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Chronicle Of Giving Grateful Patients Show Support

MCV Foundation Assets Top $400 Million

Nursing Nostalgia

Medical College of Virginia Foundation

Fall 2011

Glasgow trusts The Power of Planned Giving V i

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Chronicle Of Giving §

The Chronicle of Giving is published twice a year by the MCV Foundation for alumni and friends of the Medical College of Virginia Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University. © 2011 MCV Foundation

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Contributors: Nan L. Johnson, William P. Kotti, Brian S. Thomas, and Amanda E. Van Thunen Design: Kevin E. Schindler Photography: As noted MCV Foundation’s mission is to inspire and steward philanthropy throughout the MCV Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University. Chartered in 1949, the MCV Foundation works in partnership with alumni and friends of MCV Schools, Hospitals and Massey Cancer Center.

Contents MCV Campus News 1 Letter from President Kotti and Chairman Doswell 2 Foundation Financials 4 MCV Tapestry 5 MCV Foundation Welcomes New Trustees 6 Glasgow Trusts: The Power of Planned Giving 8 A Leap of Faith Pays Off 10 Gifts Take Different Forms 11

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We support the institution in its quest: • To preserve and restore health • To seek the cause and cure of diseases • To educate those who would serve humanity

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Through your donations, the MCV Foundation is an integral support to the dedicated teachers, clinicians, researchers and students whose efforts place the MCV Campus among the world’s leading academic medical centers providing technically superb and compassionate care to patients. The MCV Foundation supports the education, research and clinical care mission of our MCV Campus Partners: School of Allied Health Professions, School of Dentistry, School of Medicine, School of Nursing, School of Pharmacy, Massey Cancer Center, MCV Alumni Association and MCV Hospitals.

Chronicle Of Giving Grateful Patients Show Support

MCV Foundation Assets Top $406 Million

Nursing Nostalgia

Medical College of Virginia Foundation

Fall 2011

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On the Cover

Through their planned gift, the Glasgows made possible the largest cash gift in the University’s history.

Photo: Kevin E. Schindler


7th Annual MCV Campus Endowed Scholarship Brunch

MCV Campus News

Scholarship Donors and Recipients Enjoy Each Other’s Company

The MCV Foundation hosted the seventh Annual MCV Campus Endowed Scholarship brunch on October 30th. The event took place in the Grand Ballroom of the Jefferson Hotel with more than 300 student scholarship recipients, donors, and guests in attendance. MCV Foundation President, Dr. Bill Kotti, welcomed the largest group to date and reported that there were 21 new scholarships for the 2011-2012 academic year, bringing the total number of endowed scholarships for the MCV Campus to 215. Jalessa Holmes, a School of Nursing student, spoke about how receiving a scholarship has empowered her to reach her lifelong dream of becoming a nurse.

Mr. Harry Shaia, Jr. and his daughter, Anne-Marie Shaia Condlin talked with student scholarship recipients of both the Harry and Zackia Shaia Annual Scholarship in the School of Medicine and the Harry and Zackia Shaia Scholarship in the School of Pharmacy.  The students, (pictured left to right) Brad Martin, Bethany Howlett, Allison Hastings and Matt Perdue enjoyed getting to meet Harry and Anne-Marie.

Photo: VCU Creative Services

Construction Update Construction of the recently named James W. and Frances School of Dentistry Dean, Dr. David Sarrett conversed with Alex Barton, recipient of the Dr. Robert and Ruth Helsabeck Scholarship and Julia Niculescu, recipient of the Elizabeth and Eugene C. Harrison Scholarship.

G. McGlothlin Medical Education Center is well on its way to reaching completion by the target date of spring 2013. In mid-November of this year, the steel work was completed and the next phase of interior and exterior construction commenced. In this building, the school’s faculty will pioneer new approaches to training physicians and will allow the VCU School of Medicine to help meet the projected physician shortage by accommodating an increase in class size from 200 to 250, increasing the total

MCV Foundation President, Dr. Bill Kotti, posed with student speaker, Jalessa Holmes, recipient of the Lettie Pate Whitehead Scholarship, the Phi Kappa Phi Scholarship and the St. Philips Alumnae Scholarship, and Dean of the School of Nursing, Dr. Nancy Langston.

Event Photos: CSI Studios

medical student body to 1,000. Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

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MCV Foundation Over the past sixty-two years, the MCV Foundation has sustained its mission to “inspire and steward philanthropy throughout the MCV Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University.” The Foundation has seen the long-lasting results of philanthropic support from friends and alumni grow exponentially through the years. This past year was marked by several milestones, and we are excited for the many new projects and programs that are on the horizon.

