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THE

ISSUE 119

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MAY 2014

BRISTOL THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CITY OF BRISTOL

MAGAZINE

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

T H E A R T S A N D C U LT U R E I S S U E F E S T I VA L C I T Y • A RT F O R A L L • T U R N E R O N B R I S T O L THE SOUND OF MUSIC • LOST CINEMAS • FOOD CONNECTIONS A L S O : T H E T R A C K S O F W I L L G R E G O R Y.

AND: GARETH WOOD, THE MAN WHO MAPPED BRISTOL.

P L U S M U C H M O R E I N T H E C I T Y ’ S F I N E S T M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L I F E A N D L I V I N G I N B R I S T O L


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THE | CONTENTS

MAY

2014

22

62

44 12

ZEITGEIST

44

Five things to do this month

14

THE CITYIST BARTLEBY

50

18

PEOPLE & PARTIES MAP OF BRISTOL Hand-drawn by illustrator Gareth Wood

24

FACE THE MUSIC Goldfrapp’s Will Gregory’s top ten tunes

28

FESTIVAL CITY Important dates for your social diary

30

LOST CINEMAS Looking back at Bristol’s picture houses

32

MAYFEST WHAT’S ON Theatre, music, comedy, shows and more

40

20TH ANNIVERSARY Celebrating with the Bristol Ensemble

42

BRISTOL PROMS A classical music festival like no other

4 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

WHAT’S IN A NAME

56

BRISTOL AT WORK Managing director of The French Garden

74 FIT AND FAB Health and beauty news

76 BEAUTY PRODUCTS

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Harvey Nichols shows us how to get a golden glow this season

84 OUT AND ABOUT Following the old salt road

58

WINING AND DINING Food and drink news

60

FOOD CONNECTIONS Looking at Bristol’s food culture

62

BRISTOL UPDATES Make Sundays Special, outdoor concerts, business news and more

64 BRISTOL CAR CLUBS Going green in the city

The citywide theatrical extravaganza

34

TURNER ON BRISTOL

Events and activities for all ages

The history of Hotwells

Snapshots from the city’s social scene

22

72 FAMILY FUN

Touring watercolours of the south west

54

Sounding out

ARTS & EXHIBITIONS What’s happening on the city’s art scene

My Bristol, the buzz & book of the month

16

86

66

66 WEEKEND BREAK Checking out the scenic views and exciting harbourside goings-on in Falmouth

68 CITY LEARNING News from Bristol’s education institutions

70 FREELANCE MUM The benefits of Daisy Birthing

86 BEE HAPPY How to keep a buzz going in your garden

88 GARDENING How to create a herb garden

92

PROPERTY The best homes in and around Bristol

THE

BRISTOL twitter@thebristolmag

ON THE COVER Dance of the Magnetic Ballerina, the UK premiere of Czech artist Andrea Miltnerova’s striking dance solo, showing at Mayfest on 17 May at Bristol Old Vic thebristolmagazine.co.uk

MAGAZINE


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.co.

Clion

A spectacular Grade II listed townhouse (5,567 sq ) within Clion Village enjoying distant south facing views across the City. 5 recep!on rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 6 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms (4 ensuite), 2nd kitchen, cellars. 2 garages, front and rear courtyards, garden with direct access to Princess Victoria Street.

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knigh rank.com 0117 3171999

Guide price: ÂŁ1,950,000

Clion

A beau!ful Grade II listed family home at the heart of Clion. Beau!ful drawing room with access to full width balcony, dining room, kitchen/breakfast room. 5 bedrooms, family bathroom, 2 shower rooms, basement kitchen, courtyard gardens. Guide price: ÂŁ930,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knigh rank.com 0117 3171999


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Chew Valley

A beau!ful Grade II listed Georgian house and 3 bedroom co"age (totalling 7,500 sq ), 4 recep!on rooms, 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms/shower rooms (2 ensuite), immaculate gardens, outbuildings and pasture. In all about 9 acres.

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knigh rank.com 0117 3171999

Guide price: ÂŁ2,250,000

Cotham

A beau!ful bay fronted early Victorian family home (2,446 sq ) with gardens and parking. 2 recep!on rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, u!lity, butler's pantry. 5 bedrooms, bathroom, shower room. Cellar, gardens, single garage. EPC ra!ng TBC. Guide price: ÂŁ695,000

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knigh rank.com 0117 3171999


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Harbourside

A contemporary apartment with views over the floa$ng harbour. Si%ng /dining room, kitchen/breakfast room, 2 balconies. Master bedroom with ensuite shower room, guest bedroom, guest bathroom. Allocated undercro parking. EPC ra$ng B. Guide price: £395,000

0117 3171999

Tockington

A unique detached 5 bedroom barn conversion (3,857 sq ) on the outskirts of the popular village of Tockington, benefi%ng from and walled garden and courtyard. EPC ra$ng E. Guide price: £685,000

0117 3171999

Chew Magna

An elegant Grade II listed village house (4,623 sq ) with south facing gardens fron$ng the River Chew. 4 recep$on rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 7 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms (1 ensuite). Cellars. Detached garage and store, parking. Terraced gardens, sun terrace. Guide price: £1,375,000

0117 3171999

Sneyd Park

A beau$ful detached home (4,018 sq ) in a sought aer road. 3 recep$on rooms, kitchen, breakfast room. 5 bedrooms, family bathroom, 3 ensuite bath/ shower rooms, dressing room to master. Double garage, extensive cellar/ stores. Ample parking, enclosed gardens with distant views. EPC ra$ng E. Guide price: £1,395,000

0117 3171999


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Chew Magna

Substan&al and historic home (4,844 sq ) with excep&onal views across The Chew Valley and Chew Valley Lake. 5 recep&on rooms, kitchen/ breakfast room, 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2 ensuite, garaging, parking, gardens and a pasture. In all 7 acres Guide price: £1,750,000

0117 3171999

Clion

A superb Grade II listed courtyard apartment in pres&gious Royal York Crescent. Drawing room, kitchen. 2 bedrooms, bathroom and generous &mber decked private courtyard. Guide price: £320,000

0117 3171999

Clapton in Gordano

An immaculate family home (4,326 sq ) on a private lane. 3 recep&on rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 5 bedrooms, 5 bath/ shower rooms (4 ensuite). Double garage with studio above & shower room. Outdoor swimming pool. Enclosed level gardens, woodland. In all about 1.95 acres. EPC ra&ng C. Guide price: £1,750,000

0117 3171999

Belluton

A charming conversion (2,306 sq ) with wonderful views. 2 recep&on rooms, kitchen/breakfast room. 4 bedrooms, 3 bath/shower rooms. 1 bed annexe, indoor swimming pool complex. Workshop, car port. Level gardens, terraces. EPC ra&ng D. Guide price: £995,000

0117 3171999


CSKB April 14V3 .qxp:Layout 1

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O

ne of the reasons for Bristol recently being named as the best city to live in by The Times, is its ‘buzzy’ social scene, putting the city firmly in the spotlight as a centre for culture – and in this issue we celebrate just that. On top of our usual guide to what’s on in the city’s music venues, theatres, art spaces and comedy clubs we’ve also included a round-up of the exciting festival offerings, from the Bristol Harbour Festival to the Festival of Nature – and everything in between, celebrating food, music, theatre, dance and more. There’s loads going on, as usual, over the summer, but this month of May sees lots happening too, including the annual theatrical extravaganza that is Mayfest, with quirky and engaging shows taking place all over the city; and the Bristol Art weekender which sees galleries coming together to showcase exhibitions of all different kinds of art forms, which in turn prompted us to take a closer look at the hugely diverse art scene in Bristol. Turn to page 44 for our extended exhibitions listings – there really is something for everyone. As well as art and festivals, this issue also embraces Bristol’s lively music scene: we preview the cutting edge concerts at the Bristol Proms, which returns to the Bristol Old Vic again this year; take a look back at the performances of the Bristol Ensemble, the city’s professional orchestra, as it celebrates 20 years; and Bristol music man and one half of Goldfrapp, Will Gregory, picks his top ten tunes in our Face the Music feature. We’ve packed a lot into this issue, and on top of what I’ve already mentioned, you can also read about the city’s unique food culture; the illustrator who has hand-drawn a map of Bristol; the stories of lost cinemas and Turner’s watercolours of Bristol, which go on show at the city museum this month. We really are lucky to have so many cultural offerings right on our doorstep. Enjoy planning your social diary...

SAMANTHA COLEMAN All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

CONTACT THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE: Editor Email:

Samantha Coleman sam@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Deputy Editor Email:

Georgette McCready georgette@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email: Commercial Production Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Lorna Harrington lorna@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Publisher Tel: Email:

Steve Miklos 0117 974 2800 stevem@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Contact the Advertising Sales team on tel: 0117 974 2800 Advertising Sales Email:

Kathy Williams kathy@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Sue Parker sue@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Address:

The Bristol Magazine, 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED

The Bristol Magazine and The Bath Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd and are completely independent of all other local publications.

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

MAY 2014

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ZEITGEIST The Invisible Circus

5

things to do in MAY

See

Eat Feed the senses with theatre and food at Eat Drink Bristol Fashion’s special charity banquet on 3 May where the The Invisible Circus will be serving a surprise with every course. Expect the unexpected as Bristol’s finest chefs, Coexist and the inimitable Invisible Circus present a feastful night of tomfoolery with experiential performances. Diners will be whipped away into a weird and wonderful woodland folly where the trees are alive and badgers serve up a four course sharing banquet of seasonal produce. Serving up this wickedly delicious food will be a collaboration of Bristol’s leading chefs, including Freddy Bird from Clifton Lido, Josh Eggleton from The Pony & Trap, Tim Denny, Matt Duggan and Leigh Pascoe from the Star and Dove, Toby Gritten from the Pump House, Todd Francis from the Ox and Martin Walkins from Walters restaurant. Mixologist Jim Barlow from The Milk Thistle will be on hand with a cocktail menu full of unique creations. Visit: www.eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk

Wallace & Gromit © Aardman Animations Ltd 2014

Wallace & Gromit are once again a highlight in Bristol’s cultural calendar thanks to a new exhibition opening at M Shed on Saturday 24 May. Wallace & Gromit From the Drawing Board, which runs until 7 September, will take visitors on a journey that explores the world which lies behind the characters, their Bristol based creators, Aardman Animations and the award-winning films in which they star. See the famous duo up-close and view story boards, production artefacts, film archive, models, animation sets and clips and even a BAFTA and an Oscar. The exhibition will feature a series of rooms from Wallace & Gromit’s home, each exploring a different creative theme with interactive activities. Tickets: £5.95 adult, £3.95 child, £4.95 concession, family tickets £14.95.

Listen

Spiers & Boden © Christopher Knight

Confirming its place on the UK festival calendar, Bristol Folk Festival returns to Bristol on Saturday 3 & Sunday 4 May with events taking place at St George’s Bristol and Bristol Folk House from noon to 11pm. As well as top musicians including BBC Radio 2 Folk Award winners Spiers and Boden, Fairport Convention, Jim Moray, Tim Edey and Brendon Power, among many others, there will also be Morris dancers, mummers, maypoles, ceilidhs and market stalls. Tickets: £65 for the full weekend. For further information visit: bristolfolkfestival.com

Little Mix

Book

Out of town

There’s a real eclectic mix of acts taking part in Forest Live this summer, performing in seven forest locations around the country as part of the annual concert series arranged by the Forestry Commission. Woodland clearings are temporarily transformed into a concert arena creating a safe and relaxed atmosphere for giggoers. This year, at local Westonbirt Arboretum, you can see Little Mix (20 June), Suede (21 June), Rebecca Ferguson (22 June), Boyzone (18 July), Deacon Blue (19 July) and Katherine Jenkins with The National Symphony Orchestra (20 July). For further information and to book tickets visit: www.forestry.gov.uk/music or tel: 03000 680400.

Bath in Fashion’s week-long festival, which runs from 310 May, celebrates the extraordinary creative energy in the British fashion industry and takes a nostalgic look back to fashion by BIBA as it reaches its 50th birthday. Around the Georgian city, an exciting and eclectic programme of events showcases new season fashions on the catwalk, brings fashion celebrities and authors to share their style and stimulate debate, and stages workshops, style counsel, exhibitions and installations. Highlights include a talk by TopShop’s managing director Mary Homer, a nostalgic look at BIBA with brand creator Barbara Hulanicki, a makeup master class with leading makeup artists, a vintage fashion fair and a chance to see the Dress of the Year 2013 at the Fashion Museum. For a full programme of events visit: www.bathinfashion.co.uk.

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Barbara Hulanicki, creator of BIBA © Tessa Hallman


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THE CITY THE BUZZ

My BRISTOL

Mayor George Ferguson with Park Street Traders and Easigrass

We ask Nathan Filer, Bristol author and Costa Book of the Year Award winner, what he’s doing this month

Pop up park on Park Street In an initiative from the Park Street Traders committee to attract more people to Park Street, on Sunday 1 June, the whole street will be closed to traffic and turned into a pop-up park, with everything from artificial grass to trees, where you can come and relax, eat, drink and shop. On the day, there will also be activities, live music, comedy acts, dance displays, food demos and entertainment, with traders showcasing the diversity that Park Street has to offer. The event starts at 11am and will continue throughout the day until 10pm. Nadia Abdulla, who heads up the event committee, says: “We hope that by bringing a bit of Brandon Hill to Park Street we can remind people of what a diverse, beautiful and historical street we have.” Mayor George Ferguson says: “The pop-up park will mark the second 2014 Make Sunday Special event to make Park Street a traffic-free, people-friendly zone. I look forward to seeing people enjoying themselves, as local traders bring a little bit of green and a lot of fun to one of our finest urban streets.”

Book now for top show Tickets are now on sale for The National Theatre’s production of War Horse which comes to the Bristol Hippodrome from 14 January – 14 February 2015, co-directed by Bristol’s Tom Morris and Marianne Elliot. Based on the novel by Michael Morpurgo, War Horse is a remarkable tale of courage, loyalty and friendship, featuring ground-breaking puppetry work by South Africa’s Handspring Puppet Company, which brings breathing and galloping horses to life on stage. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0844 871 3012 or visit: atgtickets.com/bristol. War Horse

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What brought you to Bristol? The birth canal. What are you reading? A very exciting book by a fellow Bristolian, Anna Freeman. It’s called The Fair Fight and is set in the world of female bare-knuckle boxing in 18th century Bristol. The Hatchet features quite frequently. I have an early copy but it’ll be out in August and I think it will be huge success (you heard it here first). What is on your MP3 player? I don't have an MP3 player but I recently bought a record player. Right now it has The Beach Boys on it. Which café or restaurant takes your fancy? My wife and I moved away from Easton last year and really miss St Mark’s Road. Let’s go to Eastern Taste. Favourite watering hole? I recently discovered Small Bar on King Street. It’s a real ale bar with its own library. What more could you want?

BOOK OF THE MONTH... A Short Ride in the Jungle: The Ho Chi Minh Trail by Motorcycle by Antonia BolingbrokeKent (Summersdale, £8.99) This is a rip-roaring tale of one woman’s solo motorcycling adventure down the legendary Ho Chi Minh Trail, one of the greatest feats of military engineering in history. Since the end of the Vietnam War however, much of this vast transport network has been reclaimed by jungle, while remaining sections are littered with a deadly legacy of unexploded bombs. For Antonia, a Bristol based writer and lover of ridiculous adventures in unfeasible vehicles (in 2006 she and a friend drove a tuk tuk 12,500 miles from Bankok to Brighton), the chance to explore the trail before it is lost forever was a personal challenge she couldn’t ignore. Setting out from Hanoi on an ageing pink Honda Cub, she spent two months riding 2,000 miles through the mountains and jungles of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Battling inhospitable terrain and multiple breakdowns, her experiences ranged from the touching to the

Evening in or evening out? We have a one year old baby. What’s on Netflix? Film or play? What will you be going to see this month? I’ll be heading to the Cube cinema to watch some live performance. Kill Your Darlings is a comedy, spoken-word and music night. Next one is 13 May. What local event will you be attending? Expressions at Paintworks. This is an arts festival run by the mental health charity, Milestones. I was honoured to be a part of the opening ceremony. It runs until 1 May. What are your hobbies or interests? I have a dentist appointment. Does that count? Any projects/work in progress? I’m working on a screenplay in collaboration with playwright, Toby Farrow. It’s still a very new project but is beginning to take shape. It feels good to be doing something so different after the novel.

hilarious, meeting former American fighter pilots, tribal chiefs, illegal loggers, venomous vipers and bomb disposal experts. Antonia says: “In these two months I slept alone in the jungle, nearly stepped on a live bomb and heaved and cajoled my recalcitrant bike over the Annamite mountains. You could call it character building...” This book details her adventure and tells the story of her brave journey is thrilling and poignant: a unique insight into Southeast Asia.


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SOUNDING OUT

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shouldn’t really be writing this now as I’m officially on holiday, but such is the scribbler’s life in the interconnected 21st century that I can work and vacation at the same time. Plus I didn’t get it done before I left, as planned. I had intended to write about a pair of south Bristol burglars who go around stealing – or endeavouring to steal – boilers from recently refurbished but empty houses, but that seems rather a gloomy subject now. It’s hard to imagine anyone successfully stealing anything on the street we’re staying on, which is so narrow you can practically shake hands with the neighbours across the way. The houses are all three storeys high and the narrow lanes twist and turn across the hillside, making a getaway tricky, but the real clincher, security-wise, lies in the fact that there are people everywhere, from old women with mops to kids playing football, along with an assortment of small, generally friendly dogs. At the slightest excitement a chorus of yapping quickly spreads. This old neighbourhood in the middle of a sprawling town on Spain’s Costa Tropical may not offer its residents much space, but every house does have a garden. Look out over the skyline and you see rooftop terraces complete with geraniums in pots, sun loungers, satellite dishes, washing hung to dry and even washing machines. Oh, and small dogs, and lots of tiny songbirds in cages, whose singing fills the narrow streets along with the moaning of seagulls and

shrill cries of swifts. Some of the latter, incidentally, may have reached Bristol by the time you read this. Every city has its soundscape, as do different neighbourhoods within cities. Back home we hear blackbirds singing and the rumble of traffic from the main road. On this street every footstep on the stone road is distinct, every raised voice, every tweet. Yesterday evening another sound carried clearly over the town: an insistent, almost military drumming and then a plaintive but powerful melody, produced by numerous horns and trumpets playing together. This performance went on for about five minutes then stopped. A little while later it started again. The process was repeated for an hour, two hours, and each time the music seemed to be closer. By the time the sun set the musicians were only a few hundred metres from our house, somewhere below us in the warren of streets. Curiosity overcoming laziness, we rushed downstairs and down the hill, following one alleyway and then the next towards the drumming and a steadily intensifying smell of incense. Over the previous few days we had seen numerous posters advertising Semana Santa, or Holy Week, and that morning festivities had got underway with a Palm Sunday procession. Was this the same parade, still going on many hours later? Indeed it was. Coming round a corner we saw the darkening street filled with candlelight and clouds of incense. A small crowd had gathered and beyond them figures in tall pointed hoods were moving slowly along. From the left came the same insistent drumming and then the trumpets and horns with their wild lament, and into view came a giant figure of a woman born on a float carried by 20 or 30 people. Rows of candles blazed in front of her, while the rest of the float was covered in white roses and other flowers. Cameras flashed as this ensemble turned slowly into the next street, the figure’s head at the level of the second floor balconies, and then everyone stopped. The band members took off their peaked caps, lit cigarettes and chatted. Water was given to the float-carriers. Old ladies clucked at girls in black and old men with chains of office stood about looking stern. It was a scene, I reflected, that must have been re-enacted every year for centuries. In Bristol too, once upon a time. ■

AT THE SLIGHTEST EXCITEMENT A CHORUS OF YAPPING QUICKLY SPREADS

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Our staff are very friendly and approachable, and browsing is posi$vely encouraged! As an introductory offer, we’d like to extend a 10% discount to our Bristol Magazine customers on your first purchase. Simply quote code ‘BristolMag141’ on purchase.

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Win a pair of return flights from Bristol to Milan, Hamburg, Munich, Aberdeen or Frankfurt with bmi regional The UK’s most punctual airline, bmi regional, is offering readers an opportunity to win a pair of return tickets to a choice of five fantastic destinations with direct flights from Bristol. The airline offers travellers a high quality customer focused service with features including:

• Speedy 30 minute check-ins • • 20kg of hold luggage per passenger • • Allocated spacious seating • • Complimentary food and drink on board • • Dedicated, manned check-in desks • The choice of destinations includes Milan, Munich, Hamburg, Aberdeen and Frankfurt. bmi regional operates more than 300 scheduled flights a week across a network of 20 destinations with routes out of Aberdeen, Birmingham, Bristol, East Midlands, Manchester and Norwich. www.bmiregional.com 0844 4172 600. The prize is subject to availability, non transferrable, non refundable and only valid on the routes outlined. Travel must be completed before 25 October 2014.

Question: Which award did bmi regional win in October 2013? Email your answer, with bmi regional in the subject line, to: competitions@thebristolmagazine.co.uk, along with your full name, address and telephone number. Deadline for entries: Friday 30 May. The editor’s decision is final.

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MAY 2014

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BRISTOL | SOCIETY

PEOPLE & PARTIES Snapshots from events, parties and launches in the city

Everyone enjoys a cupcake! © Chas Breton

Hospital staff got baking for the sale

Liv Byrom, a former Bristol University student raised over £1,300 for The Bristol Bake Off © Chris Cronin

The Above & Beyond team

Above & Beyond’s 40th birthday bake sale Bristol Royal Infirmary To celebrate Bristol hospitals charity Above & Beyond’s 40th birthday, the charity’s team of staff and volunteers, along with Chairman of Trustees Drummond Forbes, put on a bake sale to raise awareness about the Bristol Bake Off, which takes place on 2-8 June. All money raised will go to raise £6M for the Golden Gift Appeal to transform the BRI and Bristol cancer centre the BHOC.

Harvey Nichols fashion show Cutlers Hall, Quakers Friars More than 400 guests enjoyed two catwalk shows in the historic setting of Cutlers Hall, which showcased the latest spring/summer collections from the likes of Alexander McQueen, Victoria Beckham, Stella McCartney, Kenzo, Roland Mouret, Mary Katrantzou and Christopher Kane. The evening began with a champagne reception by Perrier-Jouët and music was provided by Kiss FM DJs, the Dixon Brothers. The models’ hair was styled by the team from Bristol-based Maximum FX with makeup from Tom Ford, Benefit, SpaceNK and Shu Uemera. Styling by Rachel Story. Photos: Andre Regini

HN Bristol SS14 show

Elizabeth and James top, £280; MSGM trousers, £190; Jimmy Choo bag, £650

Mary Katrantzou dress, £990

18 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Giambattista Valli jacket, £1,765; MSGM dress, £395


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Ladies and Girls Clothing and Accessories

10% o full priced stock with this adversement

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MAY 2014

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BRISTOL | SOCIETY

Steve Smith, Head of Business at Bristol Audi

Brazilian samba dancing by the Sambazinhas

Bristol Rugby players

Audi A3 Cabriolet launch Bristol Audi, Cribbs Causeway To celebrate the launch of Audi’s stylish A3 Cabriolet, with its soft top roof that opens in 17 seconds, The Style Forum staged a spring fashion show at the Bristol showroom where guests enjoyed champagne and canapes as they watched Brazilian samba dancing before a catwalk of key looks for the new season. Students from City of Bristol College worked with the city’s leading fashion, hair and beauty professionals for the show, including Amulet Boutique, Garment Quarter, Hair at 58 and models from local agency Gingersnap Models. Bristol Rugby players closed the show modelling Vivienne Westwood handbags and shoes (held high on silver trays) dressed in their Bristol Audi sponsored kit. Photographs: Damien Lovegrove

Catwalk looks featured outfits from Amulet Boutique and Garment Quarter

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History, Tradition & Quality - the only Kemps Jewellers since 1881 A: 9 Calton Court, Westbury on Trym, Bristol, BS9 3DF W:

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www.kempsjewellers.com (online store) T:

0117 950 5090


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CITY | LIVES

ALL MAPPED OUT Samantha Coleman meets Bristol illustrator, Gareth Wood, who has hand-drawn a map of Bristol, with references to the city’s culture and history

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reathing new life into the traditional craft of cartography, Bristol based Gareth Wood has injected his creativity, imagination and illustrating skills into a large, contemporary hand-drawn map of Bristol, which has got Bristolians talking and wondering where they can see this work of art. If you missed the story on the local television news, Gareth Wood – under the name of Fuller Maps – specialises in the creation of personal maps – each one hand-drawn using a very fine black ink pen. Previously he has drawn a map of London and the Isle of Purbeck, as well as a commissioned map of Sydney Gardens in Bath. Now, after living in Bristol for four years, moving here to work for a local adventure company, having previously worked in the media in London, Gareth has now finished a large hand-drawn map of Bristol, which took three and a half years and over 500 hours to complete. The map itself looks almost folk art-inspired and has a charming naïvety about it, created with a mix of pattern, symbolic interpretation, pointillism and space. With a keen eye for detail, Gareth has included references to Bristol’s history and culture in the map, offering his own interpretation of Bristol using layers of information built up over years of research and living here. “The whole map is drawn by hand and tech free – it’s what I love,” says Gareth, “I did an hour every day in the morning before work listening to music – that’s when my creativity is at its peak.” Gareth has always enjoyed illustrating and in 2005, he started the epic venture of drawing a map of London. “I’m fascinated by the mapping of different environments. It is not always the physical state but the emotions and trends that we all share with our habitats that excite me,” he says. “I communicate experiences using very intricate and detailed work. It often connects with people on a personal level, telling stories, opening conversations and provoking a variety of thoughts in the viewer.” The maps contain a distinct sense of wit, satire, history and fantasy, combined with a detailed knowledge of the region’s geography – something that Gareth is also very interested in. He admits that he has always been a keen adventurer and hill walker and in his spare time likes to explore different areas. “My work lends itself perfectly to Bristol’s topography – I love to draw hilly areas. As soon as I arrived in Bristol I went to Ashton Court, and when I was there I thought, ‘this is going to be great to draw.’” Hundreds of symbols, allusions and references can be seen in the map, which makes it so interesting to look at, and so unique – capturing the spirit and personality of the city perfectly. Clearly Gareth has spent a lot of time researching, exploring and immersing himself in the city’s culture and books. When looking at the map, you’ll see that Cabot Tower is the centrepiece and everything seems to unfold from there. The Wills Memorial Building stands proudly between two smoking cigarettes, symbolising the family run company Wills Tobacco, who gave the building to the university in 1925 in honour of their father. Gareth says: “You’ll notice the cigarette smoke wisps around the tower and this also makes reference to when the The Great Hall inside the building was bombed during the Second World War, in 1940. The very next day Winston Churchill exited the Memorial Building and stood talking to journalists. It was only after he left that police discovered an unexploded bomb only metres away from the Prime Minister. The giant bomb falling from the sky is a reminder of how catastrophic the Blitz was and how much of a close shave Churchill had!” Below the Concorde illustration, which is in the allotment and housing area of St Werburgh’s, you’ll see a water mill – this is Ashley Vale Mill. “It was first mentioned as Glaspelmull in as far back as 1391,” says Gareth. “Throughout history it has served distillers, flour makers, grinding animal charcoal and making dyewoods. It is no longer there, replaced by houses, but it felt right to document what is arguably the reason for the Mina Road ever existing.” Gareth has drawn the map in a way that purposefully symbolises the buildings and locations – for example, Spike Island is full of spikes, the Christmas Steps are lined with Christmas trees and the Bristol to Bath cycle path features a bath tub at the end. Bristol’s heritage and culture are referenced explicity too – you’ll see peregrine falcons in the Avon Gorge, Brunel on top of a building, balloons 22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Gareth Wood with his hand-drawn map of Bristol. Images © Luke Thornton, lukethorntonphotography.co.uk

I LOVE THE CURIOSITIES ABOUT THE CITY... THERE ARE LOTS HIDDEN IN THE MAP

❞ floating around, bikes and music notes. “I love the curiosities about the city,” says Gareth. “There are lots hidden in the map and also some pokes at buildings I don’t like. One in particular is the pirate flag on top of the awful aquarium building!” Not all the symbols and references are obvious at first, so you need to take a really good look – you’ll be surprised how many you find. “It’s been tough not including everything that makes Bristol such a special place but the possibilities are infinite and the map can only contain so much,” says Gareth. “The things you see in the map are not a perfect representation of what is there. The places, objects and subjects are selected through all types of reasoning. It could be a recurring theme or conversation that I’ve had with certain people that makes me decide that something should be drawn. Other times it will be a personal experience. We’re all moving through the city with our lives and commonly share the same thoughts about it.” Now that the map is completed, Gareth will have it framed with antireflective glass so it can be seen clearly up close, and he has plans for it to be exhibited around the city. The grand unveiling will take place at It’s All 2 Much gallery in Stokes Croft on Saturday 31 May at 12pm, where the map will stay for two weeks. Gareth will also make prints of the map, available to buy in the galleries where the map is exhibited. So what next I ask? “Being an artist that specialises in maps makes me very nomadic. So maybe I’ll finish the London map, which is currently in storage, that way I can stay in Bristol for a little longer, or maybe I’ll find a new city in a far away land!” ■ For further information visit: www.fullermaps.com


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Rosie Webb in her studio in her Bristol home

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FACE | THE MUSIC

Will Gregory

2014 24 THEBATHMAGAZINE THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE xx 2013 | MAY | OCTOBER


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GOLDEN GUY Goldfrapp’s Will Gregory, Bristol music man extraordinaire, picks his top ten tunes

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ill Gregory is best known as one half of the group Goldfrapp with Alison Goldfrapp. Born in London he studied music at York University before moving to Bristol in the 80s. Here he played saxophone in various Bristol bands including Portishead and then toured with Tears For Fears and the Nyman band. It was in the 90s that Will transitioned in to composing music for film and TV before starting an album writing collaboration with Alison Goldfrapp as Goldfrapp. He has since created various exotic line-ups including London Saxophonic working with Moondog, and The Will Gregory Moog Ensemble. He continues to have a long standing collaboration with Bristol drummer Tony Orrell as The Gas Giants, specialising in live silent film accompaniment and in 2012 he composed an opera for the BBC Concert Orchestra with librettist Hattie Naylor, called Piccard in Space. As part of FILMIC 2014, a platform for local and international artists to come together and present, perform and discuss their work, there will be a gig by percussion outfit Powerplant who present a new work by Will Gregory at St George’s on Thursday 22 May at 8pm. Famed for their visually innovative, multi-media performances, Powerplant operate at the meeting point between new music and installation art. Expect startling 360 degree sound, live sampling and immersive visuals. Tickets £16 from tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Will and Alison Goldfrapp, as Goldfrapp

Beethoven

Charlie Parker

Will’s top ten tunes: ❶ Terry Riley – Rainbow In Curved Air It is like a beautiful piece of modernist architecture: all smooth curves and futuristic white spaces. A musical aesthetic that is not about verse/choruses or going round a harmonic structure. It opens up a whole different vista of how music can be. ❷ The Beatles – Strawberry Fields

The Beatles

Piece of art thrown into the hit parade… kind of the pinnacle of 60s commercial music. Every bar has a different arrangement but it glides past effortlessly. It is only when you really listen that you start to hear the vast machinery of studio technique and imagination that lies under the surface.

