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ISSUE 180 | SEPTEMBER 2017 £3.95 where sold

THE EDUCATION ISSUE

WE CHAT TO WRITER:

JACQUELINE WILSON

OUR GUIDE TO THE BEST SCHOOLS 2017

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? HOW TO USE THE BATH HISTORIC ARCHIVES

LAURENCE FOX IN CONVERSATION ABOUT TREADING THE BATH STAGE

WHET THE APPETITE PREPARE FOR THE GREAT BATH FEAST

IN SEARCH OF A QUEEN

SHINE BRIGHT LIKE A DIAMOND THE CITY’S BIGGEST MONTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE AND LIVING IN BATH


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Contents September 2017 5 THINGS

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10

Your essential events to look forward to this month

MY BATH

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

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76

Profile of Mentoring Plus, the Bath based charity for young people

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GUEST COLUMN

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80

Current Miss Bath, Amelia Watt shares a few of her favourite things

Therapist Patricia Goodman on cyber bullying

COVER STORY

GOOD SCHOOLS GUIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

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Our annual education special

How Bath’s independents work to survive and thrive

FACE THE MUSIC

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THE WALK

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INTERIORS

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How to attract wildlife to your garden

FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

PROPERTY

The Great Bath Feast and more . . .

The finest houses and apartments to buy or to rent

IN THE ARCHIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 How to trace your family tree or the history of your house ..............................................................

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CITY GARDENING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

Neil Menneer’s portrait of the month

ON THE ROAD

104

Designer Clair Strong flags up the big trends for autumn

Best children’s books plus an interview with Jacqueline Wilson

BATH AT WORK

102

Andrew Swift explores the Fosseway

The best entertainment in Bath this month

BATH KIDS LIT FEST

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We trial a new non surgical facelift method

Actor Laurence Fox on his new role and his favourite music

WHAT’S ON

HEALTH & BEAUTY

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ON THE COVER

The Queen of the Wylde Isabella Alexander, the new face of Nicholas Wylde jeweller, photographed by Neill Menneer of Spirit Photographic

Chris Lilly test drives the Volvo XC60

Even more great content and updates online: thebathmag.co.uk

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Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine

Like us: Facebook.com/ thebathmagazine

Follow us on Instagram @thebathmagazine


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Editors Letter September.qxp_Layout 1 23/08/2017 11:25 Page 1

EDITOR’S PICKS FOR SEPTEMBER

from the

EDITOR PHOTOGRAPH: Jon Leahy

BENDING THE TRUTH: recent history has taught us that the camera can indeed lie and photographs can be used and manipulated to tell what is now commonly known as post truth. I’ll be heading out to 44AD gallery in Bath city centre to see an exhibiton by a group of more than 30 photographers, members of the collective PhotoBath, who are examining the concept of alternative facts through their images. The free show in Abbey Street runs from Tuesday 12 to Sunday 24 September and is open daily, 10am to 6pm. Their work invites us to look afresh at perspective and perception as they explore interpretations of the theme alt.facts.

W

e’re following the minimalist’s mantra this month, originally uttered by 19th century polymath William Morris, that one should never have anything in your home that you do not either know to be useful or believe to be beautiful. This robust September issue aims to cover both those aims, containing as it does some lovely images and a lot of useful stuff. As always, our What’s On offering (from Page 26) is the largest in print in Bath, so you can plan your own cultural calendar. For those short of time there’s our handy at-a-glance 5 Things to do in Bath this month, Page 10. Add to this our gallery guide to the latest art exhibitions (Page 38), a four-page round-up of the tastiest treats in store for the forthcoming Great Bath Feast (Page 54), historian Catherine Pitt’s beginner’s guide to tracing your family tree in the Bath city archives (Page 66), gardening writer Jane Moore’s tips on how to attract wildlife to your garden this autumn (Page 110) plus our annual schools guide (from Page 81) and you’ve pretty much got yourself a handy month-long manual. There’s a healthy sprinkling of other items of interest too. Jessica Hope interviewed actor Laurence Fox – he of Lewis fame and a member of the great Fox acting dynasty – ahead of his run at the Theatre Royal Bath in Tom Stoppard’s The Real Thing (Page 22). He happily agreed to share his top ten favourite tracks with her too. I spoke to the delightful Dame Jacqueline Wilson (Page 44), creator of much loved characters such as Tracy Beaker and Hetty Feather, about her new book for children, which is set in the Second World War. A Bathonian by birth she told me how much she was looking forward to returning to the Bath Children’s Literature Festival, when she’ll be talking to legions of fans of all ages. Our foodie writer Melissa Blease had a happy encounter (Page 58) with three ex-soldiers who became friends and on leaving the services transferred their skills to running Framptons, the latest bar and restaurant to move into the historic old Empire Hotel building in Bath. Maybe you think it’s time to put something back into society? In which case you might like to read our profile of Mentoring Plus (Page 76), the excellent Bath based charity which pairs young people in Bath and north east Somerset with adult mentors. Just a few hours each week can make a huge positive difference to a young person’s confidence and outlook. There’s much more besides, take a look for yourself. We’ll be back next month with more useful information . . .

Georgette McCready Editor All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

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POP OF COLOUR: we’ll be turning our thoughts over the coming weeks towards cosying up in the warm embrace of a winter coat. This lovely red number is from Jo by Jasper Conran, £165, at Debenhams, Bath.

SWEET TOOTH: Yotam Ottolenghi, who must surely be Bath’s current favourite cook, for his wonderfully inspirational, colourful salads and vegetable based dishes, is visiting the city on Tuesday 19 September, 8pm, at the invitation of Topping & Co bookshop. He and his lifelong friend and collaborator Helen Goh will be at Komedia talking about their new book, Sweet, which goes back to Ottolenghi’s roots as a pastry chef.

living is not enough. One must have ❝ Justsunshine, freedom, and a little flower ❞ HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN

Danish writer, best remembered for his fairy tales 1805 – 1875


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ZEITGEIST

5

things to do in

September

Eat

Visit This is our chance to see behind the scenes at some of Bath’s historic venues, from museums to gardens. As part of national Heritage Open Days – Thursday 7 to Sunday 10 September – Bath and North East Somerset Council is throwing the doors open for free visits. During the four days there’s a wide choice of places to visit including: inside No4 the Circus with its beautifully restored Georgian garden; the Regency lido, the Cleveland Pools at Bathwick, which are subject to a major fundraising campaign; the interior of Fairfield House in Newbridge, which was home to Haile Selassie exiled Emporer of Ethiopia, and the Saltford brass mill with its 18-foot working water mill. To find out more visit: romanbaths.co.uk.

It’s knives and forks at the ready as Bath prepares this month to get stuck in to its annual celebration of local food and drink. The Great Bath Feast runs from Saturday 23 September to Sunday 8 October, with a menu of events that includes foodie tours of Bath with Savouring Bath, gourmet themed evenings and a chance to dine out for a tenner at numerous establishments in and around the city. Find out more on the GBF website: greatbathfeast.co.uk or pick up a programme and see what whets your appetite. Our highlights from this year’s Feast are on Page 54.

HARVEST TIME: the Great Bath Feast offers a wealth of eating and drinking opportunities

Walk Many of us would like to do something to help Bath’s rough sleepers but wonder how we can actually make a difference. One answer might be to get family and friends together to take part in the sponsored Circuit of Bath walk in aid of Julian House, the charity which works with some of our most vulnerable people. The walk, which takes in some of the most picturesque countryside around Bath, is on Sunday 24 September and participants can challenge themselves to walk the full 20 miles, or a shorter distance. Volunteers and a regular shuttle bus make the experience much easier. Children and dogs on leads are very welcome. The Julian House hostel is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week; the charity also manages 125 bed spaces for clients and three social enterprise projects including the Bath Bike Workshop. For further details or an entry form contact Cathy Adcock on 01225 354656, email: cathya@julianhouse.org.uk or online: julianhouse.org.uk.

Enjoy On the 200th anniversary of the death of Jane Austen expect the annual display of devotion by her followers, known as Janeites, to know no bounds for the annual Jane Austen Festival, which runs Friday 8 to Sunday 17 September. This year’s festival includes the spectacular Regency costume parade through the streets of Bath, walks, talks, readings from her novels, and lots of jolly dressing up and dancing. For the full programme visit: janeaustenfestivalbath.co.uk

Celebrate To coincide with the American Museum in Britain’s Jazz Age fashion exhibition, which closes on 29 October, the museum is transporting guests back to the 1920s at a prohibition-style ball on Saturday 7 October. Dress in your best 1920s inspired outfits, dance to Victoria Klewin’s Speakeasy Band and sip prohibition-era cocktails handcrafted by the Abbey Hotel’s pop-up bar. The ball is from 7.30 – 10.30pm at the museum, and there’s an after party from 10pm – 1am at The Abbey Hotel’s Igloo Bar. Tickets £15 per person. Pre-booking is essential. To book tickets, visit: americanmuseum.org or call: 01225 460503. Need to brush up on your Charleston before the ball? The Showgirl Academy is holding a 1920s dance lesson at the museum on Saturday 23 September, 10.30am – 12.30pm. £10, pre-booking necessary.

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BATH

Visit our showroom on Park Road,

(off Chelsea Road

)

Free Miele dishwasher * with every order placed in September.

sales@schmidt-bath.com | 01225 337276 1 Park Road, (off Chelsea Road) Bath BA1 3EE * ON ORDERS OVER £15,000


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ist

THE CITY THE BUZZ

Take the plunge

Correction Alongside our August Bath at Work portrait we referred to Bath ceramicist MaryJane Evans as Mary-Ann. We’d like to apologise to Mary-Jane. You can see her work at: maryjane ceramics.com.

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What brought you to Bath? I moved here with my family over ten years ago. Originally I’m from Yorkshire, but we left there when I was 10 – I’m definitely a southerner now. I studied at Oxford Brookes University and currently commute from home near Corsham to my job as a marketing executive for the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association charity in Reading. What are you reading? I switch between books that help me learn something and books that you can get completely caught up in. I picked up the habit of reading to widen my knowledge while I was studying for my masters’ degree in business management. I’ve just finished a book about how to build positive habits but am about to start a classic Jilly Cooper. What music are you listening to? I’m not even going to pretend to be cool here; I’m a pop princess and love anything I can sing (badly) along to when I’m on my own . . . and high tempo workout tracks for the gym. Which café or restaurant takes your fancy? All of them! Before the Miss Great Britain final this month I’m probably more likely to visit Beyond the Kale for a boost of goodness – and after the final I may celebrate with cake at maybe Cascara or Bertinet. Your passions? What hobbies or interests will you be pursuing? I can’t wait to get back into the kitchen and make some tasty treats, I’ve already been asked for a round of Toblerone brownies after Miss GB is over. But before then, I’ll be exercising my right to sparkle as I have thousands of rhinestones to add individually to my finals dresses. What local outdoor activity or event will you be doing or visiting? I’m looking forward to the Great Bath Feast. I promise I’m not obsessed by food but there are so many amazing places to eat in Bath. I’m also hoping to be able to go to the Movie by

Ferla Paolo Photography

We ask Amelia Watt, holder of the Miss Bath 2017 title and finalist in the Miss Great Britain contest, what she’ll be up to in September

If there were awards for the most unusual fundraising event, the latest sponsored stunt by the Forever Friends Appeal at the Royal United Hospital, Bath would surely be a winner. Volunteers are being invited to jump into the waters of Portishead Marina in Bristol and experience the once-in-a-lifetime sensation of a 14-stone Newfoundland dog plunging in after you and rescuing you. The rescue experience takes place on Saturday 30 September and participants – who need to be aged eight or older – are being asked to raise a minimum of £100 to take part. Wetsuits will be issued, you don’t even have to be able to swim, so confident are the owners of these reliable furry friends, who have been rescuing people from water for generations. The great plunge and rescue has been jointly organised by the Forever Friends Appeal (busy raising money for a new cancer centre to serve Bath and the surrounding area) and Newfound Friends, a Bristol based charity. Sign up at: foreverfriendsappeal.co.uk or tel: 01225 821535.

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My BATH Moonlight for RUH Forever Friends Appeal and watch Moulin Rouge (let’s hope the rain stays away). Which museum or gallery will you be visiting? I’m hoping I can persuade someone to come to the 1920’s dance workshop at the American Museum with me – if only to laugh at how uncoordinated I am. Film or play? What will you be going to see this month? I love going to the theatre, but with everything else going on in September I’m more likely to fit in a cinema trip – films are always better on the big screen. Hopefully I’ll get to see The Hitman’s Bodyguard. What’s your latest project? I’m really looking forward to representing Bath at the finals of Miss Great Britain this month, thanks to my sponsors Ferla Paolo Photography and Affinity Dental Care. I’ll be perfecting my catwalk and living in sparkles until the grand final on 15 September in Leicester where hopefully I can bring the crown back home. There are 50 finalists and it’s a two-day event. There are three rounds in the competition and a series of optional awards to compete for too. These include Miss Charity, for the girl who is able to raise the most for Miss GB’s chosen charities, Miss Personality and Miss Great Britain’s Got Talent. My talent, which is tricks to music with my six-year-old golden retriever Hector, has made the top 10 already and will be shown on the night. When I was training Hector I had to keep upgrading his treats to keep his interest but he rewarded me by performing well and even wore a bow tie – he looked really cute. I’ve enjoyed being Miss Bath so far, taking part in Bath Carnival, which was great fun. I am hoping to attend more events and now considering really challenging myself by doing the Bath Half marathon as Miss Bath. Follow me on Twitter and Instagram to stay up to date: @ameliazuleika. n

We’re following @vegmead, the band of energetic volunteers who run the Vegmead Edible Garden in Hedgemead Park, Bath on behalf of the community. They’ve been hard at work over the summer growing food for people to enjoy and creating a pop-up garden in Walcot Street.

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See more online thebathmag.co.uk

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The Bath Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bath and the surrounding area. We also have special distribution units in the following city centre stores and coffee shops

2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 01225 424499. Fax: 01225 426677 thebathmag.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2017 Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bath Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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CROWNING GLORY: Bath jewellery designer Nicholas Wylde with his Queen of the Wylde, Isabella Alexander PHOTOGRAPH: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic


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INDEPENDENT | BUSINESSES

SHINE BRIGHT LIKE A DIAMOND Bath’s independent business community shows some examples of how they manage to survive and thrive

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ath is a small city and it’s often said that everyone knows each other. And that’s very much the case among the city’s independent traders community, where collaboration and communication gives this sector added strength. Rather than work as rivals against each other, Bath’s most enduring businesses pull together to run an on-going publicity campaign. The most recent has been organised by jeweller Nicholas Wylde, celebrating 30 years designing and making jewellery in the city by running a treasure hunt involving his fellow independent traders. The Wylde Treasure Hunt, which has just closed to entries, saw more than 35 other businesses taking part, either by donating prizes for the winning entry or as sponsors. At the time of writing more than 3,500 entries had been registered. Had Nicholas Wylde found the collaboration with others a good example of ‘strength in numbers’ regarding indie promotions? He says: “Very much so. I feel that indie shops should work together wherever possible, complimenting each other to get the message out. In Bath, particularly, indie shops must remain the focus of Bath’s retail scene in order for the city to retain its charm and character. Working together to promote ourselves and this unique city is vital. Today’s high street is all about enjoying the experience of shopping and that’s just one very important element we consider here.” There are a number of key ways in which successful businesses survive and thrive. We’ve looked at some of those methods and those who shine in these areas. l Have a unique selling point Many of our Bath indies have a USP that sets them apart from the national chains. The Bath Hat Company and Magalleria (which sells niche magazines) specialise in selling one

product, for instance, so everyone knows they’re experts in their field. And shoe shop Chanii B is one of very few in the country where you can buy a unique range of shoes off the shelf or arrange to meet the shoe designer herself, Chantal Pilon and order a pair of bespoke shoes. A newer business, but one which is making headlines, is Taste of Bath. Helen Rich supplies customers with stylish hampers packed with food and drink made by local artisans. This is another example of a local business wanting to put Bath on the national and international map. Great Western Wine regularly hosts tasting sessions hosted by renowned figures in the wine-making industry. l Marketing This begins with your shop window and this is where indies such as Shannon, which specialises in eye-catching Scandanavian designer items, shine. Coopers home appliances shop always attracts attention with its topical, often witty themed window displays. And while businesses draw attention to themselves through targeted advertising – understanding where their customers might be looking – they also use social media to build their brand. Moss of Bath, which sells and installs televisions and hi-fi, is busy on this front. Anne Moss said: “Social media is a very important tool to us. We operate a Facebook page, a Twitter and Instagram account and a Pinterest board and believe that, from a small business perspective, social media is vital for education, brand awareness, industry trend awareness, interaction with the local community and for networking with other businesses. All of our social media is linked to our website which has an updated news/blog section.” Emma Savage of Grace and Ted, pre-loved designer clothes and accessories, is another

early adopter of social media. She doesn’t just promote Grace and Ted through Twitter and Facebook but actively works with her neighbourhood community, organising events to attract visitors to the Kingsmead Square area of Bath. l Events and promotions Draw attention to your brand by rewarding customer loyalty and keeping your database and your clients up-to-date. Nicholas Wylde’s regular newsletter had 3,000 subscribers 12 months ago – it now has 15,000 subscribers. And these people will be among the first to hear about promotions, such as the 30th anniversary celebrations throughout September, when 100 items in the Bath jewellery store will be on offer at a 30 per cent discount. l Customer service The way your staff deal with customers is key to making your independent business a success. If people have received good service, they’ll be back. Independents can go the extra mile to keeping their customers satisfied. As Paul Cooper of Coopers says: “We think our success lies in being values driven and customer focused. We want buying home appliances to be a pleasurable and human experience – a real antidote to the soulless online shopping ‘trip’.” His customers will testify that his team will cheerfully deliver white goods to a fourth floor apartment in a Georgian townhouse. l National and industry awards When your peers recognise what you’re achieving in terms of product and service that’s a badge of endorsement to wear with pride. Moss of Bath, for instance, recently won Best Independent Consumer Electronics Retailer, Best Website and a highly commended award for outstanding customer service at the Innovative Electrical Retailer awards 2017. n

THE STORY BEHIND THE PHOTOGRAPH Independent jewellery designer Nicholas Wylde launched a search this summer to find the Queen of the Wylde, someone who would become the face of Nicholas Wylde when promoting new collections. The first holder of the Queen of the Wylde is Isabella Alexander, a Bath-based businesswoman and mother. She will be the star of the new Nicholas Wylde brochure. The photography is by Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic (capturethespirit.co.uk), her floral crown was created by Corrinda Wakefield-Wylde and make-up and hair styling was by Harriet Gallon. The jewellery is by

Nicholas Wylde, incorporating his unique Wylde Flower Diamond ®. As part of her prize Isabella will be treated to a stay in a Bath hotel and a piece of Nicholas Wylde jewellery. Isabella said: “I first found Nicholas Wylde when my partner Paul bought me an anniversary gift a few years ago and since then I’ve been a huge fan. It is wonderful to buy from a local business and one that produces jewellery with such striking designs and bold colours, the new collection that I modelled for the photo shoot has some beautiful pieces, a few that I have my eye on.”

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Iconic chairs by Hans J. Wegner

The CH25 in oak-soap, CH22 in oak-walnut oil, CH26 in walnut-oak, CH23 in oak-walnut oil, and the CH24 in oak-white oil.

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Contemporary Nordic furniture from Carl Hansen and Son, Fritz Hansen and Swedese. Lighting by Louis Poulsen. Our homewares include Marimekko, Iittala, Rorstrand, with lots of Moomin mugs, fabric and throws from Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

68 Walcot Street Bath BA1 5BD 01225 424222 www.shannon-uk.com


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If looking glamorous and chic are your desire, Chanel are the ones for you. super stylish.

Ellis & Killpartrick Optometrists 18 New Bond Street, Bath, BA1 1BA Tel: 01225 466954

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FOX ON THE RUN

Jessica Hope talks to actor and singer-songwriter Laurence Fox ahead of his appearance in The Real Thing, coming to Bath this month

Laurence Fox stars in The Real Thing at Theatre Royal Bath this month


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Photos: Edmond Terakopian

LAURENCE | FOX

Laurence Fox in rehearsals for The Real Thing with fellow cast member Flora Spencer-Longhurst

marriage and infidelity, entwined with the difficulties encompassed with stage writing and the political situation at the time. Stoppard’s The Real Thing was first staged in 1982 and quickly became a success in the West End before transferring to Broadway, winning multiple awards including the Tony Award for Best Play in 1984. “It’s a real privilege to be part of this production,” says Laurence. “Tom Stoppard’s work is the pinnacle of English stage writing.” And while some directors these days reinvent classic plays to make them seem new to modern audiences, using extravagent production budgets or changing the time period and location, Laurence reassures me that director Stephen Unwin is sticking closely to Stoppard’s original vision in this production. “This play is very much about the writing, it’s all about the words. So we are trying to frame the words in a place that would work best,” he says.

Tom Stoppard’s work is the pinnacle of English stage writing

M

any will recognise Laurence Fox as one half of the canny detective duo from ITV’s Lewis, the spin-off of Inspector Morse, that ran for nine series until its finale in 2015. Away from the criminal world in his role as DS James Hathaway, Laurence has played an SS officer, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I, a suitor to Jane Austen, and a Colditz prisoner of war, among others, on the big screen over the years. And it seems Laurence doesn’t shy away from taking on diverse characters on stage either. He has played French President Charles De Gaulle in A Patriotic Traitor at the Gielgud Theatre last year, an injured soldier in Our Boys alongside Arthur Darvill, and the leading role in the onstage version of Hitchcock’s 1950s psychological thriller Strangers on a Train. Laurence – whose family has produced generations of notable names on the theatre and film scene including his father James Fox, his uncle Edward Fox (who recently came to Bath in the production of Sand in the Sandwiches), as well as cousins Emilia and Freddie Fox – is now taking on the leading role in Tom Stoppard’s multi-award winning play The Real Thing, which comes to Theatre Royal Bath for two weeks in September. “It’s by far the best part I have ever played so far in my life,” Laurence says. The Real Thing follows the story of Henry, a successful playwright who is at the top of his game, who has an affair with actress Annie – the wife of one of the stars of his latest play. Henry and Annie divorce their partners and get married, but quickly discover their relationship isn’t what they hoped it would be. Henry struggles to write a new play, while Annie becomes embroiled in attempting to free a soldier who was imprisoned for burning a memorial wreath during an anti-missile demonstration. “Henry is a very big character. He’s a writer who is going through a big change in his life. He has a huge brain and is very sensitive. He’s a very complex character,” says Laurence. The play, set in the 1980s, is an examination of issues surrounding love,

Aside from preparing for The Real Thing, Laurence’s other acting projects this year have included joining the “lovely lovely Sean Bean”, as he warmly describes him, on set for the filming of series two of ITV’s chilling The Frankenstein Chronicles – a reinterpretation of of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein set in the dark and dangerous backstreets of 1830s London. Although he can’t tell me much about his character out of fear of spoiling the storyline, Laurence says he plays a mysterious, European philanthropist, opposite the likes of Ed Stoppard and The Crown’s Vanessa Kirby. The release date for the six-part drama is yet to be announced. You can also see Laurence playing iconic Lawrence of Arabia on the big screen in Born a King, to be released in 2018, which

follows the childhood of the future King Faisal set against the backdrop of the unification of Saudi Arabia. Away from the acting world Laurence has been a musician since the age of 20 when he began writing and playing his own music – he plays the guitar and piano. How did he get into making his own music? “Someone taught me a few chords and I worked out the rest for myself,” he says, adding a string to his already talented bow. After years of perfecting his folky tone Laurence released his debut album, Holding Patterns, last year. He admits that songs on the album were influenced by what was going on in his personal life at the time – it was announced a few months after the album’s release that Laurence and actress Billie Piper were separating after more than eight years of marriage. “The writing process was really cathartic,” he says. Moving between acting jobs and writing music, does he prefer performing music or acting to a live audience, I wonder? “They couldn’t be more different from each other. I guess I feel more comfortable hiding in a character on stage. But with music, it is very much all about you, what you think and feel – it’s very exposing, especially with the stuff I write about.” Laurence is currently working on his next record, fitting in time to write in between the tour of The Real Thing, and plans to release his next album in February 2018 before going on a UK tour. LAURENCE’S FAVOURITE SONGS: 1. Soothing by Laura Marling 2. My Little Man by Sean Rowe 3. La Cienega Just Smiled by Ryan Adams 4. Leaving on a Jet Plane by John Denver 5. Brilliant Disguise by Bruce Springsteen 6. Coward of the County by Kenny Rogers 7. Highwayman by Highwaymen 8. Poison and Wine by Civil Wars The Real Thing is at Theatre Royal Bath from Monday 18 September – Saturday 30 September. Tel: 01225 448844 or visit: theatreroyal.org.uk to book tickets. Laurence’s debut album Holding Patterns is out now. Visit: laurencefox.co.uk. n

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WHAT’S ON in September EVENTS ARE LISTED IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER WESTON VILLAGE FLOWER SHOW Saturday 2 September, 2pm – 4.30pm n All Saints Centre, Weston The flower show is organised by Weston Village Gardening Club, which is inviting gardeners to enter their prize specimens for competition. Entry forms (to be handed in by Wednesday 30 August) from Weston Village vets and Kit Johnson estate agent.

Driving Miss Daisy at the Theatre Royal Bath

MOVIE BY MOONLIGHT: MOULIN ROUGE Saturday 2 September, gates open at 5pm n Royal Victoria Park, Bath The Movies by Moonlight annual open air screening is a popular Bath event for families and friends. This year’s film is Moulin Rouge, starring Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor. There will be a collection, with money raised going towards the Royal United Hospital Bath’s appeal to build a new cancer centre.

EDITOR’S PICK

The Urban Voodoo Machine, playing at Chapel Arts Centre

DOROTHY HOUSE MOONLIGHT WALK Saturday 9 September from 10pm n Southgate, Bath This is a joyful, bonding event in which hundreds of women take to the streets of Bath to walk through the night to raise money for the great and caring work done by Dorothy House Hospice Care. Last year the event raised a whopping £95,000. Participants are encouraged to dress up, the theme is Saturday Night Diva. To enrol visit: bathmoonlightwalk.org.uk. Or, if you’re out and about that evening, offer the sponsored walkers your support. SHINDIG WEEKEND FEAST Saturday 2 – Sunday 3 September, gates open noon on Saturday n Critchill Manor, Frome, BA11 4LJ Two nautical themed venues will be hosting Crazy P, My Bad Sister, The Allergies, Late Nite Tuff Guy, Mr Thing, WBBL, Shaka Loves You, X-Ray Ted, and Bristol’s Women In Music Takeover. Tickets: £79 for live music, three-course meal and camping, or £49 for music and camp, buy food from stalls. Tickets from: shindig-events.co.uk. ROBERT WEBB Monday 4 September, 8pm n Topping & Co booksellers at Komedia, Westgate Street, Bath One half of comedy duo Mitchell and Webb and columnist in The Telegraph and New Statesman, Robert Webb’s book How Not to be a Boy looks at the nature of manhood and the life lessons we learn. Tickets from £8, tel: 01225 428111.