Jim and Frances McGlothlin announced their $25 million gift to the School of Medicine in honor of their friend, Dr. Harry Young. The new medical building, now under construction, has been named the James W. and Frances G. McGlothlin Medical Education Center in recognition of their gift. This new hub of discovery for the next generation of medical doctors for the Commonwealth will transform the way that doctors are taught and patients are treated. Construction is scheduled to be completed in spring 2013. The VCU School of Medicine recently celebrated the opening of its Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Evaluation Center, which is among only a handful of such uniquely collaborative facilities in the country. The vision for this new center began to form five years ago when Fitzgerald and Margaret Bemiss made a $1 million gift to establish the Bemiss Endowed Chair in Neurodegenerative Diseases. In five short years, $5 million has been raised to support the VCU Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Center. In memory of his late wife, Natalie, Jack Congdon gave $1 million to the MCV Foundation - $500,000 to benefit VCU Massey Cancer Center and $500,000 to benefit the VCU Department of Internal Medicine’s Division of Cardiology. Mr. Congdon’s gift will support Massey Cancer Center’s clinical trial research and endow a Visiting Scholars Program in the Division of Cardiology.

All Stars Photo: VCU Creative Services

MCV Foundation President, Dr. William P. Kotti (left), and Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Dr. John C. Doswell II (right), share their enthusiasm for the year to come on the MCV Campus.

Welcome, Mr. President

Michael Rao was inaugurated on Friday, October 14th as the University’s fifth President. During the ceremony, Virginia Governor, Robert F. McDonnell brought greetings from the Commonwealth, and the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education, Arne Duncan gave the keynote address. In honor of Dr. Rao’s inauguration, more than $142,000 was raised at a dinner the previous evening for student scholarships through the Opportunity VCU initiative.

A Lasting Impact

Arthur and Margaret Glasgow made the decision to include MCV in their estate plans back in the 1950s. Now, after the recent passing of their last heir, the Glasgows’ approximately $45 million gift has come to benefit the MCV Campus. The Glasgow’s incredible vision is truly inspirational and will have the power to transform the lives of students and patients on the MCV Campus for years to come.

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Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

At the MCV Foundation’s Board of Trustees’ Annual Dinner in May, the Board recognized the commitment and leadership of Dr. Katherine C. Bobbitt N’56 and Bertha C. Rolfe P’47, long time co-chairs of the Board’s Board Resources Committee, and presented them with the Dr. Eugene P. Trani Award for MCV Campus Leadership. Established in 2009, this special award honors a current or past trustee who has demonstrated exceptional leadership, dedication and support of the MCV Campus. Charlotte K. and James C. Roberts were awarded the Michael B. Dowdy Philanthropy Award for their joint and independent fundraising efforts on behalf of the MCV Campus. The Robert W. Irby, M.D. Award for Philanthropic Leadership was awarded to Dr. Peter W. Brown for his service and dedication to both the School of Medicine and Massey Cancer Center. Earlier in the day at the Annual Meeting, the Board elected five new Trustees: Dr. Charles F. Bryan, Jr., Ann Parker H. Gottwald, David A. Lyons, Ronald H. McFarlane P’80 and Dr. James H. Revere D’65. The MCV Foundation is proud of its Trustees who all serve the community in many ways. Judy B. Collins N’75 was honored with VCU’s Presidential Medallion Award this past summer. This high honor recognizes outstanding contributions by a member of the university community. It, specifically, recognizes extraordinary achievement in the world of learning. As a special note: C. Kenneth Wright, the husband of Trustee Dianne H. Wright, received an Honorary Doctorate Degree from VCU in June.


Wise Investment

We are fortunate to have Austin Brockenbrough III leading the Foundation’s investment strategies. Under his guidance, the MCV Foundation’s endowment is fairing well, as the markets continue to rebound. Total MCV Foundation assets increased from $355.2 million to $415.5 million during Fiscal Year 2011, marking the first time the Foundation’s total assets have eclipsed $400 million. Our total disbursements were $29.2 million in support of scholarships, faculty chairs and professorships, academic and research programs, equipment, and patient care initiatives on the MCV Campus. We are investing to create future value and to meet the needs of the MCV Campus schools and units. The investment team has guided us through turbulent and uncertain economic times and is helping to ensure the stability of the endowment’s future. We are grateful for the collective wisdom provided by Austin and his financial cohorts: Nancy Everett, Steven Markel, Louis Moelchert, Jr., and Erwin Will, Jr.

Strategic Vision

This year, the Foundation’s Strategic Planning Team made headway in determining where we should be focusing our energy and resources to help position the MCV Campus for the new fundraising campaign. The team, chaired by Bruce V. Thomas, Senior Vice President for Global Market Strategy and Emerging Markets at MeadeWestvaco, has been working closely with Dr. Sheldon Retchin and the MCV Campus leadership, new Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations, John Blohm, and President Rao to implement a new model for the campus fundraising program that has the Foundation’s Development Office serving in a formal leadership and management role with the schools and units, and all with the close partnership and leadership of John Blohm. We are confident that this “hybrid” structure – which is common at comprehensive research universities – will provide a much higher degree of efficiency and effectiveness in fundraising for the campus. The team is also working with university leadership to ensure that the Foundation’s goals and aspirations align with the university’s priorities through its strategic planning process – Quest for Distinction.