❸ Nick Drake – River Man After making this Nick Drake was so worried that people might not like it that he killed himself rather than subject himself to the possibility. You can sort of see his point. The strange loping rhythm and perfect string arrangement produces something riveting. ❹ Bernard Hermann – Title music from Vertigo Exercise: write piece where two four note lines move in contrary motion over some big brass chords. Only Hermann could make such simplicity sound so brilliant. He has a way of voicing the orchestra that none of his Hollywood Peers can touch. Often imitated… never equalled. ❺ Morricone – Nina’s theme from Meta Una Sera A Cena Unusually tight piece of composition by Morricone using an arcane technique of playing the same tune against itself at different speeds. This is a kind of minimalism that later got taken up by Glass and Nyman. However with his Italian sense of drama this 7-minute gem is a perfect balance of head and heart music.

❻ Popol Vuh – Titles from Aguirre the Wrath Of God Example of repetition of an idea that is so charged it never becomes dull. ❼ Charlie Parker – My Old Flame Miles Davis said Charlie Parker was the best sax player who ever lived and you cannot disagree when you hear this. No hesitation – just full commitment and utter conviction. Even at this ballad tempo the ideas come WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

pouring out at such velocity that it seems superhuman… but the sound is yearning and very human. I think Parker and Bach could have met on a level… somewhere cosmic.

❽ Michel Legrand – Windmills of Your Mind Just one possibility from the French master arranger musical polymath. Hyperactivity never sounded so good – the sheer number of words is overwhelming in this two minute miniature… plus the dark brass and soaring string countermelodies… plus the spinning harmonic structure….

❾ Any Mahler symphony Last movement of number three is a good one. Mahler is never constrained by limits of time and space, like diving into a huge epic novel you relish the number of pages to go before this incredible stuff will stop washing through you. Mahler also is not afraid to go to the very bad places – it marks him out as one of the greats.

❿ Beethoven – Hammerklavier Sonata Nothing to say about this but honesty in art is painful but once you have been given it nothing else will do. ■ MAY 2014

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Time to sell at Clevedon?

Clevedon Salerooms recent Specialist Sale included this unusual 19th Century mahogany cased bracket clock. The silvered dial had the minutes around the outer with a subsidiary hours dial. The clock created interest from the UK and abroad from collectors keen to secure the timepiece. The bidding did not miss a beat with both on-line and telephone bidders trying to outwit one another; the new owner having to part with £6,500 to take it home.

Clevedon Salerooms next Specialist Sale will be held on Thursday 5th June. If you have antiques, work of art, collectors’ items, silver, jewellery, watches etc that you may be thinking of selling why not visit the Salerooms on one of their no obligation Free Valuation Days or contact the Salerooms to speak to a valuer.

Sold for £6,500

Visit our Marquee at the North Somerset Show – Monday 5th May

Free Valuation Days

Tuesday 6th May & Wednesday 7th May 9.30 - 1pm & 2pm - 5pm at the Salerooms

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Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers The Auction Centre Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT AMPLE FREE PARKING

Tel: 01934 830111 www.clevedon-salerooms.com

MAY 2014

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Festival of Nature

FESTIVAL CITY Bristol is about to come alive with festival fever, just as it does every summer. There’s a festival for everyone to enjoy, whatever your tastes, from food and drink, to theatre, music and art. Use our guide to plan your social diary... Bristol Shakespeare Festival

Bristol Festival of Photography, 1 – 31 May The third Bristol Festival of Photography features more than 45 exhibitions and events, from solo shows to workshops in old and new processes, photographic and projection based performances, a Victorian photo parlour plus pop-up art installations and innovative events combining photography, creative writing and fine dining. Visit: www.BFOP.org.

The Black Eagles, Bristol Harbour Festival

west. Heading back to the harbourside again, The Wild Weekend is the UK’s biggest free celebration of the natural world with two days of interactive activities, a market of local produce and live entertainment. There will also be community events across Bristol’s green spaces throughout the summer and a series of talks, including a lecture by Germaine Greer on the environment at At-Bristol on 12 June, in partnership with the Bristol Festival of Ideas. Visit: www.festivalofnature.org

Mayfest, 15 – 25 May Bristol’s annual festival of contemporary theatre, dedicated to presenting a broad range of unusual, playful and ambitious work from leading theatre makers from Bristol, the UK and beyond. See more on page 32.

Festival of Print, 17 – 28 May Bringing together a collection of the finest examples of print from around the world, the Festival of Print, held at Centrespace Gallery will include workshops, open days, films, talks and demonstrations of letterpress printing. Exhibitions include a collection of print from around the world that has been published each year for the past 30 years by the Whittington Press; and letterpress posters in the Politics of Print. Visit: theletterpresscollective.org

Festival of Nature, 18 May – 27 July The Festival of Nature returns this summer and will be bigger, better and wilder than ever, with more than 20 events across Bristol and the south 28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Vegfest, 23 – 25 May The vegan food and live music festival is back at the amphitheatre for the 11th year with 140 stalls full of mouthwatering food alongside fashion, cosmetics and bodycare, plus talks, cookery demos, workshops, films, kids cookery classes and live comedy during the day. In the evenings, headliners including Boney M, Rose Royce, Abba Gold, Peter Hook and the Light, Zion Train, Black Roots and Ruts DC will be providing the tunes. Visit: www.bristol.vegfest.co.uk

Let’s Rock Bristol, 6 – 8 June At its new home in the Ashton Court Estate, this family-friendly 80s festival presents a huge lineup of artists to perform including Bananarama, Level 42, Rick Astley, Tony Hadley, ABC, Belinda Carlisle, Go West, Heaven 17, Midge Ure, China Crisis, Alexander O’Neal, Jaki Graham, Imagination, The Blow Monkeys, The Christians, Matt Bianco, Boney M, Toyah, Dr &


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Bristol Balloon Fiesta

Foodies Festival

Grillstock

The Medics, T’Pau, Sonia and Captain Sensible. On top of this there will be attractions including a circus, funfair, and children’s entertainers. Camping is on offer for those wanting to spend the whole weekend too. Visit: www.letsrockbristol.co.uk

Grillstock, 7 – 8 June A two day festival of meat, music and mayhem on the harbourside. There’ll be a US-style BBQ competition, over 40 bands and eight DJ’s playing across four music stages. Get down to the finest Americana rock, funk, blues and country sounds. Foot stomping rockgrass legends Hayseed Dixie, top the Sunday bill and headlining on Saturday is the Fun Lovin’ Criminals. Visit: www.grillstock.co.uk

St Paul’s Carnival, 5 July This much-loved community carnival promises more music, dance and colourful costumes than ever before. Celebrating African and Caribbean culture, there will be art and food served up with a backdrop of booming bass.

Bristol Pride, 5 – 12 July The week-long festival will see a diverse range of events including a comedy night, sports fun day, dog show, Stonewall conference and theatre. Pride week is also host to the Bristol Pride film festival at the Watershed and will feature specially selected and award winning films. The week culminates in an outdoor music and arts festival in Castle Park on 12 July. Kicking off WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Vegfest

with the Pride Parade through the city, the festival will feature two stages of entertainment, family area, funfair, market, food and bars and roller disco. Pride Night will see Pride takeover the O2 Academy for the official afterparty. This year dance/house DJ sensation The Freemasons will headline along with eccentric party makers Sink The Pink, 90s club night Another Night and a specially created Pop Paparazzi Parlour from performance artist Harry Clayton Wright. Visit: www.pridebristol.co.uk

The Bristol Shakespeare Festival, 9 – 27 July From clowning to classical, traditional to twisted, alfresco to intimate, the Bristol Shakespeare Festival presents three weeks full of the very best national touring theatre companies, each with their own unique take on the Bard’s work. The festival is renowned for staging performances in unusual and iconic locations across the city, and this year is no exception. Look out for performances in a space near you, including: St Werburghs Amphitheatre, Brandon Hill Bowling Green, The Folk House, Blaise Castle, Windmill Farm, The Bierkeller, The Island and Redcliffe Caves. www.bristolshakespearefestival.org.uk

Foodies Festival, 11 – 13 July Foodies Festival, the UK’s largest celebration of food and drink returns to the harbourside for its fourth consecutive year. Feast on a vast array of culinary activities, discover new produce and enjoy a day of fun and entertainment. There’ll be

Bristol Pride

top chefs cooking; a children’s cookery theatre; a feasting tent; vintage kitchen market; real ale and cider; a daily chilli eating challenge and much more. Visit: www.foodiesfestival.com

Bristol Harbour Festival, 18 – 20 July Bristol Harbour Festival, the city’s largest free festival, brings a wonderful mix of live music, dazzling dance, street theatre performance and scintillating circus displays, to the harbourside, where a quarter of a million visitors are expected. The city’s rich maritime heritage is celebrated by a visiting fleet of pleasure craft, working boats and beautiful tall ships. The festival also acts as a showcase of the city’s international reputation as a music and arts powerhouse, with more than 100 local acts providing entertainment for all the family. Visit: www.bristolharbourfestival.co.uk

The Bristol International Balloon Fiesta, 7 – 10 August Arrive at Ashton Court at 6am and witness the spectacular sight of over 150 hot air balloons ascending into the morning sunshine as you enjoy a morning coffee and bacon sandwich. Or arrive in the evening, get a good spot and watch pilots inflate the balloons and take off en masse at 6pm into the sunset. During the day, on the ground there will be stalls and entertainment and at night, see the balloons glow and light up the skies. Bristol hospital’s charity Above & Beyond has been chosen by the Bristol International Balloon Fiesta as its charity partner for 2014 and 2015. Visit: www.bristolballoonfiesta.co.uk. ■ MAY 2014

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CITY | ARCHIVE

REELING BACK Step behind the velvet curtains of Bristol’s forgotten picture houses to read our city’s stories of human remains, men dressed as giant cats and rollerskating glory, says Jane Duffus

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hile the campaign rages on to restore the Art Deco cinema on Whiteladies Road to its former glory, it’s worth remembering that Bristol is also home to a mine of other long-lost cinematic treasures… and while some met the developers’ wrecking ball, many have survived and metamorphosed into something completely different. It’s local legend that Hollywood heartthrob Cary Grant hails from our city, but there’s more to his Brizzle story than simply being born here. You might know Archie Leach was born in Horfield, but maybe you don’t know that he hung out at the Clare Street Picture House where he saw some of the earliest sound films, and the Metropole on Ashley Road where he watched the slapstick Keystone Cops films with his dad. Grant recalled the Metropole as being “a barn-like building with hard seats and bare floors, where all the men smoked.” Grant’s connections to the Empire music hall on Old Market are well celebrated. He worked as a limelighter in his teenage years, lighting the stage illuminations. The Empire opened in 1893 as a music hall that welcomed everyone from Marie Lloyd to Harry Houdini, before becoming a cinema in 1931. By this point Bristol was saturated with cinemas and the owners resorted to introducing live performances again in 1937. The Empire limped on until 1954 despite the area being badly hit during the Blitz, before the council ordered its demolition in 1964 to make way for the Old Market roundabout. 30 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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...TO PUBLICISE WESTERNS, CHILDREN WOULD DRESS UP AS COWBOYS AND RIDE PONIES

The Empire was far from the only cinema on Old Market. Further along was the Kings Cinema – a small theatre built on the site of a former cemetery, which led to the eerie discovery of human remains when the foundations were laid. Over the decades, Kings under went many renovations – but in March 1929 it found its niche when it became Bristol’s first cinema to show a talking movie – the Al Jolson musical The Singing Fool. The Kings closed in 1976. With cinemas overwhelming the city in the 1930s, managers went to extreme lengths to stand out. One such example was for the 1929 horror film Cat and Canary, which saw a horse-drawn trailer of a giant bird in a cage being tormented by a man in an unconvincing cat costume being trotted around the city to drum up trade. While to publicise westerns, children would dress up as cowboys and ride ponies past the relevant cinemas to draw in crowds. There were some creatively construed cinemas in Bristol, too, including the Hippodrome on St Augustine’s Parade, which showed films from 1932 to 1938; the Victoria Rooms in Clifton, which showed films from 1919 to 1922; and the Bristol North Baths on Cheltenham Road, which boarded up its swimming pool recess every winter from 1922 to 1936 in order to screen films during the chillier months when swimming trade declined. Have you ever noticed that when you come out of the car park at Cabot Circus, there is a beautiful blue building in front of you? With a big curving arched doorway and porthole windows? Now the home of a building contractor company, it was


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PICTURE PERFECT: Main image, Staple Hill Picture House; left inset, Hollywood heartthrob Cary Grant Above: An advertisement for 1929 horror film Cat and Canary at the Kings Cinema and a Whiteladies Picture House advert from 1920 Right: from top, the Magnet Cinema; the Coliseum picture house on Park Row; Whiteladies Picture House in 1925 All images courtesy of Bristol Record Office. To find out more about the city’s archive collections, visit: www.bristol.gov.uk/r ecordoffice

formerly the Magnet Cinema serving the St Paul’s area of Bristol, but owing to slum clearance in the area the population dwindled and the Magnet began to lose trade. Another former cinema which still stands proud is the Coliseum on Park Row: a beautiful corner building that looks a little like Bristol’s version of New York’s famous Flat Iron Building. Converted to use as a cinema in 1912, the Coliseum had previously enjoyed favour as a roller skating rink (an enormously popular pastime for the telly-deprived Victorians). Yet for some reason, the managers who ran who the Coliseum as a cinema just couldn’t make a profit – despite hiring an all-female orchestra to try and entice custom. Admitting defeat, the Coliseum closed as a cinema in 1924, and following heavy bombing in 1940 little was left but the exterior walls. However, the building remains today and is now owned by the University of Bristol. Over in Staple Hill, builder Frank Wren purchased a plot of land on which he built the Staple Hill Picture House, which was extended in 1927 to include nearby buildings and become the Regal. The cinema remained in the hands of the Wren family, who lived next door and knocked through a door from their home straight into the offices of the cinema – meaning they were never not at work! After closing in 1963, the Regal endured the indignity of many former cinemas and became a bingo hall but now functions as a chapel. But it’s not all doom and gloom, and we haven’t lost all of our cinematic heritage just yet. Alongside the formless but functional multiplexes, Bristol still has some cinemas with character. On the Harbourside, the Watershed is celebrating 30 years of showing brilliant independent films in a regenerated warehouse; pop down to Stokes Croft and enjoy a bargain screening at The Cube in a former am-dram workshop; or head up to The Orpheus in Henleaze to really feel like you’re going to a purpose-built cinema in the olden days. ■

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THINKING DIFFERENTLY Mayfest raises the roof with another city wide theatrical extravaganza this month. We take a look at some of the highlights...

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n Thursday 15 May, Mayfest, Bristol’s annual festival of contemporary theatre, returns with a mouth-watering selection of extraordinary theatre from around the world, presented in 18 venues and sites across the city over 11 days. Dedicated to presenting a broad range of unusual, playful and ambitious work from leading theatre makers from Bristol, the UK and beyond, Mayfest is produced by MAYK in collaboration with Bristol Old Vic and works in partnership with other key arts venues across Bristol. Headlining the 2014 programme is the Freeze UK premiere of The Roof (22 – 25 May), from Requardt and Rosenberg, creators of 2010’s sell-out Electric Hotel. A highoctane mix of parkour and contemporary dance, this is a 360° performance that will capture imaginations under the night sky in Millennium Square. Wearing headphones, the audience will enter a specially constructed square of rooftops, and will be transported into the body and mind of a reluctant hero, desperate to stay alive. For the first time in Mayfest’s history, there will also be a unique strand of family shows. Kicking off the May half-term is multi-award winning Smashed international company Aracaladanza with Constellations – a magical dance-theatre piece that uses puppetry and digital visuals to enchant ages four plus at the Bristol Old Vic. Young Mayfesters will also be given the opportunity to experience a day time children’s version of the festival’s late night cabaret bar, at The Blind Tiger Cub (17-18 and 24-25 May, Bristol Old Vic). Matthew Austin and Kate Yedigaroff, artistic directors of Mayfest and MAYK Theatre said: “Mayfest is now in double figures and our 2014 programme continues to champion inspirational theatre-makers who dream big and think differently. As our festival heads in to its tweens we’re looking to the next generation with a new pilot strand of work for children and families. “This year’s programme features a genre-busting selection of theatre from punk rock to ballet, spoken word to parkour, and we’re delighted to be welcoming artists from all over the world to a city where audiences are curious, adventurous and open to new Lulu: A Murder Ballad experiences.” More unmissable shows include the multi-award winning international hit Smashed that brings contemporary circus to Bristol Old Vic with nine jugglers, 80 apples and four crockery sets and guarantees to ‘smash all your preconceptions about juggling to tiny pieces’ (20 May). The off-site and totally free Nightwalk is an immersive experience from artists Tom Bailey and Jez Riley French that follows a year-long residency with the National Trust. Audiences will be taken on a re-exploration of Leigh Woods using sounds that have resonated through the beloved Bristol landscape across its history (16 – 18 May). Tickets and a full programme of events are available from: mayfestbristol.co.uk and bristololdvic.org.uk, or by calling the Bristol Old Vic box office on tel: 0117 987 7877. To keep up to date with the festival’s news, follow @mayfestbristol on Twitter. Mayfest is also looking to expand

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The hilarious Feel About Your Body at Tobacco Factory Theatre from New Art Club is a show about how we feel about our bodies – you can expect to find out what not to do during a heart attack as well as a man talking to his bottom (19 & 20 May). I Wish I Was Lonely at The Island (from the makers of last year’s The Oh F**k Moment) explores contactability – inviting the audience to leave their phones on during the show – and asks how much of ourselves we’ve given up to the new gods in our pockets (24 & 25 May). Rising In The Worst of Scottee, (16 & 17 May, The Cube) the Time Out Performer of The Year encounters past flames, ex-friends, and other people who no longer like him. This is a darkly comedic, occasionally musical and ultimately devastating attempt to find out where he went wrong. Come and go as you please during the six hour performance of Slap Talk at the Arnolfini on 17 May. Inspired by the selfaggrandising of boxers at the pre-fight weigh in, Slap Talk is a verbal sparring match that is both a linguistic version of the fight itself and a reflection upon the violence present in everyday language. Speaking to each other and to the audience via a live feed from a camera to a monitor, the performers rant, insult and threaten each other in a scripted version of a pre-fight press conference crossed with a 24-hour rolling news channel. On 19 May at the Bristol Old Vic, Opera North and the brilliantly twisted Tiger Lillies, whose genre-defying brand of other-worldly vocals and unnerving performance style have carved them a unique niche in the cabaret and music theatre scene, take on one of theatre’s most seductive and intoxicating creations, Lulu. Lulu: A Murder Ballad brings dark and twisted tales from the underbelly of the city, combining cabaret, opera, video and imagery to seduce, delight and terrify. On the opposite end of the scale sees the UK premiere of Czech artist Andrea Miltnerova’s strikingly beautiful dance solo: Dance of the Magnetic Ballerina. Rooted to the spot on a platform surrounded by light, the magnetic ballerina flutters, shivers and shimmers for her audience, dancing her way into our subconscious (17 May, Bristol Old Vic). Other highlights include an all-male version of Wuthering Heights (18 – 20 May, Trinity Community Arts); #TORYCORE (25 May, Spike Island), a punk gig where all the lyrics are taken from the speeches of chancellor George Osborne; Freeze (23 – 25 May, Circomedia), which sees a performance from skilled rock balancer and sculpturer Nick Steur – no glue, cement or any other trick is involved; Gym Party (20 May, Bristol Old Vic), a razor sharp and darkly comic exploration of our desire to win, presented by three women who compete in a series of games, eager to share their stories, perspectives and awkward dances in between; and Rising (16 May, Bristol Old Vic), an evening of contemporary dance performed by Aakash Odedra. ■ its team of volunteers who assist with everything from flyering and stewarding, to helping out in the office and even sometimes appearing as extras in the shows. For further information about how you can get involved visit: www.mayfestbristol.co.uk/get-involved


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CULTURE BOOK Our guide to this month’s top events in Bristol and beyond Yeo Valley Organic Plant Fair

Bristol Motor Show

Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory: As You Like It, Until 2 May Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory celebrates its 15th anniversary season with Shakespeare’s greatest exploration of the meaning of love, its madness and transcendence in the funny and moving As You Like It. This production will embark on the company’s second UK tour immediately after its Tobacco Factory Theatre run. Tickets available from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatres.com.

Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory presents Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, until 3 May Intriguing, challenging and witty, this play has been widely acclaimed as Stoppard’s masterpiece. This is SATTF’s first contemporary theatre production. Box office tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatres.com.

Maison Paradiso

Blagdon. The plant fair will provide an opportunity to get up close with specialist nurseries and seed merchants who will be trading and offering hardy and unusual perennials, herbs and shade loving plants. Local craftsmen will also be on hand selling decorative metalwork. For further information tel: 01761 461650.

Maison Paradiso: Return to the Mansion, Kings Weston House, Sunday 4 May Following its debut Valentine’s event, Maison Paradiso returns to Kings Weston House for a spectacular evening featuring a pop-up restaurant by Kelly Sealy’s renowned company Pig & Swig, a party with the mighty Bedmo Disco, a giant outdoor cinema, and lots more entertainment. Dinner tickets cost £45, tickets for the party only are £15, available from www.eventbrite.co.uk.

Let It Be, Bristol Hippodrome, 5 – 10 May Early Morning Bird Song Walk with Ed Drewitt, Tyntesfield, Saturday 3 May, 5.30am – 7am Ed Drewitt, bird specialist and wildlife detective, will guide you around the National Trust’s Tyntesfield estate at dawn and tune your ears to all the different bird songs around. Finish the morning with a hot drink and a delicious bacon or mushroom buttie. Tickets: adults £14.50, children £8, family £45 (includes refreshments). For further information visit: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield.

The Bristol Motor Show, The Mall at Cribbs Causeway, 3 – 5 May Admission is free to this show, where you will be able to see a new selection of cars and caravans and explore a range of models including Bentley, Mercedes, Mazda, Honda and many more. There will also be a whole host of fun activities for all ages including Segway tours, film cars, pedal power cars, STIG selfie photo opportunity, Young Driver Training, balloon modelling and face painting. Opening times: Saturday, 9am – 8pm; Sunday, 11am – 5pm; Monday, 10am – 6pm.

The Full English May Fayre, Colston Hall Foyer, Sunday 4 May, 10am Colston Hall throws its doors open for a day of free folk based fun for families with a variety of performances, workshops, dancing and singing events, a maypole and some of the best folk artists from around the country.

The Yeo Valley Organic Garden Plant Fair, Blagdon, North Somerset, Sunday 4 May, 11am – 5pm Yeo Valley, the family run dairy company will once again be opening its doors to the public for a plant fair at Yeo Valley’s Organic Garden in 34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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A concert jam-packed with more than 40 of The Beatles’ greatest hits. Relive The Beatles’ meteoric rise from their humble beginnings in Liverpool’s Cavern Club, through the heights of Beatlemania, to their later studio masterpieces. Tickets from: www.atgtickets.com or tel: 0844 871 3012.

The Elles Bailey Band, The Trinity Centre (supporting Krista Detor), Wednesday 7 May Her voice has been described as the love child of Etta James and Janice Joplin and Bristol’s Elles Bailey’s unique husky tone will be gracing the stage once again, along with her band of bluesy boys. For further information visit: www.ellesbailey.com.

Bristol Old Vic Theatre School: Sauce for the Goose, Redgrave Theatre, 7-10 May Georges Feydeau’s high spirited romp Sauce For The Goose is stuffed with a heady mix of passions, pace and pleasure. Untrustworthy husbands, betrayed wives, artful servants and crazed Germans demonstrate why the naughty 90s were so named, as master French farceur Feydeau’s sparkling play switches from riotous farce to barbed social satire. Tickets £15, concession £10 from the box office on tel: 0117 973 3955 or visit: www.oldvic.ac.uk.