Comedian and writer Robert Webb at Topping & Co

ABSENT FRIENDS Tuesday 5 – Saturday 9 September, 7.30pm (matinee Saturday, 2pm) n The Mission Theatre, Corn Street, Bath Next Stage Theatre Company presents Absent Friends by Alan Ayckbourn. Di has organised a tea party of old friends to comfort Colin, whose fiancee has drowned. But it turns out it’s not Colin who’s the one who needs cheering up. Tickets £12.50 (£10.50 concs) tel: 01225 428600 or visit: missiontheatre.co.uk. Also at the Mission this month CULT FIGURE: KENNETH WILLIAMS Sunday 24 September, 8pm Actor Colin Elmer, who played Kenneth Williams in the 50th anniversary tour of Round the Horne, reprises his role in this new production, telling the Carry On star’s story in his own words, using anecdotes, writing and some of his original material. Tickets £12

Absent Friends at The Mission Theatre

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Ocean Film Festival at Komedia

(£10 concs), Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362, visit: bathboxoffice.org.uk. OCEAN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR Wednesday 6 September, 7.30pm n Komedia, Westgate Street, Bath From the team behind the Banff Film Festival UK Tour, a collection of mind blowing short films celebrates divers, paddlers, surfers and oceanographers who live for the sea’s salt spray. Tickets: £13.50, concessions £11.50, from: komedia.co.uk/bath. BATHAMPTON VILLAGE SHOW Saturday 9 September, 1.30pm n Bathampton Bathampton’s resident Olympic gold medallist Amy Williams is to officially open the Bathampton village show and has agreed to judge the under 12s fancy dress competition at 1.45pm. Stalls, games, bouncy castle, cream teas, local history exhibition and book signings, home grown produce, handicrafts and art. Visit: bathamptonvillageshow.co.uk. PRESTON REED Thursday 7 September, from 8pm n Chapel Arts Centre, Lower Borough Walls, Bath He’s been hailed as the world’s most gifted guitarist and now Preston Reed brings his distinctive acoustic style to Bath following an international tour of China, the USA and Europe. Tickets: £15, visit: chapelarts.org, tel: 01225 461700. Also at Chapel Arts this month KATE DIMBLEBY AND KEITH WARMINGTON Sunday 17 September, 8pm Singer-songwriter Kate Dimbleby is joined by Keith Warmington on harmonica, guitar and vocals for an evening of songs about life loss and a lot of laughter born out of friendship. Tickets: £12, £14 on the door. THE URBAN VOODOO MACHINE Friday 22 September, 8pm They’ve played Download, Glastonbury and Bestival and toured with the New York Dolls and the Pogues. They’ve been described as a riot for the eyes and sensation for the ears – a sing-along, drinkalong, clap-along band. Tickets: £12, £14 on the door. MEGSON Thursday 28 September, 8pm A husband and wife duo, Stu and Debs Hanna from Teeside who are three times nominated in the Radio2 Folk Awards – they deliver a unique brand of British folk music. Tickets: £14, £16 on the door. DRIVING MISS DAISY Wednesday 6 – Saturday 9 September, times vary n Theatre Royal, Saw Close, Bath Sian Phillips and Derek Griffiths star in this touring production of the much loved tale of the relationship between a prickly widow and her chauffeur. Tickets, tel: 01225 448844 or visit: theatreroyal.org.uk. Also at the Theatre Royal this month SALAD DAYS Tuesday 12 – Saturday 16 September, times vary Escapist fun with this evergreen, optimistic feelgood musical. This replaces Love Letters, cancelled after Ryan O’Neal had to drop out due to ill health. Continued Page 28 ➲ THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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WHAT’S | ON THE BATH PUB TOUR Every Friday night (except 8 and 15 September) meet outside the Crystal Palace for 7pm n The Crystal Palace pub, Abbey Green, Bath Bath once had more pubs per square mile than any other city in the world. This is a 90-minute whirl through the city’s drinking past, as much a pub quiz as a pub tour. Come with a team name – there are prizes. Enjoy an insider’s guide to Bath’s best boozers. Meet outside The Crystal Palace (arrive early for a drink), £9 / £7. 1920S JAZZ AGE: FASHION AND PHOTOGRAPHS Until Sunday 29 October, 10.30am – 5pm, Tuesday to Sunday (also open Bank Holiday Monday) n The American Museum, Claverton, Bath Evoking the days of prohibition in America, the bright young things, the decadence and the music. The exhibition features more than 100 objects, including flapper dresses, from 1919 to 1929. The viewer can get really close to these authentic pieces too. Tickets (to include entrance to the main house museum, the grounds and the exhibition): £12 / £10.50 over 60s and students, children, £6.50.

Son Yambu at the Wiltshire Music Centre Bath Independent Market in Abbey Green

FRAMPTON COUNTRY FAIR Saturday 10 September, gates open 9am n Frampton country estate, Frampton on Severn, Gloucestershire A celebration of the living, working countryside. Events include heavy horses, parachutists and the traditional army skill of tent pegging on horseback. There will be hundreds of stalls and stands, fresh food and children’s activities. Take your lurcher or terrier, on a lead, and enter them into the dog races. Tickets: £12 on the gate, £3 for children. Proceeds to local charities. Visit: framptoncountryfair.co.uk. IS EXECUTIVE PAY TOO HIGH? Tuesday 12 September, 7.30pm n Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, Queen Square, Bath Hard on the heels of the revelations of what many see as inflated salaries at the BBC is this talk by Paul Jackson, who writes for Investors Chronicle. He will examine what drives executive pay in this country and look at who guards the guards. Tickets: £4 on the door, £2 for students and BRLSI members. BATH PHILHARMONIA: FAURÉ’S REQUIEM Saturday 16 September, 7.30pm n St Swithin’s Church, the Paragon, Bath Bath Philharmonia perform Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem with Cantilena Youth Choir and soloists Gemma Roper and Gavin Carr in a concert of music of astonishing beauty and hope. Baritone Gavin Carr will also feature in Kindertotenlieder by Mahler, a study of the death of innocence. Tickets: £25 / £20 / £15 / £5 (u18s), Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362, or visit: bathboxoffice.org.uk.

The Taste of Timsbury food festival

A VIEW FROM THE CRESCENT n No1 Royal Crescent, Bath Until Sunday 19 November An exhibition celebrating the Royal Crescent through the eyes of prominent artists. BATH BRUNCH MARKET Sunday 10 September, 9.30am – 3.30pm n Green Park Station, Green Park, Bath Easy like Sunday morning, as they say . . . Enjoy a late leisurely breakfast at Green Park Station, followed by a gentle mooch around the artisan, vintage and independent stalls in the afternoon. Tuck in to Indian, German and Caribbean, vegetarian and vegan food. Visit: bathartisanmarket.com. THE INDEPENDENT BATH MARKET Sunday 17 September, 10am – 4pm n Abbey Green, Bath An independent monthly market featuring artisan and craft items,

Orchestra of Samples at the Wiltshire Music Centre

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WHAT’S | ON from handmade stationery to Somerset cider or freshly picked local flowers – you’ll discover different stallholders each month. The shops around the square are also worth a browse while you’re in the neighbourhood. CHARLES RENNIE Join Olly Langdon on the Bath MACKINTOSH: A Pub Tour, Friday evenings BEDROOM FOR BATH Thursday 21 September, 7.30pm n The Museum of Bath at Work, Julian Road, Bath The annual Michael Cross Lecture is being delivered by Dr Trevor Turpin on the subject of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and his design for the master bedroom for Bath engineer Sidney Horstmann. The furniture and a recreation of the room has been on display at the Museum of Bath at Work since June. The exhibition will close on 1 November. Tickets: £8 from the museum, tel: 01225 318348 or email: mobaw@hotmail.com. FIND YOUR POWER PLANT WORKSHOP Friday 22, 2pm – 6pm and Saturday 23 September, 10am – 4pm n BRLSI, Queen Square, Bath Visiting Chilean principal aromatherapist (senior trainer at the International Federation of Aromatherapists), qualified shamanic practitioner and author Sylvia Galleguillos will lead this workshop. Inspired by native Latin American shamanic practices and their understanding of the healing powers of plants, find your power plant, practise the journey with the spirit of the plants, and learn to prepare shamanic water mists and balm. One day workshop, £105, two days £175, to include all material, refreshment and herbal teas. To book tel: 07811 956685. CHARITY MASQUERADE BALL Saturday 23 September, 7pm n The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath A sparkling evening which begins with a reception, followed by dinner and an auction, plus special inspirational guest speakers including Paralympian Nigel Murray. Proceeds in aid of the Leonard Cheshire Greenhill House. Tickets: £95, tel: 01761 479902, email: greenhillevents@leonardcheshire.org. BATH ABBEY GIRLS’ CHOIR: 20TH CENTURY ANNIVERSARY CONCERT Saturday 23 September, 7pm n Bath Abbey Featuring music sung by the Abbey Girls’ and Men’s choirs with music composed by women, texts by women – notably from Mother Julian of Norwich and the Magnificat (the song of Mary) - and music composed to celebrate women, including the beautiful music of Hildegard of Bingen from the 11th century and a commission by composer Judith Bingham with words by the 13th century female mystic St Mechthild of Magdeburg. Other music includes Schubert Psalm 23, Brahms’ Ihr habt nun traurigkeit (written in memory of his mother), Grieg’s Ave Maris Stella, Bruckner’s Ave Maria and music by Mathias, Stanford, Britten and Mendelssohn. Tickets: £7 – £15 from Bath Box Office. ORCHESTRA OF SAMPLES Saturday 23 September, 8pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Ashley Road, Bradford on Avon Addictive TV is an electronic duo comprising Graham Daniels and Mark Vidler. They’ve filmed more than 200 musicians from more than 25 countries to create a glorious on-screen digital mix-up of sound and visuals. There’s an introduction to sampling and a workshop during the afternoon, places are £5, bookable in advance. Tickets for the evening: £10. Tel: 01225 860110 or visit: wiltshiremusic.org.uk. Continued Page 32 ➲ 30 TheBATHMagazine

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WHAT’S | ON Also at Wiltshire Music Centre this month MIKE MCGOLDRICK, JOHN MCCUSKER, JOHN DOYLE Sunday 24 September, 7.30pm Each is an outstanding folk musician in his own right, with many years performing experience. Together they produce a thrilling ride through jigs, ballads and reels. Tickets: £17 / £8.50 u18s. SON YAMBU Friday 29 September, 7.30pm Straight from the streets of Cuba comes this red-hot tropical son music, a fusion of Spanish and African rhythms played by this lively seven-piece. The concert is preceeded by a Cuban dance workshop from 6pm. Places are £5, bookable in advance. Concert tickets: £16 / £8 u18s (bring your kid for a quid when booking an adult ticket). BATH ARTISAN MARKET Sunday 24 September, 10am – 4pm n Queen Square, Bath More than 50 local artisans, vintage dealers and designer-makers pop-up on the last Sunday of the month alongside delicious street food stalls, stirring up delicacies including Indian, Thai, Caribbean and German food with plenty of vegan, gluten-free and vegetarian options too. Oh, there’s lots of cake too. Visit: bathartisanmarket.com. TASTE OF TIMSBURY Saturday 23 September, 10am – 3pm n The Conygre Hall, Timbsury The award-winning food festival, which is free to attend, will have more than 30 stalls inside the hall and in a marquee outside, sponsored by the Seven Stars pub. All the stallholders are local and products include cheese, charcuterie, crayfish, meat, beer, cider, wine and liqueurs, cakes, desserts, preserves, pickles and sauces, locallyproduced Indian food, dips and hummus, artisan bread, vegetables and street food. There will be cookery demonstrations and activities for children.

PLANNING AHEAD . . . HIMAL: FASHION AND ACCESSORIES FROM THE HIMALAYAS Friday 6 and Saturday 7 October, 10.30am – 4.30pm n 5 Old King Street (next to Hall and Woodhouse), Bath This is a popular annual sale of beautiful, handmade cashmere shawls and scarves, silk and cotton pyjamas, handbags, children’s slippers and Christmas decorations – all from the Himalayas and sold to raise money for the locally run charity The Charitable Foundation for the Education of Nepalese Children. HUSH NO MORE Saturday 7 October, 7.30pm n St Luke’s Church, Wellsway, Bath The Paragon Singers, conducted by Sarah Latto, offers a programme centred on Britten’s thrilling a cappella masterpiece, Hymn to St Cecilia, and also includes pieces by Monteverdi, Purcell and Rose. A captivating evening with one of Bath’s foremost chamber choirs. Tickets: £12, Bath Box Office, tel: 01225 463362. THE BRUTON DECORATIVE ANTIQUES FAIR Friday 13 (2pm – 5pm) – Sunday 15 October, open 11am – 5pm Saturday and Sunday n Haynes International Motor Museum, Sparkford, BA22 7LH Bruton has become a go-to destination celebrity and media hotspot following the opening of the Hauser and Wirth Gallery in 2014 and so this site – in the museum’s £6m extension and close to Bruton – has been chosen for the show, which features pieces from some of the most exciting decorative dealers in the UK and Europe. There’ll be 18th – 20th century decorative items for the home and garden, English folk art, French and Swedish painted furniture, mid-century furniture, textiles, furniture from country houses, lighting, mirrors, jewels and vintage designer handbags. Parking and restaurant on site. Complimentary tickets, visit: brutondecorativeantiquesfair.co.uk. n 32 TheBATHMagazine

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HIMAL FASHION and ACCESSORIES from the HIMALAYAS

Annual Autumn Event Following our hugely successful previous events and by demand, we are pleased to announce this year’s event date as Friday 6th October and Saturday 7th October 2017, 10.30am - 4.30pm 5, Old King Street, Bath (Health & Beauty Centre and Bath Chiropody Clinic; next to Hall and Woodhouse) We will have many beautiful items, including: Pure Cashmere Shawls • Pure Cashmere Scarves • Pure Cashmere Ponchos • Pure Silk Handprinted Scarves Silk & Cotton Mix Dressing Gowns • Silk & Cotton Mix Pyjama Sets (beautifully presented in matching presentation bags) NEW STOCK THIS YEAR inc. Luxurious Hand Embroidered Cashmere Shawls • Pure Wool Rugs Beautiful Embroidered Cushions • Home Accessories • Handbags Clothing • Children’s Slippers • Gifts for children, family & friends too Dare we mention…….. Beautiful Christmas Decorations Come along, bring a friend, enjoy a glass of Prosecco with us, shop! All profits from the event will be donated to The Charitable Foundation for the Education of Nepalese Children Reg’d No. 1140503 (A local charity, supporting and funding the education of children throughout Nepal.)

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SCHOOL | NEWS

LET’S DO THE SHOW RIGHT HERE The chance to shine in a new musical is now on the curriculum at King Edward’s School, Bath

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upils and staff at King Edward’s School, Bath, aren’t just content with starring in musicals – now they’re creating one of their own. This autumn, KES Senior School will be staging the premier of a musical Pop! written and developed for the school by resident composer Mark Boden and writerin-residence Catherine Bruton. This unique project has been created in in collaboration with pupils who are involved in song-writing, workshopping, performing, editing, documenting and – of course – starring in the show. Critically acclaimed teen and YA novelist Catherine Bruton, (who was described by The Guardian as ‘one of the finest teen writers of recent years’) works part-time as an English teacher at King Edward’s. With the help of pupils in the drama department, she has adapted the script from her 2011 novel Pop! (Billy Elliot meets Shameless!’ – so said The Sunday Times) to create a musical that she hopes will be, ‘hilarious and heartbreaking, topical, funny, fast-paced and perfect to show-case the talents of the talented young performers at our school.’ Music and lyrics have been developed by the school’s composer and music teacher, Mark Boden whose works have been performed by ensembles including the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and broadcast on BBC Radio 3. Mark has worked in collaboration with music pupils to develop an exciting contemporary score inspired by The Book of Mormon, Wicked and the hiphop beats of Hamilton. Sixth-former Sophie Mayhew is one of the students involved in writing some of the hits of the show. She said: “I’d start with just humming some melodies. By the end of the day we’d have lyrics. It has been such an exciting process to be involved in. The song I’m most proud of is Better Together which is such an uplifting anthem. But numbers like Find a Way and Falling Down are intimate and – we hope – really moving.” Set against a backdrop of strikes, racism and recession, Pop! follows the stories of three kids who dream of a better life for themselves and their families. They secretly enter a TV talent show. Of course, their families will kill them if they find out, and they’re going to have to be creative with the truth if they want to make it all the way – but when they scoop the big cash prize money, all will be forgiven – won’t it? “We knew the story would be a perfect 36 TheBATHMagazine

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CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE: resident composer Mark Boden has been collaborating with King Edward’s School students on the score for Pop! the musical, while writer in residence Catherine Bruton has been working with students on dialogue

vehicle for King Edward’s,” said Catherine Bruton, whose novel We Can be Heroes was recently adapted for the big screen in a family film starring Alison Steadman and Phil Davies. “The main characters are teenage kids who dream of better lives. And the issues the novel explores are so topical – immigration, social unrest, reality TV, pushy parents.” Catherine had to rip apart her original novel and put it back together like a jigsaw puzzle to make it work as a musical. “I’ve loved watching pupils bringing to life characters who had just existed in my imagination – I loved the way the music and lyrics created by Mark and the pupils articulate their inner lives and struggles – it has been the most thrilling process.” Working with students has been vital to the development of the project. “Workshopping scenes with young actors helps show what works – and what really doesn’t. And because KES GCSE and A Level drama students are devising scripts all the time themselves – they are better at creating dialogue than I am.” One of the main challenges has been working with such a big cast. “There are just so many talented singers and actors at King Edward’s,” said head of drama, Sarah Bird,

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who will be directing and producing Pop! which will be premiered at the Wroughton Theatre at the school site in North Road, Bath, from Wednesday 6 to Friday 8 December. “The philosophy of the drama team at KES is to include everyone who wants to be involved.” For the script-writer and composer, this posed a few creative challenges. “My first draft of the script simply didn’t have enough characters for all our talented actors.” said Catherine, “so I found myself re-drafting, transforming two characters into six – reassigning monologues to dialogue; while Mark rewrote solo songs as ensemble pieces. Still – having too much talent is a nice problem to have.” It has taken over a year to develop the script, music and lyrics – which is really not that long. “Projects of this scale and ambition are usually developed over a number of years, often working with a group of professional actors and musicians,” said Mark Boden. “We’re going to be staging and producing it in just a term.” Pupils will be involved in all stages of the production process – lighting, sound, set and costume design, orchestra and performance. “We want to open up as many opportunities as possible for the students involved,” said director Sarah Bird. The script has been submitted for the Bristol Old Vic Open Sessions and BEAM2018 (a showcase of new British musical theatre) while songs have been entered for various awards including the Stiles and Drewe Prize. And the school is hoping to attract some big names in the audience. Catherine is thinking big: “We want the world to see the wealth of talent at King Edward’s. So – yes – Andrew Lloyd Webber, Cameron Mackintosh and co, we’d love you to come along and watch.” n Find out more at: kesbath.com or @Pop_TheMusical on Twitter.


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

BEAUX ARTS 12 – 13 York Street, Bath Open Monday – Saturday 10am – 5pm Visit: beauxartsbath.co.uk Tel: 01225 464850 AUTUMN SHOW: MARTIN GREENLAND, SIMON ALLEN AND JACK DOHERTY Monday 11 September – Saturday 7 October

Former John Moores Prize winner Martin Greenland brings an awe-inspiring collection of landscapes to Beaux Arts, Bath for the first show of the gallery’s autumn programme. Part real, part imagination, these landscapes are a homage to the beauty of his native Lake District. Simon Allen’s wall sculptures are quite simply breathtaking. Gold and white gold gilded on to carved wood, they dazzle and shine and are particularly special in low light. Former potter in residence at the Leach Pottery Jack Doherty will be displaying his lovely soda-fired porcelain.

RainClearing From the West by Martin Greenland

WEST BARN Barton Farm, Bradford on Avon Open: 10am – 5.30pm Tel: 07767 498403 Free entry THREE WESSEX SKETCHERS Friday 6 – Sunday 8 October

For their fourth joint exhibition at the Barton Farm, the three local artists – Valérie Pirlot, Bob Child and Andrew Taylor – will showcase their latest work produced during recent travels. The show will feature a large selection of original oil and watercolour paintings. All work will be for sale alongside a selection of original prints, cards, calendars and catalogues. Meet the artists who will be present during the whole show.

Sunny Cliffs, Arrifana by Valerie Pirlot

IMAGIANATION 5 Terrace Walk, Bath Tel: 01225 312996 Visit: imagianation.com Open: daily, 10.30am – 5.30pm

Ken Loach (detail) by Richard Twose

VERVE LIVING Walcot Buildings, London Road, Bath RICHARD TWOSE IN CONVERSATION Wednesday 6 September, 6 – 9pm

Award-winning painter Richard Twose will be sharing insights into the world of contemporary art. Richard has called Bath home since 1999 and in 2011 was awarded first prize for a portrait by the Victoria Art Gallery. In 2014 his painting of Bath fashionista Jean Woods was awarded second prize at the National Portrait Gallery’s BP Portrait Awards, an award for which he is once again shortlisted this year – this time for his portrait of film director Ken Loach. Book a free place at: verveliving.uk or tel: 07785 332536.

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CHASING THE LIGHT: ROD CRAIG Saturday 2 – Saturday 30 September Artist Rod Craig has been painting and drawing all his life, turning professional after a 30 year career running a graphic design company. He has exhibited widely in the UK and had a solo show in New York in 2012. He says: “Having now made a new home in Bath I am feeling the same motivation to produce work inspired by such unqiue architecture and landscape. What interests me most here are the less obvious subjects – the back streets and the quiet corners.” Rod likes to combine his two passions of art and music and will be performing in the Imagianation gallery on Saturday 9 September in a duo, Mandolirium, with musical partner and fellow artist John Somerscales, who will also be exhibiting some of his paintings.


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ART | EXHIBITIONS

VICTORIA ART GALLERY By Pulteney Bridge Open daily, 10.30am – 5pm Tel: 01225 477233 Visit: victoriagal.org.uk JOHN EAVES: ECHOES OF PLACE Until Sunday 8 October John Eaves, who lives in Bath, is a respected contemporary artist. He studied and taught at the Bath Academy of Art and continues to delight with his bold, vibrant compositions in oil, watercolour and collage. His work is noted for its rhythmic compositions and use of colour to create mood. Free admission.

Pyramids by John Eaves

44AD GALLERY Abbey Street, Bath Daily, 10am – 6pm Tel: 07753 378325 Visit: 44ad.net

Torso by Gary Wood

ONE TWO FIVE GALLERY 4 Abbey Green, Bath Open: Wednesday to Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm Tel: 07803 033 629 Visit: onetwofivegallery.co.uk

INTO THE WOODS AND ALONG THE SHORE Monday 25 – Saturday 30 September

TORSO Friday 8 September – Sunday 1 October A major new series of ceramic sculpture by Gary Wood with accompanying scarves by Carole Waller, whose new autumn collection of quilted coats and jackets will also be found in the gallery.

New landscape and seascape work by Darren Gordon. Darren has been an art teacher in Bath schools for 22 years who has recently turned professional. He is a modern impressionist and paints on location. All work is for sale and a percentage of the proceeds of certain paintings will go towards supporting The Marine Conservation Society and The Woodlands Trust.

IN AND AROUND CORSHAM Visit: peacockartstrail.couk Free brochures from Corsham Town Hall and other town venues THE PEACOCK ARTS TRAIL Saturday 30 September – Sunday 8 October The Peacock Arts Trail features 60 open studios and exhibitions in and around Corsham. This is a free event which supports local artists and craftspeople. In mixed mediums, from crochet to fine art; photography to carpentry; jewellery making to sculpture. There is something for all tastes; traditional, modern, unexpected, beautiful, challenging, cute and amusing.

Flower Power by David Ringsell

THE BEAUFORT 1 London Road, Beaufort (the Balustrade), Bath Open: when the restaurant is open Free admission Tel: 01225 469127 Email: david@real-images.com Website: real-images.com DAVID RINGSELL Until Sunday 1 October The artist says: “I aim to present a contemporary perspective on some familiar places. While my work is representational, it retains a painterly quality. I often focus on the darker side of Bath architecture; peeling paint and stained stonework.” Originals and custom prints on sale from £200.

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The Bell by Nick Cudworth

NICK CUDWORTH GALLERY London Street, top of Walcot Street, Bath Closed on Mondays. Tel: 01225 445221 Visit: nickcudworth.com LAST ORDERS PLEASE Throughout September An exhibition of paintings and prints by Nick that celebrate some of Bath’s finest pubs. They include The Bell, a much loved music venue in Walcot Street and The Star in The Paragon, known for its excellent ales and a splendid display of flowers in its front window boxes.

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Cat and Crystal Palace (detail) by Kate Davies


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nick cudworth gallery

The Star

LAST ORDERS PLEASE

An exhibition of paintings and prints by Nick 1 – 30 September An exhibition of paintings and prints celebrating some of Bath’s finest traditional pubs including The Bell, The Larkhall Inn and The Star

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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CITY | READING

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

As Bath Children’s Literature Festival kicks off this month, here are six of our favourite books by authors and illustrators appearing at the festival

GRUMPY FROG

HARRY POTTER AND THE PHILOSOPHER’S STONE

By Ed Vere, paperback, published by Penguin, rrp £6.99 Grumpy Frog loves winning, the colour green and hopping around. But what happens when he has a shocking meeting with Pink Rabbit? Follow the comical tale of Grumpy Frog as he learns about compromise and friendship in this book by New York Times best-selling author Ed Vere. Ed will be reading his hilarious story and teaching the audience how to draw their very own grumpy frog at Bath Central United Reformed Church on Thursday 5 October at 10.30am.

By J. K. Rowling, hardback, published by Bloomsbury, rrp £30 See the world of Hogwarts come to life on the page with this wonderfully illustrated version of the first Harry Potter book, published 20 years ago this year. Awardwinning illustrator Jim Kay has recreated Harry, Hermione and all the much-loved (and villainous) characters in beautifully detailed watercolour designs. This is the perfect collectors book for children and adults alike. Jim Kay will be speaking about all things Potter at the Guildhall on Friday 6 October at 6.30pm. You’ll also be able to test your knowledge at a Harry Potter themed quiz on Saturday 8 October at 5pm in the Guildhall.

THE WIZARDS OF ONCE

By Cressida Cowell, hardback, published by Hachette Children’s Group, rrp £12.99 From the multi-million bestselling author and illustrator of the How to Train Your Dragon series comes a new adventure story full of wizards, giants, evil queens and plenty of magic. Young wizard Xar should have found his magical powers by now, so decides that he must find a witch and steal its magic. To do this he must enter the dangerous Badwoods, but finds a different kind of enemy in warrior girl Wish. Xar and Wish end up on an adventure they could never have imagined. Cressida Cowell will be discussing her new book at the Forum on Friday 29 September at 5pm.

THE UGLY FIVE

By Julia Donaldson, hardback, published by Scholastic, rrp £12.99

FANTASTICALLY GREAT WOMEN WHO CHANGED THE WORLD

Laugh along with this beautiful rhyming story that celebrates the African safari animals that are usually forgotten about – the wildebeest, warthog, vulture, hyena and marabou stork, with bold and charming illustrations. Join Gruffalo and Superworm author Julia Donaldson for plenty of songs and stories at the festival on Saturday 30 September at the Forum at 10.30am.

Descendent of suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst, Kate Pankhurst champions the women who have changed the world in history in this accessible and beautifully illustrated book. Featuring the remarkable stories of the likes of Amelia Earhart, Marie Curie and Rosa Parks, there’s plenty to inspire young ones about how they can help change the world. There will be drawing, dressing up and interesting talks by Kate at the Guildhall on Thursday 5 October at 10am.

