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Priceless

Serving Greater Delmarva Since 1984

July 1, 2022

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Holiday Weekend Festivities On Tap

See Coverage Inside • Photo by Chris Parypa

County Primary Election Preview

Summer Scenes:

Both featured photos – above, an early morning beach look and below, a Boardwalk evening Photos by Chris Parypa -- were taken last Sunday in Ocean City.

See Pages 74-77 • File Photo

Berlin Rental Change Moves Ahead

See Page 14 • File Photo

Cutest Pet Of The Month The winner of last month’s Cutest Pet of the Month contest was Eddie, a 4-year-old rescue owned by Matt Stoehr. See page 57 for this month’s contestants. Submitted Photo


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SERVING DELMARVA FOR 60 YEARS

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Gas Price Impact On Tourism On Many Area Minds

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

The south end of the Boardwalk is pictured Sunday night.

Photo by Chris Parypa

OCEAN CITY – With the arrival of the Fourth of July weekend, despite rising gas prices likely to spike again with a scheduled state gas tax kicking in on Friday, resort tourism officials remain bullish for the most part on the holiday weekend. As unleaded gas prices locally hover around the $4.75 per gallon mark this week, that number is expected to increase on Friday when the state gasoline tax will kick in without action from the General Assembly. A state gas tax increase linked to inflation and the Consumer Price Index is scheduled to kick in on Friday, meaning the state’s current gas tax rate will increase from around 36cents per gallon to 43-cents per gallon. In March, the state implemented a gas tax holiday to give Marylanders some relief from rising prices at the pump, but that holiday has expired, and the cost of gas has crept back up incrementally in the months that followed. At $4.75 locally this week, the price per gallon has dropped back somewhat from the nearly $5 per gallon just a week or so ago, but with the mandated inflationbased state gas tax rate kicking in on Friday, the price at the pump will rise again. What does that mean for a beach resort like Ocean City on arguably what should be one of the busiest weekends of the season? Historically, Ocean City has thrived at times of rising gas prices or gas shortages because of its proximity to millions of potential visitors in the large metropolitan areas. During a gas shortage and rising prices in the 1970s, Ocean City Mayor Harry Kelley famously proclaimed the resort was just a “half a tank away” and took bold steps to ensure visitors to the resort could affordably come for vacation and be ensured they would have fuel to return to their homes. When an oil embargo threatened Ocean City’s summer season, Kelley launched the famous “half a tank away” campaign and the town purchased 41,000 gallons of gasoline from the city’s coffers and ultimately sold the fuel at 50 cents cheaper than the going rate at the time. Such bold action is probably not warranted at the moment, but the era’s “half a tank away” campaign is still relevant under the current situation. Ocean City indeed is within a tank of gas from major metropolitan areas such as Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia and beyond and many of those residents are expected to make the resort their vacation destination this weekend and going forward. According to AAA Mid-Atlantic, 48 million will travel 50 miles or more over the holiday weekend, which is 4% higher than last year and just 2% lower than SEE PAGE 99


July 1, 2022

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July 1, 2022

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Council Approves Parking Change Despite Mayor’s Objections

July 1, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – A proposed code amendment allowing tandem, or stack ed, parking with a valet system for some major downtown redevelopment projects was advanced this week, but not before the mayor voiced concerns. Last week, after considerable debate, the council did not pass the proposed ordinance on second reading and instead instructed staff to bring it back with revisions that met some of their concerns to this Tuesday’s work session. In simplest terms, if a development

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

project for a hotel or resort complex in the downtown area could not meet its minimum parking space requirements on-site, tandem parking, or spaces in which vehicles could be stacked behind the other could be utilized if a comprehensive parking management system, or valet system, for example, was provided. In other words, if a project required 100 spaces under the code, 20% of them could be tandem if a dedicated comprehensive parking management system was included. It’s important to note the proposed ordinance, if approved, would apply to any significant redevelopment project in the

downtown area that can’t meet its parking requirements on-site, but really the code amendment before the council on Tuesday was crafted to accommodate the major Margaritaville project. After the council debated the various elements of the proposed code amendment ordinance and ultimately approved the preferred option 2, Mayor Rick Meehan voiced his displeasure with the pending decision by the council and specifically referenced the Margaritaville project without ever naming it. “As a mayor, I don’t agree with it,” he said. “I agree with option 1. If you read the summary, it says the development of

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infill properties in the downtown area is constrained by the availability of land for off-street parking. I think the first determination to be made is if the property is actually restrained. That’s exactly what it says.” Meehan said the planning commission’s public hearing and findings of fact on the issue remained valid. “The public hearing about this for the downtown and upper downtown talked about the uniqueness of and some of the lot sizes in the downtown area,” he said. “They are not all the same. They should be judged on a case-by-case basis, SEE PAGE 93


Resort Moves Ahead With 3-Year Contract For Air Show

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With some concerns allayed, resort officials this week agreed to a terms sheet with the OC Air Show to ensure the annual event returns for the next three years and beyond. Last week, Tourism and Business Development Director Tom Perlozzo presented a terms sheet for negotiations on a three-year contract with the OC Air Show promoter. The terms sheet was not a contract, but merely an outline of sorts for some of the issues between the town and promoter, which will provide a framework for negotiations on the actual three-year contract. Last week, the Mayor and Council voiced some concerns about certain elements in the proposed terms sheet and the issue was tabled until this Tuesday’s

work session until some of those issues could be addressed. On Tuesday, Perlozzo presented a modified terms sheet, which allayed some of the Mayor and Council’s concerns. One of the major issues raised last week was a desire to always have a major jet team act headlining the OC Air Show, such as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds or the U.S. Navy Blue Angels. While the air show promoter has generally been successful in landing one of those two major acts, typically in alternating years, the town’s elected officials wanted some guarantee in the contract language that every effort was being made to make that happen. Again, Perlozzo explained the modified terms sheet presented on Tuesday was just a framework for the pending formal contract. “It’s a term sheet,” he said. “It’s not a contract at this point. We believe this is a

good deal and we recommend moving forward to the contract phase. There are some changes based on your last meeting. Some of those are normal variable costs.” Perlozzo said the air show has a great track record of honoring its commitments. He said there was a discussion after least week’s meeting when the terms sheet was first presented about securing one of the major acts desired by the Mayor and Council. “We did talk to the air show promoter after last Monday’s meeting,” he said. “He did express a desire to bring in a major act every year. The Thunderbirds are confirmed for 2023, and he will find out about the Blue Angels for 2024 in December. Please keep in mind that the Department of Defense has the final say in deploying either.” Indeed, the modified terms sheet presented on Tuesday includes language to

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that effect. “The major military jet team headline act will include no less than one of the following: the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, the Canadian Air Force Snowbirds, or two or more U.S. military single ship jet demonstrations,” it reads. “We spoke with [OC Air Show promoter] Bryan after the Monday night meeting to confirm his desire to continue to request both the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds. We did mention that we are willing to assist with any roadblocks associated with the opportunity to secure both.” Another issue raised when the terms sheet was first presented last week was the impact on the beach rental franchisee in the air show’s footprint from 13th Street to 17th Street. A clause in the terms sheet says the promoter can provide tables, chairs and umbrellas in the event area, however, the beach rental franchisee should be compensated by the promoter for lost business. The modified terms sheet states the following: “Subject to town of Ocean City code provision, the OC Air Show shall execute a mutually-agreeable contract with the beach franchise vendor operating within the venue from the period of load-in to load-out.” Even before the Mayor and Council took up the issue during Tuesday’s work session, beach rental franchisee Patrick McLaughlin voiced some of his concerns about the terms sheet as originally proposed last week. “We do experience impacts with the special events, including the air show,” he said. “We appreciate the events, and the air show is just one example. There should be a part of the process that includes the beach franchisee. We’re in the beach rental business. We’re not in the air show business.” McLaughlin said there needed to be a formal plan in place for addressing compensation for the beach rental franchisees, who, according to the code, have exclusivity in the areas which they hold franchises. “There should be a mechanism in place where the promoter approaches the beach rental franchisee,” he said. “We want to support all of the events. The air show is not just two days. It’s a load-in, load-out process. It’s a big deal. We pay a lot of money for these franchise rights.” City Solicitor Heather Stansbury said the terms sheet explains that arrangement and it will be part of the formal contract once it is negotiated and inked. “The reality is this,” she said. “The contract the beach vendor signs acknowledges there could be special events from time to time that disrupts normal business. They need to work out that compensation with the special event promoter. That’s the fair thing to do. It might be something we need to consider in future years.” Mayor Rick Meehan said the terms sheet as presented appears to address the beach rental franchisee issue. “It’s time to move this forward,” he said. “We all recognize the importance of the air show. It should be the responsibility of the OC Air Show to reach out to the beach franchisee with an agreement.” Perlozzo agreed that was part of the modified terms sheet. SEE NEXT PAGE


1 Dead, 1 Injured In Route 12 Collision

July 1, 2022

BY SHAWN J. SOPER

SNOW HILL – One individual perished and another suffered life-threatening injuries in a head-on collision on Route 12 near Snow Hill on Tuesday evening. Around 5:15 p.m. on Tuesday, Maryland State Police troopers from the Berlin barrack responded to a reported motor vehicle collision on Route 12 near the Worcester County-Wicomico County line in Snow Hill. The preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Fusion operated by Joshua Capra, 23, of Salisbury, was traveling

northbound on Route 12 and crossed the center lane. Capra’s vehicle struck a southbound vehicle operated by Emani Press, 21, of Temperanceville, Va. Capra was pronounced deceased at the scene by Snow Hill EMS. Press was transported to TidalHealth Peninsula Regional with life-threatening injuries. The cause of the collision remains under investigation by the Maryland State Police Berlin barrack and the CRASH team. The investigation was assisted by Snow Hill Fire and EMS, Salisbury EMS and the Maryland State Highway Administration.

“This issue is going to boil down to what’s fair for the beach franchisee,” he said. “That’s in this terms sheet and the promoter has promised a concerted effort to ensure what’s fair.” Council President Matt James asked if the 30-day window for negotiating with the beach rental franchisee on compensation was the right number. “Is 30 days appropriate?” he said. “We don’t want to be in a position where it’s two days before the event and they start closing the beach.” Meehan said he was confident the air show promoter would work closely with the beach rental franchisee on what is fair. “That can be worked out,” he said. “I

think we have a great promoter and operator and it’s one of our signature events.” Satisfied their concerns from last week were allayed, the council voted unanimously to approve the modified terms sheet and move forward with negotiations on a formal three-year contract. Perlozzo said a three-year contract represented a departure from the typical year-to-year memorandum of understanding with the air show promoter. “It used to be a one-year memorandum of understanding,” he said. “Under this plan, there is a three-year contract in place. If they failed to secure a headline act as defined, the contract would be breached.”

MANAGING EDITOR

“GHOSTS IN THE SURF”

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

… Council Approves Terms Sheet

Page 9

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Brick Crosswalks Changed In Berlin

Page 10

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

Brick crosswalks are no longer supported by the state and are gradually being replaced with the classic black and white style recently installed at the four-way stop, pictured above. Photo by Steve Green

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BERLIN – The town’s iconic brick crosswalks are being eliminated in favor of safer alternatives now being used by the state. Mayor Zack Tyndall advised council members this week that Maryland’s State Highway Administration (SHA) was no longer supporting brick crosswalks and would instead be installing the traditional black and white model going forward. Tyndall’s comments during Monday’s council meeting addressed the questions that have been circulating in the community since the brick crosswalk along Main Street in front of Berlin’s Town Hall was redone last week. “What we see is what we’re going to be getting,” Tyndall said. “It meets the safety standards for the state.” At the close of Monday’s council meeting, Councilman Jack Orris brought up the crosswalks and the fact that Tyndall had shared information regarding the new version on social media but hadn’t provided the council with an update. He said residents had come to him seeking information and he wanted to be able to answer their questions when issues came up. “Folks are concerned about the crosswalks, that’s why I mentioned it, but I wasn’t really aware until they came to me,” he said. “Then I saw some chatter on Facebook where there was information available that just hadn’t gotten to us

July 1, 2022

yet.” He suggested Tyndall resume the “mayor’s report” that had once been regularly sent to council members. Tyndall said he was sending emails as issues came up rather than a regular report. As far as the crosswalks, he said he’d reached out to SHA last week to ask why the thermoplastic crosswalk painted like brick in front of town hall had been replaced with a traditional black and white crosswalk. Tyndall said officials had advised him the thermoplastic crosswalks were no longer supported by the state. “They’re not deemed to be safe and the crosswalk that we have is deemed to be safe so that is what you will be seeing on state roads throughout town,” he said. “They will be transitioning.” Jimmy Charles, the town’s public works director, said the new style would be used throughout the state, not just in Berlin. He said they had more safety features than the old crosswalks. “You know how you drive down the road and the lines are bright, these crosswalks will be the same,” he said. “They’ll have reflective glass in them so as you come up to them they’ll shine.” Dave Engelhart, the town’s planning director, added that the thermoplastic crosswalks were expensive and didn’t hold up very long. “Now the brick will be disappearing everywhere eventually,” he said. “I know it’s quaint, it’s rustic, but it’s not very durable.”


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SHA Road Work Nears Completion

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

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BERLIN – Work that has long been underway at the intersection of Assateague Road and Route 113 should soon be complete, according to state officials. The Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) confirmed this week that improvements at Route 113 and Assateague Road (Route 376) are nearly done. “The work is substantially complete,” said Shanteé Felix, SHA spokesperson. “We have only a few outstanding items remaining, which should be addressed in the next month, weather permitting.” Improvements at the intersection, which have been underway for months, drew criticism from municipal officials earlier this week. During Monday’s council meeting, Councilman Dean Burrell expressed concern regarding the striping at the intersection. “It’s an accident waiting to happen,” he said. His peers agreed. Councilwoman Shaneka Nichols said it was hard for tourists and even residents to navigate. “I really kind of feel it’s a little unacceptable that State Highway left it that way,” Councilman Jack Orris said. “There should be some sort of signage. I’m not asking for a Las Vegas light show just something that says what

lanes go where.” Police Chief Arnold Downing said SHA had been advised of the concerns regarding the intersection. “The statement was it was going to be corrected,” he said. Jamey Latchum, the town’s water resources director, said SHA was waiting on piping they needed for the stormwater management at the intersection. “They don’t know when they’re going to be back to complete everything,” he said. Less than 24 hours after the council expressed concerns about the intersection, striping was adjusted to better delineate where motorists should drive. Felix said on Wednesday that the rest of the work needed was nearing completion. “This week, a contractor is installing signs and that is expected to eliminate the need for any further lane closures,” she said. “Due to supply chain issues, our crews are still waiting on necessary materials to install a handrail at the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ramp, along with materials to complete the storm water management facility.” The improvements to the intersection were initially discussed last year, when the town agreed to give SHA a small section of property as well as some easements meant to allow for the lengthening of the right turn lane onto Route 113.

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Berlin’s Rental Changes Take Effect July 1

July 1, 2022

BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – The town’s new short-term rental ordinance will go into effect this week despite some requests for a delay. While owners of short-term rental properties estimated they’d lose 80-100 bookings if the town’s new regulations went into effect July 1, the council nevertheless decided to stick to the scheduled date this week. There was no interest in a motion to extend the implementation date. “We’re prepared to move forward with the effective date of July 1 if that’s what this body decides, but we wanted to bring this volume — I mean 80 to 100, and that’s probably an underreported number — we felt that it was due diligence to bring that before you guys,” Mayor Zack Tyndall said. In March, after years of discussion, elected officials in Berlin voted 3-2 to approve an ordinance setting up short-term rental regulations for the town. Though officials initially discussed a requirement to allow short-term rentals in the R-1 and R2 districts only if the home was the owner’s primary residence per state records, the ordinance presented did not include that provision. Mayor Zack Tyndall acknowledged he’d removed it after hearing concern about it. Dozens of residents in attendance for the March public hearing, however, said they felt it was necessary to protect Berlin’s neighborhoods. In the end, the council’s approval of the ordinance came after it was amended to work the owner occupancy requirement back in. Planning Director Dave Engelhart told officials this week that he’d been contacted by several property owners with short-term rentals in the months since. He believes there are about 15 currently operating in town. “I’ve been contacted more recently from some of the owners, they want to know how they’re going to dispose of their property,” he said. Engelhart said the property owners contacting him have short-term rentals in the R-1 and R-2 districts. They’re trying to figure out whether they should sell their properties or use them as long-term rentals that are permitted in those districts. “This is why they’re asking for a delay in the implementation of the ordinance,” he said. Engelhart recommended the effective date be extended to Jan. 1 so that owners of short-term rental properties could finish the summer. “When the weather’s good we have people visiting us all the time,” he said. “We are as much of a tourist attraction as Ocean City is so we ride the same season they do.” SEE NEXT PAGE


… Council Stays With Initial Date

July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Pictured, from left, during a discussion of short-term rentals are Berlin Council members Jack Orris, Jay Knerr and Dean Burrell, Mayor Zack Tyndall and Council member Shaneka Nichols. Council member Troy Purnell was absent. Photo by Charlene Sharpe

Engelhart read an email from Jacqueline Clemmer, a Silver Spring resident who with her husband owns a property in Berlin that is used as a short-term rental. She wrote that by renting it out on a shortterm basis they were able to retain ownership of the home so that one day they might be able to retire there. “As the owner of a property who has been paying taxes and contributing to the town’s economic growth by patronizing local contractors, restaurants and businesses for decades I am asking that you reconsider or amend this ordinance to grandfather out those of us who are in this situation by allowing us to continue to operate our rentals at least for the remainder of 2022, if not longer,” Clemmer wrote. “Having this happen in the middle of the vacation season made for unexpected changes to the 2022 budget we already had planned for income, spending and taxes.” Engelhart said similar sentiments had been expressed by other property owners. In all he was contracted by 10 property owners. He reported that one owner said 47 reservations would need to be canceled through the end of October. Collectively, Engelhart said owners estimated the loss of bookings at 80 to 100. “Some were reluctant to tell me, I think they thought that was going to send me out on an enforcement run,” he said. “I think it’s probably a lot higher number than that. It’s high season for vacation rentals, not just in Berlin but all around the area.” Tyndall said implementing the regulations in July could hurt people who had already taken off work. Councilman Jack Orris said he felt January was a bit far to extend implementation but said he was willing to consider a date after Labor Day. “I think the basis for the Jan. 1 date was the wind down of the season,” Tyndall said. Councilwoman Shaneka Nichols said that if the council delayed now the date would just keep getting extended. She noted officials had talked about shortterm rental regulations for years before they were approved in March. “Every day there’s a different scenario,” she said. “’Hey guess what my son is 18 now so my second house is going to be-

come their primary residence.’ Stop playing games. The ordinance is here, it’s in place. That’s my take on it.” Councilman Jay Knerr asked Engelhart if the town was prepared to have the ordinance become effective July 1. “In your packet is the application,” Engelhart said. “That would start everything. I’d start distributing the applications.” A motion by Orris to extend the effective date of the ordinance to Sept. 6 failed with no second. No other motions were made so the ordinance is set to go into effect July 1.

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Janasek Sues OPA Over 90-Day Ban

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – Former board member Tom Janasek has filed suit against the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors seeking relief against the enforcement of a 90-day amenity ban. In June, the Ocean Pines Association (OPA) Board of Directors voted 52, with Directors Doug Parks and Rick Farr opposed, to ban Janasek from the Yacht Club, Golf Clubhouse and Beach Club for a total of 90 days following an altercation between the former board member and Director Josette Wheatley at the Yacht Club Tiki Bar. Since that time, however, Janasek has filed suit in Worcester County Circuit Court seeking declaratory judgement and injunctive relief. The lawsuit asserts that the ban violates the association’s governing documents. “Plaintiff respectfully requests that the Court make a determination and declare … that the reported ‘ban’: violates the OPA governing documents; is not authorized by any provision of OPA governing documents; is not consistent with or authorized by any property adopted OPA rules or regulations’ is beyond the scope of the Board’s authority/power; violates and contravenes Plaintiff's property rights and interests, as contractually and legally established in the OPA governing documents; is arbitrary and capricious; and is motivated by personal animus and ill will toward Plaintiff,” the complaint reads. The board’s decision to ban Janasek from food and beverage amenities resulted from an altercation between Janasek and Wheatley on the evening of May 20. While at the Yacht Club Tiki Bar, Janasek reportedly launched into a verbal tirade over Wheatley’s vote to elect the next association president. “Mr. Janasek stood over her and began yelling loudly at her because she did not vote for Doug Parks as President for their Board of Directors,” a police report of the incident reads. Janasek was ultimately escorted from the property, and Wheatley has since obtained a peace order prevent-

ing Janasek from contacting her for a period of six months. As a result of the incident, however, the board voted in June to ban Janasek from food and beverage operations for a period of 90 days beginning June 10. “Our governing documents do give us the authority to provide for the safety at our amenities, not only for members of the association but anyone who comes to our amenities,” Director Larry Perrone said at the time. “And while there are some contradictions in the bylaws, the bylaws clearly state that we have a right and obligation to provide for safety at our amenities.” President Colette Horn agreed with the decision. “I think our governing documents falls short of this situation and I realize by stretching the limits of our governing documents we will be able to provide some kind of immediate relief from the risk that is there for Director Wheatley and other directors on this board that may be targeted, or members of the community who may be targeted,” she said at time. A lawsuit filed last week – which names the association and board members Horn, Perrone, Frank Daly and Amy Peck as defendants – outlines the series of events that led to Janasek’s resignation from the board and board members’ alleged animosity toward him. The complaint also asserts the ban violated the association’s governing documents. While the governing documents authorize facility managers and the general manager (GM) to restrict use for violating rules and regulations, the complaint states the board is only authorized to suspend amenity and facility use based on nonpayment of association fees and violations of OPA covenants. “The manager of OPA bar and restaurant facilities is Matt Ortt Companies (MOC) …,” the complaint reads. “MOC has not taken any action to suspend Plaintiff’s use of OPA facilities under its management, including those referenced in the June 10 Notice Letter. The OPA GM did not take any action to susSEE NEXT PAGE

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pend Plaintff’s use of any OPA amenities; the purported ‘ban’ was imposed by the OPA Board. And, indeed, the OPA GM could not take any action to suspend Plaintiff’s use of OPA amenities, because Plaintiff has not violated any ‘rules, regulations or policies of the Association.’” The complaint also contends that the ban also prohibits Janasek from conducting his business. As an independent contractor for AC Beverage, Janasek services bar equipment at OPA food and beverage facilities. “In imposing the wrongful and knowingly unauthorized ‘ban,’ Defendents intended to interfere with Plaintiff’s business/contractual relationship with AC Beverage and/or fully understood that such interference would result from the purported ‘ban,’” the complaint reads. “As a result, Plaintiff has suffered and is continuing to suffer monetary losses and other harm.” Ultimately, the complaint seeks declaratory judgement from the court and a preliminary injunction against the enforcement of the ban, as well as less than $75,000 in damages. A preliminary injunction hearing, originally scheduled for June 29, has been postponed to Aug. 25. A temporary restraining order, which prohibits the board from enforcing the ban until the court rules on the preliminary injunction, has also been extended. “Our position in the case is that the Board majority does not have the power to impose the ban that they have attempted to impose, and that they took this action arbitrarily, without precedent, knowing full well they were acting outside the scope of their power and the OPA governing documents,” Bruce Bright, Janasek’s attorney, said in a statement this week. “Although an unspecified amount of damages are being sought including for the Defendants’ knowing interference with Mr. Janasek’s work at the OPA venues, the main objective of this case is to obtain a judicial order striking down the improper ban.” He continued, “This is important not only for Mr. Janasek, but for any other member, including those who may be critics or political opponents of the Board majority, who might be targeted this way. As for the altercation between Mr. Janasek and Ms. Wheatley, a Peace Order was entered with Mr. Janasek’s cooperation and agreement, which ensures no contact between them (he is not interested in having any contact); and law enforcement appropriately has not intervened in the matter, despite Ms. Wheatley’s attempt to get law enforcement involved. The matter would be over but for the Board majority’s unfounded action.” Horn, Perrone, Daly and Peck all declined to comment on pending legal matters. Janasek did not return requests for comment this week.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Diakonia Board Announces New Executive Director

Page 18

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

WEST OCEAN CITY – Diakonia’s governing board has announced the appointment of Ken Argot as the nonprofit’s new executive director. Argot, having just completed 15 years as an officer in The Salvation Army, began his new role as executive director of Diakonia on June 27. Board Chair Reid Tingle said the nonprofit is eager to have Argot take the helm. “We are honored to have someone with this level of dedication of service to others accept this position,” he said. “Ken exemplifies what an executive director of a nonprofit should be. His experience and dedication to serve will have a lasting impact on our community and will truly create hope for tomorrow, as the mission statement for Diakonia states.”

In an interview this week, Argot – a Cambridge native – said his new role not only allows him to be closer to family, but to serve the community. “Initially, I hope to continue doing what we need to do to help those in need,” he said. “There’s also a really strong vision for the Route 611 campus, to make it a one-stop shop for homeless services. I’m hoping we can grow that in the future.” Officials report Argot completed a Master of Divinity degree from Asbury Theological Seminary in 1995 and went on to pastor congregations, serve KEN ARGOT as a family therapist for children and adolescents and oversaw grant compliance for the Lower Management Board of Dorchester County before joining The Salvation Army in 2005.

There, he served in Alexandria, Va., for four years, overseeing operations that included the city’s overnight shelter, as well as a transitional housing program for women released from correctional facilities. Argot then served for three years in Roanoke, Va., leading the county’s only domestic violence shelter program, before taking a position at Atlanta Temple, a Georgia-based worship and service center located at The Salvation Army’s Territorial Headquarters. Most recently, he oversaw Salvation Army operations in Frederick County, Md., where grants were secured to open and maintain new day center services to homeless persons in cooperation with downtown safety initiatives. “No one ever said, ‘I want to be homeless when I grow up,’ or ‘I hope I need someone’s help to pay my bills when I get older,’” Argot said, “but life sometimes has

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a way of distracting us from our aspirations, derailing us from our achievements, and sometimes—through circumstances beyond our control – throwing us into a darkness that leaves us unable to see our way forward without community intervention and support.” Officials say Argot’s experience as an officer in The Salvation Army has led to new programs that address homelessness. In his new capacity at Diakonia, Argot says he will continue to help those in the community gain independence. “In The Salvation Army, you never knew how long you would be allowed to stay in one community. Officers moving from place to place is intrinsic to its overall stability, despite the upheaval locally. I am so glad, though, that I now get to put my feet down in a place where a long-term investment will be vital to the organization’s future success,” Argot said. “Working in Ocean City is a dream come true for me. Our family has always loved the beach, and I really can’t wait to see the generosity of those in our community for those who want a better life for themselves.” Argot replaces Bee Miller, a two-time executive director of Diakonia. Miller led the nonprofit from 1996 to 2003 and returned to the position in 2019, following the resignation of previous executive director Claudia Nagle. “I’m so thankful for the leadership of the Board and for Bee Miller,” Argot said. “They have served admirably during one of the most difficult times in our nation’s history when it comes to human services. Our staff and volunteers have been tremendous in adapting, sacrificing, and supporting those in need in some very unusual situations. They deserve all the recognition here, I’m just here to support them.” Diakonia will celebrate its 50th anniversary in Worcester County on Nov. 4th of this year, with plans to launch an affordable housing initiative which will be part of the new campus being built on Stephen Decatur Highway, just south of the Decatur Diner, officials report. By continuing to provide food, clothing, shelter, and case management services, the organization says it hopes to continue to provide “Help for Today and Hope for Tomorrow” for the Lower Shore tri-county area. The organization says those who want more information about Diakonia, or wish to make a donation, can call 410-2130923, or visit diakoniaoc.org. Since 1972, Diakonia has been providing “help for today and hope for tomorrow,” for men, women, and families in Worcester County. By providing emergency housing, food assistance, and resources to help them get back on their feet, Diakonia helps families rebuild their lives one step at a time. Over the past 10 years, Diakonia has expanded services to the entire Lower Shore tri-county region that includes case management, housing assistance, homeless prevention, and veteran services. Diakonia is the only comprehensive provider for homeless men, women, children, and veterans on lower Eastern Shore. “The staff here is amazing, even just listening to the way they talk to clients over the phone,” Argot said in an interview this week. “It’s a great atmosphere.”


Four Arrested In Armed Robbery

July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – Three Pennsylvania men and a juvenile were arrested last weekend for an alleged strong-armed robbery in the downtown area. Around 3:45 a.m. on Saturday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to the area of 20th Street and Philadelphia Avenue for a reported strong-armed robbery. Officers met with a 25year-old victim from Baltimore, who informed police he had been assaultJADEN ed by three males who MALLERY had stolen some of his personal property, according to police reports. The victim was treated at the scene by Ocean City EMS and was transported to Atlantic General Hospital for injuries related to the assault. The preliminary investigation revealed the victim and his assailants were acquaintances and D’ANDRE had spent time at the susSAMPSON pects’ motel room before the assault occurred. The suspects left the area before with the victim’s belongings before OCPD officers arrived on the scene. However, the victim was able to provide police with a detailed description of the assailants. A short time later, OCPD officers observed

three males walking in the area of 23rd Street and detained two of them. The suspects were identified as Jaden Mallery, 18, of Canonsburg, Pa., and D’Andre Sampson, 18, of Johnstown, Pa. At that time, OCPD officers were able to recover some of the victim’s stolen property. Additional OCPD officers responded to the suspects’ motel room in the area of 26th Street where they located another suspect, identified as Jelyjah Malcolm, 18, of Johnstown, and a 17-year-old juvenile also from Johnstown, according to police reports. During a search of JELYJAH the suspects’ motel room, MALCOLM OCPD officers located more of the victim’s stolen property, according to police reports. OCPD officers were able to obtain surveillance video footage of the victim and the four suspects together before the assault occurred. Malcolm, Mallery and Sampson were each charged with first-degree assault, robbery, theft and reckless endangerment. Each was seen by a District Court Commissioner and were ordered to be held without bond. The juvenile was also charged with first-degree assault, robbery, theft and reckless endangerment. Because of the nature of the incident and the serious charges, the juvenile was waived to adult status by the District Court Commissioner and was also ordered to be held without bond.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Attempted Stabbing OCEAN CITY – A local man is being held without bond this week on first-degree assault and other charges after attempting to stab a female acquaintance at a downtown bar. Around 2:15 a.m. last Wednesday, an Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer was dispatched to the area of 28th Street for a reported verbal argument. The officer arrived and met with a female victim, who reported she had been in a nearby bar and talking with her friends when she was approached by another acquaintance, identified as Brandon Hudson, 34, of Snow Hill, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Hudson approached her and was very agitated. The victim told police Hudson was making her uncomfortable, so she gathered her belongings and left the area. The victim told police once outside, Hudson followed her to a side parking lot area, displayed a large pocketknife and threatened to stab her, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police Hud-

COPS & COURTS son lunged at her four times with the knife blade pointed at her and that she feared he was about to kill her. The victim told police Hudson pointed the knife blade at her and he was violent in his actions and was actively trying to stab her, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police her friends began to come outside because they could hear her yelling for help. The victim told police after the attempted assault, Hudson walked or ran away from the area, according to police reports. OCPD officers interviewed the victim and several other witnesses, who all positively identified Hudson as the assailant and specifically mentioned him by name, according to police reports. OCPD officers knew Hudson from prior encounters with the suspect and knew that he frequented the nearby establishment. Officers were able to positively identify Hudson utilizing the victim’s cell phone and

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coordinating it with information in the department’s database. According to police reports, the victim told officers she feared for her life and that in the moment, she believed the Hudson was going to kill her. A warrant was sworn for Hudson’s arrest, charging him with first- and seconddegree assault, reckless endangerment and carrying a dangerous weapon with intent to injure. He was arrested on Tuesday and was ordered by a District Court Commissioner to be held without bond.