Banksy: The Room in the Elephant, Tobacco Factory Theatres, 8 – 10 May, 8pm Following a sell out run at the 2013 Edinburgh Fringe Festival and a national tour, Tom Wainwright’s successful play returns home to Tobacco Factory Theatres, where it was originally commissioned. Banksy was in LA for the Oscars when he sprayed THIS LOOKS A BIT LIKE AN ELEPHANT on an old water tank. The tank was residence for a local >>


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Annie Morris will be holding a watercolour workshop at Bristol Botanic Garden

legend, Tachowa Covington, who over seven years had furnished it with carpets, a stove and even CCTV. As news spread of Banksy’s latest work, a consortium of art dealers soon appeared to repossess the water tank. Suddenly, Tachowa was homeless again… This is a story about creating something from nothing and then having it taken away, in the name of art. It will be followed by a screening of Something From Nothing, documentary maker Hal Samples’ short film about Tachowa. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatres.com

Viva España, Trinity-Henleaze UR Church, Friday 9 May, 7.30pm Marcela Daza-Valeanu (soprano) and Katri Sako-Arias (piano) present a concert of passionate classical Spanish and Latin American music. Tickets £10 from Henleaze Post Office.

Jocelyn Pook Ensemble, St George’s Bristol, Friday 9 May, 8pm

Michala Petri & Lars Hannibal

Picked by Stanley Kubrick to write her own debut score for what became his final film, Eyes Wide Shut, Jocelyn Pook’s subsequent composer-credits include The Merchant of Venice, Brick Lane, Julio Medem’s Room in Rome and Chaotic Ana among a varied filmography that includes a contribution to Scorsese’s Gangs of New York. A noted cellist, string-arranger and recording artist, she has written orchestrations for Peter Gabriel and Natacha Atlas, as well as producing her own distinctive albums. For this special Filmic commission, Jocelyn presents music from her career, arranged for a new version of her international ensemble. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or book online at: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Really Classical Relay, Bristol Music Club, St Paul’s Road, Clifton, 9 – 11 May A friendly and relaxed weekend of the best classical music, delicious local food and excellent craftwork. There will be seven international musicians playing on gut strings, music by Mozart, Beethoven and Haydn and continuous performances spanning the three days. Bring your own food and drinks and all tickets are pay what you want. For further information visit: www.reallyclassicalrelay.co.uk.

Michala Petri & Lars Hannibal, Trinity-Henleaze URC, Henleaze, Bristol, Saturday 10 May, 7.30pm

Bristol dancers perform at Redgrave Theatre in aid of Alzheimer’s Society

A rare opportunity to hear the world-famous Michala Petri and Lars Hannibal recorder and lute duo performing live in the UK. The celebrated duo perform extensively in Europe, North and South America, Japan, China and Korea, having given more than a thousand concerts in a repertoire spanning from the late Renaissance to contemporary music written especially for the duo. Tickets £16, £5 for under 25 year-olds from Opus 13 music shop on tel: 0117 923 0164 or on the door.

A Snapshot of Spring: Watercolour Workshop, Bristol Botanic Garden, Sunday 11 May, 10am-3pm A one day watercolour workshop with artist, Annie Morris, to create a snapshot of the beauty of spring in the botanic garden. The course is suitable for students of all abilities and the tutor will provide individual tuition and demonstrations. Please bring your own paints and brushes – paper is provided. Cost: £25. For further information visit: www.bristol.ac.uk/botanic-garden/education/courses.

Dance for Dementia, Redgrave Theatre, Sunday 11 May, 4pm & 7.30pm Raising money for Alzheimer’s Society, enjoy this performance of dance, featuring everything from African, Irish and acro-gymnastic, to ballet, Bollywood, Latin, street and tap – promising a unique and exciting show. Dancers from across Bristol will join >>

EDITOR’S PICK... The Whispering Wood Folk present Secrets of the Fey, Leigh Woods (meet by the North Road entrance), 9 & 10 May, 6pm & 8pm Whispering Woods create site specific performances in ancient woodland bringing ancient tales to life using circus acrobatics, live music and narrative to weave a transporting journey for the audience among the trees. Last year, Whispering Woods had a sell-out performance in October, so don’t miss the opportunity to enjoy this beautiful immersive experience in the ancient forest of Leigh Woods, carpeted with bluebells on the edge of the Avon Gorge. Strong visuals, a dynamic pace and a hint of faereality make this a thrilling treat for all ages. Dress up warm and wear sturdy shoes. Tickets in advance: £10 adults, £5 children, under 5s free, and family tickets, available from: www.whispering-wood-folk.co.uk. Tickets also available on the door: adults £12, children £6. Refreshments available from 5.30pm. In association with the National Trust and Arts Council England.

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Ada Campe will be showing off her comedic talents at What the Frock! © Andreas Lambis

together to create a fantastic fusion of different dance styles for a great cause. Tickets £8, available from Bristol Ticket Shop, www.bristolticketshop.co.uk or tel: 0117 929 9008.

Elvis Presley On Stage, Colston Hall, Tuesday 13 May, 8pm Using the latest technology, Elvis performs via state-of-the art video screens singing lead vocals backed by a live band, singers and an orchestra. This multi-media creation puts the audience inside an Elvis Presley concert presented exactly like one of his classic live performances in a Las Vegas showroom. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0844 887 1500 or visit: www.colstonhall.org.

Kizzy Morrell Residency, The Square, Clifton, Thursday 15 May, 7pm – 10pm Kizzy is set to light up the Square with her signature gospel infused jazz/blues vocals backed by a band with special guest DJ Styles. Tickets: £5.

Voices of Silence with Ashley Wass (piano), St George’s Bristol, Friday 16 May, 7.30pm Marking the outbreak of both World Wars, this programme pays homage to Wladyslav Szpilman, the Polish pianist/composer whose experiences were captured in the film, The Pianist, alongside powerful piano sonatas by Prokofiev and Bridge. The concert ends with Sally Beamish’s Voices of Silence, evoking the eerie, bleak atmosphere of a battlefield after the guns have fallen silent. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or book online at: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

What The Frock! Birthday Party, The Mauretania, Park Street, Friday 16 May, 8pm Bristol-based all-female comedy event What The Frock! turns two this month, so to celebrate it’s hosting a birthday party hosted by resident compere Cerys Nelmes. Bristol talent Jayde Adams returns from her European tour to headline and the set also includes the comedic talents of Ada Campe and Hatty Ashdown. Tickets £12 in advance from: http://www.wegottickets.com/event/265802 or £15 on the door.

Voices of Silence with Ashley Wass

The Merrymaking Festival, Kings Weston House, Saturday 17 May, 10am – 4pm A one day festival featuring eight guest speakers, more than 40 exhibitors, local crafts people, children’s workshops, activities, beauty, massage and acupuncture treatments as well as a live performance from Bristol based harmony trio band The Marionettes. Tickets £4 in advance, £5 on the door, children under 16 free. For further information visit: www.thebeautyevent.co.uk.

City of Bristol Choir, St George’s Bristol Saturday 17 May, 7.30pm David Ogden conducts the 100-strong City of Bristol Choir and professional orchestra The Lochrian Ensemble in two virtuosic works, Bach’s bright and lively Magnificat, and Mozart’s Mass in C Minor. The mass combines beautiful soprano duets with rousing choruses and orchestral fireworks. The soloists’ line-up includes Cardiff Singer of the World contender Susana Gaspar, Scottish Opera’s Eleanor Dennis and tenor Ed Lyon, described by The Guardian as “one of Britain’s top Baroque tenors.” Tickets £10 – £25 from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake

I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue, Colston Hall, Saturday 17 May, 2.30pm & 7.30pm BBC Radio’s multi-award-winning, self-styled antidote to panel games heads back on the road. Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden, Tim Brooke-Taylor, Jeremy Hardy and host Jack Dee host an evening of inspired nonsense. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0844 887 1500 or visit: www.colstonhall.org.

Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake, Bristol Hippodrome, 20 – 24 May Boldly shattering the traditional concept of swans in tutus and blending dance, humour and spectacle with extravagant award-winning designs by Lez Brotherston and lighting by Rick Fisher, Matthew Bourne has created a passionate and contemporary Swan Lake for our times. Tickets from: www.atgtickets.com or tel: 0844 871 3012.

Robin Hood, Ashton Court Gardens, 21 – 24 May CADS presents a rare outdoor production of Larry Blamire’s comedic take on the Robin Hood legend. In the woods of Ashton Court, the world of Sherwood Forest will be brought to life with thrilling sword fights, cracking comedy and romping romance. There will be a cash only bar and food available. Please bring a chair and wear appropriate clothing. Tickets £12.50 each or £40 for 4. Visit: www.bristolcads.org.uk.

May’s Ceilidh Hoedown, Tyntesfield, Friday 23 May, 7pm-11pm There’ll be a toe-tapping band, traditional ceilidh dance caller, farm yard games, 36 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Somerset cider and hog roast. Wellies and a checked shirt are essential! Tickets: £10 per person. Visit: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, St George’s Bristol, Friday 23 May, 7.30pm Some of the most famous music from the Baroque era rubs shoulders with a very modern classic, Sally Beamish’s Spinal Chords, narrated by acclaimed actress Juliet Stevenson. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or book online at: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

Extravaganza, Tobacco Factory Theatres, 27- 31 May After their storming show Napoleon: A Defence last May, these clowns return with an even sillier show rammed full of acrobatics, improvisation, live music, audience interaction, circus influences and a flaming unicycle. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatres.com.

FAME, Bristol Hippodrome, 27 – 31 May This brand new production will take you on a hi-octane roller coaster ride through dizzy heights and crashing lows as a group of star-struck wannabes embark on their quest for the ultimate accolade – fame. Tickets from: www.atgtickets.com or tel: 0844 871 3012.

Matthew Halsall Spiritual Jazz, St George’s Bristol, Thursday 29 May, 8pm As the main man behind a happening Manchester scene suffused with the spiritual and soulful jazz sounds of the 60s, trumpeter Matthew Halsall has been tipped as an important new voice by Gilles Peterson and Jamie Cullum. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or book online at: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk.

OperaUpClose presents Verdi’s La Traviata, Tobacco Factory Theatres, 29 – 31 May, 7.30pm The Olivier award-winning OperaUpClose are back, following incredible sold out performances of Tosca and La bohème in the Factory Theatre over

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the past couple of years. Set in Atlantic city, 1928 when prohibition, speakeasies and bootlegging abound. Violetta’s lover, Alfredo, is a passionate young man whose optimism has been shaken by his time at the front in the First World War. Together with his crooked politician father and Violetta’s gang-boss protector, he exposes the hypocrisy and heartache behind the glittering façade of parties. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatres.com.

Heart and the City Black Tie Ball, The Thistle Grand Hotel, Saturday 31 May, 7pm This charity ball in aid of Above & Beyond for the Bristol Heart Institute will feature welcome drinks, a three course meal, live music, raffle, live auction and a disco until 1am. Tickets: £50 each, tel: 07583571459.

Breakin’ Convention, Colston Hall, Saturday 31 May, 7.30pm Breakin’ Convention, the international festival of hip hop dance theatre, returns with another line-up of jaw-dropping performances by companies from around the world and around the corner. This hugely popular production is hosted and curated by UK hip hop theatre artist Jonzi D and features DJs, dancers, demonstrations and workshops. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0844 887 1500 or visit: www.colstonhall.org.

Concert by The Lochrian Ensemble, Winterbourne Medieval Barn, Saturday 31 May, 7.30pm In this wonderfully atmospheric setting listen to music by Pachelbel, Vivaldi, Mozart, Elgar, Mascagni and Tchaikovsky. Tickets: £9 available from Daisy’s Coffee Shop, Winterbourne or tel: 0117 957 4921.


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Bruce Forsyth Entertains, Bristol Hippodrome, Sunday 1 June, 7.30 pm A unique show featuring one of the UK’s best loved entertainers, Sir Bruce Forsyth, with The Dave Arch Orchestra featuring a mix of song, dance, comedy and piano. Tickets from: www.atgtickets.com or tel: 0844 871 3012.

BOOK NOW FOR... Stand-Up For Slapstick 3, Colston Hall, Tuesday 3 June, 7.30pm Jack Dee, Al Murray, Dara O’Briain, Tony Hawks, Jeremy Hardy, Richard Herring and Jo Caulfield take part in a fund-raiser for Slapstick, Bristol’s much loved annual festival of silent and vintage screen comedy. Tickets: £27.50 (plus booking fee). To book visit: www.colstonhall.org or tel: 0844 887 1500.

Private Peaceful, Tobacco Factory Theatres, 25 June – 12 July This is Poonamallee Productions’ 10th anniversary production, commemorating 100 years since the start of the First World War. Michael Morpurgo’s Private Peaceful relives the life of a young, First World War soldier as he awaits the firing squad at dawn. Hear his stories from growing up in rural Devon, his exciting first days at school, the accident in the forest that killed his father, his adventures with Molly, the love of his life and the battles and injustices of war that have brought him to the Front Line. First performed in Bristol in April 2004, Private Peaceful has since triumphed in Edinburgh and the West End, off-Broadway and across the UK. A decade on, this new production returns to Bristol to commemorate 100 years since the outbreak of the First World War. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactorytheatres.com.

Paolo Nutini, Bristol Harbourside amphitheatre, Wednesday 25 June In this first stand along gig at the amphitheatre for ten years, this open air event features 12 sparkling new Nutini original songs from his album Caustic Love. Tickets available from: www.gigsandtours.com, www.ticketmaster.co.uk.

Exultate Singers, St James Priory, Wednesday 25 June, 7.45pm Bristol’s accomplished chamber choir performs choral masterpieces of the Baroque era including Bach’s thrilling motet Der Geist hilft, and Domenico Scarlatti’s meditative and poignant setting of the medieval Stabat Mater poem which weaves ten voice parts in an exquisite tapestry of polyphony throughout the work. The choir is joined by cellist Richard May, who will play alongside Richard Johnson on chamber organ. Tickets £15 for adults, £13 concessions, £5 students in full time education, £2 under 18s from www.exultatesingers.org, tel: 0117 923 0164 or from Opus 13 Music at 14 St Michael’s Hill.

Haydn and Vivaldi Night, St Andrew’s Church, Backwell, Saturday 5 July, 7.30 pm The Bristol Phoenix Choir directed by Paul Walton will sing Haydn’s Missa Sancti Nicolai and Insanae et Vanae Curae, and Vivaldi’s Gloria and Dixit Dominus. Tickets £10 (16 and under free) from: tickets@bristolphoenixchoir.org.uk or tel: 07968 291882. WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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CITY | ORCHESTRA

THANK YOU FOR THE MUSIC Samantha Coleman talks to Roger Huckle, founder and artistic director of professional orchestra, Bristol Ensemble, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this month

The Bristol Ensemble with founder and artistic director Roger Huckle, pictured in the foreground, right, with his violin

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enowned for its accessible, passionate, warm and virtuosic performances, Bristol Ensemble, the city’s only professional orchestra, is a musicians’ collective, bringing together the best of the region’s performers. The group holds a pivotal position in the south west music scene, presenting a varied programme of concerts and events in the region’s major venues. This month it is celebrating its 20th anniversary. It was founded as the Emerald Ensemble by Bristol born violinist Roger Huckle, who is still leader and artistic director. “I chose the word ‘emerald’ to show that we were pitching ourselves as a quality product,” says Roger. “I was aware that there wasn’t a professional chamber orchestra in Bristol, so I made it my mission to develop one. Luckily I had lots of contacts through my previous freelance musician work, so I selected a few people to join – these were musicians who played at an excellent standard and had the right positive attitude and creativity.” The group first performed in May 1994 with a programme of Bach suites, followed by a chamber concert in Henleaze church which completely sold out. Roger says: “This was very encouraging and so we did more concerts featuring popular pieces the audiences enjoyed.” Later on, as the group grew in popularity, Roger made the decision to change the name to the Bristol Ensemble, keeping it simple and cementing the group firmly as the city’s professional orchestra. The ensemble now puts on a concert most weeks, averaging around 60 performances a year, with 55 players for large concerts and 15 players for smaller ones, regularly hosting guest conductors and working with outstanding international artists and soloists. The concerts cover everything from piano trios and chamber music to more contemporary pieces – some of you may remember the collaboration between the Bristol Ensemble, conducted by William Goodchild, and drum and bass artists Roni Size and Reprazent, which brought the house down for the opening celebrations of the new

extension to Colston Hall in 2009. The ensemble is particularly well-known for its collaborations with other art forms and film and media work as well as its highly acclaimed contemporary music series Elektrostatic at the Colston Hall, where the group works with such artists as Gabriel Prokofiev, Juice, Get the Blessing, Charles Johnston and USA group Eighth Blackbird. “Bristol is an incredibly exciting city to be working in,” says Roger. “There are so many pockets of expertise, lots of people engaged in music and plenty of opportunity for collaboration.” On top of this the ensemble regularly does recordings for tv and film, including the BBC wildlife documentaries and the recent Halo computer game. Another important part of the Bristol Ensemble, that not many people know about, is its active and innovative education programme, Preludes, with primary schools in south Bristol, which gets children learning instruments and enjoying music. Roger says: “The aim is to put classical music at the heart of every child’s education and by doing so improve confidence, co-ordination, speech and language and benefit all other areas of their learning. We want to build something long term to really have an effect on children but for this project to happen we really need more funding. What we’re doing is evidence-based practice and we’ve seen a great response from the kids. It’s amazing how much confidence it has built in them and you can see the enjoyment on their faces. They are not shy about performing in front of others either – some have even performed with the ensemble at Colston Hall!” And it’s not just children who are benefitting from the ensemble’s inspiring workshops, as the group also has an adult education arm called All 4 Music, featuring singing groups and a scratch orchestra in which anyone who can play an instrument can join in. For further information visit: www.bristolensemble.com ■

BRISTOL IS AN INCREDIBLY EXCITING CITY TO BE WORKING IN... THERE ARE SO MANY POCKETS OF EXPERTISE

UPCOMING CONCERTS:

■ On Friday 2 May at St George’s Bristol, 7.30pm, Bristol Ensemble with charismatic cellist Leonard Elschenbroich, present Vaughan Williams’ Wasps Overture; Elgar’s Cello Concerto and Bridge’s Oration, Concerto Elegiaco as part of The World Changed series. Each piece is a response to the First World War. Tickets from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001.

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■ The season’s Northern Lights series culminates on Sunday 18 May, with a concert at the Colston Hall, 7.30pm, with the Russian pianist Andrei Gavrilov. He will be directing the Bristol Ensemble from the piano in performances of piano concertos by Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov. Tickets from Colston Hall box office on tel: 0844 887 1500 or www.colstonhall.org.


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DISCOVER THE EXCELLENT WORLD OF DANCE Mumtaz Dance Company provides you with the very best of the wonderful world of Bollywood glamour through dance & Fitness

Mumtaz Dance Company specialises in: ✸ Encouraging people to participate in dance ✸ Promoting Bollywood dance and fitness to a multi-cultural society ✸ Making dance and fitness accessible for all ✸ Developing and coaching individuals ✸ Hen parties, First Dance ✸ Educational workshops for schools and colleges

"We would like to thank you for a fabulous Bollywood session our members really enjoyed it " Women's Institute Bristol contact us at enquiries@mumtazdancecompany.com Like us on Facebook & Follow us Tel : 07949 516 349 on Twitter @MumtazDance www.mumtazdancecompany.com

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CLASSICAL | MUSIC

BACK TO THE FUTURE Bristol Old Vic and Universal Music’s U-Live present Bristol Proms 2014: a live classical music festival like no other, from 28 July – 2 August at the Bristol Old Vic Charles Hazlewood’s All Star Collective

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Valentina Lisitsa

aunched last year, the Bristol Proms aims strikes a new path towards the future of classical concerts, combining musical excellence and innovation in performance in an open and accessible way. Following last year’s successful debut, Bristol Proms 2014 once again features world class musicians appearing in original performances, exploring the creative possibilities of digital technology, that have been commissioned and produced especially for the event, including: • Bryn Terfel, one of the world’s greatest bass-baritones, talking about his life and passion for music illustrated by performances of a selection of the songs that have landmarked his extraordinary career. • Daniel Hope weaves a spoken and musical journey through the Baroque period, leading up to 1766, the year the unique Bristol Old Vic Theatre was built. • International virtuoso and internet pioneer, pianist Valentina Lisitsa will perform songs by Schubert as arranged by Liszt together with the music of Michael Nyman. • Will Gregory, from the award winning band Goldfrapp, and his Moog Ensemble will perform sublime and extraordinary music using the Moog Synthesiser, one of the iconic pieces of late 20th century music technology. The diverse Bristol Proms 2014 line-up also includes the Bristol-based chamber choir the Erebus Ensemble, directed by Tom Williams, and the Sacconi Quartet; pianist Ji Liu; violinist Lisa Batiashvili; soprano Pumeza Matshikiza; Charles Hazlewood and his improvisational All Star Collective; chamber orchestras The English Concert (conducted by Robert Howarth) and film, stage and TV composer Benji Bower appearing with singer Kathleen Fitzpatrick Milton. In a series of talks Jonathan James will provide insights into the music being performed, and there is a different theme for each night of the series: Bach Night; Music in the Shadow of War; Pure Music, Pure Technology; Take Me To Your Chamber, 1700-2050; Musical Encounters and Theatre of Music. Key to creating a multi-sensory, interactive experience is the use of digital media at selected concerts. Introduced last year as an impressive combination of art and quantum mechanics, danceroom Spectroscopy added a spectacular living light show to a performance by violinist Nicola Benedetti. This year, danceroom Spectroscopy’s collaborators will be Charles Hazlewood’s All Stars, bringing their interpretative and improvisational skills to Terry Riley’s 40minute A Rainbow in Curved Air, originally released as an album in the late

1960s. At the cutting edge of the 2013 Bristol Proms was a digital hack: digital artists applied their creativity and technology (such as 360˚ cameras, binaural technology, and subjective live cameras) to the Sacconi Quartet. Their willing participants at the 2014 digital hack will be the singers of the Erebus Ensemble – whose instruments are their own bodies. Technology from 250 years ago will be placed at the fore in the final concert of the 2014 Bristol Proms, which brings a semi-staging of Purcell’s opera Dido and Aeneas, starring South African soprano Pumeza Matshikiza as the North African Queen of Carthage. Reaching far beyond the historic confines of Bristol Old Vic’s Theatre Royal, Bristol Proms 2013 reached an estimated eight million people during its week long run. Its online presence included a blog from a 12-year-old girl, describing her experience of violinist Daniel Hope and the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra in Max Richter’s recomposition of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons: “It took me through a journey that absorbed me totally. Any thought that came to my head was eaten, crushed, hoovered, you name it, by the power of this music.” Tom Morris, artistic director of the Bristol Old Vic, feels that initiatives of this kind “give us a sense of what a classical concert might look and feel like in 50 years’ time,” though he insists that “our most resounding discovery at the 2013 Bristol Proms was that the most old-fashioned technology remains the most potent of all: the atmosphere, the magic that can occur if an audience is free to respond instinctively. “With Dido and Aeneas for example, we are planning to evoke the ambience and style of an 18th century theatrical performance,” explains Tom Morris. “But this won’t be picturesque heritage opera. Dido and Aeneas is a highly emotional piece and the cultural heritage of the Bristol Old Vic is raw and radical. In the 1760s, when our theatre opened, it was presenting a dangerous and subversive art form: coming here was like visiting a speakeasy or attending a rave. It was hot-blooded entertainment.” Once again, the primary media partner for Bristol Proms 2014 is Classic FM. Presenters Tim Lihoreau, John Suchet, Jamie Crick, John Brunning and Jane Jones will be broadcasting programmes from the Bristol Old Vic across the week and there will be extensive online coverage at classicfm.com including video interviews with all headline performers. ■ For a full programme of events and to purchase tickets visit: www.bristololdvic.org.uk/bristolproms2014 or tel: 0117 987 7877

ANY THOUGHT THAT CAME TO MY HEAD WAS EATEN, CRUSHED, HOOVERED, YOU NAME IT, BY THE POWER OF THIS MUSIC

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CITYgardens

ARTS | & EXHIBITIONS

ART ATTACK Bristol Art Weekender 2 – 5 May Bristol’s art venues, artists and producers are collaborating in this weekend-long celebration of the visual arts. Involving more than 130 artists, the weekender’s ambitious I’M STAYING at Arnolfini programme showcases art (artist Impression) exhibitions of international acclaim, site-specific installations in unexpected locations, sound, video and film, and Geoff Diego Litherland at Antlers Gallery performances by outstanding contemporary artists. Jeremy Deller and Turner will be vying for top billing at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery with Deller’s Venice Biennale exhibition English Magic alongside an intimate show of eight exquisite Turner watercolours. Across the city, renowned art space Spike Island builds on the ever popular Open Studios weekend, offering the chance to glimpse behind the scenes of more than 70 artists’ studios and unveiling three new temporary works commissioned especially for the weekend. Meanwhile in Spike Island’s gallery, Andy Holden presents film, large-scale sculpture and performance exploring the output and legacy of the MI!MS (Maximum Irony! Maximum Sincerity) artistic movement, which Holden founded with friends before training as an artist in 2003. In addition, Holden’s band The Grubby Mitts will give a rare performance in the Spike gallery to kick off the Friday night celebrations. Just a short ferry ride across the harbour, Arnolfini presents Between Hello and Goodbye: the Secret World of Sarah Records – a fascinating exhibition about the enigmatic 90s Bristol record label, including the preview of Lucy Dawkins’ documentary about the label, My Secret World and performances from selected artists. Also at the Arnolfini this month is the first open commission of Bristol Biennial 2014: Crossing the Line, which takes place from 12-21 September. I’m Staying is a statement of both provocation and affirmation. Shaun C Badham’s neon artwork will travel around the city for a two year period, addressing ideas of place and change, permanence and transition. Viewers are invited to vote online for the next location. With each new site come new interpretations.