By Kate Pankhurst, paperback, published by Bloomsbury, rrp £6.99

THE ROYAL RABBITS OF LONDON By Santa Montefiore and Simon Sebag Montefiore, paperback, published by Simon & Schuster, rrp £6.99 Little Shylo the rabbit has always been teased and taunted by his siblings, making him feel like he’s an outcast. But when he overhears an evil plan by a group of ratzis to take a photo of the Queen in her nightie, Shylo takes it upon himself to travel to London and tell

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the Royal Rabbits of London about this shocking plot. But can small, quiet Shylo help save the day? Bestselling author Santa Montefiore and illustrator Kate Hindley will be running an interactive event for the whole family to enjoy at the festival on Saturday 7 October at 1.30pm at the Guildhall. Visit: bathfestivals.org.uk to book tickets.


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Furniture – Art – Styling – Accessories

NEW AUTUMN EVENTS see website for details

ver veliving.uk 15 Walcot Buildings. London Rd. BA1 6AD 07785 332536 | 07712 467347

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AUTHOR | INTERVIEW

EVERY GIRL’S BEST FRIEND Dame Jacqueline Wilson talked to Georgette McCready ahead of her visit to Bath Children’s Literature Festival, about the daily discipline of writing and where her characters come from

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ame Jacqueline Wilson has delayed our phone interview by an hour – but for a very good reason. Dame Shirley Williams had rung to say she used to have friends who lived in her house and would Jacqueline mind if she called round to take a look? So, while I’m talking to best-selling author Dame Jacqueline on the phone, another dame, politician Shirley Williams is happily wandering round her garden. Children’s favourite and creator of popular characters including Tracy Beaker, Hetty Feather, The Illustrated Mum and many many others, Jacqueline’s latest book, Wave Me Goodbye is the first she has set in the Second World War, a time of the worst conflict in history. It tells the story of Shirley, a ten-year-old, who’s sent away to the country as an evacuee. Why did she chose this period in time to write about for the first time? “I grew up after the war, but I knew a lot of people who had been evacuees and this experience had had a profound effect on them. I began to wonder what it must have been like to leave your home and your mum and dad. “I had read Nina Bawden’s Carrie’s War and thought, ‘no this has already been done’ but it haunted me. I had seen photographs of children being evacuated, wearing labels and carrying their suitcases. And then I decided that I would tell the story, in my own way. I loved writing the book and it made me wonder how today’s parents would feel about sending their children away. “In the Imperial War Museum I saw a poster that said Mothers Send Your Child to Safety in the Country, so I suppose you would because you wouldn’t want your child to be bombed.” In Wave Me Goodbye young Shirley writes letters home to her mum. Was it this experience that prompted Jacqueline to theme her latest creative writing competition for children around a letter writing challenge? “We ran a creative writing competition last year and it was very popular. I think that the art of letter writing has largely been lost. Children tend to text, phone or Skype. But I know that a lot of adults twit if they don’t receive a thank you letter when a special present has been sent. I hope this 44 TheBATHMagazine

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competition will give free rein to their imaginations.” As a profilic writer – Jacqueline has written more than 100 books – does she have a routine for writing? “I do write every day, which may be very irritating I suppose. But I like to do it at the very start of the day. I quite like to sit propped up in bed and write and the story seems to flow then. I’ll write for an hour or so. Of course there is endless other work to be done during the day but I know if I’ve got on with that draft first thing I’ll feel better about it.” Which comes first for her when she’s

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writing, the character or the situation? “Well, in Wave Me Goodbye I started by wondering what life would be like for an evacuee. Almost immediately I begin writing and the main child will emerge. It’s almost like making a new friend, you get the first impression, then you get to know them better. It sounds fey but characters often take control themselves.” Before a book is completely finished Jaqueline hands a draft to her long-time collaborator Nick Sharratt, who has been illustrating her books and creating her covers for more than 25 years. “I trust Nick,” she says, “he’s the first to read the book. I don’t


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This page, left to right, Wilson’s latest book Wave Me Goodbye, the stage version of Hetty Feather the Victorian foundling, which came to the Theatre Royal Bath, and right, Hetty Feather’s Christmas, the new Hetty Feather adventure

put much description in my books so Nick has his ideas. To be honest I have never thought ‘oh, she doesn’t look like that’ of a character when I’ve seen his ilustration. I simply see his cover illustration and immediately recognise the character.” Publishers need to see a cover even before the ink’s dry on the story, as Jacqueline wisely observes that readers do judge a book by a cover. “I think it’s important that a cover should appeal to children.” She’s just received Nick’s cover for the new Hetty Feather adventure, Hetty Feather’s Christmas – “Oh, its wonderful. I love the expression that Nick’s given Hetty.” Hetty Feather’s Christmas is cleverly tucked in time between the first time we meet our heroine aged about ten and when she’s 14. In it Hetty spends a glorious Christmas in a wealthy Victorian household and passes time with another of Jacqueline’s heroines from another book, Clover Moon. “I love it when characters from other books can get into the story and meet up – and children love it too.” Many of her books tackle different issues that children face – their parents breaking up, the threat of domestic violence, mental illness – “I don’t sit down cold bloodedly to choose an issue, but I do think that if I had a happy character with a full compliment of parents and content, well adjusted siblings, that it might not make such an interesting story.” “I am very interested in children’s minds, how they work and how they react. For example, I heard a child talking about being a bridesmaid and that inspired me to write a book for younger children (Rent A

seater Forum, as one of the undoubted highlights of the Bath Children’s Literature Festival, when she’ll be speaking about the latest Hetty Feather’s book and about Wave Me Goodbye. Tickets are £8 from: bathfestivals.org.uk or tel: 01225 463362. There won’t be a book signing after the event but instead the 71-year-old writer has arranged for printed bookplates with her signature on to be available on every book bought in the Bath Festival bookshop. As she leaves to go and retrieve her fellow Dame from her garden Jacqueline enthuses about Bath. “I was born there, but left when I was a baby. I love Bath, it has very good bookshops and I love the American Museum. Sadly I never seem to have much time to explore, so hopefully on my next visit I will be able to spend a bit more time there.” Writers aged between seven and 12 have until 8 September to enter Jacqueline Wilson’s creative writing competition. The winner of the best letter to a fictional character will have their letter published in a Jacqueline Wilson book, receive £100 in books and meet the author in person. For more details on how to enter and for Jacqueline’s own top tips on letter writing, visit: jacquelinewilson.co.uk. The website has more than 290,000 members and offers a lively interactive centre for its fans, who are generally girls aged eight to 13. Parents and guardians will be relieved to hear that every care is taken to allow fans to adopt user names so they can enjoy using the site safely. There’s even a random name generator, which I couldn’t resist trying. For the record, my new Jacqueline Wilson identity is Daisy Moonlight Daisy. n

It’s almost like making a new friend, you get the first impression, then you get to know them better . . . characters often take control themselves

BELIEVABLE CHARACATERS: opposite page, British author Dame Jacqueline Wilson

Bridesmaid) thinking about both the joys and the horrors of being a bridesmaid. There is the sadness there in among the pretty, girlie bridesmaids dresses.” A writer for all her life – she wrote her first book aged nine – what did Jacqueline read as a girl of nine or ten? “I was about ten when I read Ann Frank’s diary. She meant a great deal to me. I had her photograph by my bedside, it was just cut out of a magazine, but I really admired her. I loved the girl classics, Little Women, What Katy Did, The Secret Garden. And then when I was about 11 I discovered I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith. And there is the 17year-old Cassandra Mortmain writing her diary and that opening sentence: ‘I write this sitting in the kitchen sink’ just grabbed me. I was hooked.” Just as her legions of fans, young and not so young, are to her warm, life-affirming stories that reassure her readers that it’s OK not to be ‘normal’, that yes, people do live with challenges in their lives and with sadness too. She will be in Bath on Saturday 7 October, at 10.30am in the 1,000 THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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KIDS LIT | FEST

INSPIRE THE NEXT GENERATION Jessica Hope rounds up some of the big names from literature, television and radio appearing at Bath Children’s Literature Festival this month

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urope’s largest dedicated children’s literature festival opens in Bath at the end of September, with 10 days full of talks, workshops, games and events hosted by some of the best authors and illustrators from the industry that children of all ages (and adults too!) will love. Here’s just some of the famous faces who have turned their hand to children’s literature and are coming to Bath later this month. DAVID BADDIEL Comedian David Baddiel has been making audiences laugh their socks off since the 90s. He’s also been writing for adults and children for nearly 20 years. David’s latest book, Birthday Boy, follows the story of Sam, who absolutely loves everything about birthdays – the presents, the cake, the parties. On his 11th birthday he wishes that it could be his birthday every day and soon this wish comes true. But things begin to go wrong and something threatens the thing Sam loves more than birthdays. David Baddiel will be talking about his new book on Saturday 30 September, 10am at the Guildhall. BEN FAULKS Young fans of CBeebies will recognise Ben Faulks as allotment-loving Mr Bloom when he comes to the festival. Ben will be holding a fun and interactive event for ages four and above based on his two picture books What Makes a Me a Me? and Watch Out for Muddy Puddles on Wednesday 4 October, 10am at the Guildhall.

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ADE EDMONDSON Being a man of many talents, actor, writer and comedian Ade Edmondson has penned his first children’s book Tilly and the Time Machine, which follows Tilly as she tries to go back in time to her sixth birthday, only for her dad to get stuck in the past and only Tilly can save him. Join Ade Edmondson for an inspiring talk, along with a lesson on how to build your own time machine, on Saturday 7 October, 1.30pm at the Guildhall.

NADIYA HUSSAIN Great British Bake Off’s Nadiya Hussain has been on a whirlwind since winning the show in 2015. She’s been a judge on Junior Bake Off, she’s presented her own cookery series, and even made a cake for the Queen on her 90th birthday. Nadiya’s latest book, Nadiya’s Bake Me a Festive Story, is full of delicious dishes and bakes that the whole family can make together at Christmas. Nadiya will be sharing her favourite recipes and top cookery tips, as well as getting members of the audience to help her decorate biscuits on Friday 6 October, 4.30pm at the Guildhall.

MIRANDA HART Recognised by many for her successful sitcom Miranda, comedian and actress Miranda Hart is making a debut with her first children’s book. The Girl With The Lost Smile follows the tale of Chloe who loses her smile and heads off on an extraordinary adventure to find it again, making some very unusual friends along the way. Miranda will be talking about the ideas behind her book on Saturday 7 October, 2.45pm at the Forum, and each ticket includes a copy of the book.

GREG JAMES AND CHRIS SMITH BBC Radio presenters Greg James and Chris Smith have teamed up to write their debut children’s book Kid Normal about a boy, Murph, who gets enrolled in a school for superheroes. Despite not having any superpowers, when an enemy comes on the scene, Murph quickly discovers that you don’t necessarily need them to save the day. Greg presents Radio 1’s Drivetime show and the Official Chart, while Chris is the voice of Newsbeat. Expect plenty of games at Greg and Chris’ event on Saturday 7 October, 10am at the Guildhall.

KIMBERLY WYATT After selling more than 55 million records in girl band The Pussycat Dolls, Kimberly Wyatt has turned her 46 TheBATHMagazine

talents to judging on SKY 1’s Got To Dance, as well as featuring on CBBC’s Taking the Next Step and winning Celebrity Masterchef in 2015. Kimberly has written a book in collaboration with Dear Dylan author Siobhan Curham which follows the story of 12-year-old Billie as she auditions for a place at a renowned contemporary dance school. Kimberly will be talking about Billie’s Big Audition at the festival on Wednesday 4 October, 4.30pm at the Guildhall.

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HARRY HILL Best known for his numerous stand up shows and for being the narrator of You’ve Been Framed, comedian and television presenter Harry Hill has written a variety of hilarious books for adults and children alike over the years. His new book Matt Millz! is about a boy who enters his school talent contest to showcase his stand up, but things don’t always run on course . . . Harry will be speaking at the festival on Sunday 8 October, 11.45am at the Guildhall. n To book tickets to the festival, visit: bathfestivals.org.uk or call: 01225 463362.

TURNING THE PAGE: from left to right, comedian David Baddiel, GBBO winner Nadiya Hussain, TV presenter and comedian Harry Hill and Pussycat Dolls member and dancer Kimberly Wyatt are appearing at the festival


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A FESTIVE PARTY WITH A DIFFERENCE Celebrate Christmas with great food, big laughs and bad dancing at Komedia

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t may seem a little early to be mentioning the ‘C-word’, but with autumn upon us, now is the time to start thinking about booking your office Christmas party. If you’re looking for something out of the ordinary this year, forgo the awkward office disco and beige buffet, and head to Komedia for the unbeatably funny and fantastically festive Krater Christmas Party. In the grand setting of its baroque auditorium, Komedia Bath will be transformed into a glittering festival for party-goers to eat, drink, laugh and dance the night away with an evening of festive treats all under one roof. All through December the award-winning venue will be hosting a whole series of its ever popular Krater Christmas Parties – each one complete with an all-star comedy line-up, an indulgent three course meal, and dancing to cheesy floor-filler classics until the early hours with Club Motorcity and FAME. Komedia’s stage will be graced by the likes of Eddy Brimson, Jeff Innocent, Markus Birdman, Laura Lexx and Jarred Christmas (yes – that really is his name), as well as dozens of other fantastic comedians and comperes from across the UK and the rest of the world. To top it off, all of Komedia’s food is lovingly prepared in-house and the venue is the proud owner of Taste of the West’s Gold Award, as well as the Soil Association’s Gold certificate for its commitment to using only the freshest and best local produce. There will be a lavish array of festive options to cater for everyone’s dietary needs and preferences – from turkey with all the trimmings or an indulgent 28-day strip-loin of beef, to veggie and veganfriendly butternut and pistachio wellington. Perfect for groups large or small, Komedia Bath offers the original and best, tried and tested, sure-fire, all-in-one Christmas Party that everyone will enjoy. For further information, dates and prices, visit: komedia.co.uk/bath/christmas. Komedia Bath, 22 – 23 Westgate Street, Bath, BA1 1EP. Tel: 0845 293 8480, web: komedia.co.uk/bath. n

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A ROOM WITH A VIEW Jessica Hope discovers the history of Claverton Manor before it became the site of the American Museum in Britain

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or more than 50 years, the American Museum in Britain has drawn visitors from across the world to its vast collection of American decorative arts and crafts, and its remarkable reconstruction of panelled rooms from American family homes in the 19th century. However, if you removed the historic furniture and stripped back the panels, you would in fact find the original walls and features of what was once a quintessential English country manor house, known as Claverton Manor. Despite building and curating the museum from scratch in the late 1950s, the museum’s founders aimed to protect the period features of the house, preserving it for the future. The Claverton Manor we see today was completed around 1820, however it is possibly the third building to have been named this in the area over the centuries. Prior to this, Ralph of Shrewsbury, Bishop of Bath and Wells built a manor house in the same name near to Bassett Farm in Claverton village in the 14th century. Following this, some sources suggest that Sir Edward Hungerford or his half-brother Sir Walter may have had a manor of the same name erected in the 1580s. Sir William Bassett then purchased the manor in 1608/9, and the sale included 1,300 acres, a church and a vineyard, which was described by antiquary John Aubrey as “the best vineyard” in England in the Natural History of Wiltshire – wine continued to be made in Claverton until 48 TheBATHMagazine

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the 18th century. During The Commonwealth under Cromwell’s leadership in the 1650s, Bassett’s grandson, who later became MP for Bath, took part in a plot to take Bristol on behalf of the royalist cause with the aim of helping to restore Charles II to the throne. After the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Bassett was knighted for his support. However he racked up debts throughout his life and after his death in 1693, Claverton Manor had to be mortgaged to pay for these outstanding payments, with the manor eventually being bought in 1701 by Richard Holder from Bathampton. Ralph Allen – postmaster, philanthropist and most famous locally as the owner of Bath stone quarries – purchased the manor in 1758, restoring and rebuilding it, creating a peaceful retreat for him, his family and guests, away from the bustling city centre. Although Allen spent the majority of his time at his famous Palladian-styled mansion Prior Park, he visited Claverton on a regular basis and established a tree-lined road that linked the two properties together. The manor then passed to Allen’s great nephew Allen Tucker and was let out. The house was advertised in the Bath Journal on 27 May 1799 as “remarkably rural, and much admired for its picturesque and romanic views.” After Tucker’s death, the manor was purchased by barrister John Vivian in 1816. Vivian employed architect Jeffry Wyat (who later became known as Sir Jeffry Wyatville), who persuaded his employer to

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demolish the manor completely and rebuild it on a new site nearby further up the hill, rather than restore the old house. The decision to build on a new site could have been influenced by the popular style at the time to erect grand homes with space for landscaped gardens and impressive views – the incredible views over Limpley Stoke at Claverton certainly formed the basis for this. Work quickly began and the Claverton Manor we see today was completed in around 1820 in Wyat’s recognisable neoclassical style, emphasising the use of symmetry and Ionic columns on the exterior of the building. You can still see some of Wyat’s original features in the museum, such as the cast-iron banister and the impressive circular light in the main hall. Wyat later went on to work on even grander English houses including Chatsworth, Longleat, Ashridge and Windsor Castle on behalf of George IV. The new manor then passed to John Vivian’s son, George, in 1828. Being a patron of the arts, traveller and artist, he built a gallery in the south wing of the house in order to display his art collection. Known for his interest in history, George condemned his father’s decision to demolish the previous historic manor. He spent a great deal of time and money attempting to restore parts around the site of the old house, including the pierced walls and terraces. In 1837 George even published a collection of lithographs of what the old manor house used to look like.


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CLAVERTON | MANOR

SNAPSHOT INTO THE PAST: opposite, Claverton Manor, the seat of John Vivian Esq drawn by J D Harding, after George Vivian, printed by C Hullmadel, lithograph, c1828 This page, left, members of the RAF at Claverton Manor during the Second World War, Ernest Copper, American Museum Archives, and right, the opening of Folk Art at the Old Stables, 1962 Below, the entrance to the museum soon after it opened Images courtesy of the American Museum in Britain

George must also be recognised for his development of the gardens. He created an Italian-style garden and a rose arcade, possibly under the direction of landscaper Alexander Roos who worked at Tyntesfield in Bristol, which are now home to the museum’s Mount Vernon garden – the current gates to this garden and the balustrade date to George’s lifetime. The Vivian family continued to own the house until it was bought by Isaac Carr of Wood House, Twerton, in 1869. The property was advertised in The Times that year as a house “commanding delightful views over a most attractive county. The mansion contains noble entrance hall, a suite of loft and elegant reception rooms; in all 20 bed and dressing rooms . . .” with “highly ornamental pleasure grounds . . .” Carr sold the manor in 1874 to Henry Duncan Skrine, who owned Warleigh Manor in Bathford and hoped that moving to Claverton would help to improve his wife’s health, who was adverse to the damp and misty conditions at Warleigh. In July 1897 Skrine organised a summer fête at Claverton Manor for the Primrose League – an organisation dedicated to spreading Conservatism in Great Britain, which had more than one million members by the end of the 19th century. It was at this event that

collect artefacts and recreate period rooms from old American houses from centuries past. With the room guides trained, catering staff prepared, gardeners in place and educational department on hand, the American Museum in Britain opened its doors to the public in 1961, welcoming more than 20,000 visitors in the first three months. More than five decades on and the museum houses 12,138 items that help to tell the story of the lives of American people, from its early settlers to those who lived through the 20th century. n Visit the American Museum in Britain, Bath, BA2 7BD. Web: americanmuseum.org, tel: 01225 460503.

Winston Churchill, aged just 23, made his first political speech, where he mentioned a recent railroad workers strike and the necessity for greater insurance protection for employees. A plaque can be found outside the main entrance to the museum, marking this historic moment. The Skrine family continued to own the manor until the late 1950s. The family let out the building during the Second World War to the RAF, making it the headquarters of the RAF No 32 (Balloon Barrage) Group. The group oversaw the balloon barrages for the south west of England and south Wales, organising the tethering of balloons used to protect cities from low-flying enemy aircraft. However, as Bath was not considered a high target for attack, no balloon protection was installed. Unfortunately in April 1942 80 Nazi Luftwaffe dropped tonnes of highexplosive bombs and incendiaries in three raids on the city, killing more than 400 people and flattening or damaging 19,000 buildings. Squadron Leader Kenneth Horne, famous for his wartime radio programme Ack-Ack, Beer Beer (RAF jargon for Anti-Aircraft Balloon Barrage), was stationed at Claverton during the conflict. After the war, the Bath Domestic Science College used the manor as a hall of residence until 1956, with the picture gallery that owner George Vivian had built in the 1820s used as a student common room. The manor was then put up for sale in 1958 and purchased by British antiques dealer John Judkyn and American psychiatrist and collector Dr Dallas Pratt, with the plan to turn the house into a museum to celebrate American decorative arts and furniture. With the help of craftsman Nick Bell Knight and Ian McCallum, who became the museum’s first director, the team worked tirelessly to THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

UPCOMING EVENTS AT THE AMERICAN MUSEUM n Music Series: Eddie Martin Sunday 24 September, 2pm Join songwriter and entertainer Eddie Martin as he wows audiences with his blues guitar and harmonica skills. Included in admission to the museum.

n Prohibition Ball Saturday 7 October, 7.30pm Take a step back in time to the 1920s at this glamorous ball. Expect dancing, gambling, secret drinking and music from Victoria Klewin’s Speakeasy Band. £15 per person, pre-booking essential. n The Sir Winston Churchill Memorial Lecture Tuesday 17 October, 6pm Could Britain have secured 13 colonies as part of its empire? Historian Jeremy Black MBE discusses whether the British really could have won the American War of Independence. £10 per person, ticket includes a drink before the lecture begins at 6.45pm.

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BATH @ WORK Our series of photographic portraits by Neill Menneer shows Bath people at work. View a gallery of Bath@Work subjects at: thebathmag.co.uk

Simon Bucknell

Delivery courier and entrepreneur

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’m a Londoner and was born and brought up in Chelsea. My first job was in financial services providing asset backed loans. I met Anna, my future wife, who was based in Bristol in the same company and we decided to move out of town to start a family. We ended up in Limpley Stoke as Bath was too expensive and our children Seba and Caspar were born there. I’m a romantic I guess and we decided to search for our own The Good Life and become more self sufficient. To this end we bought a plot of land and an old house in Morchard Bishop in Devon. Actually, I was mainly inspired by Hugh Fernley-Whatsisname and his programme River Cottage which painted a picture of pastoral bliss. The reality was anything but as our years in the country were very challenging. At any time you might be called to rescue the pigs who had escaped or the hundred and one things demanded of a livestock farmer. It was all a bit ‘tractor bottoms and wellies’ and also a very isolated existence. Although the children’s school was a mile away it was a country mile and we never really lived in a community as such. Eventually we both got cabin fever and I left for Bath to search for different possibilities. I lived on a canal boat for a while and worked in recruitment. It’s a young man’s game and I specialised in food manufacturing, as a result of which I became a dedicated and enthusiastic vegan. I have set up a super food powder business selling my own mixes and concoctions. This is to help vegans and other people. The idea is that you can buy any number of organic supplements and add them to your smoothies and drinks. We can mix up five of your favourite seeds, greens, fruit, protein or ayurveda powders into a 1kg bag and deliver to your door (website is: absolutelysuperfoods.co.uk). The courier job gives me the flexibility I need and it satisfies my other passion of cycling. These companies provide a real service as it has completely expanded the range and number of restaurants that can offer a take-away service. In the old days you could only get Indians and Chinese but now customers can order from Jamie’s, Carluccio’s and Wagamamma’s. Companies like the one I work for are part of the new gig economy and the Uberfication of work where apps have replaced traditional ways of bringing companies and people together. It suits me as I now have time to develop my other business ideas. The Absolutely Super Foods business takes up much of my time and I am presently developing a new bespoke courier service based around green delivery systems. In other words providing local food or other needs to local customers by bike. I will offer this service to small businesses throughout the Bath area and at £3 a pop it will be very cost effective. I love Bath as there’s always a buzz around and as I’ve learnt I’m clearly a city boy at heart. n

PORTRAIT: Neill Menneer at Spirit Photographic. Visit: capturethespirit.co.uk, tel: 01225 483151. THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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Break the routine!

Break that back to school routine and indulge in our famous afternoon tea in the elegance of the drawing room, just quote ‘Bath Mag’ to receive 20% off your bill.

Offer subject to availability. Available Monday – Thursday. Afternoon Tea offering subject to change. To book please call 0344 879 9106 and quote ‘Bath Mag’

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DINE IN STYLE: Dan Moon, head chef at the Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel is cooking up a treat for the Great Bath Feast Picture: Paul Gillis

TUCK IN TO CITY’S FEAST The annual Great Bath Feast invites us to celebrate the best of the south west’s food and drink

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ach month in The Bath Magazine we celebrate our local food heroes, highlighting the producers, makers and chefs who bring so much delicious diversity to our plates. We’ve focussed on the brilliant work done by the volunteers at Bath’s FoodCycle free supper club, on the Corston farmer Emily Addicott Sauvao whose quinoa brand Bath Farm Girls is growing by the week, and on Matthew and Louise Macdonald whose happy, free range hens produce a subtle rainbow of coloured eggs. And so this month we’re pleased to be highlighting these food heroes and many more, who are all taking part in the Great Bath Feast, which runs from Saturday 23 September to Sunday 8 October. The feast is now an annual event, a chance for Bath and the surrounding countryside to show off its homegrown talent and for us, the hungry masses, to grab a bargain, eat at a place we’ve not tried before, or push the boat out by attending a special gourmet event.

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GOURMET EVENTS Vegetarian Supper Club with Rupert Taylor, head chef of Allium, who invites diners to join him for a convivial meat-free dinner party in the Igloo beneath the Abbey Hotel on Tuesday 26 September. Enjoy a welcome drink, three course supper and half a bottle of wine for £35 per person. Tuck in to a Bennet Banquet courtesy of Cafe L’ard’s Jane Austen Supper Club, on Friday 29 September, for a six course feast with a Jane Austen theme, served up in the relaxed and sociable atmosphere of St Swithin’s Church, the place where Jane’s parents married and her father is buried. This is a bring your own drink party, tickets are £35 a head. Join the expert vegetarian chefs from Acorn Vegetarian Kitchen, Demuths Cookery School and Green Rocket Café as they come together to show their passion for producing the very best vegetarian food, on Monday 25 September. Enjoy a fresh and seasonally inspired six course tasting menu with wine, at £60 per person.

