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SPECIAL REPORT 2019

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

LLOYD

CONSTRUCTION BUILDING TUCSON FOR 50 YEARS

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VP, Lloyd Construction

Bill Lloyd Jr.

President, Lloyd Construction

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PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Brad Lloyd


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Building Tucson for 50 Years

Lloyd Construction Celebrates Quality, Longevity By Christy Krueger

A multi-generational family business that reaches 50 years with hopes of many more to go has good reason to celebrate. Lloyd Construction’s owners, President Bill Lloyd Jr. and VP Brad Lloyd, aren’t letting the occasion slip by quietly. They’re remembering and recognizing the employees, their families and the businesses who helped the company get to where it is today. The brothers have placed advertising on city buses commemorating the milestone and have plans for several appreciation events. The celebration will also be intertwined with many bittersweet memories – company founder Bill Lloyd Sr. passed away 12 years ago. Lloyd Construction has earned a reputation for quality work and relationships formed with project owners. “We do things right, we appreciate our team and we give back to the community,” Bill said. “We all leave a piece of ourselves in each project.” The proof is not only in the amount of repeat business Lloyd earns, but also www.BizTucson.com

in the consistency of recognition from the community. Lloyd Construction has won the Cornerstone Building Foundation’s Contractor of the Year Award five times in 25 years, an award a company is eligible to win only once every four years. It’s About Family

Though Tucson is dotted with highly visible examples of Lloyd Construction’s work over the last 50 years – buildings at the University of Arizona, hotels, medical centers, schools and everything in between – what stands out to the Lloyds are the people who have made it happen, many of them along for the ride for longer than Bill and Brad have been working for the company. Their stories of what Lloyd Construction means to them and why they stay are what sets the company apart, Brad said. “Our employee retention is high. We treat everyone like family – it’s how we were raised,” he said. The bond began with employees

long before Bill Jr. and Brad were old enough to work at the company that Bill Sr. started on a shoestring in 1969, borrowing money against his car to fund his first project. “Early on in my career I really didn’t know what to think of Bill Sr. He was kind of scary,” said Mike Gilbert, a project superintendent who has been with the company for 36 years. “Once I got to know him, it became clear. His logic was simple – a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work. “I really wish I could have learned more from him,” Gilbert said. “Bill Jr. and Brad follow the exact same principles – work hard and do a good job. The Lloyd family is so strong and has helped so many people, including their employees, that when they say extended family, they really mean it.” The mantra of “family” is so strong, there are countless stories of employees working in the community or helping each other all in the name of Lloyd Construction. continued on page 75 >>> Summer 2019

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BIOSPHERE 2 LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION OBSERVATORY LAB

About 19 years ago, I hired on with Lloyd Construc“ tion. I went to work for the Lloyd ‘family,’ and I can

SAHUARITA TOWN HALL

say that with great sincerity. Everyone at Lloyd works together like a family. Bill and Brad are like brothers to me, and I call Mrs. Lloyd, ‘Mom.’

– Peter Robertson, Project Superintendent ORO VALLEY AQUATIC CENTER

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Almost everywhere I go in the city, I can spot one “ of the company’s projects where I had a hand in the

PHOTOS: ERIK HINOTE

AC HOTEL TUCSON DOWNTOWN

EL CORREDOR

building. It makes me proud and makes me feel good to be part of Lloyd Construction Company.

– Ernesto Ortega, Project Superintendent

PLAZA COLONIAL

UA ROBY GYM

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They helped me through a really bad time when “ I lost my son and I honestly could not have done it without the support of the Lloyd Construction family. They strive to treat all their employees like family.