© Jeremy Deller, English Magic at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery

Encouraging us to venture beyond the gallery and museum, Situations, producers of the weekender, invites us to seek the unexpected with a new work specially commissioned for the weekender: Annika Kahrs’ Concert for the Birds in the Lord Mayor’s Chapel – a bold and stirring installation of 100 songbirds in audience to a piano recital of Franz Liszt’s Legende # 1, a solo piece of twitter-like trills. Bristol’s Royal West of England Academy is staging a major multi-disciplinary survey show of British artists’ responses to the sea, from Turner and Constable to the best of contemporary The Secret talent. World of Bristol’s growing number Sarah Records at of critically significant Arnolfini commercial galleries contribute to the programme too: celebrated British artist, Richard Woods continues to traverse the boundaries between art, architecture and design, transforming Works|Projects’ space, and nomadic gallery, Antlers Gallery will be programming a tightly selected group show including the work of Karin Krommes and Geoff Diego Litherland. The weekender will also spotlight several of Bristol’s dynamic range of artist-run initiatives, including Hand in Glove, The Parlour Showrooms, BS Deathdrive, Spike Associates and Bristol Biennial. For a full line up of events, visit: www.bristolartweekender.co.uk

Roar: Paul Oz solo show View Art Gallery, 1 May – 29 June

Paul Oz, Senna Skull

Paul Oz, Gorilla

Internationally acclaimed Pop artist, Paul Oz returns to View Art Gallery after two sell-out appearances in group shows in 2013. This solo show presents a new collection of paintings inspired by some of the most awesome animals on earth. Majestic mammals, reptiles and birds come to life in Paul’s hands through his distinctive technique, with a palette knife and oil paint. His intensely thick paint application, in places carved 2cm thick, gives his paintings an incredible 3D effect. Through these paintings, Paul also prompts us to consider the conservation of many endangered species and the charitable work done by organisations such as Bristol Zoo Gardens and its sister venue, Wild Place Project, who are collaborating with View in this exhibition. In addition to wild animals, Paul has taken the opportunity to incorporate his passion of F1 racing, into the exhibition theme. Skullpture is a title Paul has named for his creation of skulls of animals representing racing teams, using a combination of materials, some of which are taken straight from F1 cars and helmets. View Gallery, 159-161 Hotwell Road. www.viewartgallery.co.uk

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Quiltfest, Badminton School, 29 - 31 May Bristol Quilters is a thriving local quilt group with more than 120 members. This annual summer exhibition of their work is one of the largest quilt shows in the Bristol area. On show will be more than 100 quilts as well as handmade treats and gifts and homemade cakes and refreshments. Badminton School, Westbury Road, Bristol. Opening times: Thursday, 1pm–6pm; Friday, 10am–6pm; Saturday, 10am–4pm. Admission: £4. www.bristolquilters.co.uk

Quilt by Julie Coggins

Bristol Savages 104th annual exhibition, Red Lodge, 3 - 17 May The prestigious Bristol Savages arts society, boasting some of the best artists from the Bristol area will be holding its annual exhibition at the Red Lodge on Park Row where around 130 paintings will be on view and for sale. The exhibition is open to the public free of charge every day from 10am – 4.45pm. For further information visit: www.bristolsavages.org. Pip Gillman, Room 212 1 - 17 May Pip Gillman is renowned for his watercolour paintings of town scapes around Bristol and Bath and this time he is concentrating on the area local to Room 212. His work includes familiar scenes such as the corner of Gloucester Road and Bishop Road, Joes Bakery and views down Pigsty Hill and around St Andrew’s Park. Self-taught, and with no formal art training, Pip’s influences are many, but his hope is to capture an individual feel for the subject. Room 212, Gloucester Road. www.room212.co.uk Pip Gillman

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Spring exhibition, Coldharbour Framery & Gallery, throughout May

Jenny Urquhart, Ferns and Foxgloves

The emphasis here is firmly on local, affordable art and crafts, and the gallery plays host to around 25 artists from Bristol and the south west, offering a constantly evolving mix of original paintings, prints, sculpture, ceramics, wood and glass. There’s always a burst of creative energy in spring, and it is a particularly exciting time in the gallery, with new artists coming in and returning artists exploring new areas. Well-known for her distinctive watercolours of Bristol scenes, Abigail McDougall often features the play of light on water in her work, and her most recent pieces are based on sketches made on the banks of the river Frome. Sculptor Kate Newlyn has been working both on classical themes of inner struggle and friendship, as well as scenes of daily life inspired by her summer in the Turkish countryside. Jenny Urquhart, another gallery favourite, has returned to the south-west coast for inspiration, adding texture to her colourful collages with Cornish flowers made of buttons. The English countryside is the inspiration for many of the crafts on display too: new in are delicate white porcelain bowls featuring Cornish flowers by Melissa Choroszewska, and glass panels with cow parsley motifs by Alice Gare, while Iris Milward returns with her animal poetry tiles, this time glazed in green as well as her trade-mark blue. Coldharbour Framery & Gallery 111 Coldharbour Road, Westbury Park. www.coldharbourgallery.co.uk

Te Ata’s Vision by Chris Pappan

First People, Second City, Rainmaker Gallery, 17 June – 9 August Through the art of Chris Pappan and Debra YepaPappan this exhibition, curated by Dr Max Carocci of the British Museum and Joanne Prince of Rainmaker, explores the identities of indigenous peoples in Chicago. Over half the US Native American population live in cities and this contemporary, urban, inter-tribal culture influences and inspires both artists. Chris Pappan summons characters from the past in his drawings that re-stage historical photographic portraits against carefully chosen backgrounds, conveying political messages about Native Americans’ socio-economic conditions, land rights, cultural identity and historical events. Chris’ reflected and distorted images challenge us to go beyond the surface, to glimpse the complexities of the lived experience and to nurture a vision that resonates with indigenous views, spiritualities and philosophies. Debra Yepa-Pappan draws on her experience of growing up in Chicago, with a Korean mother and Native American father. In digitally manipulated prints she layers images of her daughter’s first traditional dance with decorative Asian patterns, symbolic butterflies, dragonflies and urban scenery. The results are colourful celebrations of a dualidentity. While her husband’s work often calls on figures from the past, Debra frequently depicts the next generation carrying forward tradition as a natural part of today’s society. Rainmaker gallery, 123 Coldharbour Road. www.rainmakerart.co.uk

May Array, Lime Tree Gallery, 1 - 28 May Lime Tree Gallery has chosen an uplifting collection of new work for its short May exhibition. Painters include, new to Bristol, the very widely collected, Cornish inspired, Emma Williams. Emma’s original training in textile design influences her very distinctive work, in which colour, decorative qualities and flattened perspective play an essential role. Emma is joined by gallery favourites, Michael G Clark PAI, Marion Thomson and Sylvia Paul, fresh from her sell-out solo show in Japan. Sylvia’s visits to Japan have infused new qualities into her paintings with the beautiful colours and texture of kimono silk an obvious inspiration. Her memories of Japanese cityscapes, stone lanterns and rich interiors inspire Sylvia’s captivating collages with layers of hidden meanings, messages and associations. Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road. Tel: 0117 929 2527 www.limetreegallery.com

Sylvia Paul, Kimono Collage

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David C Johnson: Grounded, Grant Bradley Gallery, 10 - 31 May

ART TRAILS Woman by Christine Molan

Laura Robertson, one lump or two Magda Goss

Free Fall by Laura Howarth

Over the past two years, David Johnson has been exploring the landscape and seascape of England. These have been the inspiration for his colourful impressions of scenes remembered, which are completed in oils and acrylics, in his studio in Stokes Croft. He has also continued his interest in creating images from life, where the model is set in a domestic scene. A number of these images, using mixed media, including collage, will be on display. David’s etchings use several techniques from drypoint, aquatint and sugar-lift to photo-polymer. These small-scale prints in exclusively limited editions will feature boats and travellers. David has had his work selected and hung at the RWA and at small galleries in the south west. His journey in the past decade from international businessman to visual artist and creative writer has been an unusual and rewarding one. Also on show at the gallery: works by Bristol-based wood sculptor Chris Sherratt and landscape paintings by Carolyn Lamb, Rachel Howells and Roy Perry. The Grant Bradley Gallery, Bedminster Parade. Tel: 0117 9637 673 or visit: www.grantbradleygallery.co.uk

BS9 Arts Trail, 10 - 11 May, 11am - 5pm This year the art trail season in Bristol will be starting with a fresh, new, lively trail, extending from Stoke Bishop across the Downs into Henleaze and Westbury-onTrym. The BS9 Arts Trail will be showcasing nearly 70 artists working in a huge variety of mediums including paintings, handmade prints, glass work, mosaics, jewellery, textile, sculpture and photography. The venues include the Scout Hall at Stoke Bishop, the theatre hall at St Monica’s Nursing Home, Stoke Bishop Village Hall, Westbury Village Hall and numerous private homes and studios. All venues are free to enter and there will be the opportunity to meet the artists and watch some of them at work. It’s a great way to see the latest creative works of these artists, buy art at affordable prices or even discuss commissioning individual artwork, with plenty of opportunities for time out with a refreshing cuppa along the way. Leaflets showing the trail map and artist details will be available at local libraries, cafés and shops. For more information visit: www.bs9arts.co.uk

Westbury Park Art Trail, 6 – 7 June

Comfortable Surroundings by Phillippa Crabbe

Best known for Waitrose and the Orpheus Cinema this vibrant area on the edge of the Downs is buzzing with creativity. This is the second year of the Westbury Park Art Trail which is linked to the popular Westbury Park Festival. Walk around the art trail and discover galleries, a group show in a church, and artists exhibiting in their own homes. There is a wide variety of work on display including paintings, prints, ceramics, photography, wood carving, jewellery and textiles. At the Methodist church, Northview, children can take part in a Big Draw activity and there will be refreshments, and Heart Space Studios will be giving information about its regular textile and mixed media courses. Friday, 6pm -9 pm; Saturday, 11am- 5pm. For further information visit: www.westburyparkarttrail.weebly.com. Trail guides are available from galleries in Westbury Park and local libraries.

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Wokefield Sky by David Johnson

Spring Exhibition, Clifton Fine Art, Christmas Steps, until 17 May On show will be a new series of urban paintings of Bristol by Tom White; bright, engaging work of dolls interacting by Colin Vincent; Harriet Whyatt’s witty paintings inspired by the romanticism, tradition and pride of Romany Gypsies; carvings of everyday objects in expensive materials like marble by Devon based sculptor Lao-Key; narratives of dreams made from a variety of materials by Frances Bloomfield; the latest series of Turner-esque oil paintings inspired by Bristol and the surrounding area from respected Cornish artist Steve Slimm; anthropomorphic portraits by English folklore-influenced Harry Bunce; and sculpture by Sophie Howard exploring the human body. Clifton Fine Art, 11 Christmas Steps. Open: 10am – 6pm. For further information visit: www.cliftonfineart.com No Diving by Tom White


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“Mixed Anemones” by Emma Williams

May Array: 1-29 May Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

Tel 0117 929 2527

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OUT OF TOWN Mixed Exhibition, Beaux Arts, Bath, throughout May This exhibition at Beaux Arts features one of Bath’s most renowned contemporary artists – sculptor Anna Gillespie. Whether it be her cast bronzes, her environmental Anna Gillespie, Let Heaven Go sculptures made from acorn and beech nut casings, or her use of found objects in combination with unique bronze figures, Anna’s burgeoning reputation is sure to be further enhanced in her latest solo show here with Bath’s longest established commercial art space. Also on show are paintings by David Tress and ceramics by Carina Ciscatto. Beaux Arts Bath, 12-13 York Street, Bath. Tel: 01225 464850 www.beauxartsbath.co.uk

Take 5 Arts, The Oak Room, Curzon Cinema, Clevedon, throughout May There are five professional artists involved in this exhibition, incorporating silk painting, ceramics, glass design, jewellery, needlepoint, mixed media and glass mosaic. Each artist will be running workshops in the Oak Room alongside the exhibition too, for which you can book in advance.

Spring mixed exhibition, Sky Blue Framing and Gallery, throughout May

On show are Wendy French’s silk screen paintings, celebrating spring with floral images in her unique style of layering colours; as well as new collographs from Sue Brown, Catherine Hyde signed limited edition images, semi-precious stone necklaces and earrings from Tessa Tyldesley and glass wave paintings from Jane Reeves. As well as the desirable artworks on show at Sky Blue you will also find that they have a thriving framing business on site. All of the pictures on the walls are framed in house and are examples of their creativity. Usually either artist and owner Mike Ogden or gallery manager Sylvia is behind the counter and both have a wealth of experience in helping customers choose the right frame to complement their artwork. They are experts in conservation framing and can frame original paintings, limited edition prints, maps, photographs, certificates and many other types of art. If you are looking for creativity they specialise in making box frames for the presentation of contemporary art, sports shirts and all types of 3D objects. Sky Blue Framing & Gallery, 27 North View, Westbury Park. Tel: 0117 9733995. Wedding by Sally Stafford

Sally Stafford, Innocent Fine Art, 9 – 31 May Inspired by a year of travelling and by her Gloucestershire home, this solo show by Sally Stafford includes the golden grasses of central Portugal, almond blossom in southern Spain, the meadows of Skye, the Forest of Dean and most especially the River Severn which passes in front of Sally’s home. The textures and luminous colours in Sally’s work are created by fast, intense layering of paint, ink, wax, pigment and metal leaf. In contrast the finished paintings have a contemplative stillness and peace. Innocent Fine Art, 7a Boyces Avenue, Clifton. Tel: 0117 973 2614, www.innocentfineart.co.uk ■ A new Art Gallery has opened its doors in The Galleries Shopping Centre. The Studio Nine Gallery showcases a wide range of original artwork, bespoke furniture and limited edition prints, all created by local artists. The gallery was founded by Jon Newton, a bespoke furniture and interiors specialist.

Becky Wills

BV Open Studios, 29 May - 1 June BV Studios is located opposite Windmill Hill City Farm and the bland, anonymous exterior gives no clue as to the fascinating things that go on behind those walls. In fact, the studios are home to over 140 artists, making it one of the largest studio complexes in the country. Established at the beginning of 2010, to provide affordable space for artists, BV welcomes applications from artists at any stage in their career, including recent graduates. A huge range of work is created here – from painting, drawing, sculpture in wood, glass and metal, to photography, filmmaking and digital-based work. The open studios event offers a rare and exciting opportunity to wander through the different spaces, enjoy the artwork and also meet the artists. A pop-up café will be serving food all weekend, plus a barista serving excellent coffee. For further information visit: www.bvstudios.co.uk

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Poppies, silk screen by Wendy French

Gillian Adair McFarland: Here to There RE Bucheli Fine Art, 9 - 31 May An exhibition of recent work by Gillian McFarland. Fiona Cassidy, curator of the exhibition says: “I am yet to see anyone stand in front of one of Gillian McFarland’s art works and not be captivated and drawn in. Her swathes of dots create serenely abstract drawings. They range from intimate, tenderly punched pieces a handful of inches across to dramatic sweeps covering an entire wall. In addition to the piercings, delicate additions of pencil and flashes of colour find their way in. McFarlandʼs works are undoubtably beautiful; they sooth and intrigue. Their simplicity is beguiling. Sometimes a pool of ink is allowed to bleed across a surface and there is something bodily, of matter, about these coloured stains.” There will be a meet the artist event at the gallery on Saturday 24 May, 2.30pm-4.30pm. RE Bucheli Fine Art & Fine Frames, Albion House, 12A Broad Street. Tel: 0117 929 7747 www.rebucheli.co.uk Gillian McFarland, Burst


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CITY | EXHIBITION

The Mouth of the Avon, near Bristol, seen from Cliffs below Clifton, by JMW Turner, 1791–1792. © Bristol Museums, Galleries and Archives

INSPIRED BY BRISTOL Samantha Coleman talks to Karen MacDonald, who is coordinating an exhibition of watercolour paintings by JMW Turner, opening at the Bristol Museum & Art Gallery on 1 May before it goes on tour in July

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ou may not be aware that one of the country’s most prolific and wellrespected painters spent time in Bristol, developing the skills that would make him one of the most influential painters in the world. JMW Turner (1775-1851) stayed with the Narraway family, friends of his father, in Broadmead during the summers of 1791-1792 when he was just 16 and studying at the Royal Academy, where he exhibited a watercolour for the first time in 1790. Always one for an adventure, Turner particularly enjoyed climbing around the gorge near Clifton and was nicknamed ‘Prince of the Rocks’ by his hosts. Turner was undoubtedly one of the most important British artists to visit Bristol and seek inspiration from the dramatic landscape of the Avon Gorge. In these rural and waterside edges of the city, Turner found inspiration from the landscape and ships, painting scenes around Bristol, many of which depict the Avon Gorge. Now, for the first time, these works on paper will be exhibited together at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery from 1 May – 6 July in a small, intimate show called Watercolours from the West, where you’ll be able to see five watercolours of Bristol alongside one of Bath Abbey, Pembroke Castle and the Stelvio Pass in the Italian Alps which shows how Turner’s Bristol visit influenced later works of rocky landscapes. Held by collections in the west of England, these eight watercolours span the artist’s career from student days to mature style. As part of the exhibition, there will also be an interactive link to Turner’s sketchbook of his Bristol and Wiltshire visit, which is now kept in the collections at Tate Britain. Karen MacDonald, who is coordinating the project at Bristol, says: “Turner’s earliest dated drawing was 1787 (when he was 12) so ours are four years on from that. He started at the Royal Academy in 1789 so was two years into his studies when he visited Bristol. The watercolours on show will help to explain and illustrate the aesthetic and historical relevance of the Bristol landscape, highlighting the roots of Turner’s signature style and the early interests that fuelled it. “These early works show an extraordinary talent in development, but don’t look like Turners. For example, Avon Gorge and Bristol Hotwell was painted when Turner was still in the process of learning his trade, having conventional lessons in painting and draughtsmanship, and was concerned about accuracy. However, the later Pembroke Castle (1829-20) is instantly 50 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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recognisable as a typical Turner work from the depiction of the weather and atmosphere, showing his interest in painting awe-inspiring scenes that defined the Romantic movement he was a part of.” A highlight of the exhibition is Bristol’s recently acquired Turner watercolour, The Mouth of the Avon, near Bristol, seen from Cliffs below Seawalls, which hasn’t been seen in public since 1951, and was rarely exhibited before that. Bristol Museums Galleries and Archives fine art curator, Jenny Gaschke, says of the painting: “It is an accomplished work for a young artist, already revealing his subtle manipulation of nature to emphasise the drama of a scene: the warm light is employed to render a more atmospheric effect and the dimensions of the cave are enlarged. Taking the view from within the dark cave sets this image apart from Turner’s other Avon Gorge views and, although only in a general compositional manner, begs comparison with Grand Tour views of caves before the artist had actually visited Italy himself. “In the still strongly topographical approach of the Bristol visits, Turner further developed his own style and artistic confidence. This finished work shows areas of scratching out and finger and thumb prints, which are characteristic of Turner’ s method. The carefully chosen and skilfully rendered composition allows the work to stand alone, although it is smaller than other finished views of the gorge.” This exhibition is the first public project of the Frameworks partnership between Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, the Holburne Museum in Bath, The Wilson in Cheltenham, Swindon Museum & Art Gallery and the Victoria Art Gallery in Bath. It aims to raise the profile of the five art collections and develop opportunities to share audiences, skills and expertise. After showing at Bristol, the exhibition will tour to the other galleries. To coincide with the tour there will be a series of talks exploring themes connected with the works. On Saturday 3 May, hear art historian and university professor Sam Smiles talk on Art and the Avon Gorge at 2pm; while on Saturday 14 June, 10.30am – 3pm an Introduction to Painting in Watercolour workshop will take place, suitable for beginners. For further information about these events, or to book visit: www.bristolmuseums.org.uk or tel: 0117 9223571. The exhibition runs from 1 May – 6 July and is free to enter. Karen says: “Works on paper can’t be displayed for too long because of their fragility, so this is a unique opportunity not to be missed.” ■


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Diana Bruce - Nice

Westbury Park Art Trail 2014 Friday 6th June 6 - 9pm Saturday 7th June 11 - 5pm Free Community Event Walkable Trail

‘Big Draw’ free children’s event in the Church venue Saturday 7th June

Trail leaflets can be collected from local libraries and galleries in Westbury Park and surrounds. Please see website for further details & downloadable art trail guide

www.westburyparkarttrail.weebly.com

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nick cudworth gallery

Caterpillar - Dawn - Oil on canvas

BATH APPROACHES Exhibition from 1 – 31 May An exhibition of originals and prints of familiar buildings and landscapes that welcome the traveller on their journey into Bath

5 London Street (top end of Walcot Street), Bath BA1 5BU tel 01225 445221 / 07968 047639 gallery@nickcudworth.com www.nickcudworth.com

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Oil on Canvas

Tom White

SPRING EXHIBITION Harriet Whyatt • Lao-Key • Tom White Colin Vincent • Sophie Howard • Harry Bunce Frances Bloomfield 21st April - 17th May • Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm 11 Christmas Steps, Bristol BS1 5BS (T) 0781 5810302

www.cliftonfineart.com

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BRISTOL | HISTORY

What’s in a name? As part of a new series of features looking at the significance and origins of place names in Bristol, Becky Elliot looks at the history of Hotwells

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tanding sentry at the gateway to the historic port of Bristol, the ancient suburb of Hotwells was once the sole domain of merchants, sailors, ship builders and dock workers.This industrious, unassuming pocket of the city was named after the warm spring that bubbles up through the rocks at the bottom of the Avon Gorge, where Bridge Valley Road now meets the Portway. First documented in 1480 by local chronicler and topographer William Worcester, the milky spring water, rich in calcium, sulphates and minerals, had long been drunk by sailors returning to the port of Bristol after their voyages as a cure for scurvy. But it wasn’t until the 18th century that the spring gained nationwide renown for its healing properties, and Hotwells became one of the most fashionable places in Britain. In 1677, the Society of the Merchant Venturers recognised the commercial potential of the spring and set about transforming it into a tourist destination to rival that of the nearby spa in Bath. It granted a 90-year lease to two of its members, Charles Jones and Thomas Callow Hill, with strict instruction that £500 be spent transforming the area into a state-ofthe-art health resort. A splendid bath house was built, complete with modern pumping system, comfortable lodgings and an access road that swept visitors down through the majestic gorge to reach the spa at the bottom of the hill. By 1694 the work was complete, and the Hotwell House opened for business. This was the start of an economic boom for Hotwells which, although brief, shaped the architecture of the area that we know today. Huge claims were made for the medicinal properties of the waters and, as word spread, the rich, famous, and titled elite of the 18th century flocked in their hundreds to bathe in the curative spring. Fine terraces and squares, such as St Vincent’s Parade, Hope Square and Granby Hill, were built to house the tourists, and

the overflow even spread up the hill to engulf the small rural village of Clifton, sparking its transformation into one of the most majestic areas of Bristol. Offering a charming rural alternative to the city spa in Bath, Hotwells became the favourite retreat for the summer season. From May to October, the suburb thrummed with activity as Georgian high society converged on the area. Illustrious characters including Swift, Defoe and Haydn came to take the healing waters and, as its popularity grew, so did the array of diversions available beyond the spa itself. Entrepreneurial locals offered boat trips along the river, as well as excursions across the Avon on the Rownham Ferry for an afternoon of sketching in Leigh Woods, which afforded stunning views across the gorge and over to the spa itself, followed by strawberry teas in Long Ashton. Each evening, melodies from open air concerts would mingle in the balmy air, dissipated only by the colourful explosion of fireworks that signalled the close of the day’s amusements. Traders from as far as London flocked to the area to sell their wares to the wealthy visitors and, for those who couldn’t attend the spa in person, the Hotwells water was bottled in local glasshouses and sold throughout Europe. The tourist trade even gave birth to Jacobs Wells Theatre, the first in Bristol and one of the earliest to open outside London. Brainchild of Somerset actor John Hippisley, it raised the curtain in 1728 and offered an array of performances to suit all tastes, from the lofty heights of Shakespearean tragedy to the bawdy bowls of Rabelaisian pantomime. Situated next to an ale house, rumour has it that many rowdy evenings were fuelled by drink passed to punters through a hole in the wall. Brawls were commonplace, as was the presence of opportunistic pickpockets, so it was no wonder that the arrival of the more genteel Theatre Royal on King

... THE RICH, FAMOUS, AND TITLED ELITE OF THE 18TH CENTURY FLOCKED IN THEIR HUNDREDS TO BATHE IN THE CURATIVE SPRING

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BRISTOL | HISTORY

TAKING THE WATERS: main image, Rownham Ferry, by Alexander Rippingille Above, Old Hotwell House, by Samuel Jackson; right, Portrait of Thomas Goldney III, by Richard Phelps All images courtesy of Bristol Museums, Galleries & Archives

Street in 1777 killed off the trade of its smaller rival, which closed in 1803. And it was not only the theatre trade that slumped at the turn of the 19th century. As the number of graves in the Strangers’ Burial Ground grew, the reputation of the healing waters of Hotwells declined, and the economic downturn that accompanied the Napoleonic Wars proved the final death knell. But a glimpse of the glamour of Hotwells’ hey-day is still possible through the legacy of one local man. In the 1730s, Thomas Goldney III transformed his family estate into a giant playground designed to tickle the fancies of the frivolous tourists, and the enchanting realisations of his commercial vision still exist today. Now owned by the University of Bristol, Goldney House opens its doors once a year to allow visitors to meander through the ornate

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orangery, frolic in the pretty pleasure garden, or take a turn round the rotunda, following in the well-shod footsteps of the Georgian patrons. Most magical of all is a peek inside the underground grotto, encrusted with the famous ‘Bristol diamonds’ of quartz and rock crystal that sparkle a myriad of colours through the gloom, winking to each other their secret memories of Hotwells’ past. ■

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BRISTOL AT WORK David John Foster, managing director of The French Garden. Photograph by Charlotte Stone In 1964 my father set up John Foster and Sons in Gloucester, wholesaling fruit and vegetables. On his first visit to the old Bristol market in St Nick’s he took me, aged four, beside him in the front of a secondhand bread van. As his company grew so did I and the sights and sounds of the market filled my imagination. I worked in my father’s award winning shop The Fruit Bowl in Thornbury and sold my own home grown radishes and tomatoes from our wholesale lorries. At 20 I joined the first of three wholesalers on the then new market in St Phillips. I moved up through the ranks to the position of regional sales director and, as the surface of the industry changed, I changed with it. Opening wooden crates with little hammers that carried kiwi fruits packed in sawdust were long surpassed by airfreight, forklift trucks and Twitter, and it was now time for a new challenge. With the help of the sadly departed Phil Marsh we set up The French Garden Bristol. Here we sell the very finest French, British and Italian produce direct from the markets in Paris and Milan and the best growers across the UK. But what was most important was to specialise in proper customer care, recognising it to be just as crucial in wholesale as in any sector. The times and produce may have changed but the most important things have not: the people. www.charlottestonephoto.com 56 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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The Bristol Magazine is Bristol’s biggest premium lifestyle magazine.

THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

MEDIA SALES

The Bath Magazine is the city’s biggest monthly media. Both titles are widely regarded as two of finest city magazines in the UK and we are now looking out for a talented individual who would like to work with our team. The ideal candidate will possess at least one year’s media sales experience, preferably gained from a quality magazine publisher or similar sales environment. Well educated, well spoken, you will be personable, enjoy selling and possess the drive and confidence to make a valuable contribution to our continued success. We love producing superb magazines, and offering our customers a great service. The best part of our success is that it is always well rewarded and becomes an enjoyable career opportunity. Please send your CV and covering letter to Steve Miklos. email: steve@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Tel: 0117 974 2800 www. thebristolmagazine.co.uk

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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FOOD | AND DRINK

WINING & DINING news and reviews Drink up thy zider

Quick bites ■ Paintings of Bristol landmarks produced by nationally acclaimed artists can now be seen at the Steak of the Art restaurant on Bristol’s Harbourside, which combines artistthemed eating areas with original art. Gallery and restaurant owner Stephen Bowen said: “We will be commissioning new paintings of Bristol Landmarks throughout the year and will be using established as well as up and coming artists to deliver them.” The art gallery is open from 11 am to 11pm Monday to Saturday and 11am to 9pm on Sundays. ■ To celebrate the May bank holidays, the Second Floor Restaurant at Harvey Nichols Bristol is offering a special cinema package so you can enjoy your long weekend in style. The cinema package and lunch includes a two course meal, sweet-treat goody bag and cinema tickets of your choice for the Showcase Cinema in Cabot Circus for £25 per person, available on 5 and 26 May. To book, contact tel: 0117 9168899. ■ A new independent cocktail bar and kitchen has opened on Cheltenham Road inspired by prohibition era traditions. The Bootlegger offers a wide selection of drinks and cocktails, an American inspired menu and live swing, jazz, blues and rock n roll music three nights a week. The kitchen is open for brunch, lunch and dinner, serving fresh, local food in a relaxed atmosphere. Don’t miss the tasty pancakes and blueberries – a typical New York style brunch. Or just pop in for a Columbian coffee. You can find The Bootlegger at 233 Cheltenham Road, or for further information visit: www.bristolbootlegger.co.uk

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ristol Cider Shop’s annual bank holiday cider and sausage festival is back at the Southbank Club in Southville on Saturday 3 and Sunday 4 May. Sticking with tradition, the event will celebrate all things west country, including over 30 varieties of the very best local ciders, sizzling sausages from Bristol butchers and local Cajun, country and roots music. Ponchartrain will be bringing their rootsy, good time, country and bluegrass vibes on Saturday night, and Flash Harry will travel from the swamplands of Louisiana to the hills of Kildare with their foot stomping Irish/Cajun/folk blend on the Sunday evening. Entry is free during the day (12pm-6pm), with families welcome. Soft drinks will be available, along with alternative alcoholic options for non-cider drinkers. Tickets for the Saturday and Sunday night (7pmmidnight) are £5 each, available from Bristol Cider Shop.

