Food from Poland PLMA Edition 2019

Page 1

STATISTICS Export of food products p. 38

DISCOVER POLAND Relax at a farmer’s home! p. 60

DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS p. 78

02/35 (’19)

FoodfromPoland Polish Magazine for Professionals






EDITORIAL

CONTENTS MARKET NEWS .......................... 10 STATISTICS

Brand of Polish agri-food products .......... 16

COMMENTARY

FMCG Trade like nowhere else ................ 22 Agri-food export – the driving force of the Polish economy ............................................ 24

PRIVATE LABEL

Quo vadis, private label? ............................ 26 Dynamic development of the private label sector .......................... 28 History of private labels.............................. 30

Monika Górka Managing Editor

...which can be seen through the statistical figures and digits describing the export success of Polish products. Polish food exports have been growing continuously for years. High quality combined with a relatively low price is still the advantage and source of success for Polish food products in foreign markets. In 2018, a record-breaking level of revenue from exports of agri-food products was recorded. The achieved results confirm that the agri-food sector is a key segment in the Polish economy and remains an important link in the international supply chain. Consumers in Poland and abroad are looking for high quality products. They attach great importance to the transparent production process or origin of agri-food products. Transparency in the supply chain is now one of the food industry's priorities, the efforts of which focus not only on maintaining the highest standard of production but also include environmentally friendly packaging and the principles of "clean labelling". Local brand products are also gaining popularity, which are no longer seen by consumers as cheap counterparts of brand products and become an alternative to them. Abundant choice of cuisine, traditional recipes and innovative technologies these are also important aspects determining the popularity of Polish food products in the world. In turn, the diversity of nature and old Polish flavours attract tourists to cuisine-based routes not only in Polish cities but also in the real Polish countryside peaceful and cheerful - as Jan Kochanowski once wrote about it. You are mostly welcome to read!

• Editor-In-Chief - Tomasz Pańczyk

Editorial Office

Advertisement Office

• Managing Editor - Monika Górka

Bagno Street 2/218 00-112 Warsaw, Poland

Phone/Fax: +48 22 847 93 67 +48 22 828 93 66

t.panczyk@foodfrompoland.pl m.gorka@foodfrompoland.pl

• Editor - Michał Pańczyk

m.panczyk@foodfrompoland.pl

• Sales & Marketing Departmet Katarzyna Paciorek k.paciorek@foodfrompoland.pl

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Phone/Fax: +48 22 847 93 67 +48 22 828 93 66 +48 22 847 93 68 redakcja@foodfrompoland.pl www.foodfrompoland.pl

Graphics studio

Evangelos-Evangelou, Herbapol-Lublin ..... 32 Zenon Daniłowski, Makarony Polskie ...... 34 Małgorzata Cebelińska, Mlekpol .............. 36

STATISTICS

Export of Food Products in 2018 ............. 38 Promotional brochures ............................... 40

COMMENTARY

Otherwise export ......................................... 44 Sometimes, even discount stores are nothing to be afraid of ......................... 46 Polish-Italian trade exchange .................... 49

PRESENTATION

30 years on the market – Ewa Bis............ 50

INTERVIEW

Agata Karoń, Virtu Production................... 54 Wojciech Ryttel, Maxpol ............................ 56

DISCOVER POLAND

Relax at a farmer's home! ........................... 60 Polish traditional recipes ............................ 68

STORY

Gulfood Dubai 2019.................................... 70

LIST OF POLISH COMPANIES................................. 74 DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS................................... 78

Paweł Pańczyk, Maja Bulwarska

Printing house: ArtDruk Kobyłka www.artdruk.com

Fischer Trading Group Ltd. Bagno Street 2/218, 00-112 Warsaw Phone/Fax: +48 22 847 93 67, +48 22 847 93 68 t.panczyk@ftgroup.pl www.hurtidetal.pl CEO: Tomasz Pańczyk

In our publication we use i.a. pexels photos

Producers care about the quality of Polish food…

INTERVIEW


FRUIT EXPERT from where the best raspberry grow

Your partner in Private Label Visit us at PLMA 2019, Hall 7 Stand 7013- 6715- 6716 www.materne.pl




MARKET NEWS

Modern-Expo – the Ambassador of the Lublin Province Modern-Expo SA has been elected the Ambassador of the Lublin Province. This title is granted to outstanding people, institutions and companies that have made a strong contribution to the promotion of the Lublin Region in Poland and abroad. Modern-Expo, an international producer and supplier of complex equipment for the retail industry, has been elected Ambassador of the Lublin Province in the “company” category. The enterprise was selected from among 6 other regional companies nominated in the category. The company has been appreciated by the Chapter of the competition for its success on the Polish and foreign market. Modern-Expo is the leader of the industry in Central and Western Europe; over the last few years, it has opened branch offices in London, Berlin, Paris, Amsterdam, and Dubai, and it employs almost 3,500 people. A characteristic of the Lublin company is constant improvement of its offer and proposal of modern solutions to the customers. The company delivers its complex solutions to the world’s largest companies, such as Groupe Auchan, Carrefour, TESCO, Żabka Polska, McDonald’s, METRO Group, X5 Retail Group, MAGNIT, Schwarz Group, CCC, Coca Cola, REWE Group, SPAR, or Inditex Group.

Björn bottle among the winners of the Art of Packaging 2019 competition The bottle of the Björn vodka manufactured by BZK Alco won the Art of Packaging 2019 in the Professional 2019 Thirst Packaging category. The bottle received the award “for the graphic design and the bottle shape design of the new Björn premium vodka brand”. The uniqueness of the packaging is confirmed by the fact this is not the first award for this design. Previously, it received the Good Design award in a competition by the Institute of Industrial Design. The Björn bottle is covered with a lettering texture inspired by the appearance of runes carved in rock. It tells the story of a king of the Vikings. In order to read it, one needs to turn the product around several times. The vodka is available in two versions: a black bottle and a matt-white one.

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Lech Pils and Książęce Porter awarded in the prestigious International Brewing Awards 2019 Two beer brands of the Kompania Piwowarska have been distinguished in the world’s oldest and most prestigious beer competition – The International Brewing & Cider Awards. By the jury’s decision, Lech Pils, brewed at Lech Browary Wielkopolski, received the Gold Medal in the “Lager 5.5-6.9% ABV” category. Książęce Porter, on the other hand, came back from the competition with the Bronze Medal in the “Strong Dark Beer” category. Lech Pils and Książęce Porter are the only Polish beers that have joined the group of this year’s winners. Tyskie Gronie, having won five awards so far, remains the Kompania Piwowarska beer with most distinctions granted by the TIBA.

The “BAŁTYK” Chocolate Factory celebrates the golden jubilee of its liquor candies Likworki by “Bałtyk” are candies with liquid filling hidden under a chocolate layer and a shell of crystallized sugar. They are unambiguously associated with Gdańsk – the city where they came into being and where they have been continually produced for 50 years. Their production involves several generations of chocolate delicacy creators. Works on their special recipe and production technology were in progress as early as the 1960s. When creating its liquor candies, “Bałtyk” cares for every little detail. It is even important that the liquor candies are not made during a storm, as ionized air may have an adverse effect on the process of sugar crystallization. The continuous production of liquor candies and many years of experience have placed “Bałtyk” in the lead of Polish and European companies with the most experience in manufacturing such confectionery. In connection with the 50th anniversary of the tradition of production of these unique sweets, the company has prepared 2.5-kg packages of “Nalewki Domowe” and “Likworki Gdańskie” candy brands in new graphic designs. To celebrate the jubilee, “Bałtyk” has carried out a special #KarnawałLikworków campaign in social media, under which competitions and games for Internet users have been organized. Soon, enthusiasts of liquor candies will be able to participate in further jubilee promotional actions.


MARKET NEWS

Żubrówka, the third vodka brand worldwide According to the ranking by the Shanken’s IMPACT magazine, Żubrówka – the legendary Polish brand of vodka based on bison grass – is the world’s third best-selling vodka, only beaten by the Smirnoff and Absolut brands. The list was made on the basis of the previous year’s sales data.

Moreover, Żubrówka has found itself in the lead of vodkas with the highest sales increase among all spirits included in the ranking, calculated on the basis of the number of 9-liter crates sold . In total, more than 77 million liters of Żubrówka have been sold in Poland and on export markets, which is almost 9% more than in 2017.

World’s largest vodka brands in a ranking by IMPACT*: Position

Brand

Producer

Sales in 2018, millions of 9l crates

Sales change vs. 2017

1

Smirnoff

Diageo, UK

25.9

-0.5%

2

Absolut

Pernod Ricard, France

11.3

-0.9%

3

Żubrówka

CEDC, POLAND

8.6

+8.9%

4

Khortytsa

Global Spirits, Ukraine

8.0

+2.0%

5

Tito’s

Fifth Generation, USA

7.7

+22.0%

6

Khlibniy Dar

Bayadera Group, Ukraine

7.5

+4.9%

7

Nemiroff

Nemiroff Vodka, Ukraine

5.5

-1.0%

8

New Amsterdam

E&J Distillers, USA

5.2

0%

9

Svedka

Constellation Brands, USA

4.4

-1.1%

Piat Ozer

Alcohol Siberian Group, Russia

4.3

0.2%

10

Żubrówka is the highest-ranked Polish vodka brand in the IMPACT ranking. The list also includes another CEDC brand – Soplica, with total sales of 3.9 million

9-liter crates in 2018. According to the IMPACT ranking, the sales of Soplica increased by more than 11% in comparison with 2017.

Polish vodka brands in the IMPACT ranking*: Position

Position in the vodka ranking

Brand

Producer

Sales in 2018, millions of 9l crates

Sales change vs. 2017

1

3

Żubrówka

CEDC

8.6

+8.9%

2

12

Krupnik

Marie Brizard

4.0

-2.0%

3

13

Soplica

CEDC

3.9

+11.4%

23

Żołądkowa Gorzka de Luxe

Stock Spirits

2.5

-14.5%

4

* Shanken’s IMPACT, World’s Top 100 Distilled Spirit Brands Worldwide (premium and non-premium), March 2019.

The role of business in ensuring fish for future generations WWF Polska warns that overfishing threatens the stability of the fish population and may deprive 800 million people dependent on fishery of their livelihood. Sustainable fishery may turn out to be a solution for this global environmental problem, provided that all parties involved will strive to achieve it. The key role in the change of consumer behaviour is played by the cooperation of fish product manufacturers, processors and traders. WWF has the tools to help business partners in the process of transforming their portfolio. Building partnerships and coalitions in order to build consumer awareness, reasonable resource management, as well as supply chain transparency are the key to success. WWF provides expert support and assistance based on experience in the area of joint communication and education of consumers. More information on http://ryby.wwf.pl

Südzucker Polska with the “Employee-Friendly Employer” certificate The Certifying Commission of the Solidarity labour union has honoured Südzucker Polska S.A. with the “Employee-Friendly Employer” certificate. The company has been appreciated for many years of good practice in the area of observance of labour law regulations. The award ceremony of the certificates took

place at the Presidential Palace in Warsaw on 19 March 2019. The certificates rewarding employers who stand out with their partner relations with employees have been awarded continually since 2007. The Certifying Commission also takes into account the application of the occupational health and safety rules, as

well as enabling and encouraging employees to education and development. The group of laureates of this year’s competition included the Südzucker Polska S.A. company, carrying out production at 4 sugar refineries in Poland. The company’s office is found in Wrocław, it also has a trade agency in Cracow.

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MARKET NEWS

We know the Polish winner of the absolut creative competition The first stage of the Absolut Creative Competition has ended. We know the name of the happy winner who has an opportunity now to compete for the title 'global winner' of the creative brand cooperation competition. Out of as many as 7,500 participants, one person will eventually be selected to receive a money reward of EUR 20,000 as well as have an advertisement of their project placed at a cult-status location. At the national stage, Absolut selected a unique young-generation artist to take part in the next stage of the Absolut Creative Competition, along with finalists from other countries. The Polish winner, Weronika Ślifierz, was appreciated for her perfect combination of creativity with ideas professed by the brand, i.e. tolerance and openness to the world. The work by Weronika Ślifierz has been selected among 7,500 applications sent in from 19 countries, and now, she has the opportunity to become the global winner of the competition – and thus to join the list of bold and iconic artists the brand has cooperated with before, such as Keith Haring, Romero Britto, Arman Armand, and Maurizio Cattelan. In order to celebrate creativity, the artists’ power to imagine and create a better tomorrow, Absolut announced a global creative competition in November 2018, the mission of which is to find another bold, creative voice for the brand. The work by the global winner will be displayed at the cult-status location of the Piccadilly Circus in London, and the laureate will receive a money reward of EUR 20,000, joining the group of 550 artists Absolut has cooperated with over the last four decades. The winner of the global stage will be revealed in May 2019 in Stockholm.

“Herbapol-Lublin” S.A. places BIO products on the market “Herbapol-Lublin” S.A., one of the largest tea manufacturers in Poland and the leader of the fruit syrup segment, is introducing a line of ecological products to the market. The new goods hold a certificate issued by the Ekogwarancja PTRE sp. z o.o. certifying body. The distinctive “green leaf” confirming the high quality of goods that meet the requirements of ecological production standards will appear on all BIO products under the Herbapol brand. The first to reach the market are fruit syrups in two flavour variants: Malina BIO (raspberry) and Aronia BIO (chokeberry). The rich portfolio of the Herbapol brand is being increased with certified foods. The first fully ecological products of the category in which the brand is an unquestioned leader – BIO syrups in two flavours, fragrant raspberry and chokeberry – have already been put on the market. Their composition includes exclusively ecological fruit juice and ecological cane sugar. Fruit from certified ecologic farming have been used for production, and the products have received a quality certificate.

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Statement of the “Społem” Productive Labour Cooperative The “Społem” Productive Labour Cooperative announces that from 11 March 2019, it has withdrawn eggs from caged hens, as well as all components and ingredients derived from this egg category, in the production of the Majonez Kielecki Lekki light mayonnaise. Information in this regard has also been placed on the new label of this product. This is another step towards the introduction of new manufacturing solutions intended to ensure the welfare of farm animals. According to an earlier declaration, total elimination of eggs from caged hens in production, along with all components and ingredients derived from this egg category, will be complete by 2025.

Koral celebrates its 40th anniversary The beginnings of the Koral brand were a time of back-breaking work, virtually around the clock, 7 days a week. This has paid off! This year, 40 years will pass since the establishment of the company. The producer will have a sumptuous celebration, presenting as many as 30 new products for the jubilee season. A special edition of the Grand Gold ice cream in a unique package will be created, and tastes of other proposals will be enriched with original, unprecedented compositions. Specially to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Koral, a competition named “Because I Love These Moments” is underway. For this occasion, a special subpage was created on koral.com.pl, containing the company’s history and the #40yearschallenge animation, along with an online time capsule – the bokochamtechwile. pl site where ice cream fans can upload unique life memories, thus taking part in the competition.





STATISTICS

Brand of Polish agri-food products – prospects for development on foreign markets

Year after year, Polish foreign trade in agri-food products is breaking new records. These results confirm that the agri-food sector is a key segment of the Polish economy worth investing in and promoting, both on domestic and foreign markets. In 2018, the value of products sold was EUR 29.3 billion, thus achieNational Support ving an increase by 5.5% Centre for Agriculture in relation to 2017. An increase was also recorded in imports – EUR 19.8 billion (2.6% more than in 2017). EU countries are the key regular customers for Polish agri-food products, to which food worth EUR 24.2 billion was exported (82% of the total export value). Polish food exports to third countries was worth EUR 5.2 billion. In the commodity structure of Polish exports, no major changes were recorded. It was led by livestock, meat and meat products (21% of the export value), cereal grain and products (11%), tobacco and tobacco products (11%),

KOWR

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milk products (8%), sugar and confectionery (7%), fish and products (7%), vegetables (6%), fruit (5%) and their products. Polish agricultural institutions continue their measures aimed at diversifying non-EU markets for the export of agri-food products. It is all the more important that the export of food is an essential element that stabilises the domestic market in a situation where the production of food is growing faster than demand.

STRONG BRAND AS A TOOL FOR BUILDING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE While striving for the development of agri-food exports, more and more attention is

paid to a need for coherent communication of the Polish food brand, aimed at enhancing the recognisability of Polish products on foreign markets. This coherence may be achieved by a synergy of actions carried out by all entities, both public and private, involved in the promotion of agri-food products abroad. This approach derives from an assumption that even the best, in quality terms, product needs support in the form of a well-prepared, coherent and modern promotional and information strategy. Otherwise, it is lost in a multitude of equally good products available on the market nowadays. While building this strategy, we use elements confirming the attractiveness of a product,


STATISTICS

PRODUCT UNDER THE PRODUCER’S LABEL It seems that if a Polish product is to enter a given foreign market under the producer’s

5 0

5,2 4,4

19,8

19,3

17,3

23,9 16,1

21,9 15,1

20,4 14,3

15,2 12,6

10,9

11,5 9,3

11,7 10,3

10,1 8,1

8,5 6,4

10

7,1 5,4

15

13,5

20

13,6

17,9

25

24,3

27,8

30

29,3

Fig. 1. Polish foreign trade in agri-food products (in billion EUR)

4,0 3,6

such as raw materials and innovative technologies used for its production and the quality they guarantee, as well as low prices. However, the awareness of a need to strengthen the brand as a tool to build permanent competitive advantage is growing. A recognisable brand, which often builds emotional ties between the consumer and the product, adds value to the product. The brand is a symbol of everything that the product can offer – a sort of promise given to consumers. Therefore, it is extremely important, in the context of strong market competition, to build a brand as a symbol which is, first and foremost, recognisable and also evokes positive associations. Product image is one of the key marketing categories. It is affected by a series of conscious and unconscious actions. Its importance is particularly essential in sectors characterised by intense competition, such as the agri-food sector. It is difficult here to build and maintain a positive image, while it is all too easy to destroy it. The loss of confidence in one product may jeopardise the whole industry. What is more, increasing the competitive advantage of products on the market may provoke a counterattack from competitors, aimed at discrediting the product or the brand in the eyes of consumers. The greater the success, the higher the risk of dishonest practices. Thus, it is important to invest, in a much broader sense than strictly financial, in building and strengthening the image, by taking a multifaceted approach with a profound impact on importers and consumers. Bearing in mind the above, the promotional strategy for Polish food is based, on the one hand, on product attributes and, on the other hand, on the Polish food as a brand. It is due to the still small – in the eyes of foreign operators – number of outstanding brands unequivocally associated with Poland. The main objective of the strategy is to build a strong brand of Polish food under the joint “Poland tastes good” slogan– firmly associated with the country of origin and highlighting the qualities of Polish products.

