Performance Improvement Plan 2021-22 - Progress Report -July – September

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Performance Improvement Plan 2021/22 Progress Report - April to September 2021

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Mid and East Antrim Borough Council 1-29 Bridge Street Ballymena BT43 5EJ T: 0300 1245 000 E: enquiries@midandeastantrim.gov.uk W: www.midandeastantrim.gov.uk

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Contents 1.0 COVID-19 Response and Recovery

4-5

2.0 Performance Improvement Plan 2021/22

6-9

3.0 Quarter Two Performance Summary

10 - 11

4.0 Performance Improvement Objectives 2021/22

12 - 23

5.0 Statutory Key Performance Indicators

24 - 25

6.0 Performance Improvement Plan 2021/22 Summary Table

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1.0 COVID-19 Response and Recovery In March 2020, following the announcement of measures by the UK Government to tackle the COVID-19 virus, Mid and East Antrim Borough Council invoked its Emergency Plan and a number of Council services were closed with immediate effect. To ensure minimal disruption and to continue to provide vital services to our residents, Council put in place measures to guarantee many services continued to operate as normal. Additionally, some vital new services were introduced, such as the Remote Call Centre, which provided residents and business owners with advice and support on how to stay safe. Council expanded its business support programmes and provided vital advice and support to local businesses impacted by the COVID pandemic, running multiple online information sessions and webinars. Council worked extensively with local communities to support those most in need, distributing over 6,000 food parcels and awarding over £100,000 through the Community Support Grant Scheme during the first year of the pandemic. For the 2021/22 year, Council have secured additional funding from the Department for Communities to assist with ongoing COVID-19 issues that are affecting the most vulnerable people in our communities, including the Food and Essential Supplies Fund of £103.4k and the Community Support Programme top up fund of £152.6k. 04 |

Quarter Two Review 2021/22

To ensure Council services were available to as many residents as possible, a number of services were digitally transformed, including live broadcast of Council and Committee meetings and the use of digital events. The Council has been able to expand on its digital offering and a number of new digital services have been established, including the new Contact Centre System, powered by Amazon Connect within Council’s Waste department. In September 2021, Council were awarded the APSE ‘Best Service Team’ award for its innovative COVID Confidence Scheme, the first of its kind undertaken by any Northern Ireland council during the pandemic. The scheme was launched in the weeks leading up to Christmas 2020 and to date, 661 COVID Confidence Mark awards have been issued by Council as recognition of the efforts local businesses have made to ensure all the appropriate safety measures have been taken to protect shoppers and staff alike. Council remains flexible in its approach to combating the pandemic, at all times following the advice of the Public Health Agency. Further details on some of the services that Council has delivered during the last six months can be found on the opposite page.

20 Education

& Training Programmes Delivered

640 Participants at MEActive Summer Programmes

5 Green Flags Awards 3 Seaside Awards 3 Blue Flags

184 local households referred to the DfI

Affordable Warmth Scheme

3,195+ hours of one-toone mentoring delivered

ShopMEA app succesfully launched

65 Museum & heritage based events held

86 participants

grant funding has been awarded

9 local community groups secured Live

3

435 MEActive sessions

66% of available

from Employability Programmes gaining employment

planters installed in

1,770 Participants at

service requests placed to Council’s Waste team

wildflower beds planted

10 recycled plastic each of MEA’s main towns

20,995

11 New

Here

Love Here funding

269

Local Businesses Engaged & Supported

23 Town

centre events held

14,252 Visitors to The Gobbins

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2.0 Performance Improvement Plan 2021/22 The Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 2014 put in place a framework to support continuous improvement in the delivery of council services. The Act requires councils to set one or more improvement objectives each year and to have appropriate arrangements in place to achieve those objectives. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial impact on our citizens and local businesses and Council are proactively working to minimise longer term implications. For this financial year 2021/22, Council is focused on recovering and adapting to the ‘new normal’, in addition to improvement.

Strategic effectiveness

Fairness

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Quarter Two Review 2021/22

Service quality

Our Performance Improvement Plan explains what we hope to achieve, how we plan to do it and how our citizens will be better off as a result. It does not detail every improvement we intend to deliver, but focusses on the key areas identified for improvement through Community and Corporate Planning processes, stakeholder engagement and research analysis. After a period of consultation, we agreed six improvement objectives for 2021/22, focusing on seven key improvement areas:

Service availability

Sustainability

Efficiency

Innovation

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Our Improvement Objectives 2021/22 1. Grow the economy and create jobs. 2. Support the communities within the historic conservation area of Carrickfergus, contributing to the sustainability of the local economy. 3. Reduce the impact of poverty through the delivery of a Slow Cooker programme.