Assault, Malicious Destruction OCEAN CITY – A Salisbury woman was arrested last week after allegedly throwing a hotel hallway lamp at her suspected boyfriend and then hitting a security guard with it. Around 11:45 p.m. last Tuesday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officer responded to a reported disorderly individ-

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July 1, 2022 ual at a hotel at 91st Street. Officers met with the complainant, a female hotel security guard, who advised a heavily intoxicated and disorderly female, later identified as Ebony Collins, 43, of Salisbury, was causing a disturbance in the hotel, according to police reports. The security guard said a man believed to be Collins’ boyfriend wanted to go to the room where Collins and her children were staying to retrieve his wallet and phone. The security guard reportedly said when the man went to the room and retrieved is belongings, Collins threw a glass bottle at him. According to police reports, it is uncertain if the bottle struck the individual, but the distance between the bottle in the hallway and Collins’ room confirms she threw the bottle. The security guard advised that after the male retrieved his wallet and phone, Collins followed him down the hallway to the elevator and forcefully grabbed a lamp that was plugged into the wall near the elevator and threw it at the male, according to police reports. The officers observed the lamp’s prongs were still stuck in the socket and the lampshade was torn, according to police reports. The security guard said when the first elevator arrived at the fifth floor, she sent the male downstairs by himself in it. The security guard told officers she then attempted to grab the lamp from Collins, but she swung the lamp at her and hit her with it, according to police reports. The security guard reportedly had pieces of glass stuck in her hand from Collins hitting her with the lamp, although officers did not observe any obvious injuries to her hand. Collins was ultimately arrested and charged with second-degree assault and malicious destruction of property.

Assaulted For Social Media Posts OCEAN CITY – A Philadelphia man was arrested last weekend after allegedly assaulting his wife during an argument over social media posts. Around 2:35 a.m. last Thursday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a Boardwalk hotel at 14th Street for a reported domestic incident. Upon arrival, officers met with a hotel staffer who said a suspect, later identified as George Carr, 49, of Philadelphia, had asked the staffer to call 911 because his wife was irate, according to police reports. Officers responded to the room in question and interviewed Carr, who reportedly told the officers his wife was angry because another female was responding to his social media post. Carr reportedly told police the only time the argument became physical was when he shoved her to separate his wife from him as he tried to enter the bathroom. However, officers interviewed Carr’s wife, who told a separate version of the incident. The wife told officers she was angry because Carr had been sending kissy face emojis to another woman on social media. The wife told officers during the argument, Carr grabbed her by the head and threw her to the ground, according to police reports. The victim reportedly told police she got up to argue, and again, Carr grabbed her by the head and threw her to the ground. The victim told police Carr then got on top of her and began to wrap his hands around her neck stating, “I’m going to [expletive deleted] kill you,” according to poSEE NEXT PAGE


July 1, 2022

... COPS & COURTS lice reports. Officers did observe injuries to the victim’s neck consistent with her story. Based on the evidence and testimony, Carr was arrested and charged with seconddegree assault.

Loaded Gun At Pool Bar OCEAN CITY – A Pittsburgh man was arrested last weekend after being found in possession of a loaded handgun at a downtown pool bar. Around 4:40 p.m. on Sunday, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers were dispatched the area of the Boardwalk and 4th Street for a reported man with a gun. Ocean City Communications advised the male was observed in the pool bar area. Communications advised the suspect, later identified as Rod Salka, 39, of Pittsburgh, Pa., had been drinking at the pool bar for about three hours and staff advised they observed a handgun in Salka’s waistband and called 911. Officers arrived and pool bar staff pointed out Salka, who was leaving the bar, according to police reports. OCPD officers observed Salka to have a bulge in his waistband, which he was holding in place with the shoes he was carrying, according to police reports. The bulge was reportedly covered by Salka’s T-shirt, but officer knew from training weapons are often concealed in a suspect’s waistband. Salka was detained in handcuffs. OCPD officers located in his waistband a loaded 9-mm handgun. According to police reports, Salka exhibited signs of intoxication and it was determined he had been

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch wearing the handgun while he was in the bar. Salka was arrested and charged with wearing or carrying a firearm.

Suspended Sentence OCEAN CITY – A Willards man, arrested in April for malicious destruction of property, pleaded guilty this week and was sentenced to six months in jail, all of which was suspended. Around 1:35 a.m. on April 20, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to a restaurant and nightclub at 60th Street for a reported malicious destruction of property. Ocean City Communications advised bar security staff had a male suspect detained near the front door. When OCPD officers arrived, they were flagged down by security staff who advised they were detaining the suspect, later identified as Barry Wien, 61, of Willards, on the opposite side of a footbridge on the property that funnels out to 59th Street. OCPD officers reportedly observed bar security staff struggling with Wien and responded and secured the suspect in handcuffs. Bar security staff advised they had kicked Wien out of the establishment being too intoxicated and disorderly, according to police reports. Staff reported as Wien crossed the footbridge, he intentionally ripped down a light post and destroyed the light and its wiring in the process, according to police reports. Wien reportedly told police after he knocked over the light post, he ran because he felt like a wounded animal scared for his life because bar security staff was targeting him, according to police reports. He said his plan was to sneak away and drive his car to leave.

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This week, Wien pleaded guilty to malicious destruction of property and was sentenced to six months, all of which was suspended. He was placed on supervised probation for three years and ordered to pay over $1,400 in restitution to the victim.

Jail For Boardwalk Fight OCEAN CITY – A Selbyville man, arrested in May after interfering with police officers attempting to attend to an unconscious male involved in a fight on the Boardwalk, was found guilty this week and was sentenced to 30 days in jail. Around 1:20 a.m. on May 22, Ocean City Police Department (OCPD) officers responded to the area of Caroline Street and the Boardwalk for a reported fight in progress. Officers arrived and observed a large group of males surrounding a male

who was unconscious and bleeding from the head and mouth, according to police reports. Officers ordered the crowd to move back and allow paramedics to work on the unconscious male, but the unruly crowd was not listening to the officers’ commands. At that point, a male identified as Javontae Hicks, 19, of Selbyville, tried to push past the officers to attempt to see his friend, according to police reports. An OCPD officer put his arm up to attempt to move Hicks back, Hicks assaulted the officer with his fists as the group looked on, many of whom were recording the altercation with their cell phones. On Monday, Hicks was found guilty of second-degree assault and resisting arrest and was sentenced to 30 days in jail. He quickly filed an appeal in the case.

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Comments Sought On Island Changes

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

ASSATEAGUE – The National Park Service is seeking public comment on a planned reconfiguration of the existing South Ocean Beach parking area and the popular Over-Sand Vehicle (OSV) entrance road in advance of anticipated changes on the barrier island. The proposed project is in response to the westward dune movement that is encroaching on the facilities at the South Ocean Beach recreation area and the entrance to the OSV. Data collected by the National Park Service (NPS) suggests a portion of the existing traffic circle and most of the OSV entrance will be impacted by natural coastal processes by 2040, making the facilities that provide access to the popular recreation areas unsustainable at their current locations. The NPS also plans to address the increasing visitor use at the South Ocean Beach recreation area, which is causing congestion and creating safety concerns while resulting in resource degradation. More specifically, the South Ocean Beach parking area does not provide sufficient capacity to accommodate visitor use at the recreation area. In addition, the existing OSV en-

July 1, 2022

trance road cannot support the line of vehicles that forms when the OSV zone reaches the 145-vehicle maximum capacity. The current configuration creates safety issues when crowded, as it often is on most summer days, for pedestrians, drivers, bicyclists and wildlife. The NSP is developing conceptual design options to reconfigure the facilities that serve the South Ocean Beach recreation area, including the parking area, the OSV entrance road and other infrastructure and amenities to manage visitor use more effectively. The proposed project would also reconfigure the parking area to be more efficient and better support current visitor use of the area. The project would upgrade amenities such as showers, changing rooms and restroom facilities. The proposed project would also relocate access to the Life of the Dunes Trail, relocate the existing multi-use path and develop infrastructure that can easily be modified to accommodate future alternative transportation options. The public comment period on the proposed changes opened last week and will remain open until July 5. Comments can be submitted in writing at https://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=108559.


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 25


OC Expands On Fireworks Plans For Holiday Weekend

Page 26

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY -- While there won’t be fireworks shows in Ocean City on the Fourth of July on Monday, the resort is promising a series of bookend events to help ensure the holiday weekend is a success. Last week, resort officials announced the vendor for the annual Fourth of July fireworks shows had backed out at the last minute over labor issues. Resort officials, including the special events staff, scrambled and came up with some alternatives for the holiday weekend, although there will be no fireworks on the Fourth of July in Ocean City for the third year in a row. In 2020, the annual Fourth of July fireworks show was postponed amid the pandemic and fears large crowds would congregate in a small area. In 2021, the Fourth of July fireworks downtown and at Northside Park were scheduled, but as the vendor’s crew was off-loading the pyrotechnics from a box truck on the beach at Dorchester Street the morning of the holiday, one of the explosives detonated unintentionally, causing a chain reaction that set off other fireworks at the scene. Out of an abundance of caution, the planned shows downtown and at Northside Park were canceled. In April, the Mayor and Council approved a three-year contract with a new

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

vendor, American Fireworks Company, for shows on the Fourth of July and New Year’s Eve for a total of $318,000. The contract included a $100,000 commitment for this year, $106,000 in 2023 and another $112,000 for 2024. However, last week it was learned American Fireworks Company could not honor its commitment for the Fourth of July because of labor shortage issues. It remains to be seen if the cancellation represents a breach of the town’s contract with the company. City Manager Terry McGean said on Monday the contract issue is a legal matter on which town officials cannot comment. As a result, town officials pivoted in a different direction to help ensure the holiday weekend will be a memorable one for residents and visitors despite the lack of fireworks again on the Fourth of July. At the close of last week’s Mayor and Council meeting, McGean elaborated on the news to the elected officials, who were already well aware of the situation via a press release. “As you know, the contractor we had for the Fourth of July fireworks has backed out on the town at the last minute,” he said. “We have been able to schedule some replacement events.” On Sunday, July 3, an intimate Independence Day celebration is planned in conjunction with the typical Sundaes in the Park event, featuring a 7 p.m. concert by Mike Hines and the Look, fol-

lowed by a condensed fireworks show produced by the Celebrations Fireworks Company. On Tuesday, July 5, at 8 p.m., Salisbury resident and American Idol star Jay Copeland will take the stage at Northside Park for a concert as part of the town’s revised Fourth of July celebration. Also on July 5, Ocean City will feature live music on the beach downtown beginning at 8 p.m., with an abbreviated, but more intense fireworks show beginning at 9:30 p.m. The show will be a departure from Ocean City’s traditional Independence Day fireworks show and will include pyrotechnic elements from Celebrations Fireworks Company. The July 5 show promises to be roughly the same in duration as the typical Fourth of July show, but will be much more intense and lower than the traditional show, which will make the optimal viewing area between the pier and 3rd Street downtown. McGean explained the altered show at the close of last week’s meeting. “We have a fireworks show that will be different,” he said. “Our normal show is 2,500 shells. This show will be 15,000 shells. It’s much more intense, but it will be lower. It will be 300 feet versus 500 feet. We’re going to have Jay Copeland from American Idol with a concert at Northside Park on July 5.” Special Events Director Frank Miller provided more details about the planned

July 1, 2022

July 5 fireworks show on Monday. “Consider the fireworks display on July 5 to be similar in duration, 18 minutes essentially,” he said. “During that time, we will launch three times as many display shots into the sky as compared to our typical July 4 show.” Miller said the condensed, but more intense show set for July 5 should delight residents and visitors despite the date change. “Everyone loves a good fireworks finale,” he said. “Well, we’re starting with that fast pace. Shells will launch to a maximum altitude of 300 feet and will be colorful and full of life. The actual finale will noticeably intensify further into absolute mayhem, and I mean that in a good way.” Miller promised another element at the July 5 show that is different from the town’s traditional Fourth of July fireworks display. “To top it off, we have a new groundbased effect that has not been used on our beach in decades,” he said. “It will be worth the experience if you are within a few blocks of the display site.” In years past, the town has altered the parking rates at the Inlet lot on the Fourth of July in a variety of ways. Most recently, the town has raised the hourly rate at the Inlet lot from the standard $3.50 per hour to $5 per hour on the Fourth because of the increased deSEE PAGE 30


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Commissioners Approve Cluster Concept For Campgrounds

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

SNOW HILL – County leaders approved a text amendment last week allowing for a new cluster design at local campgrounds. The Worcester County Commissioners last Tuesday voted 5-0 to approve a text amendment that allows a cluster design for cabins and park model trailers at rental campgrounds. The new layout will allow campgrounds like Frontier Town to try a different layout than the traditional rows of campers and vehicles parked next to each other. “This isn’t to increase density, this is

to make a better camping experience,” said attorney Hugh Cropper, who submitted the text amendment on behalf of Sun TRS Frontier, LLC. According to county staff, the text amendment before the commissioners last Tuesday would create new cluster design standards for rental campgrounds. The new standards would allow for flexibility to minimum campsite area, setback, width, road frontage and parking requirements. The changes would apply only to recreational park trailers and cabins in rental and membership campgrounds. Cropper said the company behind Frontier Town operated campgrounds

FROM PAGE 26 mand. However, with the fireworks postponed on the Fourth next week, McGean last week suggested keeping the parking fee at the existing standard on the holiday next Monday. “One of the things we’ve done in the past on the Fourth of July is raise the rates at the Inlet lot from $3.50 per hour to $5 per hour,” he said. “I would submit that given everything we’re doing now to try to salvage or possibly improve on our normal show that we may want to not raise the rates at the Inlet lot and leave

it at the standard $3.50 rate.” Meanwhile, there will still be other fireworks displays in the area on or around the Fourth of July. The town of Berlin will host its Independence Day fireworks display on Sunday, July 3, from Heron Park. Ocean Pines will host its annual Independence Day fireworks celebration at Veterans Memorial Park on the actual Fourth of July next week. The Delmarva Shorebirds will launch celebratory fireworks in honor of Independence Day following its regular home game on July 4.

BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

… No 4th Change For Inlet Parking Rates

nationally and wanted to implement changes at the Berlin facility that were becoming popular throughout the country. Rather than the rows upon rows of RVs surrounded by campers’ personal vehicles, the company wants to set up a cluster of cabins with parking farther away. “What it does is – we don’t eliminate the parking, we don’t reduce the parking — we just move it over here out of the way and we cluster the campsites so in between them you’ve got green space,” Cropper said. He added that it was limited to 20% of the campground. And while a text amendment applies county-wide, Cropper said in this case Frontier Town planned to use this cluster design for the 112-campsite expansion it already had approved. “This will allow us to take what was cookie cutter, rectangle lots all on a paved road, and cluster them into a more natural, environmentally friendly experience,” he said. Commissioners questioned parking plans, particularly whether offsite parking would be permitted. Staff said it would not and that the parking for the cluster had to be within the area of the campground devoted to the cluster design. Diane Stelzner, a South Point resident, said her community wasn’t oppos-

July 1, 2022

ed to the cluster design but had concerns about public safety. “So far nothing has been done to the intersection of Assateague Road and 611 to provide for this large influx of additional traffic…,” she said. She said the commissioners and Maryland’s State Highway Administration should have the campground pay for adding a stoplight to the busy intersection. Stelzner added that she felt there was too much leeway in the text amendment as proposed and that she was worried golf carts and pedestrians would end up trying to cross Route 611. “We want traffic issues addressed before the camp sites are built,” she said. Staff stressed that under the text amendment off-premise parking was not permitted. While the parking doesn’t have to be next to the campsite it still has to be within that section of the campground. “This is meant to be a better experience and a more environmentally friendly condition with less impervious surface,” Cropper said. “It’s actually more expensive for the developer to build but it results in a better experience.” The commissioners voted 5-0 to approve the text amendment, with Commissioners Bud Church and Diana Purnell absent.


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Walking Path Replacement Begins

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

Crews are pictured at Stephen Decatur Park this week tearing out the old scrap tire path, which circles the property. The town plans to replace the walkway with asphalt. Photo by Charlene Sharpe BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

BERLIN – Work to replace the walking path at Stephen Decatur Park is now underway. Crews are at the park this week pulling up the scrap tire path that circles the property. It will be replaced with an asphalt walking path. “They expect to start on the path

sometime this week,” Acting Town Administrator Mary Bohlen said. Bohlen told the Berlin Town Council Monday night that crews from George & Lynch had started staging equipment in Stephen Decatur Park in preparation for replacing the path. The company will replace the path at the park and then move on to pave several streets in town. Paving is set to occur on Stevenson Lane, the east section of Graham Avenue and Decatur Street. “Those properties are all being notified,” Mayor Zack Tyndall said. Bohlen said properties on the affected streets would be provided with fliers advising them of the paving work. She said the park path would be done first and then the crews would move to Graham Avenue. Jamey Latchum, the town’s director of water resources, said that because Stevenson United Methodist Church operated its Spirit Kitchen on Wednesdays, crews would try to work around that so as not to impact pantry operations. “Some people depend on getting that food every week,” Latchum said. Park users are eager to see the walking path replaced. While the condition of the scrap tire path, built in 2009, has been a cause for concern for years, there hasn’t been funding to repair it. While replacing it with asphalt will cost about $80,000, set to come from an increase in highway user revenues from the state, replacing the path with in-kind material would have cost more than $400,000. The replacement has been endorsed by the Berlin Parks Commission, as citizens have slipped and fallen on the tire path in recent years, as it cracked and buckled in various places. “Obviously it’d be desirable to repair it in kind but that is just not practical,” Bohlen said earlier this year. “As it turned out when the pathway was originally installed it was found it should not have been installed this far north. The freezing and thawing is what has caused problems over the years. We were an experiment.”


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Resident Files Lawsuit Against Low-Speed Vehicle Ban

July 1, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – A lawsuit filed against the Town of Fenwick Island is seeking to have a new ordinance banning low-speed vehicles overturned. On June 21, Fenwick Island resident Kim Espinosa – a candidate in this year’s municipal election – filed suit against the town in the Delaware Court of Chancery seeking injunctive and declaratory relief from an ordinance prohibiting the use of low-speed vehicles in Fenwick Island. Espinosa said the ordinance has restricted her family from using their Moke low-speed, electric vehicle on town streets. “It’s licensed, registered and insured …,” she said. “It’s also the only vehicle we use when we are here.” In March, the Fenwick Island Town Council voted to approve an ordinance banning the operation of low-speed vehicles on town streets, with the exception of construction equipment, lawnmowers, emergency and town vehicles and assistive mobility devices. Town officials argued the vehicles posed safety risks. “Sadly, I feel Fenwick is not built for an increase in LSVs and golf cart traffic,” Councilman Bill Rymer said at the time. “We are a small community, but

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we have a major highway running right down the middle of it … I think it’s going to get worse if we don’t deal with it now.” Several residents, however, have voiced their objections to the low-speed vehicle ban, arguing they posed no safety issues. The complaint also outlines a state statute allowing the use of lowspeed vehicles. “This action seeks injunctive and declaratory relief arising from Defendant enacting the Code of Fenwick Island § 153-8 (the ‘Ordinance’), which prohibits the operation of low-speed vehicles in the Town of Fenwick Island, in direct conflict with 12 Dec. C. § 2113A (the ‘Statute’),” the complaint reads. “The General Assembly enacted the Statute in 2007, and allows for the operation of low-speed vehicles throughout Delaware on streets with speed limits of not more than thirty-five miles per hour.” The complaint notes that Espinosa had purchased a Moke in 2021 and utilized the vehicle on town side streets for all of her travel needs. “Plaintiff brings this action for declaratory relief requesting that this Court declare that the ordinance is preempted by the Statute, and may no longer be enforced against individuals operating low-speed vehicles in Fenwick Island,” the complaint reads. “Without immediate preliminary and permanent injunctive relief, Plaintiff is suffering

and will continue to suffer irreparable harm in the form of significant interference with her property rights and her constitutionally protected right to travel.” As the suit works its way through the court system, Espinosa noted she and her husband have also started a GoFundMe page seeking the community’s support in overturning the low-speed vehicle ordinance. “Recently the Town Council passed an ordinance outlawing Low-Speed Vehicles, despite the fact that the State of Delaware permits them and nearly all

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residents that attended the council meeting spoke against the ordinance,” the page reads. “We are filing a lawsuit against the City seeking to have the ordinance overturned. We purchased our vehicle to support the low-speed limit in our town (15 MPH), and it's also environmentally friendly because it is an electric vehicle.” When reached for comment last week, Town Manager Pat Schuchman declined to comment, stating, “please be advised that it would be inappropriate for us to comment on any pending litigation.”


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Fenwick Approves $2.4M Budget County OKs Surface Mine Rezoning

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BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – Town officials last week voted to approve a $2 millionplus budget for fiscal year 2023. Last Friday, the Fenwick Island Town Council voted 7-0 to accept the proposed fiscal year 2023 budget with $2.14 million in projected revenues and $2.44 million in projected expenses. “Between those two, the projected net operating loss, which is revenues less the expenses, results in an operating loss of $295,000 for the fiscal 2023 budget, compared to a projected loss of roughly $379,000 in the budget for the year ending in the next six weeks,” said Councilman Bill Rymer, town treasurer. “So on a positive note, we are now projecting an operating loss that is roughly 22% lower than what the town council projected going into fiscal 2022.” Rymer noted billings to property owners, including property tax, trash collection fees and ambulance fees, contributed to 46% of projected revenues. Other major revenue categories, he noted, include building fees and rental tax. “When you look at the budget, 81% of our revenues come from these three categories …,” he said. “What you also see is a budget that is pretty consistent on those smaller revenue line items.” Rymer added personnel costs, including salaries, benefits and taxes, made

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up 74% of the coming year’s expense budget. He said that included pay raises and promotions. “The budget committee proposed a 4.5% raise and a couple of proposed promotions,” he said. “That’s reflected in the budget.” Under capital expenditures, Rymer noted the town had budgeted $650,000 for sidewalks, $96,000 for new police vehicles, $70,000 for street maintenance and $100,000 for dredging consulting fees, to name a few projects. He added that the town expected to have nearly $3.6 million in cash reserves at the end of the fiscal year to cover the operating loss, capital spending and more. After further discussion, the council voted unanimously to accept the proposed budget for fiscal year 2023. The council last week also voted to adopt its fee schedule for the coming fiscal year, as well as establish a second banking relationship with Calvin B. Taylor Bank. “The finance committee approved for council consideration the development of a second banking relationship with Taylor Bank of Berlin as a safeguard for managing the town’s funds …,” said Councilman Paul Breger, committee chair. “Right no,w we have one bank that handles all of our major deposits, that’s Bank of Ocean City. And the subcommittee felt that it would be safer for the town to develop a second relationship with a strong entity.”

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – A change in zoning approved last week is expected to provide future flexibility for a property currently home to a surface mine. The Worcester County Commissioners voted 5-0 on June 21 to rezone property currently used as a surface mine on Downs Road. The land will be reclassified from A-1 to A-2. “Whatever they do next is going to be less impactful,” attorney Hugh Cropper said. Cropper told the commissioners his client, Rayne’s Land Holdings LLC, was seeking the rezoning of 105 acres on the west side of Downs Road because of a mistake in the existing A-1 zoning as well as a change in the neighborhood. He said the property had been approved for a borrow pit years ago and had been excavated to the point that future uses of the site were limited. “About 60 acres of this property has been excavated,” he said. “It’s currently being excavated more.” Cropper said zoning the property A2, which permits a little more than A-1, would be consistent with the county’s comprehensive plan. The A-2 designation didn’t exist, however, prior to the last comprehensive rezoning. “If we had an A-2 it would have been

July 1, 2022

A-2 all along,” Cropper said. According to the comprehensive plan, the county should try to preserve its large tracts of land. Cropper said that property owners needed flexibility so they could ensure the properties sustained themselves. “Once this borrow pit is done, which it’s just about done, these properties need to have a little bit of flexibility,” he said. He added that the A-1 and A-2 districts had the same residential rights so the change in zoning wouldn’t potentially lead to more houses. The change would simply allow the owner to do more than traditional agricultural and forestry, according to Cropper. “Whatever is permitted in the A-2, once this surface mine is decommissioned, whatever is permitted, whether it’s renting paddle boats, whether it’s renting kayaks, whether it’s people going fishing, whether it’s a winery, is going to have less traffic impact and be less impactful than an industrial surface mine with dump trucks,” said. Cropper also noted that the property had frontage on Route 113 a driveway on Downs Road, ensuring future access wasn’t a problem. The commissioners voted 5-0 to approve the rezoning, which was recommended by the Worcester County Planning Commission, on the basis of a mistake.


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Wicomico Superintendent Retires

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

‘Incredible Memories’ For Hanlin

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

SALISBURY – Community leaders and education officials last week recognized Wicomico County’s outgoing superintendent. In a Wicomico County Board of Education meeting last week, officials recognized Superintendent Dr. Donna Hanlin for six years of service to Wicomico County Public Schools. Board Chair Gene Malone noted that under Hanlin’s leadership, the school system had increased teacher retention, improved gradDONNA HANLIN uation rates and completed several school construction projects, to name a few accomplishments. “Wicomico County Board of Education recognizes you, Donna Hanlin, for 32 years of service in Wicomico County and congratulates you on your retirement,” he said in a tribute last week. “You are to be commended for your commitment to your chosen career in public education and for the many ways you have touched the lives of so many of our children. As you become immersed in the

next phase of your life, we hope flashbacks of your career will provide many pleasurable moments and a deep sense of satisfaction in knowing that you did indeed help shape the future.” Last fall, Hanlin announced her retirement effective June 30, 2022. While she began her tenure as school superintendent in 2016, Hanlin had spent much of her 44-year education career in Wicomico. “It has been an incredible career, very fulfilling,” she said. “Thirty-two of my 44 years in education have been spent here, and I will take with me incredible memories as I sail off into the sunset.” Hanlin noted she owed much of the success under her leadership to school system staff and teachers and parents. She also recognized Chief Finance and Operations Officer Micah Stauffer, who has been appointed the next superintendent. “I know I’m leaving the school system in great hands with Dr. Stauffer,” she said. “He is an incredible leader.” Hanlin also recognized community members for their support. “As I look back on my six years, I am incredibly grateful for the support from day one that you have provided me as superintendent of schools,” she said. “We can’t do this without community, we can’t do this without unity, and that’s what we need to continue doing as we move forward.” Mike Dunn, president and CEO of the Greater Salisbury Committee, applauded Hanlin for her commitment to the school system. He noted that Hanlin assisted in the creation of the Wicomico County Education Foundation, led Wicomico County Public Schools through the COVID-19 pandemic and helped make the Perdue Henson Junior Achievement Center a reality. “We will miss you,” he said. “We know you aren’t going anywhere, but I think it’s appropriate even under the most challenging times, we have to recognize a homegrown, James M. Bennett graduate for the excellent job you’ve done.” Late last year, the school board began working with the Maryland Association of Boards of Education to begin the search process for the next Wicomico County Public Schools superintendent. And in May, the names of three finalists were announced - Dr. Frederick Briggs, the school system’s chief academic officer, Dr. Eric Minus, Baltimore County Public Schools’ executive director of secondary schools, and Staffer. Since that time, candidate biographies and interviews have been posted on the school system’s website, which also featured an online survey to collect community input on the three finalists. After review and consideration, the school board voted in June to appoint Staffer as the next superintendent for a four-year term.


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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Ocean Pines Plans Fireworks, 5K, Special Farmers Market

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BERLIN – There will be no shortage of activities over the Fourth of July weekend for the Ocean Pines community. The following is a rundown of events. Fourth Fireworks: The Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department will once again host a Fourth of July fireworks celebration at Veterans Memorial Park on Route 589 and Cathell Road. The event this year is scheduled from 5-8:45 p.m. on Monday, July 4, with carnival games, dry slides and bounce houses for children, plus live music and food and drink vendors. Children’s wristbands are $10 and are good for all slides and bounce houses. Wristbands will be required for those attractions only. General admission is free and open to the public. Fireworks are scheduled to start at 9:15 p.m. and go until roughly 9:45 p.m. The fireworks will launch from the north side of the pond, by Cathell Road. A viewing zone will be fenced off from Manklin Creek Road to the Veterans Memorial. There will be no viewing along Ocean Parkway, from Cathell Road to Manklin Creek Road. There will also be a “safe zone” marked by an orange fence, from the pond to the firehouse. No one may enter the marked area. Guests may bring lawn chairs and blankets. Parking will be available in the area near the Ocean Pines Library and Taylor Bank. Parking will not be allowed along

Ocean Parkway. Limited handicapped parking will be available in a marked area just south of the Sports Core Pool. Police will close Ocean Parkway from Manklin Creek Road to Offshore Lane about 20 minutes before the fireworks begin. That area will remain closed until the Fire Marshal deems it safe. Additionally, police will close Cathell Road from Ocean Parkway to the entrance of the Sports Core Pool at around noon, when the fireworks company is scheduled to arrive. The area will remain closed until the fireworks equipment is loaded back up. Police and fire department personnel will help direct traffic throughout the day, and it is strongly encouraged that motorists follow their directions. Pedestrian traffic is highly encouraged. At the conclusion of the fireworks, pedestrians will have preference over motorists. Residents and guests should expect delays throughout the day. In case of inclement weather, the fireworks display will move to Tuesday, July 5. Freedom 5K: Local and regional runners are invited to join the fun this Fourth of July during the 11th annual Freedom 5K, sponsored by the Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department. This patriotic trot is scheduled to start at 8 a.m. at Veterans Memorial Park in Ocean Pines. Runners will dash through scenic areas of the Pines and may show off their best U.S.A.-inspired outfits. Tim-

ing for the event will be supplied courtesy of RIP IT Events. Awards will be given to male and female first- through third-place finishers in nine different age groups, from 10 and under to 70 and over. An award will also be given to the best dressed runner. Preregistration, $35, is open through July 3. Visit https://www.raceentry.com/races/ocean-pines-association-freedom-5k/2022/register to register. Dayof registration is $40 and starts at 7:15 a.m. Farmers Market: Hundreds of shoppers are expected to gather Saturday morning, July 2, from 8 a.m.-1 p.m., at the Ocean Pines Farmers & Artisans Market in White Horse Park. "Our Independence Day holiday market is truly a feast for the senses, and it has become an undeniable tradition for so many families," Market Manager David Bean said. The market is known for its abundance of fresh, local produce. Heaps of local sweet corn, rows of red tomatoes, and baskets of summer squashes and blueberries are just a few of the fresh items available from the market, perfect for a summer barbecue. In addition to the fresh fruits and vegetables, jams, eggs, local honey and plenty of baked goods will be on hand this weekend. Amish Friendship Bread is a bakery found in the green market loop in the

July 1, 2022

middle of the market. Shoppers line up early to choose from the many flavors created by baker Jeanine Dufrene. Dufrene said she sources from the produce merchants at the market to gather fresh fruits for her seasonal flavored breads. "The peaches have been so good and are making wonderful peach bread for my customers,” she said. The marketplace is also home to many artists, artisans and crafters. "With over 100 artisan merchants participating at the holiday market, you won't find this selection of offerings anywhere else,” Assistant Market Manager John Chandler said. "Our artisans offer an ever-changing selection of unique gifts and crafts throughout the year.” Many community organizations will also be at the market, including the Town Cats, Kiwanis Club, Jesse Klump Foundation, Friends of the Ocean Pines Library, and the Ocean Pines Volunteer Fire Department. Along with the wide selection fresh produce, baked goods, artisans, and community organizations, Bean said all the merchants strive to create a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. "Whether it’s your first visit or you’re a weekly shopper, our market merchants will make your experience a memorable one,” Bean said. “They take great pride in the products they bring and are excited to share them with our shoppers.”

