, with three sets of double doors from the kitchen leading directly out on to the terrace – ideal for the summer months. In addition, there’s a well-situated dining area from which steps lead to the family room – 102 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

Clockwise, from top left: the spacious sitting room with a wood-burning stove; one of the six immaculately presented bedrooms; highend luxury prevails throughout the house, including the bathrooms; the views over the gardens stretch to the countryside beyond

HOUSE NUMBERS

3,849

square foot of space

6

bedrooms

£1.25M price

0.8

acres of garden

PLUS

a garage, large workshop, and wood store

a perfect play room or home office. A neat utility room and convenient cloakroom complete the ground floor accommodation. A staircase from the reception hall rises to the first floor and its beautifully appointed bedrooms. The impressive master bedroom suite has a sizable walk-in wardrobe and an en suite bathroom featuring a free-standing clawfoot bathtub and sleek Fired Earth tiles. The two further bedrooms on this floor share an immaculate family bathroom. The second floor accommodation is a wonderful space for guests or children alike, with three bedrooms, a bathroom and a sitting area. Step outside, and to the rear you’ll find a large, westfacing, well-maintained garden of about 0.8 acres which is mainly laid to lawn. A paved terrace bordered by shrubs runs along the rear of the property and features a covered area currently used as an outdoor kitchen. The terrace offers direct access to the main family rooms, providing a natural outdoor entertaining space with views over the garden onto open countryside toward – a fantastic place to enjoy a far-reaching sunset view. The gravel courtyard to the front leads to a single garage on one side of the home, with extensive driveway parking to the other, and there is also a large workshop and covered wood store here too (well, with two woodburners in the house, we can see why that’s necessary). The Old Laundry – named as such as it was formerly the Old Laundry for the local farm – is a beguiling opportunity offering classic proportions and stacks of space. It feels tranquil and secluded and yet it is within easy access of numerous hotspots, and with its six bedrooms and expansive garden will suit a growing family, or maybe just a design-conscious couple looking for a magazine shootready slice of the local property market. Savills, Edgar House,17 George Street, Bath, BA1 2EN; 01225 474 500; www.savills.co.uk


Bradford-On-Avon,

N EW

Guide Price £410,000

SO

LD

A Grade II listed, three storey period home full of character in a superb central location. A fabulous family home bursting with character, feature fireplaces, beams and wooden floorboards. On the ground floor, we find an entrance hall, a generous light & airy living room with feature inglenook fireplace leading to the kitchen/breakfast room. There are two double bedrooms on the first floor, one is currently used as second living room, study/dressing room and family bathroom. Lastly, on the top floor is the master bedroom with ensuite with stunning views overlooking the town. Externally, is a pretty, low maintenance courtyard garden enclosed by stone walling with a side access to both the front and rear garden. There is also a small enclosed, gated courtyard garden to the front.

Sold – Similar Required. Winsley, £1,300,000 This handsome detached home naturally attracted a lot of interest. The impressively large plot and private location in the heart of ever popular Winsley secured the sale. Similar property sought for waiting buyers.

Tel: 01225 866747 27 Market Street, Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1LL email: info@jeremyjenkins.co.uk • website: www.jeremyjenkins.co.uk


P R O P E R T Y A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

MAXIMISE YOUR PROPERTIES AT OUR FREE SEMINAR Let our team of experts talk you through maximising your property's letting potential

O

n the 9 March we will be hosting, together with Bath accountancy firm Milsted Langdon, a free seminar for landlords and property owners, which will provide you with the unique opportunity to meet the experts to aid you in maximising your property investments. Peter Greatorex, managing director of The Apartment Company says, “With so many legislative changes to the letting industry in the past 12 months, we wanted to introduce our clients to professionals who are best placed to advise on the effects of these changes, and how it will impact them.” We believed it was essential to cover all aspects of property ownership that exceed the service we offer as a letting agent. Our team are often asked questions on how to reduce costs, tax liabilities and strategies to increase their rental yields. These helped to form the structure of the

evening programme which includes: ● Tax and SDLT issues, by Milsted Langdon ● Marketing and attracting the right tenant, by The Apartment Company ● The legal implications of letting and owning a property, by Thrings ● Mortgage advice / options, by London & Country Mortgages (L&C) The other two companies providing their expertise to the free seminar are Thrings and L&C. “L&C are one the UK’s leading firms of mortgage brokers, I have personally used them and The Apartment Company has been referring clients to them for around seven years. They bring a wealth of knowledge and access to a number of exciting buy-to-let mortgages which our clients could benefit from. Thrings are local solicitors and our neighbours in Queen Square. Bill Thomas and his team are amongst the most helpful solicitors in Bath and again, bring considerable experience and

Business and personal storage at its best

knowledge from a legal perspective,” says Peter. The aim of the seminar, which is being held at the Francis Hotel in Bath on 9 March at 6pm, is to ensure our clients have the knowledge they need to plan for long-term financial success. There are now a limited number of spaces available, to reserve yours email events@milsted-langdon.co.uk or call 0800 170 0147.