Quest for Distinction is VCU’s new strategic plan. It is a focused plan that capitalizes on the outstanding assets of the VCU experience and truly distinguishes VCU as a major research university committed to academic quality and student success at all levels. It includes four themes as areas of focus: Theme I – Become a leader among national research universities in providing all students with high quality learning/living experiences focused on inquiry, discovery and innovation in a global environment

Theme II – Attain preeminence as an urban, public research university by making contributions in research, scholarship, creative expression and clinical practice to advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life

Theme III – Achieve national recognition as a fully-integrated research university with a commitment to human health

Heartfelt Thanks

On behalf of all those whom the MCV Foundation’s work touches, we offer our sincere thanks to you, our friends, alumni and supporters. As many of this year’s developments demonstrate, today’s actions create exponential possibilities for the future. The impact of your gifts is transformative in all five of our schools, Massey Cancer Center and MCV Hospitals. On behalf of the MCV Foundation Board of Trustees and staff, thank you.

Theme IV – Become a national model for community engagement and regional impact

For more information on VCU’s Quest for Distinction, please visit: www.future.vcu.edu

John C. Doswell II, D.D.S. Chairman of the Board

William P. Kotti, Ph.D. President Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

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Financial Position & Highlights Medical College of Virginia Foundation Statement of Financial Position

For the year ended June 30, 2011 Amounts in thousands

Assets

Operating pooled investments Cash and cash equivalents $ 10,945 Long-term investments 103,534 Total operating pooled investments

114,479

Managed portfolio pooled investments

259,355

Agency assets

6,935

Other assets

34,737 Total Assets: $ 415,506

Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities Debt service obligations Accounts payable Due to MCV Alumni Association – Due to Hospital Hospitality House – Agency liabilities

$ 10,645 460 6,935

Total liabilities: $ 18,040

Net Assets Donor restricted Temporarily Permanently Unrestricted Board designated Other

$ 215,626 145,885 26,155 9,800 Total net assets: $ 387,966

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

Total Assets: $ 415,506

Medical College of Virginia Foundation Financial Highlights Total Assets (in millions)

For the year ended June 30, 2011

2007

$359.9

2008

$380.2

2009

$337.9

2010

$355.3

2011

$415.5

Program Disbursements (in millions) 2007

$24.7

2008

$25.4

2009

$29.7

2010

$29.3

2011

$29.2

Cash Contributions Totaling $45.6 million by Source 44.9% Friends and Grateful Patients 27.6% Corporations 10.6% Alumni 9.9% Foundations 6.9% Organizations

Disbursements Totaling $29.2 million by Program 77.8% Education, research and general 11.4% Faculty salaries and support 6.9% Scholarships and awards 3.5% Other program services 0.4% Indigent patient care

This is a condensed version of the financial statements submitted to the MCV Foundation. Our independent auditor issued an Unqualified Opinion on the complete financial statements, which can be obtained by writing or calling the MCV Foundation office.

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The

Nursing Thread

The history of the Medical College of Virginia is varied

and can be likened to a tapestry, woven of individual threads that together make up a bigger picture but retain their own individual identity as well. You may know that the Medical College of Virginia was founded in 1838 as the Medical Department of Hampden-Sydney College. What you may not know is how the School of Nursing developed from there. In 1993, the VCU School of Nursing celebrated the Centennial year of the founding of the hospital nursing program from which it evolved, Virginia Hospital Training School. Here are some additional facts about early years of the School of Nursing you might not know:

MCV tapestry

• • • • • • • • • • • •

The Medical College of Virginia (MCV), the parent institution of the School of Nursing, began as the medical department of Hampden-Sydney College in 1838 in the Old Union Hotel in Richmond. The Sisters of Charity from Emmitsburg, Maryland, provided nursing care for the patients housed in the hotel begining in1838. A second independent medical college, the University College of Medicine, opened its doors in 1893 two blocks from MCV. The Virginia Hospital Training School for Nurses was inaugurated in the fall of 1893 by that college and is considered the founding date for the Medical College of Virginia of Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing. Two nurses, Emily Terrell (Habliston) and Marie Moseley, graduated in 1895. The MCV Infirmary was renovated and reopened as Old Dominion Hospital in 1895, and student nurses from the Old Dominion Hospital Training School for Nurses replaced the Sisters of Mercy in caring for patients. According to the March 1896 Board of Visitors meeting, the staff of the school consisted of one supervisor and 16 students. Agnes Dillon Randolph was appointed director of the Virginia Hospital Training School in 1900. Virginia native Sadie Heath Cabaniss was hired from the Johns Hopkins University to set up the curriculum, using the Nightingale system and remained at Old Dominion until 1901. She has been described as the initiator of professional nursing in Virginia. In 1913, the Medical College of Virginia and the University College of Medicine were consolidated. The Memorial Hospital Training School and the Virginia Hospital Training School were united to become the Medical College of Virginia School of Nursing. In 1914, the School of Nursing established a central training school where students from other hospital schools in the city attended lecture courses on topics that could not be taught adequately at their hospital. On completion of their courses they received a certificate from MCV. The City of Richmond took over the Virginia Hospital Training School for Nurses from 1913 to 1922, and the hospital was used by MCV for clinical teaching.

