__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

SPRING FALL 2012 2020

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

C I TY WELLNESS OF

&

SPECIAL REPORTS: University of Arizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine Patio Pools & Spas www.BizTucson.com

SPRING 2020 • $3.99 • DISPLAY UNTIL 06/30/20


www.BizTucson.com

Winter 2018

>>>

BizTucson 195


www.BizTucson.com

Winter 2018

>>>

BizTucson 195


Talk about timing... After months of brainstorming, planning meetings, interviews, writing, photo shoots, graphic design and proofing, we were ready to publish the Spring edition of BizTucson with a cover package focusing on our remarkable “City of Wellness.” Then two words changed the world – coronavirus and pandemic. This is  definitely the most ironic turn of events in my publishing career. As we went to press, the U.S. government had declared a national emergency concerning the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Schools, businesses, places of worship, arts and sports events, fundraisers and business functions were postponed or cancelled. Some store shelves were bare and people began to “shelter in place” and “self-quarantine” in their homes. This is an unprecedented life-threatening crisis facing our nation and our planet. This  global pandemic is a rapidly evolving story putting  every human being  at risk. National, state and local governments are urging citizens to take every precaution to avoid exposure. Yet here at home, we are fortunate to have very few cases in Tucson and Pima County. We are prepared. So there is no need to “Stop The Presses!” as the  oldtime newsroom command goes. In fact, our region’s health and wellness assets are more vitally important than ever. In this issue Donna Kreutz writes, “In the early 1970s, health visionary Dr. Andrew Weil introduced mainstream medicine to an integrative healthcare approach. In 1979, Mel and Enid Zuckerman founded Canyon Ranch to re-introduce healthy habits to those who overindulged – bringing the life-changing spa experience to men as well as women. Dr. Thomas Grogan relentlessly pursued a diagnostic tool that revolutionized cancer care and in 1985 founded Ventana Medical Systems (now Roche Tissue Diagnostics), which then attracted other bioscience companies. Weil changed medicine. The Zuckermans changed the spa industry. Little wonder that the University of Arizona became a beacon of bioscience and medicine – or that Tucson became known as the City of Wellness. This report spotlights some of our health-conscious assets. Over the past four decades, the region’s $2.5 billion tourism industry has benefitted from the creation of internationally renowned spas Canyon Ranch and Miraval. Our region’s other world-class resorts also boast on-site spa services. Here in the Sonoran Desert we have the full spectrum of natural assets that draw visitors and add quality of life for our residents. 4 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Photo: Steven Meckler

BizLETTER

In this edition, we feature Dr. Thomas Grogan’s memoir “Chasing the Invisible,” the inside story of his miraculous discoveries and how he changed the face of cancer diagnostics. Since the founding of Ventana Medical Systems, this region has become a bioscience haven, now home to more than 30 companies. Grogan made his initial discoveries when he was a professor and pathologist at the University of Arizona. Roche recently announced a timely breakthrough – a diagnostic test for the novel coronavirus that can be processed in just 3.5 hours. In a Special Report on the 25th Anniversary of the University of Arizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, Monica Surfaro Spigelman quotes Dr. Weil: “The term ‘integrative medicine’ is now totally accepted in academic discourse – and poised to influence changes in healthcare. The majority of the nation’s medical schools now have Integrative Health initiatives either in clinical care, research or education.” Our next Special Report is the 50th Anniversary of Patio Pools & Spas, a homegrown success story. Gene and Nicole Ragel share their family’s passion for design and building excellence, their newly forged partnership with Poolwerx and their vision for the future of their business. We hope you relish this issue (wrapped in plastic for your protection) – and that you will help our community pull together and focus on the positive during uncertain times. Tucson has shown that it can weather adversity and we will continue to do so – again and again. We offer our sincere wishes for the well-being of our entire community and fervently hope we all support one another through these trying times. In the spirit of wellness...

Spring 2020

Volume 12 No. 1

Publisher & Owner

Steven E. Rosenberg Brent G. Mathis

Creative Director Contributing Editors

Donna Kreutz Tara Kirkpatrick Romi Carrell Wittman Elena Acoba Diane Luber

Contributing Technology Director

Mike Serres

Contributing Project Coordinator

Maricela Robles

Contributing Writers

Elena Acoba Mary Minor Davis Jay Gonzales Tara Kirkpatrick Tiffany Kjos Donna Kreutz Christy Krueger Tom Leyde David Pittman Steve Rivera Monica Surfaro Spigelman Romi Carrell Wittman Contributing Photographers

Lea Irene Dean Kelly Brent G. Mathis Chris Mooney David Sanders Balfour Walker Member:

American Advertising Federation Tucson DM-50 Southern Arizona Leadership Council Sun Corridor Inc. Tucson Metro Chamber Visit Tucson

BizTucson Phone: 520.299.1005 Subscription Information:

www.BizTucson.com subscriptions@BizTucson.com Advertising information:

Steve Rosenberg 520.299.1005 or 520.907.1012 steve@BizTucson.com BizTucson is published quarterly by Rosenberg Media, LLC., Tucson, AZ © 2020 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in columns or articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

POSTMASTER:

Steven E. Rosenberg Publisher & Owner BizTucson

Biz

Please send address changes to: BizTucson, 4729 East Sunrise Drive, #505 Tucson, AZ 85718. www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 5


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 7


8 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 9


10 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 11


BizCONTENTS

FEATURES

SPRING 2020 VOLUME 12 NO. 1

COVER STORY:

116 164

35 37 44 48 50 54 56 60 64 66 68 70 74

TUCSON: A CITY OF WELLNESS BizHEALTH Bioscience Startups Find Success University of Arizona Health Sciences BizBIOSCIENCE Dr. Thomas Grogan’s New Memoir BizEQUINE Therapeutic Ranch for Animals & Kids Therapeutic Riding of Tucson BizCYCLING The Loop Gets Tucson Moving BizFITNESS JCC’s Wheel of Wellness BizSPA The Cachet of Canyon Ranch Miraval, a World-Renowned Getaway BizTOURISM Allure of Southern Arizona Resorts & Spas BizEDUCATION UArizona College of Pharmacy Expansion BizHEALTH HealthOn University Opens

DEPARTMENTS

112

12 BizTucson

<<<

Spring Spring2020 2020

4 24 30 32 76 80

BizLETTER From the Publisher BizWORKFORCE The Future of Work BizMINING Modular Mining Expansion BizEDUCATION Southern New Hampshire University BizTECHNOLOGY The Refinery: New Project – Tech Park at The Bridges BizDESIGN ASID Commercial Design Awards

110 112 116

WOMEN WHO LEAD BizPHILANTHROPY Pam Grissom – WFSA Woman of The Year BizLEADERSHIP Susan Gray, Tucson Electric Power Danette Bewley, Tucson Airport Authority

76 118 122 128 132 160 162 164 168 170

BizMILITARY New Military Lounge BizCONSTRUCTION New Projects in the Region BizREALESTATE CCIM Commercial Real Estate Forecast Honorees BizAUTOMOTIVE Pima Community College Automotive Training Center BizSALES Sales Guru Jeffrey Gitomer BizBANKING WaFd Bank BizREALESTATE Rick Kauffman, Holualoa Companies BizHR Better Workplaces, Better World BizTRIBUTE Gerald Swanson

SPECIAL REPORTS

81

SPECIAL REPORT 2020

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

ANDREW WEIL CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

25th Anniversary

ABOUT THE COVER CITY OF WELLNESS Creative Design by Brent G. Mathis Hiking photography courtesy of Canyon Ranch

University of Arizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine 25th Anniversary

137 SPECIAL REPORT 2020

THE REGION’S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

PAT I O POOLS & S PA S 50 YEARS SERVING ARIZONA

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

Patio Pools & Spas 50th Anniversary

BizTucson 137

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 13


6 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 7


8 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 9


10 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 11


12 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 13


14 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 15


Dr. Robert C. Robbins President University of Arizona

The Future of Work

Tech Prowess, Adaptability Key for New Workforce By Tara Kirkpatrick The speaker at the podium was embarrassed to realize he didn’t have his notes. Then, a charming robot on wheels brought them to him, along with a Diet Coke and a friendly greeting. The funny, staged exchange at a recent community event between University of Arizona President Robert C. Robbins and a food delivery robot demonstrated how man and machine might work together. “The Future of Work: How to Thrive in an Automated Workplace,” held at UArizona in January, was organized by the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, UArizona Eller College of Management, Sun Corridor Inc., Pima Association of Governments and Community Foundation of Southern Arizona. Media sponsors included the Arizona Daily Star and Arizona Public Media. 24 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

“For the last 100 years, automation has changed the way this country works,” said Ron Shoopman, treasurer of the Arizona Board of Regents and former SALC president. “It has brought challenges, but also opportunities. We find ourselves in another period of significant change. How do we respond?” The next workforce will witness the Fourth Industrial Revolution – the focus of a book by World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab – in which biological, physical and digital worlds will fuse, impacting all disciplines, economies and industries. It will fundamentally change what it means to be human. To stay relevant, people must adapt and learn to thrive in an increasingly automated workforce that will see some jobs replaced and others created. About four in 10 jobs, or about 154,000 jobs, in Pima County are at

risk of going away, said George Hammond, director of the Eller Economic and Business Research Center. The lowest-skilled jobs, along with those with repetitive tasks, will be the first to face automation. Food preparation and service; farming, forestry and fishing; building maintenance; production; and sales are among the most susceptible industries. “Machines won’t take all of our jobs,” Hammond said, “but job disruptions are coming.” Industries that will face less risk for automation include education, community and social services, management, architecture, engineering and healthcare because they require sophisticated creativity and vital human interaction. Still, “more and more, we will work with smart machines,” he told the audience. www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: DAVID SANDERS

BizWORKFORCE


From left – Mara Aspinall, Managing Director, BlueStone Venture Partners; Calline Sanchez, VP, IBM Systems Lab Services; Anthony Cook, G.M., AHS Center of Excellence, Komatsu; Robert Brown, Public Affairs and Government Relations Director, TuSimple; Paul Dias, President, CEO, COO, Dias Management Top right – Ron Shoopman, Arizona Board of Regents Bottom right – George Hammond, Director, Eller Economic and Business Research Center. For example, the food delivery robot that helped Robbins is one of 38 that currently roam Northern Arizona University, bringing food from campus restaurants to students. The popular robots, summoned by an app, can cross streets, climb curbs, travel at night and operate in rain and snow. UArizona students are using an app to access free primary healthcare through their cell phones. The app, created by Seattle startup 98point6, lets students consult with doctors on health issues any time of day, Robbins said. In the event’s roundtable discussion, companies revealed more of what’s coming. TuSimple, a San Diego transportation company with offices in Tucson, aims to put driverless semitrucks on the roads by 2021. That will help fill a shortage of 50,000 long-haul drivers – a deficit expected to hit 175,000, said Robert Brown, TuSimple’s director of public affairs and government relations. The company tests the trucks on routes between Tucson and Phoenix. “We are pegged as a disruptor, but we are trying to be a positive disruptor,” Brown told the audience. “Young people are not going into trucking. We are focused on solving that long-haul stretch.” www.BizTucson.com

Food giant McDonald’s has an app that could soon identify users’ meal preferences as soon as they breach the “geofence” around a restaurant building, said Paul Dias, president, CEO and COO of Dias Management, which oversees 15 McDonald’s locations in Southern Arizona. “Once you break the entrance barrier, we start gathering data on your ordering habits, with your permission. You will be welcomed by name and asked if you would like your usual.” McDonald’s is also looking for employees who can help customers order food on kiosks and make them feel comfortable with the new technology, Dias said. “Adaptability is critical to their ability to perform the job. We are not looking for fewer employees, but the skills we are looking for today are different than a few years ago.” Adaptability is just one skill that workers will need to stay relevant, said leaders from UArizona, Pima Community College and the Pima Joint Technical Education District. Advanced IT and basic digital knowledge, complex information processing, entrepreneurship and leadership will also be in high demand in tomorrow’s workforce. UArizona’s Eller College of Management, which oversees top programs in

management information systems and entrepreneurship, has a strategic plan “built around preparing students for the next industrial revolution,” said Paulo Goes, the college’s dean. Eller houses both an artificial intelligence lab and a tech garage for its students. Fridays at Eller, when there are no classes, focus on technology and machine learning workshops, Goes said. Pima Community College, which boasts a nationally ranked aviation training program, has partnered with the Arizona Cyber Warfare Range at its East Campus to offer cutting-edge cybersecurity classes. The school is also leading a multicollege project to add 3,000 new apprenticeships in automated manufacturing. “We are improving student success and the student experience,” said David Dore, Pima’s president of campuses and executive vice chancellor. Pima JTED is launching tech programs that include drone transportation, robotics, optics and innovation, said JTED CEO Kathy Prather. “We need to disrupt how education has been delivered,” she said. “We are helping students develop what we see as the new currency.”

Biz Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 25


26 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2011

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2011

>>>

BizTucson 27


BizBRIEFS

Timothy Medcoff Attorney Timothy Medcoff is serving a one-year term as chair of the Tucson Metro Chamber’s board of directors. He succeeds Barbi Reuter, Cushman & Wakefield|PICOR president, who served since July 2018. Medcoff is co-managing partner of Farhang & Medcoff. He is a board member of Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern Arizona and has served on the boards of Therapeutic Riding of Tucson and Parent Aid Child Abuse Prevention. Biz

Dr. Nikki Castel Dr. Nikki Castel has been named the new COO of Carondelet St. Joseph’s Hospital. Castel previously was assistant administrator at the Abrazo West Campus hospital in Goodyear and provided healthcare consulting with McKinsey & Company, a consumer marketing research firm. She earned her medical degree from the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine after receiving a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Arizona State University. She was a plastic surgeon in New Jersey. Biz 28 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 29


PHOTOS: COURTESY MODULAR MINING

BizMINING

Center inset photo from left – Richard Fimbres, Tucson Ward 5 city council member; Jorge Mascena, CEO, Modular Mining; Greg Lanz, VP Business Development, Modular Mining; Ramón Valadez, Pima County District 2 Supervisor; Tom Murphy, Mayor, Town of Sahuarita.

Modular Mining Puts Customers in Driver’s Seat

Tucson Expansion Cements Role as Mining Hub By Tom Leyde What better way to explain mining than to put people in the driver’s seat? That’s what Modular Mining is doing at its Tucson headquarters. The company opened its new Customer Experience Center in January with a grand opening celebration that also marked the firm’s 40th anniversary. At the CEC opening, mining leaders and public officials could sit in installations that simulated driving a massive mining haul truck and operating a gargantuan power shovel. A monitor replicated the truck and shovel controls, giving users a very realistic experience. “Our new Customer Experience Center is designed to showcase how mine management solutions can improve safety, efficiency and productivity of mining operations...,” said Jorge Mascena, president and CEO of Modular Mining. It marks the company’s third renovation project in six years at its facility at 30 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

3289 E. Hemisphere Loop. It expanded its corporate campus in 2014 to include a building dedicated to research and development. “Tucson is evolving into a key mining technology hub and this expansion demonstrates our commitment to leading this transformation as a long-term member of this community,” Mascena said. The CEC also features a display of minerals and crystals, classrooms, mining exhibits and a long rectangular screen that shows video of mining operations. The CEC, which took 18 months to build, gives customers a sense of the technology behind Modular Mining, but it will also assist in training employees, said Greg Lanz, VP of business development. “It’s a win-win for mining companies and workers, making them safer and more productive,” he said. Modular Mining expects about 1,000

people to visit the CEC annually. Founded in 1979 by a professor and three graduate students at the University of Arizona, Modular Mining revolutionized the mining industry with its development of the DISPATCH Fleet Management System. The system improved the productivity and efficiency of open pit mining. That led to development of the ProVision High-Precision Machine Guidance System, the MineCare Maintainance Management System and others. In 1996, Komatsu, a global leader in mining equipment design, acquired a controlling interest in Modular Mining. Komatzu employs more than 800 people worldwide, with nearly 400 located in Tucson. It has mining operations in 10 countries, including the United States.

Biz www.BizTucson.com


Trust The Clements Team To Protect You & Your Business The Clements Agency, LLC is a member of Trusted Choice®, offering the smart way to buy insurance. Trusted Choice® agents and brokers represent multiple insurance companies, offering you a variety of coverage choices and customized plans to meet your specialized needs. Most importantly, as Trusted Choice® agents we are not employees of an insurance company, so you have someone who works for you, not the company.

P ro p e r t y I n s u r a n c e Liability Insurance Auto Insurance Wo r k e r ’s C o m p e n s a t i o n Bonds Personal Insurance Employee Benefits

est .

2000

Left to right: Sean, Jack & Jim Clements

520.624.3456 6 2 4 5 E . B ro a d w a y, S u i t e 3 1 0 , Tu c s o n , A Z 8 5 7 1 1 480.477.5245 8 3 5 0 E . R a i n t re e D r. , S u i t e 2 3 5 , S c o t t s d a l e , A Z 8 5 2 6 0 928.774.6631 F l awww.BizTucson.com gstaff Insurance

w w w. c l e m e n t s i n s u r a n c eSpring .com 2020

>>>

BizTucson 31


PHOTOS: LEA IRENE

BizEDUCATION

Clockwise – Ann Fraley, VP of Southwest Operations, SNHU; Ribbon Cutting Ceremony; Paul LeBlanc, President & CEO, SNHU; SNHU’s New Southwest Operations Center, Tucson.

New Hampshire School Opens in Tucson By Tom Leyde There’s a new university in Tucson, and it’s right in the center of downtown. Southwest New Hampshire University held a ribbon cutting in February to open its Southwest Operations Center. The three-story building was owned by Pima County and formerly leased to Caterpillar. The center will provide support to SNHU’s online students in western time zones. University officials said they chose Tucson for the operations center because of its welcoming atmosphere, close fit with SNHU’s culture and opportunities to be an engaged member of the community. The new center has been in the works since April 2019. Based in Manchester, N.H., SNHU plans to hire an additional 200 employees here over the next few years. It currently employs 113 people – 35 of whom transferred to Tucson from Manchester. Tucson employees will get free parking in a downtown parking garage and free coffee. 32 BizTucson

<<<

Springr 2020

“In Tucson, we feel like we’ve found home,” Paul LeBlanc, president and CEO of SNHU, said before the ribbon cutting. “There’s something about Tucson that really feels compatible. This is a place where things matter, where people matter. You guys have been amazing to us. “We’re going to learn a lot from being here,” he said. “Tucson is a place that is burgeoning and creating opportunity.” Pima County District 3 Supervisor Sharon Bronson said the SNHU operations center ticks off a number of points in the county’s economic plan. “It is, indeed, a great day for Pima County,” she said. “We’re so happy to have you here in our vital downtown,” said Tucson Mayor Regina Romero. Joe Snell, president and CEO of Sun Corridor Inc., said SNHU’s presence in Tucson will have an annual economic impact of $218 million. “We’d like to have 25 universities here. We enjoyed working with your project team,” he told SNHU officials.

By David B. Pittman

Snell said SNHU’s presence in Tucson will help to attract more companies to the area. SNHU began as a two-room business school in downtown Manchester in 1932. It now has a 300-acre campus in Manchester, serving students in all 50 states and more than 100 countries. It serves more than 130,000 students through its online university worldwide and offers more than 300 undergraduate, graduate and certificate programs. The university employs 10,000 people in the United States, with about 5,000 of them in New England. SNHU’s online students include working parents, first-time college students, lifelong learners and many current and former members of the military. The private, nonprofit institution was described as the “most innovative” regional university by U.S. News & World Report and one of the fastest-growing universities in the country. SNHU is committed to expanding access to high-quality, affordable pathways that meet the needs of each student. Biz www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 33


TUC 34 BizTucson

<

www.BizTucson.com


CSON

BizHEALTH

A City of Wellness

PHOTO: COURTESY CANYON RANCH

By Donna Kreutz Throughout history, humans have gravitated to Southern Arizona for a better life. The area’s richly diverse environment attracted plentiful wildlife which, in turn, attracted a migration of hunters from the frozen north some 10,000+ years ago. Evidence of these ancestors – the hunters’ stone tools – were discovered on a ranch site now known as the Lehner Mammoth-Kill Site near Sierra Vista. The people of this land also used a wide variety of wild plants for healing, and have continuously cultivated crops with traditional farming and irrigation systems. The dry climate has long proved beneficial for health. The first tuberculosis sanitarium in Tucson opened around 1920 and more followed over the decades. A national television ad in the 1950s urged people with nasal congestion to “send their sinuses to Arizona.” National parks and dude ranches soon dotted the state, promoting outdoor experiences in ecosystems as varied as deserts, canyons and pine forests. In the early 1970s, health visionary Dr. Andrew Weil introduced mainstream medicine to an integrative healthcare approach. In 1979, Mel and Enid Zuckerman founded Canyon Ranch to reintroduce healthy habits to those who overindulged – bringing the life-changing spa experience to men as well as women. Dr. Thomas Grogan relentlessly pursued a diagnostic tool that revolutionized cancer care and in 1985 founded Ventana Medical Systems (now Roche Tissue Diagnostics), which then attracted other bioscience companies. While Weil changed medicine, the Zuckermans changed the spa industry. Their respective philanthropies helped establish the University of Arizona

Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine and the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. Their leadership energized the local wellness movement – from Pilates, tai chi, acupuncture, massage and herbal treatments, to a massage school and even yoga classes on a rooftop downtown and in a brewery. In 1983, cycling fanatic Richard DeBernardis established El Tour de Tucson, which annually attracts thousands of cyclists from around the globe. Floods from that same year eventually would lead to the construction of The Loop, a landmark 131mile multi-use trail for cyclists, pedestrians, joggers, equestrians and tourists, which opened in 2018. The nonprofit Native Seeds/SEARCH also began conserving the rich agro-biodiversity of the arid Southwest back in 1983. The seed bank today has nearly 2,000 varieties of crops adapted to arid landscapes. In 1993 Kyria Sabin Waugaman opened Body Works Studio here, then expanded the Fletcher Pilates program to major cities on five continents. By 1995, Western horseback riding segued into “equine therapy” at Miraval Arizona and “therapeutic riding” for kids and adults at nonprofits TROT and TRAK. This year, the Tucson Jewish Community Center expanded its focus on fitness and introduced its 14-spoke “Wheel of Wellness” program. Little wonder that the University of Arizona became a mecca for biosciences and medicine – or that Southern Arizona became known as a health haven and Tucson as the City of Wellness. This report spotlights some of the region’s healthconscious assets.