PHOTO: ERIK HINOTE

– Debbie Clark, Warranty & Closeout Manager

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UA COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

1. Martin Romo, Safety Coordinator and Matthew Unger, RSP - Safety Director 2. Taylor Mount, Project Engineer; Ross Avila, Estimator; Tom Stephens, Project Engineer; Matthew McCulloch, Project Engineer; Albert Flores, Project Engineer; Kris Robertson, Project Engineer 3. Robby Garvey, Project Manager; Amy Cotner, Project Manager; Drew Neptune, Project Manager; Matt Anderson, Project Manager; Paul Pena, LEED AP, Director Pre-construction Services

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continued from page 71 Anthony French, project superintendent, helps the Tucson Rodeo Parade Committee every year, keeping the historic wagons and buggies in working order so they can be used year after year. “It feels good to work on the wagons that have been in a parade that dates back to 1925 and will continue to be in the parade if they are taken care of,” French said. French was also part of a group of employees who were working on a project for the Vail Unified School District when they became aware that one of the school district’s employees had lost her home in a wildfire. “Mike Gilbert asked several of us if we would like to volunteer to clean up the property,” French said. “I knew that the Lloyds paid to rent equipment to help with cleanup and thought it would be great to help out. Mike Gilbert, Nick Georgiopolous, Jeremy Berryhill, Ray Prall and I spent a day there cleaning up the debris. The family was so grateful, they shared the story and it got published.” 4. Debbie Clark, Warranty and Closeout Manager; Clarie Pemberton, Office Manager; Shannon Murray, Marketing Director; Sina Goharriz, IT Director

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While the Lloyds like to say they build everything from outhouses to clean rooms, the type of work has varied throughout the years, sometimes dictated by the economy or building trends. “There’s always a first time for a type of project, but prior to taking it on, we do our research,” said Brad. “For the first one, there is a learning curve; from there it opens us up to do more.” Examples where one project has led to others include schools, detention centers, medical research labs and athletic facilities. “What makes us unique is that we are not defined by a niche,” Brad said. “By remaining local, we’ve had the honor of building whatever Tucson and the surrounding communities need – everything from municipal projects such as police and fire stations, courthouses and detention centers to public facilities such as museums, public parks, sports and recreation facilities, K-12, higher education and military facilities. We do private projects – hotels, apartments, office, retail, manufacturing, healthcare and more.” continued on page 77 >>> Summer 2019

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PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

Outhouses to Clean Rooms


BizCONSTRUCTION Lloyd Construction Support for Education In an effort to remove the stigma of construction as a “blue collar” job, Lloyd supports activities that raise the awareness of the value of a career in construction and the trades. Below are but a few examples from a long list of community activities. Skills USA Challenge Brings together kids for a weekend of competition. Lloyd Construction recently sponsored the TeamWorks contest that tests the skills of top-scoring contestants in carpentry, masonry, electrical and plumbing. They form teams for a project that involves all of these components. Schools involved included:

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Benson High School

VAIL THEATRE OF THE ARTS SAHUARO HIGH SCHOOL

Canyon Del Oro High School Catalina Magnet High School Cienega High School Pima County JTED at STAR Sahuarita High School San Manuel Jr./Sr. High School Santa Rita High School Star Academic High School Willcox High School

Southern Arizona Construction Career Days Gathers more than 2,000 students from area schools to the Tucson Rodeo Grounds to introduce them to the trades. In 2018, students who visited Lloyd’s booth had to read plans and assemble a geometric dome. In 2017, students assembled luxury dog houses, which were then auctioned off to benefit the Humane Society of Southern Arizona.

CANYON DEL ORO TRACK & STADIUM

Support for

• • • •

Tucson Mentoring Kids UA American Society of Civil Engineers Vail Pride Day and VailFest Bill Lloyd Sr. Scholarship benefiting UA College of Architecture Planning and Landscape Architecture students

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continued from page 75 “Because we’re local, we’re better able to serve the project owners,” Brad said. “We’re able to ensure superior quality at the time of construction and we remain the owner’s single-source contact through and long after warranty. We build relationships. Those relationships allow us to construct buildings.”

GENERAL MYER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

I accepted a job referral out of the carpenters’ “ union hall in 2003 for a three-day call out. I once

asked Shorty Pemberton why he had called out for a carpenter to work only three days. He replied, “After three days I would know if you were worth keeping.” Almost 16 years later I am still a part of the Lloyd family.