More recent milestones in the School of Nursing’s program advancement include: • • • • • • •

In 1953, the School of Nursing initiated a baccalaureate program. In 1968, the first master’s degree program in nursing in Virginia was implemented at MCV. In 1974, a certificate family nurse practitioner program was begun. Certificate nurse practitioner programs were added in obstetrics-gynecology in 1975, and pediatrics in 1976. In 1983, the nurse practitioner programs were moved into the master’s framework and subsequently tracks were added. In January 1986, a Ph.D. program in nursing was approved for implementation in fall 1986. The nursing program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission and was last accredited in 2010.

Information courtesy of MCV/VCU School of Nursing A Proud Heritage 100 Years of Nursing Education and the VCU School of Nursing. Photo: School of Nursing, VCU Libraries, Tomompkins-McCaw Library, Special Collections & Achives

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elcome W

Foundation Board Welcom Charles F. Bryan, Jr., Ph.D.

Photo: VCU Creative Services

The MCV Foundation’s five new trustees attended their first Board meeting on September 19th.

Pictured (left to right) are Ronald H. McFarlane, Dr. James H. Revere, Ann Parker H. Gottwald, Dr. Charles F. Bryan, Jr., and David A. Lyons.

On May 9, 2011 at the MCV Foundation’s Board of Trustees’ Annual Meeting, the Board elected five new Trustees whose terms

officially began on July 1, 2011. The new

Trustees bring the number of Foundation Trustees to 45 for the 2011-2012 year.

Board Resources Committee Co-Chair Bertha Rolfe said, “These new Board members will bring a fresh perspective to our organization. Their experience with other boards and volunteer positions as well as their enthusiasm to effect change brings us a great new energy and knowledge-base. I look forward to seeing them in action.”

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Charles is founding partner with Daniel P. Jordan of Bryan & Jordan Consulting, LLC. He retired in 2008 after a thirty year career as a public historian. Dr. Bryan was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of the Virginia Historical Society in 1988 and was named President and CEO emeritus when he retired. Born and raised in McMinnville, Tennessee, Dr. Bryan is a distinguished military graduate of the Virginia Military Institute. He served two years active duty as an officer in the U.S. Army. He earned a Master’s Degree in history from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee with a specialty in the American Civil War. He has taught graduate courses at the University of Tennessee, University of Missouri-St. Louis, and Arizona State University. Dr. Bryan and his wife of forty-two years, Cammy, reside in Richmond. They have two married children and two grandsons. Dr. Bryan serves on the Board of the VMI Foundation. He has played an instrumental role in the establishment of the comprehensive Parkinson’s Disease Research and Treatment Center at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, having helped raise nearly $10 million. Dr. Bryan was selected as the Outstanding Virginian of 2009 and was recognized by the Virginia General Assembly for “his distinguished contributions, outstanding achievements, and inspiring leadership and service to the citizens of Virginia.” He holds honorary doctoral degrees from VCU and Randolph-Macon College. In 2009, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the American Association for State and Local History “for his extraordinary leadership in the field of public history.”

Ann Parker H. Gottwald

Ann Parker is a native of Richmond who has been active in the community for a number of years. She is the former President of the Sacred Heart Center Board and has served on the boards of the St. Christopher’s School, the UNC Board of Visitors, the St. Mary’s Hospital Foundation, the Massey Cancer Center Advisory Board, the Junior Board of Children’s Hospital, the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, and the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation. In addition, she has served on the Sewanee Parents Council and is a current member of the Citizens’ Advisory Council for the Executive Mansion. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she is the founder and former owner of One Thing at A Time, a specialty invitation and stationery business. She is the daughter of Haywood and Frances Hyman and is married to Thomas E. (Teddy) Gottwald. She is an active and proud mother of five boys.


es New Trustees David A. Lyons

David is managing director and serves on the executive committee of Lowe, Brockenbrough & Company, a Richmond based investment advisory firm serving individuals and institutions. Mr. Lyons is responsible for the firm’s operations. In addition, he assists with the firms’s Institutional Advisory Services, asset allocation strategy and investment strategy research. Prior to joining Lowe, Brockenbrough, he was Vice President, Institutional Marketing, at T. Rowe Price Retirement Plan Services. He holds a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Richmond and an M.B.A. from the Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the University of Richmond Alumni Association and Spider Club. David is the Immediate Past Chair and a member of the Massey Cancer Center Advisory Board. He has served in a number of board positions with the Southern Employee Benefits Conference, most recently as the board’s president. He is the recipient of the Southern Employee Benefits Conference’s Hazelhurst-Lamon Outstanding Achievement Award. David and his wife, Patricia enjoy spending time with their three children Peyton, Spencer and Dylan.

Ronald H. McFarlane, R.Ph.