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4. Improve customer engagement and service delivery by enhancing our use of information technology. 5. Development of Sullatober Household Recycling Centre.

We have outlined our progress towards meeting our objectives as follows: Green | Achieved / On track Amber | Delayed but progressing Red | Not achieved / Stopped Grey | Not due yet / Not available

6. Autism Friendly Mid and East Antrim.

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3.0 Quarter Two Performance Summary

Key Achievements to Note

We monitor our performance through a series of outcomes and indicators. The outcomes are statements of what we want to achieve for our citizens.

The indicators are the means by which we measure our progress towards achieving our outcomes. Our results for this quarter are outlined below.

59 jobs

21 Outcomes April – September 2021

25 Indicators April – September 2021

promoted & 95 business plans created through the ‘Go For It’ Programme.

‘Slow Energy Efficient’

100% of outcomes are on

68% of indicators are on

track / achieved.

track / achieved.

8 eligible properties received CTHI funding.

‘Visitor Pass’

cookbook successfully launched.

system rolled out within Ardeevin Ballymena.

6

6 Autism

Council venues accredited with Autism Impact Awards.

At least 25 construction jobs supported through CTHI.

43 slow

Site works commenced at

151 staff

Sullatober Household Recycling Centre.

cookers distributed to vulnerable households.

members completed ‘Just a Minute’ (JAM) training.

AwarenessRaising sessions.

32% are either not yet available or not yet due.

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4.0 Performance Improvement Objectives 2021/22

Our aim The promotion of new jobs in the borough by successfully delivering the ‘Go for It’ Programme.

Grow the economy and create jobs

? Why?

• You told us that ‘investment to grow the economy, create jobs and attract tourists’ was one of the most important forms of investment for Council (Household Survey 2018). • There were approximately 1,300 jobs lost in Mid and East Antrim during 2019.

The growth of new industry sectors by being a Centre of Excellence for start-ups, spinouts and social-economy businesses within the Ecos Innovation Centre.

Outcomes

How are we doing so far this year?

So far this year, 95 business plans have been created and 59 jobs have been promoted through the ‘Go for It’ Programme.

Council has achieved its target for the number of knowledge economy jobs created in Ecos Innovation Centre with 134 jobs created against a target of 125. Following a reconciliation exercise, Council remains on track for achieving its target for centre rental income. Results are currently available for the period April to June 2021.

What you will see

Delivery of an effective and efficient Planning Service to maximise economic development.

• Director of Development Who is responsible?

In relation to the target set for the processing time of major planning applications, Council were one of only two local councils to successfully achieve this target with an average of 23.4 weeks against a target of 30 weeks. Council continues to remain well below the target set for the processing of local planning applications, with an average time of just 8.2 weeks. At an achieved figure of 89.2%, Council are above the 70% target for the conclusion of enforcement cases.

120 jobs promoted through the ‘Go for It’ Programme by March 2022.

59 jobs promoted.

125 knowledge-economy jobs created in Ecos Innovation Centre by March 2022.

135 knowledge-economy jobs created.

£95,000 in rental income from Ecos Innovation Centre by March 2022.

A reconciliation completed up to the end of August 2021 confirms that Council remains on track to achieve this target.

Major Planning applications processed within an average of 30 weeks by March 2022.

23.4 weeks (April - June 2021).

Local Planning applications processed within an average of 15 weeks by March 2022.

8.2 weeks (April - June 2021).

70% of planning enforcement cases concluded within 39 weeks by March 2022.

89.2% (April - June 2021).

Indicators How we will measure progress

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Quarter Two Review 2021/22

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Objective: Support the communities within the historic

Our aim

conservation area of Carrickfergus, contributing to the sustainability of the local economy

? Why?

Up to 10 buildings of historical and architectural interest restored (including 8 existing awarded schemes), through the Townscape Heritage Initiative, with Council and National Lottery Heritage Fund grant assistance, by March 2022 or beyond. *¹ *³

• Carrickfergus Castle is a key landmark and popular visitor attraction. • Significant factory closures, changes in buying habits and proximity to Belfast have led to a decline in Carrickfergus’ traditional town centre economy.