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

– Ron Serr, Project Superintendent

From left –

Debbie Clark Warranty and Closeout Manager Michelle McConnell Estimating Assistant Clarie Pemberton Office Manager

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Brad and Bill grew up in Tucson and are passionate about contributing to the community and supporting local nonprofit organizations. They donated work for the garden at Brandi Fenton Memorial Park and a playground at Ronald McDonald House. They often donate time and materials for organizations and efforts such as Volunteer Day for the Arizona Builders Alliance that benefits a different nonprofit each year. Lloyd employees participate in fundraisers and volunteer at a variety of local charitable organizations. The family atmosphere has been such that a few families have started at Lloyd Construction. Project superintendent Jerry Pemberton, also known as “Shorty,” and office manager Clarie Pemberton have a unique office romance story. Soon after Clarie went to work for Lloyd, she recognized Shorty. She went to her childhood diary and realized the two had danced together in junior high school in 1963. After parting ways for 30 years, they were reunited as Lloyd employees and later married. Recently, the Pembertons suffered a tragic loss when their great grandson died while waiting for a liver transplant. A family friend had set up a GoFundMe account for the transplant and Lloyd Construction made a generous donation. “He passed away, but I want people to know the kind of loving family the Lloyds are,” Clarie said in sharing the story. The funds will cover medical and funeral expenses. Tim Shute, who has been with Lloyd almost all of its 50 years, mostly as a project superintendent, is thankful for the work and the relationships he’s formed there. “It’s the best company I ever worked for,” he said. “It has been a blessing for me.” Biz Summer 2019

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Family and Community are Foremost


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MEINEL OPTICAL

Tim Shute

Tim Shute has worked at Lloyd Construction for 49 years – longer than either of its owners, Bill and Brad Lloyd. Shute fondly remembers the sons of the late founder, Bill Lloyd Sr., making regular appearances in the office when they were very young. “Bill Jr. was giving me orders when he was six or seven,” Shute said.

MLK APARTMENTS

Shute was working for a Tucson homebuilder before being hired by Lloyd Construction. He went through the Association of General Contractors’ superintendent training program at Pima Community College. In 1999, he became Lloyd’s senior project superintendent.

KINO HEALTH CENTER

PHOTOS: ERIK HINOTE

Through the years Shute earned multiple certifications and gained extensive experience, honing his skills in varous aspects of construction such as logistics, safety and security.

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Medical, science and technology projects are among his forte. “I was at the University of Arizona for 14 years and built many of the labs constructed during that time,” Shute said. “I built everything from tuberculosis labs to clean rooms.” The Sarver Heart Center and the Meinel Optical Sciences Building are two well-known campus projects that Shute oversaw. “For a different organization, we’re building an eight-acre facility with labs to develop corn that can be grown anywhere,” Shute said. “The final stage will be installing automated, intelligent equipment that will maintain a consistent environment in the greenhouse. That’s what I love about this job, there is always something new to learn.” www.BizTucson.com


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From the Ground Up Bill Lloyd Sr. Built a Generational Company By Christy Krueger It’s emotional when Lloyd Construction team members talk about their company’s founder, Bill Lloyd Sr., who passed away in 2007. He left behind a wife and three sons – two sons, Brad and Bill, now run the business. But they aren’t the only ones at the company who consider him family. “I miss him dearly,” said Tim Shute, a project superintendent and a Lloyd employee for almost 50 years. “He was like a brother to me and a great mentor.” Bill’s story and therefore the story of Lloyd Construction began in Hoopeston, Illinois, where Bill grew up on a farm while suffering with severe asthma, said Brad. “When he graduated high school, he weighed a whopping 96 pounds and he was slowly suffocating.” In 1959, Tucson was a place where people with respiratory problems and illnesses would come to deal with their health issues, taking advantage of the dry air. “One day his uncle told him to get www.BizTucson.com