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Citizens Want ARPA Funding Put Toward Broadband Page 46

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY CHARLENE SHARPE

STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Desire for high-speed internet highlighted a public hearing regarding Worcester County’s use of federal relief funds. Citizens told the Worcester County Commissioners last week they wanted the county to use its American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding to help expand access to broadband in the county’s rural areas. While several questioned the county’s partnership with Talkie Communications, officials said they were willing to work with whoever was bringing broadband to the area. “If any of the internet service providers come to us with a project with a potential match and how far the money will go, I know the commissioners will actively consider it,” Chief Administrative

July 1, 2022

Worcester To Receive Over $10M Through Rescue Plan Program

Officer Weston Young said. According to county staff, Worcester will receive more than $10 million in ARPA funding. About $8 million of that has yet to be allocated. Tuesday’s public hearing was to gather input from the public on how the money should be spent. Girdletree resident Becky Richardson said she wanted to see the county invest in broadband. She recalled the difficulties her children experienced during the virtual learning that took place during the pandemic. She said she often had to drive them to Snow Hill or Poco-

moke and have them do school work in the car in order to have access to internet. “Access to reliable high-speed internet should be available to every single resident, just as electric is,” she said. “It is necessary now and will become even more important in the future.” She said she was surprised the county hadn’t partnered with Choptank, as the company is working to bring broadband to rural areas. Public Landing resident Paul Mumford offered similar comments. He sug-

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gested that the county pursue a temporary solution wirelessly as it waited for fiber. Commissioner Jim Bunting said he could see multiple cell towers from his house but still didn’t have access to internet. He said he wished Choptank would start providing high-speed internet service throughout Worcester. “They’re not setting the world on fire hooking people up either,” he said. When Mumford asked how much funding the county had given Talkie, Young said the county had given the company $100,000 to go toward a grant that had netted $2 million. He said the commissioners had also approved a loan to the company but that that had not yet been used. “Most of what they’ve done in the Pocomoke area has been on their own dime, hoping to get reimbursed by the state,” he said. Commissioner Josh Nordstrom said he’d spoken to Choptank representatives and that the county was willing to work with them. Snow Hill resident Regina Royer, who teaches online, reiterated the need for rural broadband. Stacy Hart agreed and said she didn’t want to see the county tied to just one vendor. Ocean City Fire Chief Richie Bowers said he hoped the county would be using some of its ARPA funding to support fire and EMS service in Worcester. Snow Hill resident Jeff McMahon agreed but said he also wanted to see more broadband. Snow Hill resident John Bruning said farmers needed broadband. He said they needed a solid connection for things like GPS. Bunting stressed that the commissioners have been working on broadband and will continue to do so. “We have not just been sitting here,” he said. Young reminded those in attendance that when the county issued a request for proposals in order to find a broadband partner, Choptank had not responded. “They had just gotten the state approval to get into the fiber business and they were not ready to participate,” he said. He said that the county’s practice had been and would continue to be to provide funding to match grants. County officials have been in communication with all three internet service providers actively installing fiber in Worcester County, he added. “One is actively going for grants, very aggressive with grants,” he said. “The other hasn’t shown any interest in working with us at all and the third spends more time badmouthing the competition. That’s where we are right now.” Because installing broadband throughout the county would cost more than $50 million, Young said the county would continue to target matching grants as a way to get more done with limited financial resources. “We have one company that seems to be going for grants aggressively,” he said. “We’ll match any of them. If any of them come to us and ask for a match we will find the money to match them.”


Fenwick Hotel Moratorium Extended

July 1, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – The extension of a moratorium on new hotel construction will move forward with the approval of the town council. Last Friday, the Fenwick Island Town Council voted to approve the first reading of an ordinance that will reestablish a two-year moratorium on new hotel and motel construction. Councilwoman Natalie Magdeburger noted the existing ordinance, adopted in 2020, is set to expire in July. “Historically, we have had a moratorium in place for new hotel builds since 2016,” she told the town council last week. “The town council did a twoyear moratorium at that time … They extended the moratorium for another two years in July of 2020 and that moratorium is going to expire July 24, 2022.” In 2016, the town council voted to establish a moratorium on new hotel construction following an extensive debate regarding the former Sands Motel. Developed Spiro Buas purchased the property in 2015 with plans to construct a new, upscale hotel in its place. In doing so, he proposed an ordinance change that would allow for one motel room per 600 feet instead of one motel room per 1,000 feet, allowing the hotel to expand from 38 rooms to 65 rooms. Despite outcry from nearby residents, the council at the time voted to approve the ordinance. However, a two-year moratorium on new hotel and motel construction was also put forward. Since that time, the council has approved two extensions to the moratorium to allow the town more time to consider the impacts of a new hotel on Fenwick Island. Magdeburger told officials last week she was recommending a third extension. “After looking at all the issues we’ve got going on in town, it’s my personal belief we need to extend the moratorium once again,” she said. “I’m going to propose, and I have a proposal for first reading, we extend it for another two years. It may be that we only need

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

18 months, but we’ve got several competing issues going on that we need to address.” Madgeburger noted that one of those issues was the COVID pandemic. “We now have three fulltime operating hotels -- one hotel opened up during the COVID pandemic -- and to be fair I think we need to see what impact, positive and negative, that may be imposed by that additional hotel in terms of infrastructure, public safety, etc.,” she said. “And I think we need to do it outside COVID pandemic behaviors.” Magdeburger added that the town was also looking to construct sidewalks in the commercial zone and address parking issues on commercial properties. “I think we need to get a handle on the parking issues to get a full and fair idea of what any additional motel would do in terms of that issue,” she said. Magdeburger also noted that the town would want to complete a resiliency study - which would provide the town with ways in which to address sea level rise and flooding - and a recertification of its 10-year comprehensive plan. “That could easily be an 18-month process,” she said. Councilman Bill Rymer added that the town had yet to do any studies on the impact of new hotels. “It’s important to note when the moratorium was originally put in place and extended once or twice, there was mention of needing to study, and those studies never happened,” he said. “So it’s on us to get these studies together, combined with all these other actions, to make sure we understand what we’re doing.” After further discussion, the council voted 7-0 to approve the extension of the moratorium on first reading. “I think a two-year moratorium to sort of figure out how all these issues will come into play is certainly warranted,” Magdeburger said. “I think it’s certainly wise because those types of issues are important to the best interest of the town.”

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Data Shows ‘Real Change In Market’

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BERLIN – Interest rates have been rising steadily and we are seeing a slowdown in the market because of that. Between rising costs of homes and now higher interest rates buyers, especially first-time buyers, are having a harder time finding and qualifying for their dream home. The median home price is 22.7% higher than it was in May 2021 and up 1.9% from last month April 2022. Individually the median home price was $390,000 in Worcester, $241,990 in Wicomico, and $226,00 in Somerset. We currently have only 420 active listings in the lower three counties compared to 532 in May 2021 and 1104 in May 2020 when the pandemic began. In all three counties throughout May, new settlements were down 15.8% compared to the same time last year. Individually, new settlements throughout May were up by 63.6% in Somerset and down 29% in Wicomico, and 15.5% in Worcester. New listings in May were down 12.8% compared to the same time last year in all three counties. Individually, new listings were down by 9.7% in Worcester, 22.4% in Wicomico, and up 2.6% in Somerset from May of 2021. Active listings in all three counties were down by 21.1% from May of 2021.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

Horse Play: Billy Bob is pictured getting off the ground to land a kick to another horse, most likely defending his

band. It's common for these skirmishes to take place among the island residents and yet another reminder the horses are unpredictable and need to be respected - maintain your distance. Photo by Lynne Lockhart

Individually, there were 233 active listings in Worcester, 117 in Wicomico, and 70 in Somerset. The median days on market for May 2022 was 10 which was up 42.9% from May of 2021. “Due to rising interest rates, we are starting to see a real change in the market,” said Coastal Association of REALTORS® President Grace Masten. “For the last two years, we have talked about

inventory and lack of options for home buyers pushing the price of homes up. Now you couple that with rising interest rates and buyers are starting to leave the market because they cannot afford to buy. Historically speaking, rates are still low, but they are not trending in the right direction, and we are seeing a slowing in the housing market because of that. Hopefully, this will bring some new in-

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ventory and balance to a market that has needed it.” CAR’s monthly local housing statistics are compiled by Bright Multiple Listing Service, which represents the activity of over 1,000 local REALTORS® in Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester counties, as well as 95,000 real estate professionals across the Mid-Atlantic region.

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

COMMUNITY News In Photos

The Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City honored Sarah Walker as “Kiwanian of the Month” for May. Walker, who works with the “Dawg Team” selling concessions at events, is pictured with Tim Lund, club president. Submitted Photos

SoDel Cares, the philanthropic arm of SoDel Concepts, recently donated $10,000 to West Side New Beginnings, a nonprofit building a network to address West Rehoboth’s concerns, such as housing, education, nutrition and substance abuse. Scott Kammerer, president of SoDel Concepts and founder of SoDel Cares, is pictured presenting the check to Diaz Bonville and Brenda Milbourne of West Side New Beginnings.

Thirty-five young men and women from Italy have signed up to work at Ocean City businesses for the summer and the first 14 to arrive were welcomed by the Ocean City Sons and Daughters of Italy with typical American summer fare held at the Knights of Columbus Hall and catered by Mio Fratello Restaurant. The university students come from all regions of Italy and have found jobs at Dead Freddies, Telescope Pictures, Da Lazy Lizard, Rita’s, the OC Fontainebleau, Dough Roller, Jolly Roger and Hyatt Place.

Salisbury Neighborhood Housing Services (SNHS) hosted a “Growing Together Garden” event during NeighborWorks Week in June. Pictured at the event are Cheryl Meadows, SNHS director, Pastor Martin Hutchison, Camden Community Garden, and Jane Hoy, SNHS assistant director.

On June 15 the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City welcomed two new members, Lyle Dillon and Elisabeth Prichard. Dillon, left, is pictured with Prichard, Diane Sparzak, the club’s membership chair, and Tim Lund, the club’s president.

The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) announced appointees who will serve on the USDA FSA state committee. Appointees pictured from left to right are Cheryl DeBerry, Dr. John Brooks Jr., Val Nasir, Lee D. McDaniel, Sam Smith, and C. John Sullivan III, FSA state executive director. Nasir is a Worcester County resident.


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Arts Day Success:

The Art League of Ocean City's Arts Day at the Winery held June 5 at Windmill Creek Vineyard & Winery in Berlin attracted a record attendance crowd of more than 7,000 people. The event featured more than 60 artisans, a Battle of the Beach Bands contest and a children's area. Pictured, above left, the band Hit & Run was voted the fan favorite in the Battle of the Beach Bands; above right, the band Hit & Run was voted the fan favorite in the Battle of the Beach Bands and won $1,000; below left, artisan Megan Burak of West Ocean City offered her artwork to visitors; and, below right, Kyle Dietz won the corn hole contest and took home custom corn hole boards hand painted by Bishopville artist Jim Adcock. Submitted Photos

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July 1, 2022


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Gynecologist Welcomed BERLIN – In August, Dr. Michael DiClemente, a board-certified gynecologist, will be joining Atlantic General Health System to provide care at Atlantic General Women’s Health in Selbyville, Del., and West Ocean City, Md. In addition to providing annual gynecologist examinations, DiClemente specializes in the evaluation and treatment of a wide variety of health issues unique to women, such as menstrual irregularities, menopause evaluation and treatment, MICHAEL DICLEMENTE birth control and contraceptive counseling, STD screening and treatment, among others. He has a special interest in minimally invasive surgical procedures such as hysteroscopy, endometrial ablation and laparoscopy, some of which can be performed right in the office. DiClemente has been providing comprehensive women’s health care for nearly 21 years. After earning his medical degree at Georgetown University School of Medicine, he completed an internship in obstetrics and gynecology at Cook County Hospital, in Chicago, Ill., and his OB/GYN residency at University of Massachusetts, in Worcester. DiClemente is current accepting patients.

Assistant Vice President Named OCEAN CITY – Reid Tingle, president and CEO of Bank of Ocean City, along with the Board of Directors, is pleased to announce the promotion of Kimberly Duvall to the position of assistant vice president. Duvall joined Bank of KIMBERLY DUVALL Ocean City in 2021 with 14 years of banking management experience. Prior to joining Bank of Ocean City, Duvall was an assistant vice president at PNC and Unity Bank, in the New Jersey region. Duvall will continue to serve as branch manager at our Berlin location. “Kim’s extensive banking background and dedication to customer service aligns seamlessly with the culture of Bank of Ocean City,” Tingle said. “Her positive attitude and outgoing personality allows her the ability to provide the outstanding customer experience Bank of Ocean

BUSINESS And Real Estate News

On June 22, members of The Salisbury Area Chamber of Commerce, Berlin Maryland Chamber of Commerce and the Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce celebrated the grand opening of Chesapeake Health Care’s new medical facility, located on North Main Street in Berlin. Guests were also provided information on the 7,200-square-foot facility, which offers adult and pediatric care, behavioral health and lab services. The new facility replaces Chesapeake’s smaller medical office, which was located nearby in Berlin Main Place. Above, officials are pictured last week at the ribbon cutting ceremony. Submitted Photo

City customers have enjoyed since 1916.” Bank of Ocean City is a locally-owned, independent community bank. Established in 1916 and headquartered in West Ocean City, the bank has five offices; two in Ocean City, one in Ocean Pines, one in Berlin and our Delaware branch located in Fenwick Island.

New Storefront REHOBOTH BEACH – The Rehoboth Beach – Dewey Beach Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting to celebrate Stuart Kingston’s move to Coastal Highway in advance of their grand opening celebration on June 10. Originally established in 1930, Stuart Kingston Gallery is a pillar of Rehoboth

Beach history. Opened in Rehoboth Beach 92 years ago, Maurice Stein started this iconic Rehoboth institution on the boardwalk where he, and later his son Jay, built a reputation along the East Coast as the premier destination for auctions, fine jewelry, antiques, fine art, rugs and carpets. In 2014, after the passing of Jay Stein, his daughter, Mauria, followed in his footsteps and continued the Stuart Kingston legacy. For seven years Mauria continued the traditions of holding large scale estate auctions and selling fine jewelry. With the changing of times and the lack of foot traffic, Mauria made the decision to move the business to Coastal Highway. She thought the move would be a better opportunity to breathe new life into

July 1, 2022 her historic gallery. Mauria, a fourth-generation jeweler, is going back to her roots. Her focus at her new location is primarily jewelry, including custom designs and appraisals. She also plans to have a jeweler onsite for repairs a few times a month.

Chief Medical Officer Announced SALISBURY – TidalHealth welcomes Trudy R. Hall, MD, as its next vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer (CMO). Hall succeeds Charles “C.B.” Silvia, MD, who retired earlier this year after serving in the role since 2011. She began her new role at the Salisbury, Md., hospital on June 28, 2022. Hall brings to TidalHealth an impressive and proven career of executive level leadership in health care facilities across Maryland. Most re- TRUDY HALL cently, she served as the vice president deputy chief medical officer for University of Maryland Capitol Region Health and site executive at Laurel Medical Center and Bowie Health Center. Previously, she was the interim president of the University of Maryland Laurel Regional Hospital in Laurel, Md., and served there as its vice president of medical affairs. Hall was also the CMO of the University Specialty Hospital, University of Maryland Health Systems in Baltimore. She also served for eight years as a commissioner on the Health Service and Cost Review Commission. Hall obtained her MD from University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, N.J. Her internship in internal medicine was completed at Cooper Hospital in Camden, N.J. She also served as chief resident during her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute in Edison, N.J. Hall is board-certified and a Fellow in the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She is also a previous diplomat on the National Board of Medical Examiners. As Hall assumes her new position, TidalHealth also extends its sincerest thanks and gratitude to Simona Eng, DO, for her outstanding leadership as interim CMO at the Salisbury hospital since Silvia’s retirement on January 4. SEE NEXT PAGE


July 1, 2022

... BUSINESS NEWS Assistant Vice President Hired

SALISBURY – John W. Breda, president and CEO of The Bank of Delmarva, recently announced that Ashley Wilson has joined the bank as assistant vice president – branch manager of its Pecan Square location. Wilson began her banking career in 2015 as an evening teller and worked her way up to the position she holds today. As a proud ASHLEY WILSON Eastern Shore native, Wilson is an active member of the community, and has volunteered for nonprofits such as The House of Hope, Hope & Life Outreach, and Harriett’s House. Wilson currently serves as a board member for Women Supporting Women and enjoys participating in fundraising activities and community events. OCEAN CITY – Coldwell Banker Realty is proud to announce that Nancy Reither has earned a prestigious spot on the 2022 RealTrends + Tom Ferry America’s Best Professionals list, placing her among the top real estate agents in Maryland. Reither is affiliated with the company’s Ocean City 123rd Street office. Reither ranked No. 3 in Maryland based on attaining $80,533,825 million in closed sales volNANCY REITHER ume in 2021 and No. 7 in Maryland based on 104 closed transaction sides for 2021. Rankings are listed based on closed sales volume and closed transaction sides, state by state. Additionally, Reither earned the Coldwell Banker International Society of Excellence designation, awarded to the top 345 individual sales associates out of approximately 100,000 Coldwell Banker affiliated agents worldwide for 2021 sales success. She was also the No. 1 Coldwell Banker agent in the state of Maryland for both sales volume and transaction sides in 2021. “Nancy ranks among the highest level of real estate industry professionals in Maryland,” said Rich Fleischer, president of Coldwell Banker Realty in the mid-Atlantic region. “I am excited to congratulate Nancy for attaining a coveted spot on the RealTrends + Tom Ferry America’s Best Professionals list, a true testament to her unparalleled expertise and customer service.” The RealTrends + Tom Ferry America’s Best Professionals ranking consists of all real estate agents and teams throughout each state who took part in residential real estate transactions in 2021 and met the minimum threshold to submit their data. To qualify, an individual agent most close 50 residential transaction sides or $20 million in closed sales volume, according to RealTrends. A team must close 75 residential transaction sides or $30 million in closed sales volume. Teams are ranked and grouped by their size: small (2-5 licensed agents),

Real Estate Agent Recognized

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

medium (6-10 licensed agents), large (11-20 licensed agents) and mega (21plus licensed agents). The 2022 rankings are based on data from the calendar year of 2021.

SALISBURY – More than two years into the pandemic, community colleges and four-year institutions across the country face an imperative to ensure students from communities disproportionately impacted by the pandemic can access, persist through and realize their higher education aspirations. This year, Wor-Wic Community College and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) embraced the challenge by coming together to accelerate transfer reform as a part of the Transfer Student Success Intensive. The Wor-Wic team will join the first-ever cohorts of the intensive, comprised of 29 other two- and four-year partnerships from across the country, and led by the Aspen Institute and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU). The intensive, funded with the sup-

Local Colleges Partner

port of Ascendium Education Philanthropy, will span the next year, through February of 2023. Teams will receive one-on-one consulting with experts and work to identify, collect, understand and use critical transfer outcomes and equity data. As part of this community of practice, teams will attend monthly sessions focused on co-creating practices and policies to improve transfer student success and equity. “We have always worked with students to prepare and encourage them to continue their education,” said Dr. Ray Hoy, president of Wor-Wic. “We hope this intensive will help us ease the path for students who want to take part in the many outstanding academic programs offered at UMES.” “I am excited to work with Dr. Hoy and Wor-Wic to create this strategic transfer plan between our two institutions to benefit the students in the tri-county area,” said Dr. Heidi M. Anderson, president of UMES. “Given that a large percentage of Somerset County high school students enroll at Wor-Wic, we will be able to create this pipeline for those who want to pursue a bachelor’s degree at UMES.

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This partnership will result in tuition savings for students and will help students complete their degrees faster.” Wor-Wic and UMES will join 67 of their peers in this effort, selected from an applicant pool of 97 institutions and three systems from 25 states. Together, these cohorts account for a total enrollment of nearly a million undergraduate students, offering the promise of significant impact. For Wor-Wic, participation in the intensive represents an important extension of efforts to increase community college transfer and bachelor’s degree attainment. Established programs to help students succeed include a pathway for Wor-Wic students taking chemistry in the pre-pharmacy concentration to qualify for admissions to the UMES graduate program in the School of Pharmacy, known as a “2+3 program,” as well as transfer agreements for general studies, biology, chemistry and engineering. A scholarship program for all students who transfer from Wor-Wic to UMES provides $3,500 annually toward their tuition; three top students per year are chosen for a full-ride financial aid package.

WHOLE HOUSE ELECTRICAL ASSESSMENT & SAFETY INSPECTION

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• Test/inspect GFCI outlets and breakers • Check for double tapped breakers to eliminate overloading a circuit breaker • Survey for proper surge protection • Check smoke detectors and make recommendations for compliance with local electrical codes

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

Freeman Arts Pavilion’s Photo Of The Week: Each week during the season the Freeman Arts Pavilion submits a photo of the week from the

Selbyville venue. Above, music icon Patti LaBelle performed on Wednesday, June 22. Local artist and “American Idol” contestant Jay Copeland opened the show. Photo by Kenny Pusey/Freeman Arts Pavilion Tickets are still available for 2022 performances at freemanarts.org.

Adopt A Pet From The Shelter These Loving Animals, Sponsored Each Month By Local Businesses, Are Available For Adoption At The Ocean City Humane Society: 410-213-0146. To Sponsor A Pet, Call 410-641-4561 • Annually, 10% Of The Proceeds From This Page Are Donated To The Shelter The Humane Society Desperately Needs Volunteers To Help Care For The Cats And Dogs. Any Amount Of Time You Can Spare Will Be Appreciated.

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Taylor Bank Main Street, Berlin, Md. 410-641-1700

Casual Designs Rte. 54, Fenwick 302-436-8224 Rte. 50, Berlin 410-629-1717

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The Dispatch www.mdcoastdispatch.com 410-641-4561

The Dough Roller Five Locations In Ocean City

Maryland Title Service 11500 Coastal Hwy., Suite 7, OC 410-723-2000

Elliott’s Hardware Rte. 611, West Ocean City 410-213-1088


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch’s Pets of the Month

Pet’s Name: Rajah Pet’s Age/Breed: 1-year-old barn cat Pet’s Owner: Pam Polk

Pet’s Name: Gibson Valentine Pet’s Age/Breed: 7-year-old lab collie mix Pet’s Owner: Hailey Humphrey

Pet’s Name: Rosie Pet’s Age/Breed: 1-year-old mix Pet’s Owner: Cate Nellans

Pet’s Name: Rocket Pet’s Age/Breed: 8-month-old Maltipoo Pet’s Owner: Gretchen Collins

STEVE GREEN EDITOR

Pet’s Name: Honey Pet’s Age/Breed: 18-week-old Labrador retriever Pet’s Owners: Dave & Kelly Kight

The Dispatch presents the latest edition of its Pets of the Month Contest. Each month one special animal, or two, in some cases, is picked as the cutest photo of the bunch through a private vote of our staff. Here we present this month’s pets, submitted by our readers. On the front page is last month’s winning entry, Eddie, owned by Matt Stoehr. Those interested in participating in future months’ contests are invited to send their lovable pet photo to us at editor@mdcoastdispatch.com (preferred) or to P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 or drop it off at our office in Berlin at 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Please be sure it’s a high-quality photo suitable for reproduction and to include your mailing address, the pet’s name, age and breed and the owner’s first and last name. The next series will appear in this space on Aug. 5.

Pet’s Name: Sassi Pet’s Age/Breed: 2-year-old pit bull terrier Pet’s Owner: Ross Buzzuro


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Be Safe And Thanks For Visiting Ocean City The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

PAGE SPONSORED BY THE DISPATCH

July 1, 2022


Education About Rip Currents Saves Lives Each Year

July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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GUARDING THE BEACH

BY DAMIEN SANZOTTI

SPECIALS TO THE DISPATCH

OCEAN CITY – The Ocean City Beach Patrol has been actively trying to educate people about the hazards of rips currents much longer than the 19 years I have been on the patrol. Our lifeguards talk to beach patrons several times each day and do beach safety seminars explaining rip currents and their dangers. Every one of our lifeguard chairs has a diagram (like the one on the preceding page) with an explanation of rip currents, and we periodically hand out pamphlets about rip currents. In addition, the Ocean City Beach Patrol has been actively involved with the National Weather Service (NWS) and provides updated rip current data several times each day to the NWS. With the data the beach patrol provides, the NWS can provide rip current forecasts and daily advisories for the public. The beach patrol has used an array of other methods to educate the public about rip currents. For example, there is often information on the Ocean City Convention Center’s electronic billboard, the sign entering Ocean City at the Route 90 Bridge, as well as the boardwalk. Rip currents are relatively small-scale surf-zone currents moving away from the beach. Rip currents form as waves disperse along the beach causing water to become trapped between the beach and

a sandbar or other underwater features. Water converges into a narrow, river-like channel moving away from the shore at high speed. To protect yourself from the dangers of rip currents, you need to fully understand them. To do this, DAMIEN you first need to be able SANZOTTI to identify them. The next time you are on the beach, ask your lifeguard to point out a rip current to you and explain it. Seeing it for yourself will prove to be a valuable opportunity. For many years rip currents were the 3rd leading cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S. but last year they moved up to the second leading cause. Heat related deaths remain the leading cause (over 30 years), but rip currents are more deadly than tornados, hurricanes or cold. Although the beach patrol performs between 2,000 – 4,000 in water interventions (rescues) each year, most of these are minor and in many more cases the surf rescue technician simply uses their whistle and flags to direct the swimmer out of the rip current without incident or any further action by the SRT. Beach patrons should always consult with the surf rescue technician about ocean conditions including rip current activity and the best place to swim. If you start to feel the effects of a rip current, do not panic. To escape the pull

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of the rip current, you should always swim parallel to shore and not try to fight the current. Once you no longer feel the pull, you should swim back into shore. People often make the mistake of swimming straight in against the current in a panicked state leading to exhaustion. Therefore, many people who have died in a rip current do know how to swim and in some cases are actually very good swimmers. If you ever find yourself in an uncomfortable situation in the ocean, stay calm, wave your arms and the surf rescue technician will assist you to safety. However, when people ig-

nore our plea to never enter the ocean when the beach patrol is off duty, they are making a potentially deadly mistake. To get current information about the beach patrol, daily stand locations, stats, and current beach conditions, you can follow the beach patrol on Instagram or “like us” on the official OCBP Facebook page. Always remember, “Keep your feet in the sand until the lifeguard’s in the stand.” (The writer has been with the beach patrol for 19 years and is currently a sergeant. He is a physical education teacher for the Worcester County Public School system.)


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

Chris Parypa’s Photo Of The Week: Each week staff photographer Chris Parypa is tasked with submitting a photo from his vast library to be featured in this space. Above is a look at the summer solstice sunrise from the Inlet parking lot. To purchase any of Parypa’s photos, click over to www.chrisparypa.com.


July 1, 2022

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July 1, 2022

Teach A Kid To Fish:

The Ocean Pines Anglers Club hosted more than 50 kids of all ages along with parents and grandparents at their annual Teach A Kid to Fish event on Saturday, June 18 at the South Pond in Ocean Pines. Event coordinator Lee Phillips and club members manned stations where the aspiring young anglers could learn lure identification, knot tying, fish identification, casting instruction and basic fishing rules from Department of Natural Resources representatives. Bait was provided so the youth could try out their newly learned skills in the pond with a surprising number of fish caught by the group including some impressive large mouth bass. Above left, Buddy Seigel manned the knot tying table; above right, Odin and mom learn fish identification; and at left, Logan Lawson from Dagsboro shows his large mouth bass. Submitted Photos

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Water Taxi service Reports strong start In Pines

July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

OCEAN PINES – Early returns have been strong for the new water taxi and water shuttle services in Ocean Pines. The water shuttle – like a bus on the water – makes regularly scheduled stops throughout the day at several locations along the bay, including Ocean Pines. The water taxi – like an Uber on the water – is a point-to-point service that riders can schedule at their convenience. Both are run by OC Bay Hopper. “The water transportation services that the OC Bay Hopper is providing makes it very easy for people to get to and from Ocean Pines,” OC Bay Hopper co-founder Steve Butz said. “It takes the hassle out of driving and parking in Ocean City. The water shuttle and taxi services can pick-up or drop-off at most restaurants and bars on the bay.” Butz the response, so far, has been very positive. The shuttle service started just after Memorial Day, and the taxi service kicked off in June. “We had a ton of people last Saturday from Ocean Pines and many who were going to the Yacht club. Things seem to be cooking,” Butz said. “Ocean

Pines had more traffic in and out on our boats on Saturday than any other location by far. People seem to be eating it up.” This summer, the water shuttle is scheduled to travel from Ocean Pines to locations southbound each day at 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Boats will return to Ocean Pines heading northbound at 2:15 p.m., 5:15 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. The shuttle will make stops in Ocean City and West Ocean City. One-way shuttle tickets cost $15 per person and round-trip tickets run $25 per person. The water taxi service runs Thursday through Sunday, from 9-11:30 p.m., for those who need to travel outside of the water shuttle’s schedule. The boats travel as far north as Fenwick Island and south to Assateague Island. There is a $60 minimum for the water taxi, which will cover up to four passengers for a one-way trip. For groups of five or more, there is an added $15 charge for each additional passenger. There is also a small surcharge per passenger.

Page 63

OC Bay Hopper also offers a sightseeing trip from Ocean Pines to Assateague on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. “We pick up riders at the docks in Ocean Pines at 9 a.m. and whisk them down to Assateague for a tour of the island by water,” Butz said. “They’ll get an amazing view of the wildlife and then return to the Yacht Club at about 11:15 a.m., just in time for lunch.” Ocean Pines General Manager John Viola said he sees the OC Bay Hopper partnership as both a service for resi-

dents and a potential benefit for Yacht Club business. “We encourage Ocean Pines residents to take a trip over to Ocean City and stop by the Yacht Club for a drink or bite to eat, before or after their ride,” Viola said. “We see this as a service for our residents and we believe it will be a benefit to us.” For more information or to book a seat on the OC Bay Hopper, download the OC Bay Hopper Mobile App. The OC Bay Hopper Mobile App is available for both Apple and Android devices.

OCEAN CITY – On July 4th, Fish Tales Bar and Grill, located on 22nd Street bayside in Ocean City, will host its annual Hot Dog Eating Contest in the south parking lot at noon. This amateur competition is open to anyone over the age of 18. The winner will receive at least a $1,000 cash prize, a trophy and bragging rights for an entire year. Come and grab a cold drink from one

of the bars and watch this family fun event. There will be seating available to watch the competition until 4 p.m. The first 20 people to pre-register will be the contestants. To register, please visit the Bahia Marina Tackle Shop or Fish Tales Small Bar to sign up. A registration fee of $10 is required to hold your spot. You must sign a waiver to participate.

Fish Tales To Host Hot Dog eating contest

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Wesley Smith: A Life Changed In 10 Minutes Back In 1989 Page 64

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

OCBP Alumni of the Week

(The following is a series on the men and women who have spent their summers protecting all those who came to Ocean City for fun and safe vacation.) OCEAN CITY – Things did not look promising for Wesley Smith as the summer of 1989 approached. He was living in Bel Air and had just dropped out of high school. With not a lot more than desire, he headed to Ocean City to live at the beach and join the beach patrol. The test one takes to even be considered for the OCBP starts with an early morning swim in the bone chilling waters at the inlet. Wesley, like all the others before him, would have to swim from the rock piles at the southernmost point of the beach, around the pier and race up the sand to the finish line. He’d have 10 minutes. If he didn’t make it, his plan for being a guard would be over. “When I took the test, I was the last to pass. Literally. I remember Captain Schoepf calling out times as I was dashing out of the water at the pier. He yelled ‘9:55.’ And then, about 30 seconds later, he yelled ‘9:58.’ Roughly 10 seconds later, as I plunged across the line, he announced ‘10 minutes.’ The truth was, the patrol was hurting for people, and the captain let me slide. My old Timex told

Wesley Smith is pictured in 1992.

me it was more like 10:35 for the swim.” Wesley was on his way to his first summer as a guard. He probably didn’t realize at that moment just how far this journey with the beach patrol was going to go or how much this “10 minute” swim was going to change his life. But that summer job he started helped give him focus and purpose as he pursued his dreams over the next 22 summers. Wes-

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ley guarded the crowded beaches of “condo row” for several summers before being promoted to sergeant in 1994 and then to lieutenant three years later. It was as a lieutenant that Wesley had one of his most memorable rescues. “I had to make an off-duty rescue of five people without a buoy. At about 8 a.m. that morning, I went for a long run from 78th Street to the Inlet,” he said.