Gone to market A series of food markets that have been held at Bristol’s Business Quarter at Temple Quay, have proved so successful that they have become a weekly event, taking place every Thursday lunchtime. The food and street-food markets were originally held on a monthly basis, gradually building to three times a month. Now, with interest the markets are regularly attracting hundreds of customers, and have become a welcome addition to Temple Quay’s calendar. Vicki Williams of property adviser GVA, managing agent for Temple Quay, says: “The markets have proved a great way of adding to the vibrancy of Temple Quay, making great use of the square and views of the river, providing an interesting lunch time offerING to local occupiers.” On the third Thursday of every month, local artisan producers bring their stalls to Temple Quay, while the first Thursday is a food market, and the second and fourth Thursdays of every month dedicated to street-food. The market traders currently include: Agnes Spencer’s Jamaican cuisine; Niang’s Thai Snacks; She Sells Sushi; American Kitchen, Jacob’s finest falafel and hummus dishes, as well as Sue’s Cakes. The Temple Quay market is being featured as part of the Bristol Food Connections festival that takes place in May, with the Bristol Eats market on Thursday 8 May. And with Bristol’s food market scene ever

growing, Mullion Cove has announced dates for four seasonal markets on Bristol’s historic dockside, collaborating with the ss Great Britain. The first market will Gourmet pies on sale at take place on the Mullion Cove market Saturday 3 May from 10am – 4pm in Brunel Square, where there will be an emphasis on showcasing the best in local food and drink as well as a fine selection of craft stalls too. Expect local producers selling artisan bread and cheese, hearty pies, bison and venison burgers, chilli sauces, handmade jewellery, local art and pottery, fudge, cakes and treats, preserves and sauces, local craft beer, wine and cider and much more. With free entry, ample parking and a ferry stop close-by, the market is a great way to spend a Saturday afternoon. Future summer, autumn and winter markets will take place on: Saturday 9 August, Saturday 25 October and Saturday 13 December. All markets will take place from 10am – 4pm in Brunel Square, outside Brunel’s ss Great Britain.


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A quality local independent Italian that's family run and well established. WWW.PIAZZADIROMA.CO.UK 178 WHITELADIES ROAD, CLIFTON, BRISTOL, BS8 2XU OPEN 6PM TO 11PM TUESDAY TO SUNDAY

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FOODIE | EVENT

BRISTOL FOOD CULTURE

Left, Barny Haughton, above, Harts Bakery © kirstieyoungphotography.com

Aisling Mustan takes a look at what makes Bristol’s foodie scene so special ahead of Bristol Food Connections, a city-wide event uniting the booming food businesses and local producers with the community

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ommunity spirit, a can-do attitude, a supportive environment for new businesses and a thriving field to fork movement are just some of the things that contribute to Bristol’s independent and maverick food culture. The city is bursting at the seams with new restaurants, street food stalls, supper clubs, bakeries, delis and markets. There’s also a strong community focus: from city farms to cookery schools, uniting and strengthening groups of people through food is a core value that permeates Bristol’s food culture. And all of these elements are epitomised by Bristol Food Connections, a new city-wide food event involving over 200 organisations, running from 1 – 11 May, demonstrating how food unites people from all walks of life. Some of the most exciting developments in Bristol’s food scene are happening on the streets and street food, pop-up restaurants and supper clubs have revolutionised eating out in Bristol in recent years. One of the focal points of Bristol Food Connections is the Eat Drink Bristol Fashion pop-up tipi village in Queen Square. Returning for a third year, this restaurant, tapas bar and live music venue will host a line-up of the south west’s best known chefs who will each take over the temporary fine-dining restaurant for a night. Josh Eggleton, chef proprietor of the Michelin-starred Pony & Trap in Chew Magna, is the director of EDBF. He says: “I want to get people thinking about the quality of the food they are eating, the quality of the produce and where it comes from. Bristol is well placed to be a leading light in changing attitudes towards food.” Pop-up restaurants and supper clubs will take place across the city as part of Bristol Food Connections including Mitch Tonks in Temple Meads, Clandesdiner in a secret location under a big top and Bordeaux Quay’s Kelly Sealy at Maison Paradiso. One of Bristol Food Connections’ key themes is land and growing – which makes sense for one the UK’s most verdant cities. Bristol is rich in urban farms, community gardens and unique growing projects, driven by people who are passionate about food, the environment and the local community. One such example are the city farms in St Werburghs and Windmill Hill which sell a cornucopia of fresh produce throughout the year and offer local residents the opportunity to reconnect with the land. Both city farms are hosting an array of activities throughout Bristol Food Connections including wild food walks, a forest gardening day and family growing sessions. Bristol is leading the way when it comes to addressing the global challenges surrounding food production and sustainability. We are the first UK city to have its own Food Policy Council and Good Food Plan and the aim is to establish Bristol as the sustainable food capital of Europe using the 2014 Green Capital and Bristol Food Connections as a platform. Aine Morris of the Sustainable Food Trust, which is headquartered in Bristol, says: “We’re uniquely situated on two rivers with easy access to incredibly fertile land and food producing communities in the surrounding counties. The wealth of great quality local produce is supported by an independent and entrepreneurial spirit among people who dedicate their lives to making products with passion and integrity. From farmers’ markets to pop-up restaurants, local chefs to urbangrowing projects, Bristol has an active and vibrant food community that is

worth celebrating.” Throughout Bristol Food Connections, there will be a range of talks and seminars around the theme of food sustainability including the Land and Food Forum, a BBC Radio 4 special. Buying direct from producers couldn’t be easier in Bristol. Markets all over the city, connect the region’s producers with an audience hungry for their wares. As well as at St Nick’s, you’ll find local producers at the Love Food Festival, run by Lorna Knapman, curator of Bristol Food Connections. Since starting Love Food Festival in Bristol in 2008 she has staged over 50 events all over the south west. Supporting small food businesses is at the heart of what she does, “Love Food offers considerable exposure to small producers. We want to offer food producers the opportunity to showcase their great produce so we make sure that our stall fees are modest.” Markets are a key part of Bristol Food Connections with a producers’ market in the amphitheatre, Slow Food International’s Forgotten Foods market in College Green and pop-up markets in Easton, St Paul’s and Hengrove. Artisan produce is rapidly expanding in Bristol, and nowhere is this more evident than in the proliferation of bakeries in the city. One success story is that of Laura Hart, a local baker and chef, who opened Hart’s Bakery in a Victorian railway arch at Temple Meads. Laura says: “Bristol has a very special food culture – managing to balance a small community ethos with a big city vibe. The food scene is small, close knit and very supportive of new enterprise, giving the feeling that anything is possible with enough passion and energy!” One of over 50 eateries on the Bristol Food Connections food trail, Harts Bakery is baking a special sourdough loaf using fruit and spice to reflect Bristol’s trading history. A key tenet of Bristol Food Connections is that it is a food festival for everyone. A pioneer of this philosophy is Barny Haughton, who has a long term passion for food education. Barny runs Bristol’s ground-breaking cookery school, Square Food Foundation, in Knowle West. A community interest company, all profit from the Foundation goes to supporting community projects. The cookery courses at Square Food aim to address the issue of how to cook good food on a budget. Barney says: “At Square Food Foundation we teach people from all walks of life to cook good food from scratch; masterclasses subsidise our community cooking programme – and in doing this we bridge the gap, this feels uniquely Bristol.” Square Food Foundation is hosting a number of activities as part of Bristol Food Connections including a Drop in & Bake workshop and the launch of the Knowle West Marketplace and Pizza Cafe. Bristol is full of inspiring people passionate about the importance of local, sustainable food that benefits both producers and consumers. In Bristol, the phrase ‘food hero’ goes far beyond the ability to cook an amazing meal, it signifies someone committed to seeing real social change, and choosing food as a medium through which to make this happen. ■

BRISTOL IS WELL PLACED TO BE A LEADING LIGHT IN CHANGING ATTITUDES TOWARDS FOOD

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More than 150 events will take place all over the city during Bristol Food Connections. For more information visit: www.bristolfoodconnections.com


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PROBABLY THE BEST SUPPER CLUB IN THE WORLD... 20,000 MAGAZINES DELIVERED BUT YOU CAN NOW ALSO FIND US EXCLUSIVELY AT

Complimentary copies of TBM are now specially available to customers of Harvey Nichols Bristol

Supplies are limited and the stands are re-stocked by the Harvey Nichols staff on a daily basis.

YOU CAN ALSO PICK UP THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE AT JOHN LEWIS, THE MALL AT CRIBBS CAUSEWAY, AND SELECTED WAITROSE STORES ACROSS BRISTOL

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

...well it should be as we have been improving our Bristol Supper Club for nearly twenty five years! As all long standing clubs tend to do, our age range has increased over the years, so we reckon that most members are now 50+ years old, and we enjoy socialising over restaurant meals in around Bristol. Our club has around 50 members, and there is usually a fairly even mix, but no attempt is made to balance the genders. It's an enjoyable way of making the most of our beautiful city whilst making new friends and enjoying good food and drink. We email a programme of restaurant choices to our membership on a regular basis, most meals are arranged from Thursday to Sunday evenings, and we include lunches too. Meals are a mix of old favourites and new destinations of varied nationalities and prices. Every year we hold an AGM/ Garden Party in late summer and more recently have introduced Christmas lunch, both of which are very popular. Membership costs £40 per year and £25 thereafter, so please join us for a Taster meal soon before deciding if our club is for you and paying our subscription.

You can view our website www.bristolsupperclub.org.uk or contact John 07710 247505 or Christine 0117 965 0156.

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WHAT’S | NEW

News in Brief

Luke Jeram’s water slide for Park Street

■ The Cotswold based Giffords Circus was chosen as the location for fashion giant Ted Baker’s spring/summer 2014 campaign, Get In On The Act. The campaign was shot in Cirencester last summer and the British fashion brand used the circus as the set for its look book and short film. Giffords Circus is now touring the area with its new show, The Thunders. Visit: www.giffordscircus.com

Following the success of last year’s programme of Make Sundays Special events, once again, city centre streets will be closing to motor traffic and opening up to people. Starting on Sunday 4 May the Make Sunday Special events will run throughout the summer on the first Sunday of each month, until 7 September. The first event this month (11am – 5pm) promises to be spectacular, with Luke Jeram’s water slide ride planned for Park Street (tickets only at: www.bristolslide.com), and a host of entertainers in College Green and the old city at Corn Street. You can also enjoy slow food at the Bristol Food Connections event on College Green. Visitors will be able to explore the city streets for art, music, street games and entertainment in the Old City and wander through the market stalls on Corn Street. Full details of the programme are available at: www.bristol.gov.uk/makesundayspecial

New home for wildlife

Ted Baker S/S 14 lifestlye shots

■ Due to the expansion of its auction, commercial and surveying departments, Maggs & Allen estate agents has announced the opening of a new Clifton headquarters at, 22 Richmond Hill. The new office will be home to the commercial agency, as well as the successful auction department and chartered surveyors department. Maggs & Allen’s well-established Henleaze office is now used solely by its estate agency and lettings and management departments. ■ A pop-up bridal boutique has opened on the ground floor of The Galleries shopping centre, offering an inspirational alternative to the usual and traditional bridal shop. Opened by bridalwear designer and consultant Charlotte Smith, it sells beautiful, individual yet affordable wedding outfits, bridesmaid dresses, special occasion outfits and accessories. Charlotte will be available by appointment for fittings and consultations. Visit: thepopupbridalboutique.co.uk, or tel: 07976 854014. ■ As part of the Chelsea Fringe – the alternative garden festival – horticultural happenings will be popping up across Bristol between 17 May – 8 June. From pop-up gardens to poetry revues and trails to projects, Bristol will play host to a series of events, with something for everyone. For further information visit: www.chelseafringe.com

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A derelict site next to the A4 Portway has been acquired by Avon Wildlife Trust to create a new nature reserve. This 12-acre former sports ground, soon to be named Bennett’s Patch and White’s Paddock nature reserve, will create new habitats for wildlife and provide a new space for local communities and visitors to enjoy. Funding has already been secured for the purchase from Viridor Credits Environmental Company, through the Landfill Communities Fund, and there has been additional generous support from donors Timothy Bennett and Peter and Patricia White. The Trust’s vision is to create a new reserve which champions the importance of making new homes for nature, inspiring others to do the same

BRISTOL UPDATES Summer in the city Warm weather is just around the corner and local charity St Peter’s Hospice is demonstrating how summer chic can be achieved on a budget – shown in its latest photo shoot (pictured below). Stocking pre-loved items from French Connection, Topshop, Phase Eight and Christian Dior to name just a few, you’ll be surprised what you might find in one of the 47 St Peter’s Hospice shops across the city. To find your nearest St Peter’s Hospice shop visit www.stpetershospice.org.uk.

during Green Capital year and beyond. Wildlife which already use the area include barn owls, several bat species, badgers, hedgehogs and slow worms. A major £120,000 appeal is also being launched to help meet the Trust’s ambitions for the site. Subject to formal planning approval, habitat creation at the reserve will include a wildflower meadow, native woodland, hedgerows and ponds, with works hopefully starting late summer to be able to open the reserve to the public early in 2015. To support the appeal, go to the Just Giving page at www.justgiving.com/AWT2015

The Pogues

911

■ Off the back of the announcement that Paolo Nutini would be playing a live outdoor concert on Bristol harbourside’s amphitheatre in June, Metropolis Music has introduced the Bristol Summer Series with more live concerts at the venue. Set to be an annual event, this year’s headliners are Irish punk band The Pogues on Thursday 26 June and ITV’s Big Reunion stars featuring 911, A1, Five, Damage, The Honeyz and Bewitched on Friday 27 June. Paolo Nutini and The Bristol Summer series will be the first stand along gigs at the amphitheatre for ten years – the last people to play at the amphitheatre were Massive Attack, Basement Jaxx and Groove Armada. Tickets are now on sale, available from www.gigsandtours.com, www.ticketmaster.co.uk, tel: 0844 811 0051, 0844 826 282 and Bristol Ticket Shop. For further information visit: www.bristolsummerseries.com


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BRISTOL PEOPLE What the movers and shakers are up to... ■ Nuffield Health has announced the appointment of Suzanne Davies (pictured right) as hospital director for its Bristol Hospital – The Chesterfield. Suzanne brings with her 25 years of healthcare experience, both in the NHS and independent sector, most recently including seven years as hospital director for Nuffield Health in Hereford. In her new role in Bristol, Suzanne is responsible for the overall care and satisfaction of patients, as well as staff and business development, where her focus will be to build further on the high quality of clinical care already offered by the hospital and to encourage even more world-class surgeons and consultants to join the team. ■ Maggs & Allen Estate Agents is sponsoring one of its partners, James Goodchild, who will be undertaking all 24 hours of The Capella Foundation’s 24 hour endurance event taking place on 3 and 4 May. Starting at 12pm on Saturday at Canford Park in Westbury on Trym, events include 1,000kg lift, car pull, spinning, military yomp, kayak and Zumba. Thirteen men and women known as ‘the wolfpack’ will be undertaking all 24 hours of the challenge. The Capella Foundation exists to help increase awareness of medical complications during pregnancy, and to raise as much money as possible to support medical research into advanced treatments. For further details visit: www.thecapellafoundation.com Members of the Maggs & Allen team will also be running the Bristol 10k on Sunday 11 May with the team Laura’s Lovely Jubblies, raising money for B.U.S.T. (The Bristol breast cancer unit support trust). Donations can be made at www.justgiving.com/lauraslovelyjubblies2014 ■ Barry Walsh, owner of Bristol stationery shop, Barringtons, is also a keen singer/songwriter and has written a song to commemorate 150 years of the Clifton Suspension Bridge. The song, called The Woods of Leigh, tells the story of the bridge and has been released on single – CDs can be purchased at the Clifton Suspension Bridge tourist shop and Destination Bristol in the Watershed. Barry will also be performing the song live at Portishead Working Men’s Club on 24 May and at Colston Hall on 26 October. This is not the first time Barry has written a song about local places of interest; he was instrumental in writing Bristol Hippodrome and At the Curzon when these iconic buildings celebrated their centenaries in 2013, as well as Beautiful Days; a song about the supersonic Concorde. You can hear all these songs on Youtube, just type in The Barry Walsh band. ■ A Bristol-based Rebecca Coales, image © Nick Robertson-Brown / freediver and yoga Frogfish Photograph teacher last month won the annual UK pool freediving championships and claimed the UK female champion title. Rebecca Coales set a new national record of 145m (that’s almost six lengths of a 25m pool) in the Dynamic No Fins discipline – that’s swimming underwater breast-stroke on one breath. Freediving is a sport where you swim as far as you can on one breath of air, or just hold for as long as you can without moving. Rebecca has been freediving for five years – she trains with Bristol Freedivers and Neptune Finswimming Clubs, both based at leisure centres in Bristol. She also trains at the Bannatyne gym in Redland and with local personal trainer Ben Andrews. She shares her experience as an athlete by teaching yoga for sport every Friday at the Yoga Space studio in Bristol. WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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CHINA – AN OPPORTUNITY FOR BRISTOL BUSINESSES Mark Pooley, managing principal of Bristol Chartered Accountants, Hollingdale Pooley, has just returned from a visit to China. I visited Hangzhou and Guangzhou as part of Red Dragon Advisors. We were meeting with Chinese companies which are looking to invest in the UK, to demonstrate how we could help them set up or purchase a UK company. Our message was well received. Selling professional services to Chinese investors is an export, and more UK companies need to export for the UK to consolidate its recent return to growth. Figures show that in the South West of England only 5% of businesses export their goods or services. China offers huge export opportunities; not just to UK service companies, but to UK manufacturers, particularly in the fashion and luxury good sectors. There are currently 100 million Chinese people who are classified as middle class – having an income of over US$17,000 per. There is a large demand for British luxury products and brands as evidenced by the success in China of Mulberry. If you are a small company, do not be daunted and think “I am too small to export”. A gentle way to introduce yourself to China and exporting your goods and services is to go on a trade mission. Such missions are organised by the China Britain Business Council, as well as Red Dragon Advisors in partnership with the Bristol China Partnership. My experience of going to China has been so rewarding; making business contacts and leads as well as learning about a new culture. The Chinese people are very welcoming and friendly. If you wish to know more about exporting to China, please contact Mark Pooley at our office.

Hollingdale Pooley Bramford House, 23 Westfield Park, Clifton, Bristol BS6 6LT

MAY 2014

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CITY | TRANSPORT

I like driving in your car Marie-Claire Kidd looks at the benefits of joining a car club in Bristol, and talks to people who are already on board with the scheme

F

uelled by the rising cost of motoring and increasing pressure on parking, more and more people in Bristol are joining car clubs. It means they have access to efficient, low emission vehicles without having to own one. A car club is a membership scheme which gives people access to cars and vans in their neighbourhood any time, for as long or as little as they need it. The vehicles are located in dedicated parking bays in cities and towns all around the world. According to Carplus, the national resource for sustainable transport information, the RAC calculates that the average cost of owning a new car is £6,689 per year, while charges for car clubs typically cost £3-£6 per hour or £25-£50 per day with a mileage charge of 21-23p and annual membership of £15-£60. Carplus estimates that car owners who travel less than 8,000 miles per year could save up to £3,500 a year by using a car club instead. In fact, Bristol was the first British city to support an experiment with a car club and now has one of the highest rates of car club cars per capita in England. By early 2015 it is anticipated that there will be a network of at least 150 cars across the city, with three different car club operators currently providing a choice for thousands of members. And everybody benefits. There are less cars on the roads or parked on the street, and car club members enjoy being able to drive without having to worry about insurance, tax, MOTs or servicing. The financially and environmentally savvy people who use car clubs come from all walks of life, and have different reasons for sharing their transport. Alexander Technique teacher Veronica Pollard, for example, uses her car club car to transport bulky household items and recycling; while surfer Katie Smith uses hers to get to Devon, Cornwall or South Wales. Graduate Ashley Turner, who is trying to get employment in television, joined a car club to ensure he had access to a vehicle for driving lessons.

Retired Open University worker Lois Thorn uses her car club car to get to the Wye Valley, where she is an environmental volunteer. “The car club allows me to do something I love,” she says. Financial planner Michael Grimes of My Family Finance cycles to a bay near him to collect his car club vehicle. “I save money on insurance, tax and so on, so it’s cost effective for my business,” he says. “I cycle more, which is good for my heart, and I plan my days better as I don’t use a car for local trips. Instead I cycle to the gym, the supermarket and outings with my children. It also helps the environment by reducing my carbon footprint.” He uses a City Car Club car to get to appointments and has even started to recommend joining a car club to some of his clients. Julie-Anne Burrows is a new car club member who recently sold her car. She says: “I gave up my car last year and thought I wouldn’t be able to manage without it. “I’ve managed really well on public transport and joined City Car Club to have a flexible, affordable back up for when I need it. Traditional car hire is hard work, especially if like me you don’t have a credit card, or funds to cover the deposit. “I now work part time for Citizens Online and am seconded to Bristol City Council, who were very positive about me using buses and car club cars to fulfill the role,” she adds. “I’m glad to feel part of this simple and brilliant idea.” Edward McClumpha and Anna Stretch use a car club van to transport items for their handmade furniture business, while staff at Southmead Hospital use Co-wheels car club cars to get them to and from meetings. It means that, increasingly, staff do not need to bring cars to work. Costume student Maisie Roberts and other students at the Old Vic Theatre School use car club cars to transport themselves, their props and their costumes to rehearsals and shows and Alex Pearce, Paul Smith and

I’VE MANAGED REALLY WELL ON PUBLIC TRANSPORT AND JOINED CITY CAR CLUB TO HAVE A FLEXIBLE, AFFORDABLE BACK UP

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CITY | TRANSPORT

GREEN CITY: main image, the City Car Club is one of the car clubs operating in Bristol. Above: from left, Michael Grimes cycles to his car club bay; Julie-Anne Burrows sold her car and relies on public transport and a car club; surfer Katie Smith uses her car club to get to the coast

their big band, Bristol Hornstars, use a Zipcar car club car to tow a trailer full of their instruments to gigs. Adam Renak, Alastair Whitelaw and Alex Bourla of Bristol University Sky Diving Club rely on car club cars to get out to jumps. Depending on numbers, they use a car club car or a van, and share the cost. As all three are members, they can also share the driving. According to Carplus, Bristol has been one of the most successful cities for car clubs. Its chief executive Chas Ball says: “We’re excited by the prospect of wider access to car clubs in the city as a result of planned growth to the network by Bristol City Council. They are creating new opportunities for operators

by providing new bays in the city centre and as part of a roll out of new residents parking schemes. “Car club cars help to take cars off the road by making the alternatives – public transport, cycling walking and occasional use of a car club car – more attractive. This is clearly a cheaper option for the low mileage household. “Carplus looks forward to continuing to assist the council in developing car clubs in Bristol and expanding the role they play in creating a cleaner, more successful and less congested city.” ■ To find your nearest car club, visit: www.carplus.org.uk

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Strong written & verbal communication abilities An ability to identify opportunity and react quickly and effectively A strong career focus with genuine personal motivations An ability to pay attention to details, administer, prioritise and schedule work A strong team working mentality.

Due to company success, we are growing both our permanent and contract team. We always want to promote from within and therefore want to speak to driven Consultants with a can-do- attitude and a good work ethic. If you are keen to hear more, please get in touch today. Each candidate will be dealt with highly confidentially so please feel free to call Owen O’Neill on 0117 302 7500 or email your details through to owen@ashton-consulting.co.uk.

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WEEKEND | BREAK

HARBOUR HIGHLIGHTS Nothing beats a weekend break on the Cornish coast in the sunshine, taking in the glorious sights and breathing in the fresh sea air. But even if the weather isn’t great, Falmouth offers plenty to see and do, says Samantha Coleman

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almouth on the south coast of Cornwall is one of those wonderful places that you can visit at any time of the year and still find lots going on, whatever the weather. Falmouth boasts the world’s third largest natural harbour, and has grown into a busy port over the last 400 years, combining contemporary creativity and 21st century entrepreneurialism with an historic maritime legacy. All this, combined with a great atmosphere, beautiful scenery and a good location for exploring, make Falmouth a popular choice for those looking for a weekend break away.

WHERE TO STAY: Merchants Manor is a sleek, comfortable country house-style hotel with plenty of parking and just a short walk from the beach, harbour and town centre. Owners Nick and Sioned Rudlin took over the then run-down hotel 15 months ago and immediately started work on a refurbishment project – and what a marvellous job they’ve done. The building dates back to 1915 and many of the original design features are still intact, including the magnificent stained glass windows on the staircase and wooden flooring throughout. But it has been brought up to date with stylish, contemporary interior design touches and comforts, with nods to its past too, with vintage furniture and antiques giving the place an overall effortlessly chic feel with a harmonious blend of the traditional and modern. The elegantly restored foyer, lounge and library recreate the feel of a country house where you can relax with a Cornish cream tea – or on a nice day, enjoy refreshments outside in the garden. The new bedrooms offer a high standard of accommodation, with attention to detail. From the fluffy bathrobes, luxury toiletries and free wi-fi, to the welcome tray with hot beverages, fresh bottled 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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❝ HERE YOU’LL FIND STUDENTS RUBBING SHOULDERS WITH SALTY SEA DOGS

water and homemade biscuits, everything has been designed with comfort in mind. The rooms are light and contemporary with a seaside feel – you’ll find local artwork on the walls and pieces of local craftsmanship. Supporting local businesses and crafts is important to the hotel, and this ethos filters out into the dining too. The brasserie restaurant offers seasonal local produce, simply cooked and imaginatively presented. The emphasis is on big flavours and everything from breads through to puddings is homemade, and top quality meat, poultry and game are the backbone of the menu, accompanied by a well-rounded wine list. Breakfast too is fresh and delicious, with a continental buffet and cooked dishes such as eggs benedict to choose from. Another new addition to the hotel is the state-ofthe-art wellness centre that boasts a gym full of the very latest sports equipment, a 12m indoor heated swimming pool, a hot tub and sauna. The hotel hosts regular events and special themed weekends throughout the year including live jazz evenings and wellbeing weekends.Visit: www.merchantsmanor.com. The hotel is offering readers of The Bristol Magazine three nights for the price of two on any break booked and taken before 20 July 2014 when quoting BRISTOL2014. Book on tel: 01326 312734.


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WEEKEND | BREAK

BESIDE THE SEA: Main image, Falmouth harbour; left insets, Merchants Manor hotel, a recently refurbished country house hotel; the new bedrooms are light and contemporary Above, clockwise from top left, Gyllyngvase Beach © Visit Cornwall; Pendennis Castle; Maenporth Beach; and the National Maritime Museum Cornwall © www.falmouth.co.uk

WHAT TO SEE AND DO In the town itself there are lots of family run businesses, boutiques and craft shops where you can pick up souvenirs and pieces of local artwork. Walk around the busy harbour and you’ll see fishing boats, luxurious super yachts and naval vessels. A great place to learn about the harbour’s history is at the National Maritime Museum of Cornwall (www.nmmc.co.uk) on the harbourside. An engaging experience for the whole family, here you can discover all about Cornwall’s maritime history, from smugglers and naval warfare to fishing and search and rescue, with loads of interactive exhibitions. Go inside a Sea King helicopter, challenge yourself in the survival zone, navigate a remote control boat, go beneath the sea in the underwater gallery and then go right to the top of the building for a panoramic view of Falmouth. Some of the biggest draws to Falmouth are the beautiful sandy beaches and scenic walks. Framed by two Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Falmouth offers stunning views of the docks and Fal estuary if you head up high. You can pick up maps of walks that take in local sights of interest and the South West Coast Path passes through the town too. Try the Helford to Falmouth route – a 10-mile walk that takes in the beach, coastal and garden scenery of Falmouth and includes many of Cornish author Daphne du Maurier’s famous landmarks including Pendennis Castle and Frenchman’s Creek. If the sea is calling to you, there’s plenty for watersports enthusiasts here, from windsurfing, surfing and sailing to sea kayaking. Inland the parks and sub-tropical gardens provide a perfect place to picnic and relax. Whatever time of year you visit Falmouth, there’s always a buzz, with events going on throughout the year including sailing regattas, food festivals, shanty singing and horticultural shows. There’s a lively sense of community in Falmouth and add to that the art galleries and music venues on offer and you’ll discover there’s never a dull moment.