in the truck and he drove him down to Tucson,” Brad recounted. “He dropped him off at the steps of Bear Down (Gym), gave him $50, told him he loved him, and went back to Illinois.” With no other family in Tucson to lean on, Bill registered for school at the University of Arizona and began working his way through college. “He lived in Santa Cruz dorm,” Brad said. “To support himself he did landscaping work on the highway, he was an RA in his dorm, he sold programs at the UA football games, he served ice cream at Austin’s Ice Cream Parlor on Country Club and Broadway and he did concrete work whenever available.” While enrolled at UA, he met his future wife, Barbara. The two married and she worked to help support them while he completed his engineering degree. Bill eventually took a job with real-estate developer Del Webb in Las Vegas. Being a young superintendent with Del Webb meant being moved frequently. It was not how Bill wanted to raise his family. He made the deci-

sion to go back to where he felt most at home – Tucson. Brad said Bill Sr. had plenty of job offers when he got back, but was taken by the urge to open his own business. “It was funny because they had absolutely nothing,” Brad said. “They had their clothes and their two vehicles. So he took his Ford Bronco to the bank and got a loan on it.” It was enough to fund Lloyd Construction’s first project, building outhouses on Mount Lemmon for the Girl Scouts. Before long, the word was out on Lloyd Construction. Shute was working for a homebuilder as a cement finisher when a friend told him about Lloyd Construction, a new company doing a lot of concrete work. Shute was hired and the first large job he worked on was pouring concrete slabs for University Medical Center. “We started building $1 million homes in the ’70s,” Shute recalled. “There was one other employee; we were both laborers. We did three or continued on page 83 >>> Summer 2019

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continued from page 81 “We started building the company again and hiring people four homes, then switched. Bill Sr. preferred commercial conback,” Bill said. struction. We went to D-M (Davis-Monthan) and built dorms As the company grew, new employees were added to keep and houses there.” up with the workload. That included Clarie Pemberton and Although Barbara is no longer actively involved in the busiJerry “Shorty” Pemberton, who both went to work for Lloyd ness, she had a strong presence from the start. “She was an inat almost the same time in the strumental part in the foundation early 1990s. They were not marof Lloyd Construction,” Bill said, ried to each other when they listing her roles as office clerk, acstarted at Lloyd, but are now countant, materials delivery and procurement person. He vividly husband and wife. remembers her moving equipWhen discussing memorable ment from site to site using her times, Shorty remembered a crew cab, one-ton, manual-transparticular company Christmas mission truck. party. “I put on my city clothes According to Bill, Barbara was and shaved my mustache. I went also frequently in charge of apup to Bill Sr. and he didn’t recogplying for and picking up permits, nize me. He told Bill to ‘get rid which involved hauling her ramof that salesman.’ ” bunctious sons to the permitting With Lloyd Construction office downtown. “It’s been said reaching its half-century mileshe could get a permit processed stone this year, Bill and Brad – Bill Lloyd Jr. faster than anyone in town berecognize their dad’s achievePresident cause they couldn’t wait to get ments in building the company Lloyd Construction ‘those Lloyd boys’ out of there.” and for their own opportunity to There were dark times, too, grow up in it. “To have a secondsuch as when Bill Sr. was diaggeneration business, especially in nosed with cancer and he planned to shut down the company. construction, working with people for 50 years – it’s a source Bill and Brad held it together with three staff members. And of pride,” Bill said. “We still have the older generation and the for a while their middle brother, Bryan, who owned a successnew generation, and we take care of each other.” ful business of his own, came in to help. Biz

To have a second-generation business, especially in construction, working with people for 50 years – it’s a source of pride.