Ron grew up in Roanoke and graduated from the University of Virginia with a degree in Science Education. He later enrolled in the School of Pharmacy School at VCU where he met his wife, Nancy, while they were both pursuing degrees in pharmacy. They graduated in 1980 and were married that fall. Nancy and Ron have lived in Raleigh, NC since 1984, when they moved there from Richmond, VA. Nancy was just elected Mayor of Raleigh this fall. While living in Raleigh, they have raised three children: Katie, Emily and Reynolds. Mr. McFarlane holds the position of Chief Operating Officer for MedPro Rx, Inc. He has served as Vice Chair and currently is Secretary on the board of WakeUP Wake County, a citizen’s group focused on the Water, Transit, Schools, and Growth Issues in the area. Ron is also a board member for the North Carolina League of Conservation Voters. Ron has been a volunteer coach for various YMCA Youth Sports programs since moving to Raleigh in 1984. He also served on the National Board of Directors for the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation from 2001 to 2009, where he was Vice Chair from 2005 to 2009. He is a former board member of the local Wake County AIDS Service Agency. He sits on the National Advisory Council for the VCU School of Pharmacy.

James H. Revere, D.D.S.

Jim graduated from the University of Richmond in 1961 and received his D.D.S. from the MCV School of Dentistry in 1965. He was awarded a Certificate in Orthodontics in 1989. After graduation from dental school, he served as a dentist in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, and then returned to the School of Dentistry in 1968 as a faculty member. Jim held many administrative positions in the school, serving as the Assistant Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs, the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Acting Dean – once for two years and a second time for six months. During his career, he has served on many university, state and national committees including serving as a consultant to the Commission on Dental Accreditation. In 2003, Jim retired from the full-time faculty and currently serves part-time as Director of Planned Giving in the School of Dentistry. He has been involved in community projects and currently serves as the Chair of the Lucy Corr Foundation of Lucy Corr Village at the Chesterfield Court House. He is the immediate past president of the MCV Alumni Association. He and his wife, Pat, reside in a golf community in Powhatan County.

MCV Foundation Board of Trustees 2011-2012 Ralph L. Anderson, D.D.S. Katherine C. Bobbitt, Ed.D. Roger L. Boevé Austin Brockenbrough III Louise Oliver Brooks Charles F. Bryan, Jr., Ph.D. Thomas N. Chewning Judith B. Collins, W.H.N.P. William D. Covington, D.D.S. Charles F. Crone Norwood H. Davis, Jr. John C. Doswell II, D.D.S. (Chair) Alice T. Goodwin Ann Parker H. Gottwald Bruce B. Gray J. William Gray Jr., Esq. Jeffrey H. Gumenick L. Preston Hale JoAnne K. Henry, Ed.D. Mark J. Hourigan Gail W. Johnson, R.N. Barry V. Kirkpatrick, M.D. Lee B. Krumbein David A. Lyons John W. Martin William E. Massey, Jr. Ronald H. McFarlane Dorothy A. Pauley Rebecca T. Perdue W. Baxter Perkinson, Jr., D.D.S. James H. Revere, D.D.S. Randolph N. Reynolds, Sr. James C. Roberts, Esq. Bertha C. Rolfe, R.Ph. Ellen E. Spong James H. Starkey III Joseph M. Teefey Harry R. Thalhimer Bruce V. Thomas George W. Vetrovec, M.D. Michelle V. Whitehurst-Cook, M.D. Henry L. Wilton Jane P. Wootton, M.D. Dianne Harris Wright Harold F. Young, M.D. Ex Officio Members: Michael Rao, Ph.D. President of VCU Sheldon M. Retchin, M.D., M.S.P.H. CEO of the VCU Health System Vice President of VCU Health Sciences President: William P. Kotti, Ph.D.

Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

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The Glasgow Trusts

The Power of

Arthur Glasgow

Margaret Glasgow

Images: Virginia Historical Society / Above: 2002.185.25 and 2011.1.107 / Cover: 2011.1.155 and 2002.185.23

“The power of their bequests is truly inspirational and will transform lives of generations of students and patients on the Medical Campus of VCU.”

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Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

— Dr. Bill Kotti


By: Nan Johnson

Planned Giving A lot can happen in 60 years. In the field of medicine and medical research alone, the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health reports a reduction of cervical cancer in the United States by more than 70 percent, the identification of three types of interferon to fight virus infections and tumors, and the development of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners to help detect many types of cancer, heart disease and even Alzheimer’s. These and additional advances in the fight against cancer and other degenerative diseases have all taken place since the 1950s. But the significance of this time in history doesn’t stop at medical research and its life-changing advancements. It’s also the time when two very charitable Virginians, Margaret and Arthur Glasgow, included Virginia Commonwealth University in their estate plans. Through their planned giving, the couple made possible the largest cash gift in the University’s history. “For Richmond and our entire community, it’s amazing to think of the foresight that the Glasgows had more than 60 years ago,” said Dr. Michael Rao, President of VCU and the VCU Health System. “The impact of their generosity enhances the quality of lives, our culture, our health and our service to the community in so many different ways. Their gift will be used in the same forward thinking, generous and compassionate spirit in which it was given to support the cure and prevention of cancer and other degenerative diseases.” The Glasgow trusts were established shortly before the deaths of Mrs. Glasgow in 1952 and Mr. Glasgow in 1955. Sixty years later, the couple’s trusts totaled $125 million. Nearly $70 million will go to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts to strengthen its vast collections, $45 million will be dedicated to VCU’s cancer research and prevention programs, and the remaining $10 million will be distributed to 13 nonprofit organizations in Richmond and elsewhere. President Rao acknowledged the record planned gift on behalf of VCU and the 13 additional recipients at a special ceremony held in August at the museum. “Arthur and Margaret Glasgow had an incredible vision for what they could accomplish through the creation of their trusts, although I suspect the full im-