Biz

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 35


36 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020


CITY OF WELLNESS

BizHEALTH

Bioscience Startups Find Success in Tucson Region Draws More Drug, Device and Therapeutic Companies

PHOTO OF CAMPUS: COURTESY ROCHE TISSUE DIAGNOSTICS

By Mary Minor Davis Nearly 35 years ago, Dr. Thomas Grogan, a patholodirector of BlueStone Venture Partners, a Southwestgist and professor at the University of Arizona, took an based life sciences venture capital fund. idea scribbled on notepads and turned it into Ventana In 2016, Aspinall, former president and CEO of Medical Systems, a billion-dollar, global leader in canVentana, along with Arizona Regent Ron Shoopcer diagnostics based in Tucson. man, former president and CEO of The success of Ventana – now Southern Arizona Leadership The resources are the Roche Tissue Diagnostics – set the Council, pooled a select group of foundation. Now, its triumph, along here, our technology CEOs and industry leaders to dewith detemination by industry leada strategic blueprint to attract is made here, we have velop ers and support from organizations private investment to the state’s techgreat power sources such as the Flinn Foundation, Critinology industries and create jobs. cal Path Institute, Tech Launch AriCalled Risk Capital in Arizona: and we believe we’re zona and the Arizona Bioindustry Observations and Recommendastarting to put Tucson tions to Accelerate the Growth of Association, is helping to firmly establish Southern Arizona as a mecthe State’s Innovation Economy, the on the map. ca for bioscience startups. 2016 report aimed to propel AriMore than 34 such companies zona into a top-five U.S. destination – Jordan Lancaster operate in Tucson today, including for bioscience and tech industries by President & CEO larger players like Roche and many assessing its competitiveness against Avery Therapeutics that are currently in the entrepreother markets. neurial phases of development in diagnostics, devices It built upon earlier efforts such as the Arizona Bioand therapeutics. science Roadmap, developed in 2002 and updated in “I believe we’re getting to that tipping point where 2014 by the Flinn Foundation, a private philanthropic there are enough companies and enough buzz about organization focused on promoting the bioscience secthe fact that Tucson is the place to be, especially in ditor among other civic and educational endeavors, and agnostics and devices because we have the resources the Entrepreneurial Economy for Tucson Task Force’s here,” said Mara Aspinall, co-founder and managing 2012 statewide Vision for the Future. continued on page 38 >>>

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 37


CITY OF WELLNESS

BizHEALTH

Clockwise – Mara Aspinall, Co-founder & Managing Director, BlueStone Venture Partners; Avery Therapeutics from left: Steven Goldman, MD - Chief Medical Officer, Jen Koevary – Chief Operating and Financial Officer, Jordan Lancaster – CEO, Jessi Crosby – Clinical Specialist, Matthew McBride – Senior Research Associate, Natia Bamidele – Executive Assistant; From left, Eugene W. Gerner, Chief Scientific Officer, & Jeff Jacob, CEO of Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals

continued from page 37 The report noted that Arizona could leverage its West Coast location by engaging investors to look more favorably at the state’s strong business leadership and demonstrated success of business innovation “ecosystems.” While the report said the current rate of venture capital investment in Arizona companies was about 30% of the percapita national average, several strategies could help Arizona set a goal of reaching or exceeding the national average by 2025. Since that blueprint, the state’s bioscience industry is seeing a definitive boost. A 2018 report by the Arizona Bioindustry Association showed:

State bioscience firms employed 25,686 in 2016 in 1,310 individual businesses. Industry employment grew by 9% since 2014, twice the growth rate of the nation, with four of the five major subsectors adding jobs during the period. Drugs and pharmaceuticals, and research, testing and medical labs experienced double-digit job growth since 2014.

38 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Arizona inventors were awarded nearly 2,000 bioscience-related patents since 2014, among the second quintile of states in patent activity. Since 2015, NIH awards to Arizona institutions have increased, reaching $189 million in FY 2017.

Tucson, in particular, is committed to “building the innovation ecosystem” by creating a place where companies know they can take risks and explore creative new areas and ideas, Aspinall said. “Tucson’s business community works together for success like I have not seen in other cities.” Aspinall lauded the academic resources available in Tucson. “It’s not just the undergraduate programs. We have a very strong graduate base of both younger and experienced professionals,” she said. “They’re bringing in the research that can bring about these breakthroughs.” Tech Launch Arizona, which helps UArizona discoveries reach commercial pathways to market, has also “done a great job of helping companies license technologies developed at the university,” she said. Additionally, the strong regional hospital system provides oppor-

tunities for more partnerships between the hospitals and bioscience companies. “All of this success is due to people – the person who has that wild, crazy idea – and also teams – people who want to put it together,” Aspinall said. “We have both. Early in their career, later in their career, they’re willing to take risks.” Tucson’s Avery Therapeutics is just one example. President and CEO Jordan Lancaster developed a new treatment for patients with heart damage from heart attacks, who then face a higher likelihood of heart failure. A UArizona graduate student, Lancaster was able to connect with industry leaders to assist him in the development of MyCardia engineered cardiac tissue. “This was the basis for my thesis,” Lancaster said. “I started working with Dr. Steve Goldman, a professor of medicine at the University of Arizona.” His company’s technology leverages a cell engineering technology to generate pluripotent cells from adult tissues. It is based on a discovery by John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka that garnered them the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2012. Dr. Jen Koevary, Avery’s COO and CFO, said its product has proven successful in early studies. In pre-clinical continued on page 40 >>> www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 39


CITY OF WELLNESS

BizHEALTH

continued from page 38 testing, this treatment demonstrated marked cardiovascular improvements, with the technology regenerating cells and repairing the surviving cardiac muscle and generating new tissue, she said. “It all roots back to seeing a problem, knowing and thinking it should be done better, establish that early prototype element, harnessing this new and enabling technology and moving forward by establishing the data to prove performance,” Lancaster said. “We’ve done all of this in Tucson, so we know it can be done,” he said. “The resources are here, our technology is made here, we have great power sources and we believe we’re starting to put Tucson on the map.” Avery’s next phase will be to set up the clinical trials. A large investment firm out of Boston has invested in that phase. Avery hopes to be on the market within 10 years. Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals also made its start in Tucson, founded by Dr. Frank Meyskens and Dr. Gene Gerner, a UArizona professor of cellular and molecular medicine for 40 years who currently serves on the company’s board. Jeff Jacob serves as president and CEO. Jacob said the company is possibly less than a year away from taking to market a new prevention therapy for Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, a devastating form of colon cancer that is almost 100% hereditary. Children as young as elementary school age often begin treatments that lead to the loss of their rectum and upper and lower GI by the time they are in college. In trials since 2013, the company has worked closely with C-Path in Tucson, which helps bring drugs to market at an accelerated rate, as well as the National Cancer Institute, which funded the trials. The company is currently going through FDA review and hopes to take the drug to market in 2021. “This is what I have hanging above my desk every day: ‘We’re gonna get a drug approved, make a difference in patients’ lives and make our investors a great return,’ ” Jacob said. “Tucson needs another win in the bioscience industry and I hope we can bring it, and help all of these startups realize success.”

Biz 40 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 41


CITY OF WELLNESS

BizHEALTH

TUCSON BIOSCIENCE COMPANIES

Courtesy of BlueStone Venture Partners. This list may not include all Tucson bioscience companies. All websites are accessible in BizTucson’s digital edition.

COMPANY

SECTOR

WEBSITE

Accelerate Diagnostics

Infectious Disease Diagnostics

acceleratediagnostics.com

Aqualung Therapeutics

Therapeutic: Anti-inflammatory

aqualungtherapeutics.com

Avery Therapeutics

Tissue Engineered Therapeutics

averythera.com

BioVigilant

Diagnostic Tools

biovigilant.com

Boeckeler

Sample Prep Instruments

boeckeler.com

Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals

Pharmaceutical: Oncology

canprevent.com

Catalina Pharma

Pharmaceuticals: Hypothermia

catalinapharma.com

CATS Tonometer

Ophthalmic Medical Device

catsiop.com

CellState Biosciences

Diagnostic Tools

cellstatebio.com

D3Sciences

Medical Device: Tissue Sampling

d3sciences.com

Desert DX

Diagnostics

desertdx.com

Emagine Solutions

Handheld Ultrasound Imaging

vistascan.co

HTG Molecular Diagnostics

Sequencing Device / System

htgmolecular.com

Icagen

Drug Delivery

icagen.com

iCrx

Medical Device: Optical

techlaunch.arizona.edu

Iluminos Therapeutics

Therapeutic: Alzheimers

techlaunch.arizona.edu

Intellico Therapeutics

Drug Discovery

techlaunch.arizona.edu

MCR Therapeutics

Peptide Therapeutic

techlaunch.arizona.edu

MSDx

Immune System Diagnostics

msdx.co

NuVox

Therapeutic: Hypoxia

nuvoxpharma.com

Pharos Diagnostics

Diagnostics - Human and Animal

pharosdx.com

Procyon Technologies, LLC

Medical Device

techlaunch.arizona.edu

ProNeurogen

Therapeutic: Inflammation

proneurogen.com

Pyx Health

Healthcare IT

pyxhealth.com

Radiance Therapeutics

Ophthalmic Therapeutic / Medical Device

radiancetherapeutics.com

Reglagene

Therapeutic: Gene Regulation

reglagene.com

Regulonix

Non-opioid pharma

regulonix.com

Roche Tissue Diagnostics

Diagnostics

roche.com

RxActuator

Veterinary Drug Delivery

rxactuator.net

Safkan Ear Care

Otology Medical Device

safkanhealth.com

Salutaris Medical

Ophthalmic Therapeutic / Medical Device

salutarismd.com

Scintillation Nanotechnologies

Drug Discovery

techlaunch.arizona.edu

SunQuest

Data systems and EHR systems

sunquestinfo.com

Teleost Biopharmaceutical

Derm Drug Delivery

teleostbio.com

Valley Fever Solutions

Fungicidal Therapeutics

valleyfeversolutions.com

3D Biosurfaces Technologies

Microarray Technologies

3dbiosurfaces.com

42 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE! Saturday, November 7, 2020 HONOREES Zuckerman Family Foundation

Promoting positive change in peoples’ lives and enhancing the Southern Arizona community

Dr. G. Marie Swanson Founding Dean and Professor Emerita

Dr. Richard Carmona

President, Ending Pandemics, Skoll Foundation

17th Surgeon General of the United States; Distinguished Professor, University of Arizona; Chief of Health Innovations, Canyon Ranch

Neelam Sethi

Dr. Frank Marcus

Global Volunteer and Child and Arts Advocate

Professor Emeritus, University of Arizona College of Medicine

Dr. Carlos “Kent” Campbell

Arizona Complete Health

Dr. Mark Smolinski

Transforming the Health of the Community, One Person at a Time

Global and Malaria Health Expert; Retired Public Health Physician and Malaria Strategist

Purchase sponsorships, tickets, tables and tributes at publichealth.arizona.edu/calendar/20th-anniversary-gala More information, call: 520-626-2948

Commercial

Home & Auto

Bonds

Employee Benefits

crestins.com


BizHEALTH

A Laser Focus on Disease & Health

The Force of University of Arizona Health Sciences By Jay Gonzales

Sitting at the hub of this City of Wellness, the University of Arizona and its affiliated healthcare centers and institutes are at the cutting edge of education, technology and research aimed at the ultimate targets – treating and curing diseases, some that long have been considered incurable. The foundation of it all is UArizona Health Sciences, which encompasses the Colleges of Medicine in Tucson and Phoenix, Nursing, Pharmacy, and the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. This is a massive organization that employs nearly 5,000 people – including 900 faculty – and has about 4,000 students. UArizona Health Sciences pulls in a whopping $200 million in research grants and contracts each year, making it a major economic engine in the region. Sharing the campus and no less impressive in their initiatives are the University of Arizona Cancer Center, the Steele Children’s Research Center, the Sarver Heart Center, the BIO5 Institute and the Center for Innovation in Brain Science. They represent the heart of the medical research going on at UArizona – though there are still more institutes doing equally important work. “These centers, which have a laser-focus on particular areas of health and disease, are vital to our research enterprise,” UArizona President Dr. Robert C. Robbins said. “They also are a key means in which we pursue our strategic initiatives and mission.” UArizona Health Sciences

UArizona Health Sciences launched a wide-ranging strategic plan in 2019 specifically tied to the campus-wide strategic plan adopted in the fall of 2018. “A close look at the UArizona Health Sciences initiatives shows that the benefits will almost entirely extend to Health Sciences students and to populations outside

University of Arizona Health Sciences

BIO 5

44 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan Steele Children’s Research Center


CITY OF WELLNESS

The Primary Care Physician Scholarship Program with a two-pronged goal of removing financial and geographical barriers to education and healthcare access. In exchange for four years of College of Medicine tuition, recipients make a commitment to practice for up to four years in rural or urban underserved communities in Arizona. Development of a comprehensive center for chronic pain and addiction to address the ongoing opioid

UArizona Cancer Center

Sarver Heart Center

epidemic. “The Center will conduct research on comprehensive behavioral therapies as addiction treatment, develop early screening for individuals at risk, and develop novel, non-addictive pain medications for individuals who suffer from addiction,” Robbins said.

Developing new models for healthy aging, including creating an “agefriendly university, partnering with developers of senior living communities, and expanding research capacity focused on aging.

“As one of the nation’s premier academic health centers, the University of Arizona Health Sciences is educating much-needed healthcare professionals for our state and nation,” Robbins said. “We are advancing translational biomedical research, seeking better treatments and cures for our most deadly diseases, and providing much-needed outreach services to Arizona’s major cities, towns, Native American reservations and its most remote communities.” UArizona Cancer Center

Founded in 1976 by the late Dr. Sydney Salmon, the UArizona Cancer Center became a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in 1989. The designation came with a primary responsibility “to conduct research that will lead to the reduction of cancer morbidity and mortality,” according to the center’s website. Most recently, the Cancer Center received a $6.9 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to tackle skin cancer, one of the most common cancers in the world and certainly one that is prevalent sun-drenched Arizona. “We are proud to be the only NCIdesignated Comprehensive Cancer Center headquartered in the state of Arizona,” said Joann Sweasy, interim director of the Cancer Center. “With such distinction, we are committed to helping people in communities all across our state and beyond as we strive to treat and cure cancer. We have the ability to take science to our patients through tremendous collaboration across our programs, which combines worldclass cancer research and first-class clinical care.” The Cancer Center has four established scientific-research programs that work together to accomplish the Center’s mission to prevent and cure all forms of cancer:

• • • •

Cancer Biology Cancer Imaging Cancer Prevention and Control Therapeutic Development

Steele Children’s Research Center

Under the direction of Dr. Fayez K. Ghishan, everything the Steele Children’s Research Center does is focused in one place – the child. The center currently has 75 research projects in the following areas:

• Cardiology • Critical care • Endocrinology, type 1 diabetes • Gastroenterology and nutrition • Genetics and developmental

pediatrics

Hematology, oncology, bone marrow transplants

• •

Neonatology

Pulmonology, allergy and immunology

In addition to the millions of dollars in research grants the Steele Center generates, it has established a nearly unmatched level of community support approaching $60 million through endowments and events such as the annual Father’s Day Council Tucson Father of the Year awards. Sarver Heart Center

In 1985, Dr. Jack G. Copeland revolutionized the treatment of heart transplant patients when he became the first surgeon ever to perform a successful bridge-to-transplant procedure using an artificial heart. The mechanical heart replaced the diseased heart of an endstage heart failure patient waiting for a donor heart. From that beginning, the University Heart Center – later to be named the Sarver Heart Center – was founded in 1986 with the goal of “preventing and curing cardiovascular disease through the three pillars of research, education and patient care.” The center is now comprised of more than 150 physicians and scientists with the incredibly ambitious goal of eliminating heart disease, vascular disease and strokes. “Historically we’ve talked about moving research from ‘bench to bedside,’ or from the laboratory to the patient-care continued on page 46 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 45

PHOTOS: COURTESY THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

the university facing critical healthcare challenges,” Robbins said. “Those benefits include reducing the debt burden for medical students, increasing healthcare access to underserved areas of Arizona, improving healthcare and health outcomes for Hispanics and Native Americans, and improving quality of life for an aging population.” Headed by Dr. Michael D. Dake, Health Sciences has five areas of strategic focus that address not only the medical research and treatment aspect, but also access to healthcare and education to level the playing field for those who receive healthcare and those who want to provide it. The focus areas are: Next-Generation Education, Precision Healthcare for All, Making Wellness Ageless, Creating Defenses Against Disease and New Frontiers for Better Health. Among the initiatives areas are:


CITY OF WELLNESS

BizHEALTH continued from page 45 setting,” said Dr. Nancy K. Sweitzer, director of the Sarver Heart Center. “Now, with our focus on state-of-the-art approaches, we’re equally likely to take discoveries from the bedside to the bench and back to the bedside in the form of precision medicine.”

PHOTO: PILATES STYLE MAGAZINE

Center for Innovation in Brain Science

Central to the mission of the Center for Innovation in Brain Science is finding cures for the many neurodegenerative diseases afflicting society. “The Center for Innovation in Brain Science was created to address the challenge that in the 21st century there is not a single cure for a single neurodegenerative disease,” the CIBS says in its mission statement. Located at the BioScience Research Laboratories on UArizona’s Health Science research campus, the CIBS is attacking all the major neurological diseases – Alzheimer’s; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease; Parkinson’s; and multiple sclerosis. CIBS Director Roberta Diaz Brinton heads the brain science center as it not only conducts research for cures, but also is developing drugs and treatments – all in an integrated environment on the campus.

Aspiring Teachers Learn Pilates in Tucson Kyria Sabin Waugaman was on her way to law school when she took a movement class in Southern California that changed her life – and that of others around the world. Tall and elegant, she had studied ballet as a child and played tennis and soccer in high school. Then she dropped into a pilates class in West Hollywood. That led her to Ron Fletcher, a protégé of Joseph Pilates, the founder of this fluid form of core strengthening and flexibility training. Fletcher became her teacher and mentor over the next two decades. Waugaman came to Tucson to teach pilates to guests at Canyon Ranch, then developed a pilates program for the University of Arizona School of Dance

where she remains an adjunct professor. She opened the Body Works Studio in Tucson in 1993 and since has established international Fletcher Pilates studios in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia and South America. She has said, “Pilates became part of my life, my blood, my spirit. It’s who I am and it’s what I do. “I fell in love with Tucson from the start. I didn’t question it – it was the first time in my life where I didn’t have everything planned and mapped out. It felt like following my calling. Tucson has been a wonderful place to grow my business and build my dreams.”

Biz

46 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 47


CITY OF WELLNESS

The colorful background is the PAS tissue stain, which demonstrates stored sugars and fatty substances in tissue and certain cancers. Fatty substances are magenta, cell nucleus is purple and cell cytoplasm is violet.

l Winner Gold Meda s Book Award ss e n si u B m 2020 Axio

Dr. Thomas Grogan

Founder Ventana Medical Systems

48 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizBIOSCIENCE

New Memoir Explores Dogged Pursuit to Improve Cancer Care

IMAGE: BALFOUR WALKER & BRENT G. MATHIS

By Christy Krueger Few people on this planet have the patience, determination and persistence to pursue a goal through decades of constant roadblocks and challenges. Dr. Thomas Grogan, pathologist and founder of Ventana Medical Systems, is one of those rare human beings. He’s now released a book, “Chasing the Invisible, A Doctor’s Quest to Abolish the Last Unseen Cancer Cell,” in which he tells of his long, winding journey to create a diagnostic tool that revolutionized cancer care. According to Grogan, his greatest motivator to keep fighting through these barriers and bring his invention – and many other subsequent inventions – to market was realizing it would improve patient care in a very big way – and it was the right thing to do. “A righteous twig snapped and I eventually realized it applied globally,” he said. His invention, which he started working on in his University of Arizona College of Medicine laboratory in the early 1980s, is an automated, standardized tissue biopsy diagnostic instrument that has resulted in more accurate and speedier test results for doctors and their patients. It also has helped lead to targeted, personalized therapies for patients that is becoming a standard of care in medicine today. One of Grogan’s first major obstacles came in 1985, and if he hadn’t made it through this one, he claimed, “it would have been the end.” After applying for a business license to manufacture and sell his medical device, the university attorney told him he could be considered a Class 6 felon. At the time in Arizona, it was illegal for anyone to form a private business as a state employee. The state has since passed a law to allow univerwww.BizTucson.com

sity employees to form private ventures as long as the college is given an equity position. After years of growing pains, the company began to make money and Grogan worried less about the rug being pulled out at every step. He enjoyed telling the stories – dozens of them – of his great adventure. Then one day in 2016, longtime employee Stacey Forbes approached him and urged him to write a book. “Stacey said, ‘Everyone should hear these stories outside the company.’ I didn’t think I had the energy, but Stacey did,” Grogan said. Thus, he took on another demanding mission – with a lot of support. Grogan and Forbes had contacts in literature and communications who helped with editing and reviews. Those included Marty Hirsch, a recently retired employee of Roche in Switzerland, the pharmaceutical company that acquired Ventana in 2008. The company Grogan founded is now called Roche Tissue Diagnostics. The manuscript was revised eight times – way beyond what Grogan expected when he took on the project, but it resulted in a high-quality product that’s readable and eye-opening for medical personnel and lay people alike. “My goal with the book was to explain medical/technical things to people not in the medical/technical business. I had to remember who I was telling the story to,” Grogan said. This led to his idea about how to format the book and tie all the stories together. He would tell them to his mother as if he was re-living each one. The book’s title came to Grogan early on. “In one of my stories my tech said, ‘We’re chasing the invisible.’ It was a

good way to explain it to people. The subtitle came the week before settling on the ninth draft. To cure, you must get the last cell,” he explained. Ironically, Grogan faced a personal blow shortly before starting the book – he was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. One bright spot came when he found out the pathology lab where the diagnostic test was performed used Roche Tissue Diagnostics’ equipment. Following cancer surgery, he became one of 900 patients to participate in a clinical trial at University of California, Los Angeles and other universities that studied whether immunotherapy should be given to patients in earlier stages of the disease. Previous practices limited its use to those with advanced stages. The outcome was so positive for immediate use of immunotherapy that it is now standard protocol for cancer patients who qualify. “Immunotherapy is the biggest revelation in my lifetime in cancer treatment,” Grogan said. His book launch ceremony was held in December at Roche Tissue Diagnostics, where speakers honored and thanked Grogan for his accomplishments and contributions to the employment and economic health of the region. Dr. Eric Walk, chief medical officer at Roche Tissue Diagnostics, followed with a more personal note: “For over 15 years, I’ve known Tom and heard many stories. He has humility, sincerity and a commitment to improve the human condition.” When asked if writing and publishing the book brings closure to his career, Grogan replied, “It’s icing on the cake. Looking back, tying the ribbon around it is gratifying. I’m happy it’s contained within the covers of a book.”