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What the entertaining and charming Vito Scaduto doesn’t know about Sicilian wine really isn’t worth knowing. This highly experienced sommelier will be guest host at The Bath Priory on Wednesday 27 September, for a talk and four course Michelin starred dinner paired with wines from Tasca d’Almerita, a fine wine producing estate in Sicily founded in 1830. Places for this evening are £95 per person. There’ll be more fine wine from Sicily at the Allium on Wednesday 27 September as winemaker Alessio Planeta as he guides diners through his family’s multi awardwinning wines and the Sicilian regions where they are made, all accompanied by a sumptuous four-course menu created by Allium head chef, Rupert Taylor. This evening is £75 per person. If you’re looking for a reason to enjoy chef Dan Moon’s superb menu at the Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel, join Great Bath Feast Ambassadors The Pig Guide for a six course feast in the glamorous, sophisticated, yet relaxed surroundings of


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the restaurant on Wednesday 27 September. Book a place at what promises to be a convivial evening in good company for £59 per person. Wine and cheese experts Fiona Beckett and Ben Lambourne present an evening of wine and cheese matches at Bath Rugby’s club on Thursday 28 September. Fiona is a wine writer for The Guardian and Decanter Magazine, and Ben owns Pong Cheese. The tasting session is £25 per ticket, with £5 from every ticket bought going to the Bath Rugby Foundation charity. GET STUCK IN The Great Bath Feast offers plenty of immersive food and drink based activities. You might think you know the local food scene really well but Savouring Bath’s original and fascinating walking (and sampling) tours visit places you might have overlooked and offer the inside story behind each artisan brand. Foraging is something many of us enjoyed as children, picking blackberries or hazelnuts. But we don’t always know what’s safe to eat and what might be harmful. Join expert Chris Westgate of Heavenly Hedgerows for a walk at Newton Farm entitled Foraging without Fear, on Saturday 7 October. Also at Newton Farm local artist Natasha Clutterbuck will be leading an art workshop called Drawing the Harvest, with nature’s bounty as inspiration. That’s on Thursday 28 September from 10am. If you’re one of those people who can’t resist photographing your food, either in restaurants or at home, you might benefit from an Instagram workshop teaching the secrets of successful food photography. The four hour workshop, at the Hare & Hounds, Lansdown, begins at 10am on Wednesday 27 September and is followed by lunch, giving participants the chance to hone their newly learned skills. Places on the workshop are £60, to include lunch. People who have taken part in one of Iranian teacher Simi’s Kitchen workshops will testify that her welcome makes you feel as though you’re at a friend’s home for dinner. Simi is hosting three informal Persian Feast cookery sessions at her cookery school in Great Pulteney Street. Sample the celebrated cuisine and hospitality of Persia and Azerbaijan, using seasonal ingredients grown on Simi’s organic allotment and foraged around the city to create traditional dishes such as jewelled rice, aubergine dip and saffron chicken. Places on the Great Persian Feast are £75 per person. Some of the city’s favourite food heroes can be found at Green Park Station, where this month the Bath Farmers’ Market celebrates its 20th anniversary. The market was founded in 1997 as a platform for local food producers to sell their wares direct to shoppers. The monthly market proved so popular by 2002 it became weekly and now forms a set Saturday morning routine for many Bathonians, who enjoy picking up

A PERSIAN FEAST: Simi’s Kitchen is running a series of cookery workshops, which finish with a delicious lunch

freshly grown vegetables from grower Chris Rich, talking to the producers who make the pies, cheese, chutney and cakes and stopping for a bite to eat from JC’s Kitchen, whose pulled pork wraps have earned him a cult following. On Saturday 23 September, during the day time, Green Park Station hosts Feast with a Farmer, in which local chefs will be cooking up all sorts of treats before our very eyes. Also at Green Park Station, from 5pm to 9pm, there’s an invitation to travel around the world in 80 bites as stalls are set out selling dishes from different cultures, a party atmosphere is anticipated and city workers are encouraged to stay in town and take part in this early evening celebration of the 25th anniversary of Green Park Brasserie. TENNER TREATS Lots of establishments have joined the Great Bath Feast love-in by offering customers

deals, all for £10. Please remember to mention the Tenner Treat when ordering at any of these venues. The Abbey Hotel’s stylish ArtBar is offering a glass of house wine or beer served with two tasty bar snacks, such as salt cod croquettes, salt and pepper squid and scotched quail’s eggs, for a tenner. Enjoy a roast dinner and a drink in the atmospheric Cloisters Restaurant at Bailbrook House Hotel for £10 per person, or order a Somerset cream tea in the elegant surroundings of the hotel for £10 for two people. Booking is essential for these offers. Tuck into a whole, freshly made pizza accompanied by a pint of beer, a glass of Prosecco, or a soft drink, for £10 at the Bath Pizza Company in Green Park Station, Bath. Meanwhile, down on Green Street, for the duration of the Great Bath Feast choose any Belushi’s burger and a drink to accompany it for £10. See more Tenner Treats on Page 57

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THE GREAT BATH SCONE-OFF

Georgette McCready visits a new community café that’s giving teenagers valuable hands-on work experience

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here are remarkable things going on in a corner of Odd Down where the spirit of community and the vision of a headteacher for her students has created something special for future generations. Headteacher Julie Dyer of Three Ways Special School for young people with special needs, was long aware that her students wanted to be ready and able to hold a place in the adult world, and that this included being given access to a job. Sadly in the UK fewer than eight per cent of adults with special needs are in full-time work and for a lot of families, once their teenager’s schooling is done, it can be very hard to find something gainful to do with their time. Nine years ago Julie shared her idea with her team. She wanted to build a café on the school site that would be open to paying customers and staffed, in part, by students. This summer – after a huge amount of fundraising to find the £500,000 needed – that vision has been realised and the 3 Café Kitchen is now open. It’s a bright, airy purpose-built café, wheelchair-friendly throughout, with free parking alongside and a decked courtyard garden at the back, furnished with tables and chairs and raised beds filled with edible plants. There are plans to build a pizza oven outside too. The trainee students undergo a thorough hygiene and food safety course, developed by the environmental team at Bath and North East Somerset Council, before

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they begin work. They work as a team alongside professional staff and together produce fresh, seasonal food from 9am to 4pm. On the counter are delicious fresh cakes under glass domes, while a simple hand-written bill of fare hangs on the wall, stating what the dish of the day, the soup and the sandwich options are. All the salads are freshly made from inviting looking ingredients. A bowl of soup, with bread or a large cheese scone is £4.75, while the special dish of the day is £4.75. The aim is to give the young people opportunities for future employment. Three Ways fundraiser Lucy Beattie, said: “They are learning so many skills, including communication, timekeeping, customer service and useful practices, such as clearing up after themselves. These are transferrable skills for other kinds of employment and we’re planning to equip them with NVQ Level 1 and we run a Jamie Oliver food tech course here, which gives them the certificates they’ll need when applying for jobs.” She added that the parents of teenagers at the school have been

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supportive and delighted that their children have been given this opportunity. Over the next year some 60 young people will have benefitted from working at the 3 Café Kitchen and in future not only will the café be self-funding but also able to give work experience to adults in the community with learning needs. As part of the Great Bath Feast the 3 Café Kitchen – which is handily next to Sainsbury’s on Frome Road, Odd Down – is inviting local people to come and experience its happy atmosphere and home-made, locally sourced food. From 1 to 14 September, there’s a back to school offer for parents, carers and grandparents of tea or coffee and a slice of cake for £4. Simply quote ‘back to school’ when ordering. On Saturday 30 September the café will be open into the evening for two sittings (bring your own wine or beer). Enjoy three dishes for £10 a head. The café is also hosting the Great Bath Feast Scone-Off competition. Do you have a light touch in the kitchen? Are your scones as good as your grandmother’s? Why not bake a batch of plain, cheese or your own original style scones and enter the competition to find the best scone maker in Bath. The great Scone-Off takes place on Friday 6 October, 2.30pm, at the café, Frome Road, Odd Down. Entries are £2.50 each, email: ameliahartley@threeways.co.uk or tel: 01225 838070. Money raised from the competition will help the school. n

VISION FOR THE FUTURE: main picture, the new 3 Café Kitchen at Odd Down is a bright, contemporary café with a sunny garden Inset, take part in the Great Bath Scone-Off as part of the Great Bath Feast


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ENJOY A SLICE OF THE ACTION THE TENNER TREATS The Bath Pub Tour wends its way through Bath’s drinking history. This mixture of walking tour and light-hearted pub quiz has been getting rave reviews online. Join Olly your guide during Great Bath Feast for a £10 for two participants. The tour begins from outside the Crystal Palace pub at 7pm on designated evenings. For full details of dates visit: kiltertheatre.org. Head on over to The Boater in Argyle Street (a great rugby pub with a beer garden which overlooks the River Avon) and order the pie of the day and a pint of London Pride for £10 from noon to 9pm every day throughout the Great Bath Feast. Veggie option/alternative soft drink available as part of same deal. As you browse the shelves of Bookbarn International at High Littleton, stop for a break at the Full Stop Café and try the new Ploughman’s on the menu. During the Great Bath Feast lunches are £10 for two. It’s a wholesome affair with local bread and cheese, homemade chutneys, pickles and relishes, and apple juice. No booking necessary, served all day. Back in town, at Argentine steakhouse CAU in Milsom Place there’s a cheeky brunch and cocktail deal. Visit between 9am and noon during the GBF and pick a brunch dish of your choice and a Mimosa cocktail to accompany it for £10. Or perhaps you’d like a taste of authentic French cuisine. At Chez Dominique in Argyle Street, slurp your way through a bowl of Cornish mussels in a cider, leek and Alsace bacon broth, paired with an 175ml glass of Jean de Laroche Sauvignon Blanc for £10. This offer is available Monday to Friday lunchtimes and Monday to Thursdays, 5.30pm–7pm. If you haven’t checked out the fabulous views from the terrace at The Clifton Sausage on the Paragon, may we suggest you put that right during the GBF while you indulge in a trio of gourmet sausages (Bath Blue cheese & leek, Clifton and Old Spot Pork) served with creamy mash and homemade gravy and accompanied by a 125ml glass of house red, white, rosé wine or a soft drink for £10. Another place you’ll want to visit, partly because it has uplifting views over the countryside, is Combe Grove on Brassknocker Hill. Treat yourself to two courses of fresh, seasonal and locally sourced dishes for lunch or dinner for £10. In the heart of Bath, right across from the Lantern of the West, as Bath Abbey is affectionately known is Garfunkel’s. Its picked classic menu favourites such as wraps, rotisserie chicken and burgers, alongside some tasty desserts, to offer a

special menu for the Great Bath Feast. Customers can enjoy two courses for £10, available all day, every day, for the duration of the Feast. And next to another Bath landmark, the Theatre Royal, is The Garrick’s Head where you’re invited to grab a hot salt beef roll and a pint of Garrick’s Head ale for £10 during all food service times during the Great Bath Feast. The Feast deals are not just for grown-ups. Coffee2Go on Wellsway has a family meal deal. Two large coffees for mum and dad, two large Schmoos with toppings, and four snacks (crisps or flapjacks) for £10. There are more good deals to be had near Brunel’s Bath Spa station, where Giraffe World Kitchen invites you to share a bottle of house wine, two Giraffe cocktails or four Coronas for £10, from Sunday through to Friday from 5pm to 11pm, while at Graze Bath order a handcrafted pie made with Bath Ales’ Forest Hare ale accompanied by a Bath Ales pint for £10. The Hilton Bath City Hotel in Walcot Street is serving a luxurious afternoon tea for a tenner in its Atelier Restaurant offering views over Pulteney Bridge. Booking advised. Enjoy a pizza and a 125ml glass of house red wine for £10 at Jamie’s Italian, Milsom Street, Bath. The Mint Room on Lower Bristol Road, has a light lunch menu for the Feast of a traditional chatt to begin, followed by either a light tikka massala or a superfood wrap, with either a glass of wine or a refreshing Nimbu Panni Indian long drink. Vegetarian options are available. In a Pickle will be at Newton Farm Shop at Newton St Loe throughout the GBF offering samples of chutneys, pickles and preserves and offering three jars of your choice for £10. A trip to Bath wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the Georgian splendour of

The Pump Room. Start your day in style with an elegant Bucks Fizz Breakfast: choose Eggs Benedict or Eggs Florentine accompanied by a glass of Bucks Fizz for £10 from 9.30am to 11.45am during the foodie fest. Home cooks will be pleased to hear that Robert Welch, cutlery specialists in Broad Street offers a Signature Stainless Steel Kitchen Utensil for £10 (representing a saving of £6). Facing the Pump Rooms is The Roman Baths Kitchen which prides itself in serving locally sourced, seasonal ingredients in all its dishes. Enjoy two courses for £10 from noon every day of the GBF. Bath Ales characterful pub The Salamander, tucked away in John Street, behind Milsom Street, is enticing us with a lunch offer every day excluding Sundays of two classic pub sandwiches freshly prepared in-house for £10. For those with a sweet tooth the San Francisco Fudge Factory off Abbey Green, has laid on a double delight for the Great Bath Feast. Take a table outside overlooking Bath Abbey and gorge on two generous pieces of legendary handmade fudge, accompanied by a glass of Prosecco, from Monday to Friday. CURRY FAVOUR . . . Bath Comedy Festival welcomes comedian, broadcaster and chef Hardeep Singh Kohli to Widcombe Social Club, on Thursday 5 October. As he relates anecdotes about his passion for food and the development of curry culture in the UK Hardeep will cook with volunteers. Any excess food will be given to homeless charity Julian House. Tickets: £17.50 per ticket and includes show, dinner, a cocktail and a beer. n For details visit: greatbathfeast.co.uk. Twitter: @greatbathfeast

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SALUTE TO THE EMPIRE

Melissa Blease goes behind the menu to meet the three ex-army friends who have opened Framptons overlooking Pulteney Bridge and Bath’s famous rugby ground, the Rec

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contemporary fresh air. Tom Walker, who with fellow directors Sam Westlake and Ed McAdam, run three independentlyowned café/bar/restaurant ventures, the Bath branch adding to the original in the historic Pantiles of Tunbridge Wells and a second at Ringwood in the New Forest. He said: “When we saw the vacant space, we knew we’d found the perfect spot. The building has a unique past and the location overlooking the Rec is perfect, as we’re huge rugby fans. And of course, there’s also that very special connection to the military, what with The Admiralty being based here from 1939 to 1988.” And that latter link in particular especially resonates with Tom’s team, as he and his fellow entrepreneurs became friends while serving in the British Army. Having served a total of 21 years between them in the Parachute Regiment before hanging their maroon berets up for good, the trio found themselves dissatisfied by their civilian jobs and quickly realised that the skills and experience they’d accrued in the Paras could transfer to the hospitality industry. Two years on from making that decision, they’ve applied military efficiency and discipline to a food and drink business. “This is a dynamic, fast-paced industry that’s definitely challenging on many levels, but we’re all proud of our achievements so far,” says Ed. “We’ve strictly adhered to our original commitment to opening up in interesting architectural buildings,

hat have Lloyd George, The Admiralty and the writer of this feature got in common? We’ve all – although not all the same time – mingled in the rather elegant surroundings of the building formerly known as The Empire Hotel on Grand Parade. This edifice is one of Bath’s most fascinating landmarks, described by our resident historian Catherine Pitt: “At 102 feet tall and with an extraordinary roofline depicting a cottage, a house and a castle, you really can’t miss the old Empire Hotel next to Pulteney Weir, which has been described over time as everything from ‘elegant’ and ‘eccentric’ to a ‘sunken architectural soufflé.’” The Empire, which is now home to a collection of luxury apartments, with restaurant spaces on the ground floor evokes ‘love it or loathe it’ Marmite emotions. Previous inhabitants of this part of The Empire on Grand Parade, with its views across the weir and the Rec and all the way up to Sham Castle in the hills – have never made the most of either the fabulous location or the Edwardian origins of this space. What a treat it is, then, to discover that Framptons – the newest addition to Bath’s eating and drinking scene – not only pays homage to the history behind its new home (original fixtures and fittings have been refurbished, while a beautifully-etched artwork pays tribute to the building’s past), but also brings a blast of 58 TheBATHMagazine

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sourcing great local produce, and offering a community hub where local people can enjoy making the most of their downtime.” And Bathonians have taken to the Framptons brand of brasserie-style offering casual all-day dining in either the funky dining room or the laidback bar. The local network – including members of Bath Rugby we hear – has embraced Framptons into the fold. “We’ve been overwhelmed by the positive reception and support from local businesses and the Bath community in general,” says Sam. “Every day, we meet and chat with someone new who has something to say, whether they’re keen to share an insight into who’s going to win the rugby premiership this year (Bath, obviously!), or have an interesting life story to tell. Bath folk are friendly, that’s for sure. And while opening this site had its complications, the wonderful feedback we’re getting now makes the hard work worthwhile. “It’s clear that our Bath customers really enjoy quality food made with local ingredients served in a fun and unique environment that’s familyfriendly too.” “We hope that we can offer something fresh and original to local residents on many levels,” says Tom. “We’re only the eighth bar in the whole of the UK to have tank beer installed, with two 500 litre tanks suspended above the bar containing one tonne of brewery-fresh premium lager. Not only do we overlook the Rec, Bath’s rugby ground, we’ll be

COOL HANG-OUT: main image, the bar at Framptons in The Empire, overlooking Pulteney Bridge and the weir Opposite page, the menu takes its customers through from breakfast to evening drinks and dinner Framptons’ owners Tom Walker, Ed McAdam and Sam Westlake


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showing every rugby game on our huge projector screen too. There’s an extensive wine list to pair with our locally-sourced modern menu, plenty of cocktails, a wide gin selection and, of course, Prosecco and English sparkling wine to quaff too. What’s not to like?” Over the few short weeks since Framptons first opened, the Champions Breakfast (poached egg, avocado, streaky bacon, tomato salsa and sourdough toast) has proved a hit, while the Framptons burger has received rave reviews. Meanwhile, the sharing plates are going down a treat with parties, and classics such as crispy pork belly or vegetarian risotto (the asparagus, broad

bean, goats’ cheese and pesto is recommended) keep the foodies happy. But what dishes would our friendly Framptonians choose from their own menu? “The overnight oats with fresh fruit and honey really sets you up for the day,” says Sam. “For lunch, I’d go for either the Framptons burger or the seared tuna loin in a ginger and soy dressing. For dinner, I’d do the charcuterie sharing platter followed by the ribeye steak and the dessert board, which gives a little taster of each of our puds.” Personally, I’d opt for the Eggs Benedict breakfast, tomato and macadamia ricotta sourdough for lunch, and a seafood platter followed by the Flat Iron steak (Framptons

are very good with steaks) for supper. But as all-encompassing as their own in-house offering may be, the Framptons team make time to get out and explore the best that Bath has to offer, citing breakfast at the Wild Café, coffee at Hunter and Sons and small plates and wine at Vino Vino among their favourite new discoveries. The lads have settled and recruited an army of fans as they make Bath their new base camp. A new dawn has risen over the Empire – we suggest you make a quick march in the direction of Grand Parade. n Framptons, The Empire, Grand Parade, Bath BA2 4DE. Tel: 01225 313680; web: framptonsbar.co.uk/bath.

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TRISTAN DARBY Explores the sensory world of vinyl and wine

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love the idea of introducing audiences to new wines and new experiences, so over the last few years, I’ve watched with increasing interest as different ways to pair wine have emerged. There are wines with book events (not for me – after half a glass I doubt I’d even finish a page). Then there are film and wine pairings – tasting wines consumed in the film as you go (think Sideways or a James Bond movie). But my favourite pairing idea combines my two greatest sensory pleasures – music and wine. Surely this idea isn’t so far fetched? There’s an age-old cultural link between alcohol and music and you may have read about the numerous studies into the effect that different types of music have on flavour perception. Taking this idea a step further, husband and wife team Russ and Lacey of Stylus Vinyl (stylusvinyl.com) have created a subscription service sending out monthly boxes of classic albums on vinyl paired with a great bottle of wine and a customcommissioned artwork. It’s a smart idea, and as a music and wine nut, I’m delighted to be on the pairing panel at their wine supplier, Great Western Wine. Sometimes we choose a wine that matches the artist’s character or story, sometimes it’s the album’s tone or theme and occasionally it’s both. Take Prince’s iconic album Purple Rain, for example. Prince was truly one-of-a kind. Quirky, eccentric, visionary and a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist to boot. Purple Rain was a huge commercial hit that merged styles, took risks (for example Prince removed the bassline on When Doves Cry) and inspired a generation. It brims from start to finish with energy, sex and soul, and is full of contrasting themes – pleasure, sadness, celebration, isolation, hope, despair, religion, sex – that all work seamlessly together to make this timeless album, sound as fresh and relevant 33 years on. The perfect match is d’Arenberg’s Love Grass Shiraz (£13.99 Great Western Wine). Winemaker Chester Osborn, is also one of the wine world’s most colourful characters. He’s an art-loving maverick famed for his loud shirts and larger-than-life personality, and luckily for us he’s also a brilliant winemaker who has helped to establish d’Arenberg as one of Australia’s leading family-owned wineries. Commercial success hasn’t stopped Chester from pushing boundaries, and The Love Grass is one of many brilliantly quirky wines. Shiraz is the main grape here, blended with an eclectic mix of contrasting international varieties such as cab sauv, merlot and petit verdot (Bordeaux), tinta cao (Portugal), viognier (Rhone) tempranillo (Spain), sagrantino (Italy) and pinot noir (Burgundy). Quite a blend, but they work in perfect harmony to produce a big, bold red with complex layers of aroma and flavour. There are juicy black and red fruits, some peppery spice, dark chocolate, liquorice and a touch of smoky savoury herbs. Love Grass is a wonderful wine that’s ready to drink now, but like Purple Rain will still be in fine shape a few years down the line. If you fancy trying some pairings out for yourself, join Tristan on Thursday 19 October, from 7 – 9pm at Great Western Wine, Wells Road, Bath for a Vinyl & Vine tasting. Tickets, £20, visit: greatwesternwine.co.uk. n

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THE US DELICIO GUIDE LOOKING FOR RESTAURANT INSPIRATION? The Delicious Guide to Bath featuring all the fave eateries and foodie treateries is available online at our website www.thebathmag.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @thebathmagazine


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The George

Vegetarian

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Gluten free

Enjoy a selection of fine organic wines and fresh juices

Monday Supper for two Every Monday evening Two Ribeye steaks, how you like them, with slow roast tomatoes, fries and salad, and ½ ltr of house red or white wine, you choose – £30 Thursday Supper Club The last Thursday of every month Four courses – £25 Early bookings essential All Things Italian Thursday 28th September A four course supper of classic Italian dishes – £25 All Things British Thursday 26th October A celebration of British classics, from fish to beef to Bakewell – £25

SPECIAL 3 COURSE LUNCH MENU ONLY £7.95 Available Monday to Friday 12pm - 2pm only Open Lunch: 12-3pm Evenings: 6pm-10.30pm Take away available

indiantemptationvegetarian

67 Woolley Street, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, BA15 1AQ T: 01225 865650 W: thegeorgebradfordonavon.co.uk

Tel: 01225 464631 • 01225 466626

9-10 High Street (Cheap Street), Bath BA1 5AQ

www.indiantemptation.com Opposite Bath Abbey

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FOOD | & | DRINK

ESSENTIAL OILS

Businesswoman Elena Alcala is converting the south west to the joys of Andalusian olive oil grown in the Spanish sunshine on her family’s farm

Tell us a bit about your background. I was born in the Andalusian province of Cordoba, southern Spain, in a town called Baena, where I grew up surrounded by olive trees and groves as far as the eye can see. Since a very young age, I have been involved in the harvesting of olives and production of olive oil and learning about the different types of pressings. Over the years, my father has taught my siblings and I everything there is to know about producing top quality olive oil. Having lived in the UK for 16 years, I have realised that the British are not quite as passionate about their olive oil as they are about their wine and I’m keen to change that, so I decided to set up a company to bring my family’s premium olive oil to the UK. In September 2016, La Trama – la trama being the name of the olive oil blossom – was created. Our two main award-winning oils 62 TheBATHMagazine

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are Orobaena Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Oronovus Extra Virgin Oil. Both are a beautiful pale gold. The flavour is harmonious, sweet almond, with notes of grass, fruit and nuts, very soft with low acidity. They’re perfect for cooking, drizzling and dipping.

The company’s motto is that olive oil is a jewel to your health – especially for those with heart conditions

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lena Alcala has been appearing across the region’s foodie market scene regularly recently and so – intrigued by a face we hadn’t seen around before – we decided to do a little digging and found out how she brought her family business over from beautiful Andalusia, all for the benefit of our tastebuds, hearts and hangovers.

How did you come to be in the west country? I attended UWE Bristol for both my degree in marketing and MA in European business and then had stints in the coffee and wine industries. I fell in love with Bristol (and then a Bristolian) and have never left. I now live in Claverham, North Somerset, with my husband and two wonderful stepchildren who now love dipping bread into olive oil. I set up the business here because Bristol and Bath are cosmopolitan cities which

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embrace different cultures and appreciate good quality products. I have also had a great help from the Start and Grow programme at Business West (for more information visit: businesswest.co.uk). Paint us a picture of the Andalusían groves. My family owns olive groves in different areas of the south of Cordoba, which have been passed from generation to generation. This part of Spain is well-known for the quality of the olive trees and they are on every hillside as far as the eye can see – interspersed with traditional white-washed villages. My father’s groves date back to the 1200s, when our ancestor from the Basque country (a commander of one of the armies that helped to reconquer Andalusia) was given the land as payment. My mum’s ancestors were peasants during the Napoleonic wars (1800s) and found a chest full of gold coins which they used to buy land – the mix of land from both sides is what makes up our family grove as it is today. My father retired from running his own law practice in his 50s, and decided to dedicate his efforts completely to the groves and the olive oil. Today, he is 72 and takes pride in the olive trees and all he has achieved for the family.


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FOOD | & | DRINK

A PROUD HISTORY: opposite page, Elena Alcala with some of the olive oil grown on her family estate in Spain Above, the olive farm in Andalusia dates back to the 13th century Top right, Elena on her horse Fandago

Tell us about the making process. The harvest takes place between November and February, which makes Christmas a special time for me when I visit. Once I smell the olive oil, I know it’s really Christmas. When they are ready for picking, the olives are normally black or burgundy (green olives are not a separate type, they are merely less mature) and the best quality olives are the ones that haven’t fallen from the tree yet, so a tractor grabs the olive tree from the trunk and shakes it so the olives fall down into a carefully placed net. The olives that have already fallen are also picked, but are selected for a lower-end olive oil. The lorries arrive at the factory and offload the olives, which are separated from the leaves and taken away to be ground into a paste in modern steel drum mills for about 20 minutes. After, the paste is stirred slowly for another 20 to 30 minutes in a container (a process called malaxation), where the microscopic oil drops coalesce into bigger drops, which facilitates the mechanical extraction. The paste is then pressed by centrifugation to separate the water. The oil produced by only mechanical (not chemical) means, as described above, is called virgin oil. Extra virgin olive oil is virgin olive oil that satisfies specific high chemical and organoleptic criteria (low free acidity, no or very little organoleptic defects). A higher grade extra virgin olive oil is mostly dependent on favourable weather conditions; a drought during the flowering phase, for example, can result in a lower quality (virgin) oil. It is worth noting that olive trees produce well every couple of years so greater harvests occur in alternate years (the year in-between is when the tree yields less). However, the quality is still dependent on the weather. Sometimes the produced oil will be filtered to eliminate remaining solid particles that may reduce the shelf-life of the product.

risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and stroke, while monounsaturated fatty acids of mixed animal and plant origin showed no significant effects.

What are the health benefits of olive oil? The company’s motto is that ‘olive oil is a jewel to your health’ – especially for those with heart conditions. Studies show a reduction of risk of coronary heart disease, and it’s also great for the skin. The Mediterranean diet is famous for its benefits – a 2014 meta-analysis concluded that an elevated consumption of olive oil is associated with reduced

How do we get in touch with you and the team at La Trama? Visit our website, which tells you a bit more about our olive oils, latrama.co.uk. You can order a bottle or even a whole case of 12 bottles directly from us, email: elena@latrama.co.uk, or follow us on Twitter: @TramaLimited. n

How do you ensure the best possible taste? There is no alteration to the process. It is all done solely by mechanical means, to allow the taste to be solely of pure olives. No additives or chemicals go in. The best quality olive oil also comes from the best quality trees, a good soil, a warm climate and a great deal of passion. Are you environmentally friendly? Definitely! We comply with all the EU environmental laws and the Consejo Regulador of the Designation of Origin Baena (the regulating quality control body and of health and safety). Furthermore, we use every bit of the olive. Even the olive stone which is used in the houses for central heating. This is a very common practice in the area. And we could sponsor a tree if we wished to? Oh yes. I am keen for people to feel they have a connection with my home town and the olive oil produced in the region. By sponsoring an olive tree for £35 people can help with sustaining and supporting the olive trees. They also receive two bottles of our premium Oronovus olive oil with the sponsorship certificate and an invitation to visit their tree and the factory. Are there any good alternative uses for your product? Other local manufacturers use our olive oil to make soap and creams as it is extremely good for the skin. We sell directly to these manufacturers from our family mill, or almazara, in Baena. A very unusual use of the product is to take a full spoon to cure hangovers (I don’t do this but many people in the south of Spain do), or to flavour ice cream.