pact of their generosity goes beyond their expectations,” said Dr. Bill Kotti, President, MCV Foundation. “The power of their bequests is truly inspirational and will transform lives of generations of students and patients on the Medical Campus of VCU.” Gifts such as these allow miraculous things to happen, from new discoveries to program sustainability. Born in Richmond in 1876, Margaret Elizabeth Branch was the daughter of John Patteson Branch and Mary Louise Merritt Kerr Branch. She was a cousin of James Branch Cabell, the namesake of the VCU Monroe Park Campus library. Arthur Glasgow, an engineer and brother of the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ellen Glasgow, was born in Botetourt County, Va., in 1865. He formed a partnership with Alexander Humphreys in 1892 creating Humphreys & Glasgow, an engineering firm in London that specialized in building gas plants. The two married in 1901 and had one child, Marjorie, who married Ambrose Congreve, in 1935. The Glasgows’ remarkable charitable bequest became available for disbursement when Congreve, their son-inlaw, passed away at the age of 104 while in London for the annual Chelsea Flower Show earlier this year. Congreve, a celebrated amateur horticulturalist who established one of the world’s largest collections of rhododendrons at his Irish family seat near Kilmeadan, and his late wife Marjorie Glasgow, had no children. “The Glasgow gift is truly transformative,” said Dr. Sheldon Retchin, Vice President for VCU Health Sciences and CEO, VCU Health System. “It paves the way for our continued efforts to put an end to cancer and degenerative disease. I wish I’d had the opportunity to know these visionaries.” “This is a significant gift for Virginia Commonwealth University. It’s the kind of gift that elevates a university like ours even further,” said President Rao. “As a major research university, a gift of this magnitude enables us to support the people, the facilities and the programs necessary to make a difference in people’ lives and certainly in the health of our community.” Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

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A Leap of Faith Pays Off By: Nan Johnson

Photo: Kevin Schindler

Pictured (left to right) are the Movers and Shakers at the opening of the new Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Evaluation Center on September 22nd: J. Carter Fox, Dr. Charles F. Bryan, Jr., Dr. Fred P. Woodlief III, Catherine L. Leppert, J. Morton Eggleston, Margaret Bemiss, and David C. Reynolds.

More than a million Americans have Parkinson’s, a degenerative neurological disease for which there is no test and no cure. FitzGerald “Gerry” Bemiss was one of them. Before his death in early 2011 at 88, Gerry Bemiss’ life with Parkinson’s spanned nearly 30 years and was filled with a maze of challenges: getting an accurate diagnosis, finding specialists in the field, managing care and treatment, and maintaining a positive outlook. Like the spokes of a wheel, Parkinson’s presents a multidisciplinary array of symptoms and complications including movement disorders, depression, gastrointestinal problems, speech and swallowing issues, and energy loss. Bemiss and his wife, Margaret, spent much of their time hustling from one medical appointment to the other to address each issue as a separate piece of the Parkinson’s puzzle until they found their way to the McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Center’s Parkinson’s Disease Research, Educational and Clinical Center where a comprehensive approach helped to better diagnose and manage his disease. But the VA Center was available only to veterans, and Parkinson’s still had a hold on those without access to such a novel model of care. Today, things are different. Five years ago, the Bemisses took a leap of faith and made a million-dollar gift to Virginia Commonwealth University to establish the Bemiss Endowed Chair in Neurodegenerative Diseases. It was the first step in the School of Medicine’s plan to create a