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

EXPORT

IMPORT

BALANCE

Source: elaboration by the Analysis and Strategy Office of the National Support Centre for Agriculture, based on data of the Ministry of Finance, 2018 – preliminary data.

label, it is first necessary to build or strengthen (depending on the market) the image of Polish products as a whole, the brand awareness of Polish food and its attributes. Polish food should be automatically associated with its place of origin and, first and foremost, with a guarantee of safety, naturalness, high quality and taste – i.e. the combination of features which differentiate Polish products against those of many developed European countries. From the poll carried out in 2013 upon the request of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs among tourists visiting Poland, it turned out that Poland is perceived as a particularly interesting country in culinary terms due to the quality and flavour of its food. The high quality of Polish products is guaranteed by national and EU food standard systems, as well as by one of the world’s best state-of-the-art technology parks. In turn, an original flavour is obtained as a result of using recipes passed down from generation to generation, properly adapted to the tastes and expectations of modern consumers. Building the Polish food brand should focus on these attributes of Polish products, appreciated – most importantly – by foreigners themselves. Polish agri-food operators, experienced in export, mention that the factors enabling

them to sell products under producer’s label include: long-term experience and presence in the industry, knowledge of the brand on the local market, high quality and reputation of products, technological potential of the company, high production capacity, wide range of products, price competitiveness along with presentation of the company during trade fairs. Among the benefits gained from sales under producer’s label, they mention the opportunity to strengthen the brand and company image on a given market and thus the recognisability which opens the path to concluding new contracts. Sales under producer’s label also guarantees long-term and more stable agreements than in the case of sales under the private label, higher margins on products sold, and thus greater profits. Some risks, such as increased liability for the label, were also mentioned. In the face of it, in the case of sales under the private label, the responsibility for the product to a greater extent lies with the importer/customer. This kind of cooperation also gives an opportunity to small/ family companies with low market clout, to sell their product under the label of a customer more recognisable on the local market, without generating additional costs related to a need for market recognition, pro-

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STATISTICS

BUILDING THE BRAND IN PRACTICE

Fig. 2. Geographical structure of Polish agri-food exports in 2018 Great Britain

9%

Germany

Netherlands

24%

USA

7%

2%

Italy

Other countries

EUR 29.3 billion

11%

5%

EUR 24.2 billion

France

5%

CIS

5%

Czech Republic

Other EU countries

5%

Belgium

10%

EU

3%

Hungary

Denmark

82%

3% 2% Lithuania Romania Slovakia 2% 3% Spain 2% 2%

Source: elaboration by the Analysis and Strategy Office of the National Support Centre for Agriculture, based on preliminary data of the Ministry of Finance.

motion or publicity. However, sales under the private label entails that the producer’s label will not be promoted and recognised on a given market. It also makes it possible for a customer to exchange suppliers easily. Polish companies are virtually unanimous when it comes to indicating a positive

change in the perception of Polish agri-food products on foreign market which has taken place in recent years. They also notice an increase in the recognisability and confidence in Polish food, which improves the possibility of export under producer’s label.

Fig. 3. Commodity structure of Polish agri-food exports in 2018 Other

Live animals, meat and preparations

16%

Alcohol

21%

2%

Oilseeds, vegetable fats

2%

Fruit and vegetable juices

2%

Coffee, tea, cocoa

2%

Cereal grain and preparations

EUR 29.3 billion

11%

Fruit (including nuts) and preparations

5%

Vegetables (including mushrooms) and preparations

Tobacco and tobacco products

6%

Fish and preparations

7%

Sugar and confectionery products

7%

11%

Dairy products

8%

Source: elaboration by the Analysis and Strategy Office of the National Support Centre for Agriculture, based on preliminary data of the Ministry of Finance.

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In order to harmonise promotional and information measures related to the Polish food brand and make their message more comprehensible, such activities are conducted under the joint “Poland tastes good” slogan. The National Support Centre for Agriculture (KOWR) – the major Polish institution implementing the objectives of the food promotion strategy – uses this slogan while organising the participation of Polish operators in international fairs and trade events. The KOWR carries out its tasks in countries with a high import potential – both those in which Polish food is not present yet or is present to a small extent and those which are well-known to Polish exporters. Studies on the image of Poland and Polish economy, carried out in its major economic partner countries, have indicated that the participation of Polish companies in fairs and trade events is one of the most effective ways to build brand recognisability. To promote the Polish food brand, we may also use the natural ambassadors of Poland in the world, i.e. the Polish community, as only multifaceted actions are conducive to strengthening the position of the brand on foreign markets. What is also needed is a greater consolidation of Polish producers involved in export. Effective organisation of exporters will harmonise the sales offer, which for the importer is a guarantee of stability and quality of supplies. Consequently, Polish companies will be able to compete more efficiently with operators from other countries. The “Poland tastes good” slogan may be reinforced by messages specific to individual industries, which will substantiate the reasons why Polish products taste so good. If cooperation between producers improves, the power of the message will be stronger. The Polish food brand that is well-established through the above-mentioned actions and evokes positive associations opens the door for Polish producers to enter a given market with products under their own label. We invite you to cooperate with the KOWR: eksporter@kowr.gov.pl Magdalena Rowińska Chief Specialist Export Support Department of the KOWR


KOWR National Support

Centre for Agriculture

As the main Polish institution dedicated to agri-food export support, the National Support Centre for Agriculture (KOWR) contributes to raising awareness of Polish food as a brand and to fostering trade co-operation in the agri-food sector. The KOWR is open to establishing contacts with entities seeking co-operation with the Polish agri-food sector and in creating trade opportunities of mutual benefit. Feel free to contact us at: eksporter@kowr.gov.pl. Plan of foreign promotional activities of the KOWR for 2019

No.

Date

Country

City

Fair

1

18 – 27.01.2019

Germany

Berlin

International Green Week Berlin “Grüne Woche”

2

13 – 16.02.2019

Germany

Nuremberg

Biofach

3

17 – 21.02.2019

UAE

Dubai

GULFOOD

4

05 – 08.03.2019

Japan

Tokyo

Foodex Japan

5

05 – 07.03.2019

Mexico

Guadalajara

Alimentaria Mexico

6

24 – 26.04. 2019

Vietnam

Ho Chi Minh City

Food & Hotel Vietnam

7

14 – 16.05.2019

China

Shanghai

SIAL China*

8

21 – 24.05.2019

South Korea

Seoul

Seoul Food & Hotel

9

22 – 24.05.2019

Netherlands

’s-Hertogenbosch

Mushroom Days

10

28.05 – 01.06.2019

Thailand

Bangkok

THAIFEX

11

15 – 19.08. 2019

Hong Kong

Hong Kong

HKTDC Food Expo

12

22 – 25.08. 2019

Slovakia

Nitra

AGROKOMPLEX

13

29 – 31.08. 2019

India

Mumbai

Annapoorna Anufood India

14

05 – 09.10.2019

Germany

Cologne

ANUGA

15

13 – 16.11.2019

Indonesia

Jakarta

Sial Interfood**

16

26 – 28.11.2019

Israel

Tel Aviv

Israfood

* **

The KOWR will only organise the information-promotional stand of the promotion programme for Polish food specialties (BPP-POIR) The KOWR’s participation in the event will depend on the number of companies willing to participate




COMMENTARY

Traditional grocery store in Radom, Poland

FMCG trade like nowhere else No European country has developed such a model of trade in food products as in Poland. And it should not be expected to undergo any major changes in the years to come.

Witold Nartowski Journalist

Nowhere have small, traditional grocery stores retained such a strong market position as they have in Poland. In the Czech Republic or Hungary, not to mention France or Germany, small retail outlets have just a token share in the market, comprised, above all, by a relatively narrow group of specialist stores. In Poland, the sales share of stores with an area up to 300 m2 is estimated at more than 40% of the entire market. Hypermarkets, supermarkets and discount stores have failed to dominate the FMCG trade completely, as they have in most European countries where the market share of the so-called modern trade can reach as much as 90%.

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CRAZED BEGINNINGS This state of affairs resulted from several factors. Above all, at the moment of the shift from a centrally planned economy to free market, Poland saw a boom in individual entrepreneurship. After 1990, several hundred thousand companies arose in over a little more than a dozen months, and a large proportion of them were trade enterprises. Sales were conducted in collapsible stands known as ‘jaws’, on camp beds, in tiny booths, on marketplaces springing up like mushrooms. It was on the basis of those tiny companies that the Polish private wholesale and retail trade was born, including mostly food trade. State and cooperative com-

panies, that had dominated the market until recently, proved unable to overcome such an invasion of private entrepreneurship. As a result, as many as 140,000 grocery stores and more than 10,000 wholesalers trading in FCMG are estimated to have been active on the market in mid-1990s. In late 1990s, the market shaped in such a way, yet still very weak, was entered by large international trade chains, both wholesale and retail ones. In wholesale trade, they included Makro Cash&Carry and Selgros, followed by Eurocash with the Eurocash Cash&Carry wholesale centres. Retail, on the other hand, saw the emergence of German hypermarkets


COMMENTARY

Real, French companies Casino, Auchan and Carrefour, British Tesco or Dutch Ahold, not to mention entities managing smaller stores, such as Scandinavian Rema, Austrian Julius Meinl, or German Edeka. In view of the organizational (not quantitative, by any means) weakness of the domestic trade, international leaders quickly started conquering the market and they had already controlled 40% of it in the late 1990s. This, in turn, brought protests by domestic traders and their associations, as well as demands for statutory limitation of the international expansion. Due to these measures and, above all, to self-organizing processes of Polish commerce, this invasion markedly slowed down at the verge of the 21st century, and some operators even started abandoning their operations on the Polish market or strongly restructuring their presence. This meant withdrawal of such market leaders as the Casino Group, Ahold, and some time later – the Metro Group with its Real hypermarkets. At the same time, discount stores caught a second wind – rapid development started characterizing Biedronka, owned by the Portuguese Jeronimo Martins Polska company, and two chains owned by the German Schwarz Group, i.e. Lidl discount stores and Kaufland discount supermarkets. In parallel, different forms of self-organization of trader communities, through franchise or partnership chains as well as purchasing groups, became increasingly common.

DIVERSITY OF FORMATS These processes brought about the current shape of the Polish market. Today, the number of grocery stores in Poland has more than halved compared with 25 years ago, which means above 70,000 retail outlets. The number of wholesalers recorded an even sharper drop, as there are several times, about one thousand, less of them. The wholesale of food is actually the most consolidated part of the FMCG market. Having acquired its largest competitor, i.e. Tradis owned by the Emperia Group several years ago, the Eurocash Group is currently in control of more than 20% of the market. There is no other company with such a scale of operations in the area of retail. A very strong position is occupied by such food wholesalers as Makro Cash&Carry and Selgros, owning, in total, several dozen sales floors throughout Poland. Of

wholesale companies, it is worth mentioning such entities as Specjał from Rzeszów, number 2 in the wholesale of foods; another Rzeszów company Bać-Pol, currently undergoing considerable financial difficulties; Marol from Poznań; or PPUH Gniezno. These wholesalers, just like Eurocash, cooperate with numerous franchise chains associating thousands of Polish traders. Of almost 70,000 traditional retail FMCG stores active on the Polish market, approx. 60% operate under franchise chains. Such chains as Lewiatan, abc, Groszek, Euro Sklep, or Delikatesy Centrum work under the auspices of Eurocash. Specjał is the organizer of Nasz Sklep, Delikatesy Sezam, Delikatesy Premium, and Livio, and last year, it took control

The wholesale of food is actually the most consolidated part of the FMCG market of Rabat Detal. Marol cooperates with Chata Polska, Bać-Pol with SPAR, and Gniezno with the Sklep Polski chain. Due to this cooperation between wholesale and retail as well as within retail itself, traditional trade still maintains a very strong position. Currently, discount retail chains are the most successful, being actually the greatest threat to the position of traditional trade. Here, the scene is dominated by two large chains: Biedronka, owning approx. 3,500 retail outlets, and Lidl with more than 600 stores. There are also such chains as Netto and Aldi, yet their significance is much smaller. Incidentally, discount stores today are a far cry from those stores with a small private label assortment the Polish society remembers from nearly 20 years ago. They are more like supermarkets, also offering branded products under civilized conditions of sale. Discount stores, offering low prices for high-quality products, are becoming stronger year by year. Supermarket chains are also growing larger, including those of a franchise nature, such as Intermarché with 400 stores or SPAR with more than 250 stores, and proprietary chains, including the most widespread Dino chain

owning more than 1,000 stores, Polomarket with almost 300 retail outlets, or the Milo and Eko chains acquired by Eurocash. Another format of stores operating on the Polish market are hypermarkets. As late as 20 years ago, the biggest stores dreamed of full control of the market, yet now they are experiencing similar difficulties as those in other European countries. Of the more than a dozen chains active years ago, virtually only four major ones have survived: Auchan, Carrefour, Kaufland, and Tesco, whereas the fate of the last one is still uncertain.

CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE The uniqueness of the Polish FMCG trade market against the rest of Europe is due to more than just the historical factors mentioned above. An important element affecting the development of this system is the socio-demographic structure of the country. A considerable part of the Polish society lives and works outside great agglomerations; above all, in the country and in small towns, i.e. in regions where construction of hypermarkets, supermarkets or, to a lesser extent, a large discount store will not make the enterprise profitable enough. This means that traditional trade in stores with retail space up to 300 m2 remains an alternative to modern forms of retail trade in these regions of Poland. Of course, the number of traditional stores will shrink over time (discounts already announce they will enter smaller localities with small formats), yet small private stores will probably never lose their significance as much as they have in most of the other European countries. Another characteristic of the Polish food trade is the fact retailers are increasingly willing to reach for the most modern forms of sale. Internet trade is developing quite fast – apart from the largest companies, such as Frisco.pl, tens if not hundreds of smaller enterprises of a different scale are coming into being. Obviously, they are not as many as those trading in industrial products, yet their shares in the sales value are systematically growing. However, given the essence of food trade being the freshness of the products and the consumers’ possibility to assess it on their own, such companies should not be expected to exceed a selling threshold that would make them a threat to stationary trade outlets.

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COMMENTARY

Agri-food export – the driving force of the Polish economy The agri-food sector is the key segment of the Polish economy and simultaneously, the driving force behind national exports. The value of Polish agri-food exports in 2018 reached a record-breaking level of EUR 29.3 billion – more than 5.5 times higher than at the moment of Poland’s accession to the EU in 2004. Can we expect the upward trend to continue? What are the perspectives of Polish exports? What challenges can we expect in the future?

Renata Juszkiewicz The President Of The Polish Organization Of Trade And Distribution (POHiD)

Poland’s accession to the European Union sparked the dynamic development of Polish agri-food exports, starting from the level of EUR 5.2 billion in 2004. The nearly sixfold increase in domestic exports over 14 years has largely been due to the high quality of the offered products and goods, as well as to trust built over those years, but it also results from economic conditions. Foreign capital investments enabled the opening of Polish manufacturing plants of the largest global corporations, as well as the development of Polish branches of international trade chains through which Polish products would reach other countries. The know-how acquired by Polish entrepreneurs in cooperating with the corporations enabled them to act with increasing proficiency on international markets. The favourable situation for exports has also been driven recently by the depreciation of the zloty and economic recovery in European Union countries after the 2008 crisis. The value of foreign agri-food sales in 2018 is estimated, according to preliminary data by the Ministry of Finance, at EUR 29,336 billion, which means growth by 5.5% compared with the previous year. The main outlet for Polish agri-food products is the EU countries (82.3% of the value of exports of these goods), in order of importance: Germany, the UK, the Netherlands, Italy, France, the

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Czech Republic, Belgium, Hungary, Romania and Spain. Among non-EU countries, major recipients are the Commonwealth of Independent States (above 4%) and the USA (above 2%). Our main export hits in 2018 included: cigarettes, meat (poultry, beef, pork) and meat preparations, bakery and confectionery products, chocolate and preparations containing cocoa, animal feed, sugar syrups, cheese, fish and fish preparations, as well as fruit, vegetables and their preparations, including fruit juices, mainly apple juice. The export value of these items comprised approx. 56% of the total foreign agri-food sales. Such large exports allowed surpluses of the produced foods to be allocated to foreign markets. A report by the KPMG consulting group of October 2017 shows that 50% of exporters gain 25% of their revenues on foreign sales. The most widespread reason for starting export activities is the interest in products from foreign customers (90%). More than 40% of companies also state that too much competition on the domestic market as the cause.

IS THERE A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR POLISH EXPORTS? Today, it is hard to predict clearly how long the upward trend in Polish exports will last. Among the threats to Polish exports, as listed by experts, of particular importance are predictions concerning the international downturn of economic growth, as well as disintegrative and protectionist trends in the European Union. Polish food exports are highly dependent on the EU market, so any signs of economic downturn in other EU countries, especially Germany,

being the main outlets of Polish agri-food products, should be treated with utmost seriousness. Polish exports may also suffer from Brexit and restoration of duties in the UK, which is the second largest importer of Polish food, after Germany. So how can continued development of Polish exports at an intense pace be ensured? Polish producers should expand the array of recipients of our food products with new outlets, especially in developing countries. The most prospective export directions, according to KMPG analysts, are Asian markets (above all, China), countries of Africa, the Middle East as well as North America. The success of export activities is only possible due to perfect reconnaissance of a given outlet, obtaining thorough knowledge of its specific character and acquisition of trusted local business partners. Challenges, on the other hand, may be posed by transport and logistics, which is why local production has a higher chance of success. The KMPG report shows that Polish exporters encounter a lot of barriers in their operations, having an adverse effect on the development of companies on foreign markets. They include: strong zloty, exchange rate fluctuations, complicated political situation in the recipient’s country, onerous bureaucracy, or requirements in obtaining additional certificates enabling the sale of products in a given country. For the sake of further development, Polish exports should currently focus their efforts on the identification of all market opportunities and threats, as well as the preparation of a long-term operation strategies.


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PRIVATE LABEL

Quo vadis, private label?

In recent years, the global market has been recording an intense growth in shares of private labels in the entire FMCG sales. Private label is a concept that has been present in trade since the late 19th century. The economic factor has been underlying for the attractiveness of private labels, yet today consumers no longer associate them merely with cheap counterparts to branded products. The Nielsen report published last April, based on research conducted in 60 Renata Juszkiewicz The President Of The Polish countries, shows that the Organization Of Trade And Distribution (POHiD) share of private labels in total sales of fast-moving goods on the global scale reached 16.7% in 2016, which means growth by 0.4% compared with the previous year. Some European countries may boast a share of private labels in the FMCG sales on a level exceeding 40%, such as the UK. The highest private label share growths were recorded for Austria and Germany. What makes the European market a place where private labels develop so dynamically? As the main causative factor of growth, experts point out the development of retail trade and changes in consumer behaviour.

to trends and consumer needs. Moreover, a private label may set new market trends. Usually of domestic origin.

PRIVATE LABEL YESTERDAY AND TODAY

WHAT DO CONSUMERS MAKE OF PRIVATE LABELS?

In the 1980s, private labels were first marked with trade chain logos. The next decade, in turn, brought private label category diversification by price: economy (low price shelf), standard (medium price shelf), premium (high price shelf). Currently, the diversification of categories is based on a combination of the price criterion and the customer benefit.

Many analyses, performed both on the global market and on local ones, show how private labels are perceived today from a consumer’s viewpoint. The Nielsen report shows that 58% of the world’s population consider themselves so-called smart shoppers when buying private label products. 67% of the surveyed attribute the value of private labels to their very favourable quality-to-price ratio. 70% of consumers purchase private label products in order to save money. 65% perceive a private label as a good alternative to a branded product. 71% of the population notice that the quality of private labels has significantly improved over time. A report published by the Daymon agency in April 2018, presenting data from the US market, shows that 81% of consumers purchase private label products during each visit to a store; 85% of consumers trust private label products on par with branded ones; 59% of US respondents appreciate the high diversity of private label products; 53% go to a shop specifically to buy a private label product. How does the situation look like in Poland? In the light of a market report on private labels, commissioned by the On Board Group in 2014, as many as 97% of the surveyed have declared they have or used to have private label products at home. 73% of Poles have positive associations concerning them. Among the advantages, the consumers point out: attractive price (83%), promotions (76%) and a good quality-to-price ratio (64%). As many as 54% of the surveyed claim a private label suits their needs. For comparison, only 57% of respondents declare that products of well-known brands fit their needs.

BRAND REVOLUTIONS A revolution in the assortment of private labels is going on currently, almost before our very eyes. Private labels slowly cease to be perceived by consumers as merely cheap counterparts to branded products. It is safe to say that private labels challenge traditional brands, not just by price but by innovativeness for which the changing needs of consumers are the driving force. Private labels have become an alternative to branded products. Private labels are developing in line with various trends, connected, among other things, with a healthy lifestyle, safety or convenience. Therefore, trade chains issue all kinds of private label products: organic, natural, ecologic, healthy, gluten-free, sugar-free, lactose-free, preservative-free, GMO-free, paraben-free, with a short expiry date, express-preparation, convenient in use, etc. In the age of globalization, products of national and regional cuisines enjoy enormous popularity.