Biz

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 49


BizEQUINE

TRAK Lassoes a Fast Pitch

Ranching, Animals Inspire Human Healing By Monica Surfaro Spigelman Rancher Scott Tilley is all grit and heartland honesty with a passionate message about the therapeutic value of ranching and human-animal bonds. His authentic, powerful pitch about his Therapeutic Ranch for Animals and Kids charmed a sold-out Fast Pitch audience last November and earned Tilley’s nonprofit the 2019 Fast Pitch BizTucson and Tucson Electric Power to the People Award. “Our fast-paced world has gotten us away from the basic instinct to work with our hands and know about the land and animals,” Tilley said. “It’s easy to lose your center these days, and there is enormous potential to get it back through our ranches.” Fast Pitch – the flagship program of Social Venture Partners Tucson – celebrated its fifth anniversary in creative capacitybuilding for Tucson nonprofits in

50 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

2019. TRAK was one of seven semifinalists at the November fete whose persuasive performances were awarded cash prizes at the region’s top venture philanthropy event. TRAK was founded in 2007 by Tilley and his wife, Jill, as an initiative focused on ranching and animal-assisted life skills as transformative tools for health and wellbeing. Since its founding, the appeal of connecting ranch animals and people has been far-reaching and is improving the mental and physical health of participants through education, ranch-life skill building, vocational training, community outreach, family events and camps. In 2019 alone, TRAK registered more than 2,300 new participants at the ranch and activated more than 400 volunteers. TRAK also schedules service visits to schools, memory care facilities

and assisted living centers all over Tucson. Hundreds more seriously ill children and their families at the Children’s Clinics are visited each month. Ranching Traditions

The pull of animals and ranching runs deep for Tilley, who worked his father’s cattle ranch after high school and was running horse stables and a riding school until a little more than a decade ago. That’s when he was struck with his “aha moment” that led to TRAK. “I was running a Tucson boarding facility and at the same time helping out a local lady doing horse therapy with troubled teens,” Tilley recalled. “I enjoyed the work and saw instantly how a horse could calm an autistic child or inspire a troubled teen to prefer ranch chores over video games. It reminded me of why I was in the horse business.” continued on page 52 >>>

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS & COURTESY TRAK


PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

CITY OF WELLNESS

Scott Tilley

Founder Therapeutic Ranch for Animals and Kids

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 51


CITY OF WELLNESS

BizEQUINE

continued from page 50 His wife, Jill, was a special education and rehabilitation teacher who knew what unique experiences were offered by animal interaction and ranching. The couple also had three girls and wanted their children to know ranch life, as they had. With their own horses, a couple of sheep and rabbits, and based out of a small barn on Craycroft Road, the Tilleys set up a summer camp, developed a program with four local schools, and earned nonprofit status. From those small beginnings, the ranch evolved, moving in 2016 to a larger plot of donated land. TRAK is now a five-acre complex with stables, a lazy river, enclosed pens and more than 100 animals – horses, miniature animals, donkeys, goats, chickens and sheep. As ranches are disappearing throughout Pima County, Tilley is fervent about promoting the importance of Western traditions in Tucson and sees ranch life as a critical component of wellness in the region. Tilley noted that individuals with stress and anxiety can often hide emotions in traditional therapies. Not so with animals, he said. “Animals have a sense of what’s authentic,” Tilley said. “I see families come here struggling, but within a week or two of hanging around and volunteering, their lives are changed.” Work the Land and Learn

TRAK uses a responsibility-based, “get your hands dirty” framework filled with learning and emotional benefits. Participants handle chores from cleaning out stalls to grooming horses. “It’s their ranch and their animals,” Tilley said. “The ranch way of life helps build a work ethic and an agility that inspires curiosity, team-building and even problem-solving. They take ownership and their confidence builds.” TRAK’s innovative programs also include “skills for service,” where kids or adults acquire hands-on experience. There are internships for vet techs and animal-education programs. TRAK also offers family memberships, camps, field trips and volunteering opportunities. A professional staff is certified in a number of therapeutic or equine programs. Tilley and his staff have many stories about how experiential work on the ranch is making a difference in the community. For example, a nursing home senior who was becoming isolated and depressed began opening up more after a few TRAK visits. “He hardly spoke at the nursing home, but he came alive when TRAK visited,” Tilley recalled. “It’s not rocket science. Animals help people get back in touch with themselves.” “It’s amazing how a kid who won’t make her bed, and has to be dragged out of bed to go to school, will get up at the crack of dawn to come clean out stables and feed the chickens,” Tilley added with a grin. TRAK has set a goal to serve over 3,000 members of the community in 2020. TRAK’s animal-assisted life skills and therapeutics program are also helping both youth and adults in learning settings that address age-appropriate life skills and mental health. “Creating a bridge so that the community can retain access to ranching and all its powers and benefits is our TRAK vision,” Tilley said. “We want people to see that getting your hands dirty can actually make you feel good. And that life is better for it.”

Biz

52 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 53


CITY OF WELLNESS

PHOTOS: COURTESY TROT

BizEQUINE

TROT Offers Valuable Equine Therapy Programs Serve Veterans, Riders of All Ages By Mary Minor Davis For almost 50 years, Therapeutic Riding of Tucson has provided equine therapy services to the community and beyond. Founded by Barbara Rector and Nancy McGibbon, TROT held its first class in the fall of 1974 with the help of the late Ruth Elizabeth “Bazy” Tankersley, owner of the former Al-Marah Arabian Farm. Enrolled were four students from the Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind. Today, TROT is an internationally renowned organization that provides programs for people of all ages with mental and physical challenges. More than 2,000 riders and clients participate in programs annually. Therapeutic classes are conducted as group, semiprivate or private lessons. All instructors hold Professional Asso54 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

ciation of Therapeutic Horsemanship certifications and work with parents, caregivers and participants to set appropriate goals. The instructors, with the support of a skilled team of volunteers and horses, enable students to safely develop independent riding skills. In 2010, TROT started one of the first therapy programs for veterans and continues to partner with the Southern Arizona Veterans Administration. Yet, school-aged children represent their largest clientele. TROT partners with the Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind; Tanque Verde and Sunnyside school districts; Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Family Services; and the Southern Arizona Girl Scouts. Thanks to financial support from Angel Charity for Children, TROT has added a clinic offering hippotherapy,

a form of physical, occupational and speech therapy in which a therapist uses the characteristic movements of a horse to provide carefully graded motor and sensory input. “I’m a veteran of the U.S. Navy,” wrote Joseph Bailey in a TROT testimonial. “I have a spinal cord injury and was informed about TROT. When I visited TROT I found a very caring and helpful staff ready to teach me the fundamentals of horseback riding. “My goal was to ride in the Tucson Annual Rodeo Parade. On February 21, 2013, the big day arrived, and all the lessons taught to me by TROT were put to use in one of the most amazing experiences in my life. I rode the route of the parade proudly and cheerfully waving to spectators.”

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 55


<<<

Spring 2020

PHOTOS: COURTESY PIMA COUNTY

56 BizTucson

PHOTO: DEAN KELLY

CITY OF WELLNESS

www.BizTucson.com


BizCYCLING

The Loop Gets Tucson Moving Route Creates Community in Active City

PHOTO: DAMION ALEXANDER

PHOTO: COURTESY PIMA COUNTY

By Romi Carrell Wittman

www.BizTucson.com

Since its completion in 2018, the Chuck Huckelberry Loop has become an integral part of Tucson, connecting the city, the unincorporated areas of Pima County, Marana, Oro Valley, South Tucson and Vail with more than 131 miles of paved pathways and bike lanes. It has become a community gathering spot, a place to enjoy the outdoors and unique desert vistas, and most importantly, a way to get moving on bike or on foot. “These kinds of things create a great sense of community because people meet there, they form running groups, they meet up to walk,” said Julia Strange, Tucson Medical Center’s VP of community benefit, when the Loop was completed. “They get to know one another.” The Loop not only promotes health and wellness, it’s a huge economic boon to the region. “A lot of people are moving to Tucson because of biking and the Loop,” said Damion Alexander, a realtor with Long Realty. “It’s safe and there are so many miles of it. A lot of people don’t recognize how many loops off the Loop there are. There is so much connectivity built into it.” Diane Frisch, Pima County’s director of attractions and tourism, said the Loop is great not only for tourism, but for residents. “Pima County recognized long ago that the Loop can be part of physical activity, which is critical for preventing chronic disease. The Loop gives us a chance to get everyone out there moving.” Businesses located along the Loop have embraced its communitybuilding qualities. The Tucson Jewish Community Center, for example, sits near the Loop at River Road and Alvernon. “It serves us very nicely, programmatically,” said Todd Rockoff, JCC president and CEO. “We hold 1, 5 and 10k runs along the Loop and it provides a nice connection to the city. We use the Loop intentionally in our programming. It’s a really incredible asset.” The Tucson Hop Shop in the Metal Arts Village has also developed several Loop-centric events. The award-winning tap-and-bottle shop hosts many events directly connected to cycling and serves as a meetup spot. “We worked hard at courting cyclists,” said Tucson Hop Shop co-owner David Zugerman. “Lots of bike groups meet here before their ride or after.” Steve Kimble, owner of the Metal Arts Village, said, “The Loop casts a wide enough net that it provides business to people that are one, two, three blocks away.” To help more people access the pathways, Pima County Health Department has launched a “Reach the Loop” initiative. A nearly $5 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and continued on page 58 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 57


BizCYCLING continued from page 57 Prevention has made the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health – known as the REACH program – a reality in Tucson. It’s one of the only CDC programs that explicitly focuses on reducing chronic disease for specific racial and ethnic groups in urban, rural and tribal communities. The grant has enabled the county to fund physical improvements around Tucson, including the Loop. The planting of shade trees, the construction of small ‘pocket’ parks in community neighborhoods, and other design improvements were made possible through the grant. “REACH is grounded in the belief that interventions to promote health work best when they are rooted in the values, expertise and interests of the community itself,” said REACH program director Mary Kinkade. To date, more than 500 community groups and agencies have been actively involved in local REACH efforts to promote the Loop. It was in these meetings that the idea of hosting six “Reach the

58 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Loop” events was born. These events, which conclude in April, are small gatherings designed to encourage local residents to use the Loop. The events include free bike repairs, activities for families and oppor-

A lot of people are moving to Tucson because of biking and the Loop. –

Damion Alexander Realtor Long Realty

tunities to run, walk or bike portions of the Loop with friends. The next event takes place April 11 at Las Milpitas de Cottonwood. “Everything we do is neighborhoodbased,” Kinkade said. To that end, Kinkade’s office has

trained more than 60 community members so they can organize bike rides and other health and wellness activities. “The Loop gives communities a great place to meet and walk,” she added. The county is also looking into extending the Loop to the Biosphere in Oracle and to the Pima County Fairgrounds. “People ride their bikes to work using the Loop. It’s about being healthy and building a community. It’s not just point A to point B. It’s all those things combined,” said Alexander. Kevin Kaplan, Long Realty VP of marketing and technology, lives along the Loop. “The Loop is utilized by walkers, runners and cyclists alike, promotes safe (car free) outdoor physical activity, and increases the wellness of our residents,” he said. “Other cities have developed ‘Loop Envy’.” “The connectivity, the community… there’s always something unique and it’s continually changing throughout the year. You see raptors, coyotes, turtles, tortoises, spring flowers,” said Alexander. “The Loop is one of those things that is truly a life-changer.” Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 59


BizFITNESS

Wheel of Wellness Jewish Community Center Targets All Aspects of Health

The Tucson Jewish Community Center (The J) has always been a destination for wellness and inclusiveness. Now, it’s growing its original programs and adding many more. While The J offers top-notch fitness equipment, a pool, tennis courts and other amenities to help members stay fit, it supports all areas of wellness through its innovative offerings, each one revolving around The J’s 14-spoke wellness wheel. The programs, most of which are open to the public for a fee or by membership, focus on intellectual, spiritual and emotional health, nutrition, childhood development, and disabled and aging support. “We’re taking major steps in the philosophy of wellness with new studios and space for people to move freely from one to another,” said Todd Rockoff, JCC president and CEO. There are designated areas for people with disabilities, play spaces, a demonstration kitchen and 19 classrooms for early childhood education programs, which enroll over 300 kids. Funding for these updates, which were part of a 2014-15 expansion, 60 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

came from the Zuckerman, Diamond, Baker and Ash families. “This helped us realize our goal to be a total wellness center, and it was very intentional and helped integrate the work in all those areas,” said Rockoff. All these families were also involved in the initial building of the Tucson JCC. “They and others made that dream a reality.” Thanks to a generous donation from the Sarver family, The J also was able to build a new tennis complex in 2019. “We’ve had six tennis courts from the beginning,” Rockoff said. “Sarvers helped with the original courts and then the resurfacing 20 years ago,” he said. “Now, we’ve opened six new courts, generously provided by, and named after, the Sarver family. The surface is called Laykold Masters, and this is the only place in Southern Arizona with this surface. It’s the same as at the Australian Open.” The tennis complex renovations include new shade structures, fencing and windscreens for the courts. A 1,100-square-foot building that will house a lounge, office, and restrooms will be completed this May along with a patio. “Tennis is also important to in-

spire young people, and it fosters honesty,” Rockoff said. Other athletic facilities at The J include indoor and outdoor pickleball courts and a gym for basketball and volleyball. The outdoor pool is home to a large Masters swim program and youth swim teams. “But it’s more than diet and exercise,” said Rockoff. Elements of the wellness wheel are found in each of The J’s activities and programs. For example, the annual outdoor fun run during Hanukkah includes a cultural awareness component about the holiday. Families are also encouraged to participate together and healthy snacks are offered – covering the cultural, nutritional and health spokes. The J’s early childhood curriculum canvases all areas of the wheel. “They play together and they learn it’s okay to play by themselves. They talk about their feelings and learn how to problemsolve,” Rockoff said. “When successful, human beings can’t be just physically fit – other parts of their lives are important, too.” Inclusiveness is not only a priority at The J, it’s part of the wheel. “Everycontinued on page 62 >>> www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY JCC

By Christy Krueger


CITY OF WELLNESS

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 61


CITY OF WELLNESS

When successful, human beings can’t be just physically fit – other parts of their lives are important, too. – Todd Rockoff President & CEO Jewish Community Center

continued from page 60 thing we do here is inclusive.” One program pairs adults experiencing early dementia with University of Arizona social sciences students. “They do cognitive exercises, board games and memory games. It’s highly social.” The J’s focus on young adults with disabilities led to a partnership with Arts for All, a community arts program for children and adults with or without disabilities. “Both of our boards met and decided to merge – we integrated. We will hire their staff and keep their current location. This will allow us together to serve more people with disabilities,” said Rockoff. Members of The J board of directors are generous with their time and efforts. “Bill and Brenda Viner have been tremendous leaders. They both are past chairs of our board and continue to serve on committees and provide support in a variety of ways,” said Rockoff. “Barney Holtzman is past chair and was chair during our renovations. Tom Warne is a past chair of our board. Isaac Rothschild is a tremendous leader here at The J. He helped navigate our integration with Arts for All and moved it through the process.” Since mind stimulation is an important component of integrated wellness, The J offers public language classes in French, Hebrew and Spanish. An arts studio allows participants to create clay and painting projects. Cultural aspects of The J include its well-loved sculpture garden, which started 12 years ago with donated pieces that rotate annually. “It’s part of the public arts scene, and you can see it when running the River Park,” Rockoff said. A recent addition to the garden is the Garden of Hope, a meditative space for individuals, as well as yoga and tai chi classes and lectures. Indoor art exhibits rotate every six weeks and cultural events, including concerts, are held throughout the year. A signature program, going on its 30th year, is the Tucson International Jewish Film Festival that runs for two weeks in January. Rockoff said awareness of wellness has expanded in recent years, partly because of programs offered at places like the J. “Tucson lends itself organically to being outside and participating. Family wellness is so important, and it’s good for kids to go to the gym with their parents.” “We’re proud of how we serve the whole community with intentional programs. This is the town square of our community, and we bring the community together with overall wellness.” Biz 62 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizFITNESS

Shay Beider

Integrative Touch for Kids As a pre-med student, Shay Beider saw a little girl undergo anesthesia for surgery, incredibly frightened and feeling painfully alone. It forever impacted her. She would go on to found Integrative Touch for Kids in 2005, a nonprofit dedicated to the healing and wellness of children – all based on the transformative power of human touch. ITK offers programs to help soothe children with debilitating, chronic health issues who are in hospitals undergoing painful treatments or long stays; retreats to offer support to families; and palliative care clinics for low-income children with complex medical conditions. Today, ITK provides its proprietary, integrative precision medicine therapy to thousands of children and caregivers in Southern Arizona each year. Research shows that therapy reduces pain, anxiety, and fear by percentages far greater than medications alone can provide. “We have the honor of being at ground zero for these children and their families in the most stressful and terrifying times,” said Beider. “So we use integrative touch therapy along with the power of compassion and love to bring light into people’s darkest moments.” The vision of ITK is to build a first-of-its-kind healing center – a model that can be replicated – to fully focus on children with special medical needs and their families.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 63


BizSPA

The Cachet of Canyon Ranch Tucson Founder Launched the Modern Spa Movement Motivation to better one’s life comes in different forms. For Mel Zuckerman, a Tucson real estate developer, it took the death of his father after decades of unhealthy living to jolt him out of his own harmful habits. With encouragement from his wife, Enid, Zuckerman opened a wellness spa on a property that was a former Tucson dude ranch, where the couple could live healthy lives and help others experience the same in a beautiful setting. After Canyon Ranch opened in 1979, it was Tucson’s only destination spa for 16 years before Miraval came along. Canyon Ranch eventually became one of the top destination spas in the world. “I realized that the power of physical and psychological reinvention – through exercise, diet and behavior change – was a gift I could share with other people,” Zuckerman told BizTucson in 2009. As word got out about the renowned programs in personalized and preventive wellness at Canyon Ranch, people flocked to Tucson to create their own positive experiences in mind, body and spiritual health. Locations were added in Lenox, Mass., and Las Vegas. In 2004, Canyon Ranch At Sea was launched and is now found on 12 cruise ships. Last year, the Tucson-based brand branched out with another new concept – Canyon Ranch Wellness Retreat in Woodside, Calif., where guests stay in luxury tree houses, elevated among the giant redwoods. “We are a true integrative wellness 64 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

brand that offers comprehensive health and healing experiences,” noted Lisa Fisher, director of sales, marketing and communications at Canyon Ranch Tucson. Two of the more popular Tucson offerings, she said, are Rejuvenating Waters – a combination of steam, hydrotherapy and massage to cleanse the body and promote healing – and the Healthy Lifestyle consultation that offers guests an opportunity to examine life issues such as grief, relationships and sexuality. Zuckerman believes that Canyon Ranch is a world leader among destination health spas in many ways. It transformed the spa industry from one of pampering to a concentration on fitness, health and wellness. It’s responsible for the professionalism of the industry, and his Canyon Ranch Institute educates underserved populations around the country on how to maintain a healthy lifestyle through exercise, behavioral change and nutrition. Canyon Ranch is one of the first local businesses to reach an international awareness, a boost for Tucson’s tourism sector. And it allowed Zuckerman and his wife to help lead University of Arizona to national and international acclaim through their major donations to what is now the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, both housed at UArizona. While Canyon Ranch offers exercise classes, skin treatments and outdoor

sports, it takes on a more medical bent than some other large spas and has a full medical staff, including experts in exercise physiology, life management and nutrition. Dr. Richard Carmona, the former U.S. Surgeon General, serves as chief of health innovations. “We are focused on evidence-based prevention, science-based precision and high-touch personalization,” Fisher said. One of Canyon Ranch’s most soughtafter medical programs is the DEXA body composition assessment, which measures total body fat, lean tissue and visceral fat using a low-radiation scan. In the first phase, a physician administers the test and advises the guest on how to reduce the risk for disease, Fisher said. The second phase includes an indepth meeting with an exercise physiologist who interprets the test data and helps the guest set goals for muscle mass and body fat levels. In 2017, the Zuckermans decided to retire, transferring ownership to John Goff, an investor partner since 1996. This change, according to Fisher, has not made the spa less locally driven. “Canyon Ranch Tucson remains the heartbeat of the entire brand,” Fisher stressed. “In addition to ownership enjoying time on property, they have entrusted an extensive leadership team to ensure Tucson management feels empowered to make decisions in the best interest of the guests, members and homeowners.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY CANYON RANCH

By Christy Krueger


CITY OF WELLNESS

Enid & Mel Zuckerman www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 65


BizSPA

Miraval, a World-Renowned Getaway Tucson Spa Offers Distinctive Wellness Programs

Public baths of the Greek and Roman times may have been the forerunners of our 21st century destination health spas, but they didn’t come close to the amenities and comfort offered to today’s spa guests. Case in point: Miraval Arizona. Miraval made its entrance in 1995 at a desert clearing north of Tucson that feels like a secret getaway. It is consistently recognized as one of the top destination spas in the world by the media and travel industries. The 400-acre sanctuary accommodations include luxurious guest rooms, therapeutic and meditative offerings, physical challenges and body-renewing treatments. It’s also had its share of celebrity appearances, including Debra Messing and Ellen DeGeneres. In 2007, Oprah Winfrey made a visit with a group of women who tried their hand at Swing and a Prayer, a challenge course in which guests face their fears by climbing a 35-foot ladder and swinging from a cable. Since it was purchased by Hyatt Hotels corporation three years ago, Miraval has expanded its brand, opening in Austin, Texas, last year and in Lenox, Mass., this spring. Jill Harlow, corporate director of 66 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

brand and marketing for Miraval Group, said Hyatt shares a philosophy with Miraval about caring for guests and helping them create a life in balance. “Hyatt saw that wellness was becoming more important to travelers and wanted to make a bold move to partnering with a best-in-class wellness brand,” Harlow said. During the past few years, Miraval has added numerous experiences here in response to guests’ growing interests. These include The Retreat at Miraval, a 22-villa enclave offering the property’s top accommodations; beekeeping classes; an organic farm, where guests can learn about farming practices; and a new educational kitchen. In partnership with Williams Sonoma, the Life in Balance Culinary Kitchen offers healthy cooking classes where guests learn techniques to help them make nutritious meals at home. Other popular activities at Miraval include underwater Thai massage, the floating meditation experience and noteworthy equine programs. Founded by Wyatt Webb 25 years ago, these horse offerings are on almost every guest’s itinerary, Harlow noted. “Wyatt has been making equine therapy synonymous with the Miraval ex-

perience,” she said. “Guests come from far and wide just to work with him, and we’re proud to say that he’s changed thousands of lives in his time at Miraval.” Although Hyatt is a giant conglomerate, Harlow said its leaders understand the importance of personalized attention and allowing Miraval’s specialists to heal the way they see fit rather than following handed-down corporate mandates. “While there are programming themes at all our resorts, the programming itself is largely different,” she said. “Hyatt recognized this aspect as essential to the Miraval DNA and is therefore very supportive at fostering our experts’ talent.” Harlow also explained that Miraval’s philosophy is to help its guests create an experience customized to their own wellness needs. “We offer hundreds of programs that focus on mind/body/ spirit well-being, which allows our guests to experience exactly what they need or something new that challenges them out of their comfort zones. “That’s often where our guests find the most growth.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY MIRAVAL

By Christy Krueger


CITY OF WELLNESS

Wyatt Webb

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 67


CITY OF WELLNESS

Area Resorts That House On-Property Spas

1

People come here to be in the sun and away from the cold. There’s something rejuvenating here.

1. Omni Tucson National Resort 2. Casino Del Sol Resort, Spa and Conference Center 3. The Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa 4. Loews Ventana Canyon Resort

2

4

5. El Conquistador Tucson, A Hilton Resort 6. Westward Look Wyndham Grand Resort & Spa 7. Hacienda Del Sol Guest Ranch Resort 8. JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa

6

7

9

10

9. Tubac Golf Resort & Spa 10. The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain 11. The Lodge at Ventana Canyon 68 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

– Mary Rittman VP Communications & Tourism Visit Tucson


BizTOURISM

The Allure of Southern Arizona Spas 3

Visitors Drawn to Desert for Relaxation, Renewal By Christy Krueger

5

8

11 www.BizTucson.com

The well-being of Tucson’s residents and its tourists is one of the hallmarks of the region’s economic health and vitality. “People come here to be in the sun and away from the cold,” said Mary Rittmann, VP of communications and tourism for Visit Tucson. “There’s something rejuvenating here, and it’s not just the traditional definition of wellness – relax and rejuvenate – but it’s broader: an intellectual wellness plus walking and hiking.” In fact, Visit Tucson created the 10year Metro Tucson Tourism Master Plan in 2018, laying out goals for the future, and “wellness is a key focus,” Rittman said. The region’s two destination spas, Miraval and Canyon Ranch, are worldrenowned and attract international visitors who want a unique wellness experience. Guests know these two resorts pull out all the stops, offering services and programs that may not be found anywhere else on the planet. Both have been consistently ranked as top worldwide spas by such publications as Travel + Leisure, Forbes Travel Guide and Condé Nast Traveler. While Tucson’s two destination spas draw people from around the world through their guest-centric innovations, the local resorts have picked up on the in-house spa trend and have made this amenity part of their ever-growing offerings. These include the Hashani Spa at JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa, the Sonoran Spa at West-

ward Look Wyndham Grand Resort & Spa and the newly expanded Elements Wellness Center at El Conquistador Tucson, a Hilton Resort. Resorts often package spa treatments with dining and multi-night stays for more bang for their guests’ bucks. Resort spa services and treatments range from haircuts and manicures to massages, facials and body wraps. Some therapies use products from the Sonoran Desert such as Tubac Golf Resort & Spa’s prickly pear body treatment and its mesquite vichy infusion. While Visit Tucson doesn’t receive economic impact numbers for the region’s resorts and destination spas, as they are grouped under accommodations, the resort spas are an important amenity that guests look for just as they like tennis courts, pools, golf and dining, Rittman said. “Your stay at a destination spa has an economic impact, but it’s sourced larger to keep the business anonymous,” she said. “We definitely talk about Miraval and Canyon Ranch being signature properties for each of their brands,” Rittman said. “And we talk about the fact that two of the top destination spas in the world are here in Tucson. That means this is a place that is naturally known for wellness. It’s not by coincidence that these two are here. We have sun and energy. We do support the idea that the Sonoran Desert is a place for wellness.”