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The

Faces Behind Superintendents In Charge By Mary Minor Davis

There are countless examples of Lloyd Construction’s award-winning work throughout the region: the AC Hotel Tucson Downtown, Vail Academy and High School, the Oro Valley Aquatic Center and more. It’s easy to appreciate the quality of these and other noteworthy projects, but what often goes unnoticed are the many moving parts and people behind the scenes in the construction of these diverse buildings. The people at the center of it all – overseeing the machinations of multiple people, actions and environments – are the superintendents of Lloyd

Construction. They are the ringmasters that make magic happen. “These people are completely in charge,” said Bill Lloyd Jr., president and co-owner of the company along with brother, Brad, who serves as VP. “They are the first people on the job in the morning and the last to lock up at night. These are the folks who make sure everyone goes home safely at the end of the day.” The responsibilities of Lloyd’s 15 superintendents embody the entire construction process – a myriad of responsibilities that include managing the surveyors; following the protocols

for permitting, utilities installation and materials management; safety, quality control; managing the subcontractors, and more. “They are absolutely in charge of everything – and accountable for everything,” Bill said. All but two of Lloyd’s superintendents have come up through the company ranks over the years. Mike Gilbert, Peter Robertson, Tim Shute and Shorty Pemberton have nearly 150 years of combined experience with Lloyd. Bill Lloyd describes them as the “geniuses” of the team because he has yet to see a construction challenge they haven’t

1. Project Superintendents Jason Mejias, Mike Gilbert, Shorty Pemberton, Peter Robertson 2. Project Superintendents Sean Heydel, Dennis Manley, Max Mejia

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the Buildings been able to solve – even when others have said it couldn’t be done. One example was at a renovation at the 390th Memorial Museum at the Pima Air & Space Museum. The 390th museum is dedicated to the 390th Bombardment Group that fought in World War II. One of the museum’s irreplaceable treasures is the J-Wall, which features signatures of many veterans of the 390th Bombardment Group. The plaster wall needed to be moved and no one thought it could be done without destroying it, or at a minimum, damaging it.

“Our guys figured it out. They created a movable bracing system from recycled, on-site job materials at no cost to the owner,” said Brad. “The elaborate cradling system allowed them to remove and relocate the wall without the loss of a single signature. The skill level these guys have, it’s amazing.” “We’ve got kids and grandkids in schools here,” Pemberton said. “We want to build things that are safe. People know we are associated with Lloyd, and they’ll tell us if we’re not getting it right.” As the superintendents discuss the vast footprint of their responsibilities,

there is a moment when the magnitude hits home. “It’s scary when you stop and think about it,” Pemberton said. “We don’t think about it. We do what we’ve got to do,” Gilbert said. “We put our boxing gloves on and go to work every morning and do what we can to help everyone get the job done right and safely.” The superintendents share how they worked up through the ranks in the trades, pushed by their fathers to earn a living and to always do it right. They share that knowledge with young peocontinued on page 86 >>>

3. Project Superintendents Ernesto Ortega, Ron Serr, Lalo Hernandez, Howard Smith, Brian Prescott, Chris Velasquez and Adam Pearson

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continued from page 85 ple coming on the job today. They mentor those who want to learn, cultivating that passion for wanting to work with their hands. The challenge today is finding those young people who want to work hard on the job. A stigma has grown up around construction, labeling it “blue collar” and devaluing the importance of trades today. Bill Lloyd says the industry is really “the heart of the community.” Lloyd Construction has been working to bring technical education back to the schools, and Brad says he devotes a lot of time supporting JTED (Joint Technological Education District), career days and other venues that allow him to speak on the value of working in the trades toward a career in construction. “What sets these guys apart,” said

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Bill, pointing to his superintendents, “is that we have individuals who are willing to pass down their decades of knowledge to anyone on the job site – Lloyd employee or subcontractor. Whether safety training or skills training, we invite our subcontractors to join us on site or in a classroom setting, whenever we host an internal training.” “We care about our owners and we care about the product,” Gilbert said. “If we need to keep the job moving, the Lloyd team has skilled craftspeople and laborers that allow us to self-perform in support of our subcontractors to stay on schedule. We’re just like a bunch of cowboys. We’ve got each other’s back.” One of the most important components of the superintendent’s job is quality control. Bad inspections can

ruin a company, not only in the regulatory world, but also in the community overall. This puts the superintendent on the front line to ensure inspections happen on time – and are passed every time. “The inspections are a big part of the job,” Pemberton said. “The job is our reputation. Inspectors know we’ll do it right, and that’s why we have great relations with them.” Robertson agreed. “This,” he added, holding up a cell phone to allude to technology, “isn’t going to get up at 2 in the morning and go make sure concrete is poured right. It’s needed for certain aspects of the industry, but at the end of the day, it’s all about the people building the buildings.”