PRIVATE LABEL – AN ACE UP THE TRADE CHAINS’ SLEEVE A private label, based on a traditional concept of a good quality-to-price ratio, currently has a range of properties, important from a consumer’s viewpoint, enabling it to become the highlight of a trade chain’s offer. It is often a product so unique and one-of-a-kind that the chain uses it as a tool to build customer loyalty. Private labels are increasingly gaining the status of a rightful competitor to branded products, with their innovativeness and quick time of response

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WHAT WILL BE THE FUTURE OF PRIVATE LABELS? Analysts predict that the significance of private labels will still be on the rise. Trade chains will utilize private labels to compete efficiently with global brands. A significant factor from the viewpoint of the development of private labels are the generational changes on the consumer market. The so-called millennials will be eager to test new products, including private labels.


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COMMENTARY

Dynamic development of the private label sector

Private labels comprise a growing segment of the food market and are developing dynamically. Formerly, the only things they used to be associated with were low prices and essential products. Today, they are diverse items of high quality yet affordable.

Maciej Ptaszyński Director Polish Chamber of Commerce

Entrepreneurs have to adapt their offer to the needs of the customers, and the latter have changed. The cost still is very significant in making shopping decisions, yet consumers also demand good quality. They expect a favourable quality-to-price ratio. Moreover, new shopping fashions appear all the time – currently, there is growing demand for ecological, low-processed, local or vegetarian items. This is also an area where private labels can emerge. It is worth building customer relations, caring for the image, and thus undertaking professional marketing activities. This is a process of many years, but it is necessary – and profitable if performed skillfully. Private labels are among the tools used by Polish entrepreneurs to compete with discount stores. For instance, the Lewiatan, Groszek, Euro Sklep and Gama chains distribute approx. 600 private label items of these companies, while the Społem chain features approx. 250 of them. They make it possible to narrow the price gap between them and discount stores, apparent for producer label products. Importantly, most private label items in smaller stores come from Polish manufacturers. As shown by the CMR data, private label products of a chain or a distributor are generally available at small-format stores up to 300 m2 – they can be found in more than 90% of such outlets. Private labels appear most frequently on shelves with nuts, cookies, oils and pasta, animal feed, as well as paper products (towels and toilet paper) – such private label items are featured, on average, in the offer of every second small-format store. The CMR data show that private label products of trade chains or distributors could be found on every fourteenth cash receipt in 2018, yet their share in the total turnover of such stores amounted only to 2%, just like the year before.

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In supermarkets with an area between 301 and 2500 m2, the private label product offer is considerably broader, and chain equivalents to brand products can be found in almost every category. Private labels are a keystone of the assortment of such goods as pasta, oils, jams, cookies, groats and rice. Wider accessibility and a wider offer translate into higher shares of private labels, both in the turnover of stores (approx. 5% in 2018) and in the total number of transactions (in the period under consideration, private label products would appear on every fourth cash receipt). Both in supermarkets and at smaller stores, the greatest significance of private labels has been recorded in such categories as salty snacks, cereal products (e.g. groats or rice), as well as paper products or water. On the other hand, a very slight share of such products is observed for the confectionery and alcohol categories. According to the CMR data, at small-format stores up to 300 m2, the highest importance of private labels is definitely recorded for the categories of animal feed (accounting for approx. 40% of the turnover), and paper products, such as toilet paper and towels (approx. 30% of the turnover). Private labels are also highly significant in trade in such categories as oil and vinegar (an approx. 20% share in the sales value of each category), rice (17%) and groats (15%). In supermarkets, private labels make up 35% of the sales value of vinegar, nuts, crisps, toilet paper and paper tissues. Such products are also very significant (more than a 20% share in the sales value) in such categories as groats, rice, oil, milk or cottage cheeses. In order to properly understand the subject matter of private labels, one should also take a broader look at the policy of the manufacturers’ relations with individual formats.

Manufacturers pursue the sales volume at discount stores and margins at small stores, at the expense of their profitability and increased price for customers. Thus, despite significant investment in development and efficiency increase of the supply chain, Polish stores are losing the battle against discount stores from the get-go, as far as price is concerned. Unfortunately, it should also be noted that the same is true for Polish food producers. Under such conditions, undertaking of any activities intended to narrow the price gap separating small and medium-sized independent stores from discount stores would be an appropriate course. Of course, it should be kept in mind that a private label is not a prevalent component of trade policies of smaller independent and franchise chains. They still primarily focus on a wide assortment of producer brands as well as regional products. Small stores are unable to wage a direct price war against discount stores, so they have to attract customers with a wide offer. An average assortment of a discount store is 2500-3000 SKU, while for small stores, it could be as much as 60009000 SKU. For manufacturers, making a large portion of their work dependent on a private label, despite many advantages such as the aforementioned volume of orders, may become a dead end. It may narrow down the options of receipt of other products from the portfolio and weaken the brands’ recognizability outside a specific sales channel. There is unquestionably a great future ahead for private labels in all formats, yet it is hard to imagine they could dominate the offers of smaller chains, even in the long run, as is the case at discount stores. This is why any potential regulatory measures in this regard must be based on thorough knowledge of all aspects governing the market.



PRIVATE LABEL

History of private labels Poland has undergone a crash course in experiencing private labels. The first encounter resulted from private, “non-corporate” imports of the cheapest “PL-class” products from discount stores of West Berlin and Vienna.

Andrzej Maria Faliński Expert

At that time, their main advantage over the post-Socialist offer of the early 1990s might have been just the package colour, yet in the desert of early transformation, they were available “artifacts” of a better world. Act Two was the exploratory ideas of early trade chains (of foreign origin indeed, but Polish ones as well), reaching for cheap garage production and not-entirely-honest payment policies. Up to the ongoing stage of complex supply chain cooperation based on long-term relations. Today, it is mainly food private labels that have embraced all price and quality levels. In other words, the PL-

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class (private label) products have followed the producer brand products of all levels of positioning: from “economic” ones to premium chain brands. Today, private labels are offered by all trade formats. Of course, discount stores (let us disregard the issues of definition) are the kings of the field, reserving between 40% and 70% of their SKUs (and a little less in terms of value) to private labels. Only slightly behind them are smaller stores of large-format chains, stocked close to a level of 50%. This also includes hypermarkets and supermarkets, discounting their

sales by introducing whole generations of private labels, more numerous in absolute numbers than those in so-called discounts. A simple example: let us say that a so-called discount has 1,600 SKUs in private label (integrated under an umbrella formula or not) and let it make up around 70% of the product range, but an ambitious hypermarket or supermarket may offer 3,000 – 5,000 SKUs of such goods, and it would not comprise even 20%. Private labels have also gone “to the masses”, i.e. to small retail spaces and several other strongholds of traditional trade, such as cooperative systems. Even


PRIVATE LABEL

though, in the case of the latter, we speak of several-percent shares in the offer, 20% is no rarity in modern small store systems, i.e. in standard convenience stores. In this regard, store space is not important in deciding “whether” – the decision effort has a qualitative nature, it is all about an efficient formula of “how” – to implement private label programmes. A particular role in the market of such products is played by franchises (of different “hardness”) and similar chains. Independent stores in the strict sense are essentially on the wane, while franchise itself comprises approx. 80,000 stores, of which 2/3 are food and mixed stores. Franchise integrators are usually chain wholesalers, creating chain systems associating thousands of small, medium-sized, or even large (above 200 m2) stores. Therefore, wholesale is the basic entry factor of the small and medium space into large-scale business models, and its most effective competitive instrument is comprised by private level product lines, finding retail sale systems numbering thousands of outlets in integrated stores and, increasingly, in HoReCa. Integrated stores today (franchises, purchasing groups, partnership groups) may be estimated to comprise at least 30% of food market sales, the same percentage as held by four discount chains. It is also worth keeping in mind that there are approx. 1,400 of these systems, including approx. 1,000 franchise ones alone. Today, everyone discounts sales; they fight by price and increase the efficiency of achievement of high quality parameters (thanks to uniform chain control and quality discipline) for a good price. Without private labels, this is much more difficult, costly, and on a market as dense and competitive as the Polish one, virtually impossible – both in terms of finance and management. Therefore, the commonness of PL-class products, mainly in foods, is not surprising. They comprise 20% in terms of value (recent data speak of 19.6%) and approx. 35% (according to PLMA) in terms of quantity, by SKU (stock keeping units). Estimating the entire food market at approx. 250,000 SKUs, while simultaneously omitting the collective (umbrella) brands, we arrive at a tremendous number with significant dynamics. For instance, it's suffice to say that

Today, everyone discounts sales; they fight by price and increase the efficiency of achievement of high quality parameters (thanks to uniform chain control and quality discipline) for a good price the value of the PL class of FMCG in 2015 was approx. PLN 40 billion, while recently, in 2018, it exceeded PLN 50 billion, so we speak of average annual dynamics amounting to approx. 6%. Of course, the “kings of the field” are household chemical items, non-perishable foods, fresh foods, personal care items. We have approx. 260,000 stores in Poland – probably the highest number in Europe (it had been about 350,000 ten years ago), with a very complex structure, vastly dominated by stores that are small but saturated with private labels – so these brands are everywhere, increasing the attractiveness of the producers’ work on PL-class product lines. This trend is supported by a consumer trend of key importance to Poland, indicating the proximity and quickness of purchase, or preference for the broadly understood convenience strategy, efficiently developed by discount stores, proximity markets and convenience stores (this comfort zone is likely to comprise approx. 50% of the market – 30% for discounts, about 6-7% each for small convenience stores and so-called proximity markets, which makes approx. 12-14%). It is worth noticing that the convenience strategy exceeds the rigid limits of trade formats, providing a wide area of success for private labels – we tend to buy cheap, well and comfortably. This is where the specific structure of a segment served by the PL class comes into being: approx. 60% is standard PL, up to 20% is premium PL, and the rest – quickly shrinking for many years – is economy-class PL. This brings sale stabilization to stores and producers who compete through quality, struggling for price.

An important area of private label expansion in Poland is exports – however paradoxically that might sound. This is largely determined by transnational large-area chains exporting goods to their national branches throughout and outside Europe (we mean at least 25 countries here). Here, one can speak of approx. PLN 10 billion, of which about 2/3 is comprised by private labels, usually ordered into product groups of umbrella brands. Another export segment is specialist and “ethnic” wholesale addressed to the neighbouring countries and centres of Polish emigration. The best example is exports to the UK, Germany, the Czech Republic, Ukraine, Slovakia, Hungary, Italy, the Balkans, Portugal or Spain. To a significant extent, if difficult to estimate, such products function “under” private labels of foreign wholesale exporters and recipients. I believe the amount involved reaches at least PLN 1.5 billion. Last, but by no means least: the issue of consumer reception of PL-class products. A well-known 2014 report by On Board PR states that 97% of respondents declare contact with such products. Other surveys and journalist research confirm this figure for the last 5 years. What is most important for these products? I believe the essence is that they are perceived as inexpensive (approx. 2/3 of the survey) and diverse in terms of quality and price level, not unlike brand products. The conclusion is this is just a commodity like any other. Besides, above 70% of purchasers have no reservations, perceiving private labels positively. Moreover, pointing out the price, they also associate the purchasing decision with being “smart”. Therefore, these products have found their place on the market under normal competitive principles, competing not just against their branded counterparts but against each other, and trade companies proved to be competitors, not just in trade but in production, introducing another peculiar form of consolidating their offers and trade potentials to the market. What would be next? What lies ahead is an interesting – and already ongoing – race of PL products in “omnichannel” sales. But this is, as R. Kipling puts it in the end of the Jungle Book, a different story.

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INTERVIEW

Herbapol-Lublin deeply associated with the Polish rich herbal tradition Interview with Evangelos Evangelou, President of the Board, Herbapol-Lublin. What is your evaluation of Herbapol-Lublin’s position in the Polish market? We have been the undisputed market leader in the category of teas (fruit, herbal, red and functional) as well as fruit syrups for several years. We are in second place in the green tea and jam products categories. The fact that our position has strengthened and we achieved excellent sales results once again this year is particularly important to us now, in the year of our company’s 70th anniversary. It is a time for recapitulation, evaluation of our activities so far and planning new, long-term development strategies and directions, which will strengthen Herbapol-Lublin’s position in both Polish and international markets.

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Does your leading position in individual categories require continuous development? From my perspective, as a leader, you have to be committed to creating new trends or skilfully transferring global trends into the local market, which we know very well thanks to our long-standing presence and extensive experience. Herbapol-Lublin continuously develops its current product portfolio by introducing new product varieties. At the same time, we work on new items to meet the changing expectations and needs of our consumers. Our own research laboratories, as well as internal and external verification of new recipes, ensure that consumers receive top-quality products. Over the last two years, we have broad-

ened our product portfolio by introducing a new range of ready-to-drink drinks: Herbapol ice tea without colourants, preservatives or sweeteners, available in three flavours, which are excellent alternatives to coloured drinks sold on the market. We also introduced two varieties of herbal drinks: Beauty Horsetail, citrus fruit with green tea and Detox Nettle, quince with green tea. We are developing the Big-Active brand just as dynamically. Here, the new items include more variants of white tea and a new category of green teas from the lifestyle line: Energy guarana with Yerba Mate and Relax lemon balm with lavender, as well as the Think & Focus with ginko and cola nuts variant launched this year. Moreover, we have expanded our flagship Polish Herbarium line


INTERVIEW

with three new herbal teas: Milk thistle, Hawthorn flowers and St. John’s wort. We are also continuously adapting our sesonal Herbapol range of limited editions of syrups, including flavours to warm you up in winter as well as refreshing variants for the summer. In 2017, we also made our début in the HoReCa channel, where we are developing very dynamically. This wets our appetite for even more success in the future. ‘Yours by nature’ is a slogan reflected in current global market trends. Does Herbapol follow other trends? The Herbapol brand is associated primarily with the rich herbal tradition in Poland. Since the company’s establishment in 1949, we have focused on respecting nature while also taking the best it has to offer. Our inspiration comes from the abundance and diversity of herbs whose properties can be rediscovered by consumers, among other things, thanks to our Polish Herbarium line. Tea Garden fruit teas also contain 100% natural ingredients. The first-class quality of our products is guaranteed through cooperation with verified suppliers and quality testing in our laboratories of herbs collected. We do, of course, continuously observe global trends in the food market and successively add new products to our range. However, we treat them as an inspiration for our activities. First of all, this is because all of our products are based on recipes developed by our specialists, so every product in our range is truly ‘ours’ and unique. Secondly, we continue to pay attention to the preferences and expectations of Polish consumers, which have changed drastically over the years. Nowadays, they choose products which have a positive effect on their bodies and fit their active lifestyles more and more often. The healthy nutrition trend is particularly popular among people from the younger generation, who actively seek new products with natural ingredients or functional products that support daily bodily functions. Consumer awareness in terms of how correct nutrition affects the body has also increased considerably. More attention is now being paid to product contents and ingredients, which frequently determine the purchase decision. Active monitoring of consumer and market needs and trends enables us to effectively combine tradition with innovation and

From my perspective, as a leader, you have to be committed to creating new trends or skilfully transferring global trends into the local market (...)

meet these expectations. We create products that match the pace of life and high demands of modern consumers. Although a leader’s task is also to actively seek new solutions, unknown in the domestic market, we are aware that not all proposals are able to produce a positive reaction. This is due to multiple factors, such as climate conditions, seasonality of consumption, cultural aspects or certain deeply entrenched habits associated with the occasion and manner of tasting tea, which in Poland is a traditional infusion, consumed on a daily basis and all year round. However, all our new items have so far been very well received by consumers and I believe that those launched in the market in 2019, our anniversary year, will also satisfy their tastes. I am thinking in particular about cold brew tea, which is brewed using either cold water or water at room temperature. This product is well-known outside Poland and I am curious about how customers will react to it. You are also active in the field of corporate social responsibility. Can you tell me about your key areas of activity? Every year, we donate products to organisations and institutions located near our branches in Lublin and Białystok. We want to reach smaller, local communities that need support but sometimes lack sufficient strength which would help them obtain additional funding or material support. As a company, we are naturally glad to be able to assist them since

we realise this assistance is very important to them. However, we do not feel the need for a widespread campaign to promote what we do. We want to be close to people and this is what we do when it comes to community activity, by making product donations. It is our way of thanking them for the trust they have put in us for 70 years. And how are Herbapol products doing in foreign markets? What is their potential in individual product categories? Herbal teas, fruit syrups and jam products are increasingly popular among consumers abroad. The high quality of our products, their natural ingredients and lack of unnecessary additives certainly distinguish the Herbapol and Big-Active brands internationally. Growing consumer awareness about healthy lifestyles and nutrition also undoubtedly helps to strengthen our market position. In what directions will Herbapol-Lublin’s exports develop? This year, we are going to start selling our products in two new important markets, namely South Africa and Italy. At the same time, we will continue to develop our position and strengthen our presence in Germany, North America and Canada, where we have been for several years now. We are working to consolidate our position abroad just like we are in the Polish market. What do consumers abroad expect from Herbapol products? First and foremost, what matters is the high quality of our products, their natural ingredients and local character, resulting from longterm cooperation with domestic suppliers. Another distinguishing feature of Herbapol and Big-Active products is the unique combination of ingredients and flavours, as in the case of the Tea Garden series or Big-Active teas. Affordable pricing and packaging equal to that of western products are also important. The fact that we did not become interested in products with natural ingredients when it became fashionable certainly creates additional value for consumers. Nature is Herbapol’s DNA, and combined with our knowledge and experience, it makes our products truly the best choice. Thank you.

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INTERVIEW

We are open to cooperation An interview with Zenon Daniłowski, the President of the Board of Makarony Polskie S.A.

How do the exports of Polish pasta products look like? Poland is a medium-sized pasta producer; our country manufactures approx. 150,000 tons annually. For comparison, Turkey or Egypt produce over one million tons, and Italy – several million tons of pasta per year. In our country, the level of exports is similar to imports. We mainly export pasta containing or entirely made of Polish raw materials, i.e. pasta flour and eggs. The high quality and availability of raw materials is extremely important for competitiveness on the market.

What does the export offer of Makarony Polskie S.A. include? The export offer of Makarony Polskie is dominated by pasta made of imported semolina mixture and soft flour derived from Polish wheat varieties. A major advantage of Polish producers is the availability of high-quality liquid eggs, which makes egg pasta manufactured in Poland better than anywhere else. This is appreciated by foreign consumers as well, which is why our products enjoy much interest in many countries.

companies often lack appropriate funds to conduct brand-building strategies on markets of the neighbouring countries, which is why most of our products in and outside the EU appear under the importers’ private labels. Currently, we cooperate with 23 contractors in and outside the European Union. They are our regular customers and it is to them we send most of our products. We expect to have more of them.

How important for the company is the private label segment? Currently, production under private label brands is an important segment in Poland, but in many other countries as well. The share of private label products in some categories exceeds 50%. This is well exemplified by discount chains whose private labels are often market leaders in certain categories. This phenomenon is applicable to pasta, jams and household chemicals alike. Our company produces private labels for many chains at home. We have a record of good contracts, allowing us to achieve high turnover with an attractive margin.

Do you search for private label customers abroad?

What do foreign consumers make of your products?

We are highly interested in finding private label contractors outside Poland. This is why we participate in the PLMA trade fair in Amsterdam, as well as SIAL in Shanghai. During the fairs, we promote such products as egg pasta, rolled pasta and ready meals on trays, to be reheated in traditional or microwave ovens. I think we have an opportunity to become a supplier of such products under trade chain brands. We have a very well-developed research centre; combined with our great production potential, high quality and flexibility, we are able to meet the expectations of distributors and consumers in the category of pasta and ready meals. We can quickly adapt to our contractor’s requirements; In short, we are open to cooperation.