For more advice visit our blog at www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk/newssearch.aspx Sales: 01225 471144 Lettings: 01225 303870 www.theapartmentcompany.co.uk

Would you like to work in Media Sales? We are always looking to hear from talented individuals who would like to work for MediaClash, presenting advertising opportunities and marketing solutions across our portfolio of fantastic local titles. We are a growing business and anticipate there being various opportunities over the next few months. If you would like to join our continuing success story please email your CV to steve.hawkins@mediaclash.co.uk or give us a call anytime on 01225 475800 for a chat about the company, our magazines and available positions.

• Business and personal storage • Refrigerated storage • Sign and store for personal and business use • Bespoke connected services and packaging • Country Green Post boxes • Emergency refrigerated storage

01380 850939 enquiries@countrygreenstorage.co.uk www.countrygreenstorage.co.uk

www.mediaclash.co.uk


Make the most of Bath this weekend!

Join our club For weekly inspiration on Bath’s hottest events, shows and things to do, sign up to the Bath Life Club and receive our Editor’s Top 5 picks every Friday lunchtime. Sign up here: www.mediaclash.co.uk/BLC

@BathLifeMag


la re st m TH ai R ni EE ng

These 3 bedroom penthouses benefit from secure private parking and have been restored to the highest specification. Book your viewing today with dedicated parking available.

3 bedroom penthouse apartments available from ÂŁ599,950

Call now to arrange your appointment to view

01179 102351


Box Road, Bathford, Nr. Bath Prices from ÂŁ945,000 COMING SOON! A luxury development of only four contemporary detached villas in this tucked away cul de sac situated on the North Eastern outskirts of Georgian Bath. Four bedrooms (one with GF master bedroom) plus study/bedroom five, Fitted kitchen breakfast room, separate utility room, large living/family room, ground floor cloak room, Garage, parking and garden. Summer 2017.

T: 01225 471116 crossmanhomes.co.uk

T: 01225 325857

timbennettandassociates.co.uk


PHILIP SHONE PHOTOGRAPHY

Architectural property photography In t e rior s | E x te rior s | H ot els | N ew H o mes | Res ta u ra n t s Estate Ag ents | Letti ng A gents

Email: philipshone1@gmail.com Tel: 07480 333 320 web: philipshone.wixsite.com/properties


SERVICES GUIDE

MARKETING

GUIDE to SERVICES in the

DATING AGENCY

Looking to find that special someone?

CITY

Caroline Crowther is a truly local personal introduction agency helping you meet someone new in your area. We offer a long term personal service until you find your perfect match. For a professional and personal service call

01934 744788

TO ADVERTISE HERE CALL THE BATH LIFE TEAM ON 01225 475800

or

0800 180 4788

www.carolinecrowther.com

HOUSEKEEPING

ALLERGY TESTING

ALLERGY TESTING

Laundry and Ironing Services Tailored to your needs Domestic and Commercial

Feeling unwell? May I help you?

ARE YOU FIT INSIDE AND OUT?

uk co. st. yte erg all w. ww

www.bathhousekeeping.com 01225 292141 | 07977563167 info@sparklingmatters.com

STONE SPECIALISTS

FRE pick-up E an delivery d availab le

JEWELLERY

Nigel Dando DAVIS MASONRY & CONSTRUCTION Natural stone specialist Bath stone restoration Walling Re-pointing t: 07910 621 316 e: jack_fb_123@hotmail.co.uk

WE BUY Gold, Silver & Platinum in any form or condition.

Nigel Dando 11 Pulteney Bridge, Bath BA2 4AY Tel/Fax: 01225 464013 www.nigeldando.co.uk

Headaches & migraine, tiredness & fatigue, weight problems, eczema or other skin problems, asthma, catarrh & sinus congestion, IBS & digestive disorders, anxiety & depression. If you suffer with any of the above complaints, an hour’s test could change your life!

For your nearest tester please contact Cindy on 07747 800097 or Email: allergytesting@churchviews.co.uk / www.allergytest.co.uk For local appointments please contact: Clarion Health, 2-4 Henry Street, Bath Tel: 01225 448348

STONE SPECIALISTS

Repairs, Restoration Alteration of Stone Buildings New Build Stone Cleaning Stone Carving Fireplaces