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PHOTOS: ERIK HINOTE

390TH MEMORIAL MUSEUM J-WALL


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HISTORIC TRAIN DEPOT

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PHOTO: ERIK HINOTE

Making the Old New Again Restoration Projects a Welcome Challenge By Christy Krueger Brad Lloyd loves the challenge of restofor the original source of material to use. ration projects. As the VP at Lloyd Con“When we work on anything historical, struction, he’s gained plenty of experiwe have to match the existing features,” ence from the company’s work on projects Brad said. where the old becomes new. If the original material is no longer Structures don’t have to be on the Naavailable, they replicate the look with totional Register of Historic Places to be day’s material. They also bring old buildconsidered historic. But to fit the definiings up to code, make them compliant tion, they must be at with the Americans with least 50 years old and Disabilities Act, and add historically significant, energy-saving devices. Brad said. That gener“Restoration can ally means the building be more difficult than is important on a local, new construction,” state or national level, is said Shannon Murray, tied to a historic event, is Lloyd’s marketing dia pristine example of an rector. “There are a lot architectural style, or it of unknowns about the was designed by a master original construction, architect. so there can be unex“Even if it’s not on pected issues.” Almost as the National Register, we challenging is the short – Brad Lloyd have to take care of it like time window for UA VP it is to maintain the culresidence hall projects Lloyd Construction tural history of the build– most must be finished ing,” said Brad. within the 75-day winLloyd has worked on several residence dow during the school’s summer breaks. “To accomplish this, we run multiple halls at the UA that date back decades, some to the early years of the university. crews 23 hours a day, seven days a week “The basic issues with the halls is the with specific tasks scheduled down to the plumbing, electrical, fire sprinklers and hour,” said Brad. ventilation,” Brad said. “We tear out the One of Lloyd’s most visible and exold and put in new. It allows buildings to tensive projects was downtown’s Historic have a new life because they have new inTrain Depot, originally built in 1907. frastructure.” “The depot basically had wood trusses In updating older buildings, Lloyd team and an A-frame structure. It had deteriomembers try to save whatever they can, rated over the years from being vacant, but when that’s not possible, they search continued on page 92 >>>

PHOTO: COURTESY LLOYD CONSTRUCTION

We bring in a new heart and soul for the building.

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HISTORIC RESTORATION

HISTORIC RESTORATION

continued from page 91 and we had to be really creative with this one,” Brad said. The terrazzo floors and tile walls needed to be patched. Lloyd had to find the original mine for the material to match the terrazzo floor. They went to Mexico to find the match for the tile. “Instead of removing and replacing the historic windows, we researched and figured out how to make the existing windows look brand new,” Brad said. “We sandblasted the windows with walnut shells. This was unheard of in Tucson at the time.” The process saved the City of Tucson a substantial amount of money while preserving the historic features of the Depot. For Brad, the extra work was worthwhile. “I can’t tell you how proud I am every time I see it.” Lloyd’s latest restoration endeavor is the historic Pima County Courthouse with its signature dome – a symbol of Tucson. “We’re remodeling the inside of the building while protecting the historic aspects,” Brad said. In the Dillinger Courtroom, which will serve as a museum, the woodwork, plaster ceilings and judge’s bench will be restored. There will also be an audio museum piece that will tell the history of the courthouse. Lloyd’s restoration work includes providing the owner with documentation of utilities and systems that are underground and in walls where they’re not visible. “When we build, we document everything. It’s part of turning over a project. We give them everything we can,” Brad said. The Lloyd’s long history in Tucson and their attachment to the community gives them a great appreciation for the buildings and their past stories. “We take a building with an iconic presence and make it safe and functional again,” Brad said. “We bring in a new heart and soul for the building.”