What you will see

The local community will have a better understanding of built heritage.

Who is responsible?

How we will measure progress

Quarter Two Review 2021/22

A funding application for a 9th property was received in October 2021 and is currently under assessment. A 10th application for funding is expected to be received in the near future.

The Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI) participated in European Heritage Open Days (EHOD) in September 2021. As part of EHOD, the THI led a free-of-charge guided tour of a number of the projects that are either progressing or recently completed. A film was commissioned for social media, featuring a walking tour of buildings being restored through the programme. A booklet will be produced in the closing stages of the project to record key programme achievements.

Indicators

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8 eligible properties have received Letters of Offer. 3 buildings have been successfully completed and the restoration of a further 5 is underway, due to be completed by June 2022.

The Carrickfergus Lego Exhibition will be staged in December 2021 at the Carrickfergus Civic Centre.

Outcomes

• Director of Development

How are we doing so far this year?

Increased inward investment and local employment opportunities related both directly and indirectly to heritage and tourism growth.

At least 25 construction jobs have been supported through the Townscape Heritage Initiative schemes. The number of jobs created will be established on project completion.

Up to 2 new grants awarded by March 2022 or beyond, to be measured in line with revised programme timescales.*²

One application has been received in October 2021, with another application expected soon.

Education Programme completed by March 2022.

The two remaining projects carried forward from 2020/21 are the Carrickfergus Lego Exhibition and the Launch of the Women in Carrickfergus Gaol project. Both of these are scheduled for delivery by the end of 2021/22.

Increased town centre footfall by March 2022 or beyond.*³

Footfall counters are in place and will be evaluated at the end of the project.

Lower levels of town centre vacancy by March 2022 or beyond.*³

Town centre occupancy levels will be evaluated at the end of the project.

Increased floor space for retail, commercial or residential use by March 2022 or beyond.*³

So far, the total vacant floor space restored and converted for reuse is 249m² (195m² for retail/commercial use and 54m² for museum/culture space). Ten new residential apartments are due for delivery by March 2022 or beyond.

*1 The full impact of COVID 19 on the overall programme and budget is as yet unknown. There are anticipated delays in programme arising from the management of construction projects within safe distancing guidelines. Programme delays are likely to incur additional project costs, bringing additional pressure on THI budget and the availability of grant across THI properties. *2 The principal funder, National Lottery Heritage Fund, have further offered flexibility over the proposed new grant expiry date of March 2022 during this period of uncertainty. *3 A full evaluation will take place at the end of the project and will inform future town centre regeneration initiatives. Indicator will be measured in line with revised programme timescales.


Reduce the impact of poverty through the delivery of a Slow Cooker programme. • In 2018/19, 16% of NI citizens were living in absolute poverty.*4

? Why?

Our aim

How are we doing so far this year?

A “Slow Energy Efficient” cookbook for households to prepare low cost enjoyable and nutritious meals.

The cookbook, entitled ‘Cook Slow, Eat Well’ is now available to download from the Council’s website and, also, in hard copy format. The cookbook has been promoted across Council’s social media platforms and via the Community Health and Wellbeing e-zine.

• 3% of NI households had not eaten a substantial meal at least one day in the last fortnight due to a lack of money.*5

To date the cookbook has been read online 1,370 times. Between April - September 2021, 16 slow cookers were delivered to vulnerable households, and, an additional 27 have since been distributed brining the current total to 43.

• Households experiencing food poverty often struggle to access a nutritionally adequate diet, which impacts on health & wellbeing. • Using slow cookers is a simple way to make healthy, nutritious meals at low cost.

Outcomes

Delivery of free slow cookers to vulnerable households.

What you will see

• Director of Community Who is responsible?

Indicators How we will measure progress

Council officers have connected with the Mid and East Antrim Agewell Partnership (MEAAP), which undertook an “Older Persons Needs” survey in September 2021 across Mid and East Antrim. The results of the survey showed that older people in the Borough feel they require access to healthy, nutritious meals. Council are now working with MEAAP to identify further groups of older persons who will benefit from the programme and receive slow cookers.

A series of fun and interactive virtual demonstration sessions for using a slow cooker.