Biz Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 69


CITY OF WELLNESS

PHOTOS: COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

BizEDUCATION

Rick Schnellman, Dean of the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. The newly expanded Skaggs Pharmaceutical Sciences Center built by DPR Construction; New labs at the expanded center. DPR Building Photos Courtesy of DPR Construction (Austin Tepper)

University of Arizona College of Pharmacy Opens Expansion New Space for Labs, Museum By Tom Leyde A cure for cancer, a cure for Alzheimer’s disease, a vaccine for the coronavirus. All and more could be discovered in new research facilities at the University of Arizona’s College of Pharmacy. The college held a ribbon cutting for a $26 million expansion project in February. It was the culmination of a goal set several years ago to enlarge the 70 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Skaggs Pharmaceutical Sciences Center at 1703 E. Mabel St., on the UArizona campus. The 20,000 square feet of new space and 12,000 square feet in renovated space means drug research will move forward at a faster pace, resulting in new drugs that will benefit people around the world, university officials said.

The expansion also includes 2,000 square feet to expand the College of Pharmacy’s History of Pharmacy Museum, scheduled to open later this year. The three-year project, said Rick G. Schnellmann, dean of the UArizona College of Pharmacy, “is transformative for the college. We definitely needed more space.” continued on page 72 >>> www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 71


CITY OF WELLNESS

BizEDUCATION

With this partnership and this building, we’re going to change lives forever.

JP Roczniak President University of Arizona Foundation –

continued from page 70 “This is a wonderful day,” said UArizona President Robert C. Robbins before the ribbon-cutting ceremony. “The College of Pharmacy has historically been a leader in the research of pharmacology,” he said. “It is one of the top colleges of pharmacy in the country. Discoveries will be made into new drugs that will help humanity. We look forward to great new things.” UArizona Foundation President JP Roczniak called the building project a true private and public partnership. “With this partnership and this building, we’re going to change lives forever,” he said. The project began with a $10 million challenge grant from the ALSAM Foundation. It’s a Utah-based trust founded by L.S. and Aline W. Skaggs, the same donors for whom the building is named. Major contributions were made by the college’s National Advisory Board members, alumni, faculty, students, staff and friends. A key focus of the expansion-renovation project was creating new chemistry labs for drug discovery and research. The expanded chemistry lab space will allow for more research in drug discovery, development, pharmaceutics, pharmacogenomics and pharmacology, Schnellmann said. “Space is needed because I can’t hire more people who do drug discovery unless … I have chemistry space,” Schnellmann said in a news release. “You can’t get to Part B if you don’t have Part A.” The project, built by DPR Construction, created chemistry and biology labs adjacent to each other, creating a faster flow from discovery to development of new drugs. Opened in 1982, the Skaggs Pharmaceutical Sciences Center has been the site of many research breakthroughs. Researchers have licensed a small-molecule drug aimed at shortening the lives of cancer cells. They have also developed therapies for Alzheimer’s disease and Down’s syndrome and developed one of the most promising influenza antivirals in preclinical development today.

Biz 72 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 73


CITY OF WELLNESS 1

2 3

4

74 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

5


BizHEALTH

HealthOn University Opens New Clinic is First Tenant of Trinity Office Building

PHOTOS: DAVID SANDERS

By Mary Minor Davis El Rio Health and Tucson Medical Center celebrated the second opening of the HealthOn concept, an innovative, integrated health and wellness primary care site, in the West University District. At its new location, HealthOn University will provide medical services, lab and imaging to businesses and residents located in the neighborhood. The clinic will also have midwifery services available, said Dr. Douglas Spegman, El Rio Health’s chief medical officer. The HealthOn concept first started three years ago with a Broadway location that opened in 2017. El Rio Health CEO Nancy Johnson said services in that first location have expanded to mental health care and the center has been very successful overall. When looking where to open additional HealthOn Clinics, El Rio Health captures local demographic data and assesses unmet needs or services that are not conveniently available for those residents, Johnson said. TMC HealthCare President and CEO Judy Rich said the partnership between the two community healthcare organizations is a natural fit. “Nancy (and El Rio) focus on primary care so that patients can stay out of TMC,” she said. “We are very much of that philosophy and support primary care so people can avoid going to the hospital.” Pima County Supervisor Richard Elias said that as a seventh generation Tucsonan, he has seen the evolution of El Rio Health expand tremendously

since its beginnings 50 years ago. “The strength that started El Rio continues to grow today,” he said during the opening ceremonies. “We stand on the shoulders of the people who built El Rio, making greater progress and treating more people in the way they need to have care offered to them.” The new clinic is the first tenant in the Trinity Office Building, developed by Randi Dorman and Rob Paulus, owners of R+R Develop, and Bourn Properties. Dorman said the initiative came about when Trinity Presbyterian Church approached R+R to develop a project to provide a funding source for the church, but also one that would enhance the West University neighborhood. “We stand here as an ‘overnight success,’ celebrating a project that took eight years to complete,” she said. The challenge, she said, was coming up with a concept that would bring a modern building into a historic area. This required an entirely new type of zoning process. With the help of City of Tucson leadership, Pima County, the West University Neighborhood Association and its Historic Commission, the building set a new precedent for downtown development. “We don’t do fake historic,” Dorman said. “We do compatible contemporary. It is hard to do what has never been done before, but it is worth it. This project is proof that we can honor the past while setting our sights on the future. We need to do that more in the city that

we love that is rich in history but full of great potential.” Dorman said the three-story, 25,000 sq.-ft. building features a number of design elements that created a sustainable space in its density, orientation and location. “We converted an infill lot, which was previously an underutilized surface parking into an active mixed use project,” she explained. “Everything from how the building is situated for solar efficacy, to LEED-certified windows and natural lighting, and its location to the modern streetcar really set the precedent for new construction in a historic district.” “This is a tremendous example of what a city, county and private sector partnership can bring to downtown,” noted Tucson Vice Mayor Steve Kozachik. “Because of businesses like those involved with this project, those who are willing to take risks and invest in the city, we are in a much better place financially than we were when I took office 10 years ago.” Dorman said the cost for the first phase of the Trinity building was $7.5 million, with two floors available for leasing. She also noted that phase two of the project will include a 58-unit apartment building with ground floor retail around the corner on Fourth Avenue. “We think anyone who would like to elevate their image and attract a modern workforce would love this space,” she says. “That could be a range of industries.” Biz

1. Nancy Johnson, CEO, El Rio Health 2. Dr. Douglas Spegman, El RIo Health’s chief medical officer 3. Randi Dorman, co-owner of R+R Develop 4. New HealthOn University in the West University District. The new clinic is the first tenant in the Trinity Office Building, developed by Randi Dorman and Rob Paulus, owners of R+R Develop, and Bourn Properties. 5. Judy Rich, president and CEO, TMC HealthCare www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 75


Northeast View first building UA Tech Park at The Bridges

From left â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Elaine Becherer, Chief of Staff for Mayor Regina Romero; Betsy Cantwell, SVP for Research and Innovation, University of Arizona; Richard Fimbres, Tucson City Council Member, Ward 5; Dr. Robert C. Robbins, President, University of Arizona; Carol Stewart, Associate VP, Tech Parks Arizona; Eric Smith, Executive Director, University of Arizona Center for Innovation; Matt Jensen, Partner, The Boyer Company

76 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Street Names for the University of Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tech Park at The Bridges

www.BizTucson.com


BizTECHNOLOGY

The Refinery A New Project at Tech Park at The Bridges

The Corporate Zone

The Business Zone

The University Zone

The Technology Zone

A few shovels full of dirt set in motion a major new project at the University of Arizona’s Tech Park at The Bridges in South Tucson this February. The first multitenant building at the Tech Park at The Bridges, expected to be completed by summer 2021, sets off a wave of possibilities in technological innovation and adjacent development at The Bridges. “I see this new park as another catalyst and driver for university-based economic development, a place where new ideas are incubated and businesses are formed, a place where university innovation can move at the speed of business,” said Carol Stewart, associate VP for Tech Parks Arizona. Named The Refinery, the joint project between Tech Parks Arizona and The Boyer Company will be a four-story, 120,000-square-foot building with offices for both academic and private users, including the new offices for Tech Launch Arizona, which commercializes inventions resulting from research at UArizona. Half of the space is committed for commercialization and innovation activities for the University of Arizona. The University of Arizona Tech Park at The Bridges is a 65-acre community of innovation that is part of a 350-acre master plan. The Bridges is north of Interstate-10 and bordered by Kino Parkway to the east, 36th Street to the north and the Union Pacific Railroad to the west. “This is just the beginning,” UArizona President Robert C. Robbins said of the new building at the groundbreaking. “Great things are happencontinued on page 78 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 77

IMAGES: COURTESY TECH PARK ARIZONA

By Tom Leyde


BizTECHNOLOGY continued from page 77 ing here on the south side.” Robbins foresees dynamic infrastructure being put in place such as the extension of the streetcar line and Cat Tran shuttle services to make connections flow, removing any potential barriers to connectivity between the two campuses. “This is an incredible place with incredible people,” he said. “We’re going to do great things here. … This is a monumental day. “This is going to be a catalyst that helps put us on the map and make the world a better place.” The building’s name, The Refinery, was chosen because of its proximity to the talent and bright minds that can be mined at UArizona, which serves as a workforce pipeline to companies located here. “If you want a high producing refinery, you build close to the mine,” said building developer Matt Jensen, a partner in The Boyer Company, which is based in Salt Lake City and has an office in Phoenix. The company has been in business for nearly 50 years,

78 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

completed multiple university-related research park developments and has an established relationship with UArizona. Swaim Associates designed the build-

I see this new park as another catalyst and driver for universitybased economic development, a place where new ideas are incubated and businesses are formed, a place where university innovation can move at the speed of business.

Carol Stewart Associate VP Tech Parks Arizona –

ing. Construction is expected to begin in May and local Tucson contractor CORE Construction has been selected as the general contractor for the project. The Refinery is part of the 20-acre Technology Zone of the Tech Park at The Bridges, one of four zones in the park’s master plan. The three others are University, Business and Corporate zones. All four zones will allow medium and large technology firms to leverage research resources by partnering with UArizona. The Bridges includes Tucson Marketplace at The Bridges, at 1260 E. Tucson Marketplace. The shopping center has 17 stores and businesses, including Costco, Walmart, Cinemark Theaters and First Convenience Bank. An additional second project announcement was made - a four-story Marriott-branded, 100-room hotel will be built at the corner of Kino Parkway and Tucson Marketplace Boulevard. The hotel, a joint deal between HSL Properties and Tech Parks Arizona, is expected to break ground the summer of 2020, as well. Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 79


>

PHOTOS: COURTESY ASID

BizDESIGN

Clockwise – Famous Sam’s photo by Robin Stancliff; Sol y Luna photo by Benjamin Cobb; The Venue: Brian Gassel

ASID Top Design Winners By Elena Acoba Interiors In Design and MAR Designs were the top commercial design winners at the American Society of Interior Designs Arizona South gala in September 2019. The awards program recognized work in 21 commercial and residential categories: Famous Sam’s MAR Designs owner and designer Andrea Rodriguez took two first-place awards – singular commercial space and commercial product design – for her work on the new Famous Sam’s sports restaurant and bar at River Road and La Cholla Boulevard. The new restaurant is a relocation of a 24-year-old Famous Sam’s. The owner wanted the design to attract regular

customers who see it as their neighborhood bar while updating the look to attract new customers. An open space allowed for easy views to all sections – pool tables, a gaming area, karaoke stage, 10 televisions, and a center bar surrounded by tables. A wall is painted to look like the sideline of a football field. Long tables accommodate viewing parties. Banks of LED ceiling lights can be changed into sports team colors to add to the ambience. Old-style neon signs continue the neighborhood bar feel. Student Housing The Interiors in Design team – Eva Muzaite, Brandy Holden and Ana Fernandez – earned first place in the cate-

gory of commercial design under 5,000 square feet for their work on the reception area of Sol y Luna student apartments at Tyndall and Park avenues. To soften the expansive concrete space, they used oranges for modern vinyl seating and blue hues for the walls. What they called “grungy” white wallpaper was replaced with commercial grade black and white wall covering that’s easier to clean. The firm’s other first-place award was for a commercial space over 5,000 square feet – The Venue, a student housing complex in Baton Rouge, La. The project included converting a cinema into a study lab, updating a lounge area and using Louisiana State University’s school colors in an upscale feel.

Biz 80 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


SPECIAL REPORT 2020

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

ANDREW WEIL CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE

25th Anniversary


82 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizHEALTH

Dr. Andrew Weil Integrative Medicine’s Visionary Force

The front-row seat to the future of medicine belongs to Dr. Andrew Weil – founder and director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona. His boundary-pushing efforts are the force behind healthcare’s increasing focus on a whole-person approach to healing. The model he has created is stirring new buzz as it reaches across multiple disciplines in ways that are reducing costs, improving patient outcomes and re-designing the education of health practitioners. “The term ‘integrative medicine’ is now totally accepted in academic discourse – and poised to influence changes in healthcare,” Weil said. “The majority of the nation’s medical schools now have Integrative Health initiatives either in clinical care, research or education – and there are waiting lists for our fellowships and other programs. We’re opening a model integrative clinic with Banner Health that will be replicable and sustainable.” Weil’s relentless advocacy for integrative healthcare took a significant step forward last year, with his $15 million gift to name the integrative medicine center at UArizona and establish two endowed chairs and an endowed fund for the internationally recognized program. Construction of the center’s new home on campus is slated to begin in the fall, ensuring the school’s status as the pioneer in integrative medicine education, research and innovation. Propelling a whole-person approach to health is Weil’s lifetime passion, rooted in his Philadelphia upbringing. Weil’s grandmother and mother – enthusiastic gardeners who planted bulbs in their rowhouse window boxes – encouraged his love of plants. Attending Philadelphia’s Central High www.BizTucson.com

School reinforced these botanical interests, and in his senior year, a bulletinboard notice led Weil to enter a national essay contest. He placed as a semi-finalist and won a full scholarship to an experimental school that enabled him to travel internationally for an academic year and experience other cultures. On his return, Weil entered Harvard University, where he majored in biology with a concentration in botany under Professor Richard Schultes, known as the godfather of modern ethnobotany. His career interest in medicinal plants began here. Weil continued to study the properties of medicinal and hallucinogenic plants through his training at Harvard Medical School, and received his medical degree in 1968. For nearly a decade, Weil pursued journalism more than medicine as a career – traveling and writing about indigenous healing systems. It was on one of these trips – he planned to drive to Oaxaca, Mexico to deliver a baby for a friend – that Weil’s car broke down in Tucson. His first experience in the Sonoran Desert was transformative. “I had always loved cactus, and grew them in my dorm room,” Weil recalled. “I remembered seeing Walt Disney’s ‘The Living Desert’ as a kid, and that film – shot in and around Tucson – made a strong impression on me. So, I decided to stay, and rented an old stone house at the mouth of Esperero Canyon.” From his desert hideaway, Weil continued writing for various magazines – until the UArizona asked him to do a lecture on cannabis. “The lecture, for first- and second-year students, was well received and the organizers of the course – in Human Behavior and Development – asked continued on page 84 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 83

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Monica Surfaro Spigelman


BizHEALTH continued from page 83 convinced me to back up a step and create a me to stay on as an adjunct professor,” he said. fellowship for physicians who had completed “I had been rootless, making my living as a their residency training.” journalist, and it was nice to have ties to an inIn 1994, from a room in a trailer in the stitution. Cannabis was the subject of my early College of Medicine’s parking lot, Weil estabwork. I diversified by giving lectures on my new lished the world’s first program in integrative interests in alternative medicine (no one knew medicine. what that was), healing and mind-body interac“We began by inviting leaders from 12 diftions.” ferent fields to a weekend retreat, where we The lectures at the UArizona College of hammered out the basics of a curriculum in Medicine became the basis of Weil’s first book, integrative medicine. Then, we advertised for “Health and Healing,” which laid out the phiphysicians to come to Tuclosophy of what would son for a two-year fellowlater become integraship. Four came.” tive medicine. That “For the first few years, popularized Weil as we trained just four docthe guru of alternative tors at a time,” Weil said. medicine and elevat“Since then, we have ed his leadership in a trained thousands more fringe movement that through an online fellowevolved into a mainship (with residential weeks stream phenomenon. in Tucson). Our graduWeil never intended ates are in all specialties, to see patients, but not only from the U.S. when they started but from many countries showing up at his Tucaround the world.” son doorstep after the Weil’s work at AWCIM book and the lectures, has brought healthcare to he reluctantly got into an inflection point. From it. “At first, I said I was the original four residenpracticing natural and tial fellows, the center’s preventative medicine. portfolio now includes a Sometime later, I came trail-blazing in-residency to use the term ‘integraprogram, as well as leadtive.’ ” – Dr. Andrew Weil ing-edge research that inRobert Fulford, an Founder forms education, technolold-fashioned Tucson Andrew Weil Center ogy and practice. osteopath, became for Integrative Medicine Weil has also extended Weil’s mentor. “I had his teachings to the comjust chased around the munity at large – creatworld looking for healing online learning platforms, authoring new ers, and here in Tucson was the person who books and founding a group of True Food had the most to teach me, especially about the Kitchen restaurants (one of which may soon healing power of nature,” said Weil, who procome to Tucson). Weil lectures and continues duced a video on Fulford in 1986. his outreach through podcasts and appearancUntil this time, Weil had a marginal relaes on national television, including “Dr. Oz” tionship with UArizona. But all that changed and “Oprah.” He’s thinking about a new matwhen James Dalen became dean of the Colcha bar for downtown and writing a soon-to-be lege of Medicine. Dalen brought Joseph Alppublished cookbook with his daughter, Diana. ert, a good friend of Weil’s from Harvard, from Fulfillment for Weil also involves keeping the University of Massachusetts to be chief of centered at home in his routines, surrounded medicine. by three adoring Rhodesian ridgebacks, tend“Joe and I had dinner shortly after he aring his lush vegetable garden or cooking a meal rived, and he asked me what I wanted to do, for friends. “For a lot of my life, I’ve felt that I now that I ‘had friends in high places,’” Weil was ahead of the times,” Weil said. “I feel very recalled. “I said I wanted to change all of medfortunate that I’ve lived to see the mainstream icine by creating a residency in a field called catch up with all this.” integrative medicine. We met with the dean, but since the field didn’t exist yet, Jim Dalen Biz

The term ‘integrative medicine’ is now totally accepted in academic discourse – and poised to influence changes in healthcare.

84 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

www.BizTucson.com www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 85


BizHEALTH

Integrative Medicine Comes of Age

A History of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine By Monica Surfaro Spigelman

The landscape in modern medicine is shifting, and the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona is at the core of this disruption as it reaches 25 years. When Dr. Andrew Weil arrived on the scene in the 1970s, Tucson was already well known for the health benefits of a dry, sunny climate. The Desert Sanatorium on Grant Road was a popular gateway to personal rejuvenation and treatment of chronic illness. Although a depression and a world war spurred the sanitorium’s demise, Tucson reshaped itself as a health mecca, with dude ranches, nature trails, retreat houses, therapy centers and health resorts all capitalizing on the desert surroundings. In 1975, UArizona invited Weil to lecture medical students on marijuana and alternative modalities. By the 1980s, those lectures on mind-body interaction and healing became part of the UArizona’s College of Medicine curriculum. His theories were compiled in his bestseller, “Health and Healing,” a book that clarified the changes needed in medicine and opened the door to discussions of an integrative scope in the field. “Cannabis was my old work – my new interest was in alternative therapies,” Weil said. “I had no illusions at the time of changing things in medical school, but I 86 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

wanted to teach students about a natural, preventative and more integrative practice of medicine.” Weil proposed the creation of a new residency in integrative medicine to the College of Medicine in 1993. Dean Jim Dalen, who took a significant risk among his peers to support Weil’s vision, recommended beginning the program as a fellowship. A panel of experts convened to develop a curriculum and, in 1994, UArizona established the world’s first Program in Integrative Medicine, with Weil focusing the mission on education, clinical care and research. The two-year residential fellowship, the cornerstone of the AWCIM’s educational programs, ultimately was established in 1997, funded completely by private donors. That same year, UArizona’s first Integrative Medicine Consultative Clinic opened, providing broad-reaching consultations and recommendations for preventive care for the community. For the next decade, Weil and the school focused on longterm needs of this emerging field. Scalability was key for his program. Together with seven other medical schools, UArizona founded the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine (recently renamed the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health) to help www.BizTucson.com


shape standards and curriculum. Weil’s two-year residential fellowship for primary care physicians was adapted as an online program with three weeklong residential intensives. In addition to training midcareer physicians from a full range of medical specialties, the fellowship also attracted nurse practitioners and pharmacists. Emerging Leadership

In 2000, one graduating residential fellow was tapped by Weil to become executive director of the growing program. Dr. Victoria Maizes, who was already internationally recognized as a public-health leader, helped steward the program and engage new collaborators. Multiple innovations followed her appointment. “How you help people lead healthy lives had been a central thread throughout my career,” Maizes said. “Dr. Weil is a brilliant visionary and I knew our collaboration could take the program further.” With support from the U.S. Department of Education, an integrated Family Medicine Residency was developed with six partner institutions selected from urban and rural settings. In 2008, an IM in Residency training model was developed and merged into the residency curriculum at eight family medicine programs, which piloted the initiative. That same year, the program was designated as a Center of Excellence and officially named the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine. The National Institutes of Health awarded the center a National Research Service Award Institutional Research Training Grant in 2001. Bravewell, a collaborative of leading philanthropists, launched a Bravewell Fellows Program at the center in 2005. In 2007, Weil was among six integrative medicine leaders whose pioneer work was honored by the Bravewell Collaborative. By 2010, the center had entered negotiations with the prominent North American certifying entity, American Board of Physician Specialties, to develop board certification in integrative medicine. The center also hosted the first national conference on integrawww.BizTucson.com

MILESTONES

tive mental health. With demand growing, the fellowship began accepting two classes per year in 2011. The IM philosophy, education and practice were enthusiastically embraced by UArizona medical students, who created an IM club with center faculty serving as advisors. Student interest inspired an expansion of the medical student elective and the development of the IM distinction track led by Dr. Randy Horwitz in 2011.

1994

Program in Integrative Medicine established.

1997

Residential Fellowship program began enrolling four physicians per year.

Evidence and Environment

1999

Integrative Medicine Consultative Clinic developed at the University Medical Center.

Research continued to be the crucial component to quantify the advantages of IM and build a durable model. Dr. Esther Sternberg, a rheumatologist and biomedical researcher at the National Institutes of Health, whose pioneering discoveries in the science of mind-body interactions caught the attention of Weil and Maizes, was invited to speak at the center’s 2010 Integrative Mental Health Conference and ultimately joined the center as director of research in 2012. Sternberg also joined the faculty of the UArizona College of Medicine and established the Institute on Place, Wellbeing & Performance – linking the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture with the College of Medicine and the AWCIM to fully encompass the role of the built and natural environment in health, well-being and healing. The institute’s spotlight on sensorand evidence-based design and health research linked its expertise with industry, government and other UArizona partners, including the College of Science, Department of Psychology, College of Engineering, College of Nursing and Data Science Institute, among others. Multiple studies using wearable sensors, as well as new devices of the center’s own design, measure the effects of the environment on human health. Building the Bottom Line

Given the national conversation on healthcare costs, the center sought to validate the cost effectiveness of the IM primary care model. With the opening of the University of Arizona Integrative Health Center in Phoenix in 2012, the center began a three-year continued on page 88 >>>

PIM, together with eight other medical schools, founded the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine. Renamed the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health, it has grown to 76 North American members.