“On the way back, as I was around Surf Avenue, I saw two heads together at the tail end of a long rip off the 14th Street rocks. I started to sprint to 14th Street when I noticed two kids around 10-12 years old yelling for help, one practically holding the other underwater.” Wesley recalled, “As I started swimming out, two men from the beach trudged into the rip to help, but immediately found themselves in trouble. I had to cross chest carry one kid and hold the other under his armpit as I scissor kicked to the two men who were now in danger too. I noticed a surfer about a block away and called them to paddle over. Unfortunately, it was a cheap rental surfboard, and the surfer turned out to be a young kid who didn't know what he was doing. I had all of them grab the board, and I put the leash on my ankle and swam to the sandbar around the rocks.” “Once we got in to shore, fire trucks were pulling up, and rescue team members were running out in boots on the beach, carrying a landline. Fortunately, they didn't need to use it, and all the victims were okay. The two men needed oxygen, but everyone was safe. It made the national news,” he said. Wesley’s long career with the OCBP took him much farther than water rescues. “Mentally and emotionally, the beach patrol helped me significantly. After joining OCBP, I eventually earned my GED, my Bachelor's degree, my Master's, and my PhD with tuition-paid fellowships. And I maintained a 4.0 GPA all through college. In summary, I entered the beach patrol aspiring to get a GED and left with a Ph.D. and no college debt. Toward the tail end of my OCBP career, I became a professor at the University of Miami in 2004, where I direct the most popular pre-med program on campus.” Additionally, the OCBP would name Wesley the director of training, allowing him to “revamp the training academy and create a detailed beach patrol manual.” Wesley was also proud of founding and directing the Ironguard Triathlon. His time on the patrol would come to an end by 2010. Like so many before him, life forced him to make a difficult decision. “The only thing I loved more than the job was being a father,” he said. “I realized the split life of being a professor in Florida during the winter and a Maryland beach patrol lieutenant in the summer was not good for my son and my future children. Unfortunately, I had to retire, at least until my kids go to college. And since I have a new baby girl, I guess I will return when I'm 70.” Wesley lives in Islamorada, Fla., and is certain that “without joining the beach patrol, I'd never be helping run a healthcare company or teaching future doctors at a major academic institution.” And all this because of a 10-minute swim.


Utility Company To Survey Fenwick Resident On Natural Gas

July 1, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – Town officials voted last week to authorize Chesapeake Utilities to send out a survey regarding the expansion of a natural gas line. Last Friday, the Fenwick Island Town Council voted 6-1, with Councilwoman Janice Bortner opposed, to allow Chesapeake Utilities to send out a survey gauging the communities interest in a natural gas line expansion into town. “They are currently bringing a main line to Route 54 and Route 1 to support Ocean City and they are exploring branching off of that and serving our community,” said Councilman Richard Benn, chair of the town’s infrastructure committee. “All this is is we are going to allow them to send out a survey that lets them use the town seal. They have found out in the past when they have done this survey, having the town seal on there, along with their company logo, gets more people to respond to it.” In June, Chesapeake Utilities representatives came before the town’s infrastructure committee to discuss the company’s plans to bring an eight-inch pipe down Route 54 and into Ocean City. As part of that project, officials said they were seeking the town’s interest in expanding the line into Fenwick. Officials noted the Delaware Public Service Commission requires Chesapeake Utilities to conduct a survey of the

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Letter To Gauge Line Expansion Opinion

town’s residents. To that end, representatives told committee members they were seeking permission to send out a survey letter, which would give the company access to the town’s mailing list and letterhead. “We would get a lot better idea of what’s what as far as the possibilities of extending the main,” Chesapeake Utilities’ Steve Ashcraft said at the time. Benn told councilmembers last week the survey was just that, a survey. “This is not about approving them,” he said. “We’d have to talk about franchise licenses, connection fees, all types of other things, before this moves forward. This would just allow them to send the survey using the town seal to get a better response.” Councilwoman Natalie Magdeburger questioned if town staff would be able to review the survey. “Would you be in a position to review the survey before they place our seal on it, just to make sure the language would comport with what you think is appropriate?” she asked. Benn said he believed it could be reviewed by either the town solicitor or town manager. “I’m sure we can request that,” he replied.

During public comments, resident Amy Kyle said she opposed the use of the town seal on the survey letter. She argued it could be misconstrued as a sign of endorsement. “Given that it’s not really consistent with our sustainability plan, I think there’s a higher level of consideration that needs to be given,” she added. “Is there any reason to start installing new natural gas infrastructure when what we desperately

Page 65

need to do is electrify and stop burning stuff?” Benn, however, argued in favor of sending out the survey. “This is a survey, it will give people a chance to pipe in and make those comments …,” he said. After further discussion, the council voted 6-1, with Bortner opposed, to authorize Chesapeake Utilities to send out a survey letter, with clarification that the town was not endorsing the proposed expansion. “I’m uncomfortable with it,” Bortner explained. “Something about it doesn’t sit right with me.”

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Page 66

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

People in Society Attendees at a Pollinator Week celebration in Berlin last Friday included Ryan Nellans and Matt Amey.

by Charlene Sharpe Featuring Those Helping Causes In The Resort Area

Local resident Victoria Spice is pictured with Sunnie and Nola at the Berlin Commons.

Mark and Kathy Clark are pictured with Hugh and JL Cropper at a garden party at Newport Farms in Berlin.

Shawn and Kiran Singh attended a Pollinator Week celebration during their visit to Berlin.

Patrick Henry and Jennifer Neeb are pictured at a preview reception for the Lower Shore Land Trust Pollinator Garden Tour.

Garrett Neville and Kallie Pugh paused for a photo at a Pollinator Week celebration hosted by the Buzz Meadery.

Kate Patton and Karen Prengaman attended a preview reception for the Lower Shore Land Trust’s 2nd annual Pollinator Garden Tour.

Musician Everett Spells is pictured with Ivy Wells at the Berlin Farmers Market on Sunday.

Ryan and Cate Nellans sold scones at the farmers market Sunday to raise money for Planned Parenthood.

Bruce and Susan Robson attended a garden party at Newport Farms to support Lower Shore Land Trust.


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 67

THE DISPATCH Crossword Puzzle

ANSWERS ON PAGE 102

HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21 to April 19): You difficult situation involving someone clever Ewes and Rams love nothing close to you. But you know you're doing more than to rise to a challenge. So, by the right thing, so stick with your deciall means, if you feel sure about your sion. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21): facts, step right up and defend your You're a good friend to others. Now side of the issue. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20): is the time to allow them to be good You've done some great work recent- friends to you. Rely on their trusted adly. Now it's time to reward yourself with vice to help you get through an uncersomething wonderful, perhaps a day at tain period. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21): a spa or a night out with someone very Family and friends are always imporspecial. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20): You tant, but especially so at this time. Delove to talk, but don't forget to make spite your hectic workplace schedule, time to do a little more listening, other- make a real effort to include them in wise you could miss out on an impor- your life. tant message someone might be trying CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19): to send you. That project you've been working on is CANCER (June 21 to July 22): almost ready for presentation. But you Your aspect indicates some uncertain- still need some information from a colty about one of your goals. Use this league before you can consider it done. period of shifting attitudes to reassess AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18): what you really want and what you're Don't let those negative attitudes that ready to do to get it. have sprung up around you drain your LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22): Your so- energies. Shrug them off and move acial life is picking up, and you'll soon head with the confidence that you can be mingling with old friends and mak- get the job done. ing new ones. But 'twixt the fun times, PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20): Asstay on top of changing workplace con- pects favor some dedicated fun time ditions. for the hardworking Piscean. A nice, reVIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22): A freshing plunge into the social swim trusted friend offers understanding as can recharge your physical and emoyou vent some long-pent-up feelings. tional batteries. Now, move on from there and start BORN THIS WEEK: You love to making the changes you've put off travel and be with people. You probably all this time. would be happy as a social director on LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22): You a cruise ship. (c) 2022 King Features Syndicate, Inc. might well feel uneasy asANSWERS you face a ON PAGE 46

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 68

Things I Like... By Steve Green

vanishing

OCEAN CITY

July 1, 2022

WITH BUNK MANN

A pool full of kids goofing around

The Boardwalk on weekend mornings Small live music venues Cloudless beach days

Getting home before a big storm Smell of surf wax in a car

A kid who will try new foods Berlin’s brick crosswalks

A seashell worth keeping

Dogs who don’t need a leash Crispy scrapple

Assateague reached its peak as a sportsman’s paradise in the years immediately following World War II. During this period, the only access to the isolated barrier island was by boat with duck hunters and surf fishermen as the most frequent visitors. Local kids often accompanied their fathers to Assateague and collected shells that had washed ashore during winter storms. These shells were later sold to tourists on the Boardwalk and provided spending money for a generation of Ocean City youngsters. Another quaint and fading vision from the past were the “beach buggys,” which sportsman would leave on the island during the surf fishing season. In the 1950s, the area near the South Point Ferry’s landing resembled a parking lot from the Great Depression with dozens of rusting but drivable antique vehicles waiting for their owners to arrive for another fishing trip. These old cars navigated the uncrowded beach until the opening of the Verrazano Bridge in 1964 made Assateague accessible to everyone and brought crowds to the previously remote island. To purchase one of Bunk Mann's books, click over to www.vanishingoc.com. Photo courtesy David Cropper


Fenwick Group Reviews Designs, Costs For Dredging

July 1, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – A review of conceptual designs and cost estimates highlighted a committee meeting this week to discuss potential dredging projects in Fenwick Island. On Tuesday, members of the Fenwick Island Dredging Committee met to discuss options for a long-awaited dredging project in the neighboring Little Assawoman Bay. Following directions from the committee, Anchor QEA’s Steve Bagnull presented officials this week with conceptual designs and cost estimates for three deposit sites – Seatowne, the nearby kayak launch and Seal Island. “These three cost estimates are all pretty similar …,” said Councilman Bill Rymer, committee chair. “Each is within roughly $200,000 of each other.” Late last year, committee members began exploring sites on which to deposit material from a proposed dredging project. While the committee first proposed a project with Seatowne, a nearby community which would use Fenwick’s dredged material for a wetland restoration project, officials agreed to also gather cost estimates of using areas such as Seal Island or the nearby kayak launch as a proposed deposit site. “Today is not the day to pick or the other,” Rymer told committee members this week. “I think we have to have conversations with Delaware Parks to make sure they are brought into this discussion … I just want to make sure everyone saw these conceptual designs and cost estimates first.” In addition to a project at Seatowne, Bagnull also presented committee members with conceptual designs for a project at Seal Island and a project at the kayak launch. “We were left with the charge of putting together conceptual cost estimates for Seal Island and material placement at the kayak launch area …,” he explained. “In order to come up with costs, we had to come up with conceptual-level design.” Bagnull told committee members this week the proposed project at Seal Island – located in the Little Assawoman Bay – would restore roughly eight acres of stateowned land using dredged material. He noted that rocks and dredged material would be used to develop a high marsh, low marsh and beach area. “We feel that would help keep material in place in the long term,” he explained. “We want this to be a resilient island and have habitat variability.” Bagnull said the project cost of Seal Island would total an estimated $1.75 million, which includes a $150,000 tipping fee imposed by Delaware State Parks. “The biggest difference is the tipping fee, which is the requested fee from state parks to be able to dispose of materials within their own property,” Rymer added. Bagnull also presented committee members with a proposed deposit area at the nearby kayak launch. He said dewatering and depositing the material along the bayside property would cost an estimated $1.85 million. “The cost estimate assumes the material gets mechanically dewatered and ben-

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

eficially reused, he said. “That process is pricier than pumping into bags or even into a marsh … That pushes the unit cost up.” Rymer noted he was surprised a deposit site at the kayak launch would cost more than the restoration project at Seal Island. “It makes the kayak launch option C, which is a surprise,” he said. In discussions this week, officials and residents pointed out that the town would most benefit from a proposed restoration project on Seal Island, as it acts as a storm barrier, provides wildlife habitat and contributes recreation value. Fenwick resident Steve Ross, commodore of the Fenwick Island Yacht Club, said his organization also supported the idea of focusing on Seal Island. “The club is willing to do whatever it can to contribute to the project …,” he

said. “The town is paying for all this dredging. I think we need to pick a project that most benefits the town.” Committee members ultimately agreed to reach out to Delaware State Parks to discuss conceptual designs at the two proposed deposit sites. “The next big step is we will line up a meeting with Delaware Parks to go through these analyses, get more detailed feedback and come back to the committee,” he said. Committee members this week also reviewed possible grant opportunities to fund the dredging project. Rymer noted that the town had recently applied for a National Fish and Wildlife Foundation grant, seeking $100,000 to reimburse the town for permitting and engineering costs. “It is specific to just Seal Island,” Rymer said. “Basically, we had to take a

Page 69

stance. If we are fortunate enough to win, but the committee decides Seal Island is not the right direction, we will have to contact them.” Committee members noted they could also explore the costs of hiring a grant writer. “Before we start heading down the grant writing process, we need to actually identify what the project is,” he said. Plans for a dredging project in the Little Assawoman Bay began in earnest in 2018, when the town hired Tony Pratt, former administrator for the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), to guide them through the funding and permitting processes. By the following year, Anchor QEA, a Lewes-based engineering firm, was brought on board to provide design, bidding and construction management services.

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Five Candidates File For Fenwick Town Council Seats

Page 70

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY BETHANY HOOPER

STAFF WRITER

FENWICK ISLAND – Five candidates are seeking three seats on the Fenwick Island Town Council this year. In a special meeting held last Wednesday, the Fenwick Island Town Council accepted the names of five candidates who will vie for three council seats currently held by Vicki Carmean, Bill Rymer and Richard Benn. In addition to Rymer and Benn, candidates for the 2022 election include Edward Bishop, Kimberly Espinosa and Eric Espinosa. “There will be an election,” said Council Secretary Natalie Magdeburger. On Aug. 6, Fenwick Island will hold its annual election to fill three positions on the town council with terms expiring in 2022. All council members serve two-year terms

and are tasked with adopting ordinances and resolutions and determining the general goals and policies of Fenwick Island. The deadline for voter registration has also been set for July 7, while the absentee ballot request deadline has been set for Aug. 5. The election will be held on Aug. 6, from 1-5 p.m. at town hall. This year’s town council election will follow what can only be described as a divisive 2021 campaign, in which four newcomers – Magdeburger, Janice Bortner, Jacque Napolitano and Paul Breger – unseated the four challenging incumbents to secure seats on the dais. Following a slew of resignations, Carmean, the only remaining incumbent on the town council, was appointed mayor, while Rymer and Benn were appointed to fill two council vacancies. As Rymer and Benn were appointed to fill the remainder of a two-year term, their

July 1, 2022

seats will be up for grabs in this year’s election. In a statement last week, Carmean will not be seeking a ninth term in office. “After 18 years of serving on the Fenwick Council, I have decided to ‘retire’ from the town government,” she said. “I actually began my involvement with the town 20 years ago when I first moved to Fenwick as a full-time resident. Even when I took an occasional break from serving on the council, I stayed involved by going to the meetings and joining committees.” She continued, “I have always felt a great deal of love for the town as well as a sense of responsibility as a citizen. During both the good and sometimes painful times in Fenwick's past, I have tried to remain true to certain standards, like treating people with courtesy and respect as well as encouraging honest and transparent government. Serving as the Mayor this past year with a very talented council and

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Wicomico Bond Bill To Fund Capital Projects BY BETHANY HOOPER

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dedicated staff has been the absolutely best experience.” Carmean noted, however, that she is eager to spend time pursuing other personal interests. “I am looking to journey down another road where there are more places to see and people to meet,” she said. “I am comfortable knowing that Fenwick is in a positive position to move forward. While I feel very fortunate and honored that I have been able to serve, now other very capable people have stepped forward to provide new ideas and contributions.”

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SALISBURY – Officials in Wicomico County voted this week to introduce a $23 million bond bill. On Tuesday, the Wicomico County Council voted unanimously to introduce a legislative bill allowing the county to borrow $23,378,386 for nine capital projects. “We have a calendar created such that we would go to the bond market prior to the general election,” Finance Director Pam Oland told council members this week. “The intention would be to have a second reading in July.” Oland noted that the timeline for Wicomico’s bond process was moved up to allow the same council to vote on its acceptance. “We are moving up the process so it doesn’t interact with the election,” she explained this week. The 2022 bond bill includes $2.6 million for projects at the Old Courthouse in Salisbury – $350,000 for window replacements, $500,000 for exterior masonry repairs and $1.75 million for electrical system upgrades – as well as $1,033,386 for a new Applied Technology Building at WorWic Community College. The bond bill also includes $1.2 million for the Coulbourn Mill Pond dam project, $10.1 million for a renovation and addition at Mardela Middle and High School and $250,000 in bond contingency. The bill also features $8.1 million in bonded airport projects, including $5.98 million for a runway extension project, $1.5 million for a car rental car wash and $715,000 for a natural gas line extension. With no further discussion, the council voted 7-0 to introduce the 2022 bond bill. This week’s introduction follows a $51 million bond bill approved by county leaders last year to fund eight capital projects, including the replacement of Beaver Run Elementary School and $19.6 million for the construction of a new public safety buildings. As the county did not go to the bond market in 2020 – the result of conflicts between the legislative and executive branches of government and disagreements over certifying department heads – officials noted the 2021 bond bill was larger than most, but that the county wanted to take advantage of a favorable economic climate.


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 71

with Scott Lenox Hello everyone and Happy 4th of July weekend. It’s hard to believe as the season seems to be flying by faster than ever. Though tuna fishing slowed down over the weekend we still had some good fishing offshore with some more white and blue marlin being caught and some good deep dropping for tilefish and sea bass. Inshore fishing was good with calm conditions over the weekend, and it was a busy tournament weekend. Let’s get to it. There were several tournaments last weekend and thanks to some beautiful weather there were a bunch of fish caught and a lot of fun was had. The 2nd Annual Tuna and Tiaras ladies only tuna tournament took place this weekend with 33 boats fishing hard for their share of over $75,000 in prize money. Third place in the heaviest tuna division went to the crew of On the Hunt, second place was won by the crew of the Billfisher and first place was won by the crew of the Game Changer. Game Changer’s 54-pound yellowfin tuna was good for over $23,000 in prizes. Congratulations to all of the lady anglers. The Ocean City Marlin Club Small Boat

Tournament was also held this past weekend and was another well attended event. Fifty boats competed for both inshore and offshore prizes and there were lots of fish caught. In the inshore division, first place sea bass was caught by the crew of the World Cat 230, first place flounder was caught by the Ready or Not and first place bluefish was won by Big Bird Cropper on his Lost Time. In the offshore division No Limits won the billfish release category, first place dolphin was captured by the Humpin’ Along and first place tuna was won by Team Martz. The big money winner in the OCMC Small Boat Tournament was the Humpin’ Along whose first place mahi of 20.6 pounds won them just over $7,000. The Fish N Paddle Saltwater Slam kayak tournament was also held this weekend where 74 kayak anglers paddled and fished for several thousand dollars’ worth of prize money. The big winners were third place, Daniel Son who won $1,000; Brian Scharle who won $2,000, second place; and John Farrell Stackhouse who cashed for $5,700. John also broke a tournament record with his SEE PAGE 72

The crew of the Real One fishing out of Sunset Marina landed a 340-pound blue marlin over the weekend. Submitted Photos


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

Above top left, this angler won the big money with a big flounder caught on board the Tortuga out of Bahia Marina. Above top center, this lucky angler found a grey trout (weakfish) while fishing with Captain Jason Mumford on board Lucky Break. Above top right, Captain Chris Mizurak of the Angler put his crew on some good flounder fishing over the weekend with several fish over 4 pounds. Above left, Captain John Prather of Ocean City Guide Service put this group on two keeper flounder, a legal rockfish and a nice black drum. Above right, Captain Mark Hoos of the MARLI put this group on a great day of tuna fishing with 13 yellowfin tuna for the box. Opposite page, top left, Mike Robertson, Kevin Twilley and Mike Shane hold some of our Nantucket Shoals catch with flounder of 8, 8, 9, 9.5, 10 and 10.5 pounds. Opposite page, top right, Team “Girls Got Game” of the Game Changer won first place in the 2nd Annual Tuna & Tiaras Tournament with their 54 pound yellowfin tuna. Opposite page, middle left, John Farrell Stackhouse smashed a tournament record and won first place in the Fish N Paddle kayak tournament with this 46.45 pound cobia. Opposite page, middle right, Andrew Mercer used a live spot to land this fat 29” rockfish at the Route 50 Bridge. Opposite page, bottom left, this young angler was all smiles after landing a healthy yellowfin tuna aboard Chasin’ Tides Charters. Opposite page, bottom right, Pat Borell was drifting the East Channel with a Fish in OC Deadly Double when she was surprised by this 28” cobia that was released.

... Fish In OC FROM PAGE 71 huge 46.25-pound cobia that is the largest fish ever caught in the tournament and will be tough to ever beat. Congratulations to tournament director Brian Roberts and all the kayak anglers. Offshore fishing was good late last week with several charter boats having double digit catches of yellowfin tuna, but that ended over the weekend with calm conditions and a lot more boats. What was multiple bites became a few and what was 10 to 13 legal fish became two or three. Thankfully conditions were right for deep dropping and many boats had some big sea bass, blueline tilefish and golden tilefish to over 50 pounds. Ocean bottom fishing was pretty good

this week with decent catches of sea bass and more flounder from inshore wrecks and reefs. There aren’t as many keeper sea bass being caught right now, but the ones that are have been nice sized fish up to 4 pounds. More flounder are being caught on local party and charter boats on an almost daily basis and some of the fish are “doormats” up to 6 pounds. We’ve also seen a good bite for Spanish mackerel at the inshore lumps and there are also some cutlassfish, or “ribbonfish” being caught. If you catch a cutlass while you’re out there ocean fishing be very careful with them as they have lots of very sharp teeth. Back bay fishing improved this past week with clean water conditions, with the best bite for flounder happening on the high tide. Anglers fishing behind Assateague Island or in the East Channel had the best luck on Gulp and/or live minnows on top and bottom rigs like

our Fish in OC Deadly Double. There have been some more legal rockfish caught at the Route 50 Bridge over the past week with most fish being caught on live bait like bunker or spot. There are plenty of throwback sized fish to be had on moving tide with lures like the Roy Rig or the Thing A Ma Jig, but larger fish are being caught on diving hard body plastic lures or live bait. Remember striped bass on the coast have to be in a slot from 28” to less than 35” and anglers are allowed one per person. This weekend is the Ocean City Marlin Club’s 40th Annual Canyon Kick-Off Tournament which kicks off the offshore tournament season this year. This is a fish two of three day event taking place Friday, Saturday and Sunday with lines in at 8 a.m. and lines out at 3 p.m. The Canyon Kick-Off is free to paid OCMC members, but you don’t have to be a member of the

OCMC to participate. There are categories for billfish release, heaviest tuna, heaviest bluefin tuna and heaviest dolphin. For more information, call the club at 410-213-1613. I had a great time fishing for giant flounder on the Nantucket Shoals last weekend where the crew and I had over 40 keeper fish. I caught one real close to my biggest ever at 8 pounds and we also had fish of 9 pounds, 9.5 pounds, 10 pounds and 10.5 pounds. It was unbelievable and I can’t wait to go back, but now it’s time to get back to work. We’ve got a busy tournament season coming up and I’ll be bringing to you here every week. Until next week, tight lines. (The writer is the owner of Fish in OC and host of Ocean City’s fishing television show Hooked on OC. He has worked in the fishing industry and been fishing the waters in and around Ocean City for over 25 years.)


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 73


Page 74 BY CHARLENE SHARPE STAFF WRITER

SNOW HILL – Voters are preparing to head to the polls this month with early voting starting next week and the primary set for July 19. Early voting for Worcester County residents will take place at Worcester Preparatory School from July 7 to July 14. The primary is set for Tuesday, July 19. At the local level, primary contests will determine winners in several races. This year’s Worcester County Commissioners election is highlighted by four-candidate primary races in District 3 and District 4. Contests not being decided in the primary include District 1, where incumbent Commissioner Josh Nordstrom, a Democrat, has been challenged by Republican Caryn Abbott, and District 7, where Commissioner Joe Mitrecic runs unopposed. As it has in the past, The Dispatch sent each candidate four questions regarding local issues. Their responses are printed here verbatim in hopes of providing voters a better idea of each candidate’s positions as the election nears. District 3: With longtime Commissioner Bud Church not seeking reelection, the District 3 seat attracted four challengers, all Republicans. Eric Fiori, owner of Bayside Jet Drive, among other ventures, wants to use his decades of business experience to help control growth and ensure the county has the infrastructure it needs. Thom Gulyas, a former Berlin councilman and owner of ACE Printing & Mailing, wants to follow in the footsteps of his mother, former commissioner Louise Gulyas, and is interested in expanding access to mental health care, supporting public safety and keeping taxes affordable. Shawn Kotwica, a local Realtor, wants to move the county forward in a fiscally responsible way while Tim VanVonno, who spent decades in construction and real estate, wants to support education and smart growth to ensure the county stays as it was when he moved here. Q. Why are you running for commissioner? Please list at least three reasons. Fiori: I am running for Worcester County Commissioner, District 3 because: 1. Effective leadership: Effective leaders possess skills necessary to collaborate with others to achieve common goals and prioritize things when needed. With 25 years of management experience and 22 years as a business owner, I believe I will bring a unique skill set to the commissioners. I will respect everyone’s opinion and channel compromise, while striving for the ERIC FIORI most positive outcome for all involved. Internal conflict cannot be allowed to hinder progress. A skilled manager can consider all opinions, weigh them equally with respect, and extract the best points for an optimal solution. It would be my great honor to serve Worcester County. 2. Sharpening planning and zoning: I own EJF Real Estate LLC which is the entity that holds both of my boat dealership locations. My boat dealerships reside on large parcels of commercial land which require many interactions with planning and zoning. When I first began investing in property in early 2008, the leadership in the county were excited to see new business and eager to help with new growth. As time went on, I have continued small commercial projects throughout the county, but this process has become increasingly difficult

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

WORCESTER COUNTY PRIMARY ELECTION PREVIEW and frustrating at times. Commercial and residential growth is a key factor to increasing revenue, and I want to put proper leadership in place that will be excited to work with new and growing businesses in Worcester County. 3. Love for the county: I spent many summers down at the shore, but made Worcester County my home after college in 2000. I grew up on the Magothy River in Anne Arundel County with a love for the water and the beauty of our natural resources here in Maryland. Moving east to Worcester County allowed me to take in much of the beauty in this state. I want to protect these natural resources as we live, work and enjoy this county we call home. Growth is inevitable, but controlled growth is a fiscal responsibility. With comprehensive rezoning plans on the horizon, I want to be a part of the next chapter in this crown jewel of Maryland. Gulyas: I’ve always felt pulled toward local governmental politics, especially since my mother was a dynamic Worcester County Commissioner. In 2014 and 2018, I successfully ran for the Berlin Town Council to give back to my community. Municipal level politics can be rewarding, yet challenging, and gave me the THOM opportunity to see the imGULYAS mediate results of the positive impacts I, and the rest of the council, made. Berlin has over 70 employees who allow that town to operate. Berlin couldn’t succeed without the help of these dedicated people. I’m still very proud of them today. After six years as Berlin councilman, I stepped down because we started building our forever home in South Point, eager to get back on the water, with its refreshing, breathtaking views. Worcester County is my home. I care about it, and every resident, very deeply. You have my word that I will diligently work for you. Kotwica: I believe that we can move forward in a tactical way to improve the county as a whole, while preserving the beauty for which we are all here to enjoy. Being fiscally responsible is something I pride myself, my family and our businesses for carrying out in the truest of form, and for which I would like to support the county in doing so as well. We must focus on public safety first as we all see SHAWN with the recent events at BIS. Not only with police, KOTWICA fire and EMS but also taking into account mental health professionals as well. Long-term planned strategic growth focusing on the proper infrastructures first, and then developing based on a quality foundation of better roads, strong adequate Wi-Fi and proper water and sewer infrastructure to protect our shores. VanVonno: 1. Preserving community spirit, values and health. In 2007 my wife, Catherine and I decided to move to Worcester County from Fairfax, Va., to raise our four children. We spent many weekends and summers prior enjoying the beautiful, peaceful and safe community spirit. It remindTIM ed me of "the way things VANVONNO were when I grew up" with core values of respect for community and

country, nurturing educational environment, safety and responsive law enforcement and family friendly values. Over the last 15 years, I have been able to communicate and work with so many citizens, politicians, county officials and business owners. My children have all grown to be educated, responsible adults and successful college attendance through their experiences with Ocean City Elementary, Berlin Intermediate, Worcester Prep, Worcester Tech and Stephen Decatur High School. The district has had tremendous growth and changes and I want to make sure the same values and principles that brought us here remain in place. 2. Smart growth and creating a tax base for county development: Will support to create more infill growth around population centers with existing water and sewer capabilities. Worcester County needs to consider all aspects of development and economic impact to the school system, taxes, traffic, employment, sewer/water availability, police/fire support, county administration usage and environment. 3. Continue to strengthen our educational system: Continue to have Worcester County focus on providing top level education and balancing growth and cost controls. This will allow for proper compensation for teachers and administrators, bus drivers and all the necessary tools to make sure all students are prepared for college, trade school and or chosen career path. 4. Responsive communication for citizens. I will assist the community in getting their concerns addressed and facilitate communication to the commissioners, local and state officials and always be available to help in any way possible. 5. Environmental responsibility. Worcester County is home to the most spectacular natural beauty. Every decision that will affect the environment needs to be studied and mitigated to preserve this County. Things such as solar energy, energy conservation programs, making sure the current econ-system is nourished and or repaired, more accessible recycling programs and a more efficient approval program between all levels of government. Water and sewer expansion is also vital to meet the capacity, growth and reduce polluting the aquifer. 6. Small business development and support: Will support by facilitating licensing, permits, lower taxes, community development programs, promoting local citizen entrepreneurship and providing affordable housing to encourage labor growth and availability. 7. Safety. Will support and increased (if needed) resources needed to provide adequate police, fire and rescue support to the community. Need to make sure crime issues are met with direct action and every citizen feels safe. 8. Increased support for Atlantic General Hospital: Atlantic General Hospital is an integral part of our local community to provide health and well-being for the local community and should be supported financially by the County. For example, the emergency doctors that work at AGH are also a part of a group that works at TidalHealth and PRMC. They save the lives of our citizens and a great community hospital. 9. Experience and educational background. My wife Catherine and I have been together for 32 years and raised four children to include 3 daughters Christina (law school graduate and law clerk in Worces-

July 1, 2022 ter County), Cassidy (childhood Broadway Star and graduate of performing arts LaGuardia High School in Manhattan, N.Y. and college student) and Chelsea (currently studying journalism in college) and my son Timmy (civil engineering degree from University of Maryland). Timmy has taken over the day-to-day operations of my businesses and allowed me to have the time and opportunity to run for commissioner and serve my district. My experiences both professional and personal will allow me to understand the issues facing our District and County. Being a small business owner all my adult life has given me the opportunity to truly understand the responsibility and work ethic needed for success. Other components include working through economic cycles (good and bad), regulatory hurdles and through a more and more litigious environment. Q. In your opinion, what are the three biggest issues facing Worcester County currently? Fiori: 1. First responder funding: With more and more people discovering that Worcester County is a wonderful place to live, this raises the challenges of policing and emergency response times being negatively affected due to inadequate funding. We need to ensure that our county is safe, no matter in which end you live. 2. Comprehensive rezoning and growth planning: With our explosive growth in the county, infrastructure needs arise. Planned infrastructure and controlled growth needs to be on the minds of all leadership within the county. Many of our sewer systems are at or nearing capacity in the north end of the county. To plan for this growth, we need to plan for the basic needs of our citizens. This would include new sewer and water facilities in areas which we would like this growth to occur. Neighboring states’ growth has exploded without proper planning and I do not want to see that happen in this beautiful place we call home. 3. Educational funding: The Worcester County Public School System is the reason many families move to our county. With many Blue Ribbon accredited schools, families strive to make Worcester County home. With the influx of new families, our class sizes are growing year after year and we will soon be bursting at the seams. Raising the revenue to properly fund our school systems and keep our exemplary reputation needs to be a high priority when making budget decisions. It took many years to build such an amazing school system and leadership will need to find ways to keep the momentum as class sizes continue to increase. Gulyas: There are far more than just three … bringing better access to mental health care in Worcester County for both adults and children; public safety including police, fire and ambulance services; keeping taxes – business, personal and property – affordable; bringing fire/ambulance service to West Ocean City where it is sorely needed; closely watching the rate of development, expansion and sprawl; supporting our schools, each precious child and the dedicated teachers, administrators and staff; we need central booking at our jail quickly to allow officers to do their jobs; protecting our schools with additional SROs; working on biking, walking paths and traffic safety on county roads; approaching development in South Point, where I live, with logic and design; guaranteeing Worcester County employees are paid fairly and equitably; and being in favor of building a multimillion-dollar sports core complex, but