Two demonstrations have taken place - one in September 2021 and one in October 2021. The sessions were positively received with participants receiving a slow cooking demonstration, opportunities to learn new recipes and copies of Council’s “Slow Energy Efficient” cookbook. Two more sessions are scheduled for November 2021 and January 2022.

“Slow Energy Efficient” cookbook launched by the end of July 2021.

“Cook Slow, Eat Well’ cookbook successfully launched in August 2021.

6 demonstration sessions by the end of March 2022.

To date, 2 demonstration sessions have been successfully delivered. An additional 2 have been scheduled for delivery before the end of January 2022.

50 slow cookers provided to vulnerable households by the end of March 2022.

43 slow cookers provided to date.

At least 70% of attendees state that they are now confident to produce healthy, nutritious meals using a slow cooker.

100% of attendees who participated in the session held in September 2021 stated they now felt confident to produce healthy, nutritious meals using a slow cooker.

*4 https://www.communities-ni.gov.uk/system/files/publications/communities/ni-poverty-bulletin-201819.pdf *5 Department of Health, 2018

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Improve customer engagement and service delivery by enhancing our use of information technology

Our aim

Implementation of our Digital Transformation Strategy, to include:

A redesign of the Council website developed from user experience feedback (Phase two).

• Our services will be more effective and efficient, providing greater satisfaction and value for money for ratepayers.

? Why?

• Digital Transformation will lead to improved management reporting and will support better and more informed decisionmaking.

The project team have drafted a Business Case that is expected to be approved before the end of 2021 by Council’s Senior Management Team. Once approved, the procurement process for the software to facilitate the new website will begin. Following a successful procurement process, Council will appoint a temporary website developer to ensure a smooth transition from the current MEA website to the new website.

The new automated call system continues to be utilised by Council’s Waste Department. The system isn’t restricted to Council’s normal operating hours meaning that Council is able to provide residents with a 24-hour service.

• In our recent Household Survey (2018), 39% of residents said they would like to be able to report a problem online, 37% would like to book activities, 27% would like to buy tickets and 22% would like to pay bills.

Automated Customer Call System.

Between April - September 2021, the Waste helpdesk received 14,519 calls. Since implementation, the system has been able to address almost 20% of calls. Additionally, the new live chat function has been able to address over 50% of all queries. Mid and East Antrim are the first local Authority in Northern Ireland to introduce the service as their customer contact solution for Waste Services and the helpdesk team are now exceeding industry standards with over 80% of all calls answered within 20 seconds.

• Director of Corporate Services Who is responsible?

How are we doing so far this year?

Outcomes

Council officers are currently in the process of identifying additional Council services that can avail of the service.

What you will see

Digital transformation of at least one customer facing service.

A new ‘Visitor Pass’ system has been successfully rolled out in Council’s Ardeevin building. The new system allows visitors to digitally alert Council staff of their arrival to reception, removing the need for paper based sign-in. In the event of an emergency that would involve an evacuation of the building, the system will send a text alert to all ‘signed in’ visitors instructing them what to do. Additionally, the system also allows greater COVID-19 compliance via a built-in COVID questionnaire. Additional areas for roll-out are currently being identified.

Indicators How we will measure progress

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Quarter Two Review 2021/22

Deliver ‘Community Centre Digital Connectivity’ via Full Fibre NI.

On site surveys have been completed and, to date, over 50% of the required installations have taken place. Council’s appointed supplier is on track to successfully complete this project by the target date.

Council Procurement Portal

Council’s Procurement team have completed the configuration of the new procurement system. Full training has been delivered to all system users. The new system is due to go live before the end of 2021.

A minimum of 5 digital projects completed by March 2022.

All projects are on track for successful completion.


Objective:

Development of Sullatober Household Recycling Centre

Our aim

A more effective and efficient service with increased customer satisfaction and value for money for ratepayers.

• Sullatober Household Recycling Centre (HRC) has been identified as a site in need of redevelopment.*6

? Why?

• The new site will increase recycling, improve efficiency of waste compaction and haulage, introduce new material streams for recycling and re-use and reduce the carbon footprint of the site. • Improved infrastructure will increase waste segregation and quality of materials collected to support local processors and the circular economy of Northern Ireland. • 91% of residents say that recycling is either very or fairly important to them (Residents Survey 2018).

How are we doing so far this year?

A baseline survey was completed by Council in June. This will be used to establish any changes in customer satisfaction levels when we complete our final survey in January 2022.