PLACES TO EAT Here you’ll find students rubbing shoulders with salty sea dogs, and WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

the dining options reflect this diversity. There’s a mix of trendy eateries, waterfront bars, fine dining restaurants, street side cafés, cosy traditional pubs and fish and chip shops. We enjoyed the best fish and chips we’d ever tasted in Falmouth, from the Harbour Lights restaurant and takeaway, winner of the National Fish & Chip Awards in 2012. As well as melt-in-the-mouth freshly battered fish, you can also take in great views over the harbour from here. Or there’s Rick Stein’s fish restaurant and takeaway where there are plenty of seafood choices available, including grilled sea bream fillets, grilled lobster and shucked oysters. It’s worth trying oysters while you’re in Falmouth as it is the town’s signature fruits de mer – fishermen dredge oysters under traditional, eco-friendly methods which are reputed to be of excellent quality.

PLACES TO VISIT There are so many day trips you can do from Falmouth that you probably won’t be able to fit in everything you want to see in one weekend. One of the highlights of our weekend was visiting St Mawes on the ferry. Departing from Falmouth hourly, the classic wooden ferries provide a 20-minute scenic crossing passing Falmouth docks, Pendennis and St Mawes Castles, marine wildlife and St Anthony’s Lighthouse. In St Mawes itself there’s plenty to see and do with a selection of waterside pubs and cafés, the castle, galleries and shops. Lamorran Garden is a must see and there are some scenic short walks and lovely sandy beaches to take in too. From Falmouth you can also get the ferry to Trelissick Garden – a magical estate overlooking the Fal River with beautiful woodland walking trails and sub-tropical gardens with a superb collection of exotic plants. A visit to Falmouth wouldn’t be complete if you didn’t take a look around Pendennis Castle, built by Henry VIII in 1545 to guard the entrance to the harbour. Overlooking the Carrick Rocks with breathtaking views, the English Heritage-owned fort includes a discovery centre, barrack block, guided underground tours, big guns and interactive displays that will keep all ages amused for hours. For further information about places to visit in Falmouth, visit: www.visitcornwall.com ■ MAY 2014

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CITY | LEARNING

EDUCATION NEWS ■ A new headteacher has been appointed for The Red Maids' Junior School (RMJS) with effect from January 2015. Mrs Lisa Brown will replace Mrs Gillian Rowcliffe who founded the school in 1986 and retires at the end of this year. Lisa joined The Red Maids' Junior School in 1995 having gained a BSc Hons in Psychology from Leicester University and a PGCE from Oxford Brookes University. She currently oversees science, design technology, pastoral care for new girls and links with QEH, in addition to teaching a Year 3 class. Speaking of this appointment, Lisa said: “It is a real privilege to be Lisa Brown given the opportunity to lead this outstanding school. I am thrilled to be following in the footsteps of an inspirational headteacher and look forward to building on our reputation for all-round excellence.” Jane MacFarlane, Chairman of the Governors added, “The Governors are delighted with this appointment, which was made from a field of very able applicants. We are confident that Lisa will be a strong and successful headteacher and will maintain the outstanding education and happy, stimulating environment that define the school.” ■ Redland High School for Girls and QEH boys’ school have announced plans to work together to offer a co-educational provision for pupils aged three to seven years old from September. This joint project, which will see an environmentally sympathetic extension to Redland High Junior School’s existing building, will enable Redland High School to offer an extra 24 places for boys and girls at Early Years Foundation Stage. Redland High Junior School places have become ever more sought after in recent years and the development will allow the school to satisfy local demand. Redland High School has a history of educating boys at this age, accepting boys to the junior school between 1882 and 1956, and currently accepts boys into the holiday club, Redland Rascals. Caroline Bateson, headmistress at Redland High School says: “Although we are passionate believers in single sex education from Key Stage 2, evidence demonstrates that there are important social and emotional benefits to boys and girls being educated together at an early years stage, when children are developing a sense of self, knowledge and understanding of their world and their relationships with others.” The alliance will also mean that QEH is now able to welcome boys from the age of three up to 18; currently the school is only able to accept boys from the age of seven. While the foundation and Key Stage 1 provision will be based on the Redland High site, the boys will feel part of QEH, wearing QEH uniform and with access to all of QEH’s facilities. Redland High School and QEH already have many links in place, and joint activities include workshops, lectures, sport, extra-curricular clubs, trips and social events at all ages to enhance the learning of pupils at both schools. Caroline Bateson, headmistress of Redland High School and Stephen Holliday, headmaster of QEH

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Circomedia, © Andre Pattenden

■ It is 20 years since Circomedia first opened its doors offering professional circus training, and the Bristol organisation has recently announced that from September it will be offering a BA (Hons) top-up year in contemporary circus and physical performance in partnership with Bath Spa University. The course will follow on from the successful foundation degree that Circomedia has run with the university since 2007. Last year Circomedia received its highest number of applications to date, attracting students from all over the world. The BA (Hons) contemporary circus degree will be a unique course with a strong emphasis on the integration of specialised circus techniques with theatrical performance. Taught through a variety of lectures, workshops, technical classes and work-in-progress shows, students will have the opportunity to engage conceptually with physical performance and the creative process, while developing their performance skills to a professional standard. There will also be the opportunity for students to work outside of Circomedia too. The BA (Hons) top up year will be open to students who have successfully completed years one and two of Circomedia’s foundation degree. Applicants with a similar qualification from another professional circus school may also be considered. For further information visit: www.circomedia.com. ■ St Brendan’s Sixth Form College will this September launch its first ever Girls’ Football Academy in association with Total Pro Soccer. This is 12 months ahead of the planned launch, following the phenomenal success of its Boys’ Football Academy, which started last September. The Football Academy Programme delivers professional academy standard football coaching alongside a full Level 3 study programme (A-levels or equivalent). The St Brendan’s programme is different to others in that its focus is very much educational, with football providing strong support to applications to universities with high performance teams (both in the UK and internationally); and also providing the possibility to be put forward for trials with professional football clubs. Two students from the first boy’s cohort have already secured scholarship places with American universities and another is playing for Southampton FC Academy. St Brendan’s had planned to launch a Girl’s Football Academy in September 2016, but it has had so many enquiries from budding female footballers that it has bought this forward by a year. Sophie Morgan will be the Head Girl’s Coach. Sophie has played and coached at a high level in both the UK and America. She is an FA Level 2 Coach and is currently taking her UEFA B Coaching Course. Vicki Haigh, head of sport at St Brendan’s said: “We are delighted that we are able to offer this programme a year ahead of schedule. Women’s football is in an era of explosive growth, especially since the London Olympics, and we have had enquiries from all over Bristol, Bath and North Somerset.”


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Mum, voiceover artist and BBC Radio Bristol presenter, Faye Dicker, meets the Bristol businesses that make family life easier...

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s I write this column, I’m awaiting a visit from the stork. I know – I said that last month and I promise I will never write those words again. After the next visit, the baby shop is shut. Until then, I’m a woman on a mission to make pregnancy in these last weeks as comfortable as possible. As luck would have it, my best friend Louise and I seem to be living our lives in parallel, as we both had our first babies two years ago and have shared our second pregnancies together as well. Our days start with a text to each other, comparing various pregnancy related ailments and end comparing toddler moments. So when Louise suggested I look into Daisy Birthing, I thought it was worth a go. Not being able to make it to an evening class, I was lucky enough to have a private session with another mum-to-be and enjoy the Daisy experience. Daisy Birthing is part of the Lazy Daisy chain, founded by Julie Long in 2004. With a background in pregnancy massage, hypno-birthing, pregnancy yoga and active birthing, she discovered it was combination of all these experiences, which gave the most positive birth experience. Not to mention, a more affordable approach to ante-natal classes – rather than dipping into multiple sessions. Classes are typically 1.5 hours long and begin with conversation, usually focusing on how each woman is and talking about something topical. Each session ends in relaxation, while the main focus of the class is muscle memory and movement. I met up with Karen Whittaker, who teaches classes across North Bristol and became a teacher after her second pregnancy. Her first labour had been more than a little challenging, so when she stumbled across Daisy Birthing, she was keen to sign up. After having tried it for myself, I can see why. The classes are almost hypnotic and rhythmic in nature, with signature moves that are practiced to Daisy music. The idea being that it’s anchored in your mind for the big day, so your muscle memory knows what to do. Some women even listen to the music during the birth, to take them back to the moves they have practiced in the classes. In fact, one recent graduate of Daisy Birthing had her water birth filmed for One Born Every Minute as a their grand finale, as a great example of how calm birthing can be. The camera crew were particularly pleased, as they were keen to use their underwater camera! Of course, not every birth is a natural birth and some might need medical help – Daisy Birthing isn’t there to judge. More to offer the resources that parentsto-be can refer to in any situation. The different breathing techniques can be applied in any situation and can simply help offer a calmer approach. And it doesn’t all end when the baby is born – that’s just the start of the journey. They also run relaxation and bonding class for babies aged six to 20 weeks, incorporating baby massage, baby yoga and calming and soothing techniques – it’s a more holistic approach all round. As I came away from my private class I could see the Daisy Birthing appeal. I thoroughly enjoyed chatting to the other mum, who said Wednesday nights are her favourite night of the week, they’re so relaxing. Not to mention it was a great way to learn, while actively practicing the movements. Perhaps it’s best described as an enlightening experience. For a taste of the Daisy Birthing approach, listen to the latest podcast on www.freelancebristolmum.co.uk. ■

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Join us today & let’s explore the world together...

WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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FAMILY | WHAT’S ON

PLAY TIME Use our guide to plan quality time with your little ones this month. From family friendly theatre and craft activities to music and tree climbing, there’s something for all ages to enjoy

Jack in the Green, M Shed square, Saturday 1 May, 10.30am Leaf-covered and nine feet tall, you won’t miss Bristol’s Jack in the Green. A celebration of summer, he and his disguised musicians and dancers weave through the city’s streets annually on the first Saturday in May – starting their journey at M Shed.

Big Tree Climbing, Tyntesfield, Monday 5 May, 10am - 4pm On the National Trust’s list of 50 things to do before you’re 11¾, it says climb a tree, so why not join the Great Big Tree Climbing team for a high and mighty time in the trees on the Tyntesfield estate. They will teach you how to enter a tree’s canopy using ropes, knots and karabiners, while being securely attached in a harness at all times. Those feeling brave enough can then take the zip wire back down. Normal garden admission applies plus £15.50.

I Flautisti family concert, St George’s Bristol, Sunday 11 May, 12pm A chance to hear the whole family of recorders in an hour-long programme of music from Baroque to modern day, including brand new commissions from I Flautisti’s debut album, Sound Clouds. Suitable for ages 6 and above. Tickets: £8. Book on tel: 0845 40 24 001. There will also be a recorder workshop from 10am11am suitable for children aged 7-11 who have been playing the recorder for at least a year. Workshop is free to ticket holders.

Toddler Takeover: Come Rain, Come Shine, At-Bristol, Friday 16 May, 10am - 4pm A fun-packed day of activities just for the under fives. Take part in some simple science experiments and crafts to discover more about the weather – make a woollen cloud, experience some real clouds made with dry ice, and discover what happens to feathers and flags in the wind machine. Little ones can also explore the wonders of the night sky in the Planetarium, and join in with an interactive story of an adventure across the globe. Family-friendly facilities include buggy parks, breastfeeding areas, bottle warming facilities, indoor picnic area and unisex baby changing. For further information visit: www.at-bristol.org.uk

Museums at Night event, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery, Saturday 17 May, 3pm – 8pm Get musical with a familyfriendly disco featuring retro tunes, lights and musical games, inspired by Jeremy Deller’s love of music. Presented by Mayfest and Qu Junktions. Free entry.

Constellations, Bristol Old Vic, Saturday 24 May, 2pm & 6pm Choreographer Enrique Cabrera has taken the abstract work of artist Joan Miró as his starting point and repeatedly fills his imaginary blank canvas with vivid colours, shape and movement. Wonderful dance, ingenious puppetry, and digital visuals are delivered with the trademark playfulness, creativity and style that mark multi-award winning company Aracaladanza out as one of the best. Suitable for ages 4+.

Sunset Special, Bristol Zoo, Friday 30 May, 6.30pm-10pm Visit the zoo after hours and take advantage of the rare opportunity to enjoy the attraction as the sun goes down. The zoo’s animal houses and exhibits will be open, with a number of animal talks going on, giving visitors the chance to see everything from lemurs and penguins to monkeys, seals and meerkats. Bristol Zoo’s innovative new Gorilla House will also be open – offering a 180 degree viewing area of these great animals. For more information and to book tickets visit: www.bristolzoo.org.uk/sunset-specials

My Healthy Happy City, The Architecture Centre, Saturday 31 May, 1pm – 4pm Drop in to the centre for a free, fun, creative afternoon of drawing and making visions for your healthy, happy city. Children under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Pirates Ahoy! Tynesfield, 31 May & 1 June, 10am - 4pm Experience life on the ocean waves as Tyntesfield is invaded by a motley band of pirates and their cannon. Expect loud bangs and jolly roger japes throughout the weekend. Shipshape fancy dress recommended for all lads, lassies and young scallywags.

Toddler Takeover At-Bristol

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Play pirates at Tyntesfield

Pirate School, Tyntesfield, 31 May & 1 June, 11am, 1pm & 3pm The good ship Tyntesfield needs a new crew. If you want to sail the high seas you need to be a good swash buckler and able to hunt treasure. Price: £5 per child for a one hour workshop. Normal admission applies.

Outdoor Theatre: Treasure Island, Tyntesfield, Friday 31 May, gates open 6pm, performance at 6.30pm When their ship is stranded at sea on a windless day, Captain Jim Hawkins and his loyal crew while away the time telling old sailors’ tales. And Captain Jim’s tale is always the most popular... This tale of buccaneers, greed, courage, betrayal and pieces of eight that has both humour and brutality, is suitable for adventurers ages 6 and up. Jim Hawkins invites you to hear how he came to leave his home, the Admiral Benbow Inn, and make his way across the seas to Treasure Island. For ticket information visit: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

Get Creative, M Shed, every Thursday, 10am- 12pm Every week there’s an opportunity to get your creative juices flowing, inspired by everyday objects and the imaginary world of Wallace and Gromit. Artists will be on hand with just a few simple materials to help you create some amazing characters, stories and plots. Located in Wallace & Gromit’s kitchen. Free with exhibition entry to Wallace & Gromit: From the Drawing board.


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FUNDS RUN A silent killer strikes every year taking away grandfathers, fathers, husbands and boyfriends in the Bristol area. But Bristol is lucky – the city’s Rotarians are fighting back, says Ian Beattie, event manager of Run For The Future

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rostate cancer is often called the silent killer due to few early symptoms. It affects over 40,000 UK men each year of which over 10,000 do not survive. Bristol is lucky because it has the wonderful Bristol Urological Institute (BUI) at Southmead Hospital, which does world-leading treatment. It is supported, each year, by Run for the Future – a family fun event on the Bristol Downs that raises awareness of prostate cancer and provides important funds for the work of the BUI. This year’s event will be held on Sunday 14 September and registrations are open on the website: www.runforthefuture.org. Since 2006 Run for the Future has raised over £250,000 in the fight against prostate cancer. There is no national screening programme for this cancer and although the simple PSA diagnostic test exists and is widely used worldwide, it has not yet been adopted by the NHS for a UK screening programme. As a consequence, only 8% of UK men are being screened, leaving the remainder at risk of discovering they have prostate cancer when it is too late to treat effectively. In 2005 Bristol Rotary Club formed a Prostate Cancer Committee and included senior staff from the BUI at Southmead Hospital. The first Run for the Future – a 5k fun run on Bristol’s Downs took place in September 2006. Its aim was to raise awareness about the UK’s most prevalent male cancer, and to generate funds for the BUI’s Prostate Cancer Appeal of which the chairman is local impresario, John Miles MBE, agent of celebrities such as Carol Vorderman and Noel Edmonds. Prostate cancer has family links related to diet and genetic factors. Two groups of men are at higher risk, those where the father or grandfather has had prostate cancer, and those of African or Afro-Caribbean origin. Both groups should inform their GP for PSA screening to be initiated from their mid 40s to help detect any early onset of prostate cancer. Other men should consult their GP when they reach 50. The money raised by Run for the Future has funded basic research in UWE and Bristol University seeking an alternative diagnostic test for prostate cancer and studying genetic markers to differentiate slow and fast growing prostate cancers. This joint Rotary/BUI event has been praised by BUI’s Professor David Gillatt, one of UK’s top prostate cancer surgeons, who said: “The efforts of Run for the Future have been at the very forefront of changing perceptions about prostate cancer in Bristol and will eventually, I believe, result in reduced suffering and death because of this disease.” Celebrating its 21st anniversary this year, the BUI has been at the forefront of robotic keyhole prostate cancer surgery for the past five years, with remarkable results. Men can now be operated on and leave Southmead hospital often within 24hrs of surgery and with few of the side effects associated with such surgery. This year’s Run for the Future, compered by BBC Radio Bristol’s Steve Le Fevre and Ali Vowles, starts at midday on Sunday 14 September with a warm up and music before the event. All information on how to register to take part can be found at: www.runforthefuture.org or tel: 0117 3236328 for a registration form or advice. ■ WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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HEALTH | & BEAUTY

FIT & FAB

Active events ■ Following on from the success of her Confidence Building Workshop in February, confidence coach Jo Emerson has booked two more events to be held on 15 May and 2 October in central Bath. These one-day workshops are a fun, practical and interactive way for anyone to explore the thoughts that hold them back and build new patterns of behaviour for the future. Past delegates include professionals, mums returning to work, business leaders and students all of whom said they found the content both inspiring and practical. Jo Emerson is one of the UK’s leading confidence coaches and specialises in helping people and businesses tap into their innate wisdom and vast potential. Courses cost £129 (early bird tickets are £99) and are held at The Guild in central Bath. For further information and to book visit: www.jo-emerson.com ■ People of all ages and abilities are able to take part in the Bristol Walking Festival, the largest of its kind in an urban area, which runs until 26 May. The varied programme features around 150 guided walks including new opportunities this year for speed dating, business networking, learning about the suffragettes and family activities. The 2014 festival follows on from the success of last year’s week-long event with hundreds of people taking part. Evidence shows that regular walking reduces the risk of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, type 2 diabetes and helps to counter depression and maintain mental wellbeing. Any amount of walking, and at any pace, expends energy, helps lower weight, strengthen muscles and can counter depression and maintain mental wellbeing. More information and the brochure for the festival is available at: www.bristolwalkingfestival.co.uk. ■ Bristol residents are invited to light up the night in the city’s first 3km Glow Neon Fun Run, on Saturday 10 May at 7.30pm, raising money to re-equip Action for Blind People’s Technology Training Suite in Bedminster. Inspired by colourful full moon parties in Thailand, runners will be sprayed with luminous, coloured paints at South Gloucestershire and Stroud College’s WISE campus. Then, a huge sound system will pump out party tunes; that’ll be the signal for glowing participants to run, skip, dance or simply walk the course. For further information and to book tel: 0845 345 0054

The latest health and beauty news in the city

The perfect blow-dry Luxury shampoo, fabulous conditioner, relaxing head massage and a professional blow-dry – what more could a girl want? The new blow-dry menu at Seanhanna hair salon in Cabot Circus offers just this. Simply walk in, browse the blow-dry menu and choose your favourite look for great blown out hair. No matter what kind of hair you have – thick, long, curly or straight, the Seanhanna team are ready to give you that perfect finished look, from waves and curls to smooth and sleek, up or down. For more information visit: www.seanhanna.com

Bristol-based personal trainer David Bates tells us all about what he can offer to those looking to get fit With an undying passion for sport, health and fitness I made the decision to use my experience and knowledge to set up my own business and help people like yourself realise your true fitness potential. Specialising in weight-loss, muscle definition and nutrition I have now successfully helped hundreds of people to achieve their goals and hope to continue doing so for many more years.

With a degree in sports science, a fully qualified personal trainer, exercise referral instructor and with qualifications in circuit training, kettlebell and nutrition I can proudly say that with me, you’re in the best of hands. Having been involved in sport from a very early age, I developed a love for training out in the fresh air and as such as developed a business that caters for those that share this same idea. Using the latest equipment including, battling ropes, kettlebells, sleds and much more, I train with most of my clients in their local parks but do also offer home visits as well. I offer a free non-obligatory consultation so why not give me a call, email me or visit my website for more information: www.davidbatespt.co.uk, tel: 07930 666200, email: davidbatespt@live.com

And breathe... A new yoga and therapy centre called Breathe Bristol has opened in central Bristol, formed of a collective of 11 self employed therapists and yoga teachers. In addition to yoga and acupuncture, Breathe Bristol offers psychotherapy, hypnotherapy and massage. Situated at 3 All Saints Court, St Nicholas Market, it is ideally located for anyone working or living in the city centre, providing a haven of calm from busy, stressful lives. Breathe Bristol is open 7.30am-7.30pm, Monday to Friday. For further information, please visit: www. breathebristol.co.uk

Bronze goddess Summer is just around the corner. Here are our top products for looking your best on the beach... From Left to right, Nuxe Huile Prodigieuse dry oil (from £28, available at M&S and Space NK) for face, body and hair,combines plant oils and vitamin E to nourish, repair and soften; this soft illuminating powder from Bobbi Brown (£27, House of Fraser) is made of pearls to give cheeks a delicate pink shimmer; the Michael Kors sun collection includes a self-tanner, after sun gelée and lustrous lip balm for a sun-kissed glow all in a delicate fragrance that will remind you of holidays – available online at House of Fraser

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HEALTH | & BEAUTY

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The Midas touch The golden age is back! A catwalk favourite for the new season, gold makeup shimmered at Dolce & Gabbana, Dries Van Noten and Donna Karan. We asked Rachelle Howells, beauty manager at Harvey Nichols Bristol, how to achieve this 24 carat trend

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70s style glow was seen in force on the S/S14 catwalks at Topshop Unique, House of Holland and Donna Karan. Dolce & Gabbana and Dior extended warm golden tones to the eyes with the latter even introducing metallic painted brows. Meanwhile, Dries Van Noten used gold thread on the lashes for a sexy, shimmering look. To achieve this most sophisticated of trends keep your foundation fresh and your cheeks natural, and build the colour across your eyes – use deeper golden tones as a base then lighter shades to add definition and highlight. Pucker up with luscious lip shades in coppery golds. Achieve a fuller pout by dabbing a lighter shade into the centre of your lips and a darker shade at the corners of your mouth. For a 24 carat finish, go for gold with a shimmery nail polish. 1: Laura Mercier mineral cheek colour, £18.50 2: Deborah Lippmann nail lacquer - Boom Boom Pow, £18 3: NARS pure matte lipstick, £18.50 4: Show Beauty hair fragrance, £55 5: NARS eye paint, £18.50 6: Shu Uemera pressed eye shadow, £11 7: Benefit High Brow Glow pencil, £15 8: Benefit Sunbeam complexion highlighter, £19.50 9: Laura Mercier shimmer bloc, £31 10: Sisley Phyto-Touches powder duo, £64.50 11: Tom Ford Sahara Noir EDP, £100 (50ml) All products featured are available from the Ground Floor Beauty Hall at Harvey Nichols Bristol.

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POSITIVE PATHWAYS

Hypnotherapy

(Solution Focused Clinical Hypnotherapy) Clifton-based Practice.

Clifton Therapy Centre re-launches as

Hypnotherapy can help with; Stress and anxiety, Depression,Addictions and Phobias, Smoking, OCD,Anger management,Weight management, Fertlity, Childbirth, Children's issues, Performance enhancement and Confidence issues.

Contact Amanda Gazidis (DHP) AfSFH Ba (Hons) on 07594440949 or at agazidis@yahoo.co.uk to book a FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE THEBESTOFBRISTOL PERFECTLYCOVERED BRISTOLSBIGGESTMAGAZINE PERFECTLYDELIVERED TOADVERTISETEL: 0117 9742800

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ONLY SALON IN SOUTH BRISTOL WITH ALL OF THE FOLLOWING

Deep tissue and aromatherapy massage ✥ Hot Wax ✥ nails ✥ eye brow shaping ✥ Dermalogica and Pevonia facials ✥ eye-lash extensions ✥ eye-brow tinting ✥ Sienna X spray tans ✥ fillers ✥ Botox ✥ G5 cellulite machine ✥ Microdermabrasion ✥ thread vein removal ✥ semi-permanent make-up ✥ laser/ IPL treatments ✥ Semi permanent make up ✥ Tranquillity garden

Phone: (0117) 930 0365 265 North Street, Southville, Bristol BS3 1JN Web: www.victoriarosebeauty.co.uk Email: salon@victoriarosebeauty.co.uk

MAY 2014

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Mobile - 07930 666200 E-Mail - davidbatespt@live.com Website -www.davidbatespt.co.uk

Looking to get fit for the summer? Book your FREE consultation today! Specialising in: NUTRITION WEIGHT-LOSS MUSCLE DEFINITION Offering:

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Main stockists of REDKEN

Tel: 0117 968 2663 • www.carlohairandbeauty.co.uk 6 Rockleaze Rd, Sneyd Park, Bristol BS9 1NF 78 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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HOME VISITS OUT-DOOR TRAINING STUDIO TRAINING BOOK A PACKAGE IN MAY AND RECEIVE 10% OFF!


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW YOUR SKIN?

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ow much notice do you take of your skin? Would you be aware of a persistent spot; a rough, scaly patch; a new or changing mole? Certain changes in our skin are to be expected, but others may indicate that something more serious is going on. Since the 1970s rates of malignant melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer, have more than quadrupled in the UK. The disease now affects nearly 13,000 people a year, causing around 2,000 deaths. Added to that, every year at least 150,000 new cases of less serious skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma, are diagnosed. Mr Antonio Orlando is a Consultant Plastic Surgeon at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital: The Chesterfield. He has an excellent reputation in all aspects of cosmetic surgery including breast surgery, rhinoplasty (nose surgery) and body contouring. He is also one of the leading skin cancer experts in the South West. “Malignant melanoma is an increasing problem in the UK and can affect all ages. The major cause is, of course, overexposure to UV light, and part of the problem is that although sun awareness is improving in the UK, we’re still not doing enough prevention as we should,” said Mr Orlando. According to Cancer Research UK, you’re most at risk if you’re fairskinned, especially with freckles and moles, have naturally red or blond hair, a family history of the disease or you’ve been sunburnt in the past – sunburn doubles risk of melanoma. “Sunburn causes microscopic changes in the skin, which can lead to abnormal cell formation and cancer. It also sparks changes that lead to premature ageing so it’s important to take precautions to avoid wrinkles as well as cancer!” said Mr Orlando. “Stay in the shade from 11am to 3pm, wear a hat and sunglasses and always protect your skin with a sun protection factor of at least 30.” While we need some sun exposure to help us make vitamin D, this only amounts to around 10 to 20 minutes a day from May to September and shouldn’t involve sunbathing. “A tan is a sign of skin damage – it’s the skin’s defence mechanism against UV rays,” he warns. Sunbeds are even worse. Using a sunbed just once a month can increase your risk of melanoma by more than half, while sunbed users Antonio Orlando WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

under 35 are tripling their risk of malignant melanoma, according to Cancer Research UK. “UV rays from sunbeds are much more intense than the sun’s rays,” said Mr Orlando. In fact some sunbeds emit rays that are 10 to 15 times stronger than the midday sun. While you can’t undo damage already done, being vigilant is vital when it comes to survival. “Signs to look out for include existing moles that change size, colour or outline, moles that bleed, itch or crust or the appearance of new moles,” said Mr Orlando. Treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer ranges from a cream that encourages your immune system to attack the cancer to surgery, cutting out the cancer. Melanoma is treated with surgery. “The earlier the diagnosis is made, the less invasive the treatment and the more successful it’s likely to be so if you’re worried, see your GP as soon as possible. We also offer mole checks at The Chesterfield,” added Mr Orlando.