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LIVING LIFE ON THE VEG Melissa Blease meets food hero Vicki Mowat of Riverford Organics, supplier of fresh, seasonal organic vegetables to hundreds of Bath homes each week

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“We lived and worked in London for 15 years before that, but when our two boys were three and six we decided that we needed a change from our city lifestyle,” says Vicki. “We’d taken a weekly delivery of Riverford veg boxes ourselves for years and really loved it; no matter how busy our days were, we could always put a healthy meal on the table in the evening, and Riverford’s strong ethical approach really chimed with us too. I’d been to university in Bath and had always hankered to move back here so, when we found out that the Riverford franchise in Bath was up for sale, we jumped at the chance.”

ack in the 1990s, having read agricultural and forestry science at Oxford University and endured a spell in a corporate job in New York before returning to his roots on his family’s farm in Devon, Guy Watson experienced an epiphany. A self-proclaimed “veg nerd” obsessed with organic vegetables, the policies and practices of sustainable, ethical farming and the distribution of produce and principles to like-minded people, he was keen to offer a viable, affordable alternative to supermarket shopping. And so, in 1993, he began delivering Riverford Farm vegetable boxes from the back of his battered Citroen car to around 30 local people on a weekly basis. Today, Riverford Organic Farmers packs around 47,000 boxes a week, which are delivered to homes across the UK, including around 900 in and around Bath. You probably won’t find Guy himself dropping a box on your Bath doorstep (he is, however, still very hard at work at Riverford HQ, and publishes a fascinating weekly blog on the website). You may well have met Vicki Mowat though, as she – in partnership with her husband Alan – has run the Bath area Riverford Home Delivery for the last five years.

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We believe in charging a price that’s fair for the farner and fair for the customer too How has Riverford maintained such massive popularity when competition is so rife? “For a start, Riverford is well known for choosing produce based on seasonality, flavour and

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sustainability,” says Vicki. “All our farmers look after the soil, wildlife and birds. We guaranteed unrivalled examples of whatever you choose to order from us: the carrotiest carrots, and potatoes like your granddad used to grow. We never spray unnecessary chemicals on our precious veg – it’s all, always 100% organic.” On from that, convenience (there’s no delivery charge and boxes are brought to your door) and price is a major factor in the Riverford success story. “Of course, there are competitive challenges when supermarkets discount their fruit and veg to silly prices,” says Vicki. “But cheap food always has a cost somewhere along the line, and often it’s the farmer who foots the bill. We believe in charging a price that’s fair for the farmer and fair for the customer too.” Recipes that come with your box, and can be browsed online, offer fresh inspiration while erasing any excuse for waste. Says Vicki: “People are becoming increasingly interested in adding more vegetables to their regular shopping list, not necessarily because they’re adopting a fully vegetarian or vegan lifestyle, but simply because they’re choosing to increase the amount of fruit and veg they eat while becoming

FRESH DELIVERY: main image, Vicki Mowat of Riverford Organics Opposite page, Vicki at a recent workshop held at Bathwick St Mary’s School Pictures courtesy of Riverford Organics


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FOOD | HEROES more aware of the benefits of choosing organic food, both for health gains and in an effort to protect the environment.” Are any veg particularly hip right now? “Certain produce could be called fashionable, yes; right now, kale, cauliflower and avocado are trending, and beetroot is set for superstar status. Fermented products are also becoming popular – we sell Biotiful Kefir as an extra which can be added to the box. But beyond fashion, we know that people are genuinely interested in cooking good food at home. We’ve noticed an increase in the number of people ordering our organic recipe boxes, which give you all the ingredients and instructions you need to cook delicious meals. They appeal particularly to people who are really busy as they take all the thinking out of cooking, and they’re so much more delicious and nutritious than a takeaway or a ready meal.” If you’re not already au fait with Riverford, the recipe box option may have surprised you. The company’s offering includes all manner of home delivery options. Alongside the veg, fruit and salad combos, there are meat- and dairy-specific selections, a farm shop range that includes bread, deli treats and store cupboard grocery staples, a barbecue shop and drinks from coffee and soft drinks to cider, beer and wine. Two recently launched community-focused projects further bolster the Riverford appeal. “The Riverford Veg Fund is a scheme to

help schools, charities and other groups to raise funds and promote healthy eating,” says Vicki. “We’re already working with several schools, helping them to fundraise and running healthy eating and cooking workshops with children and parents, which has been fun. We’re looking for other schools, charities and other groups to join us too. And our Master Veg cookery classes are evening workshops in village halls, introduce local people to cooking with a veg box delivery.” Vicki also maintains the Riverford profile by working in collaboration with Rachel Demuth at Demuths Vegetarian Cookery

School, who runs an advanced vegetarian cookery workshop using Riverford produce a couple of times a year. During her downtime, Vicki is a fan of both Menu Gordon Jones and Dan Moon at the Gainsborough Bath Spa Hotel restaurant, and enjoys time with her family and her border terrier Toffee at the Inn at Freshford, her local pub. “I’m proud of the ethical approach Riverford takes to good food, good farming and maintaining community connections, as well as the service we offer.” Riverford Organic Farmers, visit: riverford.co.uk. n

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BATH | HERITAGE

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

Historian Catherine Pitt visits the newly revamped Bath Record Office in Bath Guildhall and offers advice for anyone drawing up their family tree or seeking the history of their home

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brought to a ground floor room to be viewed. Although housed in an 18th century building, the Record Office keeps up to date with the modern world as much as possible. As part of the anniversary celebrations the principal archivist (and only the second head archivist in the Bath Record Office’s existence), Colin Johnstone, has selected 50 special documents to showcase over 50 weeks on the archive’s blog page. You will also find the Record Office has a social media presence on Twitter, and electronic documents are becoming a more familiar donation to Bath’s flourishing collections. The research space has expanded too. After a number of years of planning not only are there two new rooms opened up for users, but the collection itself has grown with the addition of the Local History Studies section moved from Bath Central Library. Now all in one place you can study detailed architectural plans of the very house that you live in in the city, explore the

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Volunteer Philip Bendall has spent eight years compiling more than 260,000 entries for burials in Bath’s cemeteries

ight in the beating heart of Bath, just a few metres below the busy feet that bustle past its windows, lies a treasure trove of the city’s history. Accessible to all, and for free, one simply has to ascend the steps of The Guildhall and ask at the reception desk to be directed to Bath’s Record Office and this plethora of papers, photographs and plans is ready for you to explore. Bath Record Office, which is owned and run by Bath and North East Somerset Council, first opened its doors to the public in 1967 under the auspices of archivist Robert Bryant and today it’s still available to everyone; but how many of us have actually been to explore what it has to offer, or in fact realised that the facilities were there beneath your feet? Today, the archives are much bigger than 50 years ago; spread across 12 separate rooms in The Guildhall basement, including a former Georgian kitchen. There are over four kilometres of shelving that contain everything from medieval charters, maps, and council minutes through to a Georgian music collection, and city plans and photographs. Everything is held in the city centre, there is no off-site storage, which is rare for such a vast collection. Over the years a number of projects have been undertaken by volunteers to digitise and collate parts of the archive. On the archive’s website one can now explore the Georgian Newspaper Project, Bath Soldiers who Died in the Great War and the fascinating Victorian Prisoners’ Portrait Book. Volunteers play an important part of keeping the archive alive and accessible to the public, and extra hands are always welcome. Certainly the dedication shows through with projects such as The Bath Burial Index online which is the work of one single volunteer – Philip Bendall, who has spent eight years compiling more than 260,000 entries for burials in more than 50 of Bath’s cemeteries . . . and he’s still not finished. In conjunction with its 50th anniversary, Bath Record Office has had a much needed makeover. Long gone are the mismatched wooden tables and harsh strip lighting. The archives now have a much fresher, more pleasant feel, with modern equipment and a spruced up appearance. For those with limited mobility the rooms can be reached by a lift, or with advance notice it can be arranged for documents to be

original directories that can inform you of who lived in your house or the business that traded there, and even access all the local newspapers online or via microfiche for news from a particular day, decade or even century. In the Record Office the two most popular research requests from users are building history and genealogy. Not only can you use the archive’s four computers to access sites such as Ancestory.com and The British Newspaper Archive for free, but the friendly staff and volunteers are on hand to assist you


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BATH | HERITAGE

TRACE YOUR ANCESTRY: opposite page, the city Archives hold thousands of original historic documents Above, head archivist Colin Johnstone Top right, the earliest document at Bath Record Office is the Bath City Charter, granted by King Richard I on 7 December 1189, below it is a detail from the Bath City Charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I on 4 September 1590 Trained staff at the Bath Record Office can help researchers use archive resources such as microfiche files All pictures courtesy of Bath Record Office

with your family history research if you need assistance. People travel from all over the world to view the archives in our city, and it’s not surprising with the vast collection that is held here and the expert advice. Understandably only part of the catalogue is online so the best method is to either call or email the Record Office to establish if they have what you require. It’s amazing what they have and how it brings the city, and your family history to life; for example, simply by looking in the city court ledgers you can discover if your ancestor was transported to Australia for some petty crime, or by viewing a rate book how much rent people paid to live in your house in the 19th century. Courses on family history are a popular and frequent addition to the archives’ offerings, as well as public talks. The archivists also work closely with local youth groups, societies and clubs to help with community projects, events and creative story writing inspired by the archive resources. The project Roads to Recovery: War Hospitals of the West Country was one such event that Bath Record Office assisted with, which culminated in a street performance by the Natural Theatre Company that took place in Queen Square in February. There’s more to the Bath Record Office than meets the eye, so it’s worth visiting. It can get busy so it is recommended that you phone and book – essential if you wish to use the computers or microfilm/microfiche machines. The archives are open Tuesday to Friday, but it is hoped that in the near future they will be open on Saturdays

too. If you’re unable to make it to the office then they do offer a research service which has an hourly charge. No need for a reader’s card at Bath Record Office, you simply sign in when you enter. You may be surprised to find that white gloves are no longer a requisite for handling papers as it’s been found that they cause more harm than good to documents and pick up dirt quite quickly. Digital photography for personal use is welcomed though do check with staff that you can as certain documents are copyrighted. Photocopies of material can be made for you for a small charge. Food and drink is of course not allowed near these precious documents; however you’re near to many shops and cafés that you won’t be short of finding somewhere for a break. So why not find out a bit more about your city and your home – you may be interested by what you discover, and find out if you and your family are really who you think you are. Bath Record Office opens weekly: Tuesday to Thursday 9am to 1pm, 2pm to 5pm. Friday’s 9am to 1pm, 2pm to 4.30pm (except public holidays). Tel: 01225 477421, visit: batharchives.co.uk. There’s a drop-in open day at the Bath Record Office on Monday 11 September, from 9am to 4.30pm. Visitors will be able to browse the Open Access book collection and visit the new library strongroom where hundreds of historic documents and books are stored. The archivists and local studies librarian will be on hand to welcome people and show them around. n

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HANDY ARCHIVE CHECKLIST l Phone and book a seat/computer and request documents l Pencils and notebook l Bring any research already undertaken – this is helpful for the archivists to know what you’ve done already l Laptop and lead l Digital camera l Loose change for photocopies

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

EXCEEDING ALL EXPECTATIONS Boasting a classy interior, stylish design, and traditional rock-solid Volvo safety, the new XC60 has all the attributes to prove a hit. This second-generation model more than lives up to its promise, making it one of the best SUVs in its class. Words by Chris Lilly

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olvo has, over the past few years, become an extremely ‘cool’ manufacturer. Like beauty, coolness is a subjective matter, but there are few remaining who don’t rate Volvo. The Swedish brand produces stylish cars, with efficient yet powerful engines, and interiors that compete with the best on sale today. Volvo’s new XC60 has much to live up to then, not least its rather successful predecessor. The original XC60 came along at a good time for Volvo, when the SUV boom was just starting to take hold. The new model arrives at a similarly propitious time, though a far more competitive one. SUVs are big business and show no sign of slowing down. So while the original XC60 was up against the likes of the BMW X3, Audi Q5, Mercedes Benz GLC – and that’s about it – the new model has rather more to compete with. Now, the XC60 is fighting against newer versions of the above models, plus new entrants in the shape of the Land Rover Discovery Sport, Alfa Romeo Stelvio, Jaguar F-Pace, Skoda Kodiaq, and a whole lot more. The market is rather more crowded then, making this Volvo’s life tougher than the first-generation model’s. The XC60 has some solid foundations though. Firstly, the new model is built on the same architecture as the larger XC90, and it shares a similar same engine line-up, too. The XC60 gets a choice of two diesels rather than the XC90’s one, but there is also a petrol and a plug-in hybrid available from the outset, covering plenty of bases. The same trim line-up is carried over too, with an entry-level inscription before a step up in two different directions. Momentum adds more refinement and luxury; R-Design added bite and sportiness. All three come as Pro levels too, giving buyers a bit extra on top of each trim level. Finally, we come to the design which, in my opinion, continues the good work Volvo has been doing for the past few years now. The XC60 is easily as stylish as the likes of the F-Pace and Stelvio. Again, beauty is in the eye etc, but the XC60 is a nicely designed

SUV. It shares features from the XC90, but with a more compact stance and youthful design. It manages to look different enough to not confuse the two on the road – and is the better for it. The interior is XC90-lite too, or rather less of the ‘lite’ aspect of that statement. Climbing from a 90-Series car to the XC60 would, doubtless, highlight a few differences between the two, but I must confess that I can’t think of any working from memory – and I’m pretty well versed in the XC90, S90, and V90. The Volvo Sensus infotainment system makes an appearance again, which is good news since it’s one of the best around. The portrait lay-out means navigation is more logical – you can see more of the road ahead than in a landscape configuration – while it’s customisable and can offer different screens with tablet-style controls. Other instruments are similar to the XC60’s bigger brother too, with a rocker switch to start, the option of the gear selector being embedded with Swedish crystal, a digital instrument panel, and interior design that more than lives up to Sweden’s high standards, let alone Volvo’s. In practical terms, the XC60’s seats are comfortable and supportive, while there is more than enough space in the cabin for four adults or two plus three children. As a family car, the options are restricted a little thanks to the transmission tunnel that runs down the centre of the car, restricting leg space for the occupant of the centre rear seat. Other than that, cabin space is good, and the boot is similarly spacious. It’s not class leading, but prospective buyers would have to be particularly miserly to complain about a lack of load space. As you might expect, being a Volvo, safety kit is exceptional. Systems such as City Safety with Steer Assist, Pilot Assist semiautonomous driving, and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian, cyclist, and large animal detection are all available. Passive safety is superb too, with a video of an XC60 being crash-tested shown to journalists. Despite being a pretty sceptical bunch, the room was amazed at the lack of damage a side-impact collision did to the

Volvo, despite it rolling over. This is all well and good, but how does it actually drive? After testing the XC60 at its UK launch, I can report that it drives like a Volvo. If you are looking for the sportiest of SUVs, you’d be better off with an F-Pace. However, the XC60 far from embarrasses itself on a twisting road, and there are few twistier than in the Peak District where we were invited for the drive. The XC60 might dive a little under braking, and lean a bit in the corners, but there is nothing in its demeanour to put you off hustling the Volvo down a country road should the mood take – especially in R-Design trim with the sport chassis. The rest of the time – and let’s face it, the vast majority of the time – the XC60 is a far more usable proposition than some of its rivals. The comfortable interior is complemented by a supple suspension set-up that irons out imperfections in the road rather than telegraph them to its occupants. In and around town, the car feels nimble, helped, no doubt, by its shorter wheelbase than the XC90 – though it remains almost as wide. In terms of performance, the D5 Powerpulse is the pick of the models tested, though it is more powerful and pricier than the D4. Either model will perform perfectly well everywhere, it’s just the added 45hp over the D4’s 190hp comes in handy when you need to get out of a junction quickly or cruise at motorway speeds for a long time. The D5 will complete the 0-62mph sprint in 7.2 seconds, but it will still return 51.4mpg. A T5 petrol is available too, though it is unlikely to find too many buyers in the UK since it’s only a little quicker than the D5, but has a lower fuel economy figure. The T8 TwinEngine plug-in hybrid wasn’t available to drive, but the system is the same as is available in the XC90. It’s very good in the larger car, so in a lighter model, it should perform even better. In short, Volvo’s done a top job with the new XC60. It’s practical and safe, but also stylish and likeable. It does everything you need a family SUV to do, but with plenty of élan. ■

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CITY | PEOPLE

CITYNEWS CELEBRITY TALKS OFFER INSPIRATION

News

TRADITIONAL: a Latham Interiors room at Somerset Place n The distinctive, stylish Walcot Street showroom of interior designer Eton Design, is undergoing a dramatic makeover, as the business prepares to join forces with Latham Interiors, to form Etons of Bath. The new showroom is due to open on Monday 4 September. Sarah Latham founded Latham Interiors in 2010 and has built a reputation for being one of the UK’s foremost Georgian interior design specialists and has worked on listed and significant Georgian projects nationwide over the last 11 years. Eton Design was founded seven years ago by Peter Higgins, who has worked with a number of exciting residential and leisure projects in London and the west country. The newly-formed Etons of Bath will provide advice, design, window dressings and product procurement to create and embellish classically inspired interiors. Its ethos combines a personable and expert approach with an obsession for customer service and design quality. Services for residential, commercial and hospitality customers include, full interior design, making and upholstery on site in Bath. Visit: etonsofbath.com, Twitter: @etonsofbath.

Bath based TV Homes Under the Hammer presenter Martin Roberts is launching the UK’s first Achieve Expo on Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 October in Bath’s Assembly Rooms, with a line-up of celebrity speakers designed to inspire people in the health, wealth and happiness areas of their lives. Speakers currently lined up to motivate visitors with a series of talks include ex-boxer Frank Bruno, former Olympic swimmer Sharron Davies, former ski jumper Eddie The Eagle Edwards, explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes, cookery writer Ella Mills of Deliciously Ella, TV presenter Gail Porter, comedian turned mindfulness expert Ruby Wax and Martin Roberts himself. Martin said: “When I took part in ITV’s I’m A Celebrity last year, something changed, not only in my mind-set, but also physically. My time in the jungle forced a break from my every day commitments and gave me time to reflect on my diet and fitness. In just under three weeks I lost two stone and my lifelong asthma diminished. Since returning home I have continued with this focus and feel much healthier and happier. A big part of my personal happiness comes from helping and inspiring others which is why I am launching the Achieve Expo.” Achieve will comprise two days of inspiring

and interactive talks from celebrities and

PURPOSEFUL: TV presenter Martin Roberts says his life was changed for the better after his I’m A Celebrity experience

experts from the fields of nutrition, healthy eating, wealth creation, fitness, mindfulness and motivation. An exhibition area will feature demonstrations and advice across a wide range of products and services. The early bird offer of free entry ends on Friday 1 September. The speakers will each deliver 45-minute talks (from £10 to £20), to share insights into their own achievements across health, wealth and happiness. Tickets must be purchased in advance via: achieve.co.uk or bathboxoffice.co.uk, or tel: 01225 463362. Twitter: @Achieve_Events.

Fewer than half the population has an up-to-date will, meaning that when they die their family and friends will be left to sort out the legal muddle they have left behind. During September 15 solicitors firms in the Bath area have agreed to draw up legally binding wills for £150, with fees raised being donated to the Royal United Hospital’s Forever Friends Appeal. Make a Will month gives people the opportunity to put their affairs in order by having a single standard will written, or the same price for two standard mirror or joint wills. People can request that the fee is donated to a specific area of the hospital that they may have connections with. Visit: foreverfriendsappeal.co.uk.

BATH BUSINESS BAROMETER provided for

UPDATE: JULY 2017

High Street Footfall (Month on month % change)

n Footfall hit double digits in July, nearly double that of the South West and five times the UK performance. The major impact for this growth was graduation celebrations in the city when families and friends of Bath Spa and Bath University added over 10,000 per day to visitor figures. Additionally, focus on the individuality of the city's retail offer, under the promotional banner of "Independent Retailer Month" contributed to motivating people to "shop local" with a number of businesses in the city centre recording their best trading results of the year. The late night economy appears strong, with Bath BID taxi marshals seeing an 18% increase in late night taxi patronage vs July 2016. This doesn't underestimate the need to be mindful of continuing longer term uncertainty and the need for all businesses to use every opportunity to build their resilience and continue to develop first class customer service. To this end the Bath BID is introducing a FREE Mystery Shopping pilot in the autumn for Bath BID Businesses entitled "enabling your customers to buy". As measured by Springboard’s sales index which tracks sales in brick and mortar stores

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Springboard Research Ltd.


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Specialist advice across a range of financial services Call Monahans Financial Services now on 01225 472800 Lennox House, 3 Pierrepont Street, Bath BA1 1LB

www.monahans-fsl.co.uk Planning for retirement? Worried about Inheritance Tax? Our financial planning advice delivers solutions tailored to your needs.


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We deliver to over 20,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only £15.00 (6 issues) or £40.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £70.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00 To subscribe to receiving the magazine go to our website; www.thebathmag.co.uk and scroll to the bottom of the page where you can click to an instant link Alternatively send a cheque payable to MC Publishing Ltd 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or Telephone 01225 424 499 for card payment

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Employment Tribunal Fees Supreme Court Decision Emily Eccles from the Commercial & Employment team at Mogers Drewett looks at the recent Supreme Court ruling on industrial tribunal fees.

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n the morning of 26th July, the Supreme Court – the highest court in the UK – allowed an appeal by UNISON against the legality of the current system of employment tribunal fees, holding that the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunals Fees Order 2013 is unlawful and will be quashed. The decision follows a four-year fight by the union and is being hailed as a major victory for employees everywhere. Employment tribunal fees were introduced in July 2013 by the then Lord Chancellor Chris Grayling and meant that any employee who had a claim against their employer, for example in the case of wage claims, breach of contract, unfair dismissal, race and sex discrimination, would have to pay a fee to bring their claim to tribunal. If a claim was submitted without the accompanying fee or application for fee remission it was rejected. The fees started at £160 for a type A claim such as wage claims or breach of contract, and £250 for a type B claim. However, there was also a hearing fee to consider of £230 for a type A claim, and £950 for a type B claim. Appeals at the employment appeal tribunal required an additional £400 lodging and £1,200 hearing fee. These fees put the option of a tribunal out of reach for many low paid workers, and will even have discouraged some better paid workers if disproportionate because of a low value claim. While it can never be known how many were discouraged, it is known that the introduction of fees coincided with a 70% reduction in the number of claims being taken to tribunal. In its judgement, the Supreme Court made it clear that all fees paid since 2013 will have to be refunded by the Lord Chancellor's department. Unison estimates that this figure will be more than £27m. This judgement endorsing the fundamental importance of access to justice will be better news for employees than it will employers, and while it is unknown if fees will be abolished altogether (a muchreduced fee regime may well remain in place), it will undoubtedly result in an increase in the number of claims brought to tribunal. There is also the issue of people who were historically discouraged or prevented from bringing a claim because of the fees. It remains to be seen whether tribunals will entertain the notion that it was not reasonably practicable to bring a claim when the claimant was significantly impeded or denied access to justice by unlawful fees. If this is the case, it is quite feasible that we see the resurrection of claims in the light of the ruling. Employers should take heed and ensure that any issues in the workplace are dealt with correctly to reduce the risk of a claim being brought against them. Steps should be taken, before issues arise, to review the processes they have in place to ensure they are suitable, and consider whether they would benefit from external HR support to perfect their processes and practices, and better understand their responsibilities to their employees. Emily Eccles is a solicitor at Mogers Drewett and can be contacted on 01225 750 000. Find out more at Mogersdrewett.com

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141 Englishcombe Lane, Bath BA2 2EL Tel: 01225 445507

www.oclaccountancy.com

New salary sacrifice savings You may know that new salary sacrifice schemes no longer save tax & NI, although there are a few exceptions, a major one relating to pension contributions (including auto-enrolment contributions).From April 2018 the level of auto enrolment contributions are increasing from 2% to 5% and then to 8% in April 2019. These are the total contributions with the minimum employer share as 1%, 2% and 3%, with the balance payable by the employee; this gives rise to a possible saving. Auto-enrolment only requires employers to pay the minimum rates above, but there is no reason why you can’t also pay the employees’ share by way of an extra employer’s contribution. When the increases in auto-enrolment contributions kick in, offer your employees a salary sacrifice arrangement by which you make their share of the contributions and they waive an equal amount from their pay. The employees won’t reduce their tax bill under this arrangement but they can pay less NI, saving them equal to 12% of the pension contributions you make, whilst you will also save NI at 13.8% of the extra pension contribution.

For help & advice contact us – call Marie Maggs, Mike Wilcox or Hannah Bratten on 01225 445507 for a no-obligation meeting.

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Call Marie Maggs, Mike Wilcox or Hannah Bratten on 01225 445507 to arrange a no-obligation meeting 74 ThEBATHMagazinE

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CITY | HEROES

CHANGING YOUNG LIVES

Bath charity Mentoring Plus pairs up young people who are facing various life challenges, with volunteer adults to spend time together. Georgette McCready talks to one mentor about how the project works

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but rather a commitment to spend time in activities, engaging in conversation and gradually building their sense of worth and of belonging in the community. Last year the charity paired up 117 children and young people, aged between seven and 21, with volunteers. Between them the adult volunteers spent more than 2,500 sessions with their young mentees, including 119 organised activities. Feedback to the scheme is encouraging. One parent said: “She’ll talk to her mentor when she doesn’t want to talk to us and I know she’s getting support to make better decisions. It’s helping things calm down and she’s able to discuss things with us without so much conflict.” A 14-year-old wrote after a year on the scheme: “Thank you for having me for 12 months. I have enjoyed all of the activities that you have put on and helping me with my confidence and making new friends. I will be a mentor when I am older.” With weekly get-togethers over a 12 month period a recent report on what the scheme has achieved found that 80 per cent showed improved

ehind Bath’s seemingly affluent exterior lie some pretty shameful statistics. The latest figures for young people living in Bath and North East Somerset show that almost half of this age group live in the five council areas which are among the 20 per cent most deprived neighbourhoods in the whole UK. The facts stack up to make uncomfortable reading. Primary school age children in B&NES on free school meals perform significantly below the national average in English and maths. Mental health is also a worrying issue, with more children and adolescents in the B&NES catchment area attending outpatient clinics for a range of mental health issues than national and regional averages. Jamie Luck founded the local charity Mentoring Plus 19 years ago with the aim of forging a simple but effective link between those young people living with social disadvantage and adults who would offer time to spend with them in order to better their chances in life. This is not a case of throwing money at young people, 76 TheBATHMagazine

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relationships with their family, 82 per cent showed improved confidence and self-esteem and three quarters of them had reduced their risk-taking behaviour. There was also a significant improvement in being involved at school or college. Because Mentoring Plus is a charity funding is a constant issue. It has recently moved from Newbridge Hill to new premises at the Riverside Youth Hub, York Place, London Road, Bath. CASE STUDY The charity always welcomes donations to help fund the activities it runs for young people. But it also needs a bank of volunteers to keep its services going. I met one of the mentors, Tom Annear, who is head of business development and marketing at Epoch Wealth Management. Why did he decided to volunteer to be a mentor, I asked? “I’ve been in Bath for 15 years and found the levels of poverty both surprising and shocking. I guess I thought it was time I put something back into society.”