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Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Center modeled after the VA Center and accessible to all. In five short years, with the help of the Bemiss’ pacesetting gift, $5 million has been raised to support the VCU Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Center, which officially opened this fall. Mr. Bemiss was first approached by Dr. Charles Bryan, a patient of Dr. Vincent Calabrese’s at the McGuire Clinic. Bryan was a member of an informal group of Richmond-area Parkinson’s patients known as the Movers and Shakers. He and David Reynolds, co-founder of the Movers and Shakers, with Dr. Calabrese, approached School of Medicine Dean, Dr. Jerome Strauss, about establishing a comprehensive Parkinson’s Disease Center at VCU. Impressed by the Movers and Shakers’ passion, and dedication, Strauss estimated an initial need of $10 million and offered to match their efforts dollar-for-dollar for the first $5 million raised. It was he and and his wife, Cathy, who convinced Mr. Bemiss that this project was more than a pipe dream. “I am tremendously grateful to all of the people who have contributed to the initiative,” said Mrs. Bemiss. “To the ones I know, and the ones I don’t know. Every gift is significant,” Mrs. Bemiss explained. “From $10 and $20 gifts, to contributions of more than $1 million, a lot of generous people worked very hard to get where we are today and are still working hard to keep the momentum going. This is a real triumph. I am very thankful that this is partly, and part of, Gerry’s legacy.” Mr. and Mrs. Bemiss were also thankful when Dr. James P. Bennett Jr., came to be the Bemiss Professor and Chair in Neurodegenerative Diseases, at the helm as Director of the new VCU Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Center. A leader in the field, Bennett is the former director of the University of Virginia’s Center for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases and aims to “put Parkinson’s disease in the history books.” Through the VCU Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders Center, which recently celebrated its official grand opening, he and his colleagues have created a “one-stop” collaborative resource for those who have the disease, for their families, for their physicians, for researchers and students, and for the community at large. The Center’s innovative programs are at work on multiple fronts. Outreach programs help educate the community about the disease and the Center’s work. Clinical evaluations bring different disciplines together to review a patient’s case, and electronic records to help keep a client’s care on track and up to date. And, ultimately, research moves the needle toward a test and a cure. “I want our clients at the Parkinson’s Center to live as long as their friends who don’t have Parkinson’s disease, and I want them to live as well,” said Bennett. “I’m confident we can achieve those goals.”


Paul Carnes Makes $25,000 Gift to Geriatrics In May 2011, Paul Carnes presented a $25,000 check to the MCV Foundation in support of Division of Geriatrics. Mr. Carnes is grateful for the care his father received while a patient at the VCU Medical Center and wanted to show his appreciation by making a gift. He also wanted his gift to honor Denise Lynch, RN, who cared for his father. During the check presentation, Mr. Carnes spoke about the “compassion his family has received from entire healthcare team and the wonderful care Lynch provided.” The Division of Geriatrics trains leaders who will provide clinical care for older people, teaches others how to care for older people and conducts research to better understand the aging process.

Photo: VCU Creative Services

Pictured from left to right are: Dr. Ralph R. Clark, Chief Medical Officer, VCU Health System; Denise Lynch, Access Support and Assistance Program (ASAP) Coordinator, VCUHS Administrative Nurse Liaison; Dr. John E. Nestler, Chair, Department of Internal Medicine; Paul R. Carnes; Dr. Peter A. Boling, Professor of Internal Medicine; Dr. Sheldon M. Retchin, Vice President for Health Sciences, VCU and CEO, VCU Health System; Dr. Harold F. Young, Director, Harold F. Young Neurosurgical Center; and Dr. William P. Kotti, President, MCV Foundation.

Real Estate Gift Benefits Otolaryngology

Photo: VCU Creative Services

From (left to right) are Mrs. Young Soon Shim, Dr. J. Marcus Shim and Dr. Laurence J. DiNardo

In December 2010, J. Marcus Shim (Housestaff ’82) and his wife, Young, made an extraordinary gift of real estate to the MCV Foundation. After 29 years in private practice, Dr. Shim retired in March 2010. Prior to his retirement, Dr. Shim contacted the MCV Foundation about giving his office building in Petersburg to the Foundation.

This gift will benefit the Residency Program in the Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery. The program provides comprehensive training in the medical and surgical care of patients with diseases affecting the ears, upper respiratory and aerodigesitve tracts, and related structures of the head and neck. Dr. Laurence J. DiNardo, Chair of the Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, stated, “We are extremely proud of the accomplishments of our graduates like Marcus who have gone on to thriving clinical practices. Marcus has been very generous to our department over many years, and this most recent gift is a testimony to his appreciation for the training he received here.” In addition to the office building, Dr. Shim gave the Foundation all the equipment and furnishings. Dr. DiNardo and his staff will use much of the equipment, such as an audio booth. The proceeds from the sale of the building will be used to establish an endowed fund to enhance the educational mission of the department. Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

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Dr. Debra Lyon Named First Collins-Teefey Professor The VCU School of Nursing is pleased to announce that Debra E. Lyon, Ph.D., R.N., FNP-BC, FNAP, FAAN, has been selected as the first professor to hold the Judith B. Collins and Joseph M. Teefey Distinguished Professorship in Nursing. Dr. Lyon received her B.S., M.S., post-master’s certificate and Ph.D. from the VCU School of Nursing. She served as a post-doctoral fellow sponsored by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Currently, Dr. Lyon is professor and chair of the VCU School of Nursing’s Department of Family and Community Health Nursing. She conducts NIH-funded research focusing on biobehavioral symptom management in women with breast cancer. A faculty member since 2004, Lyon’s teaching focuses on nursing research and advanced practice nursing. This fall Dr. Lyon was one of 142 nurse leaders nationwide inducted as a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, and she received the Alumni Star Award in Nursing from the VCU Alumni Association. “I am honored to have been selected as the first recipient of this Distinguished Professorship. As a quadruple alumna, I am especially proud to be a part of the School of Nursing’s growth, and I am happy and gratified to be able to focus my career as a teacher, researcher and administrator where I was once a student,” said Dr. Lyon. “We are extremely proud that Dr. Lyon’s commitment to nursing excellence is being recognized nationally and here at VCU,” said Dean Nancy F. Langston, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN. “She is an outstand-