On 3rd October 2021, the existing Sullatober Household Recycling Centre closed. Residents have been advised to use the Larne South Recycling Centre located at Island Road Lower, Islandmagee.

Outcomes What you will see

A larger site with improved infrastructure and accessibility to maximise reuse and recycling.

Council’s website has been updated to inform residents of the closure along with a press release and social media posts. Council officers continue to engage with the Northern Ireland Environment Agency to progress the site license application. This is on track to be in place during December 2021. The project remains on track. However, the expected completion date has been extended to February 2022.

• Director of Operations

Financial savings by compacting waste and reduction in fuel consumption.

Who is responsible?

The financial baseline for recycling and landfill costs has been established. This will be used to determine financial savings upon project completion.

Increase recycling by 23.2%.

An additional 1,046 tonnes of recycled materials and 12 tonnes of re-used materials.

Indicators

50% reduction in containers hauled per new compacted materials.

Results against these indicators will be determined upon project completion.

How we will measure progress

Reduce tC02e by 800.

Increased rate of customer satisfaction.

*6 WRAP - HWRC Improvement Recommendations Report - Mid and East Antrim, June 2018 20 |

Quarter Two Review 2021/22

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Objective:

Autism Friendly Mid and East Antrim

? Why?

Our aim

6 public awareness-raising sessions have been successfully delivered.

• Autism is a lifelong disability that affects the way an individual relates to people, situations and the immediate environment.*7 • In Northern Ireland, 1 in 30 children have a diagnosis of Autism. *8

An awareness-raising programme to develop the borough as an autism friendly place.

The project steering group have agreed to offer specialist awareness-raising sessions to all barbers and hairstylists within the Borough. Council have issued a press release, e-shot and a number of social media posts to request Expressions of Interest. If there is sufficient interest, awareness-raising sessions will be scheduled for delivery in 2022.

We will secure ‘Autism Friendly’ organisation status as a potential model for other Community Planning Partners.

Collaborative work has taken place with Council’s Arts and Events team to ensure that all Mid and East Antrim civic events and activities are as inclusive as possible. Halloween activities in Carnfunnock Country Park had a ‘quiet hour’ before it opened to the public.

Commitment to become a JAM friendly organisation, as this will allow people with a learning difficulty, autism or communication barrier to tell others they need ‘Just A Minute’ discreetly and easily.

‘Just A Minute’ (JAM) Awareness Training commenced in June 2021, with 151 staff members completing it successfully so far.

Development and launch of sensory garden and sensory trail at Ecos.

The sensory garden and trail at Ecos in Ballymena, were officially opened on 23 June 2021. The garden and trail has attracted attention from a number of other Councils and Council has been sharing details as an example of good practice.

A further 3 Council venues will be accredited with the Autism NI Impact Award by June 2021, including Carnfunnock Country Park, The People’s Park and The Gobbins.

All 3 targeted venues were accredited in June 2021. This brings the total number of venues accredited with Autism NI Impact Awards to 6.

• Improving people’s health and wellbeing (and reducing health inequalities) is one of residents’ top five priorities for making the local area a good place to live (Household Survey 2018).

Outcomes

• Director of Community.

What you will see

Who is responsible?

A further 6 staff members and 3 Elected Members will be trained as ‘Autism Champions’.

Indicators How we will measure progress

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Quarter Two Review 2021/22

How are we doing so far this year?

By completing the JAM Awareness Training, Council staff have gained valuable knowledge about different types of disabilities and learned how to engage with customers with a disability to ensure that they are provided with the best customer service as possible.

In total, 41 people have attended IMPACT Training, 16 of whom received the accreditation and are now Autism Champions. Of the three Elected Members targeted as Autism Champions, one received the accreditation. The other two have completed Awareness-Raising training and will advocate on behalf of the programme to additional sectors across the Borough.

3 ‘Autism Friendly’ public awareness sessions held for businesses Council staff members and the local community, with at least 70% of attendees reporting that their knowledge of autism has increased following training.

6 virtual public awareness sessions have taken place to date and 100% of participants have reported that their knowledge of autism has increased following the training.

Sensory garden and sensory trail launched by September 2021.

The sensory garden and trail is now complete.

*7 Autism NI *8 Prevalence of Autism in School Age Children in Northern Ireland 2019, Department of Health.