ACROSS THE GENERATIONS: main image, this pair of mentor and mentee demonstrate how both parties gain from the year-long process with Mentoring Plus Opposite page, charity founder Jamie Luck and mentor Tom Annear


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Tom was interviewed by staff at Mentoring Plus and given training. His personality was matched to a 14-year-old boy who was in need of some adult male company and one-to-one attention. The pair spend a couple of hours every Monday evening together. “I pick him up from his mum’s and drive him to wherever we’ve decided to go, and that’s always good chatting time. We’ve played a lot of different sports, badminton, squash, golf, crazy golf – we’ve also just hung out in the park throwing a frisbee. Then we’ll go and have a burger.” The pair will meet every week for a set

period of 12 months. Both sides are offered on-going support and communication from the charity. Tom’s mentee has been encouraged to draw up a plan of what he hopes to get out of his year, he doesn’t want Tom to give him career advice, he simply enjoys the fun they have and the chance to talk about what’s going on in his life. What does Tom get out of the experience? He has no siblings of his own but he is enjoying his time with his teenage mentee. “It’s not the same as just giving someone money to do a sponsored thing for charity, with this there’s a real sense of getting a warm, fuzzy feeling that you’re making a

difference. And yes I have grown attached to him, but we’re working on him doing some more group activities as well to grow his confidence. He knows it’s for a set time of a year, then, like many of our encounters in life – at school, in work, with friends too – we’ll both move on having gained something from the relationship. “I think the other thing I’ve realised is that at 38, to a 14-year-old I am old! It’s also given me a huge sense of gratitude for my own upbringing, which I had never properly appreciated before.” What qualities does a mentor need? “We’re not here to be a teacher, a priest or any other authority figure. We’re here to be non-judgemental, to listen, to be a conduit that gets that young person to be more engaged with school and life. It’s very important to stress that above all else you have to be dependable, reliable. When you sign up for the 12 months you have to commit the time every week, otherwise you’re just another in a long line of adults who have let them down.” Mentors are given a budget of £35 a month so they and their mentees can choose how they spend it. They might, for instance, do something free for a couple of weeks then bank the budget to do something special. To find out more about Mentoring Plus visit: mentoringplus.net, or tel: 01225 429694. n

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FAMILY | EVENTS

FAMILY DIARY IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO WITH THE CHILDREN THIS MONTH SATURDAY SKETCHING Saturday 2 September, 10.30am – 12.30pm n Fashion Museum, Assembly Rooms Get the chance to sketch the beautiful objects on display in the museum’s A History of Fashion in 100 Objects exhibition, with suggestions of key spots of interest from the museum’s curators. Use the #SaturdaySketching hashtag and tag @Fashion_Museum and @minervaartshop on Twitter, and the museum will post visitors’ sketches on its online image gallery. Free with normal museum entry. JAZZ AGE JAMBOREE TRAIL Until Sunday 3 September, 10.30am – 5pm n The American Museum in Britain, Claverton Manor, Bath, BA2 7BD Collect a trail map from the gate hut or reception and get to know the key figures from the 1920s as you follow the trail around the museum’s grounds. Complete the trail and collect a prize. Normal admission applies. £2 per trail map. Visit: americanmuseum.org. Also at The American Museum this month 1920S DANCE WORKSHOP Saturday 23 September, 10.30am – 12.30pm Always wanted to learn the Charleston? Join The Showgirl Academy for a 1920s dance lesson in a fun, informal environment. Wear comfortable clothes suitable for exercise and bring a drink. Workshop takes place in the Stables. No experience necessary. £10 per person, pre-booking essential, visit: americanmuseum.org. THE BRUTALIST PLAYGROUND n The Edge, University of Bath Until Saturday 9 September, open Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 4pm Last chance to see The Edge’s summer exhibition, the family-friendly interactive playground which takes inspiration from post-war concrete playgrounds. Free admission. Archive images of the original playgrounds are also projected on the walls. Visit: edgearts.org or call: 01225 386777. Also at The Edge this month CREATE: ART Saturday 23 September, 10.30am – 12.30pm Spend some quality time together developing your artistic skills and learning some top tips for making art at home. Takes place in the Fine Art Studio. £5 per child, £3 per adult, children must be accompanied by an adult. Suitable for five – 11 year olds. Pre-booking advisable, limited spaces.

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Superworm author Julia Donaldson is coming to Bath this month for the Children’s Literature Festival

CREATE: TALES FOR TOTS Saturday 23 September, 10.30 – 11.15am and 11.30am – 12.15pm Bring stories to life through dance, arts and crafts in this interactive workshop, where little ones will be introduced to new books or celebrate their much-loved favourite characters. Suitable for three – four year olds. £7.50 for a parent and child (additional children or adult £4). Takes place in the Ensemble Room. Pre-booking advisable. TINY ARTISTS Every Wednesday from 6 September in term time, 10 – 11am n The Pound, Pound Pill, Corsham, Wiltshire, SN13 9HX This fun sensory art session allows children to make keepsakes, explore different materials and make a whole lot of mess. Suitable for ages up to four. £3.50 per child including a hot drink for a parent/guardian. Visit: poundarts.org.uk or call: 01249 701628 / 01249 712618. Also at The Pound this month TINY EXPLORERS Every Thursday from 7 September in term time, 10 – 11am and 11.15am – 12.15pm This creative and high energy session will allow children to explore the world of acting and drama through storytelling, props and costumes. £3.50 per child including a hot drink for a parent/guardian. The 10am slot is for 18 months – four years, and the 11.15am slot is for ages up to four. HERE BE DRAGONS Until Sunday 8 October n Victoria Art Gallery Dragons of all shapes and sizes have taken over Victoria Art Gallery! Explore the colourful exhibition of work by some of the

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world’s best children’s illustrators and writers. Children can find their favourite fire-breathing characters before reading all about them in the story corner. The exhibition is £4 for adults, free for under 16s and Discovery Card holders. The gallery has also produced an app where children can find eight virtual dragon eggs that are hidden around the city centre. Go on an egg hunt, follow the app’s compass and see if you can collect all the eggs and solve the anagram for a chance of winning a very special goody bag. Visit: victoriagal.org.uk. HERITAGE WEEKEND Saturday 9 – Sunday 10 September, 10.30am – 4pm n Midsomer Norton Railway Station, Silver Street, Midsomer Norton, BA2 3EY The station is hosting a heritage weekend where all ages can learn about the history of locomotives. There will be a quiz for children on each day, and the buffet and shop will be open. No booking required. Visit: sdjr.co.uk or call: 01761 411221. MOSAIC MAGIC Saturday 10 September, 10.30am – 12.30pm n The Holburne Museum, Great Pulteney Street Have fun learning how to design and create a simple mosaic tile, taking inspiration from the beautiful patterns and colours in the museum’s decorative arts collection. All materials are included and mosaics can be taken home on the day. Participants are free to bring their own fragments of pottery to personalise their mosaic. Suitable for ages five and over. All children must be accompanied by a paying adult. Maximum two children per adult. £10 adults, £5 children. To book, call: 01225 388568 or visit: holburne.org.


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FAMILY FUN DAY AT THE RACES Sunday 17 September n Bath Racecourse, Lansdown, Bath, BA1 9BU While adults can enjoy the races, there’s plenty of fun for the kids at this familyorientated race day. There will be inflatables, face painting, pony rides and much more. Pack a picnic and have great day out with all the family. Entry for under 18s is free. Gates open 12pm, first race is at 2pm and the last is at 5pm. Visit: bath-racecourse.co.uk or call: 01225 424609. RONDO THEATRE DRAMA CLUB Every Monday from 18 September, 5 – 6pm n St Saviour's School, Bath, BA1 6TG A creative theatre company for young people aged between eight – 15. Each week participants will work with youth director Paulo Baigent to devise a play before performing it to their friends and family at The Rondo. Children can learn how to develop storylines and characters, creating roles that suit each person. It doesn’t matter how much or little acting experience you have.Visit: rondotheatre.co.uk. BATH CHILDREN’S LITERATURE FESTIVAL 2017 Friday 29 September – Sunday 8 October n Various venues across Bath Some of the biggest names in children’s

Artistic workshops for children at The Edge

books and television are coming to Bath for Europe’s largest children’s literature festival this month. The line-up includes Jacqueline Wilson, The Gruffalo and Superworm’s Julia Donaldson, author and illustrator of the Tom Gates series Liz Pichon, and the brain behind the How To Train Your Dragon books Cressida Cowell. There will be workshops by some of the industry’s most talented illustrators and writers, as well as a special Harry Potter quiz to mark 20 years since the publication of the first book. There will also be events for teens and young adults, plus children’s writing courses for adults looking for some top tips. Visit: bathfestivals.org.uk or call: 01225 463362.

DR DEE’S DAUGHTER AND THE PHILOSOPHER’S STONE WITH PALISANDER Sunday 1 October, 3pm n Wiltshire Music Centre, Bradford on Avon, BA15 1DZ Explore the themes of history, magic and science through an exciting blend of music, puppetry and storytelling in this performance which tells the tale of studious astronomer and alchemist Dr Dee and Katherine, who reads about the doctor’s quest to find the elixir of life. Tickets: £8 adults, £4 students and under 18s. Suitable for ages three and over. Visit: wiltshiremusic.org.uk or call: 01225 860100. n

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GUEST | COLUMNIST

KEEP IT REAL FOR OUR CHILDREN Patricia Goodman, a therapist at Openings Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy, offers advice for parents on protecting our children from cyber bullying

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work as a therapist in private practice and as a school counsellor at a local secondary school. In my work at the school, the most common issue the children and young people bring through my door is anxiety. It is a sad reality that I witness every week. And, in my opinion, the internet and in particular, social media, are mostly to blame. Most of us, if we are lucky, will be returning to work and our children back to school, after a summer break, rested and refreshed. But there is no break from social media – Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, Twitter etc – and especially not for young people. Generation Z (also known as PostMillennials) has grown up with the internet and social media and with the majority owning a smartphone, they have constant access to the internet. They can be connected 24/7 to their friends and family. There are benefits to this high-level connectivity but also dangers, such as increased anxiety and cyber bullying. Cyber bullying ranges from competitiveness between young people and leaving others out of group chats to extreme online abuse. Serious harassment can lead to a young person feeling isolated and depressed, with low self-esteem. Childline, the NSPCC service, defines cyber bullying as ‘using the internet, email, online games or any digital technology to threaten, tease, upset or humiliate someone else.’ Children and young people can be bullied online for any reason but most often bullying focusses on difference. This includes racism, homophobia, sexism and against people with special needs. More specifically, cyber bullying can be based on someone’s appearance, how they dress, their family and how they behave socially. It includes abusive comments, sharing pictures or personal information without consent, hacking into someone’s online profiles, phone or email and pressurising someone, especially with regard to sending sexually explicit photos. As young people are naturally self-conscious and since social media is so central to their lives, you can see how cyber bullying can be extremely distressing. In my work with young people, I have found the most prevalent form of cyber bullying to be sexting. Sexting is sending

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THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA: talk openly with young people and encourage them to develop solid face-to-face friendships messages, photos or videos of a sexual nature via text or social media. The pressurising of girls to post provocative photos of themselves on social media is particularly common. Some girls think this is normal behaviour and even expected by boys in order to be accepted. Boys too may think it is normal to ask a girl for sexual images and also to post them of themselves. Young people may think it is part of being in a relationship with someone. They may think sexting is private when it might not be. With their desire to fit in and to be popular, young people can feel pressurised to engage in sexting. However, few think through the effect of sexting as once a message or photo has been sent or posted, it can be shared. If shared, the young person is then vulnerable to bullying, such as blackmail and humiliation. So how are we as parents to inform and protect our children? There are both practical steps to be taken and also more fundamental, longer-term strategies. Most social media sites, such as Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat, have privacy settings. It is important that your child makes their profile private. In that way, only people he or she knows or allows, can follow them online and access their profile. If their profile remains public, anyone can access their personal contact details, personal photos and videos and even their exact location at any given time through location tagging features. In the case of someone being offensive on social media, that person can be actively blocked from following your child and accessing their profile. Likewise, on most social media sites there is a report button where you can report abusive content. You can also report abuse to CEOP (Child Exploitation and Online Protection). Longer-term, more fundamental strategies towards limiting the risks of cyber bullying are essential for the wellbeing of our children

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and young people. It is vital to make sure we talk to our children about what they are doing online and which social media sites they are on. In this way we keep the lines of communication open and ourselves informed. In a family culture of openness, our young people will feel more able to reach out to us if there is a problem. They will feel they can talk to us and feel supported; social isolation and loneliness are very often associated with cyber bullying, potentially closely followed by depression and anxiety. As well as talking openly to our children, we need to encourage them to talk face to face with their friends and peers. Real life socialising, as opposed to virtual talking, is so important to keep young people grounded in reality and for them to develop solid friendships. ‘Friends’ on Facebook or ‘streaks’ on Snapchat do not compare to having a good laugh with their friends or a heart to heart in person. Real life friendships and relationships contribute hugely to a young person’s selfconfidence and sense of belonging in the world. High self-esteem, and with it crucially self-respect, will foster resilience – a quality young people need now more than ever to counter whatever the virtual world may throw at them. n

Advice and support for young people Off the Record Bath – Tel: 01225 312481 Visit: offtherecord-banes.co.uk Childline – Tel: 0800 1111 Visit: childline.org.uk Openings Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy – Tel: 01225 445013 Visit: openingsbath.com Youngminds – Parents’ Helpline: 0808 802 5544. Visit: youngminds.org.uk.


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Independent Tutorial College offering: A Levels, GCSEs, Re-sits and Supplementary Tuition “Tutors are very supportive in helping students to prepare for examinations... and attain the higher grades.” OFSTED

Sarah Wringer KIE Bath, 5 Trim Street, Bath, BA1 1HB Direct Line (01225) 473502 Email: sarah.wringer@kaplan.com

27 Queen Square, Bath, BA1 2HX 01225 334577 | admissions@bathacademy.co.uk www.bathacademy.co.uk

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EDUCATION NEWS ALL-ROUND SUCCESS FOR GIRLS Students at the Royal High School Bath have achieved outstanding success in A Level and in the International Baccalaureate results, with 53% of students achieving all A*– A grades (or IB equivalent) and 74% scored A* – B grades with a 99% pass rate. One student fought off stiff competition to win a coveted place at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic OFF TO INDIA: Olivia Chick with her A Art, while seven have met their Level results and her mother Oxbridge offers. Former head girl Olivia Chick is off to India before taking up her university place. She said: “I’m looking forward to going to UCL to study geography next year, but first I’m going to travel to India to work on a women’s empowerment programme. Everyone at school has been so helpful and supportive, I’m really grateful.”

SAM IS ONE TO WATCH Radstock teenager Sam Young, pictured, who attends Millfield School, is tipped for great things in his cricketing career. The 16-year-old batsman, who also bowls off spin, progressed through Somerset County Cricket Club’s emerging player programme to the Somerset Academy. Recovering from a foot injury last year he had a successful winter. He currently plays for Premier League side Bath Cricket Club. Millfield’s director of cricket and former England assistant

coach Mark Garaway said: “I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for Sam at Millfield, in club cricket with Bath CC, in professional cricket at Somerset and hopefully also in the international arena.”

YEAR ON YEAR IMPROVEMENT

SIX OF THE BEST: Monkton Combe students off to Oxford and Cambridge, Tess Hovil, William Backhouse, April Cai, Justin Ko, Hannan Saddiq and Oliver Nunn

Monkton Combe independent school has six students taking up Oxbridge offers following the year-on-year improvement in the school’s A Level results. Of the exams sat, 40% of the grades were at A*or A grades, up from 36% on the previous year. Two pupils achieved A* grades in all four of their subjects, and another achieved three A*s and an A grade. Six other students achieved two A* grades each, with 15% of all grades awarded at the A* level and 27% of the year group achieving at least one A*.

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BATH COLLEGE

BEECHEN CLIFF SCHOOL

City Centre Campus, James Street West, Bath, BA1 1UP Somer Valley Campus, South Hill Park, Wells Road, Radstock, BA3 3RW

Kipling Avenue, Bath, BA2 4RE Tel: 01225 480466 www.beechencliff.org.uk

Autumn term: 4 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 3 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 9 April - 29 June 2018 Age of pupils: 16 - 18 years Number of pupils: 3000 full-time Day fees: N/A

Autumn term: 4 September - 20 October 2017 Christmas term: 2 November - 19 December 2018 Winter term: 4 January - 9 February 2018 Easter term: 19 February - 23 March 2018 Spring term: 9 April - 25 May 2018 Summer term: 5 June - 19 July 2018 Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years

Religious denomination: Non-denominational The curriculum: Bath College has been providing education and training for more than 125 years. The college offers vocational and academic courses in a wide range of subjects and can help you to find a suitable course to provide you with the knowledge and skills for your chosen career. They believe that all students are talented individuals and will work with you to develop your talents. The City Centre Campus offers students the opportunity to be in the middle of Bath’s vibrant city. It is easily accessible through excellent transport links from Bath, Bristol, Wiltshire and the surrounding areas. Courses on offer include Art, Design, Photography, Business, Hospitality, Hairdressing, Spa Therapies, Health and Social Care, Children’s Development, IT, Media and Sport. The Somer Valley Campus is based in the picturesque Somerset countryside and has plenty of free parking for students. Courses on offer include Arboriculture, Animal care, Veterinary nursing, and Motor vehicle. From September 2017 all Construction Design, Engineering, Stonemasonry and Construction trades will also run at this campus when the new state-of-the-art Construction Skills Centre opens. Extra curricular activities: College is much more than just your course. College can be the place where you make friends for life, try new experiences or gain new skills. The college has a number of societies including Art, Sports, Film Club and Circus Skills; it’s a great way to make new friends, meet like-minded people, or to just try something fun and new! Pastoral care: Students are at the heart of life at the College. In addition to providing highquality courses they firmly believe in giving students a full range of student-support services to enable them to succeed to the best of their abilities. All students have a personal tutor to guide them in their studies and advise them on progression routes including university entrance and careers.

Number of pupils: 1,260 Day fees: None (for pupils outside the UK £4,500 - £5,500 pa). Religious denomination: None The curriculum: A wide-ranging academic curriculum which includes GCSEs in Classical Civilisation and Latin. At A Level the school offers more than 40 courses of study. Extra curricular activities: A huge range of extra-curricular activities on offer include cricket, rugby, hockey, football, tennis and shooting. Debating, public speaking, F1 and robotics are supplemented by the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and the Combined Cadet Force. Pastoral care: Personal care and guidance is exceptional at the school, with each boy and sixth form student being looked after within the house to which he or she is allocated on entry. Name of headmaster: Mr Andrew Davies Outstanding characteristics: A school which provides great food, incredible extra-curricular provision and a highly successful academic curriculum. “Beechen Cliff School provides an outstanding education for its boys and sixth form students, which reflects its values of high aspirations and success for all. A significant strength of the school is the way in which it identifies differing ability groups, thus enabling the most-able boys to gain the highest grades possible and yet successfully supporting those who find learning more challenging to achieve examination results of which they can be proud”.

Name of principal: Laurel Penrose Outstanding characteristics: As a full-time student at Bath College you will enjoy a real alternative to school. You will be part of an adult learning environment, where you will be encouraged to discover things for yourself. If you are looking for an Apprenticeship in the area, there is no better place than Bath College, as we are the largest provider in the Bath and North East Somerset region. THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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CALDER HOUSE

DAUNTSEY’S West Lavington, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 4HE Tel: 01380 814500 Email: admissions@dauntseys.org Autumn term: 8 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 9 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 7 July 2018 Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years Number of pupils: 825 Day fees: £6,150 per term UK boarders: £10,180 per term. Religious denomination: Inter-denominational.

Thickwood Lane, Colerne, Wiltshire, SN14 8BN Tel: 01225 743566 www.CalderHouseSchool.co.uk Enquiries@CalderHouseSchool.co.uk Autumn term: 11 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 29 March 2018 Summer term: 16 April - 29 July 2018 Age of pupils: 6 - 13 years Number of pupils: 48 Day fees: £5,570 per term (£17,250 per year) includes all remedial support required to meet each pupil’s individual needs. Religious denomination: Non-denominational The curriculum: Calder House is a small, coeducational day school for pupils who, for various reasons, are out of step with their potential. We offer a friendly, non-competitive environment in which children with dyslexia, dyspraxia and other specific learning/language difficulties are encouraged to enjoy school while developing the skills they need to successfully return to mainstream education. Our average class size is eight with a staff to pupil ratio of one to four. Name of headteacher: Mrs Karen Parsons A specialist approach: We offer a whole-school approach to specialist education – one which delivers a carefully structured programme of one-to-one support within a normal school environment. A typical pupil: • arrives with an unmeasurable reading age or one that is more than two years behind their chonological age • spends just over two years at Calder House • leaves with a reading age appropriate for their chronological age or (in the case of one in three pupils) an adult reading age • sucessfully returns to mainstream education

The curriculum: The curriculum throughout the school is broad and balanced, offering all pupils the opportunity to study an extensive range of subjects. Lessons are delivered by specialist teachers in a challenging and stimulating environment that is conducive to a positive and enjoyable learning experience for the pupils. Dauntsey’s is keen to promote independent learning, enabling pupils to fulfil their potential and develop a range of key skills needed in later life. The timetable offers a great deal of flexibility with a well-structured weekly lesson arrangement and the extensive options system provides well for the different interests and aptitudes of all pupils. Extra curricular activities: All pupils discover a breadth and depth of education that takes them beyond academic achievement. Drama, music, art and sport all flourish and the rural surroundings provide an ideal setting for many outdoor activities which include sailing on the school’s very own Tall Ship, the famous 56’ gaff cutter, the Jolie Brise. Pastoral care: At Dauntsey’s each pupil joins a boarding or day house and is supported by his or her housemaster or housemistress and a team of tutors. Their aim is to ensure each pupil fulfils their potential and makes the most of the varied opportunities on offer at Dauntsey’s. Name of principal: Mr Mark Lascelles MA Outstanding characteristics: The equal balance of boarding and day pupils, the wide range of facilities, and the excellent pastoral support ensure that everyone feels part of the community. Visitors comment on the happy and friendly atmosphere; the energy, purpose and determination to do well.

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HAYESFIELD GIRLS’ SCHOOL

Upper Oldfield Park, Brougham Hayes, Bath, BA2 3QU. Tel: 01225 426151 www.hayesfield.com Autumn term: 6 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 2 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 9 April - 20 July 2018 Age of pupils: 11 - 16 years girls, 16 - 18 years co-educational Number of pupils: 1,171 Day fees: N/A Religious denomination: Non-denominational The curriculum: The innovative approach to curriculum design allows the school to offer a range of stimulating learning opportunities which support the development of good habits of learning, independence of thought, intellectual curiosity, creativity and resilience. Option choices at GCSE include two Languages, Global Perspectives, Mandarin, Dance and Latin. There is an outstanding range of more than 40 A Level subjects offered in the Sixth Form alongside a growing vocational Level 3 offer, which resulted in a pass rate of 100% A-E. Extra curricular activities: All students participate in the school’s “LEAP” after-school enrichment programme. There is something for everyone – school magazine, debating, drama, choir, orchestra, Christian Union. Amnesty International, Mandarin, Latin, dance, Duke of Edinburgh (Bronze, Silver and Gold), as well as both competitive and social sports teams. In September, Hayesfield launches its own Royal Navy CCF Contingent, which will provide students the opportunity of competing in the prestigious Fastnet Race. Pastoral care: There is a strong belief in traditional values at Hayesfield; we set high standards in our work, conduct and appearance. We place emphasis on developing the skills and values that will enable our pupils to become thinking, informed and confident adults who will be able to meet the challenges of the 21st Century. Each tutor group belongs to a House, each named after an influential woman which allows students to form friendships across the school community. Name of principal: Ms Emma Yates Outstanding characteristics: Hayesfield provides an inspirational learning environment where our ‘inclusive ethos and clear direction sets high expectations for teaching and learning’ (Ofsted, March 2017). Hayesfield girls are ‘confident, self assured learners with exemplary behavior’ (Ofsted, March 2017) and are encouraged to achieve their ambitions! The mixed Sixth Form’s 16-19 study programme have been rated as Outstanding (Ofsted, March 2017). ‘Students achieve well across the full range of subjects as a result of outstanding teaching and the strong leadership of the Sixth Form’.

KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL

King Edward’s Senior and Junior School, North Road, Bath BA2 6HU; King Edward’s Pre-Prep & Nursery School, Weston Lane, Bath BA1 4AQ. Senior School tel: 01225 464 313; Junior School tel: 01225 463 218; Pre-Prep & Nursery tel: 01225 421 681; Admissions tel: 0 1225 820399 www.kesbath.com; Twitter: @KESBath; Facebook: kesbath; Instagram: kes_bath Autumn term: 6 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 28 March 2018 Summer term: 16 April - 11 July 2018 Age of pupils: 3 - 18 Number of pupils: Senior School 785, Junior School 210 & Pre-Prep & Nursery 90 Day Fees (Per Term): Sixth Form £4,660; Senior School £4,585; Junior School £3,625; Pre-Prep £3,270; Nursery £2,695 The curriculum: Every individual is encouraged to strive for excellence and to acquire a lifelong passion for knowledge, discovery, adventure, creativity and culture. There is a wide breadth of offering in the academic curriculum at both GCSE and A Level. Extra curricular activities: Pupils’ educational experience is enhanced by an extensive programme of activities such as the Duke of Edinburgh's Award, Ten Tors, Combined Cadet Force, sports, drama, and music which has links with Bath Abbey and Bath Philharmonia Orchestra. In addition, there are over 100 lunchtime and after-school recreational clubs, including creative writing, the Environmental Action Group and the Model United Nations. Last year, the School celebrated the completion of two new professional sporting facilities; an all-weather astro pitch and four high spec netted cricket lanes. Pastoral care: The School's recent ISI report found the quality of pastoral care, support and guidance to be ‘excellent’. This was echoed by The Good Schools Guide who stated ‘Everything is directed towards the well-being of pupils. No wonder they enjoy their education and do so well in it. KES feels like a happy school.’ The School offers a strong, caring and supportive pastoral framework, working closely with parents to ensure that all members of the School community feel respected and valued. Name of principal: Mr Martin Boden Outstanding characteristics: Awarded ‘excellent’ in every category in the 2015 whole school ISI report. King Edward’s was ranked as one of the top four independent schools in the South West for its outstanding A Level and GCSE results in The Sunday Times Schools Guide, Parent Power Survey. THEBATHMAG.CO.UK

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KINGSWOOD SCHOOL

MILLFIELD & MILLFIELD PREP

Lansdown, Bath, BA1 5RG Tel: 01225 734210 Email admissions@kingswood.bath.sch.uk www.kingswood.bath.sch.uk

School name: Millfield Millfield, Street, Somerset BA16 0YD Tel: 01458 444296 Email:admissions@millfieldschool.com School name: Millfield Prep Millfield Prep, Glastonbury, Somerset, BA6 8LD Tel: 01458 832446 Email: admissions@millfieldprep.com

MONKTON PRE-PREP AND PREP SCHOOL Church Road, Combe Down, Bath, BA2 7ET Tel: 01225 831202 www.monktoncombeschool.com Autumn term: 3 September - 13 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 16 April - 6 July 2018

Autumn term: 4 September - 8 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 29 March 2018 Summer term: 23 April - 29 June 2018 Age of pupils: 2 - 18 years Number of pupils: Prep 360; Senior 1,245 Open Days: Sixth Form: Thur 28 September, 6.30pm – 9.00pm Senior: Sat 30 September, 9.00am – 12.00pm Prep School: 5 October, 9.30am – 12.00pm

Fees per term: Prep boarding: £9,165; Prep flexi boarding, £57.00 per night: day, £3,500 - £6,040. Senior boarding: £12,315, day: £8,270

Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years Number of pupils: 775 Day fees: senior £4,938 and boarding £10,643 per term

Religious denomination: Inter-denominational

The curriculum: Kingswood is a co-education school for pupils aged 3-18 years which offers an inclusive, extended family day and boarding community, free of pretension and balancing academic rigour, strength in the arts and sport, traditional values and outstanding pastoral care with a forward thinking can-do attitude. Results are outstanding. Ranked in the top 5% in the country for added value, 98% of students go onto university and 84% to Russell Group Extra curricular activities: There are over 100 extra-curricular activities available to all pupils both during the week and at weekends. Outdoor pursuits, Model United Nations, fashion and textiles, climbing, script writing or jazz, there is something for everyone. Creative, sporting and musical activities are positively encouraged and valued as Kingswood believes all round education is vital for young people in preparing them for life beyond school. Pastoral care: Kingswood was ranked as outstanding in every area of its latest inspection and relationships between the staff and pupils are highly regarded by parents. Each senior pupil has a personal tutor who mentors them, assists with each tutee’s independent learning plan and helps set personal targets as well as offering support to enable pupils to achieve their aims. Boarding and day pupils combine throughout the house system which ensures a strong sense of community spirit.