2000

New Fellowship program began enrolling 40 physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. In 2010, the 1,000-hour curriculum with residential weeks expanded to two classes per year.

2002

2002–2007 PIM awarded a $1.3 million NIH T32 Research Training Program Grant for 20 fellows, as well as a $5 million Center for Pediatrics NIH grant.

2004

Integrative Family Medicine national initiative was launched at six residency sites creating a joint family medicine residency/integrative medicine fellowship. Annual Nutrition & Health Conference convened (2004–2019) Environmental Health Meeting (2004–2018) Integrative Mental Health Conference (2009, 2010, 2019)

2005

Bravewell Fellows Program awarded 88 scholarships over six years. Alumni Association founded.

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 87


BizHEALTH

MILESTONES 2007

Jones-Lovell Endowed Chair in Integrative Rheumatology established – Dr. Andrew Weil recipient.

2008

Integrative Rheumatology offers fulltuition scholarships to fellowship for academic rheumatologists. Twelve Jones-Lovell Rheumatology scholarships awarded to date. PIM designated a Center of Excellence by unanimous vote of the College of Medicine deans and center heads, and confirmed by the Arizona Board of Regents, becoming the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine. Integrative Medicine in Residency – National curriculum in integrative medicine launched in eight family medicine residencies. Currently 85 institutions have adopted the curriculum in five specialties – Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and OB/GYN.

2009

Oxford University Press began publication of the Andrew Weil Integrative Medicine Library, a 17-volume textbook series to date.

2011

The Integrative Medicine Distinction Track was unanimously approved by the UA College of Medicine. To date, 10-15% of each medical class has enrolled.

2012

AWCIM opened UArizona Integrative Health Center, a three-year pilot project designed to provide world-class integrative primary care and study the model of care.

88 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

continued from page 87 research project to develop that model, study outcomes and fuel the national conversation on insurance reimbursement for IM and preventive medicine. The complex discussion for board certification that had begun several years earlier came to fruition in 2013, with the founding of the American Board of Integrative Medicine. AWCIM’s Horwitz was nominated and selected as the founding chair. Competencies were determined and a validated exam was created. In 2015, the first diplomats were awarded board certification. The first national online pediatric integrative medicine curriculum also launched in 2014 at six sites in partnership with many fellowship alumni. Complementing its physician education, the center developed a shorter fellowship to train allied health professionals that same year.

Awareness of and support for the field of integrative medicine now was reaching across specialties and professions. The center established the National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare in cooperation with the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health and the Health Resources and Services Administration. The NCIPH has continuing impact on interprofessional healthcare team training, and was responsible for creating a 33-hour Foundations in Integrative Health online course, the first of its kind. FIH is currently in use at 79 sites around the nation, as well as by the Allina healthcare system, which offered FIH to its 25,000 employees. The VA licenses the course for 2,000 users each year. The ‘Well-Being of Place’

Sternberg’s focus on collaborations has led to new studies measuring the impact of the built environment on human health and www.BizTucson.com


gathering for design-related industry professionals. At the 2016 AIA Convention in Philadelphia, they presented their work in an interactive, immersive experience called “Rooms for Wellbeing.” The exhibit engaged visitors in simulations and used wearable sensors to show effects of environmental factors on stress responses. The exhibit won “Best in Show, Small Booth Category” and AIA plaudits. The center and the institute have continued to lead the way in research employing wearable devices to measure health and performance. Collaborating again with government, military and industry partners, the institute has developed a sweat biomarker device program, which aims to non-invasively measure molecules in sweat.

MILESTONES 2014

The Institute on Place, Wellbeing & Performance established as a collaboration between AWCIM, the College of Medicine–Tucson, and the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture.

2015

well-being. After coming to UArizona, Sternberg continued her now 20-year collaboration with the U.S. General Services Administration, in a project called “Wellbuilt for Wellbeing.” The project uses wearable devices to measure the impact of the built environment on health, wellbeing and performance. “The GSA is the government agency that builds and operates all non-military federal buildings with more than 370 million square feet for over one million employees,” she said. “Our collaborations are tracking the environmental factors that affect workers’ happiness, health and productivity. We’re also studying the effectiveness of IM interventions on performance.” Sternberg and her GSA colleagues have presented their findings globally, including at the National Institutes of Health, the American Institute of Architects and the Greenbuild International Conference and Expo – the world’s largest www.BizTucson.com

The Integrative Health Coaching program launched and in 2017 became one of the inaugural groups to receive certification by the new National Board for Health & Wellness Coaching. AWCIM awarded a HRSA grant to establish the National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare.

Tools for Digital Natives

The center has fully embraced technology as a creative partner in IM online programming. An Integrative Health and Lifestyle program (known as IHeLp) is open to a variety of allied professionals, and the center will soon release its My Wellness Coach, the center’s first interactive self-care app for the public. More specialized courses for techsavvy, next-generation medical professionals are in development. The center has launched a free online integrative cancer-care tool kit to help as a public resource. Eight episodes of the center’s first public podcast will air this spring. In 2020, the horizons of IM appear unlimited, impelled by Weil’s recent $15 million gift to establish the new name of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine. His investment, added to his previous $5 million gift, also established the Andrew Weil Endowed Chair in Integrative Medicine, the Andrew Weil Endowed Chair for Research in Integrative Medicine and the Andrew Weil Endowed Program Fund for Integrative Medicine. In 25 years, AWCIM has grown from a buzzword to a collective enterprise of education, practice and research, positioning IM in the forefront of medicine.

The Integrative & Healthstyle program (known as IHeLp) launched to train licensed health professionals including nurses, dietitians and therapists.

2017

My Wellness Coach debuted, an online tool designed to result in wellness for underserved patient communities.

2019

CanHEAL: Cancer Health Empowerment, Advocacy and Learning pilot project launched AWCIM’s first free, in-depth, online patient-centered toolkit for integrative cancer care. $15 million gift from Dr. Weil, renaming the center as Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine. In development: Specialist-specific IMR programming will provide a short curriculum to residency programs in Emergency Medicine, Anesthesia, Surgery and OB/GYN.

Biz

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 89


90 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizHEALTH

Dr. Victoria Maizes Guiding a Global Integrative Medicine Movement

If Dr. Weil is the soul of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, then Dr. Victoria Maizes is its gravitational pull – the powerhouse mix of vision, pragmatism and knack for gathering like-minded talent to wake the world up to the notion that health is interrelated. Maizes took the helm as the center’s executive director in 2001, helping grow a small program to what is now the most significant integrative medicine program in the world. Maizes senses that the time is right to continue this innovative repositioning of a broader, more collaborative approach in medicine. “As a society we thought conventional medicine would have the answers for everything,” she said, pointing to exciting developments around antibiotics, treatment of high blood pressure and joint replacements. “Medicine has done an amazing job and we continue to have advances that are truly remarkable. At the same time, we have a society with chronic diseases related to our lifestyle. And sadly, conventional medicine has not made healthy lifestyle a significant focus.” That’s a big part of integrative medicine – paying tremendous attention to people’s lifestyle – and training practitioners so they’re more comfortable discussing lifestyle and behavior changes. “Integrative medicine education is challenging the system to take on nutrition and physical activity, sleep, people’s www.BizTucson.com

relationships, environmental exposures and spirituality. We’re looking broadly at the root of what it is that makes us healthy or, sadly, more ill,” Maizes said. She was born and raised in New York City’s borough of Queens. Maizes’ parents were educators who stimulated her interest in public health. “I came into the world wired a certain way – and was always interested in what it meant to help people to stay healthy,” she said. At Barnard College, she fashioned her own major focused on health and society. Maizes then received her medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her residency in family medicine at the University of Missouri, Columbia. With public health a central thread in her career, Maizes joined the Santa Rosa, Calif. Kaiser Permanente health maintenance organization, and led a re-engineering effort. She became the chief of its strategic education. “As I became more passionate about patient-centered healthcare, I heard that Dr. Weil had started a fellowship program in Tucson,” she recalled. “I wasn’t feeling good about how the experience of practicing medicine had become an ever faster treadmill. It was going too fast and not looking closely at the root causes of illness. So, I came to interview with Dr. Weil. When I felt the mission of the program and my own continued on page 92 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 91

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Monica Surfaro Spigelman


continued from page 91 personal mission were so well-aligned, I moved from California to the desert. When I graduated from the fellowship, Dr. Weil asked if I could step into leadership, and I did.” Now, as the AWCIM director and inaugural holder of the Andrew Weil Endowed Chair in Integrative Medicine, Maizes works with Weil to expand the fellowship program’s global reach. She helped create the IM in Residency program to give foundational training to physicians. It is scalable – currently licensed at 87 institutional programs. Under her leadership, AWCIM also developed programs ranging from certification to self-paced online training, elective rotations and stand-alone continuing education. As founding co-chair of the education committee of the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine – which represents more than half of U.S. medical schools – Maizes also led a team of educators in developing objectives for medical students in IM. “Now we have growing numbers of medical schools addressing the mind-body interaction,” she said. “We’re not just teaching nutrition as part of biochemistry, but teaching cooking. The mind-body interaction is studied. The context of medical training is changing dramatically, and we’re talking about the social determinants of health in a different way.” This transformation in medicine to a total-person approach is hitting its stride with the announcement of a new home for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine on the UArizona campus. “It will be a campus, not just a building, housing innovative spaces themed around mind, body and spirit, all connected with spaces for people to walk in nature,” Maizes said. Among the center’s accomplishments, Maizes noted its early adoption of online interactive technology for practitioner training. Digital tools also are part of the center’s plan to encourage individuals across all socio-economic levels to take responsibility for wellbeing. Also, speaking to community needs, the center plans to open an integrative primary care clinic with Banner-University Medical Center Tucson. Maizes acknowledged a personal stake in this movement. She has a “learned appreciation” for the desert, embracing it routinely on hikes, or walking her river-rock home labyrinth. Candidly, she admitted that she was uncomfortable in this landscape when she first moved to Tucson two decades ago from California. “But I quickly learned that there is a way in which the desert makes you mindful,” she said. Maizes said the desert has taught her a new respect for ritual as a conduit for wellness. AWCIM incorporates a Native Americanstyle purification lodge as an optional activity for fellows, and even uses a talking stick within education programs. “We are respectful of where ceremonies originate and feel they are a very important part of medicine,” she said. “In facing suffering, medicine encounters more intimate experiences than other professions. Ceremony is one way we teach people how to hold this.” The desert is also the perfect center for the progressive integrative medicine movement. “It’s not surprising that Dr. Weil found an openness to his ideas here – the desert is not hierarchal, with only one point of view,” she said.

‘Body of Wonder’ Podcast Offers Health Tips to Public The “Body of Wonder” podcast is a new media program, launched by the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, that will dive into the latest integrative health news and research findings, and offer the public tips on steps toward a healthier life. Drs. Andrew Weil and Victoria Maizes will host the podcast, with the first season set to air eight episodes recorded at Weil’s Tucson home. The show will be available for free through a link on the AWCIM website, or through a number of channels including Apple iTunes Podcast, Google Play Podcast, Spotify and YouTube. In Season One, the podcast’s first guests include Deepak Chopra on consciousness, science journalist Donna Jackson Nakazawa on the latest breakthroughs in brain immunology and hope for neurodegenerative diseases like dementia, and Bonnie Kaplan, who will discuss the critical role of nutrients in mental health and development. The show is designed for anyone interested in improving health through integrative health and wellness practices. Questions for Weil, Maizes or podcast guests may be submitted via email to AWCIM, or coming soon, through this link: azcim.org/body_of_wonder.html. There will also be opportunity for listeners to leave questions through recorded voice messages which may be used in the show’s public broadcast.

Biz

Biz

92 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizHEALTH

Integrative Medicine Primary Care Clinic Planned Patients Partner with Health Team By Tara Kirkpatrick A new primary care clinic that puts into concrete practice the promising tenets of integrative medicine is planned to open in partnership with BannerUniversity Medical Center Tucson. Motivation for the adult clinic, planned for north Tucson in 2021, is fueled by the success of the University of Arizona Integrative Health Center – a pilot project in Phoenix that operated from 2012 to 2016 and received high satisfaction reports from its patients. “We believe Tucson is a pretty big market for us because of Dr. Andrew Weil’s reputation and there is demand for a model like this,” said Dr. Robert Crocker, director of strategic clinical planning and implementation for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine. “We know this model to be effective.” The UAIHC in Phoenix offered patients evidence-based, prevention-aimed approaches that combined conventional and complementary medicine. Patients met extensively with primary care physicians but also had access to a chiropractor, acupuncturists, behavioral health clinicians, a dietician, a health coach and a nurse. Patients were also ofwww.BizTucson.com

fered courses on stress reduction, nutrition and lifestyle, and could take yoga and tai chi classes there. They paid for the services with a hybrid model, combining health insurance reimbursement and membership fees, paid individually or by patients’ employers. For example, many of the Phoenix patients were employees of Salt River Project, one of Arizona’s largest utilities that partnered with the UAIHC to allow their workers to receive the clinic’s services. “Much of our success was because we were working with an employer,” Crocker said. “The result was that a number of their employees sought care at the clinic.” A 2017 study authored by Crocker and others in “BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine” noted that of 83 UAIHC patients who evaluated their experience, 97.6% definitely felt they received enough time with practitioners, 100% felt they were cared for as a person, 100% felt the practitioners respected what they had to say and 100% trusted the practitioners with their health. “That is powerful,” Crocker said.

“This really is whole-person, patientcentered care. You see the physician first, they spend a lot of time with you – an hour or more. You work together as partners to come up with a treatment plan.” The Tucson clinic would operate the same way. Crocker and his team are currently evaluating which practitioners would be included in the health team. All would need to have integrative medicine training. At the UAIHC, IM fellowship training was required for the primary care doctors and the staff completed a two-week online training – Introduction to Integrative Medicine – which included a thorough overview of current literature and approaches to treating common conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. “It’s important for us to find the very best people who are eager to work in this integrative medicine model and in a team environment,” said Crocker. The clinic is also looking for local employers to partner with as SRP did in Phoenix. “That from our perspective was a win-win,” he said. “We want to work with employers to create a culture of wellness.” Biz Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 93


BizHEALTH

Dr. Esther Sternberg Designing a Healthier Workplace

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

By Monica Surfaro Spigelman Dr. Esther Sternberg is working to bring a sense of place to wellness. As Director of Research and Inaugural Andrew Weil Chair for Research in Integrative Medicine, Sternberg’s work in the science of mind-body dynamics is helping to deliver the evidence needed to advance integrative medicine education and practice, and to develop alternative diagnostic devices that measure complex IM interventions on health and well-being. “What do stress, the brain-immune interaction and the built environment have to do with integrative health?” she said. “Everything!” Weil saw this way ahead, Sternberg said. “He knew there needed to be a movement toward a body of proof on how mindbody intervention makes you well.” Sternberg is also the founding director of UArizona Institute on Place, Wellbeing & Performance and holds joint UArizona appointments as professor of medicine and psychology. She first met Weil when she was invited to speak at the center’s 2010 Integrative Mental Health Conference in Phoenix. “I showed a clip of a PBS television special I had created, ‘The Science of Healing,’ based on my book ‘Healing Spaces,’ ” she said. Dr. Gulshan Sethi, a cardiothoracic surgeon who had taken the AWCIM fellowship, and his wife, Neelam, saw the clip and arranged for Sternberg to do a screening of the PBS special at Fox Theatre Tucson. “Dr. 94 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Maizes moderated a panel between Dr. Weil and me at the showing. It was very exciting,” said Sternberg, whom Maizes later invited to come to Tucson. Sternberg, a senior scientist and section chief at the National Institutes of Health at the time, met with the center’s team about data’s role in IM decision making. “I was a big city East Coast girl who fell in love with the desert,” she said. “I knew my evidencebased work would find a home here.” Sternberg’s vision of new frontiers in IM comes full circle in the center’s initiatives, using wearable devices to measure the impact of the built environment on health, wellbeing and performance. The research also provides foundational knowledge in the center’s core curricula, validating and converting findings to IM practice, which later can impact policy and flourish in the public domain. Her studies are fully embraced in the architectural plans for the center’s new building, which should break ground in 2021. Collaborations across UArizona and in outside networks are helping to accelerate the pace of Sternberg’s research. Teams like the Advisory Committee for the AWCIM’s new complex include architects from the UArizona College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, as well as advisors from the U.S. General Services Administration. Other projects, with engineers and chemcontinued on page 96 >>> www.BizTucson.com


Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 95


BizHEALTH continued from page 94 ists aiming to develop real-time wearable that he developed. At the time, it was not sensors to measure molecules in sweat, accepted that changing brain chemistry have engaged industry and government could be related to immune disease or that partners, including the Air Force Research stress could cause illness. This was a new Labs. Still others apply these technologies beginning for me.” to measure the impacts of the AWCIM’s Sternberg had a strong upbringing in stress management protocols. science. Both her parents were born in Romania, and her father was a physician who “Partnership is the essential catalyst for was transported to science and technological innovaRussian concentration, and through tion camps in World relationships, we’re War II. Convinced pushing the forehe could find peacefront of integrative ful uses for radiation health to build deafter the war, her favices and programs ther was one of the to optimize health pioneers in nuclear and performance on medicine. an individual basis,” Sternberg worked Sternberg said. in his lab in Canada As she delves into when she was 15 working with big and was exposed to data analytics for discussions with and integrative mediabout physicians, incine – it’s surprising cluding her father’s to learn that data colleague Hans Sewasn’t always Sternlye. This all laid the berg’s main interest. groundwork for her Sternberg reinterest in the body’s ceived her medical response to stress – Dr. Esther Sternberg degree and trained and environmental Director of Research & Inaugural in rheumatology at conditions. Andrew Weil Chair for Research McGill University Sternberg continin Integrative Medicine in Montreal, Canaues to close the loop da, then served on on whole mind-body the faculty at Washhealth through her ington University research and writin St. Louis, Mo. It was a Christmas Eve ings. Her next book on working spaces will emergency consult in Montreal in 1978 be published by Harvard University Press. that changed the course of her life into a Her ongoing collaborations are measuring career of research. stress, sweat molecules and other health “I came from a hard-core biomedical responses under different environmenbackground, and in the course of training tal conditions. She has even advised her as a rheumatologist, I saw a patient with a daughter and son-in-law, trained in architecture and professors at California’s Artvery rare and fatal form of epilepsy who Center College of Design, on a project for was being treated with an experimental a children’s burn center in Chile. drug,” she recalled. She is fully devoted to the promise this “The patient had developed an autoresearch holds: “To create adaptive enimmune scarring inflammatory disease. vironments that monitor health effects It looked like he had third-degree burns across his entire body,” Sternberg said. through wearable sensors and, in turn, link “The neurosurgeons didn’t know what health outcomes automatically through caused the patient’s condition. My very the Internet of Things to the environment first article, in the New England Journal around you to optimize your own health – of Medicine, described the biochemistry this is where the future is headed. It’s not of serotonin in this patient and the disease here yet – but it’s coming.”

What do stress, the brain-immune interaction and the built environment have to do with integrative health? Everything!

Biz

96 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


Your Own Wellness Coach Via New App

The Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine’s new wellness support app, called My Wellness Coach, will help individuals over age 18 learn about health, assess current behaviors, then create goals to improve lifestyle choices. My Wellness Coach will facilitate tracking and healthy behaviors in seven core areas – movement, nutrition, sleep, relationships, resilience, environment and spirituality. AWCIM tested the initial app over several years through focus groups and pilots, with input from representatives across the University of Arizona campus. A collaborative evaluation with El Rio Health Center included 40 participants, representing a diverse underserved population, who worked through My Wellness Coach and responded to surveys. Research findings were presented at El Rio’s Research Poster event last year, netting an award for Innovative Research. In 2019, AWCIM began a small study of UArizona athletes utilizing the app. The study will continue through 2020 to see how the app impacts resilience, health and performance in student athletes. Further collaborations, including employee wellness initiatives, are under consideration. My Wellness Coach will be available on the App Store and Google Play. The wellness app will work with any Android phone or tablet (5.1 or higher), as well as iPhone (iOS 12.2 or higher). The tool also will work on an iPad, with both English and Spanish language options. More information on the app is available at selfcare. arizona.edu.

Biz

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 97


BizHEALTH

The Programs

Integrative Medicine Education at Every Level of Medicine By Tara Kirkpatrick When Wisconsin allergist Dr. Randy Horwitz applied for Dr. Andrew Weil’s signature Fellowship in Integrative Medicine in 2002, he was looking for something he had lost – his passion for practicing medicine. “I was in a practice in Madison and I was seeing patients every 20 to 25 minutes,” said Horwitz, now director of the IM Distinction Track for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine. “It was like a conveyor belt. I was looking for something else.” So have many doctors since Horwitz. Since beginning with four fellows in 1997, AWCIM now celebrates more than 1,500 fellowship alums throughout 29 countries. Beyond the fellowship, the center has thoughtfully and methodically built a multi-faceted educational program that spans numerous medical specialties, training almost 1,000 new and continuing residents each year. Ultimately, AWCIM programs are now guiding the care of more than 8 million patients. “The initial goal of the fellowship program was to seed the country with leaders in integrative medicine,” said Horwitz. “And initially, it was a lot of doctors who were not satisfied with their medical practice. They were looking to reignite their passion for going into medicine.” Now, it’s not only seasoned doctors, nurse practitioners and physician as98 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

We are expanding in different areas, always thinking how can we have the most impact on the practice of medicine.

– Dr. Randy Horwitz, Director of the Integrative Medicine Distinction Track, Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine

sistants who want integrative medicine training. Students and residents want in on the growing movement. “There is a new generation coming and people are going for progressive change,” Horwitz said. “It’s a better way to practice medicine. You are taking an all-encompassing look at the patient and it’s more satisfying.” This was a vision that Weil had back in 1993, when he proposed the creation of a new residency in IM. James Dalen, dean of the UArizona College of Medicine at the time, suggested a fellowship model and a two-year, onsite program for primary care physicians was created. “Generous and visionary philanthropists supplied all funding for the program, which assuaged concerns from the dean’s critics who complained that state funds ought not be used to develop an unproven field,” wrote Dr. Victoria Maizes in a 2015 article in the Journal of Integrative Medicine. From 1997 to 2007, the residential fellowship was offered with four then eight fellows in training at any one time. “While the residential fellowship was a transformational experience for the majority of physicians who participated, it depended on philanthropy to sustain it and could only train limited numbers of physicians,” she wrote. “Scalability and financial sustainability were critical to the longterm needs of the field.” That’s when AWCIM took it online, www.BizTucson.com


with three weeklong, hands-on trainings. “Creating a mostly online fellowship was a fruitful gamble,” Maizes explained. “The online platform made it possible to partner with eager learners and gifted faculty anywhere in the world.” The program is now the largest fellowship program of its kind in the nation. “The roots are strong in the fellowship and over time, we have grown the trunk and now we are branching out,” said Horwitz. “We are expanding in different areas, always thinking how can we have the most impact on the practice of medicine.” AWCIM now offers an IM Distinction Track to give medical students access to its tenets at the earliest stages, an IM elective rotation for fourth-year medical students and residents, an IM in Residency program and an IM Pediatrics program and rotation. Combined with the fellowship, these programs comprehensively target practicing physicians, residents and medical students. They fuse conventional approaches with integrative areas such as nutrition, botanicals, mind-body interventions and traditional Chinese medicine. Each program is rigorous in its curriculum. Those are augmented by online courses in IM health and lifestyle, health and wellness coaching, physician wellbeing and, now, in the works are new digital tools for the public to take the initiative in their own health. AWCIM was also instrumental in founding the Academic Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine in 1999 with eight other medical schools to support and mentor academic leaders, advance IM education, research and clinical care, and to inform healthcare policy. And a decade ago, AWCIM helped create an American Board of Integrative Medicine, with the American Board of Physician Specialties, to offer board certification. “I am most proud that the center is regarded as the world leader in integrative medicine education,” said AWCIM founder Dr. Andrew Weil. “The curriculum we have developed and refined remedies the deficiencies in conventional medical education and prepares doctors and allied health professionals to practice the medicine of the future.”