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July 1, 2022

... ELECTION PREVIEW only if its financing is done with foresight and wisdom and not taxpayer money. Kotwica: Public safety and adequate funding for service, affordable housing, longterm planning for proper infrastructure. VanVonno: 1. Social issues such as mental/behavioral health, keeping kids safe from drugs and continued public health and suicide prevention programs. 2. Creating smart growth around existing population centers. 3. Create a new updated comprehensive plan to meet the current issues of the county such as job creation, land use, population growth, zoning guidelines, agricultural accommodations, affordable housing and upcoming issues. Q. In recent years, the commissioners have used fund balance from prior years to balance the budget. What can the county do to build a more sustainable budget to address the fact that requested expenditures exceed anticipated revenues most years? Fiori: In recent months, there has been a mass exodus in planning and zoning due to HR related issues. Planning and zoning is so difficult to work with that local business owners do not want to reinvest or schedule improvements thus hindering forward progress within the county. Fixing the difficulties within planning and zoning will increase the tax base which is the main income generator for Worcester County. With phase in three-year assessments averaging 20% increase in value per property, this reassessment alone will generate considerable revenue. Allowing planning and zoning to both run more efficiently as well as a more desirable entity to work with, reassessments on properties with major improvements will also assist in increasing revenue county wide. Gulyas: In years of “fund balance overages,” the commissioners have done a good job of saving that for a rainy day. I’ve got no issues with pulling from fund balance to budget the next FY budget so long as the amount is not material in nature. An $11 million shortfall is obviously material, and you need to roll up your sleeves and dig in. Unfortunately, cuts must be made. With reassessments in the county being broken into north, central and south, this number will change at any given time. Add to that fact that inflation plays a huge roll in revenue streams. When the housing bubble bursts again, assessments will fall as will the revenue the county receives. Costs will continue to increase or at least stay consistent. Worcester County needs someone like me with experience to tackle these difficult decisions. Kotwica: Fiscal responsibility: It all starts at home, and how one operates their own finances. I come from a strict budgeting background where if you don’t budget for it, it’s not happening. We must demand more from the staff members who create their department’s budget, and hold them accountable to those budget numbers. Having an emergency spending fund is part of that planning. You must consider all facets of expenses when planning, plan the best you can, and have the appropriate proportionate emergency fund for unexpected variable cost in each category of expenditures. We pay off our business and personal credit cards at home at the end of every month. Simply put- if you can’t afford it, you can’t afford it. Fixed costs exist and rise over time, and variable cost can be controlled, monitored and directly correlated to expectations. This is not by mistake, but carefully planned not just this

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch year, but in consideration for the future markets to come. Setting up the goals of this year and looking into comprehensive plan to plan for future expenditures as well. VanVonno: Again smart growth is key to provide additional tax base. For example, a self storage facility in Route 589 corridor can be built and have the ability to tie into existing population centers with existing water and sewer. This will provide a large property tax base to the county to be used in other areas by minimizing the usage of the school system, police/fire and other county resources. Sewer and wastewater expansion is also a critical component to reduce pollution to the aquifer as development continues. Finally promote development in these population centers with possibly reduced cost of EDU’s, streamline permitting, initial tax incentives and or lower impact fees (with long term tax revenue in mind). Q. The commissioners’ 4-3 vote to move forward with purchasing land for a sports complex has been a hot topic in the weeks since. How would you have voted and what are your views on the project? Fiori: Due diligence is a process that occurs in the private sector as well as municipalities. Excitement cannot blind us. Emotions are strong. They can sometimes make us act before we explore all avenues. A sports complex in Worcester County is a phenomenal idea. It is an opportunity for all children to have a first-class facility and give children that cannot afford to play travel sports the same opportunities as those who can. I am 100 percent for the sports complex, but not as it stands. Due diligence needs to be done. When I am looking at a commercial piece of property to invest in, I consider all the same factors that commissioners need to consider when spending taxpayers’ hard earned money. This is a basic list of central steps that were skipped: 1. How are we getting into the property? With Seahawk Road overcrowded and Flower Street being a residential local throughway creating a large commercial operation is irresponsible. We cannot throw hundreds of cars a day onto Flower Street. 2. Why do we need prime property at approximately $76,000 an acre when we can move a few miles down the road and purchase the same space for a third of the cost? 3. Where are we getting water and sewer? Have we asked Berlin town officials? Have we even considered talking to our neighbors which already struggle with traffic related issues in the town on a daily basis? 4. Stormwater implications. Where are we going to house, control and responsibly discharge the amount of storm water from such a massive facility? As you can see there are many questions that still require answers. I would love to extend the contract date to answer the due diligence questions that were not addressed in the hasty decision to write such a massive property contract with taxpayer dollars. I would vote against until my list of questions were answered. A very expensive property that cannot be used for its intended use would not only be a tax burden for us, but for our children. Gulyas: I would vote no. Not with taxpayer money. I’m for a sports complex. It cannot go in the selected spot. No access to Route 50. Flower Street access is off the table because I will not destroy a neighborhood with traffic using the “build it and they will come” theory. Approximately $75,000 per acre, for just under 100 acres? That’s ridiculous. Buy the farm that was once going to be the tech park northwest of Routes 50 and 113 – 450-plus acres for less than

a third of the price of what they’re currently purchasing. I certainly hope this comes to referendum. The taxpayer should have a voice in this. Government should take responsibility for parks and recreation services, police and fire departments, housing services, emergency medical services, courts, transportation services (including public transportation), public works (streets, sewers, snow removal, and so forth), and infrastructure. Keep government out of private business. Kotwica: We cannot remain stagnant and unchanged. Being the only candidate on record to be for the sports complex at the SPA forum last month, this is for selfless reasons. Having no children of our own, but once being a child, we see this as a vast improvement to the area for the foreseeable future. After due diligence is completed, and operated by a sports complex professional organization, this venue could produce year round revenue to the area and create jobs that pay well. A more structured group of visitors, that spend money in our community to lower your tax basis. One must consider some of the following: room tax revenue, restaurants sales tax revenue, a local sporting goods store, and revitalizing the shopping centers just north of the land. Lastly is something that many people may not consider. Worcester County will own the land. The future location of a new larger, modern Stephen Decatur High School could be owned outright, paid for by the participants, and not by the citizens of this county. Schooling is the largest part of the budget, and adding on that cost in the future could be astronomical. We all know the saying “Buy land, they are not making it anymore.” If the county were to look for land for a new school, sellers will take advantage of this process and sell at a much larger premium in the future. Smart strategic growth with the long-term vision for the county in mind. VanVonno: I would have voted no. I see the positive aspects of the sports center but nothing was said about it for months and then they had a hearing and no questions were answered, and I worry about paying too much and no transparency or disclosures. There are also impacts to surrounding areas in Berlin and more discussion should’ve been given. This should be given to the people to vote on such a large and controversial decision for the County. Looks like they passed a referendum with signatures to get it on the ballot and the people will decide. District 4: The District 4 seat, currently held by incumbent Commissioner Ted Elder, also attracted several candidates. Elder, who defeated Virgil Shockley to win the seat in 2014, now faces Shockley again, this time in the primary. Shockley, a longtime farmer, is now a Republican and wants to be elected to meet a goal of his for many years – broadband to rural parts of the county. Elder, too, wants to continue the efforts underway to bring broadband to rural residents and also wants to remain a fiscally conservative voice among the commissioners. Newcomers seeking the District 4 seat are Nancy Bradford, a longtime Bank of Ocean City employee, and Jeff McMahon, who retired this spring after decades as Worcester County fire marshal. Why are you running for commissioner? Please list at least three reasons. Bradford: 1. Make a difference in the lives of NANCY our citizens through sound BRADFORD financial decisions. Every aspect of our county government is a di-

Page 75 rect reflection of financial decisions. 2. Provides the opportunity to utilize my skills and experience to serve our community. I have held numerous leadership roles in business and volunteer organizations that would be an asset to the position of County Commissioner. 3. To provide a service to help others. Elder: I am running for commissioner because I would like to continue my work promoting and facilitating the availability of broadband for every resident and business in the county. I would also want to continue the fiscally conservative overall running of the day-to-day county business. My third reason is to ensure that the citizens of the county are treated equally, with respect and fairness regard- TED ELDER less of their “standing” in the community. McMahon: I have devoted 42 years of public safety to Worcester County – 35 years working for Worcester County, 42 years as a volunteer firefighter and 25 as a paramedic. On March 31, 2022, I retired as the second full-time county fire marshal. I was encouraged by several business owners and friends. I feel I have so much more to contribute to the County. JEFF My experience working for MCMAHON Worcester County gives me budget knowledge and experience and knowledge of every department, department director, and most employees. In my 35 years of employment, I have worked for 25 different County Commissioners. I've personally known all five county sheriffs in my adult life and have the endorsement of former Sheriff Reggie Mason. Shockley: 1. I am the most qualified to represent District Four, which is considered the agricultural district. Roughly 30% of the county’s economy is derived from crop farming, poultry and other agricultural businesses. I have been farming for 55 years and raising chickens for 42 years. During my 16 years as a commissioner, I represented the farming community locally and at VIRGIL the state level. We must SHOCKLY save farmland. 2. In four years, I can have 99% of the county serviced with high-speed and affordable internet. 3. We must rejuvenate our education system by getting parents involved. I believe that a school should be a safe, welcoming and nurturing place. Everyday in Worcester County Public Schools kids are harassed, bullied and threatened. Teachers are harassed, threatened, spit upon, cursed and generally insulted. This has to end, period. It is obvious that tactics that have been tried to end it have not worked. Discipline must be returned to the classroom. 4. The primary responsibility of any elected official is the health and safety of the citizenry. Q. In your opinion, what are the three biggest issues facing Worcester County currently? Bradford: The need for economic development particularly in the central and southern part of the county. Develop new businesses and provide opportunities and support for existing businesses to grow. As a result of business growth we must ensure the necessary infrastructure is

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

... ELECTION PREVIEW FROM PAGE 75 available (water/sewer, internet, transportation, etc.). Businesses produce jobs for our citizens. Our county’s tax revenue will grow as a result. Appropriate funding for public safety (police, emergency services and fire and ambulance services) for training and state of the art equipment. Our local fire departments are struggling to find volunteers. Some type of incentive program needs to be implemented. Affordable housing is needed in our county. It has become more and more difficult for our citizens to obtain affordable housing rather it be through homeownership or renting. Many of our future generations are unable to afford to live here in Worcester County. Elder: Our biggest issue in my perspective going forward, will be dealing with inflation. We already are seeing inflation outpacing wages. The county will need to deal with inflated prices for any and all equipment purchased, and any contracted services. Also, there will be, and already are, delays in receiving said items. In addition, we will need to keep up wages for our talented workforce, to retain and replace them as they retire, or leave the county. Our next biggest issue is getting broadband available to everyone living, or working in the county; this will be, and has been, a priority of mine. While progress has been painfully slow, we are finally making gains that we are starting to see. We have currently three companies working with fiber optic cables in the county, the “Cadillac” of broadband systems. Choptank Co-op has installed a few in the rural areas northwest of Pocomoke. Bay Country is currently “lighting up” Newark and surrounding areas. Talkie, our I.S.P. Provider for the county, has hooked up several areas south of Pocomoke and while expanding in that area, have started another crew in Bishopville. We are working hard to find grants and providing “fast track” county permits to get the job done. We have invested $800, 000 into Maryland Broadband Cooperative to expand their trunk line fiber optic in the county. My number three issue, is to ensure that the health and safety of the county’s citizens are protected. To that end, we have expanded the sheriff’s department to ensure that the county schools are protected. We supported the health department with great cooperation during the pandemic, purchasing masks and supplying decontamination stations for ambulances and school buses. We added funding to our fire departments, so that several could increase the amount of full-time ambulances that would be available when needed. We need to continue our work on providing additional qualified individuals for both fire and EMS services. McMahon: The three biggest issues facing Worcester County are 1. growth, both residential and business. Worcester lacks the proper infrastructure to support such growth. With proper planning, for infrastructure, residential and commercial we can attract better-paying jobs. Broadband is important. 2. Public Safety is key to keeping Worcester County safe, viable, and attractive to visitors and people wanting to call Worcester County home. The fire and EMS service has changed to become a combination volunteer and career service. That combination will cost more as the volunteer companies continue to struggle to obtain new members and retain veterans. Funding our entire public safety section is

paramount. This includes police, fire, EMS, the jail, and emergency services. 3. The third biggest issue is keeping Worcester County schools at the top of the state's school systems. We must address the state's "Maintenance of Effort" formula. Shockley: 1. Lack of high-speed Internet at an affordable price for all citizens. 2. By December of 2022, when the commissioners are sworn in, we will have inflation in the double digits, sky-high interest rates, and will most likely be in a recession. As in 2008, we will have a huge decline in revenue even though it will take a couple of years to work its way through the county budget. I am the only one running who was elected in that time and knows what was done right and what was done wrong. 3. A new comprehensive plan is way past due and must be completed, and a new voting district map has to be drawn up. I am the only one running with that experience. Q. In recent years, the commissioners have used fund balance from prior years to balance the budget. What can the county do to build a more sustainable budget to address the fact that requested expenditures exceed anticipated revenues most years? Bradford: The county’s economic stability is reflected by their fund balance. It is essential that the county maintains their required fund balance to ensure against unanticipated expenditures. The county must pursue other options to build a sustainable budget such as continued reduction of expenses and/or finding other sources of revenue in lieu of borrowing against this fund balance. The county should be operated in the same fashion as any other successful business. This fund balance should be not be used as a common practice to balance our annual operating budget. Over utilization of these funds may negatively affect the county’s credit rating and financial health. Maintaining a balanced budget is one of the largest issues facing the county. Elder: In response to the budget question, I must say that the fact that the expenditures exceed revenues is because of the conservative way in which the budget is prepared. It seems that our revenues are generally underestimated, while our expenditures are in line, or slightly overestimated; this usually leaves us with a balance of funds going into the next fiscal year (fund balance); this has been occurring over the last several years. At the same time, we have gone from a 10% to a 12% reserve fund equaling approx. 29 million dollars. We also have about 15 million dollars in a budget stabilization fund if needed. We have used that fund balance from the prior year to “balance” the FY22-23 budget. As long as this keeps occurring, and because of our conservative estimate of revenue, this should not be an item of concern. This current practice is a good way to run the budget, and justifies our great credit rating from the bond rating companies. McMahon: Most county citizens do not understand where the fund balance comes from and how it is derived. Each budget year every county department submits what it believes it will need to function for the next fiscal year. Almost every year I worked for Worcester County, most departments' budgets increased. There were only a few departments that didn't always increase. The department I ran, the fire marshal's office was one of those. I saw three economic downturns in my 35 years of employment, so I understand the need for the "Fund Balance." How we use that fund balance is a completely different story. The answer to this question lies in the fact that every department will want to better itself each year.

Requested expenditures will always exceed requests. The Commissioners must work together to find the proper revenue and continue to set priorities. Shockley: The budget stabilization fund was put in place in order to stabilize the budgets from year to year. When I left in 2014 there was $9.7 million in the fund. As of December of 2021, there was $14 million. Its only purpose is to allow the commissioners to take money from that fund instead of having to raise taxes. Highspeed internet for all will aid the county in economic development. Ninety percent of new small business are started at a private home. The last new business that employed over 50 people for the south end was Hardwire in Pocomoke City, which was over 15 years ago. Economic development is not just building hotels and businesses on Route 50 or in Ocean City. This fails to address the overall need for economic development in the county. District Four has lost eight years of potential economic development, because of the failure of the current county commissioner to make high-speed internet a reality. Q. The commissioners’ 4-3 vote to move forward with purchasing land for a sports complex has been a hot topic in the weeks since. How would you have voted and what are your views on the project? Bradford: I am not opposed to the idea of a sports complex within the county, however based on the information available at the time of voting, I would have had to vote no. It appeared that a thorough evaluation of the entire project had not been conducted as it related to a business plan and financial analysis. The total cost of the project and funding sources seemed uncertain as did the potential use of taxpayer dollars. I do not feel the property near Stephen Decatur High School is the best suited location due to traffic, safety issues and the high cost of the real estate. I do not believe the county should be in the sports complex business. I felt it was unfortunate that the county failed to include the Town of Berlin officials in their discussions regarding the sports complex as they will be adversely impacted by the proposed facility. Elder: Moving onto the question of the sports complex 4-3 vote. As most people know, I voted against the proposal; my reasons are many. First is the spending issue at such a volatile financial time. As I stated in my previous answers, I am very concerned as to what’s in store over the next couple of years financially. Next, the traffic in that location will be horrific, just ask any school bus driver that services Stephen Decatur High School and/or Stephen Decatur Middle School. We need economic development in the middle and southern part of the county, this does nothing to help that problem. The funding for this type of facility should come from the private sector not from government. It should be known, that the primary use of such a facility would be from people from other places, and for the most part, our children will not be afforded the use of a pay-to-play facility. McMahon: I am in favor of a county area sports complex. Just not at the proposed location. There are, as reported, several other cheaper locations. This decision to proceed was hasty. In addition, we, the county taxpayers, should have been made aware of all the details, and just not what was in the bond wording. This project should be a private venture. I'm not against the county being involved. If so, it should be a joint state, county, and private venture. I don't think the county should operate the

July 1, 2022 sports complex. For those reasons, I would have voted against the location, but not the idea. So my vote would have been no. Shockley: The county already owns property at John Walter Smith Park in Snow Hill. The original park plan was to build six championship fields there using Program Open Space funds. The 2008 economic downturn at both the county and state level dried up the funds. In 2017-18, there was a vote by the county commissioners in office then to put the sports fields in the south end of the county. Certain commissioners didn’t like the vote, so they ignored it and came up with the new plan, which was voted on by the current commissioners. The cost proposed for this project is completely unrealistic and it is one of the most poorly planned that I have ever witnessed. In a push to secure the vote without a proper business plan for everyone to see, we will most likely have it going to referendum in November. This is D.C. politics right here in Worcester County and it stinks. District 5: In District 5, incumbent Commissioner Chip Bertino is being challenged by Grant Helvey. Bertino, who was elected in 2014, wants to continue serving the community and advocating for a limited government role in the lives of county citizens. Helvey, who held a management position at a telephone company before retiring to the area, wants to promote rural residential development as a commissioner. Q. Why are you running for commissioner? Please list at least three reasons. Bertino: I am running for reelection to continue representing my Ocean Pines district and to serve the entire county as I have during the past eight years with a conservative approach to county government. During my time in ofCHIP fice, I believe I have demBERTINO onstrated a responsive, accessible, responsible and effective approach to public service; valuing community involvement and taking a conservative perspective on taxpayer funded allocations. I seek support for another term for these three reasons: 1. To continue to advocate for the best interests of Ocean Pines and the county as a whole. 2. To continue articulating a limited county government role in the lives of county citizens. 3. To work through important community issues including ensuring the proposed sports complex is not a taxpayer-funded project, shepherding the county-wide broadband initiative and developing a stable funding formula for fire/EMT operations. Helvey: The nation's founders envisioned a government of temporary citizen volunteers to secure the rights of the people and to return to private life. I will replace a two term incumbent. I am qualified by education and 23 years of executive GRANT management experience HELVEY for the Verizon Telephone Company. I managed engineering, purchasing and operating power systems for 1,300 offices in seven states. Over 40 years of civic service has included President of Calvert County Jaycees, Jaycee International Senator, Calvert County Liquor Commissioner, Founder of a Veterans Memorial

SEE NEXT PAGE


July 1, 2022

... ELECTION PREVIEW in my hometown, Chairman of Worcester County Tea Party, Chairman of Worcester County Republican Central Committee and Trump Delegate to the Republican national convention. I will differ from the incumbent by promoting more rural residential development, supporting agro-tourism, replacing outdated eyesore county owned fences in Ocean Pines and resurfacing Manklin Creek Road at the South Gate entrance to Ocean Pines. Q. In your opinion, what are the three biggest issues facing Worcester County currently? Bertino: 1. A prevailing belief that taxpayer money is an unlimited funding source for projects and initiatives that lack proper vetting, stakeholder input and accountability and that fall outside taxpayer responsibility and expectation. 2. Unfunded state legislature mandates and funding formulas that unfairly siphon from the wallets of county taxpayers millions of dollars of additional tax burdens. Worcester is often victimized by Annapolis state lawmakers and activists who sidestep personal accountability, espouse dependency over self-reliance and who celebrate, promulgate and legislate wrong-headed ideas that threaten Worcester County values and local control. 3. The need for secure, future fire and EMS funding solutions that ensure when someone in distress calls 9-1-1, trained, professional personnel and proper equipment responds. Helvey: The Ocean City area tourism industry is highly dependent on summer weather. This creates extremely high temporary demand for public services, real estate and a seasonal workforce for only four months each year. This is further complicated by a shortage of affordable workforce housing. The area is seriously lacking tourist attractions to utilize business facilities for the spring, fall and winter months. An outdated and flawed Worcester County Comprehensive Development Plan prevents new residential development, thereby creating a housing shortage that increases costs and encourages less desirable high density dwellings. The state government school funding formula includes the asset value of Ocean City properties, most of which do not use our schools. The formula unfairly penalizes our county’s portion of state school funding as compared to other counties. Q. In recent years, the commissioners have used fund balance from prior years to balance the budget. What can the county do to build a more sustainable budget to address the fact that requested expenditures exceed anticipated revenues most years? Bertino: Fund balance (surplus) is a byproduct and dividend of the county’s ongoing conservative approach to budget development which restrains revenue projections and tamps down expense projections. When available, fund balance is allocated for capital purchases such as vehicles and equipment and for longer lasting projects such as facility improvements. Fund balance is not used to fund regular, ongoing operations or employee expenses. The reality is that akin to households and businesses, county government must respond to increased costs resulting from inflation, supply-line disruptions, workforce challenges and a host of other marketplace forces. Allocating fund balance surpluses, when appropriate, to alleviate budget pressures is prudent and desirable.

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch Helvey: In these extremely difficult economic times, the 17 county department heads should seek opportunities to reduce expenses in day to day operations of nonessential services. State mandated police body cameras will increase cost for the sheriff, the courts and state’s attorney’s operations. However, this is known and should already be factored in the annual budget. Due to an economic slow down and increased building material costs fewer building permits may be issued. Related county departments should recognize opportunities to reduce internal operating costs. I would also consider a freeze on hiring except for positions requiring highly skilled expertise or professional licenses. With the cooperation of all county employees and the board of commissioners, I believe that expenses should not exceed revenues, requiring augmentation from reserves. Q. The commissioners’ 4-3 vote to move forward with purchasing land for a sports complex has been a hot topic in the weeks since. How would you have voted and what are your views on the project? Bertino: I did vote. I was one of the three who voted against the land purchase. For the past six years I have consistently articulated and voted my deeply held conviction that taxpayer money should not be used for a sports complex. Despite my repeatedly expressed concerns that no pro forma, business or marketing plans, impact studies or partnerships exist for this project, and despite lip service to the contrary, county money is being used to fund this project. A majority of commissioners have advanced this effort and most recently voted to bond $11.2 million for the initial investment for this project including spending $7.1 million for land acquisition. If this succeeds, county taxpayers will be responsible for many tens of millions of dollars more for construction, maintenance, operation and marketing associated with this complex. This is not right. As I’ve stated for years, the county treasury is not an ATM. Helvey: A motion passed on a 4-3 vote that empowered the County Commissioners to borrow $11,198,830 to finance a portion of the design and planning for a sports complex. A separate motion to purchase 95 acres adjoining Stephen Decatur High School also passed on a 4-3 vote. A vague plan is proceeding that does not appear to include best business practice planning. A total cost estimate or permitted use of the complex for local youth sports has not been determined. There has been no coordination with the Mayor and Council of Berlin. A more professional and inclusive business plan is warranted. I would have voted no, pending additional information. District 6: In District 6, incumbent Commissioner Jim Bunting will face newcomer Richard Addis. Bunting, who owned his own surveying company and has served on the county’s planning commission and board of zoning appeals, has represented District 6 since 2010. Addis, a first-generation farmer, wants to limit the growth of government and protect land rights. Q. Why are you running for commissioner? Please list at least three reasons. Addis: Restoration of constitutional governance. We the people were always meant to elect citizen leaders, not career politicians. I want to enRICHARD sure every citizen has their ADDIS First Amendment right to address grievances of their government

at any time. Not just at special meetings or designated times convenient for the commissioners. Never again will a business owner in Worcester County be told that their business is non-essential. Article 44 of our Maryland Constitution is clear! That the provisions of the Constitution of the United States, and of this state, apply, as well in time of war, as in time of peace; and any departure therefrom, or violation thereof, under the plea of necessity, or any other plea, is subversive of good government, and tends to anarchy and despotism. As a constitutionalist educated at the Institute on the Constitution, every decision will be based on the supreme law of the land! Bunting: Did not respond. Q. In your opinion, what are the three biggest issues facing Worcester County currently? Addis: Worcester County is carrying $117 million in bond debt. The annual budget is roughly $205 million. This is equivalent to a family making $100,000 per year and carrying $57,000 dollars in credit card debt. This is not sustainable. Worcester County needs to stop borrowing money until the debt we currently have is resolved. Every year, our county passes new regulations, permits, licenses or fees. Most recently is the rental license program that removed the citizens right to rent their property only to sell the right back to them at a premium. These actions grow government by employing people to manage these new programs which also enlarges the county budget. Stagnation of governance. We have commissioners seeking their 3rd and 4th terms. This environment breeds complacency and stifles innovation. Our county government is full of politicians working for the next election and not citizen leaders working for the next generation. Bunting: Did not respond. Q. In recent years, the commissioners have used fund balance from prior years to balance the budget. What can the county do to build a more sustainable budget to address the fact that requested expenditures exceed anticipated revenues most years? Addis: We need to come to the hard realization that our government is growing faster than revenue is. We can either raise taxes which I am certainly not in favor of, or trim government. The county owns many properties that are no longer used or needed. These could be sold in auction to the public and the revenue from the sale could pay down the bonds which saves interest. The other benefit is that property will now be generating annual tax revenue. Roughly 54% ($108 million) of the county budget is spent on the board of education and Wor-Wic Community College. The state mandates that county residents pay for approximately 80% of the total school budget. The state pays the remainder at nearly 20%. This is the highest ratio in the state of Maryland. Millions of dollars can be saved in the budget by addressing this issue alone. Bunting: Did not respond. Q. The commissioners’ 4-3 vote to move forward with purchasing land for a sports complex has been a hot topic in the weeks since. How would you have voted and what are your views on the project? Addis: The sports complex as proposed will be a financial burden for years to come. The property sought, is the most expensive piece of property in the area at $7.15 million. In 2017 DE Turf in Frederica, Delaware was built for $27 million, and the

Page 77 land was leased for $1 per year. Just in “2017 dollars” that would put the Worcester complex at $34 million and that does not include inflation. Private industry has tried to build a complex in Worcester County and was met with roadblocks and obstruction. I say, get government out of the way and let private industry build the complex. Government has no business competing with the private sector who can build it and run it more efficiently. Area businesses will benefit from the private complex and the county will benefit from the tax revenue. Privately funded is a win-win for everyone. My vote is no. Bunting: Did not respond. District 2: Just one district features a Democrat primary contest. In District 2, incumbent Diana Purnell will face newcomer Catherine Freeman. Q. Why are you running for commissioner? Please list at least three reasons. Freeman: Did not respond. Purnell: I'm running for another term as Worcester County Commissioner to continue the work I’ve started. I am proud of the progress we have made and the way we work together as a County to get the job done. Together we have made education a top priority, brought broadband to DIANA rural areas of Worcester County, and provided a PURNELL long awaited sewer system to the Lewis Road area. However, we still have much more to do. Q. In your opinion, what are the three biggest issues facing Worcester County currently? Freeman: Did not respond. Purnell: In my opinion the top three issues facing Worcester are: 1. Affordable housing for our lower income residents and our seasonal workforce 2. Economic Sustainability for the County, Residents, and Businesses 3. County-wide Broadband for Education and Businesses Q. In recent years, the commissioners have used fund balance from prior years to balance the budget. What can the county do to build a more sustainable budget to address the fact that requested expenditures exceed anticipated revenues most years? Freeman: Did not respond. Purnell: Worcester County has already implemented a sustainable budget plan, increased focus on economic development and sports tourism to increase revenue, as well as working with each department to decrease non-emergent requests. Each year savings are built into the budget. When we as a group see priorities that can be met without jeopardizing future savings, we use prior savings to meet these priorities. Q. The commissioners’ 4-3 vote to move forward with purchasing land for a sports complex has been a hot topic in the weeks since. How would you have voted and what are your views on the project? Freeman: Did not respond. Purnell: I voted for purchasing the land for the sports complex. I support this project because our county youth will benefit tremendously by having access to playgrounds and walking/jogging trails along recreational sports fields. The complex will also provide an economic opportunity this county has not had. Having this facility accessible to the SDHS & SDMS will be a game changer for our students.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

Field Day Fun: Worcester Prep’s Lower School celebrated the last day of school with the annual Field Day event. Collecting the most sportsmanship points were Abby

Harrison’s second grade class. Above left, from left, are Tobi Blaska, Marshal Hidell, Jace Zervakos, Brooke Arnold, Kingsley Giardina, Charlize Damouni, Amalia Gjikuria, Madelyn Tull, Jaanvi Pandher, Peter Van Dalen, Avrum Gudelsky, Sloane Kremer and Coach Carol Hartnett. Above right, first grader Gracie Hornung participates in the bounce ball relay. Below, from left, are kindergartners, Charlie Davis and Sloane Gudelsky; fourth grader CJ Labin; and Camila Prosser and Sienna Fawcett. Submitted Photos

Friday 7-1: CHRIS ROBERSTON, 7-10pm Saturday 7-2: ENDLESS EMBER, 7-10pm Thursday 7-7: BRYAN DORSEY, 7-10pm


OPA Board Approves Electronic Voting

July 1, 2022

BY BETHANY HOOPER STAFF WRITER

OCEAN PINES – Association members will now have the option to participate in electronic voting following a vote this week by the Ocean Pines Board of Directors. In a special board meeting Monday, the Ocean Pines Association (OPA) Board of Directors voted unanimously to approve the second reading of an amendment to Resolution M-06, which would allow for electronic voting. The board this week also voted to approve a contract with Vote HOA Now for the upcoming Board of Directors election process. “The passage of this motion means we will be going to a new system of voting, starting with the Board election this year,” President Colette Horn said in a statement this week. “The Board appreciates the thorough review by the Elections Committee, which allowed us to make this change. We believe this will be a benefit for Ocean Pines homeowners.” In February, the Ocean Pines Elections Committee presented the OPA board with a presentation on electronic voting for future elections and referendums, as well as cost estimates from four online voting vendors. Cost estimates ranged from $3,414 to $15,531. Officials noted this week the recommended vendor, Vote HOA Now, presented the lowest bid of $3,414. “It’s the most cost effective,” Horn said. In a statement this week, Elections Committee Chairperson Carol Ludwig said the committee had recommended electronic voting as far back as 2020. This year, voters would have the option to return a paper ballot, or to vote online. “The Elections Committee is pleased that the OPA Board of Directors has accepted their recommendation to include the option of electronic transmission of ballots for the 2022 Board of Directors election,” she said. “Along with the announcement of the annual meeting, eligible property owners will receive the bio insert for the six candidates and a paper ballot/and return envelope, as well as individual random codes to access the online provider’s website.” Ludwig added that instructions for completing paper or online transmission would be included, and that members could provide their email to the OPA assessment database to receive emailed information from Vote HOA Now. Links to instructional videos and voting website will also be provided at oceanpines.org. The candidates for the 2022 Board election, in ballot order, are Paula Gray, Amy Peck, Stuart Lakernick, Monica Rakowski, Josette Wheatley and Steve Jacobs. The candidates are vying to fill three vacant positions on the Ocean Pines Board of Directors. The board this week also voted to table a second reading of amendments to Resolution B-03, which establishes

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

the procedures for holding the community’s annual meeting. The proposed changes would allow OPA to hold the meeting in a hybrid format, with both in-person and online attendance. Board members, however, agreed to table their decision Monday after sharing concerns about how the association would determine quorums and voter eligibility. “No one has explained to me how we are going to accurately control who is eligible to be on the meeting, who can vote, and how we determine a quorum,” said Director Larry Perrone. Perrone explained 100 association members were needed to have a quorum for the annual meeting, but that there was no process in place to verify if online attendees were members. It should be noted annual meetings are open to the public, and attendees are not required to be association members. Perrone also opined that the implementation of a hybrid format could lessen participation. “I can’t vote for this,” he said. After further discussion on potential verification processes, the board voted unanimously to table the motion to give association staff time to develop a solution. “That should all be laid out how it should be done …,” Perrone said. “It’s got to be in the resolution. That’s my opinion.”