The products by Makarony Polskie have a good opinion among consumers. The customers particularly appreciate the high quality and competitive prices. Polish small and medium

Please sum up the hitherto operations of Makarony Polskie on export markets.

What are the export directions of pasta products? Our company successfully exports pasta to different countries but the most important recipients are our neighbours. Pasta is a bulky product, so it is pointless from the economic viewpoint to transport it over large distances. Our main outlet is Ukraine. Currently, we are searching for customers willing to buy more expensive assortments in the Middle East and in China.

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In the first quarter of the year, exports accounted for approx. 8% of our entire sales. We mainly implemented sales to markets in the neighbouring countries. Export activities at our company are continuously developing. Spaghetti, Bucatini, and Linguine are the most popular pasta types. These are our export gems, apart from their good opinion among the consumers, they are easy to handle logistically, allowing us to send them to as far as Asia. As for other products, there is interest in the traditional “matchsticks for broth”. We sell this pasta in large quantities through one trade chain in England.

What will be next year’s export hit? We expect our ready meals to become future export hits. We offer an entire line of Polish cuisine dishes; moreover, we have fit dishes as well as those from different cuisines of the world. As we adapt to the customers’ needs, more taste lines may be created. It is our participation in trade fairs abroad that allows us to present our production capabilities to the entire world, as well as to establish contacts with future customers.

What future goals have you set for yourselves? We set our goals in two directions. The first one is a wider introduction to foreign markets of rolled technology egg pasta, of the nest, tagliatelle and pappardelle types. Our company makes very high-quality pasta. It is among the best on the market and it enjoys much interest. Moreover, we wish to increase the exports of health-improving pasta based on flour made of legumes, such as chickpeas, lentils, soy, green peas, and based on rare seeds, such as buckwheat, rye, millet, maize and rice, as well as mixtures thereof. It is worth stressing they are very innovative pasta products. Another goal for the next year is to introduce our ready meals to Western European trade chains. In this segment, we offer a wide range of dinner dishes on trays, as well as an entire line of canned ready meals, i.e. full dinner meals and soups. This is our offer for the next fairs and we wish to enter foreign markets with it this and next year. Thank you



INTERVIEW

Fitting worldwide trends Interview with Małgorzata Cebelińska, Director of Trade Department at SM MLEKPOL in Grajewo. Our motto is development, which means constant investments. Mlekpol can boast an export success. This year, we are marketing many new products. We are also completing our most important investment in the recent years – the construction of Poland’s largest Powdered Dairy Goods Production Plant in Mrągowo. This will be the most modern milk powder plant in Poland, with a planned capacity of 3 million liters of milk and whey per day. Therefore, the production capacities and the product offer of Mlekpol in this segment will soon rise significantly. We are happy we will be able to offer completely new products to our Partners, namely, high-purity milk and whey proteins, instant products as well as infant formulas.

The products of SM Mlekpol are well known to Polish consumers. Are they recognized abroad as well? Which brands are the most popular on individual markets? Mlekpol has created the most recognizable dairy product brands in Poland. Our flagship brand is Łaciate, but our portfolio also includes the famous Maślanka Mrągowska, Milko, Rolmlecz, Mazurski Smak, Mleko Zambrowskie, Białe, and Milatte. To foreign consumers, Mlekpol also offers brands specially dedicated to their markets. These include the Happy Barn and Milcasa brands, already well known to foreign consumers. On foreign markets, as in Poland, the Łaciate brand (milk, creams and butter) still remains the most popular. This is an extremely well-liked brand, and its nice, simple and homely character arouses very positive emotions among the consumers. The cornerstones of this brand include true values and many decades of history. Łaciate has become synonymous with top-quality Polish milk coming from the cleanest regions of Poland, i.e. Podlasie and Masuria. It can be purchased in more than 100 countries on most continents of the world. The previous year saw large investments at SM Mlekpol. What are the effects of the undertaken actions? Does it involve export activities as well?

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How large is SM Mlekpol's offer to its foreign partners? Mlekpol’s offer includes more than 400 products. For instance, in 2018 Mlekpol shipped a record-breaking quantity of UHT milk – approx. 1000 containers – to China alone. This was a full assortment of milk in one-liter and 500 ml packages, with fat content ranging from 0% to 3.8%, as well as flavoured milk in 200 ml packages. Considering the entirety of our export, we can say the products enjoying the most interest from foreign contractors include Łaciate milk and creams as well as milk powders and whey products. Our chief external market comprises the European Union countries where we send a wide range of products, including the short-term ones. The Cooperative’s products now have recipients in South America, Asia and the Far East as well. Our brands, such as Łaciate, can be found in such countries as China, the USA, Libya, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Indonesia, or the Philippines. An increasing number of products with a long shelf life, as well as frozen products such as butter or mozzarella cheese reach these markets. What are the trends on foreign dairy markets and how does your offer fit in with them? Functional foods are gaining interest on foreign markets. On this account, Mlekpol relies on surveys by the Institute for Dairy Industry Innovation, the only such facility in Poland to study the preferences and needs of dairy consumers worldwide. The effects of this cooperation are Mlekpol products with a composition suitable for each market, made of top-quality Polish milk. A good example is the Milko Acti Vege yogurt. The combination of top-class natural yogurt with vegetables and fiber turned out to be last season’s hit, not only in Poland. Product safety, reproducibility and high quality are very significant on foreign markets. Foreign customers pay much attention to the composition of products, packaging and milk origin. Mlekpol fits these worldwide trends perfectly. Thank you.


MLEKPOL Dairy Cooperative in Grajewo is the largest milk and dairy producer in Poland and one of the twenty largest milk processors in Europe. ICELAND

The mission of MLEKPOL is production and sale of high quality natural dairy products that meet the expectations of consumers.

NORWAY FINLAND SWEDEN NORTH SEA

DE NM AR

K

LATVIA

BELARUS UNITED KINGDOM

BELGIUM

GERMANY

POLAND UKRAINE

CZECH REPUBLIC SLOVAKIA

AUSTRIA FRANCE

SWITZERLAND

VA DO OL M

HUNGARY

ROMANIA

IA

EN SLOV

ITALY

CROATIA BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

SERBIA

SPAIN

ALBANIA

BULGARIA

PORTUGAL

The cooperative owns many highly-valued brands such as: Łaciate, Milko, Mazurski Smak, Maślanka Mrągowska, Rolmlecz, Mleko Zambrowskie, Mlekpol, Białe, Milatte and Mleczarnia. All the products are manufactured in 12 modern and highly specialized production plants in Poland.

LITHUANIA

IRELAND NE TH ER LA ND S

All MLEKPOL products are made of milk coming from farms from Podlasie, Warmia and Mazury - the cleanest regions of Poland. For their products MLEKPOL uses only milk from cows fed with GMO-free feed.

RUSSIA

ESTONIA

BALTIC SEA

A DONI MACE

GREECE

The most recognized MLEKPOL brand is Łaciate, which in Poland became a synonym of the word ‘milk’. Łaciate milk reaches customers worldwide. Łaciate products cover milk, cream, sour cream, butter and cream cheese. Consumers also appreciate other MLEKPOL products such as dutch and maasdam type cheese, mozzarella, butter and fermented products. The entire offer of MLEKPOL consists of over 400 products that are delivered to modern store chains, traditional shops, B2B channels and HoReCa. 30% of all Cooperative's production is being exported outside EU. Products of MLEKPOL are also known in China, the United States, Israel, Algeria, Indonesia and the Philippines. In 2019 MLEKPOL will complete the construction of the largest powder plant in Poland and one of the largest in Europe - the Production Plant of Powdered Dairy Products in Mrągowo. Following this investment MLEKPOL will expand its offer of dairy powder products with whey powder permeate, wpc, mpc, fat filled milk powders and instant milk. MLEKPOL consequently develops its product lines basing on market needs. Customers and consumers appreciate the quality of products and stability of cooperation provided by MLEKPOL Dairy Cooperative in Grajewo.


STATISTICS

Export of food products in 2018

Each year, growing food exports are recorded in Poland1. The taste and high quality of Polish foodstuffs is mainly appreciated by European consumers, but it is well-known worldwide as well. According to preliminary data, 2018 saw EUR 15,047.3 million worth of Polish foodstuffs exported, the largest recipients were Germany and the UK.

Paweł Witkowski, Senior Specialist at the Department of Trade and Services Statistics Poland

According to the data, Polish food exports in 2018 were 8.3% higher compared with the previous year, and their growth exceeded the total growth in commodity exports by 1.3 pp in total. There was an increase in the preserves of vegetables, fruit, nuts or other parts of plants category – by 11.7%, with the main recipients of such goods being Germany (EUR 377.9 million, i.e. a 15.3% increase compared with the previous year), the Netherlands (EUR 115.7

million, i.e. an increase by 5.1%), and Russia (EUR 111.5 million, i.e. a drop by 2.5%). The largest buyer of beverages, spirits and vinegar, with a 10.3% increase in sales, was France (EUR 116.3 million, i.e. an increase by 13.7%);

United Kingdom was the leader in the purchase of Polish meat, fish or crustaceans, mollusks or other aquatic invertebrate preparations in 2018 The leader in the purchase of Polish meat, fish or crustaceans, mollusks or other aquatic invertebrate preparations, with exports grow-

Products comprising Section IV of the Combined Nomenclature (CN), i.e. prepared foodstuffs; beverages, spirits and vinegar; tobacco and manufactured tobacco substitutes, were classified as food products.

1

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ing by 8.6%, was the UK (EUR 476.6 million, i.e. growth by 7.9%). An increase in sales was also recorded for goods from the categories cocoa and cocoa preparations (6.8%) as well as preparations from cereals, flour, starch or milk; pastrycooks’ products (2.4%). The largest importer of goods from these categories was Germany whose purchases reached a value of EUR 303.6 million and EUR 483.9 million, respectively. Exports of sugar and sugar confectionery products were lower than the year before – by 10.1%. The largest non-European recipients of Polish food products included the USA (EUR 265.6 million), Israel (EUR 105.8 million), and Saudi Arabia (EUR 96.7 million).

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STATISTICS

Among the commodity items of most importance in food exports compared with the previous year, a high increase was recorded, among others, in sales of fruit juices (15.1%), waters, including mineral waters and aerated waters, containing added sugar or other sweetening matter or flavours (14.3%), cigars, cheroots, cigarillos and cigarettes, of tobacco or tobacco substitutes (11.2%), prepared or preserved fish; caviar (10.6%). A drop in exports was observed, among others, for such commodity items as cane or beet sugar, and chemically pure sucrose, in solid form (by 12.3%), sugar confectionery (including white chocolate), not containing cocoa (by 7.5%).

Fig. 1. The largest foodstuff importers from Poland in 2018 Country

Value (m. EUR)

2017=100

Structure %

1

Germany

3 262.6

108.8

21.7

2

United Kingdom

1 653.7

104.9

11.0

3

Netherlands

1 065.9

125.3

7.1

4

France

747.3

106.9

5.0

5

Czech Republic

729.6

98.5

4.8

6

Italy

729.2

104.5

4.8

7

Hungary

490.2

111.9

3.3

8

Romania

447.7

119.9

3.0

9

Russia

430.0

111.6

2.9

10

Belgium

419.5

105.6

2.8

Source: Statistics Poland

702.3

923.5

2018

781.2

1 000

837.6

1 258.3

1 039.6

1 365.9

1 519.1

1 222.5

1 500

1 422.1

1 695.4

1 561.7

1 842.6

2 000

1 717.5

2 500

2 372.2

3 000

2017 2 137.6

3 500

2 989.5

4 000

3 368.1

Fig. 2. Export of goods by category of Section IV of the CN Combined Nomenclature (in EUR millions)

500 0 TOBACCO AND MANUFACTURED TOBACCO SUBSTITUTES

PREPARATIONS OF CEREALS, FLOUR, STARCH OR MILK; PASTRYCOOKS’ PRODUCTS

MISCELLANEOUS EDIBLE PREPARATIONS

PREPARATIONS OF MEAT, FISHES OR CRUSTACEANS, MOLLUSKS OR OTHER AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES

COCOA AND COCOA PREPARATIONS

PREPARATIONS OF VEGETABLES, FRUIT, NUTS OR OTHER PARTS OF PLANTS

RESIDUES AND WASTE FROM THE FOOD INDUSTRIES; PREPARED ANIMAL FODDER

BEVERAGES, SPIRITS AND VINEGAR

SUGARS AND SUGAR CONFECTIONERY

Source: Statistics Poland

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STATISTICS

Promotional brochures – an anachronism or an indispensible source of information? Trade chains all over the world invest enormous amounts of money in advertising and marketing materials in order to increase their sales and to consolidate their brand’s image on the market. Promotional brochures, sent directly to homes or offered at the checkouts free of charge, as well as available in digital form on the Internet, remain among the most popular ways to draw the attention of as many customers as possible.

Agnieszka Smarzewska FOCUS Research International

. One might dare to say that brochures are a kind of calling card for stores. Each trade chain develops its own style, comprised by graphic elements, format and page number. The research company, FOCUS Research International, involved in monitoring prices and offers in promotional brochures, has drawn up a report presenting the quantity of collected and analyzed brochures in selected European countries. The analysis considered 27 states, and the period under research included the

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first three quarters, i.e. the months from January through September, of 2017 and 2018. The survey shows that the company collected more than 100,000 promotional brochures in the period under consideration. The most, comprising more than 80% of all monitored titles, included food offers. The number of grocery brochures largely exceeded the number of publications from other market segments in each country under analysis. Over the first three quarters of 2018, the most brochures released by drugstores were collected in Montenegro and the Netherlands, brochures by electronic store chains – in Switzerland and Slovenia, while DIY store publications – in Belgium. The report has shown that the most brochures were monitored in Poland. The brochures were released frequently and in large

numbers, and the quantity of the promotional articles published therein exceeded four million for the entire period under consideration. Most of the brochures were dedicated to grocery promotions, while electronic store brochures came second. The following places, by number of brochures, were occupied by Italy and Austria, however, each of these states recorded half as many publications annually as Poland. An average of more than one hundred brochures per week were published in these three countries in the analyzed period of 2018, but only Poland exceeded the limit of one hundred the year before. The survey also included trade chains whose publications were monitored in large numbers. The top included German corporations, such as the REWE Group, owning


STATISTICS Fig. 1. Number of leaflets (Jan-Sep 2017 vs Jan-Sep 2018) Thousands

12 10

2017

8

2018

6 4 2 0

PL

IT

AT

CZ

NL

HR

ES

RS

HU

MK

BA

CH

BE

SK

BG

PT

RO

SE

FR

SI

RU

UA

DK

GR

LT

LV

ME

LT

Avg.

Fig. 2. Average number of leaflets per week by country (Jan-Sep 2017 vs Jan-Sep 2018) 200 180 160

2017

2018

140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

PL

IT

AT

CZ

NL

HR

ES

RS

HU

MK

BA

CH

BE

SK

BG

PT

RO

SE

FR

SI

RU

UA

DK

GR

RO

RS

RU

SE

SI

Fig. 3. Shares of tradesegments by country (number of leaflets in %) Jan-Sep 2018 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Electro

AT

BA

BE

BG

CH

CZ

DK

ES

FR

GR

DIY

HR

HU

Drugstores

IT

LT

LV

ME

Food stores

MK

NL

PL

PT

SK

UA

Source: FOCUS Research International

stores in many European countries. Many brochures were also issued by the Schwarz Group which may boast such brands as Lidl and Kaufland. Other high positions were occupied by Spar Group, Coop and Metro. In Poland, accounting for the largest amount of brochures, we find such publishers as Lidl, Carrefour, Auchan or E. Leclerc. The future of promotional brochures is an interesting question. Just as the traditional paper press is prophesied to fade away, printed brochures are anticipated to soon be replaced by digital publications. Unquestionably, easy access to promotional offers on the Internet is hard to overestimate. However, the survey

by FOCUS Research International has shown that paper editions accounted for as much as 90% of all monitored brochures in the analyzed period of 2017, while their percentage for the surveyed period of the following year was only 3% lower! A vast majority were issued in the convenient A4 format. The less popular A3 format was mostly recorded in Austria and Slovenia. Why is it worth examining promotional brochures? In spite of the development of technologies and social media marketing, the enormous circulation of paper brochures shows that trade chains continue to bet on this channel of customer communication.

The strength of brochures is their simple and brief way in communicating information on prices and promotions. They show specific items from the available assortment at a given store, which makes it easier to plan one’s shopping. Since consumers often reach for trade brochures, it is worth ensuring that the advertised goods and brands be presented in an interesting and unusual way. This will make their names remembered, and more people will be able to take advantage of the offers. The clearer and more visually attractive a paper promotional brochure will be, the higher its chance to beat digital media in the struggle for the customer’s attention.

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Wan-Vit is a family company with 25 years of tradition. We are one of Poland’s largest manufacturers of “warm ice cream” dessert. Thanks to the high quality of our products, we have earned the trust of our customers. Focusing on dynamic development, we have created the 4proactive product line for you. The main ingredients of the 4proactive creams are nuts. Our offer includes peanut butter as well as hazelnut, walnut, pistachio, cashew, almond and coconut creams, with many flavours and additives. Chocofita and Coffeefita Premium are alternatives to other creams and butters with high sugar content and other additives. They are 100% natural. Pumpkin, sunflower and sesame seed syrups will be a market hit. BITES and DUO STICKS natural grain snacks with a unique taste are an interesting supplement to our creams. Our products do not contain any preservatives, palm oil, salt and sugar additives.

We offer protein snacks, creams and bars to active people. They enjoy recognition not only among athletes but among all those who appreciate a healthy lifestyle. We manufacture nut creams and high-protein creams for many reputed brands on the European market. The full range of our products is available at www.4proactive.eu Currently, 55% of our production is directed to foreign markets under other brands. They can also be found in many Polish supermarkets.

Chocofita and Coffeefita Premium enjoy the most popularity regardless of the export direction. As for the nut creams, it is a well-known fact that the most absorptive markets for peanut butter are the USA and the Netherlands. Fortunately, our society is going off the beaten track, increasingly supplementing their diet with nut- and grain-based products of our manufacture. Participation in international trade fairs is intended to serve expansion to new markets, rather than being limited to domestic and European ones. We hope this is the way to show our potential business partners that we are trustworthy and that it is worth establishing cooperation with us. We believe in the success of our products, knowing they are of top quality, which is a leading factor in comparison with our competitors. Our goal is to expand the assortment in line with the trends and expectations of our customers, as well as the development of exports under our 4proactive brand; however, we do not rule out production for other brands and the general development of our company, especially in the area of new investments.



COMMENTARY

Otherwise export The Fitch agency upholds its rating, pointing out the stability and thus encouraging investors for activity in Poland.