5.0 Statutory Key Performance Indicators Objective:

In addition to the improvement areas identified by us, the Department for Communities also sets statutory targets for Councils in the functional areas of Planning, Economic Development and Waste. Our arrangements to meet these are through the delivery of our statutory services. They are outlined in our annual business plans, and as far as possible, within our Improvement Objectives. We closely monitor our progress against the statutory performance indicators to ensure we are progressing in line with our targets. We submit our results to the Department for Infrastructure, the Department for the Economy and the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) every three months.

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Quarter Two Review 2021/22

Reports are then issued comparing our performance against all 11 councils. We publish the results on the Council website every six months at www. midandeastantrim.gov.uk/PIP Our latest results are summarised in the following diagram. *9 Year to date figures up to September 2021 are not yet available, therefore quarter one figures are reported (April to June 2021). *10 No target is set for this indicator.

Indicators

Targets

The average processing time of major planning applications.

Major applications processed within an average of 30 weeks.

23.4 weeks *9

The average processing time of local planning applications.

Local applications processed within an average of 15 weeks.

8.2 weeks *9

The % of enforcement cases concluded within 39 weeks.

70% of all enforcement cases progressed to target conclusion within 39 weeks.

89.2% *9

The number of jobs promoted through business start-up activity.

120 jobs.

59 jobs

The % of household waste collected by district Councils that is sent for recycling.

50% household recycling by 2022.

The amount of biodegradable Local Authority Collected Municipal Waste that is landfilled.

16,387 tonnes (2021/22).

3,508 tonnes *9

The amount (tonnage) of Local Authority Collected Municipal Waste arisings.

N/A*10

21,553 tonnes *9

Results

54% *9


6.0 Performance Improvement Plan 2021/22 - Summary Table Improvement Objective Grow the economy and create jobs

What you will see • •

Support the communities within the historic conservation area of Carrickfergus, contributing to the sustainability of the local economy Reduce the impact of poverty through the delivery of a Slow Cooker programme

• •

• • •

Improve customer engagement and service delivery by enhancing our use of information technology

Development of Sullatober Household Recycling Centre

Autism Friendly Mid and East Antrim

• •

By when *11

The promotion of new jobs in the borough by successfully delivering the ‘Go for It’ Programme. The growth of new industry sectors by being a Centre of Excellence for start-ups, spin-outs and social-economy businesses within the Ecos Innovation Centre. Delivery of an effective and efficient Planning Service to maximise economic development.

March 2022

Up to 10 buildings of historical and architectural interest restored (including 8 existing awarded schemes), through the Townscape Heritage Initiative, with Council and Heritage Lottery grant assistance, by March 2022 or beyond. The local community will have a better understanding of built heritage. Increased inward investment and local employment opportunities related both directly and indirectly to heritage and tourism growth.

March 2022

A “Slow Energy Efficient” cookbook for households to prepare low cost, enjoyable and nutritious meals. Delivery of free slow cookers to vulnerable households. A series of fun and interactive virtual demonstration sessions for using a slow cooker.

March 2022

Further implementation of our Digital Transformation Strategy through delivery of a number of citizen-focused projects to include: • A redesign of the Council website developed from user experience feedback (Phase two). • Automated Customer Call System. • Digital transformation of at least one customer facing service. • Deliver ‘Community Centre Digital Connectivity’ via Full Fibre NI. • Council Procurement Portal.

March 2022

A more effective and efficient service with increased customer satisfaction and value for money for ratepayers. A larger site with improved infrastructure and accessibility to maximise re-use and recycling. Financial savings by compacting waste and reduction in fuel consumption.

March 2022

An awareness-raising programme to develop the borough as an autism friendly place. • We will secure ‘Autism Friendly’ organisation status as a potential model for other Community Planning Partners. • Commitment to become a JAM friendly organisation, as this will allow people with a learning difficulty, autism or communication barrier to tell others need ‘JustCOVID A Minute’ discreetly and easily. * Timescales may be subject to change as athey result of the 19 pandemic. • Development and launch of sensory garden and sensory trail at Ecos.

We welcome ongoing feedback on our Performance Improvement Plan. If you would like to make any comments, our contact details are on our website www.midandeastantrim.gov.uk/PIP 36 | 26

Performance Quarter Two Review Improvement 2021/22 Plan 2020/21

*11 Timelines are subject to change as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

March 2022