Marlene Ott

Associate Broker, CRS LTG

Page 79

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Page 80

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

Things To Do Every Sunday: Berlin Farmers Market From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., several streets will be closed to allow producers to display their goods. Live music from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Every Monday: TOPS Meeting 5-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Berlin. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support group promoting weight loss and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Call Rose 443-880-8444.

Every Monday: All ladies who love to sing are invited to the Delmarva Woman’s Acapella Chorus, Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 6-8 p.m. Contact Mary 410-629-9383 or Carol 302242-7062.

Every Tuesday: TOPS Meeting Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a weekly support and education group promoting weight loss and a healthy life style. Meetings are held at the Worcester County Berlin Health Department at 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin from 3:30-4:30 p.m. every Tuesday. 410289-4725.

Every Tuesday: Dancing The Delmarva Hand Dance Club holds dancing at the Selbyville Elks Lodge 2173 from 5:30-9 p.m. delmarvahanddancing.com.

Every Wednesday: Bingo Elks Lodge 2645, corner of Sinepuxent Avenue and 138th Street in Ocean City. Has bingo all year. Doors open 4:30 p.m. with first game sharply at 6:30 p.m. Kitchen open for light fare. 410-250-2645.

Every Thursday: Beach Singles Join the club, 55 plus, at Harpoon Hanna’s in Fenwick Island, 4-6 p.m. 302436-9577 or BeachSingles.org.

Every Friday: Bingo Knights of Columbus hosts with doors open at 5 p.m. and bingo beginning promptly at 6:30 p.m. Held at the Columbus Hall at 9901 Coastal Highway, behind St. Luke's Church. Play every

game for just $24. Light refreshments available. Call 410-524-7994 with any questions. July 2: BBQ Chicken Platter American Legion Post 123 in Berlin next to Rite Aid will host from 11 a.m. until. Platter includes half of a BBQ chicken, two sides and a roll. Price is $10.

July 2: BBQ Drive-Thru The Pocomoke Elks lodge will hold a chicken BBQ drive-thru from 10:30 a.m. until supplies are gone. Cost is $10 for half of a chicken, beans, soft roll and chips.

July 3: Musician Performamce During the 10 a.m. service, soprano Joanna Cross will perform at St. Paul's by-the-Sea Episcopal Church on 3rd Street in Ocean City. A professional vocalist, pianist, and music instructor, she will sing with the congregation throughout the service as well as a solo during the offertory and "God Bless America" just before the recessional. All are welcome.

July 4: Freedom 5K Run Local and regional runners are invited to the run, sponsored by the Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department. This patriotic trot is scheduled to start at 8 a.m. at Veterans Memorial Park in Ocean Pines. Awards will be given to male and female first-through third-place finishers in nine different age groups, from 10 and under to 70 and over. An award will also be given to the best dressed runner. Day-of registration is $40 and starts at 7:15 a.m. July 4: Hot Dog Eating Contest Fish Tales Bar and Grill, located on 22nd Street bayside in Ocean City, will host in their south parking lot at noon.

This amateur competition is open to anyone over the age of 18. The winner will receive at least a $1,000 cash prize, a trophy and bragging rights for an entire year. There will be seating available to watch the competition until 4 p.m. The first 20 people to pre-register will be the contestants. To register, please visit the Bahia Marina Tackle Shop or Fish Tales Small Bar to sign up. Registration fee of $10 is required to hold your spot. You must sign a waiver to participate.

July 5: Candidates Forum The Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce and Snow Hill Chamber of Commerce will host a public forum with the Maryland Congressional District 1 Democratic candidates from 6:30-8 p.m. The event will take place at the Old Firehouse located at 212 W. Green Street in Snow Hill. Heather Mizeur and Dave Harden are both vying for the Democrat vote during the state’s upcoming primary election on July 19. The public is invited to attend and will have the opportunity to ask questions of both candidates. July 8: Crab Cake Dinner Stevenson United Methodist Church will host from 4-6:30 p.m. at 123 N. Main Street. Prices are $14, one crab cake sandwich with green beans, baked potato and cole slaw; $24, two crab cake sandwiches with sides; and $10, crab cake sandwich. Bake sale table will be available.

July 16: Chicken BBQ Dinner From 5 p.m. until sold out at Bethany United Methodist Church, 8648 Stephen Decatur Highway. Includes choice of sides: baked beans, green beans, mac-n-cheese, oven potatoes, salad, roll and drink. Indoor dining or takeout available. Baked Goods available for an additional charge. Pre-orders

Things To Do activities are printed free of charge. To ensure that an event is listed

in a timely manner, please submit information as early as possible, since all items will be listed in advance as space permits. Be sure to include the date, name of event, time, location, address and a contact number. Email to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com; fax to 410-641-0966; or mail to The Dispatch, P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811.

recommended at bethany21811@gmail.com or 410-641-2186.

July 16: Harmony Fundraiser The Delmarva Chorus, a chapter of the Sweet Adeline International (501c3), is hosting its annual fundraising event, "Coffee, Tea and Which Witch Harmony," at 7 p.m. at the Ocean Pines Maryland Community Center. The chorus, under the direction of Carol Ludwig, has been volunteering performances of acapella harmony to communities for many years. For a donation of $10, there will be free coffee, tea and homemade baked goods, a 50-50 raffle, raffle baskets, door prizes, lots of fun and more. For tickets and information, call Joann at 215828-5521. July 19: Quarter Auction The Church of the Holy Spirit is having a Quarter Auction with doors opening at 6 p.m., and the games start at 7. Food will be available for purchase. Tickets are $10 and include a paddle. Additional paddles are $2 each, or three for $5. They are limited, so get yours now. The church is located at 100th St. and Coastal Highway in Ocean City. Call Jackie at 443-735-4275 for further information and for tickets.

July 22-23, 25: Pines Book Sale The Friends of the Ocean Pines Library announced the Annual Book Sale at the Ocean Pines Library. This event is open to the public and is scheduled as follows: Friday, July 22, 6-8 p.m., club members enjoy first access to this year’s books on sale; Saturday, July 23, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., General Sale with all books, audio and DVD's priced 50 cents to $2; and Monday, July 25, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., sale continues with all books sold at half price, including the Specials Room. This popular Annual Book Sale offers over 20,000 books that have been donated throughout the year by patrons, community members and businesses. All sales are cash or check only – no credit cards will be accepted. All monies go to benefit the Ocean Pines Library and its resources, programs and events.


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 81

The Dispatch Classifieds $15/Week for Minimum of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available) Deadline for Insertions, Cancellations & Payment is 3pm Tuesday Pre-Payment is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard

HELP WANTED

ELECTRICIAN Full-time, Year-round Now accepting applications. Established company, 5+ years exp, service type projects, health, dental, paid vacation, 401k w/matching, company van. Hawkins Electric 443-856-2001 ask for John Ross.

OC MARLIN CLUB: Line/Prep Cooks, Waitstaff, Food Runners, Bar Back, Host/HostessCall 410213-1613, apply in person or email info@ocmarlinclub.com. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– KITCHEN:Cooks, Kitchen Help, Food Runners wanted. Flexible schedule, clean kitchen, new equipment.Weekly pay checks. Friendly work environment. American Legion Post #166. Contact Sam Wiley 443-235-0876 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– MAINTENANCE: Custodial/light maintenance. Full-time. Call 410250-2262. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: For busy Landscape Contractors office in Berlin. This is a multi-tasking position for detail oriented individual including customer scheduling & routing crews. Must have strong computer skills and a pleasant personality. Call The Moore Companies, 410-641-2177 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– LANDSCAPE WORKERS NEEDED: Must have reliable transportation to work. Call 410641-2177. The Moore Companies, Berlin, MD. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CLEANERS WANTED FOR OC: If you are a conscientious individual or team looking for great pay & minimal hours on summer Saturdays in OC, then we are the cleaning company for you. Exp. preferred. Cell phone and vehicle required. (443)880-0525. ___________________________ C L E A N E R S / VAC AT I O N RENTALS: Needed for Ocean City and Ocean Pines. Experience preferred but not necessary. Text or call 443-397-1189. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Housekeeper Full Time Eastern shore resident is seeking a mature, responsible and experienced person to perform various housekeeping duties at a Berlin, MD estate five days weekly. Full time position with benefits and 401K. Reliable transportation necessary. Call 410-803-4135, fax resume to 410-272-2249 or e-mail: tgreaver@bscamerica.com. Cleaning services need not apply.

Meck Services & Designs

LABORER $16/hr and up depending on experience.

PT or FT. Hardscape, landscape, decks, etc. Contact Lisa

302-489-9229

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT Worcester Preparatory School is seeking an experienced part-time Development Assistant. The Development Assistant is responsible for assisting the Director of Development and Development Coordinator with fundraising events, data entry, and volunteer coordination on a part-time basis. Highlights of the Development assistant at WPS include: • Assist with the facilitation of the annual Gala, Holiday Bazaar and Alumni events. • Assist with the coordination of parent volunteer recruitment. • Arrange food and beverage for special events and order supplies. • Assist with the preparation of budgets and coordinating financial reports to the Board of Trustees. • Assist with database updates, gift entry and donor ommunication. • Manage online fundraising and auction software. Compensation and benefits are competitive with other area private schools and are adjusted based on experience level and credentials. Interested persons should send an Application for Employment, letter of interest, resume, to Linda Watson Director of Human Resources at lwatson@worcesterprep.org

HELP WANTED

CONSERVATION TECHNICIAN/ MARINA TRAVEL LIFT OPERATOR

Position will be responsible for the daily operation and maintenance of the travel lift and forklifts. Duties will include the operation and maintenance of the marine travel lift, proper boat docking and large forklift operation plus daily supervision of the boatyard staff.

LOWER SCHOOL SPANISH TEACHER Worcester Preparatory School is seeking an experienced part-time lower school Spanish teacher. This position reports to the Lower School Head and may be assigned study halls, clubs, or other supervisory roles. Section sizes average 14-18 students. Highlights of the Spanish program at WPS include: (1) exploration of Spanish food & culture (2) vocabulary acquisition and grammar and (3) the four fundamentals of listening, speaking, reading, & writing. Candidates for this position should possess a BA degree with a major (preferred) or minor in Spanish and be proficient in the language. Previous experience teaching Spanish at the lower school level at an independent school is desirable but not required. State certification is not required. Candidates with the ability to coach sports are desirable. Compensation and benefits are competitive with other area private schools and are adjusted based on experience level and credentials. Interested persons should send an Application for Employment, letter of interest, resume, copies of transcripts for all college work, and educational philosophy to Linda Watson, Director of Human Resources at lwatson@worcesterprep.org

NOW HIRING! PAYING TOP DOLLAR! •LINE COOKS •FOOD RUNNER •SERVERS •BARBACK

Apply online at delawarestatejobs.com

For further assistance, you may contact us by phone at 302.739.5458 or email at jobs@delaware.gov

Please apply in person. Greene Turtle West Rt. 611, West OC 410-213-1500 WEST OC’S MOST FUN PLACE TO WORK AND MAKE $$$$

White Horse Park Office Assistant: People skills and clerical experience needed, able to work Saturdays, full or part time, 8am - 4pm General Maintenance for Mobile Home Community: Part time including Saturdays, 8am - 4pm, Call White Horse Park 410 641 5102 for interview.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIANS Busy Tire & Service Centers with locations in the Rehoboth, Bethany and Ocean City areas, is now hiring for experienced technicans. Must be dependable.

AUTO MARINE SALES PERSON Busy Auto & Marine parts store with locations in Ocean Pines, Clarksville and Long Neck, is now hiring for full and part times sales persons. Experience a plus but will train the right person. Great Pay & Benefits. Call Joel 302-344-9769

Exc. Pay and Benefits. Call Matt - 302-344-9846 JOIN THE BETHANY BREWING TEAM! Ocean View, DE Now taking applications:

•BAR MANAGER

•BARBACK

For inquires, contact 402-430-6929 or 315-750-8248

NOW HIRING FULL TIME

•DRIVER Call Pam at 410-726-7061 Or Apply Within at 56th Street

Now Hiring For: Line Cooks Prep Cooks Host/Hostess

Call Matt at 302-593-4141 or email thesterlingtavern@gmail.com


Page 82

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

The Dispatch Classifieds $15/Week for Minimum of Five Lines • $2 Thereafter Per Line Display Classified Ads: $20/Week Per Column Inch (Contract Discounts Available) Deadline for Insertions, Cancellations & Payment is 3pm Tuesday Pre-Payment is Required. We Accept Visa & MasterCard

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

ENGLISH TEACHER

INDIAN RIVER MARINA IS NOW HIRING! •FUEL DOCK •DOCK HANDS •RAMP ATTENDANTS •BOATYARD •NIGHTWATCH •MAINTENANCE •SHIP STORE CLERK •GENERAL CLERICAL (SEASONAL YEAR ROUND)

Worcester Preparatory School is located in beautiful Berlin, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The school is an independent, coeducational college preparatory day school serving over 500 students in grades PK -12. We are seeking an experienced and motivated Upper School English Teacher for the 2022-2023 school year. This vibrant individual will have a strong education background and be capable of teaching the highest levels of high school English. Bachelor's degree from an accredited college with a major in English, successful classroom experience, and the ability to participate in other areas of school life are requirements forth is position. Advanced Placement experience and advanced degree would be desirable.

Apply Online at delawarestatejobs.com For additional information, please contact the Marina office at 302.227.3071 AA/EOE

Interested candidates should mail or email resume with cover letter to: Linda Watson, Director of Human Resources, 508 South Main Street, Berlin, MD 21811 or lwatson@worcesterprep.org

COMMERCIAL

Currently Hiring Manpower For:

Carpenter | Laborer | Painters Stucco & EIFS Mechanics Concrete Work o Experience preferred. o Tools, transportation & valid driver’s license are a plus. o Excellent pay and a competitive benefits package available. Please Apply Online: https://www.allstatesconst.com/delmarva-renovations-careers

Or Contact Our Office at 410-352-9800

CARPENTERS & CARPENTERS HELPERS Must have:

Tools, Transportation, Driver’s License Exp. Required! PATTERSON & SONS BUILDERS

Call 410-641-9530

RENTAL

WEST O.C. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACES AVAILABLE: 2 Office/Retail Spaces for Lease. Plenty of Parking. 443-497-4200. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

WEEKLY RENTAL: Berlin, MD. 1BR Apt for rent. Sleeps 4. 3 day min. $600 per wk. 410-251-3412. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WEEKLY RENTAL: OC MD Condos. 52nd St & 127th St. Weeks available: June 24-July 9th. 4th of July open! Call 267-254-0111 for good prices! –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

How will I find it Among the broken pieces, Faith, then forgiveness?

ESTATE SALE ESTATE SALE. Immaculate 7 room beach house with high end furnishings, art, accessories. Casa Stone, Provence & Pottery Barn dishes. Furnish your entire home at this sale! 37487 Oliver Drive, Selbyville, DE 19975. For pics go to estatesales.org and look for Selbyville sale.

The Dispatch Is On Facebook, Instagram & Twitter!

Follow Us Today & Get Daily News

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. Third Insertion MICHAEL B. MATHERS, ESQ. WEBB, CORNBROOKS, WILBER, VORHIS DOUSE & MATHERS, LLP PO BOX 910 115 BROAD STREET SALISBURY, MD 21803-0910 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

ESTATE NO. 19255

To all persons interested in the estate of JOYCE F. BLAYLOCK, ESTATE NO. 19255. Notice is given that MARY ELLEN ARNONE, 109 MT. VERNON AVENUE, CAPE MAY, NJ 08204, and DONALD CASHORE, 1002 E. BUTLER PIKE, AMBLER, PA 19002 were on JUNE 07, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JOYCE F. BLAYLOCK, who died on APRIL 06, 2022, with a will.

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811 present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will

be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 MARY ELLEN ARNONE

DONALD CASHORE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY


July 1, 2022

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The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000132 DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS ALLEN B. BLOUNT, JR.; E. SCOTT TAWES; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 47.6' X 108.6' 523 YOUNG STREET POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01-020536, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 523 YOUNG ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 47.6' X 108.6' 523 YOUNG STREET POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01- 020536, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 523 YOUNG ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, DEFENDANTS. ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit notices

of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 7th day of June, 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4th day of JulY 2022, warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 7th day of AUGUST, 2022, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 . BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Test Copy SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000130

DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS ANALYTIC PROCESS REALTY GROUP, INC.; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS REVSD PAR 132 24750 SQ FT S SIDE BACK ST CONSD PL ANALYTIC GROUP AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03- 002608, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON BACK ST., WHALEYVILLE, MD 21872, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADM I N I S T R AT O R S , GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS REVSD PAR 132 24750 SQ FT S SIDE BACK ST CONSD PL ANALYTIC GROUP AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03-002608, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON BACK ST., WHALEYVILLE, MD 21872, DEFENDANTS. ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 7th of June. 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811 copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4th day of July, 2022, warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 7th day of August, 2022, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion JAMES A. LIST, ESQ. THE LAW OFFICES OF JAMES A. LIST 5700 COASTAL HIGHWAY SUITE 100 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19259 To all persons interested in the estate of JAMES M. HARRISON, JR., AKA: JAMES MADISON HARRISON, JR., ESTATE NO. 19259. Notice is given that JAMES A. LIST, 5700 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 100, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 was on JUNE 08, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JAMES

M. HARRISON, JR., who died on MAY 25, 2022, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 8TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 JAMES A. LIST Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion RYAN T. WEST, ESQ. WEST AND WEST, P.A. 12 WILLIAM ST BERLIN, MD 21811 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000124

PRINCESS ANNE PROPERTIES LLC 12 WILLIAM STREET BERLIN, MD 21811 PLAINTIFF VS. WALTER VANDEGRIFT 39 YOUNG BIRCH RD LEVITTOWN, PA 19057 DEFENDANT AND WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND SERVE ON COUNTY ATTORNEY: ROSCOE LESLIE, ESQ. 1 WEST MARKET ST., ROOM 1103 SNOW HILL, MARYLAND 21863 AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER VANDEGRIFT DEFENDANT AND UNKNOWN OWNER OF PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER VANDEGRIFT, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST DEFENDANT ORDER 0F PUBLICATION THE OBJECT OF THIS PROCEEDING IS TO SECURE THE FORECLOSURE OF ALL RIGHTS OF REDEMPTION IN THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, SOLD BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES FOR THE STATE OF MARYLAND AND TREASURER OF WORCESTER COUNTY TO THE PLAINTIFF IN THIS PROCEEDING: 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN, PARCEL NUMBER 03034178, ASSESSED TO WALTER V A N D E G R I F I . THE COMPLAINT STATES,


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The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE AMOUNTS NECESSARY FOR REDEMPTION HAVE NOT BEEN PAID. IT IS THEREUPON THIS 3RD OF JUNE 2022 , BY THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, ORDERED, THAT NOTICE BE GIVEN BY THE INSERTION OF A COPY OF THIS ORDER IN THE DISPATCH HAVING A GENERAL CIRCULATION IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, ONCE A WEEK FOR 3 SUCCESSIVE WEEKS, WARNING ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE PROPERTY TO APPEAR IN THIS COURT BY THE 2ND DAY OF AUGUST , 2022, AND REDEEM THE PROPERTY 108 57 X 300 3 NW SIDE BRANCH ST BERLIN AND ANSWER THE COMPLAINT OR THEREAFIER A FINAL JUDGMENT WILL BE ENTERED FORECLOSING ALL RIGHTS OF REDEMPTION IN THE PROPERTY, AND VESTING IN THE PLAINTIFF' A TITLE, FREE AND CLEAR OF ALL ENCUMBRANCES. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000131 DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF VS. CONNIE M. KEEFER, PER-

SONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF RONALD C. KEEFER, JR.; THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF RONALD KEEFER, JR., DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT; LARRY V. LAYMAN; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 39' X 62' N SIDE 501 LAUREL ST POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01-021125, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 501 LAUREL ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 39' X 62' N SIDE 501 LAUREL ST POCOMOKE AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 01-021125, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS 501 LAUREL ST., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, DEFENDANTS ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) seperate pre-suit notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 9th of June, 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a

copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4TH DAY OF JULY, 2022 warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 8th day of August, 2022, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Test Copy SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion LEWIS MCDANIELS, LLC 50 CITIZENS WAY SUITE 305 FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000129 DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS DEERCREEK HOME SOLUTIONS, LLC, PLAINTIFF VS.

THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF ALFRED ARMWOOD, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT; THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF ARNETTE ARMWOOD, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT; KERI FOSTER, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF CORNELIUS AMES BYRD; THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF C. AMES BYRD A/K/A CORNELIUS AMES BYRD, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT; DONNA M.BYRD; GEORGE W. TAYLOR, JR.; BONNIE TAYLOR; WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS OF THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 55.5' X 105.24' X 51.5' X 107.25' NR W SIDE GERMANTOWN RD AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03020940, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON GERMANTOWN RD., BERLIN, MD 21811, THE UNKNOWN OWNER'S HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR OR ANY OF THEIR HEIRS, DEVISEES, EXECUTORS, ADM I N I S T R AT O R S , GRANTEES, ASSIGNS, OR SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; AND, ANY AND ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY AND PREMISES SITUATE IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS 55.5' X 105.24' X 51.5' X 107.25' NR W SIDE GERMANTOWN RD AND BEING IDENTIFIED ON THE TAX ROLL AS PARCEL ID: 03020940, AND WHICH MAY BE KNOWN AS VACANT LOT ON GERMANTOWN RD., BERLIN, MD 21811, DEFENDANTS.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Worcester County, Maryland, to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for the redemption for the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this _th of June, 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary-

July 1, 2022 land, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County, Maryland, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, on or before the 4th day of july 2022, warning all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property described above to appear in this Court by the 8th day of August, 22, and redeem their respective property or answer the Complaint, or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title in fee simple or leasehold, as appropriate, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complaint described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the property being rendered by this Court against them. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 BEAU H. OGLESBY JUDGE Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Test Copy SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland 3X 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion MARK H. WITTSTADT, ESQ. 1966 GREENSPRING DRIVE SUITE LL2 LUTHERVILLE, MD 21093 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19163 To all persons interested in the estate of CLEMENT ROBERT MERCALDO, JR. , ESTATE NO. 19163. Notice is given that GEORGE V. TRALA, 12516 OCEAN REEF DR., BERLIN, MD 21811, was on JUNE 14, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of CLEMENT ROBERT MERCALDO, JR., who died on DECEMBER 16, 2021 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file

their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 14TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 GEORGE V. TRALA Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Third Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19263 To all persons interested in the estate of ROBERT J. SMITH, ESTATE NO. 19263. Notice is given that RACHAEL E. SMITH, 214 CAYMAN COURT, WILMINGTON, DE 19808, was on JUNE 13, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ROBERT J. SMITH, who died on JUNE 03, 2022 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13TH day of DECEMBERR, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal repre-


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com sentative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 17, 2022 RACHAEL E. SMITH Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-17, 06-24, 07-01

Second Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19266 To all persons interested in the estate of JUSTIN C. MCINTYRE, ESTATE NO. 19266. Notice is given that JOHN MCINTYRE, 38465 MILDA DRIVE, OCEAN VIEW, DE 19970, was on JUNE 13, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JUSTIN C. MCINTYRE, who died on MAY 17, 2022 without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment

(or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates:

ALL OTHER PERSONS HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS 2120 BYPASS RD., POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, AND MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN LIBER I 024 PAGE 0239 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS BOOK FOR WORCESTER, MARYLAND, ASSESSED VALUE: $66,300; AND ASSESSED TO: ALICE L. MELVIN; PROPERTY ID: 01-005510, Defendants ORDER OF PUBLICATION

(1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 JOHN MCINTYRE Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 0 6-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-22-000139 CLAY WILSON IV, Plantiff VS. ALICE L. MELVIN; FARMERS HOME ADMINISTRATION, US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE; And

The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the following property: Property described as 2120 Bypass Rd., Pocomoke City, MD 21851, and more fully described in Liber 1024 Page 0239 among the Land Records Book for Worcester, Maryland, Assessed Value: $66,300; and Assessed to: Alice L. Melvin; Property ID: 0I005510. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption have not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of sale has expired. It is thereupon this 14th day of June, 2022, by the Circuit Court for Worcester; ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in a newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester once a week for three successive weeks, the last insertion on or before July 11, 2022, warning all persons interested in the said properties to be and appear in this Court by the 14th day of August 2022 and redeem the Property, and answer the Complaint, or thereafter a final judgment will be rendered foreclosing all rights of redemption in this Property and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 Beau H. Oglesby Judge of the Circuit Court for Worcester County True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion MICHAEL B. MATHERS, ESQ. WEBB, CORNBROOKS, WILBER, VORHIS DOUSE & MATHERS, LLP PO BOX 910 115 BROAD STREET SALSIBURY, MD 21803-0910 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19270 To all persons interested in the estate of MARION NOVACK, ESTATE NO. 19270. Notice is given that JOHN NOVACK, 38 MORRIS DRIVE, DEER PARK, NY 11729, was on JUNE 16, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of MARION NOVACK, who died on APRIL 13, 2022 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 16TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 JOHN NOVACK Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074

Page 85 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19260 To all persons interested in the estate of JOHN EDWARD SIPPEL, AKA: JOHN E. SIPPEL, SR., ESTATE NO. 19260. Notice is given that NANCY L. HART, 7529 CEDARTOWN ROAD, SNOW HILL, MD 21863 and JOHN SIPPEL, JR., 11925 GLEN ARM ROAD, GLEN ARM, MD 21057, was on JUNE 16, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of JOHN EDWARD SIPPEL, who died on JANUARY 29, 2022 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 16TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 NANCY L. HART JOHN SIPPEL, JR. True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000029 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. JAMES SMITH, et al Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 16th day of JUNE, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 18th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 11th day of JULY, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. DBC = DELMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC PCP = PALMETTO COAST PROPERTIES I, LLC CONDO- TIME PRICE PURMINIUM INTERCHASER UNIT VAL 206 206 206 208 301 301 311 311 401 409 409 410 410 410 411 411 501 501 501

49 51 52 39 2 6 38 39 6 22 36 20 25 36 38 39 1 2 4

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $1,500.00 $50.00 $50.00 $3,000.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $150.00 $100.00 $100.00

BC BC BC BC PCP PCP PCP PCP PCP DBC BC BC DBC BC BC BC BC PCP PCP

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 10, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08


Page 86

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or email classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Second Insertion NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 19274 NOTICE IS GIVEN that the PROBATE COURT of FAIRFAX, VA, appointed SUSAN ELEANOR GRYSAVAGE, 6608 BROAR HILL COURT, MCLEAN, VA 22101, as the PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE of the Estate of HAROLD EUGENE BONDY, who died on DECEMBER 28, 2020, domiciled in VIRGINIA, AMERICA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is PETER MARK GRYSAVAGE whose address is 10816 KINGSTEAD ROAD, DAMASCUS, MD 20872. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER COUNTY. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for WORCESTER COUNTY with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 SUSAN ELEANOR GRYSAVAGE Foreign Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

JUNE 24, 2022

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000055 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs Mildred Butt, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 21st day of _ JUNE, 2022, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 25th day of JULYY 2022, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 18th day of JULY 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERUNIT VAL 409 409 410 411 412 412 507 508 508 508 509 509 510 510 510 510 511 511

17 18 18 17 18 18 17 18 20 20 37 18 19 20 36 38 19 18

PRICE

PURCHASER

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $450.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication

TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-21-000162 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs DAVID F. FERRERA, et al. Defendants NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 21 ST day of June 2022, that the foreclosure sale ofthe properties mentioned in these proceedings made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 25th day of JULY, 2022, provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successwe weeks, before the 18th day of July, 2022 The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC.

CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERUNIT VAL 202 202 202 202 202

39 40 41 43 44

5RICE

PURCHASER

$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC BC BC BC BC

CONDO- TIME PRICE PURMINIUM INTERCHASER UNIT VAL 202 $50.00 50 BC 203 $50.00 4 BC 203 $50.00 7 BC 203 $50.00 8 BC 203 $50.00 10 BC 203 $50.00 11 BC 203 $50.00 13 BC 203 $50.00 16 BC 203 $50.00 17 BC 203 $50.00 37 BC 203 $50.00 41 BC 203 $50.00 42 BC 203 $50.00 44 BC 203 $50.00 45 BC 203 $50.00 48 BC 203 $50.00 50 BC 203 $50.00 51 BC 204 $50.00 1 BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion B. RANDALL COATES ESQCOATES, COATES, & COATES 204 WEST GREEN STREET P O BOX 293 SNOW HILL, MD 21863 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19275 To all persons interested in the estate of ANNA LEE SHOCKLEY, ESTATE NO. 19275. Notice is given that HAROLD T. SHOCKLEY, 31402 DAGSBORO ROAD, DELMAR, MD 21875, was on JUNE 21, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of ANNA LEE SHOCKLEY, who died on MAY 30, 2022 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 21ST day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the

July 1, 2022 mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 HAROLD T. SHOCKLEY, Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. TRUSTEE BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 Ocean City, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND C-23-CV-22-000138 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21843-3307 Plaintiff v. PAUL A. MARSHALL, et al. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000138 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on Saturday, July 9, 2022, at 11:30 AM the following timeshare intervals: CONDOMINIUM UNIT

TIME INTERVAL

502 502 502 503 503 503 503 503 503 503 503 503 503 503 503 503 503

47 48 49 2 3 4 6 7 10 11 12 15 16 17 36 37 39

CONDOMINIUM UNIT

TIME INTERVAL

503 503 503 503 503 504 504 504

44 46 48 49 50 1 2 10

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land R e c o r d s . The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for all intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the full payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. TRUSTEE BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 Ocean City, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND C-23-CV-22-000136 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21843-3307 Plaintiff v. DAVID SKINNER, et al. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000136 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean City, Worcester County, Maryland, on Saturday, July 9, 2022, at 11:15 AM the following timeshare intervals: CONDOMINIUM UNIT

TIME INTERVAL

505 505 505 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506 506

49 50 51 1 2 3 4 6 8 9 10 12 17 18 19 20 36 41 43 45 46 47 48 49 52

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of

Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each condominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land R e c o r d s . The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for all intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the full payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022

TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

Second Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. TRUSTEE BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 Ocean City, MD 21843-3307

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND C-23-CV-22-000065

BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21843-3307 Plaintiff v. SANDRA J. SHINDEL,et al. Defendants TRUSTEE’S SALE OF TIME SHARE INTERVALS IN BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM, OCEAN CITY, MD By virtue of a certain Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-21-000065 the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the entrance of the BAY CLUB RESORT, located at, 302 32ND STREET, OCEAN CITY, Maryland, the following described property located in Ocean Pines, Worcester County, Maryland, on Saturday, July 9, 2022, at 11:00 AM the following timeshare intervals: CONDOMINIUM UNIT

TIME INTERVAL

502 504 504 504 504 504 504 504 504 504 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505 505

46 12 14 15 26 43 47 48 49 50 1 6 7 9 10 11 15 19 40 41 42 43 44 45 48

Each time interval being one week per year in the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium, including an undivided interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Declaration of Condominium and Timeshare recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and subsequent Declarations of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, as to each con-

dominium unit and recorded among the aforesaid Land R e c o r d s . The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties and guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to withdraw any interval from the sale and/or to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: The full amount of the sales price per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such payment to be made by e-check or credit card. Bids for all intervals will open at $50.00. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, 2022 maintenance fees and all other settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be within fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the full payment made may be forfeited and the property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: Ayrika Fletcher, Esq., Trustee, at 443-6728107, or email at afletcher@mdpropertyattorney.com. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JUNE 24, 2022

TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 06-24, 07-01, 07-08

First Insertion REGAIN J.R. SMITH, ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY AND HARISON, LLP 3609 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19283

Page 87 To all persons interested in the estate of PEGGY ANNE PILCHARD, ESTATE NO. 19283. Notice is given that EUGENE MAURICE PILCHARD, 3410 REDDEN ROAD, POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851, was on JUNE 27, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the estate of PEGGY ANNE PILCHARD, who died on DECEMBER 07, 2021 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 27TH day of DECEMBER, 2022. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JULY 01, 2022 EUGENE MAURICE PILCHARD Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 07-01, 07-08, 07-15

First Insertion PETER S. BUAS, GUARDIAN OF PROPERTY WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON, L.L.P. CASE NO. C-23-FM-21-000414 SALE OF VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL PROPOERTY KNOWN AS 1 IVY LANE, BERLIN,

MARYLAND 21811 Under and by virtue of an Order of the Worcester County Circuit Court dated June 21, 2022, in Case No. C-23-FM-21-000414, the undersigned Guardian of Property will sell the following described property at public auction, to be held on site at: 1 IVY LANE BERLIN, MARYLAND 21811 ON JULY 19, 2022, AT 11:30 A.M. Property Description: All that lot or parcel of land lying and being situate in the Section called “Bainbridge” of the development known as “Ocean Pines” in the Third Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, and described as Lot No. B-03-034, as designated and distinguished on the plat entitled “OCEAN PINES, SECTION THREE”, made by B. Calvin Burns, Registered Professional Engineer No. 2583 of the State of Maryland, which said plat is duly recorded among the Land Records for Worcester County, Maryland, in Plat Book FWH No. 11, folio 45, et seq. The improvements thereon being known as 1 Ivy Lane, Berlin, Maryland. Terms of Sale: A deposit of Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000.00) will be required of the purchaser in the form of cash, certified or cashier’s check at the time and place of sale, or other form of security, at the sole discretion of the Guardian; the balance to be secured to the satisfaction of the Guardian and represented by a Promissory Note, conditioned upon the conveyance of good and marketable title. The balance in cash will be due at settlement which shall be within thirty (30) days after the date of the auction unless said period is extended by the Guardian, his successors or assigns for good cause shown. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. The Property will be sold subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions, and agreements of record affecting same, if any. Taxes, water charges, sanitary commission charges, condominium fees and assessments, assessments and liens or encumbrances for sewer, water, drainage, or other public improvements completed or commenced on or prior to the date of sale or subsequent thereto, if any, are to be adjusted and apportioned as of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter by purchaser, whether assessments have been levied or not as of date of settlement. The cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, document preparation and title insurance shall be borne by the Purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or


Page 88

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. damage to the property from the date of sale. If Purchaser fails to pay the balance of the purchase price with thirty (30) days from the date of the sale, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. If the Guardian is unable to convey good and marketable title to the property, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the Purchaser shall have no further claim against the Guardian. The improvements are being sold in an “AS IS” condition, with no warranties expressed or implied, with Purchaser responsible for any and all housing or zoning code violations. The risk of loss passes at date of sale. The Guardian reserves the right to reject any and all bids in his sole discretion. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JULY 01, 2022 PETER S. BUAS, ESQ., Guardian of Property Williams, Moore, Shockley & Harrison, L.L.P. 3509 Coastal Highway Ocean City, Maryland 21842 (410) 289-3553 3x 07-01, 07-08, 07-15

First Insertion COATES, COATES & COATES, P.A. RAYMOND D. COATES, JR. ESQ. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY SUITE 300 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 19281 Notice is given that the REGISTER OF WILLS of NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DE, appointed RICHARD W. MUTO, 14516 E. SHADOW CANYON DRIVE, FOUNTAIN HILLS, AZ 85268, as the PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE of the Estate of MALCOLM G. MUTO, who died on FEBRUARY 23, 2022, domiciled in DELAWARE, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process

is RAYMOND D. COATES, JR, whose address is 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 300, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following MARYLAND counties: WORCESTER. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JULY 01, 2022 RICHARD W. MUTO Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 3x 07-01, 07-08, 07-15

First Insertion SMALL ESTATE NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 19258 To all persons interested in the estate of ANNA REED, AKA: ANNA CASSANDRA REED. Notice is given that VIRGINIA PAIGE WILDMANN, 10316 NORTH ROAD, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842, was on JUNE 21, 2022, appointed Personal Representative of the SMALL ESTATE of: ANNA FREED, who died on APRIL 11, 2022, with a will. Further information can be

CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811

obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having any objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice.All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent's death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent's death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JULY 01, 2022 VIRGINIA PAIGE WILDMANN Personal Representative True Test Copy TERRI WESTCOTT Register of Wills for Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 1x 07-01

First Insertion AYRIKA FLETCHER, ESQ. IN-HOUSE COUNSEL BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. BOX 3307 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843-3307 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER

COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-22-000049 BAY CLUB TIME-SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 3307 Ocean City, Maryland 21842-3307 Plaintiff vs. DANIEL HARRIS, et al. Defendants ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 24TH day of JUNE, 2022,that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Ayrika Fletcher, Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 25th day of July, 2022 provided a copy of this Order be inserted in some daily newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 18th day of JULY, 2022. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share interval: TIMESHARES SOLD: BC = BAY CLUB TIME SHARE OWNERS ASSOCIATES, INC. PCP = PALMETTO BEACH CLUB, LLC. DBC = DELMARVA BEACH CLUB, LLC CONDO- TIME MINIUM INTERUNIT VAL 501 501 501 501 501 501 501 501 501 501 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502 502

8 11 13 14 16 17 18 33 50 51 1 2 3 6 14 15 17 18 21 38 40 41 42 43 45

PRICE

PURCHASER

$100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $50.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $5,200.00 $100.00 $100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $1,000.00 $100.00 $100.00 $100.00 $50.00 $50.00 $50.00

BC PCP PCP BC PCP PCP PCP DBC PCP PCP BC BC BC BC BC PCP PCP PCP DBC PCP PCP PCP PCP BC BC

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JULY 01 2022 TRUE TEST COPY SUSAN R. BRANIECKI

July 1, 2022 Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD 3x 07-01, 07-08, 07-15

First Insertion Law Offices of CIPRIANI & WERNER, P.C. 6411 IVY LANE, SUITE 600 GREENBELT, MARYLAND 20770 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND, GENERALLY KNOWN AS 2 DORCHESTER STREET, CONDO UNIT 711 BELMONT TOWERS, OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in that certain Indemnity Deed of Trust, dated November 24, 2014, executed and delivered by Todd E. Spahr and Tessa M. Spahr (collectively, the “Grantors”) to the trustee named therein and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in 6472, folio 114 (the “Deed of Trust”), the holder of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust (the “Noteholder”) having subsequently appointed Jason W. Hardman and Paul J. Cohen as Substitute Trustees under the Deed of Trust, by Deed of Appointment of Substitute Trustees, dated May 5, 2021, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber 8221, folio 283, default having occurred under the terms of said Deed of Trust and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees (collectively, the “Trustees”) will offer for sale to the highest qualified bidder at a public auction to be held AT THE COURT HOUSE ENTRANCE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, AT THE COURT HOUSE STEPS, LOCATED AT ONE WEST MARKET STREET, SNOW HILL, MARYLAND 21863, ON: MONDAY, JULY 18, 2022, at 10:30 a.m. ALL that property lying and being situate in Worcester County, Maryland, and any improvements thereon, and being more particularly described as follows (the “Property”): ALL that property situate, lying and being in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, described as Condominium Unit No. 711 in Phase Two in the “Belmont Towers Residential Condominium”, together with an undivided percentage interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration (including By-Laws) dated May 24, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of

Worcester County, Maryland, in Liber S.V.H. No. 4933, folio 287, et. seq., as amended; and pursuant to the several plats described in said Declaration and recorded as aforesaid in Plat Book S.V.H. No. 218, folio 7, et seq., as amended. BEING the same and all the land conveyed by and described in a Deed dated October 17, 2012 from John E. Billheimer and Patricia C. Billheimer to Todd E. Spahr and Tessa M. Spahr and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, in Liber No. 06000, folio 00474. The Property is believed to be a 1,474 +/- square foot condominium unit located on the seventh floor of the Belmont Towers Residential Condominium building (the “Building”) in Ocean City, Maryland. The Property is believed to contain 3 bedrooms, 2.1 bathrooms, a living room, a kitchen, central air conditioning, an outdoor balcony, and views of the Atlantic Ocean and Assateague Island. The Property is also believed to have an assigned parking space #711 and to have access to certain common elements of the Building, including an elevator, pool, and fitness room. The Property is also believed to be served by, or to have access to, adequate parking and public water, sewer, telephone and electric. According to public tax records, the Property has been assigned the following address and tax identification number: 2 Dorchester Street, Condo Unit 711, Ocean City, Maryland 21842 (Tax Account Number 10-758017). TERMS OF SALE: A deposit in the amount of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000.00), payable in cash, certified check (made payable to “Cipriani & Werner, P.C.”) or other form acceptable to the Trustees, will be required from the successful bidder (the “Purchaser”) at the time and place of sale. The Purchaser shall be required to increase the amount of the deposit to ten percent (10%) of the successful bid amount within seven (7) calendar days of the date of the sale by delivering to the Trustees certified funds in the amount necessary to increase the deposit amount as required above, unless said period is extended by the Trustees for good cause shown. The Trustees will require all potential bidders to qualify prior to the commencement of bidding by showing evidence of their ability to deliver the required deposit at the time of the sale. The balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid balance of the purchase price from the date of sale to and including the date of settlement, shall be due at settlement in cash or by cashier’s check. Interest shall accrue on the unpaid balance of the purchase


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 89

The Dispatch Legal Notices LEGAL RATES Legal advertising rate is $7 per column inch. The deadline for all legal advertising is Tuesday at noon. For more information call 410-641-4563 or fax 410-641-0966. price at the rate of ten percent (10%) per annum from the date of sale to and including the date of settlement. If settlement is delayed for any reason, there will be no abatement of interest. In the event the Noteholder, or an affiliate or subsidiary of the Noteholder, is the successful bidder at the sale, such party will not be required to tender a deposit to the Trustees or to pay interest on the unpaid purchase money. Taxes, water and all other municipal charges and liens owed against the Property that are not otherwise extinguished as a matter of law as a result of the foreclosure sale shall be the responsibility of the Purchaser and shall be paid by the Purchaser at settlement. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids, to extend the time for settlement, and to withdraw the Property from the sale for any reason and at their sole discretion. The Property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and without any warranties or representations, either express or implied, as to the

nature, condition or description of the improvements thereon. In addition, the Property will be sold subject to all existing housing, building and zoning code violations which may exist on or with respect to the Property, subject to all conditions or hazards which may exist on or with respect to the Property, subject to all critical area and wetland violations which may exist on or with respect to the Property, subject to all environmental problems or violations which may exist on or with respect to the Property, and subject to all matters, recorded documents and restrictions of record affecting the Property to the extent such matters, recorded documents or restrictions of record are senior to the Deed of Trust. The Property will be sold subject to all senior liens and encumbrances that are not extinguished by operation of law or by the foreclosure sale of the Property and subject to all easements, conditions, restrictions, rights of redemption, covenants, agreements,

such state of facts that an accurate survey or physical inspection of the Property might disclose, and all other agreements and documents of record affecting the Property, but only to the extent that such agreements or documents are senior to the Deed of Trust. The Property will not be sold subject to any written or oral lease or rental agreements that may exist in favor of any tenants or occupants of the Property. The Purchaser shall assume the risk of loss for the Property immediately after the sale takes place. It shall be the responsibility of the Purchaser to obtain possession of the Property following final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland and conveyance of the Property by the Trustees to the Purchaser. The Purchaser shall pay, at settlement, all state and local transfer taxes, documentary stamps, recordation taxes and fees, title examination costs, attor-

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CONTACT INFORMATION Phone: 410-641-4563 • Fax: 410-641-0966 Email: classifieds@mdcoastdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 467, Berlin MD 21811 neys’ fees, conveyance fees, real estate taxes, water charges, other municipal liens and charges, and all other settlement costs and other costs associated with conveying the Property to the Purchaser. The Purchaser shall settle and comply with all sale terms contained herein within twenty (20) days following final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, unless said period is extended by the Trustees for good cause shown. Time is of the essence. Settlement shall be held at the offices of Cipriani & Werner, P.C., 6411 Ivy Lane, Suite 600, Greenbelt, Maryland 20770, or such other place as may be agreed to by the Trustees. In the event the Purchaser fails to go to settlement as required herein, in addition to any other legal or equitable remedies available to the Trustees, the Trustees may, without further order of the court: (i) declare the aforementioned deposit forfeited, (ii) resell the Property at the Purchaser’s sole risk

and expense, and (iii) retain and apply the aforementioned deposit to any deficiency in the purchase price sustained by the Trustees and/or the Noteholder, all costs and expenses of both sales, reasonable attorneys’ fees, and any other damages sustained by the Trustees and/or the Noteholder as a result of the Purchaser’s default, including, without limitation, all incidental damages. In the event a resale of the Property results in a purchase price in excess of the amount originally bid by the defaulting Purchaser, the defaulting Purchaser shall not be entitled to receive payment of any such excess amount and shall not be entitled to any distribution whatsoever from the resale proceeds.

Purchaser as aforesaid, the sale of the Property shall be void and of no force or effect, and the Purchaser shall have no claims against the Trustees, the Noteholder or the Auctioneer. The parties’ respective rights and obligations regarding the terms of sale and the conduct of the sale shall be governed by and interpreted according to the laws of the State of Maryland.

If the Trustees are unable to convey any of the Property as described above, the Purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the Purchaser’s deposit without any interest thereon. Upon refund of the deposit to the

Name of Newspaper: Maryland Coast Dispatch Date of Publication JULY 01, 2022

The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable, but is offered for informational purposes only. The Trustees, the Noteholder and the Auctioneer do not make any representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of this information.

Jason W. Hardman Paul J. Cohen, Substitute Trustees 3x 07-01, 07-08, 07-15

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Page 90

Who’s Where When 45TH ST. TAPHOUSE 443-664-2201 45th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, July 1: Keith White Duo Saturday, July 2: Aaron Howell Duo BUXY’S SALTY DOG 410-289-0973 28th St. & Coastal Hwy. Friday, July 1: DJ Wax Saturday, July 2: Bond & Bentley Sunday, July 2: DJ BK COCONUTS BEACH BAR & GRILL Oceanfront Castle In The Sand 37th & 38th St. 410-289-6846 Friday, July 1: Darin Engh, Monkee Paw Saturday, July 2: Rick & Regina, Lombardy Sunday, July 3: Shortcut Sunny, Beach Mac Monday, July 4: Nate Clendenen, Smooth Rhythm Tuesday, July 5: Jack Bannon, Heather Vidal Wednesday, July 6: Kevin Poole, Rich Walton & Joe Mama Thursday, July 7: Jess Arms, Trigger Fish

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Best Beats BEATS BY WAX Buxy’s: Friday, July 1 Pickles Pub: Tuesdays & Thursdays Coins Pub: Wednesdays

DJ BK Buxy’s Salty Dog: Sundays

MOVIN’ & GROOVIN’ OC Fontainebleu Resort: Friday, July 1

BRIAN BISHOP Crabcake Factory Bayside: Tuesday, July 5

JIM LONG BAND Coin’s Pub: Saturdays

BEATS BY STYLER Pickles Pub: Fridays, Sundays, Wednesdays

CORK BAR Sunday, July 3: TBA

DJ BILLY T Harborside: Friday, Sunday &Thursday

DOC MARTEN & THE FLANNELS Purple Moose: Friday & Saturday, July 1 & 2

CRAWL STREET TAVERN 443-373-2756 Wicomico St. Downtown O.C. Friday, July 1: Rogue Citizens Saturday, July 2: Risky Business Sundays: Karaoke W/DJ Rut Thursdays: DJ DeoGee FAGER’S ISLAND 410-524-5500 60th St. In The Bay Friday, July 1: DJ RobCee, Sons Of Pirates, Here’s To The Night Saturday, July 2: Other Brother Darryl, DJ Denial, Here’s To The Night Sunday, July 3: Crushing Day, DJ Groove, In Too Deep Monday, July 4: Crushing Day, DJ Hook, Goodman Fiske Tuesday, July 5: DJ Hector, DJ Hook Wednesday, July 6: DJ Adam Dutch Thursday, July 7: DJ Groove, Holly Montgomery, Kittyback

DJ ROBCEE Fager’s Island: Friday, July 1

On The Beach

COINS PUB 410-289-3100 28th St. Plaza On Coastal Hwy. Friday, July 1: Walk Of Shame Saturday, July 2: Jim Long, Lennon LaRicci & The Leftovers Sunday, July 3: John Schwartz Wednesdays: DJ Wax

CRABCAKE FACTORY BAYSIDE 302-988-5000 37314 Lighthouse Rd., Rte. 54 Selbyville, DE Sunday, July 3: Shattered Tuesday, July 5: Brian Bishop

July 1, 2022

DJ PAPI ROISTEROUS Lookout Lounge: Sundays Purple Moose: Wednesdays

DJ DEOGEE Crawl St. Tavern: Thursdays

BOND & BENTLEY Buxy’s Salty Dog: Saturday, July 2

KAROAKE W/JEREMY Harborside: Saturdays Greene Turtle West: Sundays

GREENE TURTLE WEST 410-213-1500 Rt. 611, West O.C. Saturday, July 2: Lime Green Band Sundays: Karaoke w/ DJ Jeremy HARBORSIDE 410-213-1846 South Harbor Rd., West O.C. Fridays: DJ Billy T Saturday, July 2: The Dunehounds, DJ Jeremy Sunday, July 3: Opposite Directions, DJ Billy T Thursdays: DJ Billy T

KEVIN POOLE Coconuts Beach Bar : Wednesday, July 6

DARIN ENGH Coconuts Beach Bar: Friday, July 1

CRUSHING DAY Fager’s Island: Sunday & Monday, July 3 & 4


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Page 91

Who’s Where When OC EATERIES 443-252-3700 12849 Ocean Gateway Rte. 50 West OC Friday, July 1: Chris Robertson Saturday, July 2: Endless Ember Thursday, July 7: Bryan Dorsey

THE DUNEHOUNDS Harborside: Saturday, July 2 • 1 p.m. Pickles Pub: Saturday, July 2 • 9 p.m.

ENDLESS EMBER OC Eateries: Saturday, July 2

OC FONTAINEBLEU RESORT 410-524-3535 10100 Coastal Hwy. In The OC Friday, July 1: First Class, Movin’ & Groovin’ Saturday, July 2: First Class, Rachi & Heavy Fred Sunday, July 3: First Class, The Whiskey Barons Monday, July 4: DJ Yemi Monday-Thursday, July 4-7: On The Edge OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 410-641-7501 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, OP Friday, July 1: Tranzfusion Saturday, July 2: Eclipse (Journey Tribute) Sunday, July 3: Great Train Robbery Monday, July 4: Beach Bandits Thursday, July 4: Brian & Things

JAH WORKS Seacrets: Friday-Monday, July 1-4

WALK OF SHAME Coins Pub: Friday, July 2

SMOOTH & RHYTHM Coconuts Beach Bar: Monday, July 4

ON THE EDGE OC Fontainebleu Resort: Monday-Thursday, July 4-7

LIME GREEN BAND Greene Turtle West: Saturday, July 2

ROGUE CITIZENS Crawl St. Tavern: Friday, July 1

AARON HOWELL DUO Pier 23: Friday, July 1 45th St. Taphouse: Saturday, July 2

TRANZFUSION OP Yacht Club: Friday, July 1

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

SPORTS

Tunas and Tiaras Tourney a Big Success In The News

Club’s Annual Canyon Kickoff Underway The Berlin Little League 9-10 All-Star team stayed on a roll last weekend, sweeping five games to win the Fruitland Tournament championship. Pictured above, the 9-10 All-Stars show off their trophy and medals. Submitted Photo

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

The crew of lady anglers on the Game Changer took first place in the heaviest tuna division in the Tunas and Tiaras Tournament last weekend and earned $23,760 in prize money. Pictured above, the Game Changer crew shows off its big check. Submitted Photo BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – After getting pushed back a week because of bad weather and rough seas, the second annual Tunas and Tiaras Tournament last weekend was a big success with plenty of action off the coast. A total of 164 lady anglers and 33 boats competed in the second annual Tunas and Tiaras Tournament last week, which was moved back from a week earlier due to weather conditions. The first-place tuna award went to the crew of lady anglers on the Game Changer with a 54-pounder. The crew on the Billfisher was second and the

crew on the On the Hunt was third in the heaviest tuna category. The Espadon and the Lucky Duck tied for heaviest stringer, while third place went to the Hocus Pocus. The heaviest mahi award went to the Tighten Up with a 14-pounder. Hosted by the Ocean City Fishing Center, the Tuna and Tiaras Tournament is a ladies-only event for the benefit of Women Supporting Women, a grassroots organization founded in 1993 to provide awareness, education and support for those affected by breast cancer. Funds raised by the organization stay on Delmarva and provide free services and support to local breast cancer survivors.

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OCEAN CITY – The Ocean City Marlin Club’s 40th Annual Canyon Kickoff tournament got underway today with the first of three official fishing days. The Canyon Kickoff, held each year on or near the Fourth of July weekend, is the first major event of the season each year for the Ocean City Marlin Club and serves as a prelude to the more high-profile tournaments including the Ocean City Tuna Tournament next weekend, the Big Fish Classic later this month and, of course, the White Marlin Open next month. Each year, dozens of boats and hundreds of anglers compete in the annual event. There should be plenty of action in this year’s Canyon Kickoff. Cash prizes will also be awarded for first-, second and third-place in the heaviest fish division. Points will accumulate for each fish brought to the scales including the heaviest tuna (minimum 30 pounds), the heaviest wahoo (minimum 20 pounds) and the heaviest dol-

phin (minimum 10 pounds). In the points division, fish will be caught and released, while in the heaviest fish division, potential winners will be brought to the scales for weighing. The tournament got underway on Friday, the first official fishing day. The action will continue on Saturday and Sunday with weigh-ins each day from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Sunset Marina. The awards ceremony will be held at the Marlin Club on Sunday. Last year in the billfish release division, it was the crew on the Big Stick/#trappequeens taking first with 400 release points worth $5,886. The Fish On was second with 150 release points and earned $1,224, while the Brenda Lou was third with 100 release points. In the tuna division, first place went to the Loose Knot with a 51-pounder worth $6,615. The Gret’s Three J’s took second with a 45-pounder worth $999, and third with a 43-pounder worth $666. The Kilo Charlie took first place in the dolphin division with a 14-pounder worth a tournament-high $8,280.


… Tandem Parking Ordinance OK’d

July 1, 2022

FROM PAGE 7 which should be determined by the planning commission.” While not specifically mentioning the Margaritaville project, which is planned for an entire city block between 13th and 14th streets, Meehan made it known in no uncertain terms which project he was referring to. Margaritaville project representatives were in attendance. “Some people in the room aren’t going to like this, but if you look at the downtown area, I don’t know how you can determine an entire block and 90,000 square feet is restrained from providing parking,” he said. “It’s restrained because you are overdeveloping the property. I don’t even think this would apply, sorry, with the project everyone is talking about.” Meehan said it would be challenging to determine which properties planned for redevelopment were truly restrained in terms of providing the required parking. “I don’t know how you determine there is a uniqueness to that property in the downtown area that restrains parking,” he said. “I just don’t see how that’s possible. That’s my opinion and that’s why I do think it’s important that the planning commission first takes a look at a property to determine whether it really meets the test or not with the findings of fact and the recommendation of the planning commission.” There were also some concerns raised about the definition of the comprehensive parking system, or valet service, for example. On Tuesday, Planning and Community Development Director Bill Neville returned with a handful of options for the council to consider. The first option essentially would keep the ordinance as proposed with a discretionary planning commission recommendation during site plan approval. The second, and preferred option, would include a planning commission recommendation on the approval of a comprehensive parking management system, but not a determination if the project meets the qualifications for a code amendment allowing the system. The other two options, which included an additional approval process for a requested conditional use, and a fourth that included the creation of a new special parking exception under the purview of the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA), did not get much traction. However, the option ultimately approved did include an appeal process from the BZA. Neville explained under the preferred option two, the planning commission would still review requests for conditional uses under the new ordinance, but the final decision would ultimately be made by the Mayor and Council. Neville said the staff was recommending the second option, a hybrid of which was later approved by the majority of the council. “That’s why the staff supports option two,” he said. “The Board of Zoning Appeals would retain the option to create an appeal. We believe option two simplifies the process. We think this will play out well. If you wanted option three or

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

option four, we would have to redraft the entire ordinance.” Councilman John Gehrig said he hoped whatever version was approved would include a true definition of the comprehensive parking system carefully vetted by the planning commission at site plan review for a project. “My biggest concern with this is the valet service,” he said. “How can we ensure it’s not just going to be some maintenance guy moving cars around?” City Solicitor Heather Stansbury said the code amendment ordinance as written accomplishes that. “The way this is written, it calls for the planning commission to evaluate the comprehensive parking system,” she said. “We felt the planning commission could address those issues. We know it has to be a valet system and it has to be open at all times.” City Manager Terry McGean said there could be new, creative ways to comprehensively manage parking for a project and the ordinance as proposed did not strictly dictate a traditional valet service. McGean said Gehrig’s concerns could be addressed by adding the word “dedicated” to certain lines in the ordinance. “This allows us to be not overly prescriptive,” he said. “Parking systems will change, and technology will change. We don’t want to make this too prescriptive. We want to let the planning commission do their job and review these.” Gehrig said he was fine with the planning commission reviewing the comprehensive parking management system plans at site plan review, but he just wanted a clearer definition. “This is the first time we’re doing this,” he said. “If a developer says they’re going to have a valet system, it should be a dedicated valet system. … It needs to be somebody on demand to move the cars. It can’t be some guy watering flowers or fixing an air conditioner on a roof. This is new territory for us.” Meehan agreed with Gehrig on the comprehensive parking management system definition issue. “I agree with Councilman Gehrig with regard to making sure that this defines valet systems and comes up with something that’s adequate and meets the test of today’s standards and not just something that was done 30 years ago on a whim,” he said. Councilman Peter Buas made a motion to approve option two with the word “dedicated” inserted in the appropriate places in the ordinance in regard to a comprehensive parking management system. The motion carried with a 6-1 vote with Council President Matt James the lone dissenting vote. Meehan reiterated some of his earlier points about the proposed ordinance, which will come back up for second reading likely as soon as next week. “I just want to reaffirm my objection,” he said. “I do believe option one is the best way to really interpret and follow through on what was discussed at the public hearing and what the intent of this ordinance really is.”

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Resort Beach Bonfire Program Exceeds Expectations

Page 94

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With gas prices rising and the cost of just about everything else going up, the resort’s beach bonfire program is exceeding expectations heading into the holiday weekend and beyond. It’s no secret the cost of a vacation in Ocean City has gone up, just as it has everywhere else. From nearly $5 per gallon for gas and rising prices at accommodations and restaurants, families are still coming to the resort, but many are taking advantage of the relatively inexpensive beach bonfire program to fill the vacation experience gap. The beach bonfire program began in the 1970s and has steadily grown in popularity over the years. From a low of just 68 beach bonfire permits in 2010, the program really took a leap forward

in 2017 when the fire marshal’s office streamlined the permit process with an online version. With the cumbersome paper application process at city hall replaced with a real-time online application, one seeking to get a permit can now literally file and get approved from their phone on a beach chair. The beach bonfire program really spiked during the pandemic with restaurants closed or offering limited hours and residents and visitors concerned about large gatherings in tight spaces. In the first year of the new online permit process, the number of permit requests jumped to 479 in 2018 and 727 in 2019. When COVID broke out in 2020, the number of permits increased exponentially to 2,400. Last year in 2021, there were over 3,000 permits issued for the beach bonfire program. During this spring’s budget deliberations, there was a brief discussion about raising the per-

mit fee from the current $75 to $85, but the council, perhaps wisely, ultimately agreed to keep the fee at $75. Now, with gas prices rising and the cost of a summer vacation at the resort rising, the bonfire program is thriving more than ever. An extended family or a group of friends can get a permit and hold a beach bonfire for far less than a dinner out or a trip to other amenities. The numbers bear it out. On Saturday, for example, there have already been 53 permits issued and on Sunday, July 3, 64 permits had been issued as of late Thursday, representing nearly every block from the end of the Boardwalk at 27th Street where the program begins to the Delaware line. The list goes on and on over the next several weeks with dozens of beach bonfire permits already applied for and approved. Fire Marshal Josh Bunting said this week the program is thriving as

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expected for a variety of reasons. Bunting said the revenue generated by the program has allowed his office to increase outreach and enforcement for the program. “The bonfire program continues to provide great family-friendly entertainment for our residents and visitors with only limited complaints or issues,” he said. “The increased volume and related revenue has provided funding for increased nightly inspection staff, who drive the beach and monitor the required equipment, safety, location and promote the proper cleanup and disposal of bonfire debris to ensure the program remains a success.” There were over 3,000 permits issued in 2021 and the revenue from the beach bonfire program last year was $192,000. In fiscal year 2023, the anticipated revenue from the program was budgeted at a modest $195,000, but with everything else going on, it appears the program will exceed those expectations. Bunting said aside from the fiscal aspects, the program is providing an opportunity for the city and his department to positively interact with residents and visitors. “It’s also a tremendous public outreach opportunity for the fire department,” he said. “Our inspectors thoroughly enjoy interacting with beach patrons and get a front-row seat to families making memories that will hopefully last for generations.” There are a few downsides to the program, however. While most comply with the regulations and extinguish the fires and dispose of the remnants along with cans, bottles or other trash associated with a bonfire event, some leave the mess behind them. Public Works Director Hal Adkins agreed the program appears to be thriving this year. “We’ve seen a drastic increase in bonfires for the last few years,” he said. “It appears to be happening again this year.” Adkins said his department is charged with ensuring the beach in clean and clear of debris at the end of the day so beachgoers the next day can enjoy a pristine, white sand experience free of debris. “I clearly realize a bonfire is a familyfriendly event,” he said. “I only hope and ask that the permittee complies with the regulations and cleans up after their event so those who choose to enjoy the beach the next day can do so safely.” Adkins said there have been occasions when less than observant bonfire permit holders have created problems for his department. “The permit holder needs to properly extinguish the remnants of the bonfire in accordance with the fire marshal regulations,” he said. “We have unfortunately had occasions when they have placed the smoldering remnants in a beach trash can and the can burned up, or once we dump the can, our large collection vehicle catches on fire.”


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Jay’s café opens in oc: Jay’s Café & Trading Co. celebrate its grand opening Thursday with a ribbon cutting.