Andrzej Maria Faliński Expert

Here, great credit is due to the food sector and trade – both at home and in exports. We have been getting stronger for many years – food export has grown steadily from EUR 4 billion in 2003 to almost 30 billion (specifically, EUR 29.3 billion) in 2018. Imports record a “proper”, slightly lower growth rate – from EUR 3.6 billion to 19.8 billion, at an accounts balance constantly growing on the plus side. It is worth mentioning that imports, at approx. 40%, have a “component” nature in relation to products manufactured in Poland. Looking at approx. PLN 300 billion (approx. EUR 75-80 billion) worth of the retail food market, the result of foreign trade seems impressive, challenging the opinion on the internal market being “flooded” with foreign products. Yet on the other hand…. The dynamics of export is slowing down. 5.5% y/y might be an excellent result, but

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until recently, it used to exceed 10%. Other signs of slowdown are visible as well, both in Poland and worldwide, mainly in Europe, which is of vital importance to us. After the crisis of 2008-2010, the world of food processing and trade has been making provisions against the cycles. This process has created, among other things, great logistic, purchasing and sales conglomerates with turnovers higher than the state budget of Poland. I mean such systems as Horizon, featuring Metro, Cassino and Auchan, or EMD, with several dozen commercial companies from many countries. Colossal trade chains and networks come into being and the concentration process becomes vertical, drawing producers, IT, logistics – if only for private label programmes. Transaction values, volumes and assortments are swelling, becoming available in many channels

of sales and communication. This is a challenge for the traditional exports/imports model but also a great opportunity to enter a new, superefficient model based on the cooperation of participants and transferring the competition into new economic and non-economic dimensions. This gives rise to a mechanism that will withstand the upcoming slowdown, not just through reduced price levels and market diversification but through enormous amounts of money invested in the value and safety of globally provided products. A question arises whether the Polish food sector is able to stand out in the emerging reality of a global market; in other words, to transcend/supplement the business model born of simple advantages and a strong modernization push connected with the accession to the EU – to exploit the previous


COMMENTARY

success. One must not remain in a regional niche, even with the best products. This is an essential issue, given the concentration processes in economy and deconcentration ones in politics (see Brexit, the idea of Carolingian Europe, or our visions of the Intermarium). We are good at what we do, but as a dual market, reconciling fragmentation with consolidated segments, we will not achieve much without new, cooperation-oriented strategies of competition and development. Today, we hold a 1.7% share in global food exports. This is much for the CEE region, even for Europe as a whole, but it might not suffice without changes in trade models. Let us be honest – entry into Asia or the USA, on scales available to our companies, is and will be vestigial from the viewpoint of the interests of those markets. Trade balance numbers are merciless. This is a key economic problem, not to mention geopolitical effects. This is not about abandoning Europe or the region and the hitherto area of economic operation but about acquiring broader, non-peripheral prospects for development – including Europe as well. In spite of any incidents, quality reconciled with a relatively low price remains our strategic advantage and source of success. This is derived, firstly, from our rich culinary culture and wise utilization of new technologies, as well as relatively low costs of labour, service, domestic raw materials. We should not forget our exports come from a market featuring 80% of domestic food. Most of the export supply is comprised, of course, by large companies, about two thirds of which represent foreign or mixed capital, but… On the home market, medium-sized and small domestic companies maintain their position – making up about 40% of the market. Their technological level is comparably as high as their use of European funds and other forms of public support. In connection with the intense inflow of foreign capital into larger ones, a significant potential was created, the utilization of which is not necessarily effective. Regardless of competitive clashes and concentration processes – this is potential for the future, that must not be wasted. Large companies with foreign capital also participate to a certain extent in the aforementioned process of concentration of the

Looking at approx. EUR 75-80 billion) worth of the retail food market, the result of foreign trade seems impressive, challenging the opinion on the internal market being “flooded” with foreign products global food market. They enter great purchasing operations with brands of their main shareholders, and with Polish ones (liquor, confectionery, specific cured meats) as well. They also are – the mainstream of Polish presence there – private label suppliers to retail and wholesale distributors. This is a powerful “cost” leverage for Polish food exports. Only through chains active in Poland, it is getting close to PLN 10 billion, and foreign companies place orders in Poland too. This is a process that requires humility but turns out to be very profitable, placing our domestic market on ordering lists of global recipients – the larger, the better; and the greater number of countries, even better. However, a question arises on how to increase the share of other companies, of predominantly domestic capital, in this process. They are doing quite well in the region, in the UK, Germany and Italy, but there is still a very long road from there to operations on a global market. Where is this road, then? The incoming slowdown will obviously accelerate the concentration processes – in Poland too. And it will probably involve large producers acquiring a part of smaller companies, especially those with more interesting products, but… Trade will also reach for production potentials pushed by key players off the market, to earmark their products for private labels by supplying them financially or to make their specific brands into private ones. And this may be the road to a specific structure, connected by its specific nature to great volumes, the road to great markets – dependent but worth the efforts. Soon, an avalanche of good, diverse goods may come into being in the form of private labels of

commercial companies whose central offices are present in large purchasing and production/purchasing groups. Of course, our internal market is very absorptive but not enough to prevent arising surpluses; moreover, politicians’ ideas concerning private labels tend not to be very sensible, so exports may turn out to be the mechanism maintaining a position on the Polish market. Therefore, it is in the interest of business and the state to encourage and to support both domestic and foreign business in cooperation with the emerging mega-groups – the trade ones and the cooperative ones. This is the main route of access to non-European markets, since the organization of short-term business missions and anniversary-flagged events or trade fair stands surely is not one. So the question is, “what to do?” I think the precondition for every action intended to break and develop the existing model of implementation of and support to exports is to acquire knowledge of the mode of operation of cooperatively-organized mega-groups, both those with a flat and with a vertical structure. One should find them, study them, plan a strategy and undertake cooperative negotiations, and then organize to follow it at home. Therefore, the beginning should be decent analytics and consulting – mainly for the government, but not exclusively. One should have knowledge of companies and markets, as well as indicate places and partners to start the negotiations. Then, on the basis of reliable knowledge, one may proceed with reasonable, private-and-public investment in export platforms for manufacturing and commercial companies. Nothing stands in the way of support to smaller companies and encouragement of larger ones to cooperate with a large, internally diverse recipient working on many markets. Guarantees are needed too. To start with, for instance, what just screams to be used is a strategy referencing production resources for items certified as „organic” (bio, eco, natural, etc.) and sparking the interest of potential recipients on global markets. The potential to transform them, giving them appropriate features and functionalities is already there. Thus, one can try to overcome the embarrassing trade balances with China and other non-European countries.

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COMMENTARY – FRANCHISE A.D. 2019

Sometimes, even discount stores are nothing to be afraid of It is an unquestionable fact that the development of discount stores has saved the Polish FMCG trade. Without them, it would be like in Hungary and the Czech Republic.

Witold Nartowski Journalist

If organizers of the first franchise food trade chains in Poland were told twenty-five years ago that this organizational form will account for as much as 60% of all convenience retail outlets active on the Polish market at the end of the 2010s, they would surely never have believed it. The nature of the first franchise chains, established before 1995, was more similar to purchasing groups than to trade chains in the modern sense. The main goal of establishing such groups or associations was to provide the participants with better conditions of purchase from manufacturers and suppliers, rather than ensuring the competitiveness of their retail outlets through uniform store decoration, reduction of an outlet’s running costs through provision of less expensive trade-related services, or even financial support to a franchisee. Let us now give a brief explanation of what a franchise is anyway. Encyclopedias define it as

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a system of the sale of goods or services, based on close and continuous cooperation between separate and independent enterprises: a franchiser and its individual franchisees. A franchise also assumes transfer of know-how from the franchiser to the franchisee throughout the duration of a franchise agreement, as well as transfer of at least some products offered by the chain, the prices of which are to be negotiated by the franchiser. The essence of the system is also the fact that the franchiser grants its individual franchisees with a right and charges them with the responsibility to conduct business in accordance with the franchiser’s concept. Within the framework of a written agreement and in exchange for direct or indirect financial benefits, this financial power authorizes an individual franchisee to use the franchiser’s trade name, trademark or service mark, methods of conducting business, technical expertise, systems of procedure, as well as

other intellectual or industrial property rights, and to benefit from permanent commercial or technical assistance from the franchiser. This is what definitions say. However, how does it translate to the functioning of a grocery store?

DIFFICULT BEGINNINGS In the early 1990s, the first chain organizers probably did not exactly know that themselves. The first franchise chains were created, as I have mentioned above, on the basis of purchasing groups organized several years before and, frankly speaking, they did not differ much. There were a lot of smaller or larger purchasing groups at the time, and one of the best known ones, associating a considerable number of outlets, was the Lider chain which has however failed to stand the test of time. Although purchasing groups are trying to rebuild themselves currently, they are having difficulties doing so, since they


COMMENTARY – FRANCHISE A.D. 2019

prove unable to keep up with the competition on the part of franchises. Therefore, most purchasing groups of that time have not survived until this day, just like most of the fledgling franchise chains 25 years ago. The only significant franchise entity created in that period has been the Lewiatan Polish Trade Chain, established by merchant organizations in 1994. Almost from the onset, this chain had a unique organizational form. Over a dozen regional companies were created to serve as chain organizers in the given area, and they became companies owned by the Lewiatan Holding. Despite territorial differences, this allowed the chain to maintain its large scale and largely uniform shape. Of course, the structure of these companies and the scope of their operation would change over the years. Some merchants refrained from participation in the chain, others established their own franchising company, organizing the eLDe chain under the LD Holding name, which no longer exists now. Moreover, a quarter of a century is long enough for individual regional companies and a holding company to undergo various trials. Shares in some of them were overtaken by one of the largest wholesale FMCG distributors at the time – the Emperia Group. Later, when Emperia’s wholesale operations and franchise chains were acquired by Eurocash, Lewiatan became a part of the largest wholesaler on the Polish market. Both due to support from large wholesale entities and to the skills of chain organizers, Lewiatan has maintained its identity and developed successively over the years. Admittedly, its development was much slower than in the beginning of its operation, since it has approx. 3,200 stores today, while it used to have less than 3,000 as late as 15 years ago. However, it is hard to wonder, given the fact that the franchising offer is much richer today than in the first decade of the century and new chain participants are not as easy to attract as they used to be.

IN VIEW OF A FOREIGN THREAT The second half of the 1990s was a special period in the history of the entire Polish trade, and of franchise chains in particular. That was a time when the first large foreign trade operators entered the Polish market with their hypermarkets, supermarkets and discount stores. Over a couple of years, they gained almost 40% of the Polish retail FMCG sale market. Also in this case, domestic retailers, traditionalist in their majority, proved able to organize so well that they largely

Speaking of franchise on the Polish retail market, it is also worth remembering that the franchise formula has sparked the interest of great international trade companies operating in Poland maintained their competitiveness on a market where the expansivity of international entities was becoming increasingly dangerous. As the turn of the millennium saw franchise chains springing up like mushrooms, it was possible to preserve the structure of Polish trade that can be envied by the neighbouring countries. In the Czech Republic, Slovakia or Hungary, almost 80% of the market has been dominated by foreign business leaders over a short period of time. In Poland, on the other hand, it was possible to keep 60% of the market in the hands of traditional trade in the initial period of foreign expansion, while this percentage can be estimated at above 40% now. And all of that is largely due to franchise. In those breakthrough years, such chains emerged as Delikatesy Centrum with wholesale background in Krosno; PSH Nasz Sklep, organized by the Specjał wholesaler; Groszek, managed by Emperia; Rabat Detal, established by retailers alone; Sklep Polski of the Gniezno wholesaler; Chata Polska with a background in the form of the Marol wholesaler; or the abc chain, organized by Eurocash from the very beginning. Moreover, tens of smaller, regional franchise chains, such as Hitpol and Sezamek in Subcarpathia and Lesser Poland, Poziomka in the Radom region, or the Top Market Chain established by the Warsaw Supermarket Group, which has already become nationwide today. This franchise boom allowed Polish retailers to keep a really large portion of the domestic FMCG trade market in their own hands. Even if operators of these chains have been changing, even replaced by those not always perceived as Polish, this does not change the fact that domestic merchants remain their members, and therefore, these chains still remain supportive to the Polish trade, allowing it to compete successfully

against foreign competitors; currently, above all, against discount chains.

AN INCREASINGLY WIDER CHOICE As a result of the processes described above, the Polish market currently features several dozen operators of franchise chains under which much more than 40,000 FMCG stores are organized. Exact data is difficult to give, since there are a number of local chains, only associating several or several dozen stores each, which are frequently omitted from any statistics, prepared either by the Central Statistical Office of Poland (GUS) or by research centres. Obviously, the largest franchise chain operator is Eurocash, managing, both directly and through subsidiary franchise companies, chains totalling more than 15,000 stores. They form such chains as abc, Lewiatan, Groszek, Euro Sklep, as well as Delikatesy Centrum, Eurocash’s original franchise purchase many years ago. The number of stores operating under franchise companies of the second largest wholesaler in terms of the scale of operation, i.e. the Specjał Group, is already close to 8,000. Under such companies as Nasz Sklep, PSH Livio, or Rabat Detal in which Specjał acquired the controlling interest last year with Nasz Sklep, Delikatesy Premium, Delikatesy Sezam, Livio, and Rabat. Therefore, only two organizations associate more than a half of all franchise outlets. The largest chains include Eden with 1,200 stores and the Chorten Group that will soon hit 1,500 stores. Mirabelka from Masovia has less than 500 stores, while PGS, i.e. Top Market, owns almost 700. A similar number characterizes group chains (including Piotruś Pan, Poziomka, Bonus, or Dobry Sklep) and single stores associated under the Kropka chain. Delko is becoming an increasingly significant operator. This household chemical and cosmetics distributor, after the acquisitions it is currently performing (including the Słoneczko and Avita chains), will have more than 800 outlets in its portfolio. Smaller chains of regional nature include Chata Polska, the aforementioned hitpo and Sezamek, Pokus, Rosa, Witaj, Malinka, Cezar, To Tu, Topaz, Pionier, Sami Swoi. If we include Żabka, positioning itself for several years as a franchise chain rather than a partnership one, as it used to before, then probably as much as 60% of convenience stores on the Polish market operate under a franchise structure. It is worth keeping in mind that the share of franchise outlets is much greater among specialist chains, such as meats or bakery. This is

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COMMENTARY – FRANCHISE A.D. 2019

due to the fact that producers, when establishing their company store chains, seldom decide to build a proprietary chain – after all, retail trade is not their domain. Speaking of franchise on the Polish retail market, it is also worth remembering that the franchise formula has sparked the interest of great international trade companies operating in Poland. For several years, Carrefour has been building its own franchise chain. Under the Carrefour Express brand, Carrefour Market and the French company Globi has organized a chain that already includes more than 600 outlets today. The Odido chain, managed by Makro Cash&Carry, is among the largest franchise chains in Poland. Although its quantitative development has been virtually brought to a halt in recent years, this does not change the fact that approx. 2,000 stores operate under the Odido brand. Such chains as Intermarché or E. Leclerc have a franchise nature as well. The former is getting close to the number of 400 stores, while the latter, specialized, after all, in hypermarkets, has approx. 40 outlets, 16 of which are among the largest ones. Jeronimo Martins Polska, the operator of Biedronka, however reluctant it might be to admit it, also owns several dozen stores of franchise nature. Several years ago, on the other hand, development through franchise was announced by Simple Market supermarkets owned by Auchan. However, changes in the chain’s image and transformation thereof into Auchan Supermarket outlets seem to have caused such plans to be maybe not necessarily shelved but surely postponed. Currently, it is hard to say what the future will be of these plans.

CHOICE OF A RETAILER Until recently, most franchise operators aimed at so-called franchise hardening. This meant, on the one hand, a stronger bond between stores and a franchiser, i.e. an obligation to use the franchiser’s trade and marketing offer, and on the other hand, providing a retailer with more favourable trade conditions and more support from the operator, and sometimes even significantly higher payments on retro received from producers. The Delikatesy Centrum chain became a peculiar model for building a hard franchise at that time, as management and supply of the stores as well as marketing operations had been, in fact, delegated to the chain’s central office. Many retailers are satisfied with such conditions relieving them from a number of burdensome obligations, fa-

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cilitating operation of a retail outlet and ensuring a fair level of profits. Currently, the hard franchise topic has lost some significance. This might be due to the rapid development of soft-franchise chains, proving that retailers, to a large extent, wish to maintain a wide margin of independence. Such chains as the Chorten Group or Eden, or even Specjał-controlled Nasz Sklep, have proven that soft franchise is doing well and there is no point imposing one’s own vision or future on store owners, since the quantitative development of a chain may be inhibited. Currently, operators rather tend to focus on offering different franchise forms to retailers under one chain. This is, for instance, the way of Livio and Nasz Sklep companies: when joining them, a retailer may choose the franchise form they would like to implement under the chain. The franchise-hardening process is perceived slightly differently by chains unrelated to large wholesale operators, such as the Polish Supermarket Group or the Top Market chain. Here, one should rather speak of the chain-ordering process, i.e. ordering the principles of cooperation and sale. In view of the shrinking number of retail outlets on the market, it is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain the stores’ loyalty to chains. The ordering process is intended to ensure the elimination of errors and tightening of cooperation; consequently, retailer competitors have more difficulties than the chains within which they currently operate.

A RICHER OFFER Modern franchise networks are not just about common purchase, shop sign, store design, marketing undertakings and retro payments anymore. They also involve a range of operations

aimed at reducing the running costs of retail outlets as well as genuine support to chain participants. An increasing number of operators also offer less expensive store equipment acquisition, purchase of important trade-related items, such as cheap mobile phones, Internet access or insurance, as well as support in the acquisition of necessary financial resources to build, expand or renovate a store. Not to mention regular integration events which are not unimportant after all, especially as they take place at such interesting locations as Seychelles or Bermuda. Most chain operators with a large wholesale background also offer private label products to retailers, usually at prices competitive with those known from Biedronka or Lidl. Year by year, the support by chain organizers to chain participants is becoming increasingly wider. The number of retail outlets operating under franchise chains should be expected to rise markedly in the years to come, mainly due to the organic development of the chains and the growing number of outlets not entirely successful in competing against discount chains. At the same time, one should expect consolidation processes within the existing franchise chains. As mentioned above, more than a half of all stores associated under franchise chains today are organized by two operators: Eurocash and Specjał. Moreover, consolidation activities are helped by the fact that such measures take place with negligible interference by the Office of Competitor and Consumer Protection, since they do not upset the market balance, resulting only in change of shop signs by retailers who remain independent. This was the case, for instance, with the purchase of the controlling interest in the Rabat Detal by Specjał.


COMMENTARY

Polish-Italian trade exchange Italian cuisine has reigned in the ranking of Poland’s favourite foreign cuisines for many years. Italians are increasingly willing to reach for Polish specialties, too. Meats, soups and sweet pastries are the Polish cuisine specialties Italians are tempted to taste. Poles, on the other hand, still take delight in pizza, caprese salad or pasta and increasingly prepare them using original products brought from the Apennine Peninsula. The trade exchange in food products between Poland and Italy is on the rise. “In particular, Italians export pasta, olive oil, cheese as well as confectionery and cocoa-based products. The scale of food exports from Italy to Poland has doubled in the last two years, and it is still on the rise, which makes us very satisfied,” says Antonio Mafodda, the Director of the ICE Agency of Promotion and Internationalization of Italian Enterprises from the Section of Trade Promotion of the Italian Embassy to the Newseria Biznes information agency. “The Poles appreciate Italian cuisine; above all, due to the diversity of tastes being a significant part thereof. This is due to the high-quality ingredients used in Italian dishes. Therefore, it is so important that Italian dishes be made of original ingredients.” For many years, the Poles have named Italian cuisine as their second most favourite following the domestic cuisine. The same is shown by the data from companies involved in food delivery

from restaurants. Moreover, Italy has been at a high position in the ranking of Poland’s partners in foreign exchange for many years. In 2018, they held the fourth place on the list of countries from which Poland brings commodities, and the fifth position on the list of Polish product recipients. The value of exchange, despite turbulences in the Italian economy, amounts to EUR 21.5 billion, and although Italy’s share in the trade exchange of Poland dropped last year, it rose nominally in all currencies. Only exports from Poland remained at an unchanged level. “The amount of food exports from Italy to Poland is estimated at approx. EUR 1 billion,” Antonio Mafodda says. “Italy is the largest wine exporter to Poland. The exports are estimated at EUR 60 million.” Wines remain an indispensable ingredient of the Italian cuisine. Despite a common misconception, this country has been the largest producer of wine for several years. 48.5 million hl of wine were produced in Italy in 2018, in comparison with 46.4 million hl in France, the runner-up. “Italy is the largest wine exporter, not just to Poland but worldwide. The amount of exports is estimated at EUR 6 billion annually,” Antonio Mafodda says. However, food exchange has a two-way nature.