The curriculum: Millfield is an innovative school which frequently takes the lead in educational development. Class sizes are small and rarely exceed 16 pupils, which allows teachers to focus on each individual. Millfield offers an exceptionally wide selection of courses; at GCSE 27 subjects are on offer and 31 subjects at A-level, as well as a choice of BTEC courses and the Extended Project Qualification. Millfield offers an inspiring academic enrichment programme which includes lectures, debating, competitions and trips. Our top academics are challenged by coaching and academic clubs, and all pupils receive excellent guidance to support diverse university applications and work placements. Extra curricular activities: While Millfield is renowned for sport, we also offer a vibrant Arts programme. All pupils have opportunities across art, design, drama and music that aim to develop personal skills and a cultural appreciation of the arts. Pastoral care: As a boarding and day school we see the pastoral care and needs of our children as central to their success and personal development. Although we are a large school we preserve the caring atmosphere of a small one. Pupils can board from age seven upwards. Name of principals: Millfield - Mr Craig Considine Millfield Prep – Mrs Shirley Shayler

Name of principal: Mr Simon Morris Outstanding characteristics: Kingswood offers it all – great academics, real focus on sport and the arts, lots of co-curricular and a strong sense of community for both day pupils and boarders. Ambitious and determined, pupils at Kingswood are genuine with a strong conscience. An intelligent and outward looking school that provides excellent value for money and an outstanding education. 90 TheBATHMagazine

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Outstanding characteristics: Our strength has always been based around the belief that every child is an individual, and the school aims to put the child at the heart of everything it does. The world-class resources and facilities mean that pupils are provided with an exclusive experience with numerous opportunities available for them to discover their individual talents and potential, be it in the classroom, on the stage or on the sports field.

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Age of pupils: 2 - 13 years Number of pupils: 350 Fees (per term): Day Pre-Prep (aged 2 - 7): £3,165 - £3,260 Day Prep (aged 7 - 13): £3,825 - £5,570 Boarding Prep (aged 7 - 13): £6,790 - £8,030 The curriculum: At Monkton Pre-Prep we help children to make the transition from home to school as gentle as possible. We firmly believe that close relationships between parents, staff and children are vital. Our brand new building provides a stimulating child-centered curriculum in a safe and vibrant learning environment with outdoor learning integrated into the day to day activities of our children’s learning. As pupils move up to Monkton Prep, they are encouraged to strive for academic excellence whilst developing a love of learning. Our independent status allows our staff to maintain flexibility to choose new developments in education while preserving traditional standards. In the Prep School the syllabus in each subject is aimed at the requirements of National Curriculum up to the end of Year 6, and also the Common Entrance and Scholarship examinations at 13+. Extra curricular activities: Monkton aims to inspire confidence and a ‘give it a go’ attitude to its pupils, and we are continually trying to develop the after-school activities programme to give each child a chance to experience something different, or to pursue excellence. Pastoral care: The happiness and well-being of each child is central to what we do. Monkton thinks differently. We start with a proactive pastoral environment to develop academically strong learners within a living Christian ethos. Name of head: Head of Pre-Prep: Mrs Catherine Winchcombe Head of Prep: Mr Martin Davis Outstanding characteristics: Monkton Pre-Prep and Prep School are located on a 30 acre site just 1 mile from the center of Bath. This ample space and fantastic facilities on site ensures every child find their inspiration. Monkton inspires young people to become confident, kind and ambitious adults who live fulfilling lives.


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MONKTON SENIOR SCHOOL

OLDFIELD SCHOOL

PRIOR PARK COLLEGE

Kelston Road, Bath, BA1 9AB. Tel: 01225 423582 www.oldfieldschool.com enquiries@oldfieldschool.com

Ralph Allen Drive, Bath, BA2 5AH Tel: 01225 835353 Website: www.priorparkschools.com Email: admissions@priorparkschools.com

Monkton Combe, Bath, BA2 7HG Tel: 01225 721133 www.monktoncombeschool.com Autumn term: 3 September - 13 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 16 April - 6 July 2018 Number of pupils: 375 Day fees: £6,470 - £6,800 Boarding Fees: £9,110 - £10,845 The curriculum: As Monkton's outstanding exam results over the last few years demonstrate, inspiring academic ambition is one of our key priorities. Our students work hard and are well motivated. They are supported and encouraged through the care and enthusiasm of our teachers, who are committed to delivering lessons that are lively and enjoyable, as well as rigorous and demanding. Extra curricular activities: The wide range of activities, clubs and societies available enable each pupil to find areas of enjoyment that both motivate and give them confidence. However, the thinking and planning behind our diverse programme goes beyond the activities themselves. Whilst we hope to inspire the next Olympic rower, poet laureate or national fencing champion, we also use our activity programme to teach our pupils the skills they need for life and the characteristics necessary for today's working environment Pastoral care: Monkton thinks differently. We start with a proactive pastoral environment, ensuring every one of our students knows and fully understands themselves, everything else if built from that and, as our outstanding exam results over the last few years demonstrate, our approach works. Name of principal: Mr Chris Wheeler Outstanding characteristics: Monkton is a deliberately smaller school which enables us to consider each of our pupils as individuals. First and foremost we focus on how much a child knows about or understands themselves; everything else is built from that. 92 TheBATHMagazine

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Autumn term: 1 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 2 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 9 April - 23 July 2018 Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years boys and girls Number of pupils: 1,100

Autumn term: 6 September - 13 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 22 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 7 July 2018

The curriculum: Oldfield has a broad and balanced curriculum delivered through six learning areas. In Years 7 to 9 the curriculum broadly follows the National Curriculum. We offer over 25 subjects at A Level and students usually study 10 or 11subjects at GCSE

Number of pupils: 600

Extra-curricular activities: We believe a vibrant and wide ranging extra-curricular and enrichment programme is an essential part of personal development. We aim to encourage participation from all of our students. Extracurricular activities include debating society, language clubs, drama, and music clubs including glee club, choir and ukele. Sports clubs include; netball, football, boys and girls rugby, athletics, dance, cross country, badminton, basketball, tennis, and cricket. Residential and day trips are also seen as an important part of our students’ educational lives, with trips to Barcelona, Ardeche and Mimosa, Moscow, Belgium, Dorset, and a week-long Activities Week with all students participating in a wide variety of activities here and abroad. Pastoral care: Seeing students as individual learners and promoting a fully-rounded education is at the heart of what we aim to achieve. We work in partnership with students and parents to raise students’ expectations and standards of achievement in a caring, secure and supportive environment. Each student is supported by a tutor who will monitor their group’s attendance, celebrate their achievements and raise any concerns. There is a Year 7 evening in September for parents to meet the tutors and members of staff. Tutors remain with their tutor groups throughout their life at Oldfield, enabling them to support them throughout their school life. Name of headteacher: Mr Steven Mackay Outstanding characteristics: We provide an exceptional education in an environment that challenges all students and fosters ambition. Our students have respect for themselves, each other and their school and are well-prepared to face the world as compassionate, confident and resilient young people. The behaviour and conduct of our students is excellent. We recognise and reward good work and behaviour. The principles underlying this policy are based on respect – for self, for others and for the environment.

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Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years

Day fees: Boarding:Full fee, per term £10,065 per annum £30,195 International boarding: Full fee, per term £10,425, per annum £31,275 Weekly: Full fee, per term £8,300 per annum, £24,900 Junior Full Boarding: Full fee, per term £7,640 per annum £22,920. Junior Weekly Boarding: Full fee, per term £6,750, per annum £20,250. Day 13+: Full fee, per term £5,440, per annum £16,320. Day 11+: Full fee, per term £4,925, per annum £14,775. Religious denomination: Catholic, but all faiths are warmly welcome The curriculum: Prior Park College offers a broad but balanced curriculum, allowing every child to find their talent. The College offers 26 A-level subjects while students study 10 or 11 GCSE subjects. The College prides itself on the very strong teacher/student partnerships based on mutual respect and commitment to learning. Extra curricular activities: The College has outstanding facilities including a Sports’ Centre, Art & Design Faculty and Sixth Form Centre. An impressive number of music and drama productions are held in the magnificent Chapel, John Wood Chapel and Julian Slade Theatre each year. A broad and balanced sporting curriculum helps to promote sporting excellence and sporting opportunities for all. Pastoral Care: The Pastoral Care programme is classed as outstanding, with Housemasters and Housemistresses supported by a dedicated group of tutors who each address the needs of a small group of students. A vibrant and supportive community culture exists within each of the Houses and across the College. Name of principal: Mr James Murphy-O’Connor, MA Oxon Outstanding characteristics: A happy, purposeful, high-achieving community in which diverse talents can blossom without censure from peers.


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THE ROYAL HIGH SCHOOL

SHELDON SCHOOL SIXTH FORM

ST GREGORY’S SCHOOL

The Royal High School Bath, GDST Tel: 01225 313877 www.royalhighbath.gdst.net

Hardenhuish Lane, Chippenham, Wiltshire SN14 6HJ Telephone: 01249 766036 (Sixth Form Office) www.sheldonschool.co.uk sixthform@sheldonschool.co.uk

Saint Gregory’s Catholic College Combe Hay Lane, Odd Down, Bath, BA2 8PA Tel: 01225 832873 www.st-gregorys.org.uk

Autumn term: 6 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 6 January - 29 March 2018 Summer term: 19 April - 7 July 2018 Age of pupils: 3 - 18 years Number of pupils: 615

Autumn term: 4 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 2 January - 23 March 2018 Summer term: 9 April - 24 July 2018 Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years Number of pupils: 950

Day fees: (Per term – 3 term year) from Nursery £3,203 - Full Boarding Seniors (Yrs 7-13) £9,403

Day fees: N/A

Religious denomination: Multi faith The curriculum: The challenging curriculum promotes intellectual rigour, creative enquiry and critical thinking to ensure that girls will lead, serve and shape the world positively, now and in the future. With excellent academic results, the young women become well-educated, wellrounded and well-balanced, able to navigate a global, multi-cultural, technology-driven world, successfully.

Religious denomination: Catholic

Autumn term: 5 September - 21 December 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 29 March 2018 Summer term: 16 April - 20 July 2018

Extra curricular activities: Our girls love to get involved in just about everything! It’s all about having a go and our encyclopedic list of clubs and activities, some at lunchtime and many after school, is growing all the time. Whether it's fencing or French, swimming or science club, debating or digital photography, we always strongly encourage the girls to take up one or two activities, to develop a passion, to jump in and try something completely new, to meet a challenge, to have fun and to make another set of friends.

Age of pupils: 16 - 18

Pastoral care: Pastoral care and academic development go hand in hand. The school knows that girls perform best when they are happy and secure, so the caring and supportive community gives girls a real sense of belonging. The school recognise the pressures, uncertainties and challenges moving from childhood to adulthood, so if girls have any worries at all, there is always someone qualified to talk to. Or sometimes a friendly chat and cup of tea is just the ticket, someone is always there.

Extra curricular activities: There are lots of opportunities for Sixth Form students to involve themselves in sport, charity work, performing arts, clubs, social activities and a very wide range of trips and visits. Many Sixth Form students mentor younger pupils, while others take part in the annual Leavers’ Expedition.

Name of head: Mrs Jo Duncan Outstanding characteristics: The school is a hugely successful mix of day and boarding girls, a happy, thriving community free from stereotypes. The girls build confidence and high self-esteem, while fostering qualities such as courage, loyalty, compassion and integrity. The Royal High School is proud to be part of The Girls’ Day School Trust (GDST) which has 26 UK schools and academies. It is an innovative, high-achieving school that provides a wonderful environment for girls to excel academically, thrive emotionally and develop socially. Cranwell House, The Royal High Junior School, is a beautiful school with a dynamic, girl-focused curriculum and opportunities for outdoor learning focused on ecology and conservation. Girls develop a deeper understanding of everything they study, to help them to see the connections within and between disciplines, to grapple with complex ideas, to develop a flexible and creative mindset, and to enjoy their studies. A great education lays the foundation for life-long learning. 94 TheBATHMagazine

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The curriculum: Saint Gregory’s curriculum encourages students to develop their talents, deepen their knowledge and become motivated independent learners within a caring Christian pastoral setting. High expectations and excellent teaching and learning opportunities create an atmosphere that allows students to thrive. We encourage our students to think for themselves and to become creative problem solvers, ready to meet the challenges of an ever-changing world.

Number of pupils: 380 The curriculum: Sheldon School Sixth Form is the largest in Wiltshire, offering 30 A level subjects. Most students take 4 subjects in Year 12 and 3 in Year 13. Many subjects have more than one teaching group, making timetabling more flexible than in most Sixth Forms. The school enjoys an excellent learning environment including a purpose-built Sixth Form Centre.

Pastoral care: The Pastoral care programme is classed as outstanding, with the Head of Sixth Form supported by two Year Heads and a team of 20 tutors and other staff. Tutor groups are paired to encourage Year 13 students to support those new to A level study. Head of Sixth Form: Mr Michael Seeley Outstanding characteristics: Sheldon Sixth Form is justly proud of our consistently strong A level results and wide-ranging Sixth Form package, aimed at developing confident and happy young adults.

Extra-curricular activities: Numerous extracurricular opportunities are available at Saint Gregory’s for students to extend and deepen their learning by participating in a wealth of clubs, residential visits and activities. Students are encouraged to work together through sports clubs and teams whilst participation in the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme and Ten Tors provides additional opportunities and challenge. Our specialisms in Performing Arts and Science ensures a broad range of performance and STEM opportunities for all. As an international school we have wellestablished partnerships across Europe and Asia with students visiting France, Germany, Czech Republic, Spain, Poland, Hungary and Turkey through EU and British Council sponsored projects. We have a unique partnership with schools in China and Spain and our Mandarin Excellence Programme further enhances the rich language offer at Saint Gregory’s. Pastoral care: As an inclusive Catholic school Saint Gregory’s holds the child at the centre of everything we do. At Saint Gregory’s, the personal development and well-being of our students is paramount and our Christian values are central to our educational purpose, creating an aspirational, enriching and supportive environment for all our students. Name of headteacher: Ms Ann Cusack Outstanding characteristics: Saint Gregory’s is recognised in the Ofsted Outstanding Providers list as the only secondary school in B&NES to achieve the rating of Outstanding in three consecutive inspections, making it one of Ofsted’s highest achieving secondary schools locally and nationally. In all reports Inspectors arrived at exactly the same conclusion: Saint Gregory’s is an Outstanding school in every way. The school’s most recent inspection by Clifton Diocese also rated the school as an Outstanding Catholic school.


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ST MARGARET’S PREP SCHOOL

ST MARK’S SCHOOL, BATH

STONAR

Curzon Street, Calne, Wiltshire, SN11 0DF Tel: 01249 857220 Email: office@stmargaretsprep.org.uk www.stmargaretsprep.org.uk

Bay Tree Road, Larkhall, Bath, BA1 6ND Tel: 01225 312661 info@st-marks.org.uk www.st-marks.org.uk

Cottles Park, Atworth, Wiltshire SN12 8NT Tel: 01225 701740 www.stonarschool.com

Autumn term: 5 September - 13 December 2017 Winter term: 9 January - 22 March 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 11 July 2018 Age of pupils: 3 - 18 years

Autumn term: 4 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 2 January - 23 March 2018 Summer Term: 9 April - 24 July 2018 Age of pupils: 11 - 18 years Number of pupils: 220

Number of pupils: 200

Day fees: N/A

Day fees: Kindergarten – session/funding dependent. Pre-Prep: £3,275-£3,635. Prep: £3,900-£4,340 Religious denomination: None

Religious denomination: Church of England

The curriculum: This comprises an extensive range of activities designed to promote not only learning, but also personal growth and development. The curriculum is delivered, in the main, by class teachers, all of whom are experts in the relevant ages. This is then enhanced by specialist tuition in Sport, Music, Latin, Computing, Art and Modern Foreign Languages. Teaching throughout the school is tailored to meet the needs of the individual child and children are encouraged to reflect and evaluate their own learning and with support identify their next steps. Extra curricular activities: In addition to the traditional school clubs such as sport, music, gardening, cookery, dance and art, there is also the ‘hidden curriculum’. This is what the children learn from the way they are treated and how they are expected to behave. They learn to grow into positive, responsible adults who can work and co-operate with others, whilst at the same time developing their knowledge and skills in order to achieve their true potential. Pastoral care: Every effort is made to ensure that the children never feel lost or bewildered and that they quickly find their feet and are given a sense of belonging. Our commitment to providing a safe and nurturing environment for our pupils ensures that they are enabled to be the best that they can be. Communication between staff, children and parents is both flexible and open, leading to the best possible outcomes for growth and development. Name of headmistress: Mrs Karen Cordon Outstanding characteristics: A school with real spirit and energy, which lives each day to the full. We purposefully pack excitement and learning experiences into every moment. St Margaret’s is a place where friendships and special memories are created and where a love of learning is established.

The curriculum: St Mark’s is a school where children thrive and reach their full academic and personal potential through a combination of a personalised and dynamic curriculum, quality teaching, enriching opportunities and high expectations. St Mark’s also provides a place at The New Sixth, providing a high-quality sixth form education as a platform for future success in higher education and the workplace. Extra curricular activities: An inspiring careers programme, extra-curricular activities and outstanding enrichment opportunities allow students to build on their personal achievements and experiences. Partnerships with businesses and universities also widen the school’s offer, providing students with academic tutoring, trips to experience university life and activities to promote personal development. Overseas trips allow students to explore their learning in a global context. Pastoral care: The school recognises the importance of creating a seamless transition to secondary school and have a dedicated primary liaison plan in place to support this journey. The well-being and care of students is fundamentally important and central to all that St Mark’s does. Small class sizes mean that all students have the opportunity for unrivalled mentoring and individual support. Name of headteacher: Mr Barnaby Ash, BSc (Hons) NPQH Outstanding characteristics: St Mark’s vision is to inspire students for future success by developing confident, independent learners with a spirit of ambition and adventure. Their vision is underpinned by their Christian ethos and core school values: wisdom, ambition and integrity, which shape students’ development. St Mark’s was rated ‘Good’ both by Ofsted and SIAMS in 2015 with acknowledgement across key areas: leadership and management, behaviour and safety of students, quality of teaching and the achievement of students.

Autumn term: 6 September - 15 December 2017 Spring term: 9 January - 15 March 2018 Summer term: 23 April - 6 July 2018 Age of pupils: 2 - 18 Number of pupils: Junior school 113, Senior school 215 Day fees: Boarders: £6,650-£9,740 per term, Prep: £2,750-£3,700 per term, Senior school £4,950-£5,330 per term. Religious denomination: Non-denominational. The curriculum: The school offers a broad and imaginative curriculum with excellent teaching in small classes. We motivate pupils to think for themselves, explore new ideas and develop independence, imagination, resilience, high aspirations and a sense of responsibility for their own progress. In this way they acquire life-long learning skills and the ability to adapt to change. Stonar is regularly in the top 10% of schools at GCSE for value-added, meaning pupils achieve on average up to a grade higher than predicted in all subjects. Extra curricular activities: Through the huge range of extra curricular activities on offer, pupils discover their own interests and talents and learn to respect and celebrate those of others. An array of clubs at lunchtimes and after lessons enrich the experience at Stonar and academic work is enhanced by subject specific and optional trips. Riding has been a core feature at the school for several decades and the British Horse Society approved equestrian centre offers outstanding facilities including stabling, indoor and outdoor schools and a cross country schooling field. Pastoral care: Pupils, parents and teachers alike often describe Stonar as a family. Our nurturing ethos is integral to the school, backed up by an outstanding and robust pastoral structure which ensures the very best care for every child. As a small school, each pupil is known individually. Stretched and inspired by everything they experience at Stonar, and supported by our strong community, pupils develop into confident, out-going young adults. Name of principal: Dr Sally Divall MA PhD PGCE Outstanding characteristics: As part of the NACE education group, Stonar has 20 international partner schools which are united by the dedication to educational excellence and cocurricular depth. As a result, Stonar is developing a unique global facet to its pupils’ education. Exchange trips, language immersion weeks and cross cultural events bring schools in the group together and allow students to work alongside peers of other nationalities. Stonar is now fully co-educational and applications are welcomed from both boys and girls for all years in 2018.

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THE PARAGON SCHOOL

Lyncombe House, Lyncombe Vale, BA2 4LT. Tel: 01225 310837 Email: reception.paragon@priorparkschools.com www.priorparkschools.com Autumn term: 6 September - 14 December 2017 Half term: 23 October - 31 October 2017 Spring term: 8 January - 23 March 2018 Half term: 12 February - 16 February 2018 Summer term: 17 April - 10 July 2018 Half term: 28 May - 1 June 2018 Age of pupils: 3 - 11 years Number of pupils: 270 Day fees: per term, Juniors: Years 3, 4, 5 and 6, including lunches: £3,325 per term. Infants: Years 1 & 2, including lunches: £3,170 per term. Reception: Full Time, including lunches: £2,990 per term. Squirrels Nursery: Full Time, including lunches: £2,850 per term. Part Time: Per Day: £570 per term. Per morning without lunch (until 12 o'clock): £310 per term. Per morning including lunch (until 1 o’clock): £420 per term. Per afternoon: £255 per term Religious denomination: Christian The curriculum: Broad, balanced curriculum with cross-curricular links and some topic based work. Emphasis on core subjects and attaining high academic standards, with an engaging humanities curriculum and cross-curricular ICT. Sport, art, music and outdoor learning are also extremely strong. Extra curricular activities: A fantastic range of extra-curricular activities from chess and pottery to conservation and groovy movers. Staff and external specialist teachers and coaches run over 65 lunchtime and after school clubs. The majority of the clubs focus on enjoyment and exploring new interests. Some of the clubs are by invitation only to provide the children with the opportunity to develop their skill level. There is also a rich mix of school trips and activity days, including a week in France for Year 6 children, visits to local historical sites, a residential adventure centre, and many themed days that make full use of the school’s grounds. Pastoral care: Every child at The Paragon should feel secure and affirmed, valued for who they are regardless of their ability. Children feel comfortable about approaching a teacher to talk about something that’s bothering them. Strong relationships with parents help identify problems at an early stage. Each class has a prefect, chosen from the eldest year group, to support and advise them. A school council, with democratically elected representatives from Year 2 up, meets monthly with the headmaster. Name of principal: Mr Andrew Harvey Outstanding characteristics: The Paragon feels so special: its friendly family atmosphere and belief that happy children learn best is at the heart of what they do (with the results to prove it). 98 TheBATHMagazine

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BEST FOOT FORWARD: the launch of the Bathscape Walking Festival at the Thermae Bath Spa

STEPPING OUT

Bath is to get its first dedicated walking festival with a series of guided walks – and best of all it’s free to take part

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NEVER MISS OUT

ollowing the revelation (in a nationwide survey carried out for Jordans cereals) that one in three Brits couldn’t identify an oak tree and 13% confessed to not having taken a stroll in the countryside in the past two years, Bath is to get its first free walking festival to get us all outside and stepping out in the fresh air. Heritage Lottery funding has been put into a new joint project, called Bathscape Landcape Partnership to run a programme of themed walks from Saturday 16 to Sunday 24 September. Bathscape Walking Festival comprises 27 free guided walks, ranging from a safari of the wildlife of Smallcombe Cemetery to exploring language and the landscape in a creative writing workshop held out in the fields. There are also 14 walks in the Somer Walking Festival to choose from. This is a chance to explore the beautiful countryside that surrounds Bath, to get some exercise and gain some of the serenity and calm to be found in a natural habitat, surrounded by grass and trees. Groups involved with setting up and guiding the walks include Avon Wildlife Trust, the National Trust and the Cotswold volunteer wardens. As well as walks, such as the five mile circular walk around the Lansdown skyline and a tour of the Limpley Stoke Valley and Combe Down, there’s plenty of opportunity to learn something new about our natural world. An evening walk at Batheaston will be led by guides carrying bat detectors, giving the assembled group the chance to find out about different species of bats living in the area. On another walk, led by Ken Tatem, formerly of the Environment Agency, there’s an expert’s account of how the flood defences were set up to protect Midsomer Norton. The festival website – bathscapewalkingfestival.co.uk – has details of all the walks. If you’re not sure how many miles you can manage, you could sign up for the short guided tour around Bath City Farm on the hillside above Twerton, which has the twin distractions of lots of animals to see and far reaching views over the city, while the more ambitious may enjoy the challenge of the 20-mile Julian House Circuit of Bath walk to raise money for the charity which works with homeless and vulnerable men and women. The walks are handily marked in categories so the viewer can choose from themes such as those suitable for children, or where dogs are welcome. There are also literary and historic themed walks. Organisers are asking people to book their places in advance so the numbers are managable. The programme also states whether a packed lunch or refreshment is advisable – although it’s always a good idea to carry fresh water. Booking for any of the Bathscape Walking Festival can be done through the website or by phone, tel: 01225 477265. n 100 TheBATHMagazine

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HEALTH | & | BEAUTY

R E V I EW

REVIVE,

rejuvenate

& REVITALISE Jessica Hope tries the pioneering CACI Synergy facial and body treatment at Frontlinestyle Bath

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espite the questionable weather we’ve been experiencing lately, it is in fact summer. And summer means one thing in this country – it’s wedding season. It’s a week until my sister’s wedding and I will be walking down the aisle with her as her only bridesmaid on the big day, channelling the elegance of Pippa Middleton (I hope!). As lovely as it is to be involved in the ceremony, as anyone involved in a wedding tends to feel, it is a bit daunting having all those eyes and cameras on you. Being prone to break outs and blemishes, I visited Frontlinestyle Hair and Beauty Salon on Monmouth Street to get my skin ready ahead of the wedding. I tried the awardwinning CACI Synergy facial treatment which exfoliates, targets lines and wrinkles, and cleanses the skin of impurities and blemishes.