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Chronicle of Giving Fall 2011

ing example of the high caliber of faculty and researchers who are providing visionary leadership and guidance to ensure our students remain among the best trained nurses in the country.” The Collins-Teefey Distinguished Professorship was originally established as the Judith B. Collins Distinguished Professorship through a leadership commitment by family, friends, grateful patients and colleagues to honor Ms. Judith B. Collins, MS, RN, WHNP, FAAN, for her distinguished career, lifelong commitment to women’s health and leadership on the faculty of the VCU School of Nursing. Earlier this year, the VCU Board of Visitors approved the VCU School of Nursing’s request to rename the fund the CollinsTeefey Distinguished Professorship. Ms. Collins asked that Mr. Teefey’s name be added in honor of his professional and personal commitment to health care, his financial contributions to and leadership in establishing the Collins Distinguished Professorship and the strength and beauty of their friendship and marriage. “Joe and I are thrilled with the appointment of Dr. Lyon to the Collins-Teefey Distinguished Professorship,” said Ms. Collins. “We enthusiastically support the ongoing excellence at the VCU School of Nursing with both faculty and students involved in teaching, research, clinical practice and community outreach – all embodied in Dr. Lyon!”

Top photo: Dr. Lyon received her Alumni Star Award from VCU President Michael Rao on October 21, 2011. / Photo: Dr. Stephanie L. Ferguson Bottom photo: Pictured are Joe Teefey and Judy Collins N’75, named parties for the Collins-Teefey Distinguished Professorship in the VCU School of Nursing. / Photo: CSI Studio


Photo: Fran Householder

Photo: Kevin Schindler

By: Nan Johnson

Pictured above (left to right): Dr. Ken Ellenbogen, Dr. Ian Nixon, Jack Congdon, Dr. Bill Kotti, and Teri Lovelace of The Community Foundation met to discuss Mr. Congdon’s gift benefitting the Division of Cardiology.

$1 1 Million Gift Pictured are Dr. Gordon Ginder, Director, VCU Massey Cancer Center (left) with Jack Condgon (right) in front of Mr. Congdon and his late wife’s named research wing.

Supports Cancer and Cardiology Research VCU Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Department of Internal Medicine’s Cardiology Division have each received a $500,000 gift from The Natalie & Jack Congdon Charitable Fund of The Community Foundation Serving Richmond and Central Virginia. The gifts will be used to support advancements in science and patient care. Given in memory of his late wife, Natalie, Mr. Congdon’s generous gifts are specifically dedicated to the Division of Cardiology’s Visiting Scholar program and Massey Cancer Center’s clinical trial research. A research wing providing space for researchers from five academic departments including medicine, pharmacology, chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and bio-chemistry has been named in the couple’s honor at Massey Cancer Center. The research impacts leukemia, lung and breast cancers while examining the structural composition of cancer and how it evolves. “Jack Congdon’s generous gift has given a wonderful boost to our current $100 million Research for Life campaign, and, on behalf of the entire team, I am thrilled to have his wonderful commitment to Massey’s clinical trials program,” said Dr. Gordon D. Ginder, Director, VCU Massey Cancer Center. “This gift is a partnership that will help to further the translation of vital research through clinical trials to the patient’s bedside, where it will hopefully have a life-prolonging impact.”

In addition to funding cancer research, Mr. Congdon’s gift also supports cardiac research through The Natalie and Jack Congdon Visiting Scholar in Cardiology. “Cardiologists who receive their training at VCU are at the forefront of the fight against heart disease and stroke,” said Dr. Kenneth Ellenbogen, Chair, Cardiology Division, VCU Department of Internal Medicine. “The Congdon Visiting Scholar endowment enables the VCU Pauley Heart Center to create and perfect new potentially life-saving procedures. We are so very grateful to Jack for his generosity and trust.” Visiting scholars attracted to the VCU Pauley Heart Center will spend one to two years at the Center working with faculty members and sharing their research. “Research helps distinguish us as an academic medical center of the highest caliber,” said MCV Foundation President, Dr. William P. Kotti. “Jack Congdon’s generous financial support helps students, faculty and our entire scientific community as we move toward creating solutions to humanity’s toughest health challenges.” “Natalie and I always considered the VCU Medical Center as one of the top in the country,” Mr. Congdon said. “She would be very pleased to know that our gifts to this wonderful institution will have such a long-range impact including new ideas from world-renowned cardiologists and cancer treatment research.”


MCV P.O. Box 980234 • Richmond, Virginia 23298-0234

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

PAID Permit No. 1182 Richmond, Virginia

Photo: Kevin E. Schindler

Chronicle of Giving | Fall 2011  

Medical College of Virginia Foundation Chronicle of Giving

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