Free Meet the Experts: Cosmetic Surgery event Tuesday 20 May, 6:30pm-8:30pm Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital: The Chesterfield is hosting a free Meet the Experts event on Tuesday 20 May. The event is open to everyone and offers the chance to meet with Mr Orlando, as well as Miss Lisa Sacks, both highly respected surgeons. For more information visit www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol or call 0117 911 1735.

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN Tel: 0117 911 1735 • www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol MAY 2014

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Bristol Laser Vision at Bristol Eye Hospital Celebrates its First Birthday!

CALM IS KEY

As the service at Bristol Laser Vision moves into its second year, patients are delighted with their results following Laser Eye Surgery. Why not join them?

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he team at Bristol Laser Vision are thrilled to be celebrating their First Birthday. Since launching in April 2013, they have continued to provide patients throughout the South West with a locally delivered refractive surgery service, offering bespoke laser eye surgery and refractive lens exchange procedures using state-of-the-art technology, within the safe and trusted surroundings of Bristol Eye Hospital. Key to their success says Consultant Lead for the service, Mr Philip Jaycock, is that “Our patients remain at the heart of everything we do. It’s extremely important to us that patients receive the best care and the best treatments for them and their eyes. We are proud to say that 100% of patients surveyed would recommend Bristol Laser Vision to others.”

Rachael – Treated in November 2013 “Right from my initial consultation, Bristol Laser Vision offered expert advice and thorough testing to ensure my treatment was tailored to my needs. I felt very reassured on the day and the procedure was professionally carried out, alongside a caring and friendly experience. After a period of recovery my sight improved unbelievably well and my vision is now perfect. I can now live without the cost of contact lenses and hassle of glasses – I am delighted.” So if you’re fed up with your glasses or contact lenses and are considering the increasingly popular solution offered by laser eye surgery, why not join the delighted patients who have chosen Bristol Laser Vision at Bristol Eye hospital to care for their eyes? Book a consultation with Bristol Laser Vision today and take the next step towards a hassle free life and enjoy a clearer view. For further information, or to book a consultation, contact Bristol Laser Vision. T: 0117 342 1600 E: info@bristollaservision.co.uk W: www.bristollaservision.co.uk 80 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Amanda Gazidis of Positive Pathways Hypnotherapy explains the benefits of hypnotherapy for fertility, childbirth and children

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ypnotherapy is fast becoming the most popular complementary therapy because it is very pleasant, safe, enjoyable and effective. Hypnotherapy brings about positive change in a relatively short period to create happier and healthier lives. Relaxation and focusing upon your inner resources and strengths is the key. My job as a hypnotherapist is wonderful because I help people improve the quality of their lives profoundly. My specialisms are hypnotherapy for fertility, childbirth and for children, working from my Clifton-based practice and from the Chiron Centre for natural health in Westbury-on-Trym. I really enjoy supporting my clients through the process of conception, gestation and birth. Hypnotherapy is key in creating a good mental, emotional and physical balance to optimise the chances of conception and improve the quality of the pregnancy and birth. How can hypnotherapy help with fertility? A fertile state is having mental, spiritual and physical balance. A client is far more likely to conceive in a state of general wellbeing in the mind, body and spirit, and hypnotherapy promotes and encourages this. We use trance to address the subconscious mind and the messages we tell ourselves in order to restore balance by reducing stress and increasing feelings of calm and relaxation. I see my clients finding balance in their lives and this has increased the chances of conceiving considerably. Research studies have shown that during IVF treatment clients are 50% more likely to conceive with hypnotherapy treatment. What is hypno-birthing? The benefits of hypno-birthing are being acknowledged more than ever – even Kate Middleton opted for hypno-birthing. A series of sessions for hypnobirthing, combined with a relaxation CD, improves the experience of pregnancy and childbirth greatly. Hypnotherapy induces relaxation in the mother-to-be and she then releases positive hormones that actively effect the baby. Research has shown that natural endorphins are 200 times more powerful than morphine. A calmer mum results in greater levels of oxygenation and lowered levels of stress hormones. Hypno-birthing results in babies being born in a calm way and happier, healthier mums and partners. Hypnotherapy for children five years upwards Children absolutely love hypnotherapy. They soak up the sessions like a sponge and love the attention. I make the experience fun and interesting for them, using props such as rainbow carpets and wands and they enjoy relaxing and listening to stories. Hypnotherapy empowers children to have greater confidence and self-esteem, improving their thoughts, emotions and actions and therefore their and their families lives. Issues such as bullying, selfconfidence, stammering, acne, ADHD, bed-wetting, fears and phobias are so often successfully resolved through receiving hypnotherapy. I will be running a talk on the benefits of hypnotherapy for fertility, childbirth and for children on Thursday 22 May at the Chiron Centre studio, 7.30-9pm. To book, contact me on tel: 07594440949. ■ To book a consultation or to find out more, email Amanda on agazidis@yahoo.co.uk, tel: 07594440949 or call the Chiron Centre on tel: (0117) 9620008. Visit Youtube to see a Positive Pathways Hypnotherapy video.


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Heavy, Swollen, Painful legs or arms? Lymphatic Management: Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) Decongetive Lymphoedma Therapy (DLT) Electromagnetic Therapy: Arthritis (Osteo and Rhemo), Back Pain, Joint Pain, Sports Injuries and Skin conditions

www.centre4health.co.uk Whiteladies Medical Centre, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2PU and mobile home service 07867 934677 / 01453 836230

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Nutrition to support people with arthritis By Georgie O’Connor, Nutritional Therapist and lecturer at CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine).

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here are many different types of arthritis but all feature inflammation either as a causative agent or as a side effect. Inflammation causes the joint heat, pain and mobility problems, so it is not an easy task to keep mobile. It is, however, extremely important to do so in order to avoid further joint deterioration. Fortunately, enjoying a balanced diet of fresh, seasonal foods can help alleviate your symptoms by tackling inflammation at its source. There are lots of fabulous foods to choose from that will provide oodles of phytonutrients, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, such as pears, apples, berries, spinach, carrots and sweet potatoes. 2 or 3 portions of oily fish per week, such as salmon, mackerel or sardines, will provide the necessary essential fat, omega 3, that will ensure any inflammatory response is appropriate. If you are vegetarian, then use ground flaxseed or chia seeds. Onions, garlic, turmeric and ginger will add depth and zing to each and every meal and pack a powerful antiinflammatory punch. You can also use fresh ginger to flavour teas or just steep it in hot water, and add lemon for a refreshing alternative to regular tea. Consider increasing your consumption of green tea, to keep the antiinflammatory nutrients coming between meals. Adequate hydration is an absolute must to ensure that all the body’s tissues are exchanging waste products for nutrients efficiently, so always aim to consume 1.5 to 2 litres of water, herbal teas and/or dilute fruit juices per day. Once those inflammatory waste products have been collected by the circulation, the liver will package them up and dispose of them either via the kidneys or the bowel. The 1.5 to 2 litres of fluid will ensure the kidneys are working optimally, but in order to ensure waste products are being effectively removed via the bowel and are not being reabsorbed to contribute to the inflammatory burden, then you need to ensure you’re getting good levels of fibre; aim for 5 portions of vegetables and 2 fruit per day. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, pack an extra detoxification bonus for your liver. This is no one single arthritis eating plan, but everyone will benefit from an anti-inflammatory diet. It is worth mentioning that some people with arthritis have a problem with the deadly nightshade family – tomato, pepper, aubergine and potatoes, whilst others find that citrus fruit may exacerbate their symptoms. Only some people benefit from

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excluding such foods and as they all contain really important nutrients, they shouldn’t be excluded lightly. Try cutting them out for a week, and note if there is any improvement in your symptoms; if there’s no noticeable change then continue to enjoy them as part of your daily fare. Foods that should be avoided by everyone, especially those with Georgie O’Connor inflammatory conditions like arthritis, are fried foods, refined carbohydrates and trans fats, often found in processed foods. Fried foods may increase body fat which in turn puts extra strain on the joints and increases the risk of wear and tear. Plus, fat is biologically active, producing harmful hormones and pro-inflammatory messengers. Grilling, steaming, roasting, and baking are all far more joint friendly methods of cooking food. Refined carbohydrates such as white bread, sugar, instant rice and most breakfast cereals all rapidly raise your blood sugar, which can cause damage to circulating blood cells, hormones and messengers, in turn causing the immune system to react inappropriately. This is not good news for your joints! Be kind to your body- you only have one!

FREE CNM Open Evening Thursday 8th May 6.30pm-8.30pm Find out about training with CNM Bristol for a successful career in Naturopathic Nutrition or Naturopathic Acupuncture. You can also hear more about our short course ‘Nutrition for Everyday Living’ which starts on 17th May. For more information, venue, and to reserve your place: 01342 410 505 info@naturopathy-uk.com

www.naturopathy-uk.com


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Follow the old salt road This eight-mile walk starts by heading through woods and fields near Painswick, before following an old salt road and returning along the Cotswold Way past an iron age hillfort. It also takes you past two popular and traditional country inns, says Andrew Swift

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he starting point is a walkers’ car park on the Cotswold Way (CW). Just north of Painswick town centre, turn west off the A46 along the B4073 and, after a third of a mile, turn right following a signpost to the walkers’ car park, which is a little way along on the left (SO867104).

• Head north out of the car park along the road. After 250 metres bear right at a crossroads (you can if you wish, cut the corner) (SO869108). Cross the main road and carry straight on. After 200 metres turn right at a T-junction following a signpost for the The Park. After another 200 metres turn left, bearing to the left of a house called The Brambles. Walk straight on along a footpath at the end (don’t follow a footpath sign pointing right). • After 100 metres cross a slab stile to the right of a house and turn left alongside a wall (SO875105). Carry on down through a gate and follow a track down through a field. Cross a stile and a stream by the gate at the bottom and bear right following footpath waymarks. Don’t cross a stile but carry on through a metal gate and follow a faint track diagonally up a field. There is a good view across to Painswick from here. After going through a gate, don’t follow a waymark to the right, but carry straight on, heading to the left of the bank you can see ahead.

• Go through a small wooden gate in the far corner of the field (SO883101) and carry on, following the path uphill and through a gate at the top. Turn left past Pyll House and follow a footpath sign across a parking area and through a gate. Carry on with a hedge on your right, go through a five-bar gate and carry on with a field of alpacas on the right. Cross a stile at the end and turn left downhill alongside a wall. After crossing a stream and a 84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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stile, head up through a field, bearing right through two wooden gates. At the end of a track turn right, turning almost immediately left up a bridleway – although you may want to take a break at the Butcher’s Arms a few metres further on (SO891104). • Carry on up a rocky path past Steepways Cottage to emerge on Sheepscombe Common. Bear left to follow a clear track uphill (not the one bearing left alongside a fence). Carry on through an area where trees have recently been felled into Lords and Ladies Wood. Carry on along a bridleway, ignoring footpaths branching off to the left. After 350 metres, when a drystone wall cuts diagonally across, bear left to follow the bridleway alongside it. A few metres further on, as you leave Lords and Ladies Wood, bear right to follow the bridleway alongside the wall (SO891110). On your left is Saltridge Wood, and it is thought that the bridleway you are following is part of an ancient salt road along which salt was carried from Droitwich to south Gloucestershire. • After the bridleway starts to descend, continue across a crosspath and, when the wall bears east, carry straight on down a muddy track. After this levels out, bear left at a fork to continue down the bridleway. At the bottom, where several tracks meet (SO895120), carry straight on along the bridleway, following it as it curves right. The next section, as the bridleway curves gracefully along the contours, is particularly attractive. When the path forks, bear left along the bridleway and, after going down steps, you will see Brook Farm and its trout ponds in the valley below. • Follow the bridleway as it curves round the back of Brook Farm, and carry on up a lane which bears right up to Cranham Common. After passing


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some modern buildings, bear left at a junction, cross a road and bear right along a path beside a hedgerow. Carry on in the same direction into Cranham and turn left at – or call into – the Black Horse (SO896129). • Turn left again at the bottom and carry on along the road through the village for 250 metres. By the 40mph signs, bear right through a car park and follow a path bearing left into the woods, past a Cotswold Way Circular Walk waymark. Carry on along it for 500 metres before crossing a road. Continue straight on for another 300 metres, and, when you come to a T-junction with a broken-down wall ahead, turn left along the Cotswold Way (CW) (SO886135).

woodland, and, when you emerge into the open, head to the right of the wall ahead. Continue alongside the cemetery and carry on in the same direction, crossing a road, to return to the car park. ■

FURTHER INFORMATION... ■

Distance: 8 miles

Time: 3-4 hours

Level of challenge: Several stiles early on, plus some muddy paths

Map: OS Explorer 179

Refreshment stops: Butcher’s Arms, Sheepscombe (tel: 01452 812113) –food served 12-2.30 & 6.30-9.30 Mon-Fri; 12-9.30 Sat; 12-8 Sun. Black Horse, Cranham (tel: 01452 812217) – food served 12-2 & 6.30-9 Tue-Fri; 12-2 only Sun; closed Mon

ON THE WAY: left, the old salt road along which salt was carried from Droitwich to south Gloucestershire Above, a stream near Sheepscombe Right, the Butcher’s Arms at Sheepscombe

• After 600 metres, when you come to a road, turn right along it. At a T-junction, cross ahead and bear left for a few metres before following a footpath into woods. After following a stone wall on your right for a little way, bear left to follow a CW waymark across a minor road (SO880129). When the path forks, bear left to follow the CW. When you come to a lane, carry on along it for 200 metres before going under a height-restriction barrier and following CW waymarks across a golf course with Painswick Fort on your right. (Alternatively, for a view from the summit of the fort, bear right after passing the barrier and follow a path alongside the woods. Carry on along the edge of the ramparts before heading carefully down them to rejoin the CW.) • After 1,100 metres, when you come to a lane (SO867117), turn left along it for 50 metres, before turning right and following the CW to the left of Catbrain Quarry. Carry on along a path through

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BEE-FRIENDLY GARDENS Nothing says summer has arrived more than the sound of bumblebees buzzing around colourful flowers on a warm sunny day. Rosemary Free from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust explains how we can help to conserve bees in our own gardens

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umblebees are an essential part of the countryside, responsible as they are for pollinating our crops and wildflowers. However, in the past 80 years, two of the 26 species in the UK have become extinct and several others are now extremely rare. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust (BBCT), which was set up in 2006 to address concerns about the plight of this much-loved insect, is now calling on gardeners to play their part by creating bee-friendly havens. Gardeners from Bristol have a particularly important role to play, given the city’s proximity to two important bumblebee habitats. “Bristol is right in the middle of two bumblebee hotspots – the Gwent and Somerset Levels,” says BBCT data monitoring officer Dr Richard Comont. “And with the city’s Green Capital initiative and the Festival of Nature, it’s a great place to go bee-watching.” The queens from some species of bumblebee – such as the Buff-tailed bumblebee and Tree bumblebee – will have already emerged from hibernation in the last couple of months and established their nests. Others, such as the Red-tailed bumblebee, Garden bumblebee and Common carder bee emerge from hibernation anytime between March and June. One of Britain’s rarest bees, the Shrill carder – which is now only found in seven locations in the UK including South Wales and Somerset – emerges in May. At this time of year, it is important to have spring plants which are rich in nectar and pollen so 86 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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❝ BRISTOL IS RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF TWO BUMBLEBEE HOTSPOTS – THE GWENT AND SOMERSET LEVELS

the queens can replenish their energy after a winter without food. “Gardens can be a great resource for bumblebees – the bees need flowers from March to October, and increasingly gardens are the only places they can find enough to keep going,” says Richard. “Wildlife-friendly gardening is often portrayed as untidy and nettle-filled. But the bumblebees’ main need is for flowers – nectar and pollen will keep them buzzing all summer.” However, before you head for your nearest garden centre, it is important to remember that not all flowers are suitable for bumblebees. Plants like pansies and double begonias offer little for bumblebees and other pollinators because they produce little or no pollen and nectar. Others, such as petunias, have flower shapes that bumblebees cannot use – either because the petals form long tunnels which are too long or narrow for the bees to feed from or because they have multiple tightly-packed heads. It is also best to avoid species that have a habit of escaping from gardens and invading wild habitats nearby, for example, rhododendron and Himalayan balsam. Instead opt for plants which provide plenty of nectar and pollen but also have a variety of flower shapes to cater for the needs of different bee species. For long-tongued bumblebees, including the Shrill carder bee, go for plants with tubular flowers such as aquilegia, foxglove and monkshood. Meanwhile, short-tongued bumblebees such as the White-tailed and Early bumblebees prefer open flowers. Raspberry, blackberry, white clover and


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Bee Walks

FLOWER POWER: Main image, whitetailed bumblebee; left inset, moss carder bee Above, examples of bee friendly gardens featuring flowers with plenty of nectar and pollen Right, illustrations of some of the most common types of bees you may spot when you’re out and about: left, Bombus Hortorum the garden bumblebee, Bombus Pascuorum the common carder bee; Bombus Lapidarius the red-tailed bumblebee (Queen and male) and lower right: Rudbeckia

small-flowered varieties of sweet peas are all good options. Other popular blooms for early summer are allium, which can grow in almost any type of soil, and borage, which provides both nectar for bumblebees and edible flowers for the gardener. Summer is the time of the year when bumblebee workers stock up on pollen and nectar to feed the larvae and young bees in their growing colony. A plentiful supply of flowers will help increase the likelihood of a colony producing a new generation of bumblebees later in the year. Catmint, honeysuckle and Viper’s bugloss are all popular with long-tongued species, while short-tongued bumblebees will feed on devil’s bit scabius, bird’s foot trefoil and knapweed. Herb gardens with thyme, marjoram and lavender are also fantastic for bees. The greater the number of suitable flowering plants in your garden the better but as a rule of thumb, you should aim for at least two kinds of bee-friendly plant for each flowering period. For late-emerging species, it is also important to have plants which are in flower into October. Even if you don’t have a garden, you can play your part by taking part in BBCT’s Spring into Action campaign. The trust has produced two resource packs to help people lobby their councils and local garden centres to become more bee-friendly. For local authorities, something as simple as changing the cutting regime of the grass verges and park land could have a huge impact on bumblebee populations. Meanwhile garden centres can play an important role by promoting plants beneficial to bumblebees over common bedding plants which offer little or no pollen and nectar. ■

The Bumblebee Conservation Trust is looking for volunteers to help them monitor these much-loved pollinators by signing up to its BeeWalk project – a national recording scheme which aims to build up a more accurate picture of bumblebee populations across the UK. All you need is a spare hour or so every month between now and October to walk a fixed route of about a mile. Having recorded the bumblebees you see on your walk, you then enter the information on the trust’s website. In general, most people will only see what are often referred to as the Big Eight common bumblebees. These include the Buff-tailed, Red-tailed and White-tailed bumblebees as well as the Garden bumblebee and Common carder bee. If you do come across a rare species or a bee you don’t recognise, you can take some photographs and upload them to a special BeeWatch website, run by BBCT in partnership with Aberdeen University. Here you will be guided through some easy questions to help identify the bumblebee in your photo, which is then verified by an expert. Marc Carlton, from Chepstow, has been doing BeeWalks for three years. “I’m constantly encouraging people to record bumblebees,” he says. “It’s a great way of getting into the countryside and learning a lot. However, it’s a steep learning curve. I would always say to newcomers – start in your garden as soon as possible. Get an ID kit if you don’t already know about bumblebees and see if you can record the big six, seven or eight in your garden. That’s the first step on the ladder. Most people have no idea there is more than one bumblebee.” Marc, who is involved with the UK Wildlife Gardening Forum, also says the route you choose is important. His route is on the Gloucestershire side of the River Wye and takes in the cliff tops beside the Bristol channel as well as arable land with hedges. “It’s a mix of habitat which is all to the good,” he says. “I’ve seen most of the big six or seven plus one or two cuckoo bees. What you see, and when, is very dependent on the flowers. What I have learnt is there is a very close relationship between flowers and bumblebees. They don’t have time to fly around if there’s no food. They just go where the food is. On any particular stretch, if the flowers are out and if it’s not pouring with rain, the bees are there. If there are no flowers there are no bees.” For those new to the world of bumblebees, Marc suggests sharing a BeeWalk with a group of friends or neighbours. “If you get several people in a village or allotment say, or a group of friends, they can all go on a bumblebee ID course and share a BeeWalk. That makes it easier because of the commitment. It’s only a couple of hours every month but you have to do it when the sun’s out, not pouring with rain.” Groups in the Bristol area interested in taking part in a guided BeeWalk or attending an ID talk can contact Marc Carlton at: foxleas@phonecoop.coop For more information about how to get involved in BeeWalks visit: http://bumblebeeconservation.org/getinvolved/surveys/beewalk/

To find out how bee-friendly your garden is, try the Bee Kind tool on the BBCT website which will give you a score on the flowers already in your garden and advice on what else to plant: http://beekind.bumblebeeconservation.org/

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PERFECT SCENTS Our Bristol garden design feature writer, Margaux Speirs explains how to create a herb garden which can be used in the kitchen and beautiful to look at, any time of year

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herb garden can be beautiful to look at, sweet smelling and of great culinary use. Although herb plants tend to have less elaborate flowers, their quiet colours lend an air of tranquility that a bright floral garden may lack. Also, pollinators are particularly attracted to edible plant flowers so on a hot summer day the air will be alive with their gentle buzzing adding another element of charm. Most aromatic herbs need a sunny site with free draining soil. If the area you want to grow herbs is damp then either add gravel or sand to the soil or create a raised bed. It only needs to be as little as 15cm above the level of the adjoining garden to make a difference to the drainage. There is an excellent wooden construction product from Woodblocx which is like Lego for gardeners, making building planters, walls and ponds child’s play. It’s only available online but they will help you select the blocks you need if you send them your design. If your herb garden is just going to be in an old Belfast sink or large tub then to make sure it drains well put bits of broken pots or large pebbles in the bottom and cover them with a layer of sand before putting on the top soil. Make a list of the herbs you are most likely to use in the kitchen. My favourites are rosemary, sage, bay, chives, mint, thyme, parsley, basil, coriander and tarragon. Rosemary can be used for hedging and bay can be cut into topiary shapes, giving added interest. You can only grow parsley, coriander and basil outside during the warmer months but they would grow on an indoor window sill all year. Tarragon is tricky to grow and not very hardy but worth a go if, like me, you love the taste. Like any plant, to grow well its environment needs to suit is own special

growing needs so if your herbs are going to be close neighbours limit your list to those with compatible requirements. Research which ones are very vigorous and take measures to confine their spread. For example, mint grows very rapidly and it is wise to grow it in a pot sunk up to the neck in soil within your herb garden. Some herbs are evergreen and they will be the “backbone” to your herb garden. Those which are herbaceous (die back in winter) or annual (live only one growing year) will leave gaps when they die back so position these so the gaps they leave do not spoil the overall effect. Tall plants will cast a shadow over smaller neighbours so put them on the north side of the bed. Placing plants in groups always looks less bitty unless the plant has sufficient presence to stand alone. Start with a good framework of dramatic architectural herbs, such as fennel or bay trees cut into lollipops then infill with the less showy herbs. Box hedging is often used as a framework for a herb garden because it can be planted in interesting design shapes, trimmed regularly to keep it small and neat and it holds up plants inclined to flop. Draw your design on paper before you go shopping. Even when you have drawn your design, check before committing yourself to planting by arranging the pots where you intend them to be. When planting out dig a hole only as deep as the soil the nursery grew them in. Only fertilise the soil where you are growing salads or leafy green herbs, as many aromatic herbs, particularly those with grey green leaves such as sage, thrive in poor soil. Water pot-grown plants before you put them in the garden and keep your herb garden well watered throughout its first growing season. You can buy water retaining granules which swell up when wet so hang onto water longer. These are suitable for container planting but where

PLACING PLANTS IN GROUPS ALWAYS LOOKS LESS BITTY UNLESS THE PLANT HAS SUFFICIENT PRESENCE TO STAND ALONE

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you have put your herb garden into the ground then well-rotted manure or compost does the job better for longer. Finally to maintain your herb garden, prune woody plants quite hard at the onset of their natural growing period (but after the risk of frost has passed). Clump-forming herbs which are getting too big for their space can be dug up in autumn and the clump cut into pieces with a sharp knife. Each piece will grow into a new clump. Unless the herb thrives on poor soil feed it with mulch or compost after pruning or dividing. Jekka’s Herb Farm in South Gloucestershire has the largest collection of culinary herbs in the UK and is open to the public on several days in May: worth a visit to help you plan your herb garden and to source special herb plants. ■

PLANT OF THE MONTH Kolkwitzia amabilis is an easy to grow, abundant-flowering shrub which well deserves its common name Beauty Bush. Grow it in sun or part shade, giving it space to reach its full size of at least 1.5 metres tall and 2.5 metres across. It needs very little care and attention and its annual late spring show of pink bells will make your heart sing.