BY THE NUMBERS Fellowship and Integrative Health & Lifestyle Program 1,500 alumni 570 students 29 countries IM Elective Rotation and IM Distinction Track 540 participants IM in Residency and Pediatric IM in Residency 1,163 graduates 1,000 current residents 87 institutional programs

Biz www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 99


CanHEAL:

A Free Online Cancer Tool Kit CanHEAL is a new online tool kit, developed by the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, to be a resource for patients who have just been diagnosed with cancer. This tool kit is already supporting thousands of users who have been touched in some way by cancer. Supported by the Scheidel Foundation, CanHEAL is an information resource that allows individuals to explore questions about the disease or treatment options. Among current users, more than 32% are cancer survivors and more than 25% identify as healthcare providers. Initially designed as a short course for patients, CanHEAL is now a flexible tool, allowing users to click through sections or use a keyword search feature to get answers to health questions. It is easy to explore by phone, tablet or computer. Sections, for example, feature discussions on mood and emotions during cancer care, the impact of environmental exposures and a lifestyle resources unit with wellness education tools. In one section called Care of the Spirit, users can learn more about mindfulness practices, healing rituals, contemplation or gratitude exercises. CanHEAL provides sections that explain how complementary therapies support wellness in conjunction with conventional western medicine treatment. The tool kit also covers side effects, safety, how to look for student clinics and how to find a practitioner. A feedback feature allows users to dig deep or ask follow-up questions. An AWCIM account name and password are needed to access this free community resource. Sign in to gain toolkit access at: cancertoolkit.integrativemedicine.arizona.edu

100 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


Conceptual Design Imagery Entry/Lobby

BizHEALTH

NEW ANDREW WEIL CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE:

A Beacon of Integrative Health Worker Wellbeing Drives Design CONCEPTUAL DESIGN IMAGERY: LINE AND SPACE

By Tara Kirkpatrick When the new Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine opens at the University of Arizona, it will offer concrete proof of what a healthy workplace can look like. The 34,000-square-foot complex of glass buildings, planned for UArizona’s north health campus, will showcase what is possible to enhance physical and emotional wellbeing at work – and serve as a flagship to the 25 years of normchallenging medical research and training forged by Dr. Andrew Weil and his devoted team. “It’s such an exciting opportunity – to expand these principles and incorporate them into a building that embodies integrative health,” said Dr. Esther Sternberg, AWCIM’s research director and head of the UArizona Institute on Place, Wellbeing & Performance. Her www.BizTucson.com

pioneering work in healthy spaces set the ambitious vision for the new design. The $20 million project, set to break ground next year, will offer a central headquarters for Weil, AWCIM faculty

and staff, which until now have been scattered across the city in different locations, including the original brick house on Mountain Avenue that served as ground zero for Weil’s transformative efforts in medicine that began in 1994. The new center will also serve as a mini-campus that will incorporate open, light-filled spaces where people can work collaboratively or privately. There will be a teaching kitchen, a “living lab” to test the impacts on health of new building technologies and products, large educational spaces, rooftop gardens and a smart system that allows the windows to open and close easily for fresh air exchange. One unique section of offices will extend like a treehouse over a greenbelt, fed by rainwater runoff. continued on page 102 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 101


BizHEALTH

Conceptual Design Imagery North Elevation continued from page 101 “It’s going to be very focused on being a healthy and productive work environment” said Kieran Richardson, the center’s director of operations. “Not only will it be an example of a healthy work space, we are also going to figure out the ideal positions for how people should work. It’s going to be the endless search for the perfect environment.”

102 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

“We are going to spend a lot of time thinking about the lights,” said Richardson. “There will be a lot of shade structures and angles and landscaping to mitigate the sun, yet still let in that ambient light. I get happy every time I see a new drawing.” There will be a lot of shade structures and angles and landscaping to mitigate the sun, yet still let in that ambient light. I get happy every time I see a new drawing. The building’s vision also calls for nontoxic materials to be used with no “off-gas-


sing” – which happens when chemical compounds from new products such as carpeting or paint evaporate into the air and can trigger sensitivities in people. The center’s “Living Lab” will also focus on testing new “green” products and bioresponsive materials. “We believe that the built environment is an essential component of integrative health, which can help prevent disease and optimize health,” said Sternberg. “Our research has proven that the design of the office environment can affect people’s stress and activity levels, their posture, even their stress levels and sleep quality when they go home at night.

This state-of-the-art office building will embody all these data-driven, science-based principles.” A noteworthy 2018 study in Occupational & Environmental Medicine, authored by Sternberg and her team, found that people in open bench seating were more active at the office than those in private offices and cubicles. That higher activity was linked to lower physiological stress after hours. Other findings in the study, carried out with the U.S. General Services Administration, showed workers who were more active and less stressed also had better sleep. The study is just one example of Sternberg’s international recognition as a leader in mind-body continued on page 105 >>>

Conceptual Design Imagery South Elevation

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN IMAGERY: LINE AND SPACE

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 103


BizHEALTH

Conceptual Design Imagery Demonstration Kitchen

Lower level floor plan

Upper level floor plan

Conceptual Design Imagery

Yoga/Classroom/Large Conference

104 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020


interaction in illness and healing and the role environment plays. Her best-selling books include “The Balance Within: The Science Connecting Health” and “Emotions and Healing Spaces: The Science of Place and Well-Being,” which was recognized by the president of the American Institute of Architects as an inspiration for the group’s Design and Health Initiative. “It’s an incredibly exciting time to work with builders and architects,” Sternberg said. “We have, at this point, a prescription for a healthy building and architects and designers are receiving it with open arms. They want to build healthy buildings and position themselves in the marketplace to show that they care about occupants.” Fittingly, the new center is designed by Line and Space, a Tucson architectural firm led by UArizona grads who also built the Poetry Center on campus. The firm strives for sustainability and environmental stewardship. Donated monastery bells that have resided on the ground floor of the Arizona Cancer Center could move to a planned meditation chapel within the AWCIM center. The university’s Center for Buddhist Studies will also find a new home there. “They needed a home and we saw a lot of synergy with them,” Richardson said. “Our building will serve as a model for healthy buildings and we look forward to welcoming in the community,” he said. “We also plan to connect more closely with the College of Medicine and the hospital. We plan to offer classes and workshops in the educational spaces and make it a community hub.” Biz www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 105

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN IMAGERY: LINE AND SPACE

continued from page 103


BizHEALTH Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine Capital Project

We are currently in the design phase of a new, landmark capital project that will be home to the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine. The center’s design will reflect the pioneering, innovative spirit of Dr. Andrew Weil and will support AWCIM’s work to inspire the pursuit of health and the transformation of healthcare. We believe the built environment is an essential component of integrative health, central to disease prevention and health promotion. Our research has proven that the design of the office environment can affect people’s stress and activity levels, their posture, even their sleep quality. This state-of-the-art campus will embody all these data-driven, science-based principles and will be an innovative model for buildings anywhere.

FOR LIMITED NAMING OPPORTUNITIES PLEASE CONTACT LaToya L. Singletary Director of Development University of Arizona Foundation Principal Giving at (520) 621-5996 or LaToya.Singletary@uafoundation.org. Other giving opportunities are also available at integrativemedicine.arizona.edu.

From left – Dr. Robert C. Robbins, President, University of Arizona; Dr. Andrew Weil, founder of UArizona Center for Integrative Medicine; Dr. Michael D. Dake, UArizona Senior VP for Health Sciences, and Dr. Victoria Maizes, Executive Director, Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine.

Thanks to Dr. Weil, University of Arizona the Heart of Integrative Medicine Just one year ago, Dr. Andrew Weil ensured the University of Arizona would be the epicenter of the integrative medicine movement with a $15 million gift to the school where his vision began 25 years ago. The noteworthy gift, which Weil said was the high point of his career, has made possible a modern new home for what will now be called the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine. The money, combined with his earlier $5 million donation, also established the Andrew Weil Endowed Chair in Integrative Medicine, the Andrew Weil Endowed Chair for Research in Integrative Medicine and the Andrew Weil Endowed Program Fund for Integrative Medicine. But more than that, the Harvardeducated physician turned visionary health guru further bolstered his dream for simply good medicine that began with a fellowship here in 1994.

As UArizona President Dr. Robert C. Robbins said in BizTucson in 2019, “All of what Andy has thought of and built upon over the years – you should eat the right foods, you should exercise, you should not smoke, you should get enough sleep, you should manage stress – if we all follow the guidance of our sage leader here, we’ll end up living longer, healthier lives that will be more productive and more fulfilling.” “To have the University of Arizona be the epicenter for this movement around the world, we have derived incredible benefits as a university,” Robbins said. “Andy is right. When you train others to go out all over the world, you can go to any city, any region of the world and find one of your fellows and they’re evangelizing your message all over the world and it came from the University of Arizona.”

Biz 106 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: CHRIS MOONEY

Naming Opportunities Available


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 107


BizBRIEFS

Lindsay Pearson Lindsay Pearson has become partner with Snell & Wilmer. The 2010 Vermont Law School graduate has been with the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tucson office for nine years as part of the commercial finance practice group. She concentrates on banking, commercial and real estate finance, and loan sales transactions, restructures and workouts. Pearson is a member of Angel Charity for Children and volunteered with Southern Arizona Legal Aid.

Biz

Jill Perrella Snell & Wilmer has added Jill Perrella as partner. She joined the law firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tucson office in 2012, four years after graduating from the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. She represents creditors and debtors in complex commercial bankruptcy cases and state court litigation. She volunteers for the U.S. Bankruptcy Court Self-Help Center. Perrella chairs the Arizona Public Media governance committee and is a Community Advisory Board member.

Biz www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 109


110 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

WOMEN WHO LEAD


BizPHILANTHROPY

Pam Grissom

Tireless Women’s Advocate to be Feted By Tiffany Kjos A Tucson native whose life’s work is to give women a boost is being honored with a prestigious award she’ll receive at a popular annual luncheon. At 70, awardee Pam Grissom isn’t slowing down. She helped girls and women gain confidence and poise at her successful talent agency in the 1970s, gives scholarships to young women so they can go to college, and continues to work tirelessly at Arizona List, which provides financial means for women seeking political office. The list of her nonprofit affiliations may be longer than her arm. Grissom will be honored April 28 at the 27th annual Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona luncheon, an event that draws 1,000-plus attendees every year. Of all the women she’s influenced, perhaps the luckiest is her daughter, Jessica Brandt. “As a kid, I always admired her and looked up to her and wanted to be like her,” said Brandt, who is on the board of directors for Arizona List, which Grissom co-founded. When she was growing up, her mom would make breakfast and they’d eat together, Brandt recalled, then her mom would “put on clothes and her perfume and go to work. I thought that was so glamorous.” Grissom counts among her blessings Brandt’s three children – 16-year-old Shelby, 13-year-old Luke, and 10-yearold Jake – as well as son-in-law Martin. “Her energy is amazing. She’s just got this fire inside that keeps her always thinking forward and moving forward and doing things toward her goals,” Brandt said. “She has an effect on women at the state level and also on the oneon-one level.” Grissom, who said she “luckily made some good decisions” financially, has www.BizTucson.com

used her wealth and influence to propel individual girls and groups of women toward better lives. Personally, Grissom provides scholarships to young women so they can attend college. Professionally, she’s worked to bolster the self-esteem and confidence of young women. Grissom founded the Grissom Talent Agency in the 1970s. After several successful years in business, the modeling industry started to trend toward superskinny models, and Grissom decided to head in a new direction.

WOMEN’S FOUNDATION OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA 27TH ANNUAL LUNCHEON Tuesday, April 28 For sponsorship opportunities or reserving tables and tickets, please contact Jill Bishop jbishop@womengiving.org or 520-622-8886, ext. 4

“I had a midlife correction,” she said. She became more involved in politics and, with a friend, she decided to help get more women elected in Arizona. So, in 1993, Arizona List was founded. “As a product of the ’60s, this really tapped into me feeling nothing is going to change in our country unless we have women creating policy,” Grissom said of her desire to help women achieve elected office. “I had experience in Emily’s List, a national organization, and I saw that if you put the right kind of training and the right kind of money behind women candidates, they could win. Women were traditionally still not viewed as

serious and they were not able to raise money the way men could,” she said. Today Arizona List has 1,000 members. Grissom fits the type of woman that the women’s foundation wants to recognize at its annual luncheon. “We honor a local champion that has demonstrated leadership and has advocated for women and girls in our community,” said foundation CEO Amalia Luxardo. “We are specifically honoring Pam this year because of her lifelong commitment to amplifying our voice as women. Pam is a true treasure for women and girls in Southern Arizona.” Grissom’s support affects a wide range of charitable groups, including Junior Achievement, the Women’s Foundation, Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona, the Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault, Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Tucson. She also supports Planned Parenthood, YWCA, KORE Press and a handful of national organizations. While Brandt grew up listening to Grissom talk about teaching girls how to make themselves feel good about themselves, she finally was struck by her mom’s impact on women when she was in college. “She started taking me to the Emily’s List annual convention in Washington, then she started taking other women,” said Brandt, 46. “She is always thinking about what was happening nationally and then bringing it back to Tucson.” “It’s nice that she’s getting recognized. She doesn’t do any of this work to be recognized,” Brandt said. “I think she never thought she’d be recognized and she kind of finds it embarrassing to be recognized, but she’s put a lot of effort and time into this community in so many different areas.”

Biz

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 111


PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

WOMEN WHO LEAD

Susan Gray

President & COO Tucson Electric Power

112 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizLEADERSHIP

First Female President in TEP’s 128-Year History By Jay Gonzales When Susan Gray arrived at Tucson Electric Power as a full-time engineer 23 years ago, it was easy to tell there was something different about her and where she was headed. The most noticeable was that she was a woman in the notoriously man’s world of operations at an electric utility. But what was most rare about that was it didn’t seem to matter. She had the capabilities, approach, drive and acceptance to carve a path to where she is today – the first female president in the 128-year history of TEP and its umbrella company, UNS Energy. “She’s the right choice for this job because of her experience with the company, her collaborative leadership style and her business knowledge,” said David Hutchens, who, until Gray’s promotion Jan. 1, held the positions of president and CEO. He is still the CEO of the company, but has ceded the daily operations to Gray as he attends to more of the business with UNS Energy’s parent company, Fortis. “It’s the perfect time for her skills to take over that role.” With titles and responsibilities now separated at UNS Energy and TEP for the first time in decades, Gray and Hutchens work as a team to keep the company on track with the many challenges it faces, including the impact of solar power on the industry, the reduction of fossil fuel usage, the company’s role in the community, and the importance of its 2,000-plus employees throughout Arizona. “I’m running the day-to-day, so this is an opportunity for me to take on a greater responsibility,” said Gray, who went from director to VP to SVP and COO and then to president in five years. She remains the company’s COO. www.BizTucson.com

“We just refreshed our strategy. Our CFO, Frank Marino, and I led that effort and we also created a new company vision statement and a new mission statement. I was able to lead all of that so it’s not like Day 1, I’m president; now we’re going to take a right turn. I’m responsible for a really well-run organization. I have the opportunity of inheriting that. A big part of it is carrying on with where we were already headed, and part of that is because I got to be part of deciding where we were headed before I was president.”

I’ve had an opportunity to connect with most of the people in this company. I think that builds some loyalty and some trust with those employees and they’re more willing to follow whatever vision I cast because they know me, and they know that I care about them. – Susan Gray President & COO Tucson Electric Power

Jim Pyers, a retired TEP VP and one of Gray’s mentors, said it was pretty apparent Gray was headed for a leadership role when she arrived to work in his area in 1997. That came after a stint as a student intern in 1994. She left the

company because it wasn’t hiring at the time and worked as a consultant before being hired back as an energy management system engineer. She began making her way through the operations side of the business in various engineering positions. “At the time, female engineers were not the norm,” Pyers said. “Being an engineer was one thing, but being in operations was something entirely different.” Pyers said Gray had an approach that he knew would make her successful in the male-dominated environment. “She knew what questions to ask and then she listened,” Pyers said. “I thought that she had leadership potential as time went on. She was, for lack of a better word, durable in an environment where females were the exception.” The durability came into play from the start when Gray arrived at the University of Arizona in hopes of becoming a doctor while competing on the UArizona swim team, which was one of the top college programs at the time. She remains a competitive triathlete today. As she discovered where she wanted her career to go, she changed directions in school a few times, ultimately putting herself on the leadership path. “I was pre-med studying biology for the first two years while I was swimming at the UA and was not a serious student at the time,” Gray said. “I thought, ‘Gosh, if I don’t get into medical school, what am I going to do with a biology degree?’ “I thought I could switch to biomedical engineering. At the time that was a master’s program, so you had to do your undergrad in either electrical or computer engineering. I didn’t really know continued on page 114 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 113


BizLEADERSHIP continued from page 113 that much about computers at the time, so electrical sounded more doable to me. I pretty much started over.” It took six years to complete her undergraduate degree in electrical engineering. She later added a master’s in business administration from the Eller College of Management at UArizona. While engineering was her education and her field, leadership was her goal, Gray said. “I enjoy solving problems and I think that’s what engineers do,” she said. “But I think I enjoy solving people problems more, and I realized that I had a knack for bringing people together to solve those problems. I found myself in an unofficial leadership role and I just thought that I could make a bigger difference if I took the leadership path.” Gray said that, as she began to work her way through the ranks at TEP, she didn’t necessarily see gender as the challenge so much as the time it might take her to move into leadership positions. She said she was in her 30s and saw the employees who held director posi-

114 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

tions as having put in a lot of years to get there. She had started a family and thought she would be limited in her advancement because – by choice – she preferred not to spend long work weeks away from her kids. “In some ways I was a reluctant leader, but I kept taking that next step because I felt like I could do it,” she said. “I didn’t necessarily aspire to be a vice president and I think part of it was just I hadn’t been exposed to the requirements of the position. Probably a couple of years before I became a vice president, I started warming up to the idea that it would be something I could do and would want to do.” Then it happened – fast. In 2015, she was promoted from director of design and construction services to VP of energy delivery. She was promoted to SVP and COO in 2019 and a year later took the helm as president. “Being exposed to the officer group, just being part of the conversations, you learn a ton,” Gray said. “You learn what kinds of questions they ask, what

do they think.” She took the initiative of working with an executive coach provided by the company and, through various self-assessment tools and 360-degree reviews, learned a lot about herself that she might not have otherwise realized. The knowledge gave her confidence that she was in the right place in her career and, more importantly, capable of leading the organization. “I think it held up a mirror and I saw some things I hadn’t seen. Other people saw more potential in me than I did. But you start to recognize, ‘Oh my gosh, I do have that potential,’ and it builds confidence. “I connect really well with people. I enjoy being with people at all levels in our organization. Coming up through operations, I’ve had an opportunity to connect with a lot of people – most of the people in this company. I think that builds some loyalty and some trust with those employees and they’re more willing to follow my vision because they know me, and they know that I care about them.”

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


Biz www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 115


Danette Bewley

President & CEO Tucson Airport Authority

116 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

WOMEN WHO LEAD


BizLEADERSHIP

Airport Chief Executive Has Aviation in Her Blood By David Pittman

Aviation is in the DNA of Danette Bewley, president and CEO of the Tucson Airport Authority. “I didn’t get where I am by myself. I had a lot of wonderful support, with my mom and dad being most influential,” Bewley said. Her father was a decorated naval pilot flying missions over Cuba. Her mother was a flight attendant. They met in 1962 when he was flying from Key West to Miami between missions. Bewley grew up in San Diego, where her father continued as a naval fighter pilot before working more than 35 years flying commercial airliners. “Aviation has been what I know from birth,” said Bewley, who became a pilot herself. “When I was young and someone asked, ‘What are you going to be when you grow up?’ …for me it was always centered on aviation. Even today, I still want to look out the window when a plane takes off. It’s just so amazing and fascinating.” Bewley was named TAA president and CEO in December, after serving on an interim basis since last July. Bewley, previously TAA’s vice president of operations and COO, replaced Bonnie Allin. Bewley has 30 years’ experience in commercial airport management. She came to TAA in 2012 after stints with airport authorities in RenoTahoe, Jacksonville, Fla., and San Diego. “Danette has a strong background as an airport executive and we’re fortunate that she was already a member of the TAA team,” said Lisa Lovallo, former chair of the TAA board. “Since Danette www.BizTucson.com

took over the leadership role, there has been a new willingness for the airport to be more closely connected to the community.” Bewley’s rise to the top position at Tucson International Airport coincided with several developments:

Sun Corridor Inc. and TAA introduced an “economic blueprint” that targets three TAA-owned land parcels for commercial development. The plan also envisions a possible new airport entrance and terminal connected to Interstate 10, “shovel ready” airport sites and incentivized trade zones.

• Officials of the National Guard Bureau, the city of Tucson, TAA and Aerovation signed a letter of intent to relocate the entrance to the ANG base from Valencia Road to South Park Avenue. Aerovation, a Tucsonbased aerospace technology firm, would be moved if the gate is built. The gate, opened in 1958, does not meet current military safety and security standards. The agreement, 7 1/2 years in the making, allows design work to begin. Congressional approval may be needed for full funding of the project.

Bewley delivered her first State of the Airport Address at the TAA annual meeting Jan. 27. She reported that TUS passenger numbers grew by 5% in 2019, making it the fifth-busiest year in the airport’s history. “We were just 2,800 passengers short

of topping 3.8 million passengers for the year,” Bewley said. “It would’ve happened had it not been for the FAA’s grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX in March that caused three of our largest airlines to reduce their schedules across their networks. The situation continues to affect us this year.” Bewley said TAA this year will embark on its largest ever construction endeavor – the Airfield Safety Enhancement Project. Currently, TUS has a main runway about 11,000 feet long and 150 feet wide and a smaller general aviation runway. In the project, the general aviation runway will be demolished. A new runway will be built parallel to the main runway. A taxiway will sit between them to provide additional elements to meet current safety standards. The project is currently estimated to cost $230 million and will take four to six years to complete. Design work is underway. Bewley told BizTucson she’s “been blessed” to work at great airports and travel throughout the country to grow her professional skills and knowledge base. “This is the fourth airport system I’ve worked for and I’d like it to be my last,” she said. “I really love it here. I would like to retire here in Tucson when it’s time for that. This airport and all of the programs and projects we have going on are so wonderful and engaging that you can’t help but feel passion for this industry.”