Tel: 01225 462688 / 07968 697091 Email: Julian@bathstonemasons.co.uk

www.bathstonemasons.co.uk


B AT H L I V E S

Q&A

A

rtist Perry Harris is currently illustrating a graphic novel to celebrate 40 years of the fanzine Vague, a post-punk spoof of Vogue magazine which Perry co-founded with two friends, one of whom is Tom Vague. The fanzine survived outside the mainstream, and without any rules it swiftly developed in several different directions, seeing the founders travel the country to interview the likes of The Clash, The Ramones, and Joy Division. It was described by Louder than War magazine as “A major work. Arguably the best of the early eighties post-punk scenes.” Alongside illustrating the publication on and off for four decades, Perry has also illustrated everything from children’s reads to horror novels and exhibited locally at venues such as Walcot Chapel Gallery and the Guildhall, all while juggling a job at the Royal High School in Bath for the past 20 years. We caught up with him to find out what else he’s up to right now… In the late 1970s, two friends and I started a fanzine publication called Vague… It was a DIY post-punk spoof of Vogue. We began writing reviews of local gigs and doing features with small bands. After a few issues, we grew from eight pages to 20 and started interviewing bands such as The Clash, The Cure, Madness, The Ramones, and Adam and The Ants. At the time of Antmania, we increased to 10,000 copies which we collated and stapled by hand, then we moved our office from Wiltshire to Bath and spent most of the 80s travelling the country selling our product and interviewing singers. It covered most of the various post-punk sub-cults – new romantics, rockabillies, proto-goths – until it became a more irregular annual cyber-punk journal written by Tom Vague. I’m now illustrating the book 40 Years of Vague… Although that’s just a working title and will probably change. I’ve been sending Tom cartoons for Vague on and off over the last four decades. I’m currently working on illustrating the graphic novel, which will celebrate another milestone of the fanzine. We’re aiming to release it next year. One of the other publications I’m proud of is the book Beastly Bath… It’s an illustrated compendium, designed by Kate McDonnell, of caustic quotes, gathered by Gideon Kibblewhite, from famous Bath visitors of the past – including the likes of Jane Austen and Charles Dickens. I’ve illustrated other books too, including Frogg Moody’s graphic novel, Autumn of Terror; and I recently finished the illustrations for Karen M. Hoyle’s follow-up to her children’s book The Adventures of Austin the Cornish Miner.

114 I BATH LIFE I www.mediaclash.co.uk

PERRY HARRIS The accomplished artist on co-founding a post-punk fanzine, why he’s drawn over one thousand images of Bath, and his first job as a stage scenery painter at the Theatre Royal… Day-to-day, I mainly draw cartoons of Bath… Sometimes they represent everyday life, but more often they represent current news stories – like the campaign to save the Bathampton Meadows. Bath’s classical architecture works really well as a setting for my illustrations… But it’s as much about responding to where I am, the things I notice, and life in Bath. The Bath illustrations have definitely started to take over, but I also draw comic strips and landscapes. When I recently reached one thousand illustrations of Bath, I planned to stop… But it turned out to be just a brief pause. I get asked about illustrating cards and books quite often and, when hounded enough, I do. Once I began posting my work on social media, it sort of escalated… Thanks to website Bath:Hacked, there is now an interactive online location map of my Bath cartoons; about 550 images are plotted onto it at the moment. I live in Lansdown and find it a pleasure to call Bath my home…. I’ve lived in the city for 30 years; it’s always inspiring to walk around such a beautiful place where the biggest cause of anxiety seems to be just seagulls. I moved to Bath in the 1980s to study fine art… I worked as a stage scenery painter at the Theatre Royal workshops, then as an architectural illustrator. I started off at art college in Salisbury in the late 1970s and began drawing cartoons in punk

fanzines; I never stopped sketching. For the last 20 years I’ve combined working as a school caretaker with illustrating. Bath is full of great places, so it’s hard to pick a favourite spot… With work and my illustrating, I don’t get a lot of time to go out; but when I do, The Bell Inn remains a favourite place, and Komedia is a great venue in which to see bands. As for shops, I’m a fan of Independent Spirit of Bath and other independents, which are such a vital part of shopping in the city. Area-wise, my favourite place is probably Widcombe; I also love how Alexandra Park rises up above you; and there are some fantastic places to walk in the area. I don’t care about material possessions… Good physical and mental health, plus a sense of humour is what matters most to me. In 2017 I have a lot in the pipeline… And I have just started work on the 2017 Once Upon a Time in the West Festival, which will be taking place in July in Trowbridge; I’ll be working on illustrating several graphic novels, and I will be doing an exhibition in Bath later in the year, which I’m currently working on the drawings for.

Follow Perry on Twitter: @uhperry 40 Years of Vague is due to be released in 2018, but other publications, including Beastly Bath and The Adventures of Austin the Cornish Miner, are out now


Carpets

Design Floors

Rugs

Commercial Flooring

Showrooms at Silcox Son & Wicks Kingsmead Square, Bath 01225 471888 Flooring for your Home: www.carpetsandooringbath.co.uk

Flooring for your Business: www.bathcontractooring.co.uk

Image shows: Jacaranda Natural Weave Hexagon Ebony and Shimla Charcoal


Bath Life – issue 333