Margaux Speirs is a pre-registered member of the Society of Garden Designers and runs her business, Margaux Speirs Garden Design from her home in Bristol. For further information visit: www.margauxspeirsgardendesign.co.uk

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Duck Egg Kitchens HAND CRAFTED KITCHENS

WE LOVE KITCHENS 0117 958 8797

www.duckeggkitchens.co.uk

THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE THEBESTOFBRISTOL PERFECTLYCOVERED BRISTOLSBIGGESTMAGAZINE PERFECTLYDELIVERED TOADVERTISETEL: 0117 9742800 90 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT This charming, rustic cottage has bags of character, picturesque views and plenty of space – and with 13 bedrooms, a one bed annexe and located close to Bristol airport, there is huge business potential here, writes Marianne Swinkels

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alk about a misnomer. You’ll certainly need to think outside the box if you view this property, because Meadow Cottage is a place which truly belies its name. And rid yourself of stereotypical perceptions of cottages, conjuring up, as they can, quaint images of modest, cutesy rural dwellings with a dash of chintz and a splash of flowering borders, wisteria and rose scented bowers. This home really is not that. But by all means think thatch, bags of character and features and all those other evocative generalisations which so readily spring to mind when envisioning this gorgeous genre of country home – and you are starting out on the right lines. Think bigger, bolder, even sumptuous, throw in an inglenook or two and you are getting hotter. Think huge business potential and/or substantial farmhouse living and yes, even a meadow or two, and you are certainly on the right track. Which is exactly what Meadow Cottage is. A hidden charmer down a verdant lane yet close to Bristol’s international airport. Described as outstanding, lovingly updated, enchanting et al, you could happily puree such adjectives in one great mixing bowl, because whichever way you view this 17th century home cum current B&B cottage it offers a tantalising concoction of opportunities. Venture a mere mile or two past the airport and into the peaceful countryside of Redhill’s Lye Hole Lane and you’ll soon know which side your bread is buttered on when you catch the first glimpse of this large, picture-book abode in its secluded one acre plot. Here is a handsome stone-built building whose exterior shrieks history and

heritage and epitomises, with its recently laid expanse of thatched roof, the best of all things rustic. Landscaped south facing gardens, sweeping steps which grant access to a series of large stone terraces, magnolia, mulberry fruit and specimen trees, pond, well, outbuildings and rural views stretching way across the Mendips, add to the picturesque. Even the pet dogs are housed in a characterfully heated and lit shed. But just wait until you get inside. For the beauty of this particular beast lies in its tasteful restoration and significant expansion, transforming the original two bed 1640s cottage and one-time neighbouring stable into a substantial family home with a detached one bedroom annexe. Several centuries on, the owners of Meadow Cottage embarked on the sympathetic two storey extension in 2004 – a mammoth building project which took a couple of years to complete. With the focus on maintaining the authenticity of the house, no proverbial stone was left unturned to replicate features from its bygone era and yet to incorporate all modern home comforts. If you have a yen for the old, the love affair will start as soon as you enter the flagstoned, wood panelled entrance hall. Using the cream of local craftsmens’ skills, the owners strove to convert the new and preserve the original without compromise to the integrity or quality of the building. And boy, did they succeed. It is not a listed building, but all due reverence has been given to the place. Exposed oak beams and doors, vaulted ceilings, inglenook fireplaces, lime

THE BEAUTY OF THIS PARTICULAR BEAST LIES IN ITS TASTEFUL RESTORATION AND SIGNIFICANT EXPANSION

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PROPERTY PROFILE Where: Meadow Cottage, Lye Hole Lane, Redhill, Nr Wrington, Somerset

What: Substantial detached extended and restored thatched and stone built former 17th century farmhouse in peaceful country location and secluded one acre grounds. Presently run as a thriving B&B business within easy reach of Bristol International Airport. Separate one-bed coach house annexe with rental income potential The spec: Over 4,200 sq ft of character accommodation currently arranged as 13 guest bedrooms and variety of ensuite/separate bath/shower/wetrooms over two wings. Large oak beamed kitchen/breakfast room with bespoke units and commercial catering/cooking equipment. Quality craftsmanship and original/authentic features throughout rendered walls, reclaimed alms floors, flagstones, red brick and terracotta tiles… quirky character abounds. The central axis of the home, now also the focal point for B&B guests, is the huge kitchen/breakfast room where no expense has been spared on catering in style. The French gas/electric cooker would grace any professional kitchen and the sleek hand-crafted bespoke units with oak inlay and stainless steel trim will evoke envy from any chef. Luxury and modernity have figured large in the many shower, bath and wet rooms, some with a freestanding claw and ball foot bath, others with body jets, power showers and en suites with underfloor heating… because there was another ingenious plan the owners had in mind. To adapt Meadow Cottage to accommodate a thriving B&B venture, capitalising on the airport and tourism market. Currently used as 12 highly individual bedrooms, plus a converted top floor attic room, Meadow Cottage can be bought lock, stock and barrel… every antique bed, furniture, kitchen equipment, bedding and even teaspoons included. With a B&B turnover in the region of £120,000 per annum last financial year; and bookings have since soared significantly this year; there is plenty of food for thought here. There is business potential too in the one bed annexe, with an expected rental value of £8k per year. But if you simply want to buy into a gorgeous pile in Bristol’s southern hinterland, with easy get-away airport access and nearby Wrington’s convivial community and local amenities, this should more than tick a box or two. Easily reconfigured back to a family home, with two wings accessed by separate staircases, the options for spreading out in the 4,200 square feet of luxury accommodation are quite simply stupendous. The old adage ‘make your bed and lie in it’ has never had such a positive spin. For as the owner of this cottagey manse so rightly says, this is a house which gives you a great warm hug. ■ WWW.THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Price: In the region of £1,150,000 (excluding B&B business goodwill/contents). Annexe available through separate negotiation, in the region of £150,000 Agent: CJ Hole, Congresbury office www.cjhole.co.uk

Contact: Email: congresbury@cjhole.co.uk Tel: 01934 830333

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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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oodman & Lilley are delighted to market this substantial detached seven bedroom Grade II listed, ‘Queen Anne’ style home situated in the heart of the ever popular village of Easton-In-Gordano. This stunning period home has many benefits including a wide variety of original features, cellar rooms, private grounds, outbuildings and ample parking. Call us to arrange your viewing. Goodman & Lilley, 156 Henleaze Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 213 0777

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PRIORY LANE EASTON-IN-GORDANO Guide Price £900,000


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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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oyal York Crescent has a historical past and is allegedly the longest crescent in Europe. Work began in the 1790’s and was still being completed 20 years later. Number 30 is Grade II listed and has far reaching views over the city, looking south and across to Dundry Hill. The southerly aspect means that the house is flooded with light and there are many elegant period features including sash windows with working shutters, curved balustrades on the staircase, marble fireplaces and the classic first floor balcony with wrought iron railings. There are five floors plus a cellar with the lower ground floor currently incorporated into the main house. However this could easily provide a self contained annexe if preferred. In all the accommodation comprises: Entrance hall, staircase hall, sitting room, kitchen/breakfast room, first floor drawing room with balcony, dining room, study, games room, second kitchen, utility room and cloakroom. There are six bedrooms, five bathrooms four of which are en suite, a cellar/workshop and two garages. There is an enclosed courtyard to the front of the house giving access to the garages and at the year a very pretty and good sized walled garden leads out onto princess Victoria Street. This is Clifton at its Regency finest. Agents for the property are Knight Frank.

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

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30 ROYAL YORK CRESCENT, CLIFTON • Six bedrooms • Five Bathrooms • Garages • Walled garden • Spectacular Views • Sought after Clifton location

£1,950,000 MAY 2014

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www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 973 4940 22 Richmond Hill, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 1BA

LD SOSTC

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Clifton

City Centre

£695,000

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Freehold Investment Properties Required

£550,000

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Buyers waiting for tenanted & vacant properties

Redland

Fishponds

£595,000

£325,000

Bristol’s fastest growing Commercial Agency Retail | Industrial | Office | Investment LET AGREED - SIMILAR REQUIRED

Pembroke Road, Clifton

£20,000PA

Former doctors surgery of approx. 1,000sqft with own access and rear courtyard, situated in a prime location on Pembroke Road just a stone’s throw from Clifton Village and Whiteladies Road.

Paintworks, Arnos Vale

£220,000/£15,000PA

Very well presented and improved self-contained workshop/creative space (just under 1,000sqft gross internal area) with allocated parking. Situated in the highly popular Paintworks Development, Arnos Vale, Bristol’s creative quarter. Early enquiries recommended. Available for sale or to let.

Estate Agents

Lettings & Management

Maggs & Allen Commercial MAY.indd 1

NEW INSTRUCTION

High Street, Shirehampton

LET AGREED - SIMILAR REQUIRED

NEW INSTRUCTION

£550,000

North Street, Southville

£16,500PA

Canford Lane, Westbury-On-Trym

£12,000PA

Freehold mixed commercial investment consisting of 3x retail units and 2x first floor flats. The property is very well presented throughout benefiting from rear access, a roof terrace and double glazing. Fully let, producing approximately £43,500pa. Early enquiries are recommended.

Well presented and spacious restaurant (just under 1,000sqft gross internal area) with additional front terrace. Formerly ‘Cafe Sazz’, now relaunched as ‘Grill Express’, the property is situated in a prime location in North Street. Premium of £85,000 sought to include all chattels and fixtures and fittings (subject to some personal belongings).

Rare opportunity to lease this well presented shop approx. 530sqft in the heart of Westbury Village. Benefiting from A1 and A2 planning consent with the addition of a rear courtyard and side access. Other notable businesses nearby include Cooperative, Grupo Lounge and Lloyds Pharmacy.

NEW INSTRUCTION

NEW INSTRUCTION

NEW INSTRUCTION

Jamaica Street, Stokes Croft

£275,000

Period end of terrace freehold investment property arranged as ground floor café/restaurant, renovated to a very high specification with addition basement storage, toilets and kitchen. Although the tenants have been in occupation for some time, a new 10 year FRI lease has just been agreed at £21,600p.a.x (plus service charge).

Auctioneers

Bath Road, Arnos Vale

£450,000

Substantial terrace of 4x three storey properties with rear access and stores offering huge redevelopment potential subject to consents. Arranged as commercial with 4 maisonettes in need of renovation. Well situated close to ‘Paintworks’, Bristol Temple Meads and the city centre.

New Homes

Chartered Surveyors

High Street, Shirehampton

£450,000

Well presented and deceptively spacious freehold investment arranged as a large tenanted ground floor retail unit with store room and rear access, with a 2 bedroom first floor flat and further self contained maisonette occupying the entire second and third floors. Fully let producing £36,240pa. Early enquiries are recommended.

Commercial/ Investment

Energy Assessors

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Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents Keep up-to-date with our latest news and market comments at our website:

www.burstoncook.co.uk

(0117) 934 9977

WATERLOO HOUSE, CLIFTON OFFICES TO LET 2nd floor office suite with ground floor reception/office. 1,004 sq ft – Mainly open plan. New flexible lease.

At the latest Estates Gazette Interactive Awards held in Bristol, Burston Cook were announced as most active agent in the City based on the number of transactions they have concluded over the last 12 months. We are absolutely thrilled to have won this award against stiff competition and credit must go to all of the Burston Cook team who work so hard throughout the year.

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR CLIENTS CENTRAL BRISTOL INDUSTRIAL INVESTMENT Comprising 4 industrial units – Let until 2018 at a rent of £38,500 pax Good established tenant Offers IRO £433,000

51 OLD MARKET STREET, BRISTOL

FREEHOLD INVESTMENT

A substantial property comprising 2 x 1 bed flats, 1 x studio flat, 1 x 3 bed maisonette + large retail shop – Flats currently let at £36,000 pax + vacant shop – potential total income c £50,000 pax on letting the shop –

AWAITING PHOTO

Freehold offers in excess of £500,000

(0117) 934 9977

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BROOK OFFICE PARK, EMERSONS GREEN

FOR SALE – CLIFTON *£100,000*

*FOR SALE*

Office building of c 470 sq ft gross, providing contemporary space with potential for other uses.

Newly constructed office building of c 3,300 sq ft with 20 car spaces. Offers IRO £535,000 QC30, QUEEN CHARLOTTE STERET

22 ORCHARD STREET – BS1

City Centre contemporary open plan office suite of 1,005 sq ft –

An attractive period office building of c 1,458 sq ft –

To buy £150,000 –

Competitive rent

New lease –

To rent £10,000 pax 12 PARK ROW, BRISTOL

NORTH STREET, SOUTHVILLE

Prominent road frontage Shop to rent – C 327 sq ft

Ground floor shop let with vacant upper floor offices with residential potential –

New flexible lease

For sale £325,000

Only £8,500 pax WATERLOO HOUSE, CLIFTON OFFICES TO LET

SHOP FOR SALE, CLIFTON VILLAGE *Only £140,000*

2nd floor office suite with ground floor reception/office.

Lock up shop fronting The Mall –

1,004 sq ft – Mainly open plan.

Ideal for investors & occupiers

New flexible lease. FORMER GOSPEL HALL, HANHAM, BRISTOL

PRINCESS VICTORIA STREET, CLIFTON TO LET –

A modern hall with D1 consent on a large site with potential.

Mews style office building of c 1,700 sq ft net –

Freehold for sale.

New lease - £13.50 per sq ft

(0117) 934 9977

Julian Cook

Jayne Rixon

Charlie Kershaw

Finola Ingham

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PROUD TO HELP BRISTOL’S BUSINESS PEOPLE A SELECTION OF RECENT COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS ES D IC REE F OF AG T LE

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BURSTON COOK IS THE MOST ACTIVE COMMERCIAL AGENT IN BRISTOL 2014 *EGI Deals Competitions*

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Bishopston

St. Andrews

Montpelier

This attractive Victorian home is ideally located for public transport links and local businesses. In addition, easy access to Bishop Road School and being within the Redland Green APR makes this is a perfect family home. Further benefits include a 40 foot westerly facing rear garden, and being offered for sale with no onward chain. EPC D

Cleverly arranged over three floors and offering far reaching views across central Bristol, this well-presented three bedroomed semi-detached property boasts three good size bedrooms and a family bathroom, with the upper floor, currently used as a play room, measuring over 21’ by 18’ with breath-taking views to the rear aspect. EPC D

Offered to the market with no onward chain and located on this premier St. Andrews Road, this well-presented period home offers spacious accommodation throughout with an array of period features. Further benefits include double glazing, modern fitted kitchen and a landscaped rear garden enjoying a sunny aspect. EPC TBA

Guide Price £369,750

Guide Price £445,000

£325,000

Multi Award Winners 2011 & 2012 Triple Award Winners 2013

Westbury Park

Henleaze

Stoke Bishop

Beautifully presented Victorian four bedroom family home arranged over three levels benefitting from a 60ft Westerly facing rear garden which is accessed via bi-fold doors from a modern kitchen/diner. The property also offers two receptions and a modern en-suite within the loft conversion. EPC D

Superbly presented with three double bedrooms, spacious modern bathroom and full width kitchen/diner to rear with French doors to a 21m landscaped garden. Conveniently located within the local Henleaze high street location and offering a contemporary feel throughout. EPC D

This charming detached family home offers a rich history having been built in 1896. The property offers two receptions: living room with period cast iron fireplace and French doors leading to garden, three bedrooms and a separate W/C. No onward chain. Awaiting EPC

Price Guide £525,000

CJ Hole MAY.indd 1

Price Guide £450,000

Price Guide £350,000

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Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com We are in the customer service business. Here at CJ Hole Clifton the team work tirelessly to make sure we get things right. And when things don’t go to plan, as sometimes happens in the Selling and Letting industry we work tirelessly to minimise stress and complications for clients. I just wanted to share with you just a few of the many nice things that people have said about the team in the last few weeks. “People always tell you that moving house is traumatic and full of hassle. Have to say, that wasn’t our experience with Howard and his team. If they’re not careful - they’ll start giving estate agents a good name!” - S, BS6

“Thank heavens I trusted my instinct and chose CJ Hole Clifton to handle my sale. You are a great team.” - T, BS1 “I am extremely thankful to everyone at CJ Hole Clifton that helped to get the sale agreed and complete! 10 out of 10 from me! I will definitely recommend you and your team to anyone looking for an estate agent.” - A, BS8 If you are considering selling or letting your property and would like a free no obligation appointment we would be delighted to hear from you. Howard Davis M.N.A.E.A Managing Director - CJ Hole Clifton

Clifton

Sneyd Park

Clifton

A recently refurbished garden level flat in a most convenient location. The well-presented interior offers a central hall, living room, two bedrooms, shower room and kitchen/breakfast room. The flat has use of the adjacent, paved garden to the rear of the building and spacious walk in vaulted storage area. EPC D

Fantastic views over the Avon Gorge! This ground floor two double bedroom apartment also has direct access to well-maintained communal gardens, GCH, double glazing and allocated parking plus additional parking to the front. EPC B

Bags of character and charm, great views and lots of light. This 3 double bedroom top floor flat is on one of Clifton’s more popular roads. Comprises; sitting room, kitchen, bathroom, and a spindled staircase and large skylight allowing plenty of natural light into the heart of the flat. EPC E

£250,000

£299,950

£389,950

Redland

Clifton

Sneyd Park

A unique modern three bedroom house with a private enclosed courtyard garden, car port and out building/home office. A stylish example of open plan living in a great location. There is also a garage nearby which is offered under separate negotiation. EPC D

A hidden gem! This four storey architect designed home is both elegant and individual. Courtyard gardens to front and rear, off street parking, first floor living room with Juliette balcony and large roof balcony with stunning Clifton views. EPC B

An excellent opportunity to own a detached bungalow within this sought after Sneyd Park location. Four bedrooms with built in wardrobes, parking and garage, plus attractive established gardens. EPC D

Guide Price £550,000

£695,000

£425,000

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Free bespoke marketing to get you on the move


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A superb three bedroom period house in popular Westbury Park.

WESTBURY PARK | BRISTOL

GUIDE PRICE £500,000

A beautiful home which attracted significant interest – with a sale agreed (STC) following a successful Open House & offers received in excess of the Guide Price. Similar Properties Required


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Stoke Bishop

£550,000 Coombe Lane

£499,950

Stoke Bishop

£500,000

Located at the top end of Roman Way this family home is a truly unique residence offering many bespoke features and an exceptional modern interior throughout. large open plan entrance hallway with open Oak staircase which to the rear has a designer kitchen with granite counter tops, under floor heating.

An attractive and well located detached home that was built in 1989, it was built on the location one of the Coach houses that served the Napier Miles estate/Kingsweston House in the 19th and 20th centuries. The current owners have tastefully improved and updated the property and offer a spacious, light and welcoming home

Available for purchase for the first time in over 40 years and nestled in a prime Stoke bishop cul-de-sac this detached family home offers exceptional square footage. In need of renovation this family home is priced to reflect the work needed and is marketed with no onward chain. Situated in the far end of the cul-de-sac and with the 'Old Sneed Nature Reserve'.

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973 D IRE LD QU SO RE R ILA SIM

Westbury on Trym

£479,950 Westbury on Trym

£470,000

Originally a Three bedroom 1930's dwelling, the current owners have sympathetically and substantially extended the existing footprint to create a Five bedroom family home. The extensions allow extraordinarily flexible accommodation rarely found in such a prime position. Within walking distance to Elmlea school.

With much of the original lavish ornamentation originally so prevalent in Art deco styling still in situe in this light and airey family home an early viewing would be highly recommended to avoid disappointment. In good decorative order throughout, and located a short stroll to the local shops on Stoke Lane, and to Elmlea and Westbury Schools.

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Westbury on Trym

£360,000

This fantastic three bedroom terraced house is located in a quiet cul-desac walking distance from Westbury on Trym C of E Academy. Accommodation comprises of three bedrooms, separate lounge, open plan kitchen/dining area and a family bathroom. Outside, the property benefits from a delightful lawned rear garden which has two storage sheds. Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

W ION NE CT RU ST IN

Westbury on Trym

£340,000 Henleaze

£205,000

Westbury-on-Trym

£175,000

Less than 100 meters from the prestigious Westbury on Trym Church of England School, this three bedroom semi will be of unrivalled interest to families looking to be in the heart of Westbury Village. In a cul-de-sac located off a one way street the elevated position of the property allows stunning views over Westbury.

A purpose built first floor retirement property in good decorative order. With Lift providing access to the higher levels, and a communal area for socialising and events. Communal parking to rear. Excellent public transport networks and conveniently located near local shops and amenities.

This three bedroom apartment is within easy reach of the popular Westbury village and the M4/M5 motorway networks and local bus routes. situated in beautifully maintained gardens with level access to the apartment to the rear or stair entrance to the front. There is also a garage allocated to the property.

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973

Please contact our Westbury-on Trym branch on 0117 962 1973


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£178,500 Clifton

£179,950

Clifton

£269,950

One bedroom hall floor flat set within a Georgian terrace conveniently located for Whiteladies Road. Property offers level access, high ceilings, and sash windows. Open plan lounge/kitchen/diner with sash window to rear elevation with open views, bedroom with large window to front elevation, and stylish shower room with W.C. Offered with no onward chain.

One bedroom hall floor flat set within a Georgian terrace conveniently located for Whiteladies Road. Property offers level access, high ceilings, and sash windows. Open plan lounge/kitchen/diner with sash window to rear elevation with open views, bedroom with large window to front elevation, and stylish shower room with W.C. Offered with no onward chain.

Two bedroom garden flat set within a fine Georgian terrace. Benefits from private entrance, sash windows, and gas central heating. Lounge/diner to front elevation, separate kitchen, modern bathroom, sizeable master bedroom with two built in wardrobes, second bedroom leading to utility area. To the rear is an attractive private courtyard garden with timber decking.

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Clifton

£270,000 Waterfront

£324,995

Waterfront

£325,000

A fantastic two double bedroom first floor apartment set in this this period building situated between Clifton Village and the Clifton Triangle. The property benefits from a 16' living room, separate fitted kitchen and a contemporary bathroom.. To the rear of the property there are communal gardens for the use of the residents of Richmond Terrace. Offered with no onward chain.

Two bedroom apartment situated in this sought after location of Bristol. The property provides two double bedrooms with en suite to the master bedroom, balconies to both the living room and master bedroom providing panoramic views, under floor heating, allocated enclosed security car parking space and communal garden/atrium.

Stunning two double bedroom first floor apartment set within the Invicta development. This recently completed property has never been lived in and benefits allocated underground parking space. Master bedroom with en suite, three Juliette balconies, and built in wardrobe. Second double bedroom with Juliette balcony, main bathroom, modern kitchen with breakfast bar, and living room with sliding doors to balcony.

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Redland

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£450,000 Redland

£599,995

Clifton

£625,000

Sold – Similar required. Located within the Redland Green APR is this recently modernised and extended semi-detached family home. Benefits from unobstructed views across Bristol City centre and the Cranbrook Valley, a southerly facing lawned garden, and a large garage. Three bedrooms with the potential for a fourth or an additional reception room, utility room and an additional room currently used as a study.

Sold – Similar Required. Semi-detached house on a quiet road in Redland, currently arranged as two separate three bedroom apartments with potential to convert back into a five double bedroom family home. Benefits from South Westerly facing lawned rear garden.

Sold – Similar Required. Three double bedroom, three storey property with open plan kitchen/dining room doors opening out onto enclosed and private rear garden. The property offers parking by way of a garage with further dedicated parking to the driveway. Nearby attractions include Clifton Village and Whiteladies Road.

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007

Please contact our Clifton branch on 0117 946 6007


Beyond your expectations www.hamptons.co.uk

NEW INSTRUCTION

Kingsweston, Bristol

This substantial and historically important Grade I Listed house was originally built as a banqueting hall for the adjacent Kings Weston House. The spectacular loggia was added to the existing building in the early 17th century and was designed by the eminent architect of the time, ‘John Vanbrugh’. This is the only building that he designed outside of London and is Grade I Listed due to its exceptional historical importance. There are believed to be only one hundred Grade I Listed buildings in Bristol including the Clifton Suspension Bridge, Temple Meads train station and Kings Weston House itself.

Guide price £735,000 • 3 Bedroom main house • 2 Bedroom summer house • Italianate garden • Ample gated parking • Private gardens in a woodland setting

Hamptons Bristol

Sales. 0117 322 6362 | bristol@hamptons-int.com

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NEW INSTRUCTION

Redland, Bristol

A delightful and highly distinctive double fronted Edwardian villa situated on Redland Park just off Whiteladies Road. This substantial 5 bedroom family house offers spacious and light accommodation over 3 floors including a self contained one bedroom garden apartment. The imposing property benefits from a plethora of period features inside and out. External features include mullion and box bay windows, balconies, a decoratively tiled storm porch, painted wood facias and scrolled timber supports, tall brick chimneys and decorative ridge tiling. EPC Rating: F

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Guide price £1,395,000 • 3 Reception rooms • 5 Bedrooms • Self contained 1 bedroom lower ground floor apartment • Gated driveway with 3 places for off road parking • Situated within 100 yards ofWhiteladies Road

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Redland - Guide Price £865,000

Period 7 bedroom semi-detached family home with delightful gardens, garden studio and garage, situated in a desirable sought after Woodstock Road within Redland Green APR. Two reception rooms, office/hobbies room, kitchen, utility and bathroom. Four bedrooms on the first floor, family bathroom and three further bedroom on the top floor.

Redland - Guide Price £499,950

This is a newly totally refurbished and beautifully finished 1930’s 4 bedroom semi-detached family house. The property is in a very favourable location close to Redland Green School.There is also an excellent range of shops and amenities just around the corner in Coldharbour Road and just a little further the popular Waitrose super market and Henleaze High Street.

Clifton - £399,000

A superb 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom duplex penthouse apartment with balcony, terrace, secure car parking and far reaching views. The lower floor mainly comprises entrance hall, 3 double bedrooms (one en suite) and bathroom. Upper floor is an open plan kitchen living area with floor to ceiling glass doors opening onto a large terrace and smaller balcony.

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Redland - £600,000

A lovely welcoming mid terrace family home in central Redland offering scope for some refurbishment to the incoming owners requirements. Potential for self-contained flat on the lower floor or extensive family kitchen area.Two reception rooms (one currently a lovely farmhouse style kitchen) and utility/bathroom on the hall floor. 5 bedrooms and bathroom upstairs.

Westbury Park - Guide Price £430,000

An attractive three bedroom Victorian terraced house conveniently situated in a popular location within a minutes’ walk of Durdham Downs. The house is presented in a tasteful style with arguably the most attractive feature of the house is the open plan kitchen/dining/family area which opens onto the rear courtyard garden.

Clifton - £225,000

A lovely spacious one bedroom hall floor flat with direct access onto its own garden area and the extensive private gardens of Bellevue Terrace. Lovely high ceilings and large sash windows with views towards Cabot Tower. Separate kitchen with door to gardens , bathroom. Early viewing advised.

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Sneyd Park Guide Price - £675,000

A very nicely presented modern four bedroom detached house occupying a lovely yet manageable plot in an envious position on Julian Road within a few minutes’ walk of Durdham Downs. Suitable for families or those looking to downsize the house offers two reception rooms, kitchen and cloakroom on the ground floor. Upstairs are four bedrooms and bathroom.

Westbury-on-Trym £550,000

A lovely traditional four bedroom 1930’s semi with exceptional rear garden backing onto Bristol university playing fields. The house offers three reception rooms, four bedrooms, bathroom and a useful loft hobby room accessed via a pull down ladder. The rear garden is a gardeners delights and benefits from an aspect the receives evening sun.

Westbury-on-Trym £499,950

Henleaze Guide Price £450,000

An extended four bedroom 1930’s semi with scope for improvement and remodelling on highly desirable Abbey Road. Four bedrooms including a master with en suite. Two reception rooms. Lovely 80 foot long rear garden. Garage and off street parking.

A most attractive Bath stone fronted early Victorian mid terrace house situated just of Henleaze Road and convenient for the local high Street. Two interconnecting reception rooms, decent sized kitchen/diner. Utility area.Three bedrooms and bathroom upstairs. Lovely front and rear gardens incorporating a former stable.

Stoke Bishop £650,000

An individual four bedroom detached house with stunning front and rear gardens overlooking playing fields. Two reception rooms, kitchen and utility area. Ground floor bedroom and bathroom. Upstairs there are three bedrooms and a shower room. Scope to further extend if desired.

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Westbury-on-Trym £450,000

A wonderful, spacious family home in a prime location comprising four bedrooms, three reception rooms and a surprisingly large garden. Situated in a lovely position, within a small, quiet cul-de-sac, this semi-detached house is just a few minutes’ walk to Westbury village.

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CONTEMPORARY OR TRADITIONAL 25% OFF SOFAS

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WE SPECIALISE IN BESPOKE DETAILS & SIZES IN UPHOLSTERY AND CABINET FURNITURE Any of our sofa designs or our cabinet furniture may be changed in proportion or style

Our cabinet furniture can be painted literally in any colour and we can design any piece

to suit your preference and space - made to fit bookcases and wardrobes are a speciality

We have the largest selection of available fabrics of any sofa manufacturer and the shortest lead time typically 2 to 3 weeks

25% discount still available on all cabinet and sofa orders for another few weeks

25% OFF BESPOKE WARDROBE SYSTEMS We are just past Clifton Down Shopping Centre 56/60, Whiteladies Rd, BS8 2PY Mon-Sat 9.30 - 5.30/Sun 12 - 5

TEL: 01173 292746


The Bristol Magazine May 2014