PHOTO: COURTESY LLOYD CONSTRUCTION

UA DORM – YUMA HALL

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When I started working at Lloyd Construction, “ my father had passed away and my mother, sister,

and brothers eventually moved out of Arizona. At that time, I didn’t realize that I needed to fill a void. The folks at Lloyd Construction did just that. With support, strength, and compassion, they have empowered my growth as a person.

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– Amy Cotner, Project Manager www.BizTucson.com


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Mud Huts to Smart Buildings

Technology Now a Big Part of Construction By Mary Minor Davis The construction industry has been evolving since the dawn of man. Mud huts and stone monoliths brought an end to nomadic life and eventually led to urbanization. Thousands of years later, the Industrial Revolution that began in the 18th century changed by leaps and bounds how we build things. Today, revolutionary advances in everything from project management software to building materials have turned the construction industry into a leader in human and process advancement. Lloyd Construction has immersed itself in the newest technologies, realizing countless benefits in all aspects of how it does business. “It was not so long ago when you showed up on the job with a Yankee screwdriver and a hand saw as your primary tools of the trade,” said Jason Mejias, a project superintendent at Lloyd. “We transmitted proposals and plans via fax machine, struggling to make copies of 42-inch-by-30-inch diagrams on copy machines geared for 8½-by-11, not to mention the expense of purchasing plan sets for each subcontractor. Pagers drove you to a landline to connect, and then there was the bulky bag phone where maybe you could find a signal to call and connect on a job site.” Flash forward just 30 years later and technology has changed everything. From cordless tools to smartphones, web-based applications and greener materials, Lloyd builds with responsible choices that are efficient, affordable and long-lasting, www.BizTucson.com

All those faxes and fuzzy copies? Now there’s technology that allows everyone on the project team to access all documents digitally in real time online, be they CAD-based images, schematics

It was not so long ago when you showed up on the job with a Yankee screwdriver and a hand saw as your primary tools of the trade. – Jason Mejias Project Superintendent Lloyd Construction

or other documents converted to PDFs. “Technology has made it a lot easier to communicate across the board,” said Dennis Manley, also a superintendent. “Many of the unknowns are removed, and it provides real-time collaboration.” Robotics, drones, video technology and web- and cloud-based platforms all ensure that everyone on the project

team is up-to-date with progress and changes on any given job. From there, project managers and superintendents can use the information to assess quality and timing on the job site, marrying the human element with data that once took days – even weeks – to reach the team. New construction materials and preengineered parts simplify construction and add to the durability and quality of a given project. Perhaps one of the greatest changes on the site is the use of prefabrication. In lieu of building on site, entire sections of buildings can be assembled compartmentally and then put in place by a crane. “It takes less manpower; quality control is much better because it’s all right there in front of you,” Mejias said. “You can actually sheet and insulate walls, put in utilities and then set them in place. If you can prefab, that’s always exciting.” Motion detectors and timing systems for energy platforms help reduce energy use. Building automation in general is now the norm – smart buildings that can run entire facilities with a computer. Green projects are also a regular part of the business, said Brad Lloyd, VP of the company. LEDs, solar panels, low volatile organic compounds and higher thermal insulation systems are now generally part of any architectural plan. “It is the responsibility of any contractor to build respectfully to the Earth,” Lloyd said.

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Summer 2019

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BizTucson 97


BizCONSTRUCTION

98 BizTucson

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Summer 2019

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Summer 2019

>>>

BizTucson 99


100 BizTucson

<<<

Summer 2019

www.BizTucson.com

Profile for BizTucson Magazine

Lloyd Construction Special Report 2019  

Building Tucson for 50 Years

Lloyd Construction Special Report 2019  

Building Tucson for 50 Years

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