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My lovely therapist Fran explains how the salon is using brand new CACI technology, which currently isn’t available in any other salon in Bath, where the therapists use a microcurrent and LED light to help tone and soften the skin. This technology can be used on all skin types and can help different conditions, from acne to wrinkles, scar tissue to eczema. I begin my facial with a peel – don’t be put off this, it isn’t one of those scary, acid, skin eroding peels you might have heard horror stories about. Fran applies a gorgeous strawberry-smelling cream before gently gliding the ultrasonic peeling tool along my face, which softens my face and takes off the dead skin and impurities. She then uses red and blue light, which has anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, during a deep exfoliation which stimulates tissue repair, encourages collagen and calms my skin. Fran then applies a numbing cream to my forehead and above my lips and uses a wrinkle comb to smooth out my lines and plump my lips – I can see the difference on my forehead almost instantly. Light probes are then applied to the blemishes on my forehead and chin, which help to heal my problem areas. To calm my skin after this deep cleanse, Fran adds a cooling mask and gently massages my face using probes with blue light. After applying a Claudie SPF 50, my skin is left soft and

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smooth, while my blemishes have certainly gone down and my pores are cleansed. My skin looks more relaxed and fresh than it has in a long while. Fran then moves on to my next treatment – a CACI Synergy cellulite massager for the thighs and bottom. Well, how else am I going to get prepared for my Pippa moment in the spotlight? If you’d like to fight cellulite, tone your legs and bum and get ready for your beach holiday, then a course of this treatment is recommended. Using a microcurrent from the CACI machine, the treatment helps break down fatty deposits, and encourages circulation and drainage in my lymphatic system, as well as tightening and sculpting this area. This is an intense and deep treatment (it isn’t a relaxing massage), but certainly isn’t uncomfortable. Plus, as it is around 30 minutes long, it’s perfect to fit in during your lunch break. A Clarins anti-cellulite cream is then applied to my legs and bottom, which helps to lift and tighten my skin. Off I go, prepped and ready for the wedding. Just wondering whether Prince Harry got his invite . . . The CACI Synergy purifying facial is £60 and the CACI Electro cellulite massager is £35, a course of 10 is recommended. Frontlinestyle, 4 – 5 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2AJ. To book, tel: 01225 478478 or visit: frontlinestyle.co.uk. n


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Hydra Peel Infusion

Hydra Peel Infusion is a treatment that combines exfoliation, hydration, chemical peeling and non-needle mesotherapy to infuse different vitamins into the skin. Treatments have no down time and are suitable for all skin types. It can be used to target fine lines, wrinkles, dry skin, scarring, rosacea, sun damage and pigmentation as well as problematic skins.

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B Hairdressing Love Animals? So do we! All of the Paul Mitchell hair products we sell and all the PM hair colourants are cruelty-free, even down to our cleaning products. ‘B’ is also a vegan salon. B Hairdressing is situated in the Artisan quarter of Bath that is Widcombe, only a stone’s throw from Bath Spa train station. We think outside the lines in every way. We are a gender-neutral salon we base our prices on your hair length. We pride ourselves on being one of the most fashion forward and creative salons. We personalise every service to you. Anything goes!

B Hairdressing 11 Claverton Buildings, Bath, BA2 4LD Tel: 01225 311332 Web: bhairdressing.co.uk

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FOLLOWING THE FOSSE Andrew Swift takes us on a journey to which begins with a car ride then continues on foot, following a route laid out in Roman times

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ur September walk takes us some 20 miles north of Bath to explore where Wiltshire meets Gloucestershire. The first part of the walk follows the course of the Roman Fosse Way, taking in a lost Roman town and making a short diversion to visit the site of an old mill on the Sherston branch of the River Avon. After passing the village of Shipton Moyne, and its curiously monikered inn, the Cat & Custard Pot, we follow country lanes back through Easton Grey to the starting point. Although around half the walk is on roads, these are almost entirely quiet lanes with ample verges. More field walking was planned, but the plans were frustrated by difficulties of access and truculent cows, which some walkers, especially with dogs, could have found threatening. So the lanes seemed a sounder alternative. Another potential problem is the use of part of the Fosse by off-road vehicles, although, having walked it three times in the past year, I have yet to see anything more than tyre tracks. We drive along the Fosse – as far as possible – to get to the starting point. A word of warning, though – there are a couple of narrow, winding, highbanked stretches, where you hope you do not meet anything coming the other way. From Bath, drive east along London Road, carry on through Batheaston, and, at the mini roundabout by the 104 TheBATHMagazine

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White Lion, take the second exit on the left up Bannerdown Road. After winding uphill for a mile and a half, the road joins the course of the Fosse to head straight across the Cotswold plateau. The Three Shires Stone, which you pass on the left, marks the point where you leave Somerset. For the next two miles the Fosse straddles the border between Gloucestershire and Wiltshire. When the main road bears right, carry on along a minor road (signposted The Shoe). The Fosse continues straight on for a mile and a quarter before dropping down to the valley of the Doncombe Brook. Having now crossed into Wiltshire, it climbs to regain the plateau. Such steep, winding sections – at odds with many people’s idea of Roman roads – are, as you will discover, a characteristic of the Fosse. At the main road, carry straight on. The building on the left across the road was a pub called The Shoe, which gave its name to this cluster of houses. After another two miles, the road drops down again – to the Broadmead Brook – although to call it a road at this point is stretching a point somewhat. This is the trickiest section of the Fosse – narrow, high-banked and rocky. At the next crossroads, by the Salutation Inn, carry straight on. After going under the M4, the road swings right, leaving the Fosse Way to continue on as a gravel track. As you enter Grittleton, turn left to follow a lane which, after less than a mile,

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swings right to rejoin the Fosse. Carry on past Elm and Ash crossroads and over the main line to South Wales, before being brought up short at a T junction, with the Fosse, once more downgraded to a track, disappearing ahead. Turn right, and, when you come to the village of Norton, turn left (signposted Foxley, Malmesbury). Shortly afterwards, turn left again (signposted Easton Grey, Westonbirt) and after three-quarters of a mile, when the lane curves right to rejoin the Fosse, bear left onto a gravel track and park (ST879855). From here, you will be continuing along the Fosse on foot. After following the road north for 300m, when it starts to curve left, branch off to the right to carry on along a muddy track. This section of the Fosse is lined by high hedges, rich with blackberries and elderberries. After 350m when you come to a lane, cross and carry on. After 900m, go through a handgate and continue downhill. At the bottom, just before a bridge, turn left through a handgate for a short diversion (ST889870). Head up a holloway and go through a KG at the top. Carry on through a field, go through a KG at the end, passing the overgrown ruin of a building on the left, and continue through a seven-bar gate. A little further on you come to the site of Easton Grey Mill, a glorious spot, with the ruins of the mill on your right and impressive sluice gates, made in Malmesbury, on your left.

HIDDEN BEAUTY: main image, the River Avon at Easton Grey and opposite, enjoying big skies over the Fosse Way


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THE | WALK

back from Gloucestershire into Wiltshire. At the main road, cross, turn left and then right a few metres further on, passing Easton Grey church and the gates of Easton Grey House, guarded by a lodge with an oversize chimney. The village itself, 250m further on, with rows of old stone cottages beside the Avon, is as alluring as many more celebrated Cotswold villages, yet has none of the trappings of a tourist honeypot. After crossing the bridge, climb the hill to where Ruckley Barn lies overgrown on the left, before carrying on along the road for 1000m to your car. n Andrew Swift is the author of On Foot in Bath: Fifteen Walks Around a World Heritage City and co-author, with Kirsten Elliot, of Ghost Signs of Bath.

Retrace your steps, cross the bridge over the Avon and follow the Fosse as it curves through the site of the Roman town of Easton Grey, no trace of which survives above ground. At the top of the rise, go through a gate and, after 500m, carry on across a road. Soon after this, the county boundary swings in from the left to once again follow the Fosse northward. After 800m, just past the buildings of Upper Fosse Farm, turn left along a broad track known as Cranmore Lane (ST897883). After 300m, when it forks, bear right, and

900m further on you enter the village of Shipton Moyne. Bear left at the road and almost immediately bear left along a lane – unless you want to call into the Cat and Custard Pot Inn, which is a little further along. Carry on along the lane, passing a turning on the left, and after 700m you will glimpse 17th century Pond Farm on the right – reflected in the still waters of its pond (ST885894). At a T junction turn left for Easton Grey, and after 800m, when the lane curves right past Normeads Covert, you cross

FACT FILE ■ Length of walk: 6 miles ■ Approximate time: 2½ – 3 hours ■ Map: OS Explorer 168 ■ Refreshment stops: Cat and Custard Pot Inn, Shipton Moyne, open 11am – 3pm and 6 – 11pm Monday to Friday, all day Saturday and Sunday. Dogs welcome. Tel: 01666 880249, visit: catandcustard.co.uk

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PLAYFUL: Athena Art 2017 spring collection

STAYING ON TREND Bath based interior designer Clair Strong summarises the design and colour trends to look out for in 2018 according to Pantone

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s we were just getting used to Greenery being 2017’s colour of the year, Pantone has announced its colour predictions for 2018. At the International Home and Housewares Show earlier this year, Pantone Colour Institute executive director Leatrice Eiseman revealed the design and colour trends we could be seeing next year. In an interesting departure from the soft pastels we’ve come to know and love over the past few years, Eiseman forecasted a continuing shift over to brighter, more intense hues. Eiseman said of the move to brighter tones: “Intense colours seem to be a natural application of our intense lifestyles and thought processes these days.” It will come as no surprise then that an array of vivid colours play an important role in the eight colour groups Pantone announced at the show. The colour groups are: Playful, Discretion, Verdure, FarFetched, Resourceful, TECH-nique, Intricacy and Intensity. Read on to find out more about them. PLAYFUL Vibrant, schoolroom colours like Despicable Me’s Minion yellow, lime green and cobalt blue combine to create this fun, stop-andstare colour scheme. This colour scheme is excellent for a child’s room or nursery where

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such playful hues are sure to charm, but its talents don’t end there. Add in bright pink and a few balancing, softer hues and you’ve got a really on-trend tropical colour scheme, perfect for outdoor spaces.

DISCRETION: MiaFleur blush textile wall hanging

DISCRETION This colour group gives a nod to recent pastel trends, proving that they will never entirely go out of fashion. It is very much the antithesis of Playful, with a subtle selection of delicate, desaturated hues. Blush pink – the popular neutral of the moment – features alongside romantic tones of lilac, pale yellow, sage green and rose. It’s an elegant, Marie Antoinette inspired scheme, ideal for the sanctuary of the bedroom or bathroom. VERDURE Verdure has been widely described as a nature-inspired palette symbolic of health. It certainly lives up to its name with plenty of lush vegetable hues. No less than three verdant shades of green work in pleasant contrast with a slightly smaller selection of purples, yellows and a singular eggshell blue. The end result is an uplifting, jewel-like scheme perfect for any room that requires a pump of positivity. FAR-FETCHED Far-fetched is a warm and earthy colour group that “reaches out and embraces many

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Arthouse Amazonia white cushion


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CITY | INTERIORS

FAR-FETCHED: Bright silk cushions by Lauraloves

RESOURCEFUL: Small pendant lights by Pooky

VERDURE: Tropical green themes at H&M Home

different cultures,” says Pantone’s Leatrice Eiseman. With colours like ruby wine, cornsilk yellow and burnt orange it is a deeply enticing and comforting palette. Texture and pattern seem almost as important to this scheme as colour, with fabrics like velvet and linen and intricate geometric prints enhancing the global sentiment. RESOURCEFUL This palette consists almost entirely of varying shades of orange and blue – complementary hues on the colour wheel. The juxtaposition of warm and cool tones really draws the eye in, so this is very much a ‘statement’ colour scheme. It can look whimsical and playful or cool and retro, depending on the shades chosen. I’m a big advocate for using unexpected colour combinations in unexpected places, such as the kitchen or utility room. TECH-NIQUE In a world where homes are becoming smarter than phones, it seems almost inevitable that Pantone would create a techinspired colour palette. This group is made up of bright, loud hues that according to Eiseman “seem to shine from within”. Hot pink, electric blue and vivid turquoise feature heavily and are prevented from becoming too overbearing with grounding shades of pure white and almond beige. It’s a fun, fresh and

modern colour scheme, but it’s not for the fainthearted. INTRICACY At the International Home and Housewares Show, Eiseman declared metallics the “new neutrals”. This palette supports that theory with a wide selection of metallic hues accented by black, berry red and an almost sulphuric yellow. It’s a luxurious colour scheme – not flamboyantly bright like some of the others, but not exactly shy and retiring either. It’s the perfect choice if you want to infuse a little dark glamour into your home.

TECH-NIQUE: Colors Love Rugs in orange, Rugseller

INTENSITY I love this palette – it’s a really well chosen eclectic mix of colours designed to evoke feelings of strength and power. Cool shades of plum, blue and teal react with fiery shades of orange and yellow which is then all anchored with dramatic black and gold accents. It can be light and charming or dark and moody but there’s this overall sense of sophistication. It’s possibly the most versatile colour group of the bunch. n Clair Strong Interior Design is a small, friendly, creative business based in Bath and London, providing services for residential and commercial clients. Visit: clairstrong.co.uk or contact: clair@clairstrong.co.uk.

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SUNNINGHILL INTERIORS BEAUTIFUL & EXCEPTIONAL INTERIOR & EXTERIOR DESIGN Call or email for a free initial consultation Tel: 01784 435175 Mobile: 07534 447676 info@sunninghillinteriors.co.uk www.sunninghillinteriors.co.uk

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WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE Make your garden a haven for wildlife this autumn, says Jane Moore

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tiny spot tucked away by the garage that isn’t big enough to do anything with. Take a handful of logs and a fern perhaps and suddenly that odd spot has purpose and charm. As a wildlife lover, a few logs placed in a pile will swiftly become home to all sorts of creatures – perhaps a stags horn beetle or even a hedgehog if you’re lucky. Use deciduous tree logs rather than conifer if you can afford to be choosy but any log pile is better than none, so don’t be too particular. Pile your logs in a sheltered, dry corner of the garden and make a pyramid shape to create a tempting little hidey-hole which is just the sort of place hedgehogs love to hibernate. Hedgehogs are useful to have about the place as their natural diet consists of slugs, beetles and worms. If you would like to encourage them to stick around put out a shallow dish of water for them. You can also supplement their diet with meat-based dog or cat food, unsalted chopped peanuts or sunflower heads. Hedgehogs are lactose intolerant, so don’t give them milk.

ou’re all going to love me this month as I am giving you carte blanche to do very little in your garden for the next few weeks. Sit back, put the secateurs down and step away from the strimmer for a short while. It’s a bona fide licence to be lazy. Yes, really, and it’s all in the name of wildlife. The top priority is to take it easy this autumn because making your garden a hotel for overwintering bugs and beasties mostly involves doing very little. It’s targeted sloth, however, carefully planned to maximise the habitats in your garden and to set the scene for the birds and butterflies that will hopefully flock in and take up residence come the spring. LEAVE YOUR LEAVES As always it’s vital to start with the little things. So stop tidying up quite so much. Instead of raking up every leaf religiously, leave odd piles of leaves in the corners or simply sweep them off the path or lawn under the shrubs where all sorts of beetles, worms and whatnot will have field day hiding amongst them.

WATCH THE GRASS GROW Resist the urge to mow and strim right to the very edges – instead let the grass grow a little longer by the hedge and off to the boundaries of your garden. By all means mow a bowling

LOG PILE As a gardener, the great thing about a log pile is that you can use it to fill in an odd space, that awkward corner where nothing much will grow or that

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green by the house but let the lawn get a bit wild and woolly elsewhere. Remember the films The Fantastic Journey or Antz? There’s a whole world going on in that long grass. Ideally you should stop weedkilling the lawn too. That would allow all the clover and buttercups and so on to establish and their flowers will attract various bees, butterflies, moths and later on birds to scavenge their seeds. I know that is quite a commitment but it’s worth thinking about it for next season. You could always do what I’ve done at The Bath Priory which is both. We have one area we keep weed-free and mown like a carpet and another area which is mown in parts but remains untreated and full of wildflowers. There’s no need to tell you which one is a-buzz with bees. ABANDON YOUR BORDERS Neglect is the name of the game when it comes your beds. Leave all those flower heads on shrubs and perennials if you can possibly bear it. Some will look fantastically architectural such as the eryngiums, cardoons and grasses, other less so but all those stems make great places for overwintering insects as well as warm hibernating material and later on nesting material for birds. Lots of those seeds from the cardoon heads and even buddleia are brilliant foodstuffs for small birds as

ENCOURAGE WILDLIFE: main picture, hedgehogs like to forage about in piles of leaves in search of slugs and beetles Opposite page, leave dried sunflower heads out for birds and hedgehogs to feed on Far right, make your own bug hotel for the garden – a welcome refuge for bees, ladybirds and lacewings


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CITY | GARDENING

the picking becomes leaner in the autumn months. But it’s not just food those herbaceous plants provide, it’s also vital cover too. Little birds such as wrens will zip about between the herbaceous stems pecking up insects galore safe from any predators in the dense thicket. HOMES FOR BUGS Get a bit creative and build your own bug box or bug hotel. This can be as simple as bundles of cut canes or hollow stems such as cow parsley, tied together and placed strategically around the garden in the crooks

of trees, nestled in climbers and trellis or on walls. If you want to be more ornamental, drill holes 2mm to 10mm in size in an attractive, bark covered log and hang or place in the garden to make a house for overwintering bees. Many of these are the early season pollinators such as flower bees which are the main pollinators of fruit trees so you’re also helping to ensure a good crop. You can get completely carried away, as I did one very wet day, and create an elaborate hotel for ladybirds, lacewings and so on. I used an old wine box and filled it with cut canes, pine cones, rolls of cardboard and

added a few allium flowers. You can use wood chips, bits of twig and pieces of bark – whatever comes to hand that you like the look of and that will provide a little nest for ladybirds and lacewings. These are two of the best predators in the garden, wolfing their way through hundreds of aphids and such-like during the summer so it’s well worth looking after them in the winter. Beside which, it’s a fun project for a dreary day with the kids or grandchildren too. n Jane Moore is the award-winning gardening columnist and head gardener at The Bath Priory Hotel. Twitter: @janethegardener.

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Pietra wood and stone fp Sept.qxp_Layout 22 22/08/2017 16:09 Page 1

The Old Filling Station 400 Ham Green, Holt BA14 6PX t 01225 783527 / 782408 e info@pwasltd.com

NEW HOLT SHOWROOM NOW OPEN

NOW OPEN

UNTIL 8PM EVERY THURSDAY

Opening Hours: Mon – Fri 9am – 5.30pm (until 8pm on Thursdays) Sat 9am – 5pm

www.pwasltd.com

Fulham Showroom 196 – 198 Wandsworth Bridge Rd, London SW6 2UE

Tel 0207 610 6111


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the directory

to advertise in this section call 01225 424 499

Electricians

House & Home

Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

ONEMagazinEONECiTYONEMOnTh • T 01225 424 499

KEIKO KISHIMOTO

A locally based sash window specialist trading for over 15 years

Holistic Treatments for Wellbeing

Aromatherapy • Reflexology/Facial reflexology Japanese Cosmo Facelift • Deep Tissue Massage For more information, please visit:

Bath Sash Windows

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• Draught Proofing • • Repair and Refurbishment • • Window Replacement • • Double Glazed Wooden Windows •

Trowbridge & Neal’s Yard Bath

07796 395158 - bathsashwindows.com

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PROPERTY | HOMEPAGE

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ituated just under a mile from Bath Spa Station and set in mature gardens of almost an acre this fine detached house is sure to appeal to a variety of potential purchasers. The house has been extended and now offers well presented and versatile family accommodation. On the ground floor there is a good sized sitting room which leads into the dining room and a lovely sunny conservatory from which to enjoy the gardens. The well fitted kitchen boasts an AGA and there is plenty of additional space in the large family room. Upstairs there are a total of five bedrooms two of which have en suite shower rooms and there is also a guest bathroom. Outside, the double width plot of gardens are mostly south facing and are a particularly lovely feature of the property, providing a peaceful and private setting. There is a double garage and ample driveway parking for several vehicles. Cotswold is a beautiful home within easy striking distance of the centre of Bath, good local schools and rail and motorway connections. Full details are available from agents Pritchards.

Pritchards, 11 Quiet Street, Bath. Tel: 01225 466225

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COTSWOLD PERRYMEAD, BATH • Five bedroom family home • Tranquil wooded location less than a mile from Bath Spa Station • Approaching one acre of beautiful gardens • Conservatory • Spacious accommodation

Guide price: £1,250,000


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Freshford A substantial detached 6 bed family home in a superb location with far reaching views and good sized level walled gardens within this sought after village. Versatile accommodation with the potential to extend subject to the necessary consents. Kitchen/breakfast room, dining room, living room, utility, cloakroom, games room. 2 en suite shower/bath rooms and further bathroom. Double garage and ample off road parking. Internal area: 2508 sq ft/233 sq m.

Price: ÂŁ1,100,000

Marlborough Buildings A beautifully presented 2 bed ground floor apartment with a wealth of period charm and features. Views over mature gardens and allotments to Royal Victoria Park and the Approach Golf Course (as illustrated). Sought after location with a level walk to the city centre. Int area approx 793 sq ft/73.7 sq m..

Price: ÂŁ495,000 11 Quiet Street, Bath BA1 2LB

Tel: 01225 466 225

Follow us on


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Is your apartment rental-ready? Peter Greatorex, managing director of The apartment Company

I

’ve spoken a lot recently about the financial rewards associated with being a landlord …. According to a new report by ARLA (May 2017), rents have risen to the highest level since July 2016. RICS Residential Market Survey (May 2017) also noted rental values have increased across the country. For Bath landlords, the figures are just as encouraging. Rightmove’s latest Rental Price Tracker (Q1) notes Bath as being the second highest rental growth area outside Greater London. Our first ever landlord seminar in March was a full house. We are seeing increased demand year on year for all sorts of reasons. Being where we are, our apartments are popular with the likes of downsizers, second home owners, local young professionals and buy-to-let investors. However, it’s important that landlords are aware that the tastes and requirements of tenants have changed a lot over the last few years, now expecting a high standard of living. Therefore, to attract good quality tenants and maximise your rental potential, an apartment needs to be rental-ready.

Here are my Top 10 Tips… Think about location, location, location! We’re practically asked at every viewing; ‘How fast is the internet?’ followed by; ‘Is Sky available here?’ Take that into account, ensuring good mobile phone reception too. Make sure the building has a good security set up, as well as the apartment itself.

Crafting beautiful homes in stunning locations Bath | Somerset | Wiltshire | Cotswold | Dorset

Tenant’s require a potential new home to be clean, well-maintained and ready to move in. Nobody likes to see dust, mould, damp, peeling wallpaper and so on. Decorate where necessary and ensure a professional clean in between tenancies. Modern fixtures and fittings are essential. Pay particular attention to the bathroom and the kitchen – no avocado suites please! Tenants want to be warm, especially in the older buildings which Bath is notorious for. Ensure a good central heating system is in place, as well as double glazing (if you can) and suitable insulation. Unless student accommodation, offer an unfurnished home - most people have furniture. Allow pets (if the freeholder accepts them). See our Blog for the advantages of letting pet-friendly homes. Make sure there is parking, and include a permit in the rent. Parking is invaluable to most people today.

01225 791155 ashford-homes.co.uk

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Choose a good letting agent to manage the property. Tenants like to feel they are in safe hands should any problems arise. If you prefer to manage yourself, make sure you maintain good communication with them. The Apartment Company Pg@theapartmentcompany.co.uk or call 01225 471144.


Somerset Place, Lansdown A rare opportunity to rent a superbly refurbished five storey townhouse on one of Bath`s most exclusive and sought-after crescents, boasting magnificent period features, contemporary comforts and breath-taking southerly views over Bath. Situated in an elevated position on the northern slopes of Lansdown, the property allows excellent access to the city centre, the M4 Motorway and a number of highly regarded schools.

Rent: ÂŁ3,600 pcm* striking entrance hall | dining room | high ceilings | elegant oak flooring | beautiful kitchen | stunning first floor living room | drawing room | 4 good sized double bedrooms (1 en-suite) | 2 contemporary shower rooms | cinema room | courtyard garden Reside Bath | 24 Barton Street Bath BA1 1HG | T 01225 445 777 | E info@residebath.co.uk | W www.residebath.co.uk

*An administration fee of ÂŁ420.00 inc. VAT applies.

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SELLING YOUR PROPERTY? Choose an estate agency that will promote your best interests If you are currently thinking of selling your property, then consider using one of The Bath Magazine’s featured estate agencies to give you the best possible promotional coverage. Our estate agents advertise with us as part of a bigger selection of print and online marketing which means your property is presented to the highest standard and will reach the greatest audience.

Bath’s Biggest Magazine

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Wentworth September.qxp_Layout 2 21/08/2017 15:29 Page 1

SOLD

Bath City Centre

SOLD

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£450,000 Heywood, Nr Bath

SOLD SOLD

STC

£795,000 Bathampton, Bath

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SELLING in Bath or the surrounding villages?

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LOCAL INDEPENDENT ESTATE AGENTS. Cold Ashton, Nr Bath £360,000

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25 Monmouth St, Bath BA1 2AP

SOLD

£495,000

STC

£450,000 Weston, Bath

£525,000

T: 01225 904 904 for a free valuation www.wentworthea.com


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Central Andrewsonline.co.uk

Chatham Row, BA1 £920,000

01225 809 571

Chatham Row is an elegant terrace of Georgian townhouses located in the sought after artisan quarter of Bath with views towards the River Avon and is a pleasant level walk to the city centre. Whole townhouse on no through road. Offers four floors with vaults and private parking with garage. Flexible accommodation currently arranged as four bedrooms. Small courtyard to front and rear. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A

central@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Bear Flat Andrewsonline.co.uk

Egerton Road, Bath, BA2 £675,000

Featuring off street parking and a wonderful garden is this extended and modernised family home. Four reception rooms, four bedrooms, bathroom and en-suite, utility, WC. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 01225 805 680 bearflat@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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Camden Andrewsonline.co.uk

Highbury Terrace, A beautifully presented, end-terrace Georgian house with three double bedrooms, off-street parking and a stunning home office/studio. The current vendors have made numerous improvements to the property to create BA1 a stylish home, which combines period features and a contemporary finish. Energy Efficiency Rating: N/A £650,000

01225 809 868 camden@andrewsonline.co.uk

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk

Newbridge Andrewsonline.co.uk

Palladian, Victoria Bridge Road, Bath, BA2 £365,000

Palladian, set within the Bath Riverside development, only 0.5 miles of the main attractions of Bath city centre. This executive two bedroom apartment offers city life with the sought after benefits of secure underground parking, lift and private communal gardens. The accommodation offers open plan living with a modern fitted kitchen, space for dining and a living area for relaxing, whilst looking at the skyline views from one of the three wonderful Juliette balconies. modern white bathroom suite. Energy Efficiency Rating: B

Bear Flat sales 01225 805680 01225 809 685 newbridge@andrewsonline.co.uk Newbridge sales 01225 809685

To view more properties and other services available visit Andrewsonline.co.uk


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CLIFTON VILLAS, Bath

ÂŁ1,300,000

A substantial Victorian home located on The Avenue in Combe Down overlooking The Firs Field. Offering 3466sq.ft, this sympathetically extended family home with accommodation over four floors, comprises six bedrooms, a 40ft+ kitchen/dining/family room, three reception rooms, utility room, downstairs cloakroom, off street parking, garage and garden. EPC Rating: E


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THE OLD RECTORY, Yatton Keynell

ÂŁ1,100,000

Located on the high street of Yatton Keynell, and offered for sale chain free, this five bedroom Grade II period property is set within fantastic grounds. In need of refurbishment. Accommodation comprises three reception rooms and garden room, five bedrooms, and ample off road parking. EPC Exempt


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The Bath Magazine September 2017  

The Bath Magazine is Bath’s biggest monthly guide to life and living in the city of Bath.

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