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Annual Report 2013

W

e are pleased to share another year of achievements that were made possible through the support of our Board members, Benefactors, donors, volunteers and dedicated staff. All were essential to the many successes we have enjoyed in 2013. With their support and passionate belief in the Conservancy’s mission, we surpassed many of our goals in protecting and restoring Catalina Island, its wildlife and its plants, while sustainably growing many of the programs enjoyed by Catalina’s residents and visitors. We look forward to another year of working together to advance the Conservancy’s mission of being responsible stewards of this exceptional resource through a balance of conservation, education and recreation. Ann M. Muscat, PhD President and CEO John P. Cotton

Chair, Board of Directors


CATALINA ISLAND CONSERVANCY FEMALE ADULT BISON received contraceptives in a successful leading-edge wildlife management program aimed at keeping the herd at about 150 animals

1,852 FEDERALLY ENDANGERED Catalina Island foxes estimated to be on Catalina, up from approximately 100 in 1999, in one of the fastest recoveries of an endangered species

REGISTERED HIKERS trekked the wildlands trails

240 million PLANT SEEDS, many of rare and endemic species, now stored by the Conservancy

ACRES TREATED to remove invasive plants and restore native plants

202

3 Published peer-reviewed SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES by Conservancy biologists

58,289

AVALON RESIDENTS enjoyed Families in Nature's free experiences in Catalina's wildlands

VISITORS to the NATURE CENTERS in Avalon Canyon and Airport in the Sky

46%

1,000

16,783

PLANTS GROWN AND MAINTAINED at the Ackerman Native Plant Nursery

NEST SITES monitored for Scripps's Murrelet, a seabird classified as "threatened"

1,564

NATURALIST TRAINING

people have completed Naturalist Training through the Conservancy, a milestone reached in 2013

20,418

7

9.5 million

7,364

INCREASE IN ONE YEAR

3,969

FACEBOOK FRIENDS

INDIVIDUAL INTERACTIONS WITH STUDENTS by the Education staff

WEEKLY LISTENERS to the Conservancy-produced Isla Earth Radio Series

131% INCREASE IN ONE YEAR

JEEP速 ECO TOURS

3,848 PASSENGERS

919

TOURS

46% INCREASE IN ONE YEAR

61,281 YOUTH CAMPERS enjoyed Conservancy-owned lands, and many of them participated in Stop the Spread, the Conservancy's invasive plant education and removal program for campers

627

VOLUNTEER

PUBLIC ASSISTS by Conservancy Rangers

INA ISL AL

44,657 VISITORS to the Wrigley Memorial & Botanic Garden

25,000 VOLUNTEERS HOURS dedicated to Conservancy projects

CAT

EDUCATION

CONSERVATION

51

D AN

RECREATION

2013 A Year of Accomplishments

CONSERVANCY RANGER


Financial Highlights 2013 SOURCES OF FUNDING ($9.6 Million) Endowment Distribution 17%

Earned Income 57% Contributions 26%

The mission of the Catalina Island Conservancy is to be a responsible steward of its lands through a balance of conservation, education and recreation.

ff Contributions: Cash and goods donated to the Conservancy from a broad spectrum of

supporters, including individuals, foundations, governmental agencies, businesses and the net proceeds from the annual Conservancy Ball

ff Earned Income: Revenue generated via the operation of mission-driven activities

managed by the Conservancy, including admissions to the Wrigley Memorial & Botanic Garden; access to the Island’s interior via roads, campgrounds and the Airport in the Sky; educational tours, and various land, mooring and communications leases

ff Endowment Distribution: Funds distributed from the Conservancy endowment as

approved by the Benefactors and Board of Directors each year

Total sources exclude net investment income.

AREAS OF SPENDING ($9.9 Million)

Supporting Infrastructure 31%

Programmatic 47%

Administrative 13%

Development 9%

ff Programmatic: Spending that directly supported the Conservancy’s mission activities

of conservation, education and recreation, which included the cost to manage the Island’s ecological health through wildlife management and native and invasive plant programs; ecological literacy via communications and outreach, school-based and lifelong learning programs (including the Wrigley Memorial & Botanic Garden and the Nature Centers at Avalon Canyon and the Airport in the Sky); experiences with the wild via visitor services such as Jeep® Eco Tours, hiking, biking, camping and airport access, and management of the Conservancy’s volunteer program

ff Supporting Infrastructure: Spending that supported mission activities and maintained

Conservancy assets, including those that provide access to the approximately 42,000 acres managed by the Conservancy (roads, trails, rangers, facilities, equipment and vehicle fleet)

ff Administrative: Incurred to manage Conservancy operations ff Development: Supported fundraising activities, including the Conservancy’s

membership program, events, grant writing and individual giving

2013 spending was augmented by nearly $400,000 in restricted-use, multi-year donations and grants received in prior years but not reflected in current year sources of funding. Cover photo by Jack Baldelli

Annual Report & Infographic  

The Catalina Island Conservancy was seeking an engaging and exciting new way to tell the story of its work in its Annual Report. We created...

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