Biz Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 117


BizMILITARY

From left – Sandi Eghtesadi, Jon Volpe (with plaque), Col. Michael R. Drowley, Brig. Gen. Andrew J. MacDonald, Taunya Villicana, Mark Irvin, Marshall Dennington and Danette Bewley

Military Comfort at Tucson International Airport A newly renovated military lounge, paid for with public donations and contributions of materials and services from Tucson individuals and businesses, was officially unveiled at a Jan. 14 ribboncutting ceremony at Tucson International Airport. The lounge, which cost about $150,000 to refurbish, is used by traveling military members and their families. It’s located in the baggage claim area. “This is a project not just for the Tucson Airport Authority to be proud of, but our entire community. From the ground up, the military lounge has a refreshed feel and look,” said Danette Bewley, president and CEO of the Tucson Airport Authority. “We are so appreciative of the individuals and organizations that donated time, material and money.” Commanders of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and the Morris Air National Guard Base at TUS praised the renovation, saying it is an example of the outstanding support Tucson shows to the people who serve in the military. “The lounge is incredible,” said Col. Michael R. Drowley, commander of 118 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

both DM and the 355th Fighter Wing. “It gives our soldiers a place to put their gear and deployment packs and also provides comfortable surroundings that allow them to relax and focus on the mission ahead. A lot of hard work and dedication was put into this project and the personal touches included are phenomenal.” Those special touches include reclining, theater-style seating; a large flatscreen TV; a kitchenette equipped with a refrigerator, coffee makers and microwave; patriotic and aviation-themed paintings; storage shelves filled with pillows and blankets, and a well-stocked supply of bottled water, soft drinks and snacks. “Wowza” was the expression Brig. Gen. Andrew J. MacDonald used to describe the newly renovated lounge. MacDonald, commander of the Air National Guard Wing at TUS, said the lounge “provides an inviting environment for our soldiers. It makes me want to buy an airline ticket so I can use it.” The project was the brainchild of two close friends and community leaders: Mark Irvin, founder and CEO of Mark

Irvin Commercial Real Estate Services, and Marshall Dennington, owner of Temco Air Environmental, an air conditioning and heating servicing company. Irvin and Dennington care deeply about the military and served together as honorary co-commanders at DM for seven years. “We were flying from Tucson to go on a fishing expedition back in July 2018 when we happened to see the airport’s old military lounge,” said Irvin. “Having the lounge was a good idea, but we found it kind of depressing. It was furnished with old, used stuff, none of which matched. There was no plumbing. It was just a room. Marshall and I thought we could do better.” After getting TAA’s approval, Irvin and Dennington organized a fundraising campaign that raised $150,000 for the renovation. Nearly 80 individuals and businesses provided the cash donations and in-kind material and service contributions needed to get the job done. Plaques mounted inside the lounge identify the individuals and organizations that contributed to the renovation. Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: HAUS PHOTO CO.

By David Pittman


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 119


IMAGES: COURTESY SANTA RITA LANDSCAPING

BizBRIEF

Santa Rita Landscaping Wins State Awards The Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association recently honored Santa Rita Landscaping for its commercial maintenance of the Unisource/TEP building in downtown Tucson. The Award of Distinction for Commercial Maintenance under $25,000 was one of four top honors the landscaping company received at the annual awards held in Phoenix in November. The ALCA awards recognize projects designed and constructed in Arizona by professional contractors that achieve the highest landscape quality, provide unique solutions to landscape problems, conserve natural resources and enhance the environment. The Unisource/TEP building is a unique building that complements the revamped downtown, a Santa Rita press release said. “From the custom raised rustic planter beds to the liner run of ocotillos, the lush native plant pallet brings a striking image which ties into the theme of the building,” the release said. “Each section of the building has its own landscape setting that complements the uniqueness of its surrounding. Our objective is to continue to manage the landscape areas for this building with only the highest standards to bring out the intrinsic beauty while protecting the investment of the landscape environment for years to come.”

Biz

120 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 121


BizCONSTRUCTION

N E W

T O

M A R K E T

Project: Mister Car Wash Location: 2975 S. Kino Parkway Owner: Mister Car Wash Contractor: MW Morrissey Construction Architect: A23 Studios Completion Date: October 2019 Construction Cost: $2.1 million Project Description: The tunnel-design car wash with associated facilities is a ground-up new construction project.

Project: TMC ER Observation Rooms Location: 5301 E. Grant Road Owner: Tucson Medical Center Contractor: Lloyd Construction Architect: DLR Group Completion Date: November 2019 Construction Cost: $1.1 million Project Description: This roughly 5,000 square feet of renovation sees the addition of 18 beds and a nurse’s station for 24-hour observation of patients experiencing chest pains.

Project: University of Arizona’s Oro Valley Veterinary Medicine Facility Location: 1580 E. Hanley Blvd., Oro Valley Owner: University of Arizona Contractor: Lloyd Construction Architect: GLHN Architects & Engineers Completion Date: August 2019 Construction Cost: $4.1 million Project Description: An existing pharmaceutical research laboratory was renovated to become a collaborative learning space and practice laboratory for the UArizona College of Veterinary Medicine.

122 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Fall 2019

>>>

BizTucson 123


BizCONSTRUCTION

N E W

T O

M A R K E T

Project:

Newport at Amphi

Location:

Northwest corner of Prince Road and Stone Ave.

Owner:

Newport Partners

Contractor: Tofel Dent Construction Architect: Poster Mirto McDonald Completion Date: Second quarter 2021 Construction Cost: $7.8 million Project Description: This is a 40-unit apartment project for families, funded by Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, and is Newport Partnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first Tucson project.

124 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 125


BizBRIEF

Heart Doctors Partner to Best Serve Region Physicians from the Tucson Heart Group are joining Pima Heart & Vascular to create the largest, privately owned cardiovascular practice in Arizona. When the transition and other partnerships are completed, Pima Heart & Vascular will have 61 providers and 360 support staff working at 30 locations throughout Southern Arizona. The partnership will increase collaboration among medical, clinical and administrative staff, as well as, streamline systems and processes. “With two highly reputable, locally owned cardiovascular groups, it just makes sense to work together,” said Pima Heart & Vascular President Dr. Ajay Tuli. “This partnership will help us provide a better, more cohesive patient experience while maintaining all of our

126 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

business and operations within Southern Arizona.” The five physicians of the Tucson Heart Group and their current staff will continue to see patients in their offices. They started the practice in 1994 and maintain locations in Tucson, Douglas, Sierra Vista, Willcox and Nogales. Pima Heart & Vascular was founded in 1980 with a presence in west Tucson. Today, it has offices in Green Valley, Oro Valley, Benson, Douglas, Nogales, Safford, Sierra Vista and several Tucson locations. It offers hospital services, office-based imaging and care at the Pima Heart Surgery Center and the Tucson Heart Center. In the last several years, the practice has added several vascular surgeons to address related medical issues.

“It’s quite common for cardiac and vascular issues to occur together,” said Pima Heart & Vascular cardiologist Dr. Rajen Desai. In other recently announced partnerships, Dr. Kirk Gavlick, an interventional cardiologist, began seeing patients in January. Cardiologists Dr. Gregory Koshkarian and Dr. Gordon Watson will join the group in July. “We are proud to remain locally owned and operated since 1980,” said Pima Heart & Vascular CEO Claudia Rasnake. “It’s tough to do in today’s medical climate. We are grateful for the continued opportunity to be the largest privately owned cardiovascular practice in Arizona.”

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 127


BizREALESTATE

Office Michael Gross Tucson Realty & Trust Co. Vacancy rate: 2019 Forecast – 8.80 percent 2019 Actual – 8.50 percent 2020 Forecast – 8.36 percent Industrial David Blanchette NAI Horizon Vacancy rate: 2019 Forecast – 5.75 percent 2019 Actual – 6.60 percent 2020 Forecast – 5.00 percent Finance Laurie Weber LendAmerica 10-Year Treasury constant maturity rate: 2019 Forecast – 2.62 percent 2019 Actual – 1.92 percent 2020 Forecast – 2.00 percent Retail Pat Darcy Tucson Realty & Trust Co. Vacancy rate: 2019 Forecast – 5.70 percent 2019 Actual – 5.70 percent 2020 Forecast – 5.40 percent Multifamily Allan Mendelsberg Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Vacancy rate: 2019 Forecast – 6.05 percent 2019 Actual – 6.40 percent 2020 Forecast – 5.50 percent Land James T. Lavery RE/MAX Commercial Building permits: 2019 Forecast – 4,180 2019 Actual – 3,697 2020 Forecast – 4,000

128 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Tucson’s Red-Hot Real Estate Market

Reports, Permits Signal Boon for Southern Arizona By David Pittman Tucson’s economy is rapidly expanding and residential and commercial real estate markets are only going to get hotter. That was the view of James T. Lavery, president of the Southern Arizona Certified Commercial Investment Member chapter. He spoke at the 29th annual Commercial Real Estate Forecast in February at the Double Tree by Hilton – Reid Park. About 300 people attended the event. “Tucson has an extremely strong residential market right now,” Lavery said. “In fact, it was ranked the third hottest housing market in the country by realtor. com recently. And commercial development always follows the rooftops.” Further evidence of Tucson’s increasing economic strength came from CBRE, a global commercial real estate services and investment giant, which ranked Tucson the “No. 1 Opportunity Market” among secondary mar-

kets in North America in its 2019 Scoring Tech Talent Report. “Local business dynamics are very favorable,” Lavery said. “We have good job reports, building permits are up, prices are appreciating, a lot of renovation and repurposing is happening, and everyone seems busy in all sectors of the real estate market.” The CCIM forecast competition is one of the longest-running events of its type in the United States. Winners in the various award categories are: Office

Michael Gross, a top producer at Tucson Realty & Trust Co., won in this category for the fifth time and the second consecutive year by predicting an 8.80 percent vacancy rate for office properties in metro Tucson at the close of 2019. The actual rate was 8.50 percent. Gross predicted the rate will drop to 8.36% by the close of 2020. continued on page 130 >>> www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: BRENT G. MATHIS

CCIM Forecast Winners


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 129


BizREALESTATE

Tucson has an extremely strong residential market right now.

James T. Lavery President Certified Commercial Investment Member Southern Arizona Chapter –

continued from page 128 Industrial

David Blanchette, VP of NAI Tucson, won this category by forecasting the vacancy rate of leasable space in the industrial sector at 5.75 percent at the end of 2019. The actual rate was 6.60 percent. He predicts the rate will fall to 5.00 percent by the end of this year. Retail

Pat Darcy, a former Major League Baseball pitcher who heads the retail division of Tucson Realty & Trust Co., won the 2019 forecasting award in this category, predicting the vacancy rate for retail properties would be 5.70 percent at the close of last year. The actual rate was 5.50 percent. Darcy predicts the rate will be 5.40 percent at the close of 2020.

Multifamily

Allan Mendelsberg, who joined Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR in 2009 and was the firm’s top producer in 2017 and 2018, won in the multifamily category. He predicted the vacancy rate in Tucson’s apartment market would be 6.05 percent. The actual rate was 6.40 percent. Mendelsberg predicts that rate to be 5.50 percent later this year. Finance

Laurie Weber – who opened commercial mortgage company, LendAmerica, in 1999 – won this award by predicting the yield on the 10-year Treasury note would be 2.62 percent at the end of last year. The actual rate was 1.92 percent. Weber predicts the rate will be 2.00 percent at 2020’s close. Weber is a four-time winner in the competition.

Land

CCIM chapter president Lavery won in the residential land-use category for the second year in a row by predicting 4,180 residential building permits would be issued in Pima County in 2019. The actual number was 3,697. Lavery predicts 4,000 permits will be issued in 2020.

Biz 130 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 131


PHOTOS: COURTESY PIMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

BizAUTOMOTIVE

Clockwise – Lee D. Lambert, Chancellor, Pima Community College; Breaking Ground Ceremony; Concept illustrations of the new Automotive Technology and Innovation Center

High-Tech Auto Center to Open Near Pima Community College Downtown New Programs to Train Future Workforce By Steve Rivera A state-of-the-art Automotive Technology and Innovation Center will open next spring near Pima Community College’s downtown campus. The idea for the new center came about in 2014 when administrators saw the need for students to be key players in the 21st century workforce, making the downtown campus a hub for potential hires in Southern Arizona and beyond. The programs will center on advanced manufacturing, automotive technology 132 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

and building and construction. The programs will be designed around the concepts of speed, convergence and adaptability: speed in response to current workforce needs and the future of work; convergence for the “disciplines and industry partners,” and adaptability for the needed space and programs for the “changing of industry and learners,” said David A. Doré, PCC president of campuses and executive vice chancellor.

The $12.5 million Automotive Technology and Innovation Center will be situated just west of PCC’s downtown campus. At two stories and 45,000 square feet, the facility will include learning labs, classrooms, student gathering areas, faculty offices and an industry-advisory boardroom. “The Automotive Technology and Innovation Center is a tangible result of the commitment Pima Community continued on page 134 >>> www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 133


BizAUTOMOTIVE

The Automotive Technology and Innovation Center is a tangible result of the commitment Pima Community College has made to serve our community’s workforce needs.

Lee D. Lambert Chancellor Pima Community College –

continued from page 132 College has made to serve our community’s workforce needs, provide students with state-of-the-art learning opportunities, and positively impact the economy of Tucson and the region,” said PCC Chancellor Lee D. Lambert. The center will host programs in automotive technology, diesel technology and electronic vehicle technology to meet the growing demand of dealerships and other employers for students certified in today’s workforce needs. Doré said there is a plan for Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) to visit as well, including companies like Chrysler, Ford and others “who sponsor programs where we are training specifically for (the OEMs). We have spaces in the buildings for three OEMs.” The goal is to have those OEMs by the building’s completion in April 2021. Raytheon, Caterpillar and others had the initial input in what the space would look like. “I tell the students who are registering now (for the future) that they will be able to have (their) classes and be in the building before they graduate,” Doré said. “This will dramatically allow us to increase our capacity to have more students.” The center won’t be just for students out of high school, but for older students who need “re-skilling” or “upskilling” in technology. Doré said Pima plays a “critical role” in helping students become more quickly adapted to today’s workforce needs. The new center is another example of Pima’s ongoing commitment to students, the community and industry throughout Southern Arizona, he said. “This is really an investment into our future,” he said.

Biz 134 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizBRIEFS Lindsay Welch

Lindsay Welch has joined Tech Parks Arizona as executive director of corporate relations. She’s responsible for attracting new business to the University of Arizona’s incubator of technology commercialization. She also works to strengthen relationships with businesses who want to connect with the university. Welch has held executive positions with Crest Insurance Group and the American Heart Association in Tucson. She’s president of the Tucson Metro Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Council. Biz

Adriana Rincon

Angel Charity for Children has selected Adriana Rincon to serve as the 2020 General Chair for the venerable organization. Rincon is owner/broker of TR Realty & Investments, LLC, and has been active in several nonprofit groups in Tucson. She is a founding member of the National Charity League’s Tucson Chapter and is past president of Tu Nidito Children & Family Services. Biz

Kristie Stevens

Angel Charity for Children has selected Kristie Stevens to serve as the 2020 Vice Chair. Stevens is currently the assistant principal and athletic director at Ironwood Ridge High School. A former women’s tennis coach at Catalina Foothills High School, Stevens led her teams to 15 state championships.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 135


BizBRIEFS

Bruce Goetz Bruce Goetz has moved from Denver as director of operations to become VP of operations and COO for the Tucson Airport Authority. His new role will include work on the airportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s airfield safety enhancement project, which involves closing and building runways and taxiways. Goetz also worked in operations at the Paine Field/Snohomish County Airport in Everett, Wash. He serves as a board member for the American Association of Airport Executives.

Biz

Angela DiFuccia Venture capital firm Shot Ventures has named Angela DiFuccia as operating partner for its investment funds and portfolio companies, assisting with investor reporting in digital assets. DiFuccia has 14 years of business management and asset management experience. She has worked in commercial real estate markets, helping brokers and investors acquire and manage assets. She is a founding member of Tucson Young Professionals and a sustainer in Junior League of Tucson.

Biz

136 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


SPECIAL REPORT 2020

THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BUSINESS MAGAZINE

PAT I O POOLS & S PA S 50 YEARS SERVING ARIZONA

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 137


138 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 139


PAT I O POOLS & S PA S From left â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Eugene Ragel III Production Manager

Gene Ragel Jr. President

Nicole Ragel VP

140 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

BizPOOLS

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 141


142 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

PHOTOS: COURTESY PATIO POOLS & SPAS

BizPOOLS

www.BizTucson.com


50 Ye a r s Ser ving Ar izona By April Bourie If you live in Tucson, you likely have a fond memory involving a pool, whether as adventuresome play as a child, at pool parties, or watching your own kids expend some of their energy. In March, Patio Pools & Spas celebrated 50 years of making some of those memories. Nicole Ragel, Patio Pools & Spas VP, attributed the company’s halfcentury of success to staying focused on the founder’s values: provide high-quality construction, products and services; value its employees; and support its community. Gene Ragel Sr. started building swimming pools in Tucson in 1946 with Johnny Austad, owner of Austad Steel. Austad was a steel fabricator, concrete contractor and innovator. Together, they built many poured-concrete pools, as well as water tanks and fallout shelters, with a steel-forming system. In 1958, Gene and Jack Wilson, who also worked at Austad Steel, left the company to found Ragel Wilson Pools. With the introduction of Shotcrete, customer pools became the focus of their company. From 1959 to 1963, Ragel built approximately 75 pools a year until he moved to Phoenix, where he designed and sold pools for Paddock Pools. In 1969 Shasta Pools hired Ragel to manage a new company in Tucson named Patio Pools. In March 1970, he had the opportunity to move back to the booming Phoenix market or purchase Patio Pools. He opted to purchase the company and, with partner Jon Evans, they changed the company’s direction to customer pools built to extremely highquality standards offered at affordable prices. The philosophy was a hit with pool buyers in Tucson; within only one year Patio Pools & Spas became Southern Arizona’s largest customer pool and spa builder. Soon thereafter, they opened the first fullservice retail pool supply store carrying pool chemicals, accessories and toys as well as patio furniture. continued on page 144 >>> www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 143


BizPOOLS continued from page 143 The store also carried a new product to the Tucson market – above-ground acrylic hot tubs. In 1978, Patio Pools went on to a record 817 projects and, by the end of the decade, Patio Pools & Spas had opened a total of five retail stores. With the dawning of the 1980s, Ragel bought out his partner. Within six months, the nation was plunged into a deep economic recession that caused many businesses to fail, but Patio Pools & Spas soldiered on. In 1982, Ragel suffered a fatal heart attack. His wife, Dorothy, took over the company’s reins, and with the support of her children in the business and an experienced management team, the business grew steadily throughout the 1980s. Today, Gene Ragel Jr. is Patio’s president. Nicole Ragel, his wife, serves as VP, while their son, Eugene III – known as ER – is the company’s production manager. “I’m proud that I am not only following in my father’s footsteps. I get to work

144 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

side by side with my son and wife,” Gene Jr. said. “My dad wanted people to have an affordable pool that was built with above-standard construction practices and high-quality materials. Exceeding customer satisfaction was his goal, just as it is ours today.”

When we met with Patio Pools, they clicked with us from the beginning. They made the design and building process easy. –

Nina and Brian Larabee Customers

Over the years, Patio Pools & Spas has built an exceptional reputation for high-quality, affordable swimming pools and outstanding service. The company continues that today in each of its retail

stores, its pool renovation department and its service department. Patio Pools & Spas is equally dedicated to its employees. It’s an approach that permeates each of Patio’s storefronts and it’s one the family feels contributes to its high customer service ratings. “Our corporate culture has a family environment,” explained Nicole. “The Ragel family works side by side with our employees to make the company successful. We have several people that have worked here for over 40 years, and 50% of our retail staff have been with us for over 20 years.” Training is central to the company’s investment in its employees and it was one of the reasons the Ragels recently purchased a Poolwerx franchise. Poolwerx is one of the world’s largest pool and hot tub/spa maintenance providers. It provides exhaustive training in all aspects of pool service, maintenance and retail services. Patio Pools & Spas has contributed to the community by giving its employees a say in which organizations and causes continued on page 148 >>>

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 145


BizPOOLS

146 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


PHOTO: COURTESY PATIO POOLS & SPAS

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 147


BizPOOLS continued from page 144 the company supports. “We are proud members of the community,” said Nicole. “We live here, and we want to invest in our community. That goes a long way with our customers because you don’t see as many pool builders get as involved as we do.” Staying true to these core values is paying off. Diana Delgado has used Patio Pools & Spas to build two pools, one in the 1980s and another in 2018 at her new home. “I was really happy with them the first time, and I figured that they had to be good to survive the recent economy fall,” Delgado said. “I didn’t even check around when I was ready to build my new pool. I just went with Patio Pools.” Delgado wasn’t disappointed. The company designed and built her a beautiful pool, built a custom grotto and assisted with the plumbing, gas and electrical on her outdoor shower. “The first time I worked with them was great,” said Delgado. “The second time was even better. I am a very happy customer.” Patio Pools & Spas handles the maintenance of Delgado’s pool. “The weekly maintenance service is excellent. They let me know immediately about any issues that need to be resolved and are on the repairs the next day,” she said. Nina and Brian Larabee, who live in Vail, also sing Patio Pools & Spas’ praises. “We called several pool companies before we found Patio Pools,” Nina said. “They either didn’t return our calls or they wouldn’t come to our area to build our pool. When we met with Patio Pools, they clicked with us from the beginning. They made the design and building process easy.” “ER Ragel was our production manager, and he was always spot-on,” said Brian. “He knows so much about the process and gave us advice throughout the entire build. It was a great experience, and it was completed when they said it would be.” The Larabees maintain their own pool and have been impressed with Patio Pools & Spas/Poolwerx retail locations. “Their employees are well-educated about their products and extremely helpful,” said Nina. “They do an absolutely fabulous job!”

Biz 148 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


Casino Del Sol

PHOTOS: COURTESY PATIO POOLS & SPAS

The Retreat â&#x20AC;&#x201C; University of Arizona Housing

www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 149


Special Olympics kickoff event in February, which included a Polar Plunge at a community pool. Patio Pools & Spas provided an above-ground party spa for participants to warm up, and several of its employees participated in the plunge. The event raised more than $31,000, the highest amount ever.

150 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizPOOLS

Giving Back to the Community

Children Benefit from Patio Pools & Spas Support

PHOTOS: GENE RAGEL

By April Bourie

When you hear the name “Patio Pools & Spas,” you might picture a blissful backyard setting with a cool, blue pool in the center. But Patio Pools & Spas is much more than pool construction, service and maintenance. As the Tucson company celebrates 50 years in business, it also recommits itself to being an active member of the community. “We’re a success because of the community, and it’s our responsibility to give back,” said Nicole Ragel, Patio Pools & Spas VP. “We live here and we want to invest in our community, and I think that sets us apart from our competition.” The company’s support of many charity organizations and community events include the Arizona Heart Foundation, Tucson Medical Center’s Miracle Children’s Network and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Tucson. For many years, the company has sponsored drowning prevention programs. “We like to participate in events that have something in relationship to pools or water,” said Ragel. To that end, Patio Pools & Spas supported the Special Olympics kickoff event in February, which included a Polar Plunge at a community pool. The company provided an www.BizTucson.com

above-ground party spa for participants to warm up, and several of its employees participated in the plunge. “The company is really great about bringing awareness to our employees about causes that management is passionate about and offering employees

We live here and we want to invest in our community. Nicole Ragel VP Patio Pools & Spas –

the opportunity to get involved,” said Kathy Gilmore, Patio Pools & Spas office manager. “When employees learned about the Polar Plunge, it was great to see the employees’ excited faces and hear many of them plan to participate. It’s also a great bonding opportunity for our employees.” Ragel takes employees’ favorite charities and organizations into consideration. “When I’m considering supporting a charity event, I also consider if this is something that employees would en-

joy or would be a nice reward for them to attend,” she said. The Event, a tasting event hosted by the Boys & Girls Clubs, is one such event that’s popular with Patio Pool’s employees. Laurie Wetterschneider, a Patio Pools & Spas client and an emeritus boards member of BGC, approached Ragel five years ago to sponsor The Event. “She responded within moments and agreed to be a sponsor,” said Wetterschneider. “Their continued support is invaluable as the funds raised by The Event are directly used to run the operations of our clubhouses.” Patio Pools & Spas built Wetterschneider’s pool back in the 1980s, and when her parents needed a pool built, she recommended the company for the job because of the excellent workmanship and customer service. “They’re our family pool builder. The same technical adviser has worked with us for 23 years,” she said. “I know we can always call him and get help whenever we need it, even on holidays and weekends.” What really thrills Wetterschneider is the level of community support the company provides. She said, “If I’m going to give business to someone, it’s going to be someone who gives back.”