The Polish cuisine, traditionally heavier by nature, is cutting down on fat, just as the Italian one, rich in carbohydrates, and manufacturers pay increasing attention to the health-improving advantages of their products. The Italians particularly appreciate Polish meat. „The Italians love a good eat. We are also open to new tastes. Therefore, the question whether the Polish cuisine is likely to conquer Italian hearts can be answered simply: yes, it is! Speaking of individual products, many Italians visiting Poland praise duck, venison, as well as delicious Polish confectioneries, such as apple pie. Moreover, Polish cuisine can also offer very good soups, such as the porcini soup,” Antonio Mafodda enumerates. In total, Italy imported EUR 1.6 billion worth of agri-food goods from Poland in 2018, including live animals and raw materials. This is more than 5% of last year’s entire exports from Poland in this area. The inhabitants of the Italian Peninsula are also willing to reach for Polish processed products. According to the Central Statistical Office of Poland (GUS), food preparations accounted for approx. EUR 698 million in exports and just EUR 424.6 million in imports in 2017 (no data for 2018 are available yet). Source: Newseria.pl

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PRESENTATION

30 Years on the market!

The Ewa-Bis company was founded at the end of the 80s, at the time of beginning of political changes in Poland . The company started with the trade of food products both Polish and "foreign". In 2010, it began exporting of fruit and vegetables to world markets. The business of exporting fruit and vegetables is very fragmented, Ewa-Bis is one of the 20 largest exporters in Poland, we have about 1.5 percent of shares in this market. We work with many clients and our goal is to meet their needs. We work with about 60 producer groups and about 100 individual farmers. Ewa-Bis exports fruits and vegetables to about 40 countries, to almost whole of Europe, North African countries, also works in territory of the former Soviet republics (Belarus, Ukraine, Kazakhstan), in parts of Asia and Canada. The development process of the company is a natural thing. We have been building the group since 1987. We currently operate in 5 countries, work in Poland, Russia, Germany, Ukraine and Canada. We are thinking about more countries. The whole group employs over 200 people and generates 200 million PLN of annual turnover. Ewa-Bis is a lead-

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ing company in the group, it employs more than 30 people, in 2017 earned nearly 100 million PLN of sales revenues. However, we do not want to be just a supplier of fruit and vegetables, therefore, we are developing the second business branch, i.e. selling frozen, concentrates and processed fruit and vegetables. Ultimately, we want the offer to be equivalent. Poland is a huge basin in terms of processing, able to precisely the large capacity. There is a logical explanation for the development of our company to sell processed products in parallel with fresh products. We are developing at a rate of over 20 percent annually. We have a chance to develop at this pace in the coming years, provided that we can develop a good base of suppliers. Within three years we would like to develop a business model that will bring us 50 percent of the revenue from the export of fresh and processed products.

In addition, for the 30th anniversary of the company, we want to create an innovative drink under the name „FRUKTOMANIA”. We are currently implementing it on the Polish market and international markets. It is an innovative combination of juice with large pieces of fruit. Fruit snack drink: 2-in-1 or „PIJESZ i JESZ” ("EAT AND DRINK"). At the moment we are also developing the FMCG department, beer and innovative freeze-dried fruit powders. We participate in most international fairs from North America to Japan. We also receive many awards. Recently we received the award for the "Best Exporter" and "Gazelles of Business". We can also be proud of the Fruktomania award – „Food fair hit WARSAW FOOD EXPO 2018”. We do not stop even for a moment. Adriana Rudnicka, General Director Marek Marzec, Owner





INTERVIEW

Constant development is our mission

Interview with Agata Karoń, Export Manager, Virtu Production.

Virtu can say proudly very wide portfolio, which is available in whole Poland. Which of them are hits of export sale? Yes, we have a large variety of ready meals in our offer. Export hits depend strongly on the destination country. For example in the UK or in Germany, our bestsellers are the Dumplings with cottage cheese and potatoes, in Hungary – the pancakes, in Lithuania – the spring-rolls… Due to such wide assortment we are able to meet expectations of our business partners in many countries. VIRTU brand is strong and well known but we also deliver a lot of products under Private Labels of our clients.

In which country You develop Your activity, and which of them are the most important for You? We have been developing export sales for about 10 years, starting from the countries with large groups of residents of Polish-origin (the UK, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands). Within last few years we launched our products into the new foreign markets like the Baltic countries, Scandinavia, Hungary, Romania. At the same time we work on developing new product lines for British and German markets, which are very important to us. VIRTU brand is now representing international ready-meals, not only Polish cuisine.

Do You plan to branch out Your export directions or to introduce new products on international markets in the nearest time?

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Yes! Constant development is an integral part of the VIRTU’s mission. Within last 2 years we have developed new international product lines, also under new brands. In 2018 VIRTU opened second production plant, specializing in stone-baked Italian pizza PAPA LUIGI. In Poland the PAPA LUIGI product line was awarded the gold medal in the consumer survey, carried out by the institute GfK Polonia: "BEST PRODUCT – CHOICE OF CONSUMERS 2019" in the category READY DISHES. The aim of the study was to select, based on consumer feedback, the best new FMCG products launched on the market from September 1, 2017 to September 1, 2018. Pizza PAPA LUIGI's share in export sales is growing rapidly what proves that it has already gained fans in many countries. In 2019 we are introducing to the market our new brand FOOD HOUSE, which will cover our convenient ready meals, vegan dishes, high-protein meals. Those products were designed to meet current market trends: quick and easy preparation, short ingredients list, great taste, portion for 1 person. The variety of products guarantees that customers will not get bored. At the same time we are improving the quality of our core products, thanks to the investments made in the modern production lines. Our both factories are certified IFS and BRC. With the new offer we want to reach for new markets and strengthen our position as a leader in ready-meals category. VIRTU’s R&D Team is working closely with our business partners to prepare recipes suitable for foreign markets.

How important is participation in international fairs for Virtu? Which of them are the most important for You? It’s very important to take part in international fairs and exhibitions. We take part in all the important events for food manufacturers to find new business partners, extend our sales potential or simply looking for inspirations for further growth.

What foreign consumers value the most in Polish products? Foreign consumers value high quality of food from Poland, natural ingredients, good taste. In many countries typical Polish dishes are well known and they are present on the foreign markets not only in polish shops but also on the shelves of big supermarket chains. The best examples are polish Pierogi (Dumplings) or Zapiekanka (Pizza-baguettes) – by VIRTU of course!

Thank you.



INTERVIEW

Satisfied client is our priority Interview with Wojciech Ryttel – Marketing Director at MAXPOL (fair services & organization).

or in the United States. On the other hand, there are also companies that are afraid of travelling outside Europe and incur huge expenses on fairs in Europe. I must admit, however, that the interest in the food industry among Polish exporters is growing and it is becoming increasingly visible. For example, now we have finished recruitment for Anuga and it has turned out that out of 28 companies that will go with us as many as 6 are completely new to our company, and 5 out of them are going to the fair for the first time.

Why should Polish exhibitors benefit from Maxpol's services? What makes you stand out from the competition?

How was the beginning of this year for Maxpol? Have new services appeared in the company's offer? The beginning of this year looked very promising. We started the year with the large ISM fair in Cologne - the largest sweets fair in the world. We hosted over 25 companies and sold over 600 m2 of space. Companies praise this event to a great extent. We see that the fair is bigger every year and the number of exhibitors is growing. When it comes to exhibition stand designs, many companies are giving up octanorms, that is, standard exhibition stand designs. Nowadays, individual wooden, laminated, and more luxurious exhibition stand designs are becoming more popular. We are following this trend.

Which fairs currently play the biggest role in the international market? Which of them are crucial for your company? There are several such trade fairs. ANUGA is the largest one in the world, and this year it will be held in Cologne in October. One cannot forget about next year's SIAL in Paris. Many important fairs take place in Europe, e.g., PLMA in Amsterdam, the private brand fair. We also have a large Yummex sweets trade fair in Dubai or SIAL in China and Canada. However, for us all

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fairs are very important, none are less or more important. We believe that every customer, every trade fair plays a big and important role. This is what has caused our customers to co-operate with us for many years, and new customers come because they see, having been recommended by others, that it is worth being with us and win new markets.

Is the interest in food fairs rising among Polish exporters? In Europe we can see that we are a large and serious exhibitor, in Asia in turn, we are getting more and more convinced about it, which pleases us. More and more companies are choosing those directions, not only China, but also THAIFEX in Thailand or Taiwan, India and South Korea. We can also be seen in the Middle East and we are slowly beginning to be visible in Africa, which is very important for us.

Which fairs are particularly popular amongst Maxpol’s customers? It always depends on the customer, on the product, which markets they want to enter. We have customers who do not go around Europe at all because they think that it has already become a ’commonplace’ and they know everything about it. They are trying to appear in Asia or in Africa

First of all, we stand out with our experience we've been on the market for 29 years now. We have a young, integrated team of employees who have gained experience in the industry. I think that we are also competing with the price and the ability to provide the client with what our competitors are not yet able to offer. We are capable of not only fully taking care of the customer, so that an exhibition stand is ready on time, but we may also suggest, for example, a trip abroad to take part in a fair for the first time in order to enter new markets. We often recommend, especially to our new customers to participate in the trade fair on their own - without a stand, instead of encouraging them to make a "mindless" investment in the exhibition stand, which is always the case with our competitors. We always assume that if someone participates in the fair for the first time, it is better to go without a stand and watch the whole event. Thus, we guarantee the flight, accommodation, as well as an admission card and a fair directory, including our assistance at a given trade fair event. Our stands are elegant, clean and erected in a timely manner. They meet all the expectations to the extent of displaying the exhibitor's products effectively at the stand. Solutions that our company offer to exhibitors raise growing interest. An integrated brigade of responsible fitters complete the job on time. MAXPOL's motto is that the customer satisfaction is the most important thing for us. And we stick to it. Thank you.


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RELAX AT A FARMER’S HOME! Polish villages are places with a spirit and an unforgettable atmosphere. Old Polish tastes, bread baked using traditional recipes – all of this combined with landscapes that captivate with their natural simplicity. They are a perfect retreat from the turmoil of cities and everyday duties. Polish villages are very diverse – many of them cultivate regional traditions and cultural heritage. Foreign visitors are increasingly interested in the Polish rural tourism offer, becoming more and more complex every year. COUNTRYSIDE TOURISM IS STILL GROWING “Tourists increasingly decide to spend holidays in the country, as they long for interaction with nature and look for genuine experiences. By spending your vacation at a farmer’s home, you can learn how to bake bread, taste the traditional Polish cuisine and spend time

in an active way. Since the previous year, the Polish Tourism Organization has been organizing the ‘No Better Place Than the Country – 12 good practices in rural tourism’ competition, one of the categories is relax at a farmer’s home,” says Robert Andrzejczyk, the President of the Polish Tourism Organization.

THE WINNERS OF THE FIRST EDITION INCLUDED: • “ZIOŁOWY DZBANEK” (JUG OF HERBS) AGRITOURISM FARM, • “OLA” AGRITOURISM FARM, • “POD SREBRNĄ GÓRĄ” (UNDER THE SILVER MOUNTAIN). ALL THESE FACILITIES ARE SURROUNDED BY FARM BUILDINGS, FIELDS, MEADOWS AND FORESTS. THE OWNERS GROW VEGETABLE GARDENS AND OFFER HOMEMADE MEALS BASED ON LOCAL PRODUCTS; THERE ARE ANIMALS TOO AT THE FARM.

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“JUG OF HERBS” AGRITOURISM FARM

“OLA” AGRITOURISM FARM

“UNDER THE SILVER MOUNTAIN”

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1ST PLACE

SĄPY

“JUG OF HERBS” AGRITOURISM FARM The “Jug of Herbs” farm is located in Sąpy – the “Babia Dolina” theme village in the Warmian-Masurian Province. Thanks to the locals, a regional education centre with a reconstructed rural farmstead has been established here. The main theme of the village are the ubiquitous wooden figurines of country women. The inhabitants owe their handicraft skills to the workshops ran by the host, Ewa Nisiewicz.

FARM’S WORKSHOPS “Guests can participate in workshops dedicated to herbalism, pottery, doll twining or butter churning. In total, we have 12 kinds of workshops,” Ewa Nisiewicz says. Here, you will learn how to make motanki twined dolls. Slavic women of old would sit down with children by the table or on a clearing and twine the dolls together. When twining the dolls, women used their hands, fabrics and yarn, with no scissors or needles involved. The same rules apply at the doll-twining workshops at the “Jug of Herbs”. Staying at the farm of Mr. and Mrs. Nisiewicz, you will see how difficult and demanding farm work is. The farmstead features Balbina the cow – a milk-cow simulator on which children learn how to get milk from a cow. You will discover rural equipment needed for milk processing and learn to churn sour cream into butter with your own hands. Few children today know how potatoes are planted. This is why the “History of Potato” cycle of educational classes has been created; during these classes, children can plant potatoes, then weed the patch, dig the potatoes up and take them home. At the Potter’s Shed, adults and children alike will conjure little wonders on a potter’s wheel and then fire them in a kiln. This place is full of ringing clay cups, jugs and pots. The Herbalist’s Cottage is lively as well. Bunches of herbs from nearby fields spread their fragrance from the windows. Having passed the threshold, you will learn the secrets of herbalism, discover what a herbal horoscope is about and taste some flat bread with herbs. A real tile stove is still in working order. Time has stood still here… Nice hosts will receive you the old Polish way: you will taste real bread from a bread oven, good smoked meats, herbal delicacies. Not only do edible flowers with tomato and mozzarella look fantastic but they taste so as well. The fragrance of fresh herbs and a meadow keep the guests company. The nearby Herbal Garden is a place where about 30 colourful herbs grow, including savory, black caraway, marshmallow, thyme, lovage, angelica, marigold or black hollyhock. This is a perfect place to learn how to recognize herbs and what they are used for. The hosts do not rest on their laurels. Next year, they intend to expand the herbal garden and improve its arrangement.

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Photos: Polish Tourism Organisation

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2

ND

PLACE

SŁAJSZEWO

“OLA” AGRITOURISM FARM The “Ola” Agritourism Farm, ran by the Zacharewicz family, has a captivating rural atmosphere. The farm has been active since 1993 in Słajszewo, Pomeranian Province. The place is charming with its country mood. It is usually visited by families with children. The little ones participate in everyday farm work, such as collecting eggs, feeding chicken and rabbits, milking cows or giving milk to calves. Some are interested in field work, riding on a tractor, or watching the ploughing or winter crop sowing.

TASTE THE POLISH COUNTRY The hosts provide perfect conditions to relax. The farm is surrounded by flowers, a pond and a leisure corner are available in the garden. Swings, a trampoline, a sandbox, as well as a volleyball, football and basketball field await the guests. You can also spend good time by the fire (with an optional roasted piglet) or have a barbecue under roofed sheds. A comfortable bed, a home-like atmosphere, a bright, starry night – relaxing at the farm of Mr. and Mrs. Zacharewicz will let you taste the Polish country. This is a place for people who love contact with nature and who value peace. It is located not far from the sea and from the Mierzeja Sarbska (Sarbsko Spit) natural reserve (featuring moving dunes up to 24 m high). The farm may also serve as a good base for those who love sunbathing and seashore walks. Here, you will taste healthy farm delicacies: fresh cow milk, cottage cheese, homemade butter, vegetables straight from the garden and tasty fruit from a backyard orchard, jams, compotes as well as other homemade preserves.

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In the kitchen, Katarzyna Zacharewicz relies on her own products (cured meats, meat, dairy, vegetables and fruit). She serves the traditional Polish cuisine dishes along with her own baked goods. The Pomeranian-style duck prepared by the host will open you to new tastes. Blueberry liqueur will sweeten up your senses. Minced lard or cod pâté will stay in your memory for a long time. These are genuine culinary hits, winning prestigious awards in competitions. The dishes by Katarzyna Zacharewicz are entered in the list of traditional products. The host organizes displays of bread-baking in a traditional bread oven, which is quite a tourist attraction. Elementary schools or even scouting groups arrive to see it. During the baking, children learn the cereal crops of which flour is made and discover old secrets of baking.


Photos: Polish Tourism Organisation

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3RD PLACE

“UNDER THE SILVER MOUNTAIN” The “Under the Silver Mountain” eco-tourist farm combines Polish hospitality with a European standard and an ecological approach. This is the effect of the hard work and perseverance of the hosts – Agata and Zbigniew Wolak.

JEŻÓW SUDECKI

COMFORT, AESTHETICS, TASTE Comfort, aesthetics, taste – these are the hallmarks of this place. The cuisine of Mrs. Wolak delights with its dishes. The taste of ecologically-grown lettuce and tomatoes or oven-baked leavened bread are unforgettable. The fragrance of cinnamon spreads throughout the house. At the same time, the hosts prove that Polish cuisine is not only tasty but healthy. At the dining hall on the ground floor, breakfast is served in the morning and dinner in the afternoon – all of it fresh, largely based on ecological products from the hosts’ own farm. Traditional leavened bread, rolls, challahs and cookies are baked in a bread oven

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built with Mr. Zbyszek’s own hands. There is also a smokehouse where homemade cured meats are made. Most vegetables come from the backyard garden. Moreover, all guests praise the perfect cottage cheese, prepared from milk straight from their cows. “We would like all of our guests to know the difference and to know how genuine rural food tastes like,” the hosts agree. “Besides, I like playing with tastes,” Agata Wolak adds. Those who prefer walking, cycling or car trips to lazing on a garden lounger have all of the region’s attractions at their disposal. The place is not far from Góra Szybowcowa (Glider Hill; 561

m tall) – connected with the interesting history of German and Polish air sports. This has remained an active training centre for paraglider and glider pilots, but, above all, it is a fabulous scenic point, the destination for the locals’ Sunday trips. The panorama is so fascinating one can spend several hours here. However, if you would like to get some extra entertainment, you can visit the “U Czarownic” [The Witches’ Bar]. It is also worth seeing the Pilchowice dam (the second largest one after Solina). This is the tallest stone and arch dam in Poland (height: 69 m, crown length: 270 m).


Photos: Polish Tourism Organisation

WWW.POLAND.TRAVEL – COMPREHENSIVE TOURIST TRAVEL GUIDE THROUGH BEAUTIFUL PLACES IN POLAND

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Ingredients:  Hortex Mexican Mix – 1 package  400 g chicken fillet  4 wheat tortillas  150 g mushrooms  100 g Cheddar cheese

CHICKEN QUESADILLAS

 1 onion  5 tablespoons oil  8 tablespoons hot tomato sauce  salt, pepper  baking paper

Slice the chicken fillet and onion into strips and fry in hot oil; while stirring, add sliced mushrooms and the Mexican mix. Season with salt and pepper. Place the ready, fried mass in the middle of a tortilla, sprinkle the top with grated cheese and pour hot tomato sauce. Roll into a crescent, apply water to the ends of dough and press. Spread baking paper on a baking tray and place the quesadillas on it. Bake for 10-15 minutes in an oven heated to 180°C. Recipe by: Hortex

LEDZIE W ŚMIETANIE

niki:

ml Śmietany mogenizowanej snystaw 18% ml octu 10% (½ szklanki) ety śledziowe żek cukru uże cebule żki majonezu arenek ziela angielskiego liście laurowe

Ingredients: • 200 ml Krasnystaw 18% homogenized cream • 125 ml 10% vinegar (½ glass) • 4 herring fillets • 8 tablespoons sugar

gotowanie:

oczę w wodzie lub ez min. godzinę. 3 u i 2 łyżki octu łączę Cebulę kroję w talarki i am w garnku. Dodaję liść ziele angielskie, zalewam sypuję resztę cukru. garnek na kuchenkę i dzam do wrzenia; gotuję min. Wyłączam kuchenkę, sztę octu. Po 2-3 min. m i wystawiam cebulę do ia. W misce łączę majonez m cukrowo-octowym, tudzoną cebulę, i mieszam. Śledzie można ć na dwa sposoby: do cebuli ze śmietaną dodać okrojonego na kawałki 3-4 cm i wymieszać; lub zeniu jej w lodówce, cebulę ze śmietaną na ożonego na talerzu.

• 2 large onions • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise • 5 grains allspice • 2-3 bay leaves

Żurek w chlebie

Z włoszczyzny i kości ugotować wywar, wyjąć warzywa pokroić marchewkę w kostkę i wrzucić z powrotem do garnka. Dodać zakwas, pokrojony w kostkę boczek, pokrojoną w

porcja dla: 4 osób

HERRING IN CREAM Ingredients: • 1 small bunch of soup greens, • 0.5 kg smoked pork loin bones, • 0.5 l rye sourdough for the żur soup, • 100 g bacon, • 4 white sausages, • 1.5 l water,

Soak the herrings in water or cream for at least an hour.plastry Mixkiełbasę, 3 tablespoons of sugar and namoczone i pokrojone roztarty czosnek, przyprawy, grzyby wcześniej • 1 mały pęczek włoszczyzny, i zagotować całość. koniec gotowania ½ szklanki 2 tablespoons of vinegar into a syrup. Slice the onion and place in Pod a pot. Add the baypowstałej leaf,zupy połączyć z mąką • 0,5 kg wędzonych kości schabowych i z pozostałą jej ilością w garnku. Gotowy żurek przelać do wydrążonych chlebków, na allspice, cover with water and pour the remaining sugar.wierzchu Cook and bring to boil; cook for wieprzowych, ułożyć ćwiartki ugotowanego na twardo jajka. • off 0,5 l zakwasu na żur, approx. 1 minute. Turn the cooker, add the remaining vinegar. Leave for 2-3 minutes • 100 g boczku, then drain and remove onion to cool down. Combine mayonnaise with the sugar and • 4 kiełbaski białe, vinegar syrup in a• bowl, add cooled onion, cream and stir. Herrings can be finished in 1,5 l wody, • 2 ząbkisliced czosnku, into 3-4 cm pieces to the onion/cream combination and two ways: add herring • 4 suszone borowiki, stir; or put refrigerated onion with cream on the herring laid on a plate. • 2 łyżki mąki, *Recipe using products bypszenne OSM Krasnystaw • 4 chlebki w kształcie koła, • Liść laurowy, Majeranek suszony Prymat, *author: Tomasz Kołodziejczyk, the author of the blog szczypta.com, Marta Kekusz; pro• Sól morska, Pieprz czarny mielony Prymat. duct stylization: Monika Stachowska, photograph by: Agnieszka Murak – Metka Studio. Recipe by: Krasnystaw przepis: Prymat

• 2 cloves of garlic, • 4 dried porcini mushrooms, • 2 tablespoons flour, • 4 round wheat bread rolls, • Bay leaf, Prymat dried marjoram, • Sea salt, Prymat ground black pepper

Make broth with soup greens and bones, remove vegetables, dice the carrots and put back into the pot. Add sourdough, diced bacon, sliced sausage, crushed garlic, spices, soaked and diced mushrooms, and boil the entirety. After it has boiled, combine half a glass of the obtained soup with flour and the rest of the soup in a pot. Pour the ready żurek into emptied bread rolls, place quarters of a hard-boiled egg on the top. Recipe by: Prymat

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.

ZUREK – SOUR RYE SOUP IN BREAD


łą czekoladą i karmelowym sosem

Babka Wielkanocna

BABKA CAKE WITH ICING

Masło Polskie ucierać na puszystą masę, dodając stopniowo cukier puder i żółtka. Zmniejszyć obroty miksera, dodać twaróg Hanusi i mieszać do uzyskania jednolitej konsystencji. Następnie dodać śmietankę Wypasioną i mąkę ziemniaczaną. Oddzielnie ubijać na sztywno pianę z białek i delikatnie łączyć z wcześniej przygotowaną masą twarogową. Spód tortownicy o średnicy około 28 cm wyłożyć papierem do pieczenia, a boki posmarować masłem Polskim i obsypać mielonymi orzechami. Masę delikatnie przelać do tortownicy i włożyć do piekarnika nagrzanego do 170 °C. Piec około 1 godziny. Wyłączyć piekarnik i w zamkniętym powoli studzić sernik, co zapobiegnie jego opadnięciu. Przygotować sos. Cukier rozpuścić w garnku do uzyskania słomkowego koloru, następnie dodać śmietankę Wypasioną i gotować powoli, aby odparować wodę. Gdy sos zredukuje się o połowę, doprawić solą, zdjąć z ognia i wystudzić. Bitą śmietankę przygotować, ubijając na sztywno śmietankę Wypasioną. Cukier dodać pod koniec ubijania. Migdały uprażyć w piecu do uzyskania lekko brązowego koloru, wystudzić. Na wierzch sernika wyłożyć bitą śmietankę, a następnie za pomocą noża zetrzeć czekoladę. Na koniec obsypać migdałami. Podawać z sosem karmelowym.

CHEESECAKE

WITH WHIPPED CREAM AND CARAMEL SAUCE

Ingredients: cheesecake: • 1 kg „Na Polski Stół” 18% premium cottage cheese by MLEKOVITA • 200 g Polskie butter by MLEKOVITA (room temperature) • 1.5 glass powdered sugar • 6 eggs • 1 vanilla bean • 200 ml 30% Wypasiona cream by MLEKOVITA • 4 tablespoons potato starch

cream caramel sauce: • 330 ml 30% Wypasiona cream by MLEKOVITA • 110 g sugar • 1 pinch salt whipped cream: • 330 ml 30% Wypasiona cream by MLEKOVITA (cooled) • 3 tablespoons sugar decoration: • white and milk chocolate • half a glass almond flakes

Mix Polskie butter into a fluffy mass, gradually adding powdered sugar and yolk. Slow down the mixer rotations, add Hanusia cottage cheese and mix until homogenous. Add Wypasiona cream and potato starch. Separately, whip egg whites until stiff and mix in gently with the previously prepared cheese mass. Spread baking paper on the bottom of a cake pan with a diameter of approx. 28 cm, cover the sides with Polskie butter and sprinkle with ground nuts. Gently pour the mass into the cake pan and place in an oven preheated to 170 °C. Bake for approx. 1 hour. Turn off the oven and slowly cool the cheesecake in the closed oven, to prevent its collapsing. Prepare the sauce. Melt sugar in a pot until straw coloured, then add Wypasiona cream and boil slowly until water evaporates. When the sauce is reduced by half, season with salt, turn off the fire and cool. Prepare whipped cream by whipping Wypasiona cream until stiff. Then add sugar. Roast almonds in oven until lightly browned, cool down. Put whipped cream on the top of the cheesecake, then grind chocolate with a knife. Finally, sprinkle almonds. Serve with caramel sauce. Recipe by: MLEKOVITA

Ingredients: • HELIO fudge mass with preferred flavour: walnut, chocolate, kaymak, kukułki candy or egg liqueur • 100 g butter • 5 egg whites • 5 egg yolks • 3 tablespoons sugar • 2 teaspoons baking powder • 1 teaspoon vanilla sugar • 180 g wheat flour • 100 g potato starch • HELIO biscuit mix • HELIO white icing and decorations

• Masa krówkowa HE w ulubionym smaku chowa, czekoladow mak, kukułka lub ad • 100 g masła • 5 białek • 5 żółtek • 3 łyżki cukru • 2 łyżeczki proszku d czenia • 1 łyżeczka cukru wa nowego • 180 g mąki pszenne • 100 g skrobi ziemni • Mieszanka keksowa • Polewa i dekoracja b HELIO

Masło roztopić w rondelku razem z wybraną

przygotowane ciasto przełożyć na wysma-

Melt butter in a saucepan with the preferred fudge mass.rowaną Whip whites masą krówkowąHELIO HELIO. W misce ubić pianę bułkąegg tartą formę z kominkiem i piec z białek, dodać cukier, proszek do pieczenia w temp. 180 °C przez ok. 45–50 minut. into a foam in a bowl, add sugar, baking powder and vanilla sugar, followed by yolk i cukier wanilinowy, następnie żółtka oraz sok Po wystudzeniu babkę udekorować Polewą z połówki cytryny. W kolejnym i dekoracją białą HELIO. Polecamy też przepis and juice squeezed from half a lemon.wyciśnięty At the next step, add previously melted butter kroku należy dodać roztopione wcześniej na Babkę Wielkanocną z polewą kajmakową with fudge mass and stir in flour, starch biscuitz mąką, mix. Place resulting masłoand z masą HELIO krówkową i wymieszać dostępny the w formie wideo na kanale HELIO – skrobiąwith oraz mieszanką keksową HELIO. Tak Bakalioweat Klimaty na Youtube.com dough in a chimney baking pan covered bread crumbs and bake 180 °C for approx. 45–50 mins. When the cake cools down, decorate it with HELIO white icing and decorations. We also recommend a recipe for the Easter Babka with kaymak icing, available on video on the HELIO – Bakaliowe Klimaty channel on YouTube. Recipe by: HELIO

sernik z brzoskwiniami

CHEESECAKE WITH PEACHES

ciasto: • 450 g mąki • 100 g cukru pudru • 250 g margaryny PALMA • 5 żółtek • 200 g gęstego jogurtu naturalnego • 2 łyżeczki proszku do pieczenia

Ingredients: dough: • 300 g powdered sugar krem: • 450 flourPALMA • 250 g g margaryny • 1 kg homogenized cheese (for cheesecakes) • 300 g cukru pudru • 1 kg serka homogeniozowanego • 100 g powdered sugar Wyrobić wszystkie składniki•na5ciastoeggs (do sernika) i podzielić na 2/3 i 1/3. Mniejszą część włożyć do lo• 5 jajek dówki. Blaszkę wyłożyć papierem do pieczenia i większą częścią ciasta wyłożyć na blaszkę. • 1-2 budynie śmietankowe wmargarine proszku • 250 g PALMA • 1-2 powdered cream puddings Utrzeć PALMĘ z cukrem, dodać pozostałe składniki i utrzeć mikserem na gładką masę. Masę • puszka brzoskwiń. serową wylać na ciasto. Na masę serową wyłożyć pokrojone w cienkie plasterki brzoskwinie. Pianę przygotować poprzez ubicie białek na sztywno i dodanie cukru oraz skrobi. Pianę • 5 piana: egg yolks • 1 can peaches • 5 białek wyłożyć na masę serową. Na pianę wyłożyć wyjęte z lodówki ciasto, poprzez roztarcie go • 200 g cukru pudru w palcach. Ciasto ma tworzyć postać kruszonki. Piec w temperaturze 175 °C przez około • 200 g thick natural yoghurt foam: godzinę. Jeśli góra ciasta będzie się zbyt szybko nagrzewać należy ją przykryć folią aluminio• 1 płaska łyżka skrobi ziemniaczanej wą lub papierem do pieczenia. • 2 teaspoons baking powder • 5 egg whites cream: • 200 g powdered sugar • 250 g PALMA margarine • 1 level tablespoon potato starch Knead all dough ingredients and divide into 2/3 and 1/3. Put the smaller part in the refrigerator. Line a baking tray with baking paper and put the larger part of the dough onto the tray. Mix PALMA with sugar, add the remaining ingredients and combine with a mixer into a smooth mass. Pour the cheese mass onto the dough. Put thinly sliced peaches onto the cheese mass. Prepare the foam by whipping egg whites stiff and adding sugar and starch. Put the foam on the cheese mass. Place the refrigerated dough onto the foam by rubbing dough in fingers. The dough should have a streusel consistency. Bake at 175 °C for about an hour. If the top of the cake heats up too quickly, cover with aluminium foil or baking paper. Recipe by: ZT Bielmar

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STORY

Gulfood Dubai 2019 with Food from Poland Magazine The 24th Edition of Gulfood which took place from 17th to 21st February 2019 was acclaimed a major success. According to organizers, more than 100 000 visitors from over 200 countries around the globe has attended the event making it the largest to date. This year’s show incorporated a range of new features under the theme "The World of Good. The World of Food". Food from Poland Magazine was present throughout fairs at Dubai World Trade Center (DWTC) promoting Polish companies and Polish excellent food products. Gulfood Dubai is one of the biggest industry events in the region. It attracts both exporters and importers of food products causing favorable trade conditions.

Issue 01/34 2019

FoodfromPolaFnododfroPm oland

STATISTICS It’s sweet, it’s Polish!

» p. 20

POLISH FMCG 2018 Summary

MARKET

» p. 28

DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS

» p. 88

STATIST ICS It’s swe et, it’s Polis

h!

» p. 20

POLISH FMCG MARKET 2018 Sum mary

» p. 28

DISCOVE PRODUC R POLISH TS

» p. 88

NUMBER OF EXHIBITORS

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/34

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Polish

Polish Ma

gazine for

If you seek cooperation with Polish FMCG manufacturers or distributing companies do not hesitate to contact our Publishing House – p.panczyk@foodfrompoland.pl

4 200

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sionals Magazine for Profes

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NUMBER OF POLISH COMPANIES

DISTANCE BETWEEN WARSAW AND DUBAI

Professio

nals


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CONTACT POLISH COMPANIES

• BiFIX company was established on the ground of fruit farm owned by the company founder –

BiFIX W. Piasecki Sp.J Górki Małe 33 Dworska Street 95-080 Tuszyn ,Poland Phone: +48 42 614 40 88 Fax: +48 42 614 41 20 bifix@bifix.pl www.bifix.pl www.zdroweherbaty.com.pl

Mr Wojciech Piasecki in 1992. It has been producing fruit teas from its own plantations along with

herbal, black and green teas for over 25 years. Recently, fruit raw materials, fruit juice concentrates and dried fruits have been added to the standard offer.

• BiFIX products are associated with the highest quality, excellent taste and therapeutic values.

The company's mission is to produce high quality teas from natural fruits. The aim is to expand the markets by offering customers solid services and the best products made by nature.

• Fruit tea blends are perfectly composed for an exquisite taste. Company's products have the

Healthy Food Certificate and Consumer's Quality Mark, as well as numerous awards for their quality

and taste values. Part of the production has been certified with PTRE Ecological Certificate. The company cooperates with many farms from clean ecological areas, thus the raw materials for BiFIX teas are of the highest quality.

Bogutti Sp. z o. o. Henryków-Urocze 48 Gromadzka Street 05-504 Złotokłos, Poland Phone: +48 783 956 466 Fax: +48 22 266 01 19 export@bogutti.com www.bogutti.com

Colian Sp. z o.o. 1 Zdrojowa Street 62-860, Opatówek, Poland Export Department: Phone: +48 62 590 33 08 export@colian.com www.colian.com

Dobrowolscy Sp. z o.o. Wadowice Górne 93, 39-308, Poland Phone: +48 14 666 20 00 export@bd24.eu dobrowolscy@dobrowolscy.pl www.dobrowolscy.pl

Grupa Owoce Natury Ltd. 25 Serwituty Street, 02-233 Warsaw, Poland Phone: +48 605 517 013 +48 603 147 942 kamil.kowalski@owocenatury.eu agnieszka.rembisz@owocenatury.eu www.owocenatury.eu

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•The BOGUTTI company specializes in production of high quality, rich cookies, baked according to the best Italian technologies.

•Cream fudge is something for the Polish to be proud of... Cream fudges are still the most

recognisable Polish export product. Bogutti is also a producer of the traditional Polish cream fudge recognisable on the international market.

•We offer three types of cream fudge: MILK, CHOCOLATE and BUTTER. The secret of Bogutti’s cream fudge is its exceptional taste.

•Colian is a group of confectionery products cooperating under: Jutrzenka, Goplana Solidarność and other brands. Aggregated experiences, technologies and production potentials let Colian achieve a position of one of the biggest confectionery producers on the Polish market.

•Company is constantly exploring client’s needs, keeping high quality, unique taste and nutrition values of offered products. Through participation in various development programs, effective

creation of product categories and efficient service company wants to be perceived as an innovative and an effective partner for many years.

•„Dobrowolscy” is a Polish, family-run company that has been appreciated by customers and consumers for 27 years. “Dobrowolscy” specializes in excellent cold cured meats, and constantly strives to provide its customers with the highest quality products which refer to the taste of traditional cold cured meats. The motto of the brand is the slogan “We link generations through taste”. •„Dobrowolscy” is a company combining the advantages of a regional manufacturer with production and distribution capabilities on a nationwide scale. Over 600 employees, production on the level of 1500 tons of cold cured meats per month, the highest quality and safety standards, among others, BRC; IFS. The company’s portfolio includes smoked meats, hams, roasts and pâtés. •Traditionally Smoked and Dobrowolscy Brothers are the company’s leading Premium brands. In response to the changing needs of consumers, the company continues to introduce new product lines – for example, the line of the highest quality poultry products under the name KUKURYKU Premium. •The quality of Dobrowolscy products is proven not only through recognition and popularity among consumers, but also through received awards, among others: Pearl of the Market 2018; Appreciate Polish Products, Hit of FMCG market 2018.

• For almost 10 years, Grupa Owoce Natury has been exporting high quality fresh and processed agri-food products to over 50 countries around the world. We are at the forefront of Polish exporters of fresh fruit and vegetables. We work with over 60 producer groups and 100 individual farmers. The offer addressed to industry and retail includes standard and organic products from the range of: fresh, frozen, dried and powdered fruit and vegetables, NFC juices, concentrates, mousses and fruit and vegetable purees, processed cereal, meat and fish products, chocolate products, cookies, dairy products and milk powders, as well as dietary food, drinks and snacks.


CONTACT POLISH COMPANIES

• Food from Poland is an English-language professional FMCG sector Magazine published by

Fischer Trading Group Ltd. since 2009. Magazine is available on prestigious, international trade fairs such as: ISM Cologne, ANUGA Cologne, IFE London, PLMA Amsterdam, PRODEXPO Moscow, SIAL Paris, Gulfood Dubai, Foodex Japan, SIAL Canada, SIAL China, THAIFEX Thailand, Summer Fancy Food Show, HKTDC Food Expo or ANUFOOD China.

• Food from Poland Magazine focuses on Polish FMCG market, marvelous Polish export products and producers who represent national food industry.

• Food from Poland is the best guidebook for persons and companies who find interests in FMCG sector and are looking for business contact with Polish producers.

• “HURT & DETAL (Wholesale & Retail) is a Polish-language nationwide monthly issued Magazine focusing on FMCG market in Poland. Circulation stands at 70 000 copies per month, closed trade

distribution in the area of Poland. Publishing House guarantees optimum attainment with the in-

formation to merchants on four levels: print advertorials, social media contact, website commercials and banners & effective mailing (20 000 trade emails) – full marketing campaign.

• HURT & DETAL is a host of annual “Złoty Paragon” (Golden Recipe) Awards Ceremony, where

votes on best products are collected directly from retailers and “Złoty Paragon Innowacja” (Golden Recipe – Innovation) – consumer award contest.

FOOD FROM POLAND MAGAZINE 2/218 Bagno Street 00-112 Warsaw, Poland Phone: +48 506 777 459 k.paciorek@foodfrompoland.pl www.foodfrompoland.pl

FoodfromPoland

HURT&DETAL MAGAZINE 2/218 Bagno Street 00-112 Warsaw, Poland Phone: +48 22 847 93 67 redakcja@hurtidetal.pl www.hurtidetal.pl

• Herbapol-Lublin S.A. was founded 70 years ago. Polish market leader in fruit syrups category, as well as in herbal, red, functional and fruit tea categories.

• Drawing upon what is best in nature, it produces exceptional products bringing positive emotions and moments of pleasure to its consumers.

• Company’s portfolio includes Herbapol and Big-Active brands, as well as Nasza, Green-Up, drinks and Zioła Mnicha.

• The Herbapol brand is a perfect combination of tradition and innovation. Brand portfolio includes teas, syrups and jam products. In 2018 Lifestyle teas were added to company’s portfolio. Big-Active is known for exotic fruit mixed with green teas, as well as high quality black teas.

„HERBAPOL - LUBLIN” S.A. 35 Diamentowa Street 20-471 Lublin, Poland Phone: +48 81 748 82 78 export@herbapol.com.pl www.herbapol.com.pl

• Things have changed in the last several decades. However, Herbapol-Lublin S.A. continues to

only use the best and natural ingredients for unique tasting experience and seek innovative solutions to maintain its leadership position.

• Hortex is a leading brand in frozen fruits and vegetables category and one of the leading producers of juices, nectars and drinks in Poland. The company has been challenging new trends for several dozen years, making up innovative products and taste combinations, adjusting to changing lifestyle of its customers. Taking into consideration their various needs, product range encompasses over 400 SKUs. • Hortex products are subject to in-depth, multi-stage quality control and assessment, based upon the highest standards and best practices. Plant, when they are manufactured, have been granted certificates confirming top quality and product safety – IFS/BRC, ISO. Owning to that Hortex brand means top quality and is perfectly recognized.

•The MAGO Group is the leading manufacturer of the state-of-the-art solutions in the area of sales and storage space arrangement. It provides comprehensive furnishing for all types of facilities. Offer includes high quality, modern solutions for trade including, store racks, stand-alone display units POS and POP, storage racks, checkout counters and advanced systems for the functional and efficient management of products in a commercial facility. Company provides installation and after-sale service for solutions. Group designs and manufactures luminaries and components related to the use of light sources. Further, it provides the solutions which integrate online and traditional shopping. •The MAGO Group consists of the manufacturing plants in: Rusiec, Rawa Mazowiecka and Kaliningrad, and the companies: Hemilab (new technologies), Perfect Data (smart shelf technology) and Danler (lighting). Company has branches in Russia, Germany, France and Ukraine, and distance networks in Poland and worldwide. Wide offer and the individual approach to customers helped to achieve the position of one of the leaders of the global store and warehouse equipment industry.

Hortex Sp.zo.o. Polski Ogród Sp.zo.o. 2 Mszczonowska Street 02-337 Warsaw Phone: +48 22 572 12 12 frozenexport@hortex.pl www.hortex.pl

MAGO Group 119/121 Katowicka Avenue, Rusiec 05-830 Nadarzyn, Poland Phone: +48 22 729 81 01 sprzedawcy@mago.com www.mago.com

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CONTACT POLISH COMPANIES

• Makarony Polskie SA is one of the biggest, dynamically changing pasta producers in Poland. It

Makarony Polskie S.A. 15a Podkarpacka Street 35-082 Rzeszów, Poland Phone: +48 17 875 30 10 Fax: +48 17 875 30 20 sprzedaz@makarony.pl www.makarony.pl

is a company with rich traditions, many years of experience and thriving factories in Rzeszow and Czestochowa. Making best to satisfy customers’ expectations, company offers a wide variety of

shapes of pasta, pressed and laminated, manufactured with or without eggs, from finest durum and standard wheat.

•Products are sold under two main brands: Makarony Polskie and Sorenti. Cctivity includes production services, such as pasta and processed products for brands of the biggest chain stores. Manufac-

turing processes are conducted on the basis of modern production lines, and implemented standards guarantee the highest quality and microbiological purity of products.

• Materne-Polska offers a wide range of fruit preserves, marmalades and jams (both low and high sugar content) in various recipes or processed according to the individual requests of our customers.

Materne-Polska Sp z o.o.

37A Łopatki Street 24-160 Wąwolnica, Poland Phone: +48 81 88 26 311 Fax: +48 81 88 25 366 materne.polska@materne.pl www.materne.pl

Offer also includes a selection of glass and plastic packaging manufactured both locally and abroad.

• As the part of global group Andros Fruits, Materne-Polska is one of the largest fruit purchasing

and processing companies in Poland with a modern freezing facility equipped with three-stage fruit sorting system. Factory is located in the heart of the Polish fruit region where over 80% of Polish red fruits are cultivated. It gives us the possibility to get the best raw material directly from the fields. Company closely co-operate with suppliers and permanently control cultivating methods and fruit

quality at every stage of growth. Materne-Polska process a wide range of organic fruits and holds IFS, BRC, BIO and HALAL certificates. The company purchases approx. 13.000 tons of fresh fruits per year and produces up to 10.000 tons of jams per year.

PPH MAXPOL Sp. z o.o. 479 Puławska Street 02-844 Warsaw, Poland Phone: +48 22 628 06 21 +48 22 625 14 08 +48 22 629 96 21

Fax: +48 22 621 03 73 maxpol@maxpol-targi.com.pl www.maxpol-targi.com.pl

MLEKPOL 13 Elewatorska Street 19-203 Grajewo Phone: +48 86 2730537 sekretariat.handel@mlekpol.com.pl www.mlekpol.com.pl

PPH MAXPOL offers: •

Designing stands for individual exhibitors as well as for national groups;

Forwarding and customs clearances of company’s products with the delivery directly

Preparing and assembling the individual stands, stands arrangements; to the stand;

Professional services for fair participants as: flights, accommodation, local transfers in the city of the fair.

•Mlekpol Dairy Cooperative in Grajewo is the biggest producer of milk and dairy products in Poland and one of the twenty largest milk processors in Europe.

•The winner of many awards and the most recognizable brand of Mlekpol is Łaciate – in Poland

this brand has become a synonym of milk. Łaciate products include milk, cream, butter and cream cheese. The entire offer of Mlekpol includes more than 400 products, which have found their customers in the majority of European countries, South America, Asia and the Far East countries.

•Foreign customers value the quality of the product and the stability of cooperation which is ensured by Mlekpol.

•The company SERTOP is one of the leading manufacturers of processed cheese on the Polish

Sertop Sp. z o.o.

58 Przemysłowa Street 43-100 Tychy Phone: +48 32 217 08 38 +48 32 326 46 41 export-info@sertop.com.pl www.sertop.com.pl

market. The company has more than fifty-year tradition of producing high quality products based on proven recipes while maintaining strict quality control. For the production are used only natural ingredients, it does not apply any preservatives and colorings.

•SERTOP offer includes more than 20 flavors of processed cheese in a variety of formats, such: round boxes 140 g and 280 g, cubes 100 g and 30 g, blocks 100 g and 100 g sausages.

SERTOP company meets all the requirements for the sale of processed cheese on the Polish and

foreign markets. SERTOP sells its products to the Polish market and the markets of the European Union and the United States, Canada, countries of the Middle East, South Korea.

•The company is certified BRC Global Standard Certificate and IFS (International Food Standard).

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CONTACT POLISH COMPANIES

• VIRTU is the leader producer of ready-cooked meals in Poland. This family-run company was

established in 1992. During 27 years we have managed to build a strong, recognizable and valued brand. As a leader in the production of ready meals, we not only respond to the market demand by providing innovative solutions but we also set market trends in our category.

• Currently Virtu has 2 modern production facilities, both certified IFS and BRC, to ensure the highest quality of our products. We are constantly developing to meet the changing nutritional trends and growing customer’s demands for quick, convenient and tasty meals.

• Company supplies chilled ready meals to the biggest retail chains in Poland and Europe, under

Virtu Production Sp. z o.o.

35 Łośnicka Street 42-400 Zawiercie, Poland Phone: +48 32 671 81 40 eksport@virtu.com.pl www.virtu.com.pl

Virtu brand as well ass under Private Label of business partners.

• Vobro’s Confectionery Factory was founded in 1986 in Poland. Vobro’s mission is to fully satisfy

Customers’ needs by producing high quality and safe confectionary products. Vobro’s product range is made up of over 100 chocolate confectionery products (pralines and chocolate sweets), jellies. Among Vobro’s best sellers are dessert chocolates filled with cherries in liqueur, perfectly ripe flawless cherries are selected, bathed in liqueur and packed in luxurious dark chocolate.

• For many years WAN-VIT company has taken care of its customers tastes.

As one of the leaders of food industry in Poland, WAN-VIT can ensure that products are made from traditional recipes and the highest quality raw materials.

• Putting on the dynamic development, company created a new products line 4proActive.

• 4proActive products were created thinking about everyone who puts his attention to healthy and active lifestyle, take care of slim silhouette and good mood as well as those being on low sugar and gluten-free diet.

ZPC Vobro Wojciech Wojenkowski

78 Podgorna Street 87-300 Brodnica, Poland Phone: +48 56 493 28 51 export@vobro.com.pl www.vobro.pl

Z.P.H.U. WAN-VIT

11a 3 Maja Street 88-430 Janowiec Wlkp., Poland Phone: +48 601 831 863 www.4proactive.eu www.wan-vit.pl

Advertise in Fall Edition 2019 Distribution • •

ANUGA Cologne (05-09.10.2019) ANUFOOD China (20-22.11.2019)

STATISTICS Export of food products p. 36

DISCOVER POLAND Relax at a farmer’s home! p. 60

DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS p. 78

FoodfroPm oland

02/35 (’19)

Polish Magazine for Profession

als

Advertisement Office k.paciorek@foodfrompoland.pl +48 506 777 459 Fischer Trading Group Sp. z o.o. Bagno 2/218, 00-112 Warsaw, Poland

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DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS Peppermint Herbal Tea

Blueberry Jam

Mint contains essential oils, which includes free alcohols (especially menthol), as well as tannins and flavonoids. It will help to reduce gastrointestinal discomfort from increased gastric acid secretion as well as to decrease the risk of liver and biliary tract diseases. In the case of colds and inflammations of the mouth, can also be used in inhalation treatments.

Right now it's the moment in which we bring to market our fruit jams! Healthy, tasty and low-sugar! Produced from natural fruit ripening in full sun with the highest nutritional value from our own plantations. We do not use artificial preservatives, additives or colorants. Modern machinery and innovative technologies used in the production of jams meet all quality requirements. In our offer we have for you classic jams, jams for health, fruit products and marmalades. Rich fruit flavour closed in each jar will make you want more!Blueberries Are Low in Calories But High in Nutrients. Blueberries are the King of Antioxidant Foods.

www.BIFIX.pl

www.BIFIX.pl

Offer of BOGUTTI COMPANY! FREE – No added sugar Cookies. There is absolutely no added sugar in Free Cookies. Really good and simple cookies, inspired by family traditional home recipe. They are a great alternative for breakfast, can be also serve as a snack at school or work. You can choose from the following flavours, Butter Cookies with 20% Butter, Cookies with 20% Chocolate, Chocolate & Cranberry or Chocolate & Hazelnut. Cookies are manufactured from the natural ingredients: 0 Sugar, 0 Trans Fat, No Preservatives. Cookies look nice and attractive with 12 months Shelf-life. Net weight 135g www.BOGUTTI.com

Grześki Chocolate Bar So bite into the world of Grześki and enjoy. www.COLIAN.com

Choco threesome Exceptional coconut team. Do you want to stay fit and healthy? Try out our unique, finest and premium quality sweetmeats. They are healthy and delicious with a cocoa flavor. Only with natural ingredients. www.4PROACTIVE.eu www.WAN-VIT.pl

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DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS Big-Active Drawing upon what is best in nature, we produce exceptional products bringing positive emotions and moments of pleasure to our consumers. www.HERBAPOL.com.pl

RELAX

THINK & FOCUS

ENERGY

Melissa with Lavender

An innovative

Guarana with Yerba Mate

Tea - a combination of

composition of green

tea - a combination of green

green tea with melissa

tea with Japanese

tea with mate leaves and

and lavender flower. The

ginkgo and kola

guarana seeds. Such a set

ingredients contained in

nuts. The ingredients

is perfect for the beginning

it contribute to relieving

included in BA Think

of the day to ensure proper

the feeling of anxiety,

& Focus: contribute to

stimulation and energy boost

thus affecting the better

the proper functioning

for the whole day. Guarana

well-being and optimal

of the brain and

seeds help to reduce the

relaxation of the whole

support memory and

feeling of mental fatigue.

body. Also beneficial for a

concentration

Mate leaves strengthen the

good night's sleep.

vitality of the body.

CHERRY PASSION

VOBRO PRALINES

Cherry Passion is a perfect way to express love, gratitude, friendship or apologies and simply make the day of our beloved ones even sweeter. This delicious fusion of cherries in liqueur hidden in fine chocolate is not only tasty, chic and lovable - it is a beautifully wrapped gift, ready to be presented right from the store to your special someone. Elegant, decorative packaging contains exceptional pralines with a liquid, cherry heart appreciated by consumers worldwide thanks to extraordinary mix of flavours inside each praline.

These new double-layered world famous desserts hidden in great quality chocolate pralines are just toothsome. Glamourous and cute packaging is almost as sweet as pralines inside the box. Its offbeat look and unique flavour inspired by trendy sweets is truly eye-catching. Chic boxes are appreciated by those consumers who value packaging design matching their style and home interiors. Great idea for a gift for fashionable women who love sweets and good quality chocolate.

www.VOBRO.pl

www.VOBRO.pl

Hortex Stir-fry vegetables with herbs and red pepper 400g Hortex Stir Fry Vegetables with herbs and red pepper is a perfect blend of potatoes wedges, most delicious vegetables and seasoning closed in a separate sachet. It can be a meal itself or inspiration for many dishes – you can use this product for stew, gratin or whatever you like!

Hortex Apple Juice 100% 1l Apple juice squeezed with the utmost care. Hortex is a guarantee of quality and excellent taste. 60 years of tradition, passion and commitment is a reliable recipe for success! www.HORTEX.pl

www.HORTEX.pl

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DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS

PIZZA PAPA LUIGI According to the survey of the renowned research institute GfK Polonia, the product line Pizza Papa Luigi by Virtu was rewarded with golden medal for “The best product – consumer’s choice 2019” in category: ready meals. The survey covered 327 products, launched between 1/09/2017 and 1/09/2018. Pizzas Papa Luigi are based on traditional, Italian recipes. Thanks to the use of modern machine park, including a stone-baking oven pizza bases are thin & crispy. The secret of a unique taste is hidden in the tomato sauce without functional additives, special mixture of spices and carefully selected topping components. www.VIRTU.com.pl

100% fruit spread Fruit preserves prepared with 100 g of fruit per 100 g of product, sweetened only with concentrated fruit juice (options of concentrated fruit juice to be choosen: apple, pineapple, pear, multifruit, grape, date...). No preservatives, no added sugar, no artificial colors or flavours. For those who value healthy lifestyle and nature.

Reduced sugar fruit preserves Fruits preserves with less sugar than standard European jam. The product has 30% less sugar than standard product (standard jam: 60 g sugar per 100 g of product). For people who care about themselves. www.MATERNE.pl

www.MATERNE.pl

Spelt, buckwheat and rye pasta. Wholegrain pasta is a perfect proposition for people who care about their daily diet. www.MAKARONY.pl

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DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS VEGAN DISHES Due to the current trend on the food market, Virtu has been developing new line of plant products. Vegan Pierogis (dumplings) are the first in the family. The filling with a clear, comprehensive flavor is closed in soft, light and elastic dough. You may choose between Vegan dumplings with broccoli, smoked tofu and spinach and Vegan dumplings with potatoes and smoked tofu. The appearance of VIRTU vegan dumplings for sale was quickly noticed by many portals dedicated to the vegan diet. They obtained very high marks. The first very good sales results confirm the precise match of vegan VIRTU dumplings to the prevailing market trend. New vegan dishes by Virtu coming soon… www.VIRTU.com.pl VEGAN DUMPLINGS WITH BROCCOLI, SMOKED TOFU AND SPINACH

VEGAN DUMPLINGS WITH POTATOES AND SMOKED TOFU

“Tradycyjnie Wedzone” “Tradycyjnie Wedzone” is our top premium brand. The characteristic feature of this brand is traditional smoking on real alder-beech wood. Due to selected high quality meat and proper spices it was possible to create absolutetly unique products. www.DOBROWOLSCY.pl

HAM FROM WADOWICE

SIRLOIN FROM WADOWICE HAM

- 110 g of meat per 100 g of

- 110 g of meat per 100 g of

product,

product,

- Without phosphates

- Without phosphates

- Product invariably associated

- Product invariably associated

with taste from old times

with taste from old times,

- It seduces with its fragility and

- It seduces with its fragility and

perfect structure

perfect structure

- Smoked in a traditional

- Smoked in a traditional

smokehouse on a live flame,

smokehouse on a live flame,

- Smokehouses are fired with

- Smokehouses are fired with

alder-beech wood

alder-beech wood

Fruits and vegetables

Ewa-Bis offer

The offer addressed to industry, Horeca and retail includes standard and organic products from the range of: fresh fruit and vegetables from European moderate climate zone as well as the wide range of frozen, dried and powdered fruit and vegetables from the whole World.

The offer addressed to industry, Horeca and retail includes standard and organic products from the range of: NFC juices, concentrates, mousses and fruit and vegetable purees, processed cereal, meat and fish products, chocolate products, cookies, dairy products and milk powders, as well as dietary food, drinks and snacks.

www.OWOCENATURY.eu

www.OWOCENATURY.eu

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DISCOVER POLISH PRODUCTS Milcasa

Mozarella

Milcasa is a milk brand from the MLEKPOL’s portfolio dedicated to foreign customers that stands for UHT milk of the highest quality – a natural full value food product with an exceptionally creamy flavour. Milcasa milk comes from cows grazed on the cleanest Polish meadows, located in areas not contaminated with heavy industry. Not without a reason the Polish regions of Podlasie, Warmia and Mazury, where Milcasa originates from, are called the Green Lungs of Poland. Milcasa milk comes from cows fed with non-GMO products. Being an excellent source of calcium and protein, it also provides a wealth of valuable vitamins and minerals.

Italian flavour, Polish milk. Made of the highest quality milk from cows grazed on meadows located in the Polish regions not contaminated with heavy industry. Excellent Mozarella cheese offered in the form of chips – perfect for pizza, pasta and casseroles. Being an excellent source of calcium and protein, it also provides a wealth of valuable vitamins and minerals. Packaging dedicated to the HoReCa channel. www.MLEKPOL.com.pl

www.MLEKPOL.com.pl

Processed product MAZURSKI – 280g round box

Processed cheese MIX “Your... favourite” – 140g round box

www.SERTOP.com.pl

www.SERTOP.com.pl

Fruits & vegetables display – island

Spinakerr slim headfor double-function checkout counter

Among the wide range of MAGO’s solutions dedicated to fruits and vegetables, the display island draws a special attention. The modern structure of the display has been covered with a wood-like board, and the distinctive side elements are made of plexiglass. The island has been equipped with a display tray for additional products. The versatility of this solution will allow you to set up this type of displays in the sequence and a combination of several extensions next to each other. www.MAGO.com

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Thanks to the use of a modern SPINAKERR SLIM head, the MAGO checkout counter may perform two functions:  traditional checkout counter operated by a cashier,  a self-service checkout counter — after logout of the cashier, the head moves to the self-service position. The SPINAKERR heads may be installed in most of the existing MAGO cash boxes. www.MAGO.com

02/2019



FRUIT EXPERT from where the best cherry grow

Your partner in Private Label Visit us at PLMA 2019, Hall 7 Stand 7013- 6715- 6716 www.materne.pl