Named after the patriarch of the Taustin Family, Jay's Café celebrates the family's desire to elevate expectations and create a memorable experience by bringing the best to the Ocean City community and its visitors throughout the day. The business is the latest addition to the 24th Street redevelopment undertaken by The Taustin Group. This newest concept is pivotal to the effort to make the former Embers property a premier dining, entertainment and shopping destination at all times of day. Pictured, from left, are Mike Gershenfeld COO; Miranda Hearn, assistant manager; Melissa Bunting, general manager; and Jay, Cheryl and Cole Taustin. Submitted Photo

resort officials Warn against private Fireworks

BY SHAWN J. SOPER MANAGING EDITOR

OCEAN CITY – With no official fireworks in Ocean City on the Fourth of July, the town’s fire marshal’s office this week warned about the dangers of private pyrotechnics on the holiday and the potential penalties. Last week, resort officials anounced the vendor for the annual Fourth of July fireworks show downtown on the beach and uptown at Northside Park had to back out because of labor issues. The cancellation resulted in town officials, including the special events department, scrambling to provide alternatives over the holiday weekend. As a result, there will be a concert and small fireworks show on Sunday at Northside Park in conjunction with the weekly Sundaes in the Park event. On Tuesday, the town will feature live music and an abbreviated, but more intense, fireworks show downtown. The absence of an official fireworks show on the actual Fourth of July, however, creates a void that could, and likely will, be filled by the private sector. Ocean City Fire Marshal Josh Bunting urged residents and visitors not to fill the gap with their own, potentially dangerous, fireworks shows. “While we appreciate the connection our citizens and visitors have with fireworks and Independence Day, we’re hopeful that the town’s two fireworks shows on Sunday at Northside Park and Tuesday, July 5 on the beach at Talbot Street will be well-attended and folks will leave the fireworks to the professionals,” he said. “Hand-held sparklers and small novelty items like poppers or snakes, for example, are legal for use in Ocean City and may be enjoyed on the beach or backyards in the presence of a responsible adult.” Bunting said his department and the police department would be out strongly

enforcing the town’s ordinances on private fireworks over the weekend. “Ground-based sparklers, while legal in other areas of the state, including Worcester County, remain prohibited in Ocean City due to the more dense, urban nature of our town,” he said. “Larger consumer fireworks are illegal for use anywhere in the state of Maryland,” he said.

“Confiscation, criminal citations or fines up to $1,000 may be issued for fireworksrelated violations by police officers or fire marshal’s working in town throughout the holiday weekend. As in the past, our office will pursue appropriate criminal charges for the reckless discharge of fireworks that place lives and property in danger.”

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

July 1, 2022

OBITUARIES Betty Smith Bush BERLIN – Betty Smith Bush, age 81, passed away on Thursday, June 23, 2022, at Catered Living in Ocean Pines. Born in Salisbury, raised in South Point and Synepuxent, she was the daughter of Mack and Elise Smith. She is survived by her husband Lewis Bush, and children, James Hudson and his wife Janis of Friendship, Kevin Hudson and fiancée Lynn Massey of St. Martin’s Neck, Betty Ann Moyer and her husband KenBETTY BUSH ton, and Susan Strickland and her husband Mike, both of West Ocean City. She was a devoted grandmother to Peyton Stant, Jenna Schiller (Kyle) Kasie Urena (Enver), Joshua Moyer and Korie Strickland, and great-grandchildren, Logan, Brock, and Amber Stant, Quinton Furbay, Ailyn Urena and Hudson Schiller. Also surviving are many nieces and nephews. Betty was a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School and held many diverse positions. She was a secretary at Stephen Decatur High School, manager of the Ocean City Airport, partner in the banner plane business, (Ocean Ariel Ads), founder of Ocean City’s first “Shade Shack” and owner of “Panache,” an interior design firm. Her first love though was her family. She loved traveling with them on many family vacations. Betty

also had many friends in Ocean City where she spent her whole life. She will be missed greatly by all. Services were held. A donation in her memory may be made to Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21802, or the Alzheimer’s Association, 909 Progress Circle Salisbury, Md. 21804. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

Maurice A. Wheeler BERLIN – Maurice A. Wheeler, age 75, died peacefully with his family by his side at Coastal Hospice on the Lake on Tuesday, May 24, 2022. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Arthur Wheeler and Frances MAURICE Brinsfield. He is survived WHEELER by his beautiful wife of 50 years, Madeline Wheeler; two sisters Joyce Busick and Anna Lehr; son and daughter-in-law Mark and Bohunka Wheeler; son Paul Wheeler; daughter and boyfriend Laura Wheeler and Blair Allen; daughter and son-in-law, Kimberly Wheeler and Jimmy Lowman; and four grandchildren Sophie, Edward, Jameson, and Killian. Maurice was a diehard fan of the Washington Capitals and a baseball fa-

natic. He was a lover of cheeseburgers, Italian food, Billy’s meatball subs, and all things sweet. When he was not working in Baltimore, Maurice enjoyed the Boardwalk (especially Thrashers French Fries), traveling, watching movies and listening to Oldies. He is preceded in death by his brother, Arthur Wheeler. There will be a visitation from 10-11 a.m., at the Community Church of Ocean Pines on Saturday, July 9 followed by the funeral service at 11 a.m. There will be a luncheon in his honor following the service in the Church Hall. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of The Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. In lieu of flowers please donate to Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21804 or the Michael J. Fox Foundation, P.O. Box 4777, New York, N.Y. 10163-4777.

and Michael Dickerson; aunts Tina Evans and Trina Dickerson; dear cousins Michelle Smiley, Craig Allen, Cory Willey, and Regina Joyner; grandmothers Pauline Pruitt and Peggy Bivens; grandfather Joe Harrison; and a host of loving relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his grandfather, John Dickerson, and greatgrandparents Clonie and Edna Pruitt, Nathaniel and Annie Whittington. A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, July 9 at Delmar Fire Department, 301 E. Grove Street, Delmar, Del., where friends may call one hour before the service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to https://gofund.me/077bcdb8 . All donations will be used for memorial services and all expenses incurred from our family's tragic loss. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com

Ricky Raiseem Whittington

GIRDLETREE – Violet Louise Lynch, age 87, passed away on Monday, June 27, 2022 at her home in Girdletree. Born in Berlin, she was one of 14 children born to the late Jerome Martin Holloway and Della Kate Cropper Holloway. She was preceded VIOLET LYNCH in death by her beloved husband, Edward Russell Lynch, Sr. (2012). Surviving are her children, Edward Russell Lynch Jr. of Snow Hill, Dale Allen Lynch and his wife Beverly of Pocomoke, David Wayne Lynch of Girdletree, John Ray Lynch of Pocomoke City and Brenda Sue Bounds and her husband Chester of Newark. There are four grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Also surviving is her sister, Christine Brasure of Salisbury, and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her brothers and sisters, Edith Voellger, Reba Dennis, Edward Holloway, Dorothy Brittingham, Julia Widic, Frances Hudson, Vincent Holloway, Mary Fernandez, Rosalee Davis, Calvin Holloway, Madlyn Massey and Ruth Bailey. Mrs. Lynch had been a beloved homemaker who also enjoyed cooking, baking, watching hummingbirds, and helping with their family seafood business. She had attended Spence Baptist Church. A graveside service will be held on Saturday, July 9 at 3 p.m. at Taylorville United Methodist Cemetery, 11252 Adkins Rd. Berlin, MD 21811. Rev. Terry Fort will officiate. A donation in her memory may be made to Taylorville United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 456, Berlin, Md. 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

WOODBRIDGE, Va. – Ricky Raiseem Whittington, age 40, of Woodbridge, Va., died unexpectedly on Friday, June 10, 2022, from injuries sustained in a vehicle crash. Ricky was born in Salisbury and was the son of Karen Whittington-White and the late Ricky Lemont Whittington. Ricky was raised in Parsonsburg and graduated from Parkside High School in 2000, where he enjoyed playing football for the Parkside Rams. During his senior year, he was named Homecoming King. After high school, he attended Morgan State University, obtaining a Master of Science DeRICKY gree in Industrial Engi- WHITTINGTON neering. Ricky was an engineer in Geospatial Intelligence, where his co-workers often described him as someone who always led by example, had a strong work ethic, and was fun to be around. Ricky always made it known to others that he was the “protector” of his little brothers and sister. He was always showing a brother’s, unconditional love. One of Ricky’s most significant accomplishments was being the father of his baby girl, Fairra. As a dad, Ricky always displayed kindness, patience, strength, and a fantastic sense of humor. His sense of humor was often highlighted in his stylish dress and love for the Washington Redskins/Commanders. He is survived by his loving mother and father, Karen and Ernest White of Laurel, Del.; his beautiful daughter, Fairra Whittington of Woodbridge, Va.; three brothers, Ryan Whittington, Ernest White Jr. and Ayron White; sisters Phylita Reeves and Charise Beckett; uncles Kevin Whittington, Tony White

Violet Louise Lynch

Obituaries cost $50 to appear in The Dispatch and photos are no extra charge. Direct all inquiries to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com, fax to 410-641-0966 or mail to P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811.


… Hopes Remain High For Solid Holiday Weekend In Resort

July 1, 2022

FROM PAGE 4 pre-pandemic 2019. Despite high gas prices, car travel on the holiday weekend is expected to set a new record with 42 million hitting the road for the Fourth, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic. Automobile travel will account for 88% of all travel this weekend, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic. For Ocean City tourism and hospitality officials, those numbers point to a strong three-day weekend for the resort, despite rising gas prices expected to jump higher when the state-mandated gas tax hike kicks in on Friday. Ocean City Marketing and Communications Director Jessica Waters said this week the resort has thrived in the past when gas prices were high and much of the marketing campaign harped on it. “One thing that has always contributed to our successful tourism in Ocean City, along with our clean beach and historic Boardwalk, is our geography,” she said. “Our summer campaign ‘Enjoy’ is really all-encompassing because visitors who want to enjoy a trip to Ocean City can do so knowing we are only a half a tank of gas away. If visitors are traveling from Baltimore, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., or even as far as New Jersey, New York or Pennsylvania, they can do so knowing they won’t have to fill up much at the pump.” Waters said the town continues to offer free value-added special events to help visitors feeling the pain at the pump to enjoy their visit while they are in the

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

resort. “Of course, to show our appreciation for visitors choosing Ocean City as their vacation destination, we offer tons of great, free events for families when they get here,” she said. “Whether it’s Sundaes in the Park or movies on the beach, we have plenty of things for visitors of all ages to enjoy. It also helps save a little spending money at the pump and hopefully will even be reason enough to visit more than once.” Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association (OCHMRA) Executive Director Susan Jones said this week early bookings for the holiday weekend have been modest for the most part, but that doesn’t mean visitors aren’t coming. She said a current trend is late or even lastminute bookings. “We are doing call-arounds now and aren’t finding too many that are saying they are sold out for this weekend, and several are taking two nights rather than three on a holiday weekend, so that’s not very good,” she said. “But we have been noticing that bookings are very last minute recently.” Jones agreed Ocean City has thrived in the past when gas prices soared. She also pointed to the ongoing crisis with air travel as a reason visitors could fill up and head to the resort for the holiday weekend. “It appears visitors are waiting until the last minute to book to ensure the weather looks promising,” she said. “Giv-

en our proximity to so many metro areas, we’ve always seemed to fare okay when gas prices are in the news. With the shortage of airline staff and the hassle of air travel in general, hopefully folks will hop in their cars and come to Ocean City.” Meanwhile, some high-ranking state officials are urging lawmakers to convene a special session to consider repealing the gas tax hike set to kick in on Friday. Gov. Larry Hogan pointed to the gas tax holiday Maryland employed in March, urging the General Assembly and the comptroller to stave off the tax hike on Friday. “Nearly 100 days ago, Maryland became the first state in the nation to suspend the gas tax, and we proved that it can be done successfully to lower prices for working Americans,” he said. “We have also been calling on President Biden to take action to suspend the federal gas tax, and we are pleased that he has now finally agreed to do so. With the pain at the pump only getting worse, Congress should act immediately to suspend the federal gas tax.” Hogan urged the General Assembly to take action to avoid the gas tax hike coming on Friday and called on state comptroller and gubernatorial candidate, Peter Franchot, to do his part. “Today, we are also again calling on Democratic leaders in Maryland to take action to address rising gas prices,” he said. “We are once again calling on the

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comptroller to use the same authority he has in the past in order to minimize the impact of the gas tax increase scheduled for July 1. We are again calling on the presiding officers of the General Assembly to convene a special session for the express and sole purpose of passing emergency legislation to suspend the gas tax. I am prepared to swiftly sign a gas tax suspension into law. There is no reason why we cannot come together and get this done before the July 4th holiday to provide much-needed relief for the crushing costs burdening families and businesses.” For his part, Franchot this week fired off the letter to U.S. Congressional leaders and the leadership of the state’s General Assembly to act decisively to avoid the pending gas tax increase. “As Maryland’s chief fiscal officer and motor fuel regulator, I call on the leadership of the Congress - and once again call on the leadership of the Maryland General Assembly to act expeditiously and enact a gas tax holiday until the end of September,” he wrote. “If both Congress and the General Assembly heed the president’s- and your constituentscall to action, residents and businesses here in Maryland will save nearly $550 million over the next three months. These are significant savings for Marylanders, families, and small businesses who are seeing their household budgets and business margins decimated through no fault of their own.”


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

The Dispatch Forever In Memory Of Our Founder, Dick Lohmeyer (May 25, 1927-May 5, 2005) The Dispatch, Serving Greater Ocean City Since 1984, Is Published By Maryland Coast Dispatch Inc. Weekly On Friday Mornings MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 467, Berlin, Md. 21811 PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 10012 Old Ocean City Blvd. Berlin, Md. 21811 PHONE: 410-641-4561 FAX: 410-641-0966 ONLINE WEBSITES: mdcoastdispatch.com facebook.com/thedispatchoc twitter.com/thedispatchocmd instagram.com/thedispatchocmd J. STEVEN GREEN Publisher/Editor editor@mdcoastdispatch.com

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July 1, 2022

Calmer June Overall Worth Noting In Resort How We See It

All things considered this June was a major improvement over recent years in Ocean City. The significant reduction in serious crimes during a traditionally problematic time is great news. The month of June is always a concern for the resort, due to the convergence of thousands of young people looking to simply party with friends and other unscrupulous types who come here looking to buy and sell drugs and fight. It’s been this way for decades, but there’s no disputing the severity of the incidents have hit concerning levels in recent years, as one-time fistfights are now often replaced with knives and

guns. The summer of 2020 was particularly troublesome with multiple stabbings and shootings, and city officials did their best to bring perspective to the rash of major crime, saying it was pandemic fever merged with cheap rentals bringing disturbing visitors to the island. It seemed like a spin job at the time, but what else were city officials expected to say publicly. Hindsight has shown, in fact, there was some truth to what city officials were maintaining. Nonetheless, we know privately the police department was concerned and tactical changes were made as far as boosting presence in

problem areas, namely the Boardwalk at night. This June was not without a few disturbing incidents – notably the stabbings that occurred without any arrests because the suspects fled. There was the span of 48 hours when there was a fatal pedestrian collision and another serious one. By and large, these incidents need to be taken with the proper perspective given the population influx seen throughout the month of June. All in all, a mild June on the crime front has come and gone in Ocean City. It’s been a long time since that conclusion could be made.

Letters To The Editor Proposed Inlet Project Will Have Adverse Impact Editor: I am writing with comments related to the Proposed Navigation Improvements Draft for the Ocean City, Maryland Inlet released on May 23, 2022. As proposed, I have to voice my greater family's opposition to this project. We recognize the potential economic benefit IF this project stabilizes the inlet navigation channel through preservation of commercial fishing in the resort area and potential decreased maintenance costs. However, there is no guarantee that the hoped-for improvement will be realized. We are very frequent visitors to Assateague National Seashore by boat. Currently, the only way to access the Maryland part of the National Seashore is utilizing the Verrazano Bridge over Sinepuxent Bay, or by boat. The only way to access the Ocean Beach north of the Assateague State Park is either by hiking north from there, or anchoring on a beach and walking to the Ocean Beach. There are only two places where this can be accomplished. The first is the two beaches in the inlet at the North end of the island which is what you are proposing to close off with this project. In the past, you could anchor on the West beach at the North end of the island to do this. However, a path that used to go through the dunes is frequently blocked in the summer by "Do Not Enter" signs related to the Piping Plover and other bird species nesting. In the past, you could also walk around the North end of the island. However, the loss of a passable beach at the Northwest corner of the island makes this impassable, too. The other area is about two miles south of the inlet on Sinepuxent Bay. This is roughly directly opposite the Sun Outdoors RV Campground just south of the Ocean City Municipal Airport. In this area, there is a beach that can be anchored at, and a runoff "wash" that can be traversed the short distance to the Ocean Beach. The problem with this location is that every year, starting in early May through early September, this entire area is post-

ed as "Do Not Enter" due to the Piping Plover and other dune nesting bird species. During the Pandemic, we utilized other Western side beaches along the Sinepuxent Bay to anchor at to avoid the crowds. While we could not access the Ocean Beach from there, we could at least relax and enjoy nature socially distanced from others. Last year, and again this year, the National Park Service has moved the "Do Not Enter" signs from the land above the high water line, to into the water to prevent access to these beaches. These annual summertime access restrictions greatly reduces access to sandy beaches to only the North End of Assateague Island. Currently, on the Northwest end of the Island, there is approximately 2000 linear feet of anchorable/beachable beach along the North end of Sinepuxent Bay. The two areas that you are proposing to close are a total of approximately 600 linear feet. That comes out to a 23% loss of access which is unacceptable. We are also concerned about the loss of this soft shoreline. I have witnessed schools of small fish, Horseshoe Crab spawning, and other small marine life in these basins. As a long-time boater and explorer of the waters around the Saint Martin River, Assawoman and Little Assawoman Bays, Isle of Wight Bay, and Sinepuxent Bay, there are very few places that a boater can anchor at a sand beach to passively enjoy this incredible natural resource. Without access to the Ocean Beach at the North end of Assateague Island many people each year would be denied this amazing location. Personally, for our family and us, this would be a tragedy. Once you remove access to a natural resource, you are unlikely to get it back. When you extend those jetties, if it does not accomplish what is hoped for, you will not be taking the rocks back out. The only thing that might make this project "palatable" is the following: First, the plan would need to include filling in the area south of the Western end of the proposed jetty extension. This could produce about 200 linear feet of

beach to offset the loss of 600 linear feet. Also, filling in sand behind the length of the jetty extensions would improve access to the Ocean Beach. Second, the other part that would need to be included is increased access during the summer to the above mentioned area about 2 miles south of the inlet opposite the Sun Outdoors RV Campground. I fully understand the need to protect the dune nesting birds. However, allowing access to this approximately 700 linear feet of beach and access to the Ocean Beach would compensate for the loss of the North end inlet beaches. The "Do Not Enter" zone could be moved back above the Sinepuxent Bay beach. A marked pathway, with "Do Not Enter" on either side could then lead to the Ocean Beach. In summary, the current plan is incomplete in that it does not consider in its analysis the public access to a natural resource that they have had access to for decades. It also does not compensate for the environmental loss of a natural soft shoreline by creation of another nearby. I urge the US Army Corps of Engineers, and National Park Service to use my comments, along with the many others I am sure you have received, to consider all of the stakeholders related to this project. Adverse impacts will last for decades. Sincerely yours, Dr. Stephen A. Pulley Dr. Kathleen Sardella Ocean City

Arts Day Appreciation Editor: The Art League of Ocean City would like to thank the thousands of guests who came out to support us at our 2nd Annual Arts Day at the Winery, held on June 5 at Windmill Creek Vineyard & Winery in Berlin. What a huge success. A recordbreaking family crowd of more than 7,000 visited with 60 artisans offering their work, listened and voted during the Battle of the Beach Bands, and enjoyed the lovely ambiance and fine wines of Windmill Creek on a perfect spring day. SEE NEXT PAGE


July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Letters To The Editor Special thanks goes out to our sponsors for the event: Radio Ocean City, Fish Tales Bar & Grill, the Joan Jenkins Foundation, Positive Energy, Beach Music, and T.E.A.M. Productions. Also to the wonderful Mariner family and their staff at Windmill Creek and to Aubrey Sizemore and the amazing Art League team (including volunteers) who coordinated the event. Thank you, too, to artist Jim Adcock for the hand-painted cornhole boards. The mission of the Art League is to bring art to the community as well as opportunities for artists. We received this message from Matthew Davey of The MBD Band, who played at the event, and we wanted to share it with you. “The event the Art League of Ocean City just had for the original artists at Windmill Creek Vineyards is a big deal,” Davey wrote. “I mean it! It may be a bigger deal than you all may realize. Delmarva needs to set an example to our youth that there is a place for your own music, and writing your own music isn’t a waste of time. You and the Art League have genuinely made me more optimistic about the future of original music on Delmarva. I just needed to meet the right people, you.” That’s why we’re here. Rina Thaler Ocean City (The writer is the executive director of the Art League of Ocean City.)

Research Important Editor: It is a real shame that we no longer teach any real Civics that teaches all our students how our version of Democracy, a representative republic, actually works and what powers are given to each position in our government. It seems that too many folks depend on social media and slanted news operations that express opinions instead of facts, but still present that as news or verifiable information. Laws are made by Congress, not the executive. But we see how many law makers are just stooges of the lobbyist like Big Oil and lately the NRA who give them millions in donations, and then vote against the wishes of the majority of Americans. Follow the money. Let's outlaw lobbyists, all those secret PACs, and limit donations from actual voters only. The price of gas is set by the international energy companies, not the President. We export gas and oil even now because the energy companies sell to the highest bidder, and no one dares to freeze exports. The price and availability of commodities are set by free market forces, unless you want more government regulations. Those that complain the loudest and complain the most about prices also appear to demand less government regs, so make a choice, will you? Congress does have that power to make the regulations to freeze or lower prices, not the executive. The Judicial has the final say as to what they believe to be constitutional, but that has become slanted by the current stacked courts. The previous president should have worked a bit harder to get more than a low C average in university so that he could understand that a tariff is not a tax on other countries like China, but just an

added cost to the purchasers of those goods. China does not pay a dime more, we pay it, do not listen to his lies. Read a book on basic economics, which he never appeared to. The one positive outcome of tariffs is to make American goods more competitive, but not enough yet to return manufacturing to America. Prices for all the imports we buy would be lower if we removed the tariffs immediately, but that would slow renewing our manufacturing sector. I shopped to buy a US flag recently, but it was a struggle to find an American made one. Just like the MAGA hats and obscene F*** Biden flags, most are made in China, or its materials are, where they are sold for half the price of American made. We need to stop buying Chinese made and buy American whenever we can and pay the extra. The advantage then is that your hard-earned cash stays in our economy not going overseas, to develop our companies and jobs. Amazon and Walmart make it too easy to buy overseas products. Please do the due diligence to find the country of origin, and help American manufacturing regain the American market share. Please stop listening to misleading sound bites, and research from vetted sources. Hans Vandenbosch Snow Hill

Regrettable Decisions Editor: Poor decisions: These police officers and civilians are losing their lives over poor decisions of the political leaders who don’t care, judges with poor judgment and attorneys representing these career criminals. If these criminals were thrown in jail and the key was thrown away many officers and innocent civilians would be alive today. How many innocents have to get killed before we hold the political leaders, the judges, and the attorneys responsible for their poor decisions, poor representing and poor judgements? How many more families have to bury their loved ones because these so-called lawmakers are literally handing these criminals a future list of innocent people lives? You stop this by capital punishment and extended sentences. And instant death penalty when you kill someone. No prayer, no priest, no remorse. Pointing the same sword at the criminals who do these inhumane actions. These criminals have no remorse or care about anything besides how many times they get away with their crimes. My message to the city council and mayor is I think you need to be more worried about these criminals and the constant crimes that are going on within the county and within the town limits of Ocean City and stop worrying about skateboarding, scooters and electric bikes. Get your priorities in order because you got families to worry about. It only takes one bad judgment by a judge and one of these criminals will play the devil in sheep’s clothing and possibly hurt innocent families. You don’t want the reputation of Baltimore city in Ocean City. Get your business in order and or get off your thrones. D.T Hagan Ocean City

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Between The Lines by Publisher/Editor Steve Green The next several weeks will reveal everything as far as gauging the summer tourism season. In general, the summer season thus far has been strange. Though reviews are always mixed when reviewing summer business, the consensus seems to be it’s been a slow start. “It’s been a weird fall so far,” as one hospitality worker joked last week, understanding full well the summer season is in full swing. The reference was due to the randomness of the weather and smaller crowds, especially during the week. There have been numerous days in June when it felt more like September and October from weather and population standpoints. For instance, the average temperature at 6 a.m. in Ocean City for June as of Wednesday was 60 degrees. It’s been sweatshirt weather most of the time on the Boardwalk in the mornings and evenings. It’s why the ocean temperature has not even hit 68 degrees yet. The weird weather pattern will eventually change, but it doesn’t look immediate. The highest forecasted daytime temperature over the next 10 days in Ocean City is 83 degrees with most days only expected to reach the upper 70s. It will be warmer inland, of course, but there’s been a weird weather trend this summer. From a business standpoint, it’s been unpredictable as well. Every day seems to be different for most businesses. Random hectic days followed by quiet days traditionally busy. This seems to be especially the case in West Ocean City where reports indicate sales are largely down among restaurants and bars. June is always a bit odd for local businesses, and July, August and September are typically the best months of the year. The asterisk for this summer is what impact the historic fuel prices will have on visitor tendencies. It’s too early to tell at this point. The hope today seems to be business will ramp up this month through early fall, and the slow start will be forgotten in no time. Though it’s not official yet, it’s looking like the November general election will feature a referendum on the sports complex for Worcester County voters. The petition group is expected to meet its deadline and surpass the minimum threshold of necessary signatures, according to organizers. What’s next will be interesting to observe. An extension of the current property purchase contract will likely be needed as it was reportedly for six months. If all plays out as it should, voters should have a referendum question before them in November on whether the county can proceed with the planned acquisition of property through a bond sale. County officials could throw a curveball and abandon the effort altogether or the current set of commissioners could avoid a referendum by funding the acquisition through reserves. Neither of these options seem plausible. It's going to be fascinating how county voters decide this issue if a referendum does in fact happen. Based on the spring public hearing and general observations in the community, my early prediction is it will be close. The petition group enjoyed success in its signature gathering effort, but it doesn’t mean each person who signed will vote against the sports complex when it comes to the November election. My sense is people like having a voice on the matter, and this was a message petitioners used well to get signatures. On multiple occasions, I overheard petition organizers say something along the lines of – signing the petition doesn’t mean you are against the sports complex, it just gives you an opportunity to vote on how public dollars are spent on the project. It was a message that resonated. There were two significant issues involving State Highway Administration (SHA) and the Town of Berlin this week. First, there was the absurd traffic pattern at the intersection of Route 113 and Assateague Road (which I call the RV Bypass during the summer months). The frustration over the odd traffic pattern comes after months of anxiety over the long construction project along Assateague Road. It was learned the intersection will be getting improved eventually, but the early striping on the road was bizarre. There were essentially two lanes marked for northbound 113 traffic and one bumped out lane for motorists heading south on 113 or west toward Berlin. It made no sense. The striping was improved Tuesday to at least make the designated lanes more obvious, but it’s still a strange pattern until final work is completed. The second issue involving SHA was the stamped crosswalks in downtown Berlin. When the repaving was completed along Bay and William streets, it was learned the former brick pattern would not be returning to the crosswalk at Main Street as well as in front of town hall. Instead, SHA told town officials the stamped brick crosswalks will be phased out in favor of what Councilman Jay Knerr referred to as the “Abbey Road” concept – referring to the famous album cover by The Beatles. It’s a boring black-and-white striped look. It will evidently be the norm for crosswalks maintained by SHA moving forward. In the coming years, the existing brick-stamped crosswalks will be replaced with the Abbey Road designs because they are viewed as safer and more durable by SHA. This is a debatable point. A couple of the existing brick-looking crosswalks downtown are in bad shape, but the majority seem to be weathering fine considering they have been in place for several years. There are two clear aspects to me here — the town has no say on this and the new look is not as aesthetically pleasing.


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The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

Puzzle Answers

O

July 1, 2022

The Adventures of Fatherhood

by Steve Green

PUZZLE ON PAGE 67

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ver the course of my parenting life, there have been moments of anguish and dare to admit, embarrassment as a result of actions and decisions by my kids. If you have never had any of these as a parent, it’s either one of two things – you live in the clouds of denial or you are simply blessed and fortunate. I have written about this subject before when things are heavy. I accept both my kids are challenging. It doesn’t mean my wife and I are bad parents. Some people – those judgmental types – think, however, kids are direct reflections of their parents and upbringing. These folks come to hasty, ignorant conclusions devoid of empathy and understanding. It happens all the time, but I refuse to meet commonplace with acceptance. While I have accepted my parenting road is unique – and probably tougher than most while easier than some – I have learned along the way a bit of compassion is needed toward other parents. We need to lift each other up, rather than tear down. If it’s to be believed it takes a village to raise a kid – and I do think it’s true – we should all accept none of us know everything that goes on within a family. There’s likely a bit of ugliness within every home at times. These people we are raising need us in their lives, but they may also make horrible decisions along the way. It’s okay to feel shame every now and again internally, but we must take a holistic view to parenting. We need to have our eyes open with a keen perspective. Lapses in judgement should not be met with absolute condemnation. Some scolding packaged with consequences for a wrong choice seems important to us, but these are family decisions. One direction is not for all, and that’s okay. There’s no real right or wrong when it comes to parenting because each child is different. Criticism of fellow parents is not a productive course and it can be

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harmful when it’s done with deceipt. On this general topic of divisiveness, Dr. Ben Carson says, “We, the American people, are not each other’s enemies. The enemies are those people behind the curtain jerking everybody’s chains and trying to divide us up by age, by race, by income.” Parents don’t need community judgment over this or that action done by a teenager. If we are keeping it real, most teens are immature, entirely too obsessed with themselves and selfish. This is not a direct result of parenting. It starts at home but there are many instances when the right course is being set by parents and the wrong direction is chosen. I found a favorite new page to follow recently called Whitney Fleming Writes. A mother of three teen daughters, she keeps it real, and I like how she writes, especially on teens. Here’s an excerpt. There's a reason why parents of big kids shut down when their kids hit the teenage years. There's a reason why moms stop talking to other parents at pick up lines and dads avoid people at all cost You know that phrase little kids, little problems. Big kids, bigger problems? It is so true. And if you are lucky enough to raise a teenager that never drank or smoked or did drugs, if you are lucky enough to have a child that never got arrested for a misdemeanor or snuck out or cheated on a test, if you are lucky enough never to feel like you were just a complete and utter failure as a parent because of the behavior of your kid despite your best efforts, consider it just that: lucky. Because for most big kids who do something bad, it is usually not from bad parenting as much as the teen making a bad decision. And we need to sit on that for a second. Kids who make bad choices often come from a loving home and from great parents. Before we rush to judgment. Before

we roll our eyes and start mentioning all the things we think those parents did wrong. Before we fill ourselves with righteous indignation. We need to remember that it could be our kid, and how do we want people to treat us? Sure, we need to be conscientious parents and raise our kids to the best of our abilities. Kids raised by engaged parents have the best shot at developing into productive adults. But unless you have severely neglected, abused, or traumatized your child, we need to recognize that sometimes teenagers lose their way despite our best efforts. It's their brain wiring. It's outside influences. It's rebellion. It's seeking control. It's growing up. … I speak from experience. Sometimes good kids just make bad decisions. Sometimes good kids have addictions. Sometimes good kids are hurting and don't know how to express it. Sometimes good kids cave under pressure. Sometimes good kids want to impress their peers so they do something bad. And oftentimes these good kids come from good parents, great parents, loving parents. There is enough guilt when it comes to parenting. Did I do too much for them? Not enough? Did I give them too much freedom? Was I too overbearing? … So, the next time your local rumor mill starts running with the bad behavior of a child coming from a "good" family, maybe resist the urge to spread the gossip to another friend. Instead, maybe use it as a discussion springboard with your own child. ... We have to dig deep within ourselves to understand each other. (The writer is the publisher and editor of The Dispatch. He and his wife, Pamela, are proud parents of two boys. This weekly column examines their transition into parenthood and all that goes along with it. E-mail any thoughts to editor@mdcoastdispatch.com.)

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July 1, 2022

The Dispatch/Maryland Coast Dispatch

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July 1, 2022