Biz

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 151


152 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizPOOLS

PHOTOS: GENE RAGEL

AFTER

BEFORE

Patio Pools & Spas and Poolwerx Partner to Serve Tucson By April Bourie Green water. Plaster cracks. Tile that’s coming loose. Many things can go wrong when a pool isn’t properly maintained. From weekly administration of chemicals to keep the water in balance to biggerticket items like pumps, heaters and water features, regular pool maintenance is www.BizTucson.com

critical to prevent deterioration and, at worst, failure. In an effort to better help its customers handle any issues to properly maintain their pools, Patio Pools & Spas retail outlets are now Poolwerx franchises, offering pool services, retail products and pool maintenance training for do-

it-yourselfers who need a little help. The franchise is a new investment for Patio Pools & Spas, and it’s one that Nicole Ragel, VP of Patio Pools & Spas, said benefits both customers and the company. continued on page 155 >>> Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 153


BizPOOLS

154 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


continued from page 153 “Poolwerx’s core value is ‘find a better way.’ They work with franchise owners to find a better way to be on the cutting edge with products, training and procedures,” Ragel said. “Their corporate office is in Dallas, and they have a large training facility there where we can send our employees to learn about the newest trends and products.” Ragel added that Poolwerx also offers training on the business side. Management training is available in a variety of areas, including effective human resources management, customer service and business best practices. “We have a conference call once a month with other franchisees to share ideas about marketing, employee retention and retail and also to discuss what’s working

10-time winner of the Pool and Spa News Industry Choice Award

Pool & Spa News Top 5 Retailers in Industry

MAAX Spas Dealer of the Year

International Award “Masters of Design” for Hot Tub and Pool categories

MAAX Spas Platinum Level Customer Service Award

FreeFlow Spas Dealer of the Year Award

TuffTool Dealer of the Year Award

Bigfish Best Local Hot Tub/Retail Store

Finalist in the Tucson Metro Chamber of Commerce 2012 Copper Cactus Award “Best Places to Work” in Tucson

We have designed, built and renovated more than 30,000 pools since 1969

Top 50 Pool Builder worldwide since the program’s inception

2013 Poolsearch.com’s Best Pool Builder

Ranked in the Top 20 Pool & Spa Companies in the world by Pool & Spa News

5-time winner of the Platinum Service Award from Coleman Spas

More than 125 International Design Awards

We’ve built many of Southern Arizona’s resort pools, commercial projects and residential pools

We are Southern Arizona’s oldest and largest pool builder

We have been a BBB and ROC member for more than 45 years

Nominated for the BBB Torch Awards in 2013 for Ethics

Award winner for PebbleTec’s World’s Greatest Pool Builders

When you own and operate a company, you’re so busy that it’s hard to give 100 % to every single part of the company. Poolwerx gives us more time to focus on our customers.

– ER Ragel Production Manager Patio Pools & Spas

for us in various parts of our businesses,” Ragel said. Employees who attend training not only come away with more knowledge, but they also bond with co-workers and create networks of their own with franchisee employees in other parts of the country. “We’re utilizing the global knowledge and experience of the franchise to benefit our company, our employees and our customers locally,” said Ragel. ER Ragel, Patio Pools & Spas production manager, said having a partner in the business benefits everyone, from the company to staff to customers. “When you own and operate a company, you’re so busy that it’s hard to give 100% to every single part of the company,” he said. “Poolwerx has many tried and true offerings that we can take advantage of, including forms, checklists, market research and even procedures that follow code requirements. This gives us more time to focus on our customers and their needs.” By joining forces with other franchisees around the nation through Poolwerx, Patio Pools & Spas has reduced costs. “We’re able to purchase products and software in greater volume with other franchisees to reduce costs and purchase risks,” Nicole said. “This allows us to get competitive pricing that we can pass along to our customers.” Biz www.BizTucson.com

PATIO POOLS & SPAS ACCOLADES

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 155


156 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Winter 2018

>>>

BizTucson 195


BizBRIEF

Jonathan Saffer

Isaac Crum

Sarah Letzkus

Rusing Lopez & Lizardi Firm Announces Promotions Rusing Lopez & Lizardi has promoted two attorneys and added an equity partner. Jonathan Saffer became the company’s fifth equity partner in January. His 18-year practice has focused on commercial litigation, finance and business law. He advises lending institutions in commercial finance matters and represents several local businesses. Saffer’s extensive trial experience includes civil actions in federal and state courts, as well as contested matters and adversary proceedings in bankruptcy court. He earned his law degree from the University of Arizona after playing professional baseball with the Montreal Ex-

158 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

pos organization. He also holds a UArizona bachelor’s degree in marketing. Isaac Crum was promoted to partner. He has more than 10 years of experience – including in Phoenix and Washington, D.C. – representing major corporations in commercial and intellectual property litigation. Clients have tapped his computer engineering background as part of his legal experience. His law degree is from UArizona’s James E. Rogers College of Law. Crum also has a UArizona bachelor’s degree in computer engineering. Sarah Letzkus was also promoted. She represents employers and individuals in employment disputes and on com-

mercial litigation issues such as breach of contract, commercial torts and lender liability. Letzkus is a member of the Tucson Metro Chamber Emerging Leaders Council. She earned her law degree from Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. Established in Tucson in 1992, Rusing Lopez & Lizardi, PLLC, provides legal services to businesses and business owners. These include litigation, employment disputes, real estate, immigration, business transactions, contract negotiations and general business advice. The firm also has an office in Scottsdale.

Biz

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 159


BizSALES

Expose Yourself to ‘No’ and ‘Not Now’ to Get to ‘Yes’ By Jeffrey Gitomer

Ninety-seven percent of all sales are not made on the first call. It takes five to 10 exposures (follow–ups) to a prospect to make the first sale. The prospect may not actually say “no” each time, but each time you follow up and the prospect doesn’t buy, he’s saying, “Not now, buddy; do something else for me; I’m still shopping around; I haven’t met with my partner; try again later.” In short, “You haven’t sold me yet.” As a professional salesperson you better have what it takes to persevere through the follow-up process and not quit. Be willing to put forth the effort to get to the last “no,” or consider taking a job in a warehouse with a salary. Here are some follow-up guidelines to ensure early closing success: • Know the real reasons your prospect wants your product.

160 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Know the real reasons your prospect does not want your product.

Know your prospect’s hot buttons (things you think will make the prospect buy), and work with them in constructing your follow-up plan.

Present new information relative to the sale each time you call or visit.

Be creative in your style and presentation manner.

Be sincere about your desire to help the customer first, and earn the commission second.

Be direct in your communication. Beating around the bush will only frustrate the prospect (and probably cause him to buy elsewhere). Answer all questions. Don’t patronize the prospect.

Be friendly. People like to buy from friends.

Use humor. Be funny. People love to laugh. Making your prospect laugh is a great way to establish common ground and rapport.

When in doubt, sell the prospect for her reasons, not yours.

Don’t be afraid to ask for the sale each time. If there were a formula for following up, it would be: Their reasons + new information + creative + sincere + direct + friendly + humor = SALE. www.BizTucson.com


But there isn’t an exact formula. Every follow-up is different, and elements from the above guidelines must be chosen as called for. Here are a few lead-in lines you might try so that you don’t feel uneasy about how to start the conversation: •

I discovered something that I believe to be an important factor in your decision…

I just emailed you a note from a customer who had an experience like yours…

Something new has occurred that I thought you would like to know about…

There has been a change in status…

I was thinking about you, and called to see if you found out about…

Don’t say, “I called to see if you got my letter, proposal, info or sample…” it sounds dumb and it gives the prospect a way out. If he doesn’t want to talk to you, he’ll say, “No, I never got it.” Where does that leave you? Nowhere. Why not try, “I sent you some (name the stuff) the other day and I wanted to go over a couple of things with you personally, because they weren’t self-explanatory.” Some salespeople fear that they’re “bugging” the prospect if they call too often. If you feel that way, it’s for two reasons: •

You haven’t established enough rapport and have limited access.

Your follow-ups are about selling and not about helping.

It’s likely you won’t bug the prospect if he’s a salesperson himself; you have something new, creative, or funny to say; you’re short and to the point; he’s genuinely interested in your product or service; he returns your calls right away; or, he likes you. It’s likely you will bug the prospect if you call more than three times without a returned call; you ask dumb or pushy questions (probably because you didn’t listen well in the first place); you are perceived as insincere; you exert pressure too soon or too often; or, you are in any way rude to the prospect or anyone on his staff. Follow-up is another word for sale. Your ability to follow-up will determine your success in sales. Ask any professional salesperson the secret for success, he or she will answer, persistence. Biz

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of 13 best-selling books including The Sales Bible, The Little Red Book of Selling, and The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude. His real-world ideas and content are also available as online courses at www.GitomerLearningAcademy.com. For information about training and seminars visit www.Gitomer.com or www.GitomerCertifiedAdvisors.com, or email Jeffrey personally at salesman@gitomer.com. © 2020 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from GitGo, LLC, Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. (704) 333-1112 www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 161


BizBANKING

WaFd Bank Ramps Up Local Lending Initiatives to Boost Pima County Investment

WaFd Bank Arizona plans to increase local lending to pump up economic development in the region with its new Southern Arizona Commercial Banking Center, located in Oro Valley. The branch, at 8001 N. Oracle Road, houses the regional headquarters for the Southern Arizona Business Banking Initiative. WaFd – pronounced WAH-fed, short for Washington Federal – launched the initiative in 2015 in Phoenix as a push to provide hyper-local loans and other services. The Phoenix efforts expanded a technology-focused university, helped a family operate regional farms and allowed a staffing company to help meet medical staffing needs. “When we looked at how to best support economic development in Southern Arizona, it quickly became clear to us we wanted the effort to be a wholly local one, meaning making an investment in Pima County and with Pima County banking specialists directly,” said Mike Brown, WaFd Bank Arizona president. “We are poised to help Southern Arizona businesses grow in this new decade,” Brown said. The center, which formally opened in February, offers business lines of credit, business term loans, commercial real estate financing, acquisition financing and treasury

management. It also serves as a regular branch for WaFd customers. Last year, WaFd launched treasury management, an online service for commercial customers. “It includes a user-friendly dashboard summarizing the client’s activity and account relationship, as well as additional features and tools to enhance the online banking experience,” Brown said. The Oro Valley location also houses all of WaFd’s Southern Arizona business and commercial banking executives. They include Senior VP and Division Manager Kim Dees, as well as, VPs and Senior Relationship Managers Jill Malick and Steve Ponzo. Georgia Velarde, a senior commercial loan officer, and Wayne Chandler, a veteran community banker, also are located there. WaFd opened near Seattle in 1917. Today, its 236 offices across eight western states focus on business-to-business banking, commercial and equipment lending and home loan and corporate real estate financing. WaFd has 31 branches across the state, including Benson, Bisbee, Douglas, Nogales and Safford. There are eight locations in the Tucson metropolitan area, including South Tucson and Green Valley.

Biz

From top: Thomas J. Kelley, WaFd Bank Chairman of the Board and Mike Brown, WaFd Bank Arizona President; Paris Davis, WaFd Bank Arizona SVP & Northwest Arizona division manager, Kim Dees, WaFd Bank Arizona SVP & Southern Arizona division manager, Lisa Davey, WaFd Bank Arizona VP & Northeast Arizona division manager, and Reyna Mendez, WaFd Bank Arizona regional support lead; Jill Malick, WaFd Bank Arizona VP & Senior Relationship Manager for Commercial Banking, speaks to those in attendance; Todd Gerber, WaFd Bank Arizona’s Commercial Division Manager and Steve Ponzo, WaFd Bank Arizona’s VP & Senior Relationship Manager, Commercial Banking. 162 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: WAFD BANK ARIZONA

By Elena Acoba


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 163


Richard B. Kauffman

PHOTO: BRENT G. MATHIS

Principal & CEO Holualoa Companies

164 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


BizREALESTATE

Holualoa Companies Names New CEO By David Pittman Holualoa Companies, a Tucsonbased real estate investment firm managing assets spanning the United States and Europe, has undergone a significant leadership shift – but don’t expect a change in the principles it has used in achieving phenomenal success. Richard B. Kauffman, 59, former Holualoa CFO, has been promoted to CEO. I. Michael Kasser, 79, continues as founder and chairman of the company. Holualoa invests globally in office, retail, industrial, multifamily, hotel and mixed-use properties and has acquired more than $2.5 billion in assets. “I was ready to pass on leadership and Rick worked his way into the position,” Kasser said. “Rick has been an integral part of Holualoa’s success over the last 20 years. He not only has my confidence and respect, but the confidence and respect of everyone in our company. He’s a natural leader.” Kasser remains highly active in the company. “My role has been changing over a long period,” Kasser said. “I am there to provide guidance, advice and experience.” Kauffman said the executive team and company principles will remain unchanged under his leadership. “I am honored to work with Holualoa’s skilled team of professionals and particularly my partners on the company’s executive team, including Aroon Chinai, Chief Investment Officer; Stan Shafer, COO, and Lani Baker, VP of finance.” “We are a hands-on company and our people are very analytical,” he said. “That, combined with our culture of discipline and attention to detail, has produced superior results for Holualoa’s investors through favorable and unfavorable business cycles.” www.BizTucson.com

Kauffman added that the business of real estate investment demands flexibility and a willingness to adapt. “Everything is cyclical and market conditions are always changing,” he said. “We study how apartments are doing in Los Angeles and how industrial is doing in Phoenix. We study various product types. Where, when, why and how we invest always changes, that’s change of orientation; but our analytical approach and attention to detail is a constant.”

We are small enough to be nimble and responsive, but big enough to commit appropriate resources to opportunities. –

Richard B. Kauffman Principal & CEO Holualoa Companies

The company was founded in 1985 with its first office in Kona, Hawaii. In 1992, the Tucson office opened. Since then, Holualoa has established offices in Scottsdale, Santa Monica and Paris. Holualoa has 30 employees, 17 of whom work in Tucson. “Our size is one of our strengths,” Kauffman said. “We are small enough to be nimble and responsive, but big enough to commit appropriate resources to opportunities.” Kauffman called Holualoa an “interesting and rewarding” place to work. “Our staff is long-tenured and there is little turnover, which is a good reflection on the business and the quality of the staff.”

Holualoa is enthusiastic about the future of Tucson. “Tucson is booming and we are bullish on downtown,” Kauffman said. “Rio Nuevo is doing a great job and we have invested in several downtown properties including the Pioneer Building, Herbert Residential Apartments, One East Congress and McCormick Townhomes, which we recently sold.” Holualoa Companies recently acquired a significant share of Greenlight Communities, a Scottsdale-based company building an innovative, new type of multifamily residential community under the Cabana brand. It aims to provide a more attainable, less expensive rental solution for individuals and families. Greenlight has more than 2,300 units under development in metro Phoenix. Greenlight’s communities are designed with individual buildings that surround common courtyards featuring a pool, fitness areas or other amenities designed to encourage community interaction. “This is already underway in the Phoenix area and we are looking for sites to do this in Tucson,” said Kauffman. “There is a need for more attainable housing.” Kauffman joined Holualoa in 2000. His previous experience includes manager of corporate audit for the Tuttle-Click Automotive Group; CFO and board member of Factory 2-U, a 40-store discount retailer in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, and manager of corporate audit for Campbell Soup. He earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Pennsylvania State University and obtained his CPA license.

Biz Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 165


BizBRIEF

HSL to Open Encantada Continental Reserve HSL Properties is increasing its Southern Arizona footprint with the opening of Encantada Continental Reserve in Marana. When the $42 million, 304-unit luxury community opens this summer, it will mark the eighth Encantada-branded community in the region. Located at 6101 W. Arizona Pavilions Drive, Encantada Continental Reserve offers easy access to Interstate 10 as well as premier shopping, dining, golf and entertainment. Encantada Continental Reserve apartment homes were built with comfort and convenience in mind. Residents of the gated community will experience stylish and modern amenities. •

Interior features include sound-resistant walls, dual-pane windows, quartz countertops, modern dark wood cabinetry, energy-efficient GE appliances, 9-foot ceilings, vinyl plank flooring, LED lighting, custom accent walls, fullsize washers and dryers, large patios/balconies with extra storage, ready-to-go internet and Wi-Fi connectivity and much more.

Residents will enjoy the largest Encantada pool to date with lagoon, hot tub spa, entertainment pavilion, fire pit lounge and cabanas with TVs.

166 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

The community boasts a luxurious clubhouse; 24-hour, state-of-the-art fitness center with Fitness on Demand; two dog ranches; complimentary bicycle checkout; a private on-site movie theatre that seats 28; Starbucks coffee bar; controlled access, gated entry; and a 24-hour access Amazon Hub by Amazon locker station.

The community is 100% smoke-free. The community offers energy-efficient one-, two- and three-bedroom floor plan options with upscale design elements to provide residents with comfort and luxury.

Formed in 1975, HSL Properties owns and operates approximately 10,000 apartment units in 37 apartment communities as well as 11 hotels, including the El Conquistador Tucson, A Hilton Resort, and several other real estate holdings such as office buildings, call centers and industrial parks. HSL is the largest apartment owner in Southern Arizona and one of the biggest in the state. This new development celebrates HSL’s 45 years in business as a leading Southern Arizona apartment owner and operator.

Biz www.BizTucson.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY HSL PROPERTIES

New Luxury Apartments Mark Company’s 45th Anniversary


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 167


BizHR

Better Workplaces, Better World By Heather Karp SHRM-CP

President Society for Human Resources Management of Greater Tucson This year, the Society for Human Resources Management of Greater Tucson is focused on a 20/20 perspective: Vision, Clarity, and Value. By espousing our national motto of “Better Workplaces. Better World,” SHRM-GT recognizes the necessity for human resources professionals to fuse people and business together. SHRM-GT provides professionals the opportunity to earn an HR certification that focuses on applying practices that address both people and the strategy of business operations. SHRM-GT believes the HR professional must not only know laws, facts and figures, but also implement that knowledge in the workplace. You may recognize certifications in fields of accounting, architecture, project management and information technology. As workplaces evolve, so must the HR professional. SHRM-GT has created a certification on par with other professional certifications and credentialing. The certification tests the HR professional on realistic and relevant on-the-job scenarios. It focuses on a body of competency and knowledge that stretches across industries, geographic borders, job responsibilities and career levels. Global employers are backing the Certified Professional and Senior Certified Professional certifications as they reflect what HR professionals must know to be leaders. Fun fact: SHRM is the largest HR membership organization and the industry leader in HR professional development. SHRM-GT offers local HR professionals the opportunity to earn their SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP by joining our local chapter, purchasing the SHRM learning system and attending a 14-week, expert-facilitated study group that prepares individuals for the exam. This study group is, by far, the best value available to our members. The certification study groups have increased the success rate of first-time passes for this exam. As a business leader, you want your HR professionals to be current with all things people, but also be able to weave both people and business together effectively. SHRM-GT’s mission is to inspire, influence, develop and drive meaningful leadership through innovative ideas and expertise. Please check out www.shrmgt.org for more information on our local chapter offerings and www.shrm.org for more information on the SHRM Certification.

Biz

168 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Spring 2020

>>>

BizTucson 169


BizTRIBUTE

Gerald Swanson

Arizona’s Economics Champion By Tara Kirkpatrick Gerald Swanson, a beloved University of Arizona economics professor, bestselling author, sought-after business speaker, husband, father and grandfather, died in January of cancer. He was 79. Swanson was one of the region’s sharpest economic minds, teaching students at the Eller College of Management for more than 40 years and winning every teaching award – some more than once – for his ability to simplify complex principles through his engaging style. Students often changed their majors to economics after taking his class. “Gerry was an inspiration to everyone,” said Eller Dean Paulo Goes. “He had this unique mix of a great personality, knowledge of economics and a gift for explaining concepts. He was a great storyteller.” Studying business and engineering at the University of Illinois, Swanson earned his doctorate in economics in 1971 and honed an innate gift for public speaking. After moving to Tucson with his wife, Gwen, he accepted the post to teach large economics lectures at UArizona. When Swanson retired in 2012, he had taught more than 40,000 students. “He always prepared very conscientiously for his classes, but was able to be so spontaneous in person,” said Gwen. “He always paid attention to what was going on so he could relate economics to what was going on in the world. He had a passion for economics, but he really was a showman. I’d always ask him, ‘How’d you come up with such a witty thing to say?’ ” “He connected the concepts with real-world situations in a way that got students excited to learn more,” said Dan Twibell, a 1992 UArizona economics graduate who founded Skysis, a Scottsdale-based biopharmaceutical consulting firm. “I credit Professor 170 BizTucson

<<<

Spring 2020

Swanson with much of my business success.” Swanson was asked to join a tax reform commission in Phoenix, where he met Thomas R. Brown, the late cofounder of Burr-Brown Research Corp. Brown was looking for someone to carpool with from Tucson. “Gerry would joke about how my dad would just pepper him with questions on the drive,” recalled Brown’s daughter, Sarah Smallhouse. “They were always chuckling and analyzing. Gerry became one of his closest personal friends.”

Gerald Swanson Swanson and Brown would start the Arizona Council on Economic Education to instruct high school teachers how to incorporate economics into their curriculum. Swanson became the council’s executive director and held workshops throughout the state – a mission that would lead to consulting on a Disney film, “The People on Market Street.” Later, he consulted both corporations and governments. Swanson traveled to South America in 1987 to research his first book, “The Hyperinflation Survival Guide,” and later co-authored “Bankruptcy 1995,”

a New York Times bestseller publicly lauded by Ross Perot that landed Swanson on talk shows, including NBC’s Today. His 2004 book, “America the Broke,” was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. “The world has lost one of its national treasures,” said Amy Cramer, a Pima Community College economics professor who chose Swanson as a mentor. “His work on the national deficit is not in some dusty library somewhere. This is one of the most important issues of our day and we put ourselves in peril not to read his books.” Swanson also taught economics teachers across the nation and the world and was constantly asked to speak to industry groups in petroleum, food and farming. The Tucson business community enjoyed Swanson’s annual Economic Outlook forecast, which he delivered with humor and optimism, even when the outlook was bleak. When Smallhouse and her family formed the Thomas R. Brown Foundation, Swanson joined the board and devoted 22 years to its mission to advance economics and STEM education, civic leadership and workforce development. “Had it not been for Gerry’s leadership, I don’t think the Brown Foundation would be doing the work it is today. He profoundly impacted our focus.” Perhaps most telling of Swanson’s benevolent influence came at his standingroom-only memorial service in January, where friends and family spoke also of a man who loved musicals, made a mean margarita and left people happier in his presence. “People say the measure of a life welllived is the impact you have on others and that was Gerry,” Goes said. “He impacted the lives of everyone – his fellow faculty, his students and everyone who knew him. He was amazing.”

Biz www.BizTucson.com


www.BizTucson.com

Winter 2018

>>>

BizTucson 195


www.BizTucson.com

Winter 2018

>>>

BizTucson 195

Profile for BizTucson Magazine

BizTucson Magazine Spring 2020  

The Region's Business Magazine

BizTucson Magazine Spring 2020  

The Region's Business Magazine

Profile for mcserres

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded