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THE

Issue 150

I

DeCeMBeR 2016

MAGAZINE

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

£3.95 where sold

T C A R E T S I S ristol to get the B to rn tu re rs te The Puppini Sis n off to a swinging start festive seaso

BRIGHT LIKE A DIAMOND: JEWELLERY TO MAKE YOU JUST DAZZLE...

SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH ON SUPERB HIT SERIES PLANET EARTH II

MISTLETOE & WINE: PARTY TIPS FROM AN EXPERT ON THE GRAPE

ACTRESS SONYA CASSIDY TALKS BRISTOL AND BIG BREAKS

FRESH & GREEN: HOW TO FASHION YOUR OWN FESTIVE WREATH


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SOFAS, CURTAINS AND CABINET BY CHRISTMAS

FINE CARPET

We make bespoke sofas and upholstery and curtains in our own factory in Bristol and design and make painted or solid pine or oak cabinet furniture from standard ranges or made to measure and to your own or our designs We have some production space left for pre-christmas delivery for orders received during the first days of December

Curtains and Blinds Sofas and Fabrics Bespoke Cabinet Furniture and Wardrobes

Sofas, Curtains and Cabinet Furniture Made to order in 2-4 weeks

terms and conditions apply

We are just past Clifton Down Shopping Centre 56/64, Whiteladies Rd, BS8 2PY Mon-Sat 9.30 - 5.30/Sun 12 - 5

TEL: 01173 292746

All types of reupholstery Traditional to comtemporary styles Antique and Vintage pieces


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Our new dedicated wardrobe, carpet and flooring showroom is now open in the old Maskreys building next door to our existing store at 56-64 Whiteladies Road.


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Global Real eState adviSoR oF the YeaR Our understanding of the ever-changing market enables us to price your property accurately so you can rely on Knight Frank to get you moving. Call +44 1172 950 425 to arrange your free market valuation. Knightfrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com

Guide price £1,500,000

KnightFrank KnightFrank.co.uk

Sneyd Park Detached 5 bed family home (3074 sq ft) located at the end of a private no through road. 2 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast/sitting room, 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. Gardens, integral double garage. EPC C.

Guide price £475,000

nTheMarket.com

Guide price £675,000

Clifton

Clifton

A beautiful 2 bedroom (774 sq ft) hall floor apartment with private garden and communal garden. Drawing room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, guest WC, attic storage, private and communal garden.

Beautifully presented 3 bedroom (1,456 sq ft) lateral hall floor apartment found close to Clifton Village. 1 reception room, kitchen/breakfast room, 3 bedrooms, bathroom, storage, allocated off-street parking. EPC D.

Guide price £1,000,000

Guide price £545,000

barrow Gurney

Clifton

A charming 4 bedroom detached home (2,097 sq ft)  enjoying an elevated position with views across the surrounding countryside. 3 receptions, kitchen/ breakfast, 4 bedrooms 2 bathrooms. 1.8 acres including a detached home office, double garage, double carport and stable. EPC F.

Generously proportioned upper maisonette with outstanding views. Open plan drawing room/kitchen/breakfast room, 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, extensive storage, outstanding views, allocated off street parking.


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Image by Alex Lee Johnson

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50

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Contents December 2016 REGULARS ZEITGEIST

THE CULTURE

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16

Five of the best things to do in the city this month

CITYIST

Get your diaries out!

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18

We catch up with Edson Burton and report on local goings-on

BARTLEBY

22

...Talks troublesome Christmas deadlines of the domestic kind ...................................................

EXHIBITIONS

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44

What’s going on at the city galleries this month?

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BUSINESS UPDATES

WHAT’S ON & HAPPENINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

60

BOOKS

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58

We’re planning some major indoor time – during which we’ll be curling up with a fave novel, then immediately watching the film adaptation

Bite-sized news from local firms and organisations

FOOD & DRINK

FEATURES MUSIC

NEWS

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28

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52

The latest from the city’s dining scene

The Puppini Sisters are back in town – have you got your ticket?

NATURAL HISTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Sir David Attenborough on Planet Earth II and Bristol’s reputation as a beacon for wildlife storytelling

ONE TO ONE

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Bethan Williams chats to actress Sonya Cassidy about her role in the current series of Humans, and what she loves about this city

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50

WINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Local oenophile, wine writer and consultant Angela Mount gives us a few tips on end-of-year entertaining

BRISTOL AT WORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Meet the lovely Sam, head booze inventor at recently launched new business Espensen Spirit


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Contents December 2016 BODY, MIND & SPIRIT REVIEW

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Image by Steven Haywood

72

Our Louise sets aside her usual scepticism to try out S-Thetics’ hot (and cold) new treatment

HAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Renowned local hairdresser Doug Hobbs shows us how to knock up some super-stylish party updos

MAKE UP

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76

Head to Charlotte Tilbury, in the much-improved beauty area of John Lewis, if it’s a smouldering seasonal look you seek

34

SHOPPING FESTIVE GIFT GUIDE

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24

A few little ideas to help see off the Christmas shopping list

FASHION

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26

Get those New Year’s Eve party outfits nailed

JEWELLERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ...And finish them off with something extra special

WATCHES

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32

The square case is returning to vogue...

LEISURE

74

CRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Rachel Husband, florist at The Rose Shed, talks us through how to make our own festive wreath

THE GETAWAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Before the chaos of Christmas really kicks in, we take a breather at gorgeous Thornbury Castle – just half an hour from central Bristol

MOTORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Dara Foley jumps the queue to check out Audi’s new compact SUV

WALK THE WALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Andrew Swift is off to wintry Woodchester Park

HABITAT INTERIORS

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86

Katherine Ogilvie explains her love affair with Instagram

PROPERTY

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90

We head to Clifton Lodge, at number 37 Upper Belgrave Road...

GARDENING

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92

Margaux Speirs recommends getting into the spirit of the season by fashioning a festive wicker reindeer

12 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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DECEMBER 2016

68 ON THE COVER

The Puppini Sisters – returning to Bristol’s Spiegeltent on 7 December. Turn to p28 for our chat with multi-talented founder Marcella Puppini


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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 13


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THIS MONTH WE’VE BEEN... Warming the cockles...

...With hot mugs of Barrow Gurney business Lovely Drinks’ apple and ginger – it has no added sugar so is a healthy alternative to our morning coffee, but we like it best in the evening with a shot of rum! • lovelydrinks.co.uk

Excited for...

from the

EDITOR Indies in Bristol on 3 December – more than your typical Christmas market, it’ll include talks, workshops, installations, art and music as well as street food and artisan traders. • actlocalbristol.co.uk

“...Christmas, children, is not a date. It is a state of mind...” – Mary Ellen Chase

W

e’re well and truly in said state of mind this issue – ready to welcome in Christmas and shower it with glitter. Well, we’re mentally ready, at least. Let’s not talk about all the presents we are yet to pin down and purchase (instead, let’s flick to p24 for some inspiration...) The festive feels have been further reinforced by this month’s cover stars, The Puppini Sisters, especially after our chat with their multi-talented founder Marcella (see p28). The very thought of their annual Spiegeltent show which, in our book, gets the festive season off to a swinging start, officially – it’s basically tinsel for the ears – has us in the mood for merriment. It’s also down to all the DIY prep we’ve been doing – practising glamorous updos for the string of Yuletide celebrations ahead (see p74 for how-tos from renowned Bristol hairdresser Doug Hobbs); and our best smouldering eye make-up (with a little help from Charlotte Tilbury at John Lewis on p76); as well as gathering up the wintriest foliage we can find for a homemade wreath à la Rachel Husband from The Rose Shed, to hang on our doors and ward off any miserable old Scrooges. Inspired by Margaux Speirs (see p90), we’ve even had a go at our own wicker reindeer decorations for the garden, and started sorting out the wine supplies for all the end-of-year entertaining we’ve promised to do. But Angela Mount’s helping us with that, over on p54, so that’s almost ticked off the list too. Perhaps we’re not so far off being prepared, after all; there’s just the glitzy jewellery (p30) to pick out really, to finish off the party outfit (p26 – you see what we’re doing here) and then maybe we can sit back with a favourite book (p58) or snuggle up with Planet Earth II (more on that on p34) and wait for it all to kick off... Merry Christmas, one and all – see you in 2017!

The Tobacco Factory’s 1920s-themed New Year’s Eve bash – ‘Escape The Metropolis’ – where there’ll be live music, aerial acts, fire dancing and loads more. • tobaccofactorytheatres.com

AMANDA NICHOLLS EDITOR Editor’s image by Paolo Ferla; ferlapaolo.com

@thebristolmag

14 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

thebristolmag.co.uk

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DECEMBER 2016

@thebristolmag

Sky dining while suspended over beautiful Bristol Harbourside – oh yes, you heard – which will be possible here next year! Turn to p20 for more on the experience...


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5

ZEITGEIST

fab things to do in DECEMBER

GET IN THE SPIRIT

TRAVEL BACK IN TIME You won’t find any Scrooges at the ss Great Britain’s festive fayre from 17 to 19 December – although the ghosts of Victorian Christmases past could well make an appearance. Join the hustle and bustle of 19th-century life on the docks, alongside first-class folk and cheeky street urchins. Try your hand at crafting the perfect Christmas card, enjoy carol singing from local schools and professional choirs, and warm your cockles with mulled wine and hot chocolate. You might even spot Charles Dickens himself, and his bearded buddy Brunel... Tickets from £8 to £14.

Smithson Gallery’s pop-up Christmas event will feature a select collection of work from established artists and craftspeople over 3 and 4 December. Hosted at The Forge, a contemporary hidden gem of a venue near Colston Street, this festive weekend offers a delightful alternative to trawling the shops, with unique screen prints, jewellery, stationery and exquisite homeware all available to purchase. While you’re deliberating over the best gifts for your nearest and dearest (and yourself – why not?) enjoy seasonal refreshments which will have you in high spirits for the rest of the day. • smithsongallery.co.uk

FANCY FAIRYTALE You may think you know the rags-toriches, pumpkin-carriage-featuring tale inside out, but the Dr Marten-wearing tomboy Cinderella in Tobacco Factory Theatres and Travelling Light Company’s production is no Disney princess. Nominated for an Olivier award, this collaborative reinterpretation features original music, puppetry and captivating five-piece ensemble acting. Tickets cost £11 to £20, and you can catch Cinderella: A Fairytale from 8 December to 22 January – just make sure you’re home before midnight!

• ssgreatbritain.org

SPRINTING SANTAS Pull up your socks and lace up your trainers as Santas On The Run returns on 11 December. You won’t want to miss the sight of over 2,000 Santas descending upon the city, with each individual raising money for Children’s Hospice South West. Watch from the sidelines or join the race as participants of all ages don their costumes and start the 2k from Bristol’s Harbourside at 1pm. Participation costs from £7.50 to £15, including the essential costume – reindeer optional. • chsw.org.uk/santasbristol

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• tobaccofactorytheatres.com

GO ABOVE AND BEYOND... Join Bristol-based charity Above and Beyond for its annual Christmas Star concert, featuring traditional carols with the Above and Beyond singers, music from the Bristol Salvation Army Brass Band and guest choirs, all compered by BBC Radio Bristol's Phil Hammond. Taking place on 15 December in the splendour of Bristol Cathedral, the concert will also include festive readings from Above and Beyond fundraisers and former hospital patients Simon Law and 16-year-old Tom Winchester. The charity, which raises crucial funds for Bristol’s hospitals, is offering the chance to name your own star in memory of a loved one to hang on the Above and Beyond tree, which will stay in the cathedral until 5 January. Tickets from £5 to £10. • aboveandbeyond.org.uk

DECEMBER 2016


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THE CITY THE BUZZ

My

BRISTOL

We take five with local writer, historian and compere Edson Burton

Carnival is back! St Pauls Carnival is recruiting a new voluntary board of directors, as it prepares to return on 1 July with a colourful celebration of Bristol’s African-Caribbean community. “We have begun the process to appoint a non-paid board of directors who we hope to have selected by early December,” said Jonathan Jackson, chair of the Carnival Reference group. “We have had tremendous input from over 100 people.” Mayor Marvin Rees added: “St Pauls Carnival is, and always will be, a huge part of this city's cultural identity. It's important we bring this showcase of AfricanCaribbean culture back to the city streets so we can again embrace the important role the community plays in our city life.” • @stpaulscarnival

Art at the heart A new contemporary art exhibition was installed at dockside neighbourhood Wapping Wharf recently – to showcase the city’s renowned street art and graffiti scene. In partnership with Upfest, two murals – one by Gemma Compton and featuring her intricate floral designs, and one by Sophie Long and featuring brightly coloured Bristol cormorants – appeared on the converted shipping containers at Cargo, creating a new outdoor gallery that will present different artwork throughout the year. “Bristol is known for its independent food and street art scenes so it’s a natural fit to install an outdoor gallery space to showcase Bristol’s contemporary artists at Cargo, a hub for independent retailers,” said Upfest’s Steve Hayles.“With Gaol Ferry Steps, south Bristol and Bedminster seeming closer to the centre than ever before, it’s great to create a showcase for the street art scene just over the way from Upfest HQ.” • wappingwharf.co.uk; upfest.co.uk

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So, what are you up to at the moment? I am artist in residence at Watershed’s Pervasive Media Studio; and I’m developing immersive theatre piece The Last Blues Song of a Lost Afronaut (working title). It brings together ideas of Afrotopia, identity, ecological disaster, mythology and exporation. It's early days and I'm hoping the residency gives me the chance to collaborate with some of the most pioneering forms of creative technology. I'm also working on a Radio 4 drama to be broadcast in May. Hard not to say too much but the protagonist agrees to drive a car to Swindon for a handsome sum, but he musn't look in the boot... I am also engagment officer for the Trinity Centre's IGNiTE programme, which features diverse live performance, workshops and residences, and am a member of film programming collective Come the Revolution, who have been busy working on the Bristol programme for BFI Black Star. So far, so brilliant. Good audiences, new faces, great feedback. Come the Revolution isn't so much a project as a lifelong commitment to creating discussions through film. When did your life in creative writing begin? Probably when an ancient spirit entered my mother's womb and took over my soul. I would otherwise trace the coincidence of having my first Radio 4 drama commission and completing my poetry collection Seasoned in 2007. I realised a vague childhood ambition had become manifest. What’s in the pipeline for 2017? Fingers crossed, my poet buddy Miles Chambers – a fantastic orator – and I will be touring our sell-out show Curried Goat & Fish Fingers, produced by Bristol Old Vic. The aforementioned Radio 4 play will be broadcast and I hope to be delivering a midscale version of my Afrofuturist play. There are a couple of other projects percolating, including a film script and a collaboration with Bristol Old Vic – I'll say more when there's more meat on the bone, so to speak. What do you love about this city? I describe Bristol as a human city. Its scale is such that one can feel connected and yet not mired in parochialism. It is a city that welcomes eccentricity, a city where DIY creativity has fostered new forms of music, art, media, technology, organisation. Having less has been the driver of innovation. Creativity is welcomed and nurtured in

Bristol. It is seen as a vital part of all our lives and a viable career path. But most of all, creative people are willing to work together, to share resources – human, and otherwise. The ecology of the arts, the scale of the city, means that whatever your practice, you are never far away from accessing the network you need for self development and to develop an idea. What’s pumping out of your speakers? I'm cutting between Gregory Porter's Take Me to The Alley, Prince’s Hit N Run Phase Two. Can't believe this funk gem dropped just months before his departure. What are you reading at the moment? I’m still halfway through Margo Jefferson's beautifully weighted biopic Negroland and have just started reading Coulson Whitehead's gripping slave-cum-fantasy story Underground Railway. Which local venues are you loving? Gosh, where to begin? Hands down, the Watershed is the most complete space in the city. Good food, great cinema and the Shangri-La of networking. The Trinity Centre has gone from strength to strength, especially with the IGNiTE programme. It has an intimacy which makes you feel a special connection with performers on stage. Most surreal moment so far? Sitting next to the heir to the throne was pretty cool. I was one of 11 performers who recited a poem by Owen Sheers as part of the unveiling of new work The Jurors, by sculptor Hew Locke. Prince William took his seat to my left as we re-enacted the historic signing of the Magna Carta – the centrepiece of the Magna Carta commemoration attended by heads of state, members of the royal family; the establishment writ large. Whch other creatives do you admire? Celestine Walcott-Gordon is a star – if you have been embraced by her voice and spirit you cannot be in dispute. Isadora Vibes is queen of the quirk – a daring performer whose razor-sharp poetry quietens the most rumbustious crowd. And there are few writers who write across medium – poetry and theatre – with such quality, as Tom Edward Phillips. • @EdsonBurton


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THE CITY Supper in the sky?

Following its huge success in London, next year will see Events in the Sky – the open-air dining experience where guests are hoisted 100 feet in the air and seated around a unique ‘sky table’ – visit Bristol to offer the public something of a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity. Bristol in the Sky will see Bristol restaurants transfer their menus and dining experiences to the sky table, suspended in the air by a mobile crane. The table seats 22 guests with a head chef, sommelier and waiting team serving from the pop-up kitchen in the centre of the table. Guests are securely fastened in their seats before the table is raised from the ground and their gourmet experience begins. The restaurant will run from the 7-10 September at the Waterfront Square next to the Lloyds Amphitheatre, with nine sittings per day, including breakfast (£50), lunch (£125), dinner (£150), afternoon drinks (£75) and evening drinks (£75). Tickets are on sale now, with the full line-up to be announced in February, though Harvey Nichols Restaurant has already confirmed its involvement, with award-winning executive chef Louise McCrimmon. “We’re looking forward to visiting Bristol in 2017, partnering with Bristol’s best chefs and restaurants,” said Dale Agar of Events in the Sky. “Guests will enjoy a breathtaking dining experience with spectacular views of Bristol Harbour.” • eventsinthesky.co.uk

BRISTAGRAM Some of our favourite recent snaps taken by folk around the city! Tag your best pics of Bristol using #thebristolmag Alfresco din @chicken ing on shedhq’s decking

s @wokyko’ New eatery n chow mei e or ap ng Si

Invasion

in St Pau

ls (@lstd

bristol)

READ ALL ABOUT IT... Charlotte Pope at Foyles bookshop recommends Enid Blyton for Grown-Ups by Bruno Vincent After the success of the Ladybird Books for GrownUps series, comes a new parody of a childhood favourite that's guaranteed to get sides splitting. Who doesn't have a lingering nostalgia for Enid Blyton's beloved Famous Five – following Julian, Dick, Anne, George and Timmy the dog on an adventure with a picnic basket and lashings of ginger beer? Now the gang have grown up and are no longer facing smugglers and kidnappers, but even more frightening challenges that await as they enter into adulthood... There's Five Go Parenting (nappy-changing and sleepless nights); Five Go Gluten Free (an anxious search for a suitable cream tea); Five Go on a Strategy Away Day (team building exercises and plenty of fun); Five Give Up the Booze (ginger beer is now a poor substitute for alcohol) and Five on Brexit Island (the gang are divided by politics). Fully illustrated, the stories are told in the style of the original Blyton tales and will be a delight to grown up fans of the Five. 20 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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DECEMBER 2016

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the Somm e, beautifu captured lly by @neilj amesb


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At Artemis we are proud to offer our instant jewellery commission process - if you can’t find the perfect piece in one of our existing collections, you can sit and create something unique and special with one of our talented designers Artemis is also known as an Aladdin’s cave of gorgeous gifts and Christmas decorations which complement our jewellery perfectly Free gift wrapping service with any purchase Tel: 0117 924 1003 www.artemisbristol.co.uk 214 Gloucester Road, Bishopston Bristol BS7 8NU

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 21


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Christmas deadlines...

I

may have mentioned this before, but in the dozen years we’ve lived at Bartleby Towers there has always been scaffolding somewhere on our street. There are only a hundred houses, but when we first arrived, at least 95 of them needed serious work. It’s not uncommon to see scaffolders dismantling poles on one side of the street, then promptly carrying them across the road to begin work on the next house. Last year it was our turn, and through an unavoidable quirk of timing we ended up spending Christmas with half a roof and a big hole in our bedroom ceiling. Fortunately, our builders had old-fashioned ideas when it came to Christmas, and left us in peace for a good couple of weeks – being builders, I suppose they probably spent their holiday working somewhere else. Anyone who has had work done on their house will know that it always takes much longer than it’s supposed to. The phrase ‘You’ll be in by Christmas’ often translates as ‘Better make other plans as you won’t have an oven/running water/a roof’. Yet however improbable it may seem that the festive deadline will be met, we cling to our belief in a Yuletide miracle. The kitchen must be finished for Christmas. It just must! Yes, yes, yes, says the builder, until Christmas Eve comes around and his phone goes to voicemail. So I had to laugh the other day when a plasterer working next door told me not to worry because they would certainly be finished by Christmas. Like ours, the house was poorly built in the first place and has enjoyed a similar maintenance programme comprising years of neglect interspersed with DIY botching. Talking to builders working up and down the street is always enjoyable, if slightly scary. One described a house in which an enterprising owner had removed all the interior walls from the ground floor. He wasn’t sure, he said, how the place was still standing. Another emerged covered head to toe in black dust. I hadn’t realised before that coal dust – a waste product of local mines – had been used to plaster not only walls but also ceilings, so a ceiling collapse in these parts resembles a minor colliery disaster. Black dust has certainly been a by-product of our neighbour’s renovation works, which have seen the whole place stripped back to the walls. At one point the skip, full of blackened rubble topped with deadlylooking former appliances – namely a gas oven and a pair of antique electric fires – suggested a scene from the Blitz. The effect was further enhanced when, a couple of days later, a large crater appeared in the road. Apparently the old lead pipe bringing water into the house had sprung a leak and they were trying to find out where it joined the mains pipe running down the street. It took a fair amount of exploratory digging to find it buried under five feet of clay. Another day revealed the connection they were looking for. At this point the foreman of next door’s works knocked on our door. His forced smile suggested that he might have bad news. Could I check our water was running, he asked. Apparently they had disconnected the damaged pipe only to find that the neighbouring house on the other side from us had lost its water supply as well. Ours, fortunately, was unaffected, but whoever installed those pipes had taken a shortcut or two. They weren’t worrying about the future. They needed to get the job done quickly, to meet some long-forgotten deadline – perhaps they had promised new homes ready for Christmas, 1899... ■ 22 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Editor Tel: Email:

Amanda Nicholls 0117 974 2800 amanda@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Web Editor/Staff Writer Emma Payne Email: emma@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Publisher Email:

Steve Miklos steve@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Production Manager Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Louise Harrold, Sue Parker, Liz Grey For advertising enquiries please contact us on: 0117 974 2800 Email: sales@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Financial Director Email:

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...A few little pointers to help with the Christmas list

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Cocoa Mulled Wine Sachets, £5; hotelchocolat.com Detox & Restore Face Mask Kit, £26.50; aaskincare.co.uk Trio of Copper Votives, £30; nisiliving.co.uk Lily’s Kitchen Festive Dog Biscuits with Turkey and Cranberry, £4; barkersfordogs.com Shavata Brow Strengthener, £18; available at House of Fraser; shavata.co.uk Bill Skinner Woodland Drop Earrings, £75; amuletboutique.co.uk Canaries Of Atlantis (Brass), £45; nisiliving.co.uk Coach Crosstown Leather Bag, £175; johnlewis.com Rhoda Orange Vegan Faux Suede Zip Boot, £165; collectionandco.co.uk Christmas A Deux Hamper, £65; harveynichols.com Santa Dog Jumper, £10; barkersfordogs.com Wild Planet Christmas Spice Candle, £28.95; movementboutique.co.uk The Elf’s Stocking, £10; hotelchocolat.com Prints by Bristol illustrators and local writer Emily Koch, £35-£80, available at etsy.com/uk/shop/emilykochshop

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Jealous Sweets Fruitilicious Christmas Cracker, £8.99; harveynichols.com Estée Lauder Eau de Parfum Modern Muse Gift Set, £46; johnlewis.com Bloom Print Silk Pyjama Set, £149; hobbs.co.uk Jessica Russel Flint Silk Eye Mask, £26.95; movementboutique.co.uk Jo Malone London Orange Bitters Deluxe Candle, £120; jomalone.co.uk Clutch Bag With Recycled Leather, £49.99, Maybe Mabel; maybemabel.com Horizontal Stripe Cashmink Scarf, £25; johnlewis.com Tall Wellington Boots in Silver, £90, available at Schuh; hunterboots.com Full-Length Damask Travel Mirror, £45; magicmirroruk.com Men’s Apple Watch, £649; johnlewis.com Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Headset, £549; johnlewis.com Porcelain Necklace with Gold Plated Chain, £25, available at Smithson Gallery’s pop-up fair at The Forge on 3 & 4 December; smithsongallery.co.uk Ptarmigan Tweed Coat, £549.95; available at Lady’s Wood Shooting School; schoffel.co.uk Beaded Bracelet, £12; folksy.com/shops/mudita Your Place Or Mine Marc Jacobs Vegan Leather Make-Up Pouch, £95; johnlewis.com Christmas Hamper, £35; hotelchocolat.com

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SHOPPING | FASHION

PARTY

PIECE

VELVET DRESS, £39.50 Gloriously golden hues and metallics to boot – what more could you want? Marks & Spencer, The Mall at Cribbs; marksandspencer.com

DRESS, £110 Embellished sheer fabrics are all over the place at the moment, and they’re worth investing in. River Island, The Mall at Cribbs; riverisland.com

SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL BAG, £59 Hold on tight to this clutch... Henry Hunt; henryhunt.co.uk

Whether you’re in the market for a showstopping little something to complete your festive drinks ensemble, or an uber-glittery, glamorous get-up to guarantee heads turn as you sashay into the partay on New Year’s Eve, we’ve compiled a few gorgeous garments that have inspired us recently... PAULE KA SATIN DRESS, £515 You’ll look bright as a festive berry in this rich burgundy belted number. Harvey Nichols; harveynichols.com

EMBELLISHED HEELS, £95 Ever so festive! Dune, The Mall at Cribbs; dunelondon.com

CREAM CAPE, £89 A two-tiered knitted cape with faux fur trim could add some wintry fairytale charm... Henry Hunt; henryhunt.co.uk

LOVATO JACQUARD TROUSERS, £89 Channel a textured look with tapered trousers from the Olivia Palermo collection. Dress them up after dark for a sharp, tailored silhouette. Coast, The Mall at Cribbs; coast-stores.com

DEVORÉ JUMPSUIT, £80 Prefer something more playful? How about this chic all-in-one in classic black and gold? Next, The Mall at Cribbs; next.co.uk

VELVET LACE-TRIM A-LINE DRESS, £55 Tap into a luxe look with trending textures velvet and lace, and team with metallic heels. Topshop, The Mall at Cribbs; topshop.com

HENRIETTA GOWN, £249 We get mermaid vibes off this magnificent dress – open at the back, and with more sequins that you can shake a stick at. Henry Hunt; henryhunt.co.uk

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FAUX FUR STOLE, £79 Require a luxuriously soft stole with silk lining and stag brooch to finish off your outfit? Look no further... Henry Hunt; henryhunt.co.uk


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Three big voices, three sparkling personalities – nobody has ever been able to decide who’s the biggest diva, says Marcella

SISTER ACT Marcella Puppini talks vinyl, Vivienne Westwood, and founding a new record label, as her hit close-harmony group returns to Bristol to get the festive season off to a swinging start

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t’s been over a decade since Italian-born Marcella Puppini formed her vivacious singing trio The Puppini Sisters, specialising in a unique brand of close harmony fusing pop, jazz, swing and more – and since then she’s done everything from conducting orchestras and radio presenting to music producing. With the group – which also features the hugely talented Kate Mullins and Emma Smith – being regulars at Bristol’s Spiegeltent, we thought it was high time that we had a chat... So Marcella, what can we expect from this year’s Spiegel show? Well, as you know, Christmas at the Spiegeltent has become quite a tradition for us, so you can expect our traditional dose of super-camp festive cheer. On top of that, we will be debuting some brand new songs, and – as always – outdoing ourselves in the costume department. What else is new with you girls? We recently had a new release: a double album deluxe version of The High Life, containing remixes of all of the tracks on the album. We asked 14 of the world’s top electro-swing producers to collaborate with us, and the result is phenomenal! You have a fantastic background in fashion – working with Vivienne Westwood before studying a degree in music. Does your fashion knowledge influence your music or vice versa? That’s an excellent question! I definitely think it does. Working with Vivienne, and before that, studying at Central St Martin’s College of Art, really taught me to look at things from different angles, to be inquisitive and to never go for the obvious – and I think that it shows! 28 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Looking at the number of retro groups today, it’s easy to forget that we were first, that we were doing it at a time when the retro look and sound were extremely underground. And I believe that one of the reasons I get to certain ideas before others is because I take inspiration for music from fashion, and vice versa. You’ve a strong image; where do you get your vintage-inspired outfits? I design most of our costumes, but we often also combine great vintage finds with high street pieces. It’s all about how you put them together – often all it takes is a waist-cinching belt and some Ruby Woo lipstick. You’re often ‘antiquing’ rock and pop songs, reworking them into an older style. How do you go about this – is there a process or is it more about improvisation and finding the right sound? All of our arrangements are scored classically, either by myself or Kate. It’s the only way to get the precision and the intricacy of the harmonies and phrasing. However, once we’ve learned the arrangements and we start performing, they get subtly changed as we start using different inflections. When that happens it’s magical, as we’re all doing it together without discussing it first. That’s what happens when you’ve been singing together for such a long time! What’s your favourite musical era and why? Most people seem to be quite surprised to find out that I’m really into electronic music: drum and bass, trip hop, even a lot of dance music. But I don’t really have a favourite musical era: I love opera as much as Nick Cave and contemporary hip hop, and of course I am crazy about the swing sound of the ’30s and ’40s.


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What drew you to a career in music? I have always been crazy about it. I started playing the piano at the age of five and grew up singing harmony with my brother and sister. When I was a teenager, I dreamed of being an opera singer, but my family never took music seriously as a career option and so I followed my other passion – drawing – which then took me into a career in fashion. But I never gave up singing and playing, and eventually I realised I would only ever be happy if I made music my career – so I retrained, and the rest is history. Why do you think your sound and style is still so popular with audiences and listeners? It’s a combination of two factors. Swing is infectious and cool, with its intricate syncopated rhythms and echoes of fabulous dance parties; and on a different level, there’s the nostalgic appeal of a make-believe era of solid values and simpler lifestyle – the good old days. Vinyl has made a huge comeback – do you think the way we listen to music is unimportant, or all part of the experience? While I’m perfectly able to enjoy listening to MP3s on my iPhone, there’s no denying that there’s something special about vinyl. I remember the first time I heard an old Yma Sumac recording on vinyl, a couple of years ago – it was incredible. It know it sounds pretentious to refer to the depth of the sound of vinyl, but those are the only words I can think of to describe it.

What has been the highlight so far? 2016 has been quite a fabulous year, to be honest. Self-releasing an album (alongside the release of my solo album!) has been an exhilarating experience – as well as a massive learning curve. We’ve also founded Millionaire Records, with the intention of signing other artists in a couple of years’ time. We hear you’ve been learning to produce? Yes, and to DJ. I’ve been gigging as a DJ for the last few months, and I’m getting pretty good at it, and my production skills are getting better too. I’ve been working on a few hip hop noir tracks with R.A. The Rugged Man, which will probably culminate in an EP, and my aim is to be able to start producing these myself. Who’s your biggest celeb fan? I’d say Prince Charles. Though Michael Bublé and Hugh Laurie are also fans. We’ve not done too badly, have we? ■ • Bristol Spiegeltent, 7th December, thepuppinisisters.com; christmasspiegeltent.co.uk

You often maintain close harmonies while singing, does this come fairly naturally to you all or is there a lot of practice involved? We all have a natural ability to sing harmony, but I’d be lying if I told you it doesn’t also involve tons of practice! Three big voices, three sparkling personalities... Who is the biggest diva of the group? It’s a daily contest, and no one has ever been able to decide on a winner.

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SHOPPING | JEWELLERY

SHINE

BRIGHT

SNOWFLAKE PENDANT, £400 Beautifully wintry and with 18ct white gold, from the Dazzle Collection. Nicholas Wylde; nicholaswylde.com

MULTI-STONE RING, £1,155 An unusual design by Clare Chandler, created with 18ct yellow gold and set with eight rubies. Clifton Rocks; cliftonrocks.co.uk

...make like a diamond at that elegant Christmas soiree... RASPBERRY STUD EARRINGS, £40 Hand-carved by Bill Skinner with crimson beads and gold plating. Amulet; amuletboutique.co.uk BELLA NECKLACE, £115 Made with freshwater pearls and featuring a silver bird T-bar. Artemis; artemisbristol.co.uk

DIAMOND RING, £2,500 18ct princess-cut diamond ring with Milgrain setting; Julie Anne Palmer; julieannepalmer.com

MISTLETOE PENDANT, £1,950 So very festive! Nicholas Wylde; nicholaswylde.com

HALO PENDANT, £395 Sapphires and diamonds, oh my... Pravins, Cabot Circus; pravins.co.uk CUFF LINKS, £146 These silver-etched cufflinks are strong on both detail and chic. Diana Porter; dianaporter.co.uk

SNOWFLAKE RING, £6,200 Top of the want list – with blue tear drop diamond and 18ct yellow, rose and white gold. Julie Anne Palmer; julieannepalmer.com

EARRINGS, £750 Pretty in pink tourmaline... Julie Anne Palmer; julieannepalmer.com

SILVER CUFF, £475 The bulging, textured forms of this bangle by silversmith Hannah Felicity Dunne are a hit with us. Diana Porter; dianaporter.co.uk

DIAMOND RING, £1,507 A gorgeous 9ct yellow gold ring to set off your party outfit, good and proper. Diana Porter; dianaporter.co.uk

BRACELET, £95 Sterling silver overlay bracelet handmade by Anthony Honahnie – Hopi tribe, Arizona. Rainmaker Gallery; rainmakerart.co.uk

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DROP EARRINGS, £129 22ct yellow gold plated beauts by Mirri Damer. Clifton Rocks; cliftonrocks.co.uk

DECEMBER 2016

SAPPHIRE RING, £5,630 We love this tear drop shape, its diamond frame and bewitching purple sapphire. Julie Anne Palmer; julieannepalmer.com


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Gold & Platinum Studio Handmade and Bespoke Jewellery 19 Northumberland Place, Bath BA1 5AR | Tel: +44 (0)1225 462 300 VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE : www.goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk | e: mike@goldandplatinumstudio.co.uk

Stunning Engagement rings, Wedding bands & tailor-made rings, the perfect Christmas gift

Engagement Rings • Wedding Rings • Wedding Gifts Beautiful Gift Ideas for the bridesmaids, mother of the bride and for the groom A 10% discount on any pair of rings purchased & off any further gifts for your wedding when you mention The Bristol Magazine We also offer Bespoke Jewellery • Silver Jewellery • Watches • Jewellery & Watch Repairs • Gold purchased (old jewellery & coins)

History, Tradition & Quality - the only Kemps Jewellers since 1881 9 Calton Court, Westbury on Trym, Bristol, BS9 3DF

www.kempsjewellers.com

0117 950 5090 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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SHOPPING | WATCHES

HIP TO BE SQUARE

Although square case watches have been in the minority to their rounder cousins for many years, in recent times and especially since the launch of a certain smart-watch; square and rectangular timepieces are returning to vogue. We asked Mallory Jewellers to pick out five of the front-runners...

TIME ON TREND

CARTIER – DRIVE

Perhaps the most famous square case of all is the Heuer Monaco, as worn by Steve McQueen in the 1971 film, Le Mans. This year’s Hollywood A-listers, football stars, and allround style gurus are leading the ‘hip to be square’ revival...

After years of searching for a men’s watch which truly personifies Cartier design, the Drive has arrived. Conveying smooth style, an in-house movement and options in steel or gold, Cartier finally has a watch that delivers everything the sophisticated gent requires. Price: £5,000

PATEK PHILIPPE – GONDOLO Mixing tradition with modern style, the new white gold Gondolo is a pièce de résistance from one of Switzerland’s most iconic watch manufacturers. The beautiful matt blue sunburst dial perfectly combines eight-day power reserve measurement with day and date indication to provide an aficionado’s timepiece to treasure for a lifetime. Price: £40,090

PANERAI – RADIOMIR 1940 Mixing utilitarian readability with retro style, this 1940s Radiomir is perfect as something a little different for the watch connoisseur. Internally the inhouse micro rotor P.4000 movement allows a thin case 45mm diameter watch to adapt to many wrist sizes and is, simply, cool. Price: £7,600

JAEGER-LECOULTRE – REVERSO TRIBUTE DUO The 85th anniversary of the iconic Reverso sees the arrival of a collector’s dream. With dual time capability, silver and blue dials and representing true 1930s style, this watch is a must for any enthusiast of in-house manufacture. A true celebration of Swiss watch-making expertise. Price: £9,150

Visit the specialist watch showroom at Mallory Jewellers in Bath. 1 - 5 Bridge Street, Bath BA2 4AP www.mallory-jewellers.com All watches shown are subject to availability

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TAG HEUER – MONZA This really is special… Under the retro Heuer logo, this new Monza is the revival of vintage style the TAG collector has been calling for. The 42mm black titanium coated case houses the calibre 17 movement powering this very cool numbered special edition chronograph… Keep an eye out for similar releases over the next few years. Price: £4,000


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Symbol Range, Copper or Satin Chrome.

Lighting the way is should be

Tel: 0117 963 5943 Email: info@thelightingstudiobristol.co.uk www.thelightingstudiobristol.co.uk Visit us in store at: Unit 2, Bedminster Retail Park, Sheene Way, Bedminster, Bristol BS3 4TA

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50m-tall metal structures in Singapore’s Supertree Grove, 11 of which are embedded with environmentally sustainable functions – a futuristic way of being more sensible with the planet’s resources. Image © BBC NHU/Tom Hugh-Jones

SECOND NATURE Broadcasting paragon Sir David Attenborough was in town recently for the world premiere of the sequel to Planet Earth – he talked to us about its long-awaited snow leopard sequence, why Bristol is such a beacon for wildlife filmmakers, and why he won’t stop yet...

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ildlife documentaries are more akin to works of art these days – cinematic creations with breathtaking visual sequences, stirring scores by leading Hollywood composers such as Hans Zimmer and, in the case of the BBC’s current Planet Earth sequel, the inherently trustworthy, everauthoritative voice of a globally treasured broadcaster who has witnessed the entire evolution of the genre.

...In the Fifties, natural history programmes were a laugh – unintentionally...

❞ For as steadily as Sir David Attenborough’s career has bloomed and developed over the years, so, synchronously, have the possibilities on film. “In the Fifties, natural history programmes on television were a laugh – unintentionally,” he recalls, beer in hand, before the group of enrapt young journalists gathered round him for what feels more like a bedtime story than a pre-premiere interview. “They were pathetic really, if you look at them now. Over the last few decades, every two or three years – and every time we’ve done a big new series – there’s been 34 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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something major that we didn’t have before. Of course, the first big new thing was colour. Another hugely important thing was the use of electronic cameras instead of film cameras. And now there’s almost nothing we can’t do.” Quite – we can’t imagine what might be possible if Planet Earth III ever came into being, and neither, it seems, can Sir David. “If you asked me what we could do in five years’ time that we can’t do now, I would have to work very hard to think of something,” he confesses. “You can film at the bottom of the sea, at the top of the mountains, you can speed things up and slow them down, film microscopic things, gigantic things. Our latest set of tricks uses drones, tiny cameras that you can guide electronically by radio control, that take you up 50 feet in the air, and the lenses are such that you can see everything – it’s just amazing. And now the pictures are more detailed than the human eye can see. So why bother, you may ask – but actually if the quality of the film, and the resolution of the picture, is such that you can take a little bit and blow it up to occupy the full screen without it looking blurry, you’ve suddenly got a completely new, extraordinary way of editing films. You won’t see it but you will be aware of it – how did they get that close-up? How did they manage to put that sequence together? It’s a thrill.” As anyone who’s been keeping up with the series will have seen, the use of such equipment – initially adapted from the military – allows for some incredibly immersive sequences. We’re bouncing through the trees alongside a lemur one moment, or sloping beside a sloth as he seeks out his missus while following her mating call, and the next, feasting our eyes on a fly dragging at a drop of drool on a komodo


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dragon, marching with 50 million migrating red crabs across Christmas Island, or watching a knot of racer snakes playing a grim game of Grandmother’s Footsteps with a baby iguana, and hoping against hope for its escape from a rapidly tightening ball of slithering bodies – the latter such unique, unseen footage that it went viral online. And all in the most high-def detail you can possibly imagine. “That’s one of the important differences between the original Planet Earth and this one,” says executive producer Mike Gunton. “The first was more observational – looking at it all from upon high – whereas we’ve tried to take the cameras and put them in the animals’ world a bit more. These programmes now find themselves competing with super high-end drama in the same sorts of slots, so they have to have some of those sensibilities about them. We don’t make documentary quite as we did even 20 years ago, they're much richer in the tapestry.” “I thought I knew about the Galápagos. I had never seen that stuff with the racer snakes,” David chimes in. “And the Zavodovski sequence is just absolutely extraordinary.” He’s talking, of course, about the scene in the first episode where producer Elizabeth White and her team brave tough island conditions to film a chinstrap penguin colony. “The first time I ever really saw a wildlife spectacle was when I was about six in 1932 – a Yorkshireman called Cherry Kearton, who was a world pioneer, had gone off to a penguin island off South Africa in his pith helmet and riding breeches. He, or his producer, thought the only way to make penguins interesting was to pretend they were little people in dinner jackets and so he made them sort of funny – the fact that they are far more interesting than they are funny escaped him! Elizabeth, of course, has shown what they’re really like.”

cameraman Doug Allan in the Himalayas. It took three trips and 18 weeks in a little tent. Can you imagine? Sat in a thing the size of a lavatory; just waiting for something to happen. All for three shots. It drove him nuts. Now, the snow leopard sequence in this series…” he tails off – words unnecessary to describe the scene, or perhaps simply unavailable. “And it’s all because of camera traps, motivated by the actions of the animals themselves, and placed where we knew they would turn up, having done so much research.” So David’s work is done, then? There’s really nothing left to do? “Well we’re now saying; we’ll do it better!” he enthuses. “I make natural history programmes because that’s what I want to see when I sit down at home – it’s great stuff to watch – as well as the fact they’re crucially important for keeping people in touch with the natural world. It’s true, it’s beautiful, it’s not trying to sell you anything, it’s not trying to get your vote, it’s always exciting.”

Mission complete?

“I can’t think of many animals we haven't filmed but I think there are some things they do that we haven't filmed yet,” suggests Mike. “Funnily enough, people don't want to just see new creatures, they want to see them doing new things. The only other place where there are still lots of interesting stories for us, I think, is the ocean.” “Oh, the Japanese beat us to that,” says David. “The great thing I wanted to film in the deep ocean was the giant squid. Fantastic animal, 100 feet long. Like hell we tried, but the NHK naturalist unit – the director of whom, happily, is a great friend of ours, got a very clever sequence – God knows what it cost. But I take my hat off to them.” There’s also a focus on the urbanised habitat this series, in the final episode, aired on 11 December – and it’s an area of equal fascination. “Undoubtedly it’s the rat that’s best adapted to the city environment,” says Mike. “But the creatures we have featured are the most successful examples of their type – for example, the highest density of leopards is in an urban environment in Mumbai, the highest density of peregrine falcons is in New York City. The animals that can adapt, adapt wonderfully and are super successful.” “Because humans are so wasteful, if you can manage to live alongside them, you’re in clover,” explains David. “But there’s no question that humans are also the biggest threat to our planet. Since the natural history unit was founded in Bristol, there are three times as many human beings on the Earth. They all need feeding, they all need

It seems there’s one stand-out segment in particular that both David and Mike can hardly wait to talk about – that of the snow leopard – which was finally made possible thanks to the new tech. “They’re so remote, that the logical effort it would take to put a camera team in the field for the time needed to get the shots is almost impossible,” explains Mike. “But remote cameras don't complain, they don’t need feeding, they don't need paying – they just sit there shooting, shooting, shooting! They give you the kind of insight into those animals which would have been undreamable.” “They would leave scent marks on the rocks,” adds cameraman Max Hug Williams. “They almost use them as we might use Facebook, essentially updating their status by peeing on the rocks, then the other leopards come past each week and and check who’s fertile, who’s been in the area. They were literally brushing past the cameras, so camera traps and stabilised camera gimbals were really key to the look of Planet Earth II.” “30 years ago, I sat down and wrote a 13-part series – Life on Earth – and wrote all the things I would ever wish to see,” David remembers. “I wrote a sequence with a snow leopard, and people said; ‘What are you talking about? Nobody's ever photographed a wild snow leopard, they’ve never been seen!’ And eventually I crossed it out. I tried again before Life of Mammals, and then, 10 years ago, they put legendary

...Because humans are so wasteful, if you can manage to live alongside them, you’re in clover...

The sixth episode looks at animals adapted to urban life, like macaques in Jaipur – they’ll swipe anything they can get their hands on and even take over houses to squat in! Image © BBC

The highest density of peregrine falcons is in New York, says executive producer Mike. Image © BBC NHU/Paul Thompson

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NATURAL HISTORY

Sir David took time to chat – animatedly – with local journalists when he came to town last month for the premiere of the new series. Image © BBC/Steven Haywood

space, and most of that comes from the natural world. We have to be more sensible about the way we use the planet’s resources. Human beings have got to live within their means much more. “We make films about wonderful animals, and we go where they are, not where they were yesterday, so I get a rather rosier idea of what the wild world is like – but a couple of years ago, the BBC sent me out to go and see what the state of the planet was. I went to places in Borneo that I knew 30 years ago, where there’s nothing but oil palms. How terrible are the Bornean people, you say, but the reason they do it is because humanity needs feeding, and it needs money.”

Bristol: a beacon Whether it’s the documentation of the beauty and wonder of the natural world or the perils it faces, we’re proud to live in a city that has been so instrumental to wildlife storytelling, and is now regarded as a beacon of the genre – known by those in the biz as ‘Green Hollywood’. “It’s because the BBC has standards,” David reasons. “The BBC natural history unit was the first in the world, and it has led the world. They treated the subject seriously and realised a branch of expertise and skill was necessary to produce the right results. In the early days, each region was encouraged to adopt a specialism and it so happened there was a radio producer called Desmond Hawkins who was devoted to birds and natural history, and when TV came, he fought hard to make sure Bristol was the head of natural history. Now this city is the capital of wildlife filmmaking. The foremost and the first international festival of wildlife films was founded here – if you talk to wildlife cameramen anywhere in the world; they'll always say ‘See you at Wildscreen! There’s a great sort of freemasonry of craftsmen who come here to see their mates and of course try and sell programmes as well as seeing what all the others are doing!” “Yes, there’s something about the centre of gravity Bristol has created, drawing people to it,” agrees Mike. “There’s a wonderful collegiate sense too; there’s a number of independent programme makers here, and support industries – the editing, the sound, there’s some very high quality craft around Bristol. There’s also this bond about the environment and the message that we can get out there. I joined the unit in 1987 to work with David on Trials of Life – I thought it would be fun to do natural history for three years. 26 years later, I'm still here because once you've done it, you don't want to do

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anything else; and this is the best place to do it.” So, West is best, as we know, but where’s next – and is there yet more on the agenda? “I’m making a film about a fossil, going to Australia and America – you know, various things,” announces David, matter of factly. “I’d like to go to the middle of the Gobi desert but the BBC will never send me there because there aren't any animals. But there are some very nice fossils… “I know I’m extremely lucky – it’s no secret I'm 90 and I know an awful lot of dear friends and relatives my age who can’t remember anything or get about. It’s not their fault, and it’s not down to any virtue of mine. But as long as I can walk about, it would seem to me grossly wasteful and ungrateful not to take advantage of it.”

...As long as I can walk about, it would seem to me grossly ungrateful not to take advantage of it...

❞ And boy, are we glad he does. But how about a nice, relaxing holiday in a favourite British spot, first? “I’d go to the Hebrides,” he says. “There’s no doubt as to what the greatest world-class spectacle in the UK is, and thats the thousand-foot high sea cliffs of northern Scotland. You can talk about wildebeest and the like, but that’s amazing.” “And they have the white-tailed sea eagle which is one of the coolest birds of prey on the planet,” grins Mike. It’s no great surprise, then, that if Sir David could take one gift from the animal world – perhaps as a thankyou for all he’s done for it – it would be flight. Bat or bird, though, asks Mike – that’s the big question. “Oh bird, of course,” Sir Dave immediately replies. “I don’t want to spend all my time in the dark – not amongst all that poo…” ■ • Catch Planet Earth II on BBC One on 4 & 11 December; bbc.co.uk


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LOCAL | EVENTS

WHAT’S ON There’s plenty to do in the city this month...

Torvill and Dean star in Cinderella at Bristol Hippodrome

Bristol Bach Choir bring the spirit of Christmas to St George’s – image © Richard Hanmer

Treefest comes to St Mary Redcliffe Church

FROM 1 DECEMBER

FROM 8 DECEMBER

2 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

8 DECEMBER, 7.30PM – 9PM

Steve Tilston and Friends, Bristol Folk House

Shooting Gorillas, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery

Songwriting legend Steve Tilston brings his unique brand of folk, blues, jazz and classical to Bristol, along with pals Keith Warmington and Hugh Bradley on the harmonica and double bass. Tickets from £11.50 to £13.50; folkhousemusic.com

Bristol-based film maker and producer of John Bishop’s Gorilla Adventure Sarah Peat discusses how, since they were first brought to the attention of the western world, gorillas have been regarded and presented to the public. Entrance is free; bristolmuseums.org.uk

2 DECEMBER – 15 JANUARY, TIMES VARY

9 – 14 DECEMBER, ALL DAY

The Snow Queen, Bristol Old Vic Hans Christian Andersen’s magical fairytale sees the lives of best friends Gerda and Kai turned upside down by the legendary Snow Queen, accompanied by live music and original songs. Tickets cost £9.50 to £34; bristololdvic.org.uk

Treefest, St Mary Redcliffe Church Take the little ones to this spectacular festive display of over 100 decorated Christmas trees, provided by schools, businesses and community groups. All donations go to Mothers for Mothers and St Mary Redcliffe Church’s outreach programme; treefest.org.uk

3 DECEMBER, 12PM – 5PM

Style & Fashion Event, The Bristol Hotel

10 DECEMBER – 8 JANUARY, TIMES VARY

Cinderella, Bristol Hippodrome The rags-to-riches formula you know and love is enhanced with lashings of glitter, dazzling sets, a Shetland pony and bumbling Buttons this year, with ice skating legends Torvill and Dean making a mesmerising appearance as the Fairy Godparents. Tickets from £12 to £45.50; atgtickets.com 11 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

Kate Rusby at Christmas, Colston Hall Folk favourite Kate Rusby brings her soulful lyricism to Bristol with a selection of tracks from her three Christmas albums and latest release Life in a Paper Boat, accompanied by her own band and a lively brass quintet. Tickets from £19.35 to £23.65; colstonhall.org

10 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

Perfect your winter look with advice from industry experts, tutorials, demonstrations, exclusive discounts and beauty treatments galore. Complete the day with afternoon tea and a glass of Prosecco, plus a goody bag packed with stylish gifts. Tickets cost £55; stylepaletteevents.com

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influential figures. Tickets from £15 to £24.50; colstonhall.org

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A Celebration of David Bowie, Colston Hall Philip Glass’ avant garde interpretation of Heroes and Low – two of Bowie’s most iconic albums – takes centre stage in this performance. Conducted by Charles Hazlewood, a 42-piece orchestra will create a hypnotic, ethereal homage to one of music’s most

DECEMBER 2016

12 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

Noel! Noel! Bristol Cathedral Join Bristol Brass and Bristol Cabot Choir in their 40th anniversary year for an evening of sacred Christmas music and carols in the splendour of Bristol Cathedral. Tickets cost from £10 to £15; bristol-cathedral.co.uk

13 DECEMBER – 31 JANUARY, TIMES VARY

Winter Kitchen, At-Bristol Fire up your taste buds in the kitchen and explore the science behind warming winter treats. Take part in cook-alongs and enjoy tasting the end results – after all, one of the best things about Christmas is the food! Tickets from £8.95 to £13.90; at-bristol.org.uk 14 DECEMBER, 7.45PM

Handel’s Messiah, St George’s Bristol Ensemble and the Choir of Royal Holloway bring Handel’s masterpiece, Messiah, to life in a semi-staged performance in the intimate acoustic of St George’s Bristol. Tickets from £5 to £23; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

FROM 15 DECEMBER 15 & 17 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

Carols by Candlelight, St James Priory The Exultate Singers present their annual exquisite concert of carols and Christmas music in the beautiful setting of St James Priory. Tickets from £4 to £18, to include a complimentary programme and interval refreshments; exultatesingers.org 16 DECEMBER, 8PM

Belshazzar’s Feast, Christ Church Downend


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LOCAL | EVENTS Folk duo Paul Hutchinson and Paul Sartin fuse traditional English music with jazz, pop and classical styles, topped off with lashings of wry humour. Tickets from £10 to £14; downendfolkclub.co.uk 16 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

LSO: Fate Beckons, Colston Hall London Symphony Orchestra delivers the portentous Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4, balanced by two youthful Mozart concertos – both performed by violinist and conductor Nikolaj Znaider. Tickets from £8.50 to £42; colstonhall.org 17 DECEMBER, 10.30AM

Organ Elevenses, Holy Trinity Church Join Richard Johnson for a seasonal organ elevenses recital with coffee and cakes from 10.30am and a 40-minute recital from 11am, with a large-screen projection of the organist. Suggested donation of £5; westbury-parish-church.org.uk 17 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

Spirit of Christmas, St George’s Join Bristol Bach Choir for a traditional sparkling evening of uplifting choral music, entertaining readings and exhilarating brass. Tickets from £5 to £20, in support of St Peter’s Hospice; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk 18 DECEMBER, 2PM & 4.30PM

Children’s Christmas Carnival, St George’s Join Bristol Ensemble as they fly through Howard Blake’s The Snowman soundtrack, followed by a mini Sound of Music and

carols galore – bring your best singing voice! Tickets from £5 to £15; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Paul Hutchinson and Paul Sartin bring Belshazzar’s Feast to Christ Church Downend – image © Ely Lucas

19 DECEMBER, 10.30AM

Let’s Animate Christmas! Curzon Cinema Combine collage, 2D stop motion and iPad technology to create the perfect festive animation with this exciting workshop, suitable for children aged 7 to 11. Tickets cost £10; curzon.org.uk

FROM 20 DECEMBER 20 & 21 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

Christmas Spectacular, St George’s

Steve Tilston comes to Bristol Folk House

Two brilliantly entertaining evenings of Christmas music led by David Ogden and Bristol Ensemble with City of Bristol Choir and Exultate Singers, including festive orchestral pieces and beautiful choral Christmas carols. Tickets from £4 to £26; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk 22 DECEMBER, 7.30PM

Festive Fiesta, St George’s A feel-good family festive evening of carols and Christmas music – come and sing all your festive favourites with members of City of Bristol Choir, accompanied by professional orchestra The Bristol Ensemble. Tickets from £4 to £23; stgeorgesbristol.co.uk 31 DECEMBER – 7 JANUARY, TIMES VARY

Dick Whittington, Redgrave Theatre The panto season will thrive long after Christmas is over, as Starlight Productions brings Dick Whittington’s quest for fame and fortune to the Redgrave Theatre. Tickets cost £14.50; redgravetheatre.com

Kate Rusby brings festive favourites to Colston Hall

EDITOR’S PICK... 31 DECEMBER, 8PM – 3AM

New Year’s Eve, Spiegeltent The glittering Spiegeltent is open until New Year’s Eve for the first time this year, and they aren’t holding back with the last shindig of the season. Enjoy a frivolous evening of 1930s cabaret from Rodney & Alexandra; a laser rave with old skool legends Mr Micky Finn and Shades of Rhythm; and no end of party poppers, champagne and raucous antics. This is less of a party and more of a mini-festival, with jazz, hip-hop and carnival sounds emanating from three new spaces around the Spiegeltent: The Rave Cave, The Bristol Hi-Fi and The Cabaret Lounge. But it’s not just about the music, as immersive theatre from Kid Carpet; zany comedy from Flick Ferdinando; and walkabout circus performers offer another dimension – see you at midnight under the glitterball! • christmasspiegeltent.co.uk

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EXHIBITIONS

STATE OF THE ART Are We There Yet? Programme Gallery until 10 December The first time British photographer Barry Cawston came across Banksy was in 1992, when he was living in Hackney and saw a stencilled image of Samuel L Jackson and John Travolta holding yellow bananas. From that moment, he was hooked. 10 years later, he opened The Drugstore Gallery in Axbridge, and discovered the delights of WestonSuper-Mare. Having grown up in Bournemouth, faded Victorian British seaside towns always had a particular resonance for him – but as a social-documentary photographer, it was Weston’s punk attitude that really drew him in. So when Banksy’s Dismaland landed on his doorstep last year, Cawston was transfixed. On the opening night, he began to document the spectacle, the art, and people’s reactions to it. A new photographic story emerged, and with the help of Kickstarter supporters, and collaborators, Cawston’s images – still so relevant as our own increasingly absurd dystopian reality unfolds – have become a successful book and touring exhibition. • barrycawston.com; hopperprojects.com

Still Lives, Grant Bradley Gallery, 9 December – 7 January See ‘Still Lives’, a series of oil paintings by Victoria Laird and inspired by found animal skulls and fairy lights. Through this work, Victoria has discovered a beauty in the macabre and how the fragility of life makes it all the more precious. Meanwhile, Bill Moore offers a painting style unique in its simplicity. He is inspired by humanity, the built environment, the strange, often humorous and absurd aspects of the everyday and commonplace, and the subsequent changes that time brings. See also Bristol-born artist John Garland’s work, focused on capturing landscapes and cityscapes in Expressionist style.

• grantbradleygallery.co.uk

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Christmas Show, Coldharbour Framery & Gallery, 2 December This month the gallery is full of vibrant colours, tribal textiles, lanterns, fiery raku pots and the glitter of gold, not to mention fabulous paintings and prints. The Christmas open evening is a great chance to meet artists and see their latest work – expect new pieces by Abigail McDougall, Cath Read and Jenny Urquhart, plus spectacular ceramics by Andrew Niblett and Sophie Smith. • coldharbourgallery.co.uk

xx


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EXHIBITIONS

Hedwig Houben: Others and I, Spike Island, until 11 December

Photos by Stuart Whipps

Dutch artist Hedwig Houben makes sculptural works and installations mediated by film, performance and language. She has presented tableaux and accompanying filmed performances – each comprising art objects and a script activated by the artist or a guest performer. Houben is interested in the shift that occurs when the works leave her orbit and exist in isolation from their maker, in an institutional context. Who is the most powerful player – the artist, the art work or the spectator? • spikeisland.org.uk

Mixed Show, Clifton Contemporary Art, 1 – 24 December Explore a variety of original paintings, sculptures, prints and ceramics, including Dartmoor snowscapes by Hannah Woodman (First Snow pictured left), elegant stoneware by Christine Feiler and glowing gold and bronze leaf decorated still lifes by Lynn Golden. There will also be a new selection of Trevor Lillistone’s individually thrown, richly glazed ceramic pieces and beautiful new mixed media canvases by Maggie Matthews. For Christmas and the New Year the gallery is also welcoming new artists to its roster of original West Country talent… • cliftoncontemporaryart.co.uk

Also not to be missed... ● Wildlife Photographer of the Year, M Shed, until 5 March View 100 breathtaking images, from balletic whales to lizard-chasing parakeets, urban visitors to fantastical landscapes – all strong on visual drama and narrative. Launched in 1965, Wildlife Photographer of the Year is the most prestigious photography event of its kind, and has provided a global platform that showcases the natural world’s most astonishing and challenging sights, for over 50 years. Today the competition receives over 42,000 entries from 96 countries, resulting in an incredible calibre of work, such as this wonderfully atmospheric image by Gideon Knight, pictured right. • bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed

● Harbourside Night Exhibition: Andrew Burns-Colwill, 1 Canons Road, 1 December Artist Andrew Burns-Colwill heads to the harbourside in the first of an exciting new series of outdoor exhibitions highlighting Bristol’s artists and creators in innovative ways. Andrew’s paintings will ‘float’ above the harbour while he demonstrates his skills and techniques, and there will also be a delicious collective of street food traders, plus live music and DJs keeping the walkway buzzing. Art lovers will also be able to bring a piece of the Night Gallery home with them, via a print art shop running out of No. 1 Harbourside, and the first 50 ticket holders will enjoy a free mulled cider. • theharboursidemarket.co.uk ● Christmas Exhibition, Lime Tree Gallery, 1 December – 13 January A wide-ranging, strong and vibrant exhibition of 'painterly' works by notable contemporary artists, with a good selection of Christmas present-sized and affordable works. Featuring paintings by artists including Chris Bennett, Sam Cartman, Niggy Dowler (Rosy Cornucopia pictured right), John Evans, Anna King, Tom Mabon, Morag Muir, Céline Ranger and Peter Wileman – as well as beautiful silver jewellery by Moa Smith. • limetreegallery.com

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Christmas Exhibition Dec 1 - Jan 13

Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

Tel 0117 929 2527 Winter Morning Light by Lucy McKie ROI

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CRAFT

FRESH AND GREEN Ace Bristol florist Rachel Husband, of The Rose Shed at Paintworks, shows us how to create our very own wreath in time for Christmas You will need...

Step three

• Wreath ring frame • Fresh moss, mixed winter foliage from a florist – or alternatively, you can use garden cuttings • Festive accessories – anything from pine cones and twigs to baubles, fruit slices and ribbon • Secateurs • Reel wire and wire lengths

The last foliage bunch should sit neatly under the first, covering all of the moss – so your finished wreath should look something like this. Feel free to go for more of a wild, rustic look, or go larger – each wreath is unique. To finish off the wire, wrap it around the last bunch a few times, and bring back through itself to secure tightly – then cut the wire and push it back up into the moss.

Step one Secure the start of your reel wire to the wire frame by winding it round a couple times and twisting around one of the copper wires. Gather a handful of your moss and place onto the top of the wire frame, continue to wrap your reel wire around the moss, securing it tightly to the frame. Keep adding handfuls of moss to the wire frame, and wiring around to keep in place. When you finish mossing, go over the wreath with another cycle of wire to make sure the moss is secured.

Step four Choose your decorations and place them on top of the wreath to get the look you want – that way you can tweak the design before finally wiring. Clusters work well – pairs of cones or orange/apple slices. (Push the wire through your fruit slices, bend through and twist to secure.) Spread them out evenly, or group them. Leave space for a bow if you like. Other nice ideas are whole limes, feathers, cinnamon sticks. With the cinnamon, push the wire behind the raffia then push the decoration through the foliage and moss base – twist to another wire to secure, then push the ends of the wire back and up into the base of the wreath.

Step two Cut the larger foliage branches into smaller sections. Cut smaller sprigs around 15cm and layer them up in a small bunch, tightly wrapping the wire around the stems three times, so the bunch is secure on the moss. Blue spruce is tough so add this at the base, then the daintier foliage such as the eucalyptus on top, so you don’t squash it. Add in any twigs at this stage too. After you have wired the first bunch, place another bunch over the stems of the first, and again secure with three wraps of wire. Keep going along the wreath, covering the whole moss frame.

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Step five Keep adding decorations, finish your design with a ribbon of your choice and there you have it, your very own handmade door wreath! ■ • Rachel is hosting workshops on 8 December at 7pm and 10 December 10 at 10am and 2pm; contact rachel@theroseshed.co.uk


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Visually, Bristol is a very unique city, says Sonya – who would love to shoot around the city or work on stage here again. All photography by Alex Lee Johnson


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ONE | TO ONE

HUMAN

INTEREST From Ripper Street to The Paradise, born and bred Bristolian Sonya Cassidy is taking our screens by storm – especially in the lead role of the latest season of Humans… Words by Bethan Andews

F

rom a young age, Sonya Cassidy found herself inherently interested in human behaviour – fascinated by observing other people going about everyday life. It’s fair to say that today, this fascination has contributed to a very successful career in acting, both on stage and, most recently, on screen, in a show concerned with this particular subject. What is also fair to suggest, is that this fascination was born from her childhood in Bristol – a city which Sonya sees as full to the brim with the best type of individuals. “Although I lived in Nailsea, I’d get the bus into Bristol to study and people-watch – which is my favourite thing to do – and it’s a wonderful place for that,” she says. “I was always surrounded by culture and creative folk – Boston Tea Party on Park Street holds a very special place in my heart for this reason. It all inspired me and definitely had an effect on my acting.” Of course, it is Sonya’s immense talent that has really fuelled her career, but it’s nice to know that Bristol helped set some solid foundations. Having been accepted into RADA straight from school, Sonya moved from Bristol to London and – testament to her talent – was later cast in Inherit the Wind with Kevin Spacey at the Old Vic. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this catapulted her into public consciousness and led to appearances in TV shows such as BBC One’s Ripper Street and The Paradise.

❝ ...I’d get the bus into Bristol to study and people-watch – it’s a wonderful place for that...

future – including her exciting casting as one of the lead roles in the new season of the critically acclaimed, futuristic Channel Four series Humans. “I was a huge fan of the first season – it’s clever and welltimed,” she says. “What’s been wonderful for me to realise is how much it appeals to such a wide demographic, which is so rare. The scope of this new season in terms of what the directors are diving into is quite extraordinary really.” Speaking of the future, I can’t help but wonder what plans she has for her next role and whether she’ll return to Bristol. “I would love to work on stage there or shoot around the city,” she says. “I know that Poldark is shot around Bristol, but I’d love to see more for the media industry happening because there is such a wealth of culture. Visually, it’s a very unique city.” Most important, she says, is that the next job is different but equally as challenging as the last. “I think for an actor, the big dream is to still be working everyday. I’d like to still be acting as a little old lady,” she laughs. It’s her humbleness that is so endearing, and it’s uplifting to see the child-like excitement for the stage – which she felt while growing up – is still, very clearly, with her. “I feel very fortunate, and I have several ‘cloud nine’ moments,” she reflects. “They can just be small things like the theatre being packed every night, or when you could hear a pin drop because the auditorium is so still and quiet. I quite often stop and just think, ‘This is really cool’ – and I never want that to end.” n

• Catch the next episode of Humans on Channel Four on 4 December; follow Sonya on Twitter @sonya_cassidy

❞ Taking to the stage at the Old Vic in the capital seems a fitting start for the girl whose acting passions began at the Old Vic Youth Theatre in Bristol. “I had three incredible years there while it was taught by Heather Williams and Hilary Davies,” says Sonya, with whom there are no airs and graces – she comes across as modest and refreshingly grateful for the opportunities she has been presented with. “They were incredibly supportive, and when I got my first lead role at 16, I realised I wanted to give it a go as a career. It helped that the theatre is a gorgeous space too.” Diversity is something Sonya treasures, I discover as she tells me about the new skills she learns continuously, from each different job she does. “I love the assortment of roles out there, and I love that the older you get, the more you can bring to a role,” she explains. “As an actor, you are always observing things. You should be far more interested in other people than you should be yourself. You know, I know me pretty well I think, so that’s fine! But I can learn so much from watching another person.” For Sonya, the pull of the job is the character as opposed to whether it is on stage or screen, so we can expect to see her in both in the THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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FOOD & Drink

TASTY TITBITS FROM THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS, CHEFS AND PRODUCERS

SPICE UP YOUR LIFE A new restaurant opened in Clifton Village recently, with an ambitious menu drawing inspiration from the 29 states of India. The team at Nutmeg aim to source all their ingredients from within a three-mile radius – with meat coming from Ruby & White – and have commissioned a huge mural by local street art experts, Graft Workshop. Owners Raja and Charlotte are also introducing dishes such as pork chop vindaloo and beef madras, and have an award-winning bartender creating Indian twists on classic cocktails. “I grew up in a village in Southern India and was always the cook in the family so my life has been shaped by my experiences with ingredients and flavours,” says Raja. “I’ve gone from sleeping under tamarind trees while helping my father in rice fields, to working in restaurants for the last 10 years, and now opening my own restaurant. There are so many different varieties of cuisine spanning India and Nutmeg embraces the differences in ingredients and dishes across the regions.” • @nutmegclifton

MISS IT, MISS OUT! IN IT TO WIN IT Bristol vintage-style tearoom Cox & Baloney won gold at the Bristol & Somerset Tourism Awards recently, for Café/Tearoom of the Year. “We’re over the moon and couldn’t be happier,” said Joney McNamara and Amy Cox – the owners of the tearoom and bar on Cheltenham Road, which judges deemed “a unique and mesmerising place” – when they attended the ceremony to collect their award. “We are so proud of everything we’ve achieved and utterly thankful for the support of our friends and family with the business. This award is totally the icing on the cake for us.” • coxandbaloneytearooms.com

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Chef James Lee Gordon of The Chocolate Bear Kitchen is collaborating with speciality beer bar the Strawberry Thief to offer diners with food intolerances an inclusive gluten-free and at least 50% vegan menu in an eight-week residency in the runup to Christmas. Dishes will include crispy homemade chicken sausage with braised leeks, paired with amber Belgian beer Kwak; cured mackerel, celeriac remoulade, orange and sesame, paired with strong Belgian pale ale La Chouffe; and vegan waffles with poached pear and chocolate infused poaching liquor, paired with dark Trappist beer Westmalle Dubbel. • thechocolatebearkitchen.com; strawberrythiefbar.com


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THE

Indian Dining

Bar ✶ Champagne Lounge ✶ Restaurant

Christmas Menu 2016 • Welcome glass of mulled wine on arrival

To Begin – A medley of… Grilled Courgette, Aubergine and button mushroom salad with grapefruit and cumin dressing Deep fried soft shell crab with red pepper sauce Spiced fishcake of monkfish, potato and spring onion, drizzled with tomato and sweetcorn chutney

To follow – A sumptuous feast of Roast free range Somerset turkey served with a Chettinad sauce and Wiltshire Lamb cutlets simmered in a spiced spinach puree Served with Traditonal chickpea masala infused with assam tea leaves, Peas Pilau & Garlic Naan

Dessert – Mango rice pudding or Honey & saffron ice-cream • All produce, meat and fish are sourced from local producers and suppliers

Prices – £30 for 2 courses, £35 for 3 courses (minimum 2 people). Vegetarian and Vegan options available

The Mint Room, 12 - 16 Clifton Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1AF Tel: 0117 329 1300 www.themintroom.co.uk

info@themintroom.co.uk


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FOOD & DRINK

MISTLETOE & WINE... As the time for end-of-year entertaining approaches, Angela Mount imparts an oenophile’s expert insight

W

ith the festive season almost upon us, thoughts quickly turn to hospitality, as well as shopping for presents and the Christmas feast. Early December is the time when many of us realise that another year has almost gone by, and we throw drinks parties to assuage the guilt of having forgotten to invite friends, select neighbours and family round over the past months – so, ahead of the main event, here are a few tips to ensure smooth and relaxed entertaining, from a vinous perspective!

Get your numbers right To calculate the amount of wine needed, work on the basis on six glasses per bottle. If you’re planning a relatively big party, enlist the help of a local wine merchant, such as Corks of Cotham, Grape & Grind or Averys, who also offer free glass hire if you buy your wine from them.

Keep it cool Invest in some big plastic bins, and fill them with lots of ice and water to chill white and sparkling wines. In the worst case scenario, fill the bathtub! It’s okay to pop wine bottles in the freezer for 15 minutes for a quick chill down, but don’t leave them longer than that. Never put fizz in the freezer – the expansion as the wine freezes will make the bottles pop, resulting in no fizz and a horrid freezer mess.

Golden rule Never open your best bottles for a drinks party; wine is the support act here, not the star.

Fancy some fizz? The big debate here is always whether to serve Champagne, or sparkling wine on these occasions. Certainly never bring out your best Grande Marques. If you do go down that route, head straight to Aldi – their Champagne Monsigny Brut NV, from the renowned house of Philizot, is a staggeringly low £9.99, and ticks all the boxes. Alternatively, try Tesco 54 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Finest Pignoletto (£8) – a northern Italian fizz – to ring the changes from Prosecco. Averys also stock a deliciously creamy, ripe and food-friendly Almery Cremant de Limoux Brut (£12.99).

All white on the night White wines need to be lively and fresh. You don’t want to weigh guests down with heavy, oaky wines – the style needs to match the upbeat mood. Sauvignon Blanc continues to top the popularity charts, but you could always opt for a searingly crisp and elegant, fresh herb and gooseberry-strewn version – the Loire Cave de Valencay Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Corks of Cotham, £9.49). Or try a lively Italian white, as an alternative that pairs well with food. Averys Antigniano Grechetto ‘Broccatelli Galli’ 2015 (£7.99) would be a great value option, bursting with zesty lemon and grapefruit freshness. Otherwise, if you’re serving smoked salmon, or spiced canapés and dips, a slightly aromatic white would be better. Bath merchant Great Western Wine offers a delicious Gruner Veltliner from New Zealand, with notes of nectarine and ginger, and a tangy lime bite – Yealands Estate Gruner Veltliner 2014 (£12.95, available by mail order).

Something more substantial? As far as reds are concerned, the message is simple; avoid heavy, tannic wines and stick to either lighter style, juicy reds, or richer, but very soft styles. Barbera d’Asti ‘Ceppi Storici’ Araldica 2013 (Grape & Grind, £7.99) is cracking value, and offers a riot of deliciously smooth, lively, black cherry and plum fruits, with a soft, spicy backbone, and a bright, fresh style. Ripe, fruity reds, including Grenache and Pinot Noir are also good options. Waitrose’s award-winning Baron De Ley Rioja Reserva (down to £9.99 since 9 November), with its rich, voluptuous, silky style, would also be a great party choice, especially if you’re serving more substantial dishes, such as braised beef or pulled pork. • Follow Angela on Twitter @angelatalkswine


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BRISTOL AT WORK: Espensen Spirit We find out more about the newly launched local producer, based in St George

S

am Espensen has been making boozy beverages for friends and family for years, but it was only last year that she decided to go into partnership with pal Phil Gillies (pictured below) – turning her lovely range of recipes for flavoured vodkas, gins and whiskies into a one-of-a-kind business, all while running Conversation Creation PR. Made using fresh produce from Bristol Fruit Market, and base alcohol from Langley Distillery, the drinks are artificial colour and flavouring free. It does mean they have a shorter shelf life than most spirits, and are best drunk within a few months of being made, but we can’t see that ever posing too much of a problem, especially after sampling them at the brand’s quirky launch at 20th Century Flicks on Christmas Steps recently... Sam’s first wave of products – available in beautifully shaped bottles that range in price from £3.25 to £29.50, if you’re in the market for a Christmas gift – consist of the Gin Genie (a blueberry gin), Ruby Cuby (rhubarb and custard vodka), PG Sips (pink grapefruit and raspberry vodka) and Pump Up the Jam (raspberry gin). “The branding and names reflect our love of film, music, books and animals,” says Sam, who has taken on friends Charlotte Cripps and Somerset artist Richard Fry as her brand manager and illustrator respectively. “And I couldn’t think of a better place to start a company than Bristol. Particularly a spirit brand, as the South West is historically linked with rum and gin, and the city has a thriving pub and bar scene. We feel so lucky to be based in St George in what is basically now the brewing quarter of Bristol – we’ve got several breweries within walking distance and John from Arbor Ales has given me loads of advice so he’s a bit of a hero of ours.

tasted like a bottle of TCP... We recently discovered our rhubarb and custard vodka goes really well with puddings or cakes, and if you serve it in a glass of prosecco or champagne it pairs nicely with a lot of canapés. I like our raspberry gin with tonic as a mixer, and served with hard cheese, while our blueberry gin tastes delicious with cheesecake and Bakewell Tart (we have a cocktail we make called Genie’s Cheesecake, in fact).” So, whatever happens to all that leftover spirit-infused fruit, we wonder, innocently... “Watch this space,” says Sam. “None of it is thrown away, don’t you worry – there’s too much booze in it for that! We have plans for it that involve cocktails and food products that we’ll be announcing soon.” Having been diagnosed last year with CPTSD (complex posttraumatic stress disorder), Sam is using Espensen Spirit, which has been a key part of her recovery, as a platform to raise awareness of mental health issues, especially in the workplace. Donations from every sale are being made to local charities, including homeless charity Caring in Bristol; Holly Hedge Animal Sanctuary; The Racehorse Rehoming Centre and a local cancer charity. “Besides the tasting part, which is pretty good, it’s the people I work with who are the best bit of all of it,” smiles Sam. “Because I have CPTSD, I don’t do well in a ‘normal’ office environment, and we’ve created a workplace where we really respect and look after each other. You spend most of your life at work so it should be enjoyable and certainly not something you dread. I consider myself incredibly lucky to finally have a job where I am happy. So I love the people as much as I love physically making and testing the drinks.” The boss is pretty hands on, then? “Yes, I make every single drink – macerating, chopping, stirring, filtering – and and am up at 5am to get the best deals from the fruit market. I chose to include my own name in the brand because I was ashamed of it for years due to a difficult upbringing. But I have now decided to embrace it and be proud of my ‘Espensen spirit,’ as that is what has helped me get through tough times. And besides, all the best alcohol has an unpronounceable name!” n • espensenspirit.com

...I can’t think of a better place to start a spirit brand, as the South West is historically linked with rum and gin, and has a thriving pub and bar scene...

❞ “The bottles we use are made of Italian glass – we hope people keep them once they’re empty to use for vases, oils, vinegars or their own homemade drinks,” she adds. “Their unusual shape meant our labels were the hardest part of the process in terms of getting the brand off the ground – they took 11 different print suppliers to perfect. We set our hearts on using these particular bottles, but because of the way they curve they proved excruciatingly difficult to work with. A few times we considered chucking the towel in and either compromising or changing bottles but I’m really glad I stuck to my guns.” It took a while to whittle down the winning flavours too, and a good deal of experimenting, we’re told. “I wanted to make a drink that combined strawberries and mint, but it tasted really artificial,” remembers Sam. “I had the same problem I have with a lot of other flavoured spirits on the market – they taste of the fake version of what they’re meant to be rather than what the actual fruit tastes of. I also once made a blueberry vodka by accident (put in the wrong alcohol!) and I wasn’t a fan of that. Oh, and there was a passionfruit vodka that THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 57


BOOKS

PAGE AND SCREEN Dark autumn evenings make us feel like curling up with a top book or a hit film – here we revisit a few of our favourite novels that have gone on to become both The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (paperback, Bloomsbury, £8.99)

Atonement by Ian McEwan (paperback, Vintage Publishing, £8.99)

Khaled Hosseini’s first novel, published in 2003, tells the story of two young boys – Amir and Hassan – set in 1975 Afghanistan. The two boys take part in a kite-flying tournament, but are unaware of the events that are to happen to them later that afternoon which will define their lives. The Kite Runner was number one on the New York Times bestseller list for over two years. The 2007 film was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Golden Globes.

During the hot summer of 1935, teenager Briony Tallis watches her sister Cecilia take off her clothes and plunge into the fountain of a country house in front of Robbie Turner, the housekeeper’s son. Briony misconstrues the sexual tension between Cecilia and Robbie, and later accuses Robbie of a crime that will change these young people’s lives forever. The 2007 film was directed by Joe Wright and starred James McAvoy, Keira Knightley, Benedict Cumberbatch and Vanessa Redgrave. The film received numerous nominations, including seven at the Golden Globes and 14 at the BAFTAs, and won an Oscar for Best Original Score. The film was highly praised for its moving five minute-long tracking shot of the evacuation of Dunkirk which showed the horrors and pointlessness of the war.

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (paperback, Orion Publishing, £8.99) On the morning of her fifth wedding anniversary, Amy disappears. Her husband, Nick, is quickly assumed a suspect by the police. Amy’s diary describes Nick as aggressive and controlling, but could he really murder his wife? Or was Amy really as perfect as everyone believed? Gone Girl spent over 130 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, with 37 weeks at number one, and has sold more than 15 million copies worldwide. Gillian Flynn wrote the screenplay for the 2014 film based on the book, which starred Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike. The film received numerous award nominations, especially in categories for direction and best actress for Pike’s portrayal of Amy.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote (paperback, Penguin Books, £7.99) Theouts poken Holly Golightly is a young 1940s socialite in New York who receives an income from wealthy men who take her out on the town and give her expensive gifts. The novella was adapted for the 1961 film starring Audrey Hepburn, which set the plot in the 1960s. Breakfast at Tiffany’s is recognised by most as Hepburn’s most memorable film, for which she received an Academy nomination for Best Actress.

Schindler’s Ark by Thomas Keneally (paperback, Hodder & Stoughton, £9.99) Inspired by Poldek Pfefferberg’s experiences of the Holocaust, Keneally’s novel is based on the life of Oskar Schindler and follows how he went from being a Nazi Party member and entrepreneur to risking his life to save Polish Jews from almost certain death in a Nazi concentration camp. Schindler’s Ark won the Booker Prize in 1982, while Steven Spielberg’s 1993 film Schindler’s List, which was based on Keneally’s novel, received seven Academy Awards among other international awards, and is often regarded as one of the best ever made.

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (hardback, Penguin Books, £14.99) Austen’s 1811 novel follows the story of the Dashwood sisters – Elinor and Marianne – who, after the death of their father, are left with a small inheritance and are forced to move home with their widowed mother and young sister to a small cottage in the country. After being accepted into local society, Marianne falls for the dashing but unruly John Willoughby, while Elinor tries to hide her feelings for Edward Ferrars. This particular copy is part of Penguin’s clothbound classics range, designed by Coralie Bickford-

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Smith. The 1995 film of Sense and Sensibility was a hit at the box office, receiving 11 nominations and winning three awards at the 1995 British Academy Film Awards. Emma Thompson, who wrote the screenplay and starred in the film, was awarded with Best Adapted Screenplay at the Academy Awards, and also gained a nomination for Best Actress for her part as Elinor Dashwood. The film also starred late film legend Alan Rickman, as well as the fabulous Kate Winslet and Hugh Grant.

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BRISTOL UPDATES BITE-SIZED BUSINESS NEWS FROM ACROSS THE CITY

KEEP IT LOCAL

Paying Bristol Energy bills with the Bristol Pound will ensure you support the city

CONGRATULATIONS!

BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS

An online furniture store set up by a young entrepreneur five years ago has won a national award. Paul Randall, from Brislington, set up Rainbow Zebra from his family home and struggled to make ends meet – but now the firm’s success has been recognised by the Online Business Awards, and won in the Office Equipment, Supplies and Furniture category. “I’m delighted to receive this award,” said Paul, who is set to hit a million-pound turnover this year. “It’s great to have recognition for all our hard work over the last five years, and show potential customers that we have been awarded for being a userfriendly website. It will also help us to stand out in a crowded market.” The OBA, in association with Talk Business, focuses on enterprising UK companies with a powerful online presence. “Paul truly shows what hard work, persistence and entrepreneurial spirit can do,” said Dominic Lill, online editor at Talk Business. “With a beautifully designed website and user friendly online service, not to mention great deals, Rainbow Zebra is exactly what SMEs need when looking for new office furniture.” • rainbowzebra.co.uk

Bristol architects O’LearyGoss celebrated their 25th year at the Royal West of England Academy recently. Nearly 150 people joined the 13-strong, Redlandbased company, which has been involved in more than 100 regional projects with a construction value of £160million, and shortlisted for a Historic England Angel Award for their innovative £2.25million visitors’ centre at the UK’s only Grade-I Victorian pier in Clevedon, which opened in May. “It’s amazing to think when the company started there were occasions when we didn’t think we’d be around the next month, let alone in 25 years,” said director Robert O’Leary. “O’LearyGoss Architects has a wide-ranging portfolio from residential developments to heritage projects in the Bristol area; with the lion’s share built as we emerged from the ‘credit crunch’ of 2008.” Robert and co-director Jenny Goss married a year before they qualified as architects, and launched O’LearyGoss in 1991. Their initial success arrived with small projects including refurbishing hospital wards, and the company is still highly regarded for design in the healthcare sector. • olearygoss.co.uk

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Bristol has become the first city to have its own energy company accepting the area’s own local currency, and encouraging more people to keep their money local by using the Bristol Pound. Bristol Energy is a gas and electricity company that will reinvest its profits straight back into the city, supporting essential services and local communities, and is the first one of its kind in the South West. Its customers can now pay their bills in the local currency too, meaning the company can help more locallygenerated income to stay in the city. Bristol became the first city to have its own currency in 2012, and the Bristol Pound is the largest alternative to Sterling. Over 800 businesses now accept it across the city and millions of Bristol Pounds have gone into circulation. Each one spent supports independent businesses, and nearly 2,500 Bristolians have opened a digital Bristol Pound account, with thousands more spending the paper notes on everything from council tax to bus fares, groceries to cinema tickets. Some even take their wages in the currency. “We believe energy companies have the power to make a positive difference,” said Peter Haigh, managing director of Bristol Energy. “If you pay your bills with Bristol Energy, your money doesn’t just disappear into the pockets of private shareholders, it will help us to support your city. As a Bristol-born company we’re very proud to offer our customers the chance to pay in Bristol Pounds, helping even more of the money made in the city, stay local to the city.” Existing customers who use the Bristol Pound will be able to start paying in the currency straight away. "I'm really pleased that Bristol Energy will now accept Bristol Pounds,” said local resident Sally Britton. “It's great that we can pay for essentials with Bristol Pounds and support our local economy." If you join Bristol Energy quoting the code BPOUND001, Bristol Energy will give you up to 30 Bristol Pounds for switching. • bristol-energy.co.uk


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50 ways to leave your lover? By Sharon Giles, Sharp Family Law – Bristol and Bath Solicitors. Protecting what matters most

W

ell, the truth is, if we’re talking about divorce in the UK, there are only five. And if a couple wants to fast track the process, then there are really only two. The challenge is that the quickest divorce routes both involve blame – and so turn up the heat in a situation that may already be difficult to manage. It means that dealing thoughtfully with the ‘blame factor’ from the word go is pivotal for every effective quick divorce strategy.

The challenge is that the quickest divorce routes both involve blame

Although many UK divorce professionals continue to campaign for a ‘no fault’ option, until the law changes, there’s no avoiding having to tip-toe around one-sided allegations of adultery or unreasonable behaviour. But while some couples have no problem with allocating or accepting blame for marriage breakdown, others genuinely struggle. For some, the actual cause of marital

breakdown is intangible – a gradual erosion of the spark that was once there by years of irritation. So is a refusal to empty the dishwasher enough to satisfy a Judge that a marriage is broken down? Probably not. But after 25 years, such a seemingly minor issue could well be the ‘last straw’. Moving on to a better future With professional support and an understanding of why a one-sided blame petition is needed, the finger pointing can be tempered. The focus can then turn to the real issues to address post divorce – such as shared care of the children and division of family finance. For those prepared to wait until they’ve been living apart for two years or more, the need to find fault disappears. In reality though, most couples want their divorce to proceed without delay once they’ve made the decision. The currently obligatory ‘blame’ therefore needs careful management to avoid negative impacts on long-term outcomes. At Sharp Family Law we understand the importance and benefit of establishing a calm and supportive environment from the outset to facilitate the personal and sensitive discussions ahead. A carefully drafted divorce petition – even if loaded with blame – can help to put the negotiations that follow onto a positive and constructive footing.

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

Sharon Giles

Clare Webb

Sharp Family Law: Broad Quay House, Prince St, Bristol, BS1 4DJ email: info@sharpfamilylaw.com m: 07766 107527 t: 0117 905 8805 website: www.sharpfamilylaw.com

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Coping with co-parenting – tips for a successful Christmas

Should you submit a self-assessment tax return before 31 January? Contact HOLLINGDALE POOLEY for advice Individuals with straightforward tax affairs, where their income is subject to tax through payroll, often won’t need to complete a self-assessment tax return. However, for individuals with more complicated tax affairs you may need to complete a tax return by 31 January 2017. The most common reasons for completing a tax return include:

I

t might be “the most wonderful time of the year”, but Christmas can present childcare conundrums for separated parents. Most ex-couples won’t be marking Christmas together, but both parents will still want to spend the festive period with their children, who can’t be in two places at once. It’s tempting to ignore this issue and hope it goes away, or to fall back on your usual co-parenting arrangements, but this can often lead to last minute conflict and uncertainty. And as most separated parents know, arguments with your children at the centre are distressing for them and not likely to lead to a harmonious Christmas holiday. When it comes to broaching the subject of Christmas with your expartner, it’s a good idea to make a plan well in advance and stick to it. It’s a lot easier for you as parents to come to a rational and fair decision three months before Christmas than at the beginning of December, when the holiday season is in full swing. Many separated parents agree to share out Christmas and Boxing Day – they find it easier to take a whole day each rather than alternate mornings and afternoons, which inevitably involves more shuttling back and forth. Another option is to allow one parent to have the children for a longer period at Christmas in return for a similar concession for the other parent – for example, Mum has the kids at Christmas so Dad can take them on holiday for New Year. Whatever you decide, remember to factor in and inform your children’s other relatives, particularly those on your side of the family – will your own parents want to see their grandchild? Once you’ve agreed an arrangement for this year, it’s a wise idea to make a long term plan for future Christmases so that you don’t have the same issue every 12 months. Using a previous example, this could mean you alternate Christmas and Boxing Day each year so that each parent gets to take a turn, or you could keep the same days in future years. Needless to say, before making a decision about Christmas, you should speak to your children if they’re old enough and find out what they want to do. After all, this is about them getting to spend time with you as much as the other way round. If they feel that their feelings and opinions have been listened to, Christmas will be a much happier time for everyone.

T: 0117 325 2929 E: info@barcankirby.co.uk www.barcankirby.co.uk F: @barcankirby

• If you are self-employed, including a partner in a partnership; • if you are a company director; • if you have income from a buy-to-let property, including a holiday let; • if your annual total income exceeds £100,000; • if you have made chargeable disposals, such as a sale of second home, shareholdings and antiques; • if you are a trustee or personal representative of a deceased estate; • if you are 65 or over and receive a reduced age allowance; • if your annual total income exceeds £50,000 and you are in receipt of child benefit. What can we do for you? At Hollingdale Pooley, we offer a comprehensive tax return preparation service. We will discuss your tax affairs with you, either in person or by telephone/email, and following this initial consultation we will provide you with details of the information we require from you to prepare your return. We will then prepare your tax return and send it to you for your approval, with an explanation of your tax liability in plain English. Once you approve your return, we will ensure it is submitted to HM Revenue & Customs on your behalf. In addition, we will become your authorised tax agents with HM Revenue & Customs, allowing us to deal directly with them should there be any queries and so removing the burden from you. Alongside the wealth of knowledge and experience our partners bring to our firm, we have a dedicated tax manager, Tom Ogden, a Chartered Tax Advisor, providing a range of compliance and advisory services to personal and business clients. Please contact Tom or one of our partners for a free initial consultation, or email enquiries@hollingdalepooley.co.uk

Hollingdale Pooley Bramford House, 23 Westfield Park, Clifton, Bristol BS6 6LT Tel: 0117 973 3377 www.hollingdalepooley.co.uk

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• Co-educational day school for pupils aged 5-13 with

dyslexia and other specific learning/language difficulties.

• Located in Wiltshire between Bath and Chippenham. CReSTeD approved.

• Fully qualified specialist teachers with maximum class size of eight - reducing to one-to-one as required.

Call 01225 743 566 or visit www.CalderHouseSchool.co.uk 64 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Very Best Wishes for the Festive Season

From all the team at T H E

BRISTOL MAGAZINE

Advertisers Please Note: The Deadline for Receiving Copy for the January 2017 Issue is Wednesday December 14th

Telephone 0117 974 2800 66 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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By Dr Andrew Daniel, Headmaster of Monmouth School

HAPPY GRADES “Success is not the key to happiness, happiness is the key to success.” This mantra, coined by philosopher Albert Schweitzer, is ingrained in everything we do here at Monmouth School. From the annual adventure break to stunning Pembrokeshire, designed to help Year 9 bond in September, to celebrating boys’ achievements outside of school, our pupils’ wellbeing is always a top priority. We believe our excellent pastoral care is largely to thank for our outstanding academic results – 65% go on to Russell Group Universities and 18 boys have gone to Oxford and Cambridge in the last two years. For this reason, Monmouth’s innovative teachers are constantly thinking of new ways to improve provision for pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. Sport plays a huge role in many boys’ school careers, but for those happiest exercising their brains, new clubs are springing up to break down barriers and unite like-minded pupils. One boy, Sam Sully, used an engineering scholarship to send balloons carrying Raspberry Pi computers, cameras and radios into space to snap Earth from above on three separate occasions. Now, his infectious enthusiasm has been channelled into establishing the Monmouth High Altitude Balloon (HAB) Club in the physics department. Sam briefed 42 pupils from across Forms I to Sixth Form on the idea. As well as boosting Sam’s confidence, it has sparked great excitement among the teams who will be soldering, programming and testing their payloads with the ultimate aim of launching their own balloons in the Lent term. This comes after a dedicated Minecraft group collaborated to create a mind-blowing version of Monmouth School in the online game. Our latest Estyn inspection, Wales’ answer to Ofsted, rated Monmouth as ‘excellent’ in every category, the highest praise possible. Under ‘Care, support and guidance’, inspectors highlighted the many opportunities for “pupils to reflect on their own values and beliefs and to engage in a wide range of community-based activities.” Sam’s Pi in the sky club illustrates this perfectly and I can’t wait to see what it leads to next. *The Schools have an established bus route covering the Thornbury area. For more information, visit habs-monmouth.org, call 01600 710433 for Monmouth School or 01600 711104 for HMSG. THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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THE | GETAWAY

THORNBURY CASTLE History, style, culinary expertise and comfort combine beautifully at this Tudor gem just a short jaunt from the city, says Jessica Beaumont

B

efore the madness of Christmas was unmistakably upon us, before a solid fortnight of festive drinks parties, hectic last-minute forays into town, and hefty end-of-term deadlines would possess us completely; during a recent rare moment of clarity we decided to allocate some time to ourselves, take a few deep breaths and enjoy what could be our last weekend of relaxation in a while. And where better, pray tell, to sequester ourselves thought we, than the sanctuary of a 16th-century castle on the edge of the Cotswolds yet also a nippy 30-minute drive from central Bristol? As we approach our Tudor bolthole – which, 500 years previously, once played host to Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn during its days as a royal demesne – rays of late-afternoon winter sun have thoughtfully got the the honey-hued stone glowing antique gold, while everything from a pretty vineyard to stone passages, leafy red creepers climbing ancient walls, and diminutive doors made for medieval men, capture our attention. Along with a gust of wind and several autumn leaves, we blow in from the car park and are greeted by a life-size suit of armour in the hall; the kind of super-smart decor befitting a top country hotel; and plenty of historical detail. A sucker for a simple wood-panelled wall alone, I’m already head over heels before we even reach our allotted quarters. Needless to say, there’s something a little bit special about staying in a castle, particularly when you’re allowed in pretty much every single bit of it – I say that because the only other time we visited a castle, we were on a school trip and got told off for trying to conduct our own studies into parts that were, as we felt, selfishly cordoned off, most likely due to completely legit safety concerns. “The only exception is the ruins,” says head receptionist Darren Titcombe, as he sets our bags down in ‘Audley’, our room for the night. “You see, the castle was never quite finished as the Duke of Buckingham was unfortunately beheaded.” Seems like a pretty acceptable excuse to us, so we reckon we’ll let him off, and anyway, we hear the team are hoping to convert the ruins into a luxury spa and pool, so we can deal with this area being out of bounds for now. Hungry like the direwolf, we arrange an early dinner in the castle’s two AA-rosette restaurant. We’ve heard a fair bit about new chef Stuart Shaw – formerly of Raymond Blanc’s Belmond Le Manoir Aux Quat’Saisons, and The Manor

House in Castle Combe, where he earned the restaurant its Michelin star – and are keen to investigate his offering for ourselves. But first, to the lounge, to recline a while in dusky pink velvet armchairs, and beg companion W to upholster me my own for Christmas, while nibbling on delicate cheese and paprika straws dipped in truffle mousse. Between peering upwards to see gigantic portraits in old golden frames, we see off The Frizzo (Edmond Briottet crèmes topped with Prosecco and elderflower) and a Horse’s Neck (whiskey topped with ginger ale and finished with lemon zest) – the latter chosen simply, and rather impulsively, says W, because it sounds like something Jon Snow might have guzzled down at Winterfell. Imagining I’m Sophia Loren (we’re told the glamour puss dined here back in the Seventies, along with the likes of Laurence Olivier), we make our way into the restaurant and are seated among various goblets and crowns set in little alcoves as well as a contemporary sculptural centrepiece. There’s a good balance of authenticity and theatricality, and a fairly hushed yet simultaneously unstuffy ambience. Moreish fish cakes with pickled shallot arrive as an appetiser after spherical hunks of apricot and rosemary bread, and the discovery of a secret compartment in the panelling next to us – useful for squirrelling away any unwanted grub perhaps, not that we can possibly see us needing it. No, not with the likes of crispy lamb belly, slow cooked egg yolk, tomato, smoked hay emulsion and lamb’s lettuce – which has W sitting back and closing his eyes in appreciation every minute or two. The sticky veal and truffle tortellini doesn’t stick around long either – demolished almost instantly along with its crispy potato, smoked pancetta and parmesan foam accompaniments. Having wrestled with his head – which strongly advises him to opt for the main course of marinated venison with blackberry and bacon powder, crispy leg boudain, sautéed chard, pickled beetroot, chocolate and venison jus – W follows his heart, which demands the roasted fillet of dry aged beef, ox cheek boulangere, confit shallot, girolles and port jus. It turns out to be a superb choice. My decision is straightforward and, being a keen seafood aficionado, means a plump pan-fried fillet of stone bass soon materialises with crushed artichoke, razor clams, dill and onion oil, root veg and artichoke, all in a flavoursome shellfish broth. Well-matched with fine wines suggested by the castle sommelier; and with veg fresh from the fruitful kitchen garden, both dishes are a delight to devour. Liking the idea of a creating a little symmetry, we finish much like we began, with an apricot and rosemary pairing – this time in the form of souffle with rosehip and yoghurt sorbet – but can’t help adding the decidedly seasonalsounding ‘Orchard’ to our order, and with poached apples, pickled blackberries, calvados custard, caramelised apple purée and ‘crumble granola’, it lives up to its promise. Post-fireside espresso martinis, we retire to our chamber – complete with sleek, well-appointed bathroom and fourposter, yet channelling more homely comfort than formal splendour, and the ideal space to round off an impressive evening in a very memorable venue. ■ • Rooms start from £195; thornburycastle.co.uk

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Opposite page, clockwise from top: The winter sun kindly had the castle’s medieval stone glowing antique gold on our arrival; enjoy chess and martinis beside the fire; the calibre of the food matches the grandeur of the hotel; you’ll be greeted by this guy as you go in; one of the hotel’s 23 sumptuous bedchambers


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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

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MOTORING | TEST DRIVE

FORM AN ORDERLY Q... Now available in the UK, the Audi Q2 is one of the motor industry’s most eagerly awaited arrivals of 2016. Dara Foley jumps the queue and has a first look at this über-cool compact crossover

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nveiled at this year’s Geneva Motor Show, the Q2 is the latest addition to Audi’s impressive line up, and the first compact SUV being offered by the premium brands. Acting as an entry-level crossover and appealing to the younger, but the more design-savvy driver, the Q2 slots nicely into the current Q range. The ever popular Q3, Q5 and the ginormous seven-seat Q7 are all best sellers, and for very good reason – but the smaller, sportier, and more importantly, the more affordable Q2 will tick all the boxes for a new generation of Audi aspirants. It looks every bit a premium Audi SUV, but the Q2 is the first model under the leadership of new chief designer Mark Lichte and its appeal is edgier and the shaping is bolder, with sharpened-up lines that distinguish it from its stable mates. At the front, the Q2 has a much squarer elevation and a different look to the larger models, but reassuring familiarity comes in the form of the huge Audi grille and that much coveted four-circle badge from Ingolstadt. In profile, the high roof line, that gently slopes to the rear, gives it a poised and sporty posture, and the wide, robust-looking C-pillars that curve around to meet the high back windscreen (Audi calls them "blades") can be customised in many contrasting finishes for added visual expression. At launch there are three standard trim options: the SE, the Sport, and the S-line, each offering extra levels of refinement, but on top of this is a fourth, feature-packed exclusive version: the Edition #1. Extra customisation and high tech gadgetry is the key theme for all motor manufacturers as they compete for the younger market segment, and throughout the range, the Q2 certainly does not disappoint. VW Audi is brilliant at creating high quality designs and finely engineered components, and much of the car has been created using the tried and tested mechanicals from their existing models. But the group has also taken the lead by bringing myriad styling options for the new owner to enjoy. There are 12 (and some very vibrant) exterior colours to choose from, a choice of alloy wheels, ranging from 16 to 19 inches, and the option for a two-tone roof. Inside the cabin, the choice becomes even more expressive, as the range of fabrics, and painted and brushed aluminium trim finishes will give buyers plenty of options to have fun with. As you would expect from Audi, all materials used are high quality, pleasing to the eye, and lovely to the touch. The biggest appeal for our connected generation comes in the form of a full spectrum of Vorsprung durch Technik toys, many fitted as standard in all Q2s. They have a smartphone interface, the new Audi ‘pre-sense’ front with pedestrian recognition system, and a seven-inch

infotainment screen located on the top of the dashboard, which allows you to scroll through all the menus using the rotary command dial and buttons in a console near the gear lever. On screen, you can toggle through many of the car’s settings – radio, connectivity, including ‘Apple Car Play’ which is just starting to feature in the UK car markets. There’s a great sound system included and there is also an option to upgrade to a Bang & Olufsen, however if you are looking to spend a little more, then maybe go for the technology pack configuration which includes the brilliant Audi ‘Virtual Cockpit’. First introduced in the R8, and now offered across the range, the 12.3 inch LCD display replaces and simulates all the usual analogue dials and instruments behind the steering wheel, and buttons on the wheel control the many driver information viewing options. The technology pack also extends the Q2’s capabilities with sat nav and 4G internet access via an installed sim card. The driver and passenger comfort is excellent, and it’s surprisingly spacious inside. Even though the Q2 is a compact SUV, there’s good legroom, headspace and width – as always though, it’s a slightly rawer deal if you are the fifth passenger taking the middle of the back seat. Wherever you are in the car, there’s a good supply of convenient cubbyholes and handy storage. The boot is generous too, and at 405 litres that’s better than most in this class and will easily take three suitcases. To drive the Q2 is a delightfully simple and a well-balanced experience. There’s a range of power and drive train options but the excellent seven-speed S-tronic auto transmission is probably one of the best on the market and comes with the 1.4 TFSI, the 1.6 TDI engines as well as a Quattro S-Tonic version with the 2.0 TDI engine. Across the range the Q2 is responsive and smooth. Around town, the raised driving position offers good vision in traffic, the steering is confident and the ride very comfortable and controlled but this is no slouch either – on open carriageways it packs a punch and is very capable. Prices start from £20,230 for the 1.0-litre TFSI in SE trim level. While the top of the range Edition #1 version is priced from £34,570. However, Audi expect the mid-range 1.4 or 1.6 sport models to really be the best sellers as they not only have a great spec for the price, but the various numbers on CO2 emissions, MPG, and other running costs all come in extremely competitively when compared to some of the less premium compact SUVs currently around. Of course, for those that want the badge, the design, the engineering; the best bit is you get an Audi. Form that orderly queue... ■ Bristol Audi, Lysander Road, Cribbs Causeway, Bristol BS10 7FF Bristol BS10 7TU; 0117 9581450; bristolaudi.co.uk

Audi’s Virtual Cockpit

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

FACE VALUE Louise Harrold sets aside her scepticism and samples S-Thetics’ exclusive new treatment

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irst of all, reader, a necessary disclaimer: I am not someone who is usually partial to a ‘rave review’. As someone who approaches most things with a healthy dose of scepticism, I find it difficult to wax lyrical about, well, almost anything really; however sometimes, needs must, and a bit of enthusiasm is not only justified but necessary after receiving a treatment as good as the newly arrived Fire and Ice facial at Bristol clinic S-Thetics. Exclusive to S-Thetics, it’s often referred to as the Red Carpet Treatment due to its ability to provide instant results to any given Hollywood starlet before an important premiere, and is the bestseller at the prestigious Beverly Hills Hotel spa. Impressive credentials; although, not being someone who will be making her way along a red carpet anytime soon, I wonder how the treatment translates to the ‘normal’ woman; the one travelling home after the treatment via an Uber, rather than a private jet. Upon entering, the process feels instantly different – no mood lighting, aroma of essential oils, or ambient sounds circulating via a poorly hidden CD player in the corner. Instead, I’m soon sat in a reassuringly clinical office, with a knowledgeable, friendly dermatologist before me, receiving a detailed analysis of my skin. The Fire and Ice facial does promise big things; the fire element being a mild chemical peel that resurfaces the skin, and the ice element being a soothing mask offering hydration afterwards. I am told it will provide instantly visible results that same day, which will include plumper skin, a noticeable reduction in fine lines, and the always coveted, dewy, healthy glow. As we begin the treatment, the dermatologist talks me through the science behind each step. Since I’ve never had any form of chemical peel The iS Clinical range is recommended for continuing your care regime post-treatment

before, she is keen to make sure I understand what is being applied to my skin and why – if this facial is more pricey than what you would usually part with for a treatment, you soon come to understand that it’s down to the quality of the pharmaceutical-grade ingredients used. The ‘fire’ – the resurfacing peel – is formulated with sugar cane extract (a natural, potent source of the glycolic acid used in chemical peels), combined with clinically formulated vitamins A and B3. As the resurfacing masque is applied, I am told I will begin to feel a tingling warmth that will intensify and, right on cue, my skin starts to warm up. This was the part I had been slightly apprehensive about; what if it heated up too much? Or I was left with a reddened face? While everyone’s skin does react slightly differently to the treatment, I feel reassured knowing the sensation can be quickly counteracted with a neutralising agent at any point should I want it to. As it goes, I find myself enjoying the sensation immensely. At this point, I don’t know if it is a placebo effect but I am sure that I can actually feel my skin improving. After allowing a few minutes for the resurfacing to work, my skin is cleansed and the ‘ice’ – the rejuvenating masque – is applied. Formulated with hyaluronic acid, aloe vera, green tea, grape seed and rosemary extract, this concoction feels absolutely heavenly as my dermatologist takes time smoothing it therapeutically over my skin, allowing it to sink slowly. With the facial complete, I am keen to see the results in the mirror, particularly as, with the dermatologist’s back turned, I fleetingly run my finger over my skin and am struck by how velvety-soft it is. Even before catching a glimpse of myself, I know the result is going to be good and, while I am not sure anyone ever looks their best immediately after a facial, I am extremely surprised to see that the promises and claims attributed to this facial ring true. The fine lines I have been gaining in recent years have seemingly been buffed away to almost nothing and (while I detest a cliché) my skin really is radiant. I do look noticeably different – rejuvenated and refreshed – and I am really quite impressed. As the days pass, these observable results remain, and a week later, when I am still receiving compliments and the usual “Have you done something different?” the answer is yes, I have; for this facial is about as different as anything I have tried before. And, look, it has even turned me into one of those wax lyricists I mentioned... ■ • The Fire & Ice facial costs £125; sthetics.co.uk

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HAIR

’DO TIME Make sure your barnet’s on point in the run up to Christmas, with the help of renowned Bristol hairdresser Doug Hobbs and his step-by-step guides to updos for straight and curly hair

The curly chignon

Step three

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f you’re looking for something quick to do, glamorous yet casual, and suitable for any party, then this soft up-do might be for you. We decided to use a model with curly hair as we find there’s often a shortage of how-to guides using curly hair, in both magazines and online – but if you have wavy or straight hair, fear not, this hairstyle will work just as well on you. Inspired by what’s currently trending on Instagram and Pinterest, it requires minimum effort and features a valuable technique to learn for those days when you’re not sure how to put your hair up, or if you want to dress it down during the day and then dress it up with accessories in the evening before heading out to that Christmas party. You will need a hair band, kirby grips, hairspray, smoothing cream and shine spray.

Gently (curly hair requires minimal fiddling), split your front sections in two vertically. Run your fingers through the section closest to the bun/chignon, wrap it over to the opposite side and secure it into the bun using pins. If you feel it’s getting frizzy as you’re preparing, add more oil or cream to the hair. Create your desired wrap effect and if you have any excess hair, pin and hide into your bun. I always find it looks nicer to leave out some hair to show off the curls. Curly hair doesn’t have to be sleek; it looks great in its natural state. Repeat on the other side, leaving the section closest to your face loose for your plait. Plait each front section, then wrap the plait over to the opposite side of the bun and secure using pins to complete the wrap effect.

Step one When you’re working with naturally curly hair, be soft and loose – you don’t want to brush it, you want to work with the natural curl. Start by smoothing your hair; we tend to use TIGI After Party, but any good smoothing cream works. Then section the hair off into three parts, from the crown area down to the ear on both sides.

Step four Create a plait with the last section and use oil to keep it from going fluffy. It doesn’t matter how tight you braid as you will slowly loosen it with your fingers and thumbs afterwards. Take that plait and do exactly the same as you did in step three – wrap and pin it into your bun. Grab any excess hair and pin down into the bun. If you have nice hair accessories, get them involved!

Step two Tie the back part of the sectioned hair into a bun, creating a chignon shape. Pin the bun into place and to hide the excess curls/leftover hair, pin back into the bun and your hair. Grab the side of the bun and pins inside and loosen slightly to create a bit of structure in your bun. Add a few more pins along where the hair band is to make sure it all stays in place and if you feel like it’s too full, get the bottom part of the bun and ball it inside. Once you’re happy with your chignon structure, you’ll be ready for the next step.

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Step five Curly hair tends to get fluffy over time so I usually use TIGI Headrush or Maxxed-Out hair spray to hold. Lightly spritz on hair and with a pin, smooth some of the bits down. Finish with shine spray – well, it is Christmas after all...


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HAIR

The Audrey Hepburn I call this hairstyle the Audrey Hepburn (with a modern twist). It looks elaborate but it’s a very easy and a fun party look that shouldn’t take you longer than 20 minutes. It’s also really flexible – you can have your hair all smooth, with a plait or twist. You will need a hair donut, hairbrush, hairspray, pins or grips, and accessories. TIP: It’s always best to use the donut which is the same colour as the hair as it’s easier for you to hide. On this occasion we’re going one shade lighter to show you how you can achieve this look at home. You can use any size donut, and you can also put two donuts on top of each other to give it more height.

Step three Take sections as thick as you want; I find eighths tends to work better but you can play around with it, each time brushing the hair through from roots to ends with hairspray on the brush. It’s really quick; you can even do it in four sections. TIP: The more sections you take, the more dramatic the look. Also make sure your hair is very firm so that the bit coming out from the nape does not sag.

Step one From the crown area, take square sections approximately the same width as the donut. Starting with the section closest to the crown, backcomb your hair to the root and slip the hair through the donut, pressing firmly onto your head. Put your grip in the base and secure firmly. Do this all the way around the donut. The pins go into the backcombing at the root, to keep the donut firm but comfortable.

Step four The ends create a great, textured look if not wrapped around neatly. To give it a twist, plait one of the sections and grip into the donut. For a party feel, we’re adding a lot of texture.

Step five Step two Spray some hairspray onto your brush, wait for it to dry slightly, comb the top layer to cover the backcombing and wrap around the donut, leaving a nice twist at the side to pin and secure into the donut. Spraying on your hairbrush not only avoids waste, but also helps stop the hair from stiffening and smooths stray hair.

To create height, backcomb the front using the hair left, spray the brush and smooth the top to create movement. Using any leftover stray ends, backcomb with your fingers. For a festive look, add accessories. We incorporated a bit of ivy from the garden – it grows everywhere! • hobbs-style.co.uk

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BEAUTY

LA DOLCE VITA... The Bristol Magazine makes a beeline for the brand new Charlotte Tilbury counter at John Lewis and discovers some seriously sweet looks for party season

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ejoice, if you’re mad about make-up – because there’s a new Mecca in town, at The Mall at Cribbs Causeway. The ‘Town Square’, as the recently revamped beauty area at John Lewis has been dubbed, now features the likes of Urban Decay, Marc Jacobs Beauty and Charlotte Tilbury, and plenty more. Professional make-up artist and celeb favourite for 25 years, having worked with top photographers, models and stars – think everyone from Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz to Cara Delevingne, Natalie Portman and Naomi Campbell – Charlotte Tilbury started her own make-up brand in 2013, and it’s her new Bristol counter we’ve come to visit. Looking every inch the Hollywood-endorsed operation with bright lamps outlining its displays, it’s a slick addition to the Town Square. While products can, of course, be bought separately, they are helpfully arranged in complete sets, as part of individual looks with their own carefully compiled profiles, such as ‘The Rock Chick’ (“Glastonbury, leather jackets and lots of kohl”); The Golden Goddess (“Ibiza, St Tropez, Miami, Goa; all you need is a sweep of bronze”); and ‘The Ingénue’ (“Coachella, cut-off denim, fresh, dewy skin”). For anyone who struggles to figure out which blush goes best with which lip colour or eye shadow – yep, that’ll be us – having that bit of extra guidance and some suggested looks means you really can’t go too far wrong, especially with everything from soft and subtle daytime looks to more dialled-up drama – which happens to be exactly what we’re after. Keen to ensure the ultimate entrance for our first winter party of the season, we go for ‘The Dolce Vita’ – illustrated by a smouldering model with sultry, smokey eyes and an enviable glow. First, make-up artist Lucinda spritzes us with some of Charlotte’s new ‘mind-altering fleurotic’ fragrance, Scent of a Dream – which she’s got old pal Kate Moss, no less, fronting for her – before beginning to demonstate our chosen look on willing model Louise. After removing any traces of existing make-up with a sweep of Take It All Off – an oil-rich, two-toned cleanser with an organic cornflower water base – and preparing the skin with a ‘glow balm’ comprising buckthorn and cranberry seed oil, as well as Charlotte Tilbury’s backstage favourite Magic Cream, it’s time to create the desired complexion. It’s a four-step process featuring the collagen-boosting Magic Foundation; a little concealer; a finishing powder designed to give an airbrushed effect; and the Filmstar Bronze & Glow – all of which glide on and provide a smooth canvas for what comes next. For the Dolce Vita look, that means the even Ecstasy blusher, a bit of the velvety Pillowtalk lip liner, followed by Penelope Pink lippy and a smear of Charlotte’s creamily luxe high-gloss lacquer, Seduction. Then of course, there are the signature eyes – achieved with kohl pencil, a shodõ pen for the coveted perfect feline flick and the Dolce eyeshadow palette (designed to be applied in order of: prime, enhance, smoke and pop). Having finished off this particular set of smouldering peepers with a few strokes of Full Fat Lashes Mascara, which promises to deliver a ‘three-dimensional flutter’, Lucinda frames them with the triangularshaped brow cream-pencil Brooke S (many of the products are named after Charlotte’s favourite Hollywood legends). While the look would definitely work a treat for a festive party, it’s not so ridiculously dramatic that Louise is embarrassed to leave the counter while it’s still daylight – it enhances the natural features, and the bronzers, specially formulated without any of the orange pigments usually abundant, seem to sculpt the face more subtly. Louise comments on how, despite being in a bustling department store, the experience is surprisingly relaxing and therapeutic, and is later very excited to learn that once you’ve booked in to have a full look applied for £35, this is then redeemable against any products purchased after. Bonus! ■ • charlottetilbury.com; johnlewis.com 76 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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Products are helpfully arranged in complete looks but can be bought separately


EF Medispa fp.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2016 11:30 Page 1

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+ receive a FREE bespoke mini facial of your choice


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CARLO hair& beauty M

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ANTI-AGING SKINCARE QUIZ How much do you know about the impact of food on how our skin ages? Find out in this challenging quiz from CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine).

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hink ‘anti-ageing skincare’ and most people picture expensive lotions and potions. In fact, having radiant skin which stands the test of time, can start with what we eat. Find out how much you know by ticking what you think are the correct answers to the following 10 questions, then compare them with the answers given at the end.

1. Eating which of these foods can best help keep wrinkles at bay? a) avocado b) pasta c) kale

2. Collagen supports skin structure and reduces sagging. What nutrient is especially critical for collagen formation: a) vitamin C b) vitamin K c) vitamin D 3. How does sugar damage skin in the long term? a) it doesn’t negatively affect skin b) it increases AGEs (advanced glycation end products) that damage collagen fibres c) it dries out our skin by causing shrinkage of cellular membranes

4. Which of the below is the best source of zinc to keep spots and acne at bay? a) pumpkin seeds b) spinach c) apples

10. Apart from eating a healthy diet, what else can you do to a promote a youthful complexion: a) drink filtered water b) minimise toxic ingredients in food, skincare, and other products c) exercise d) all of the above

5. What macronutrient is especially responsible for the ‘building blocks’ that keep our skin strong: a) fat b) protein c) carbohydrate

Award yourself one point for every answer you gave that matches the correct answers here: 1a; 2a; 3b; 4a; 5b; 6b; 7a; 8a; 9d; 10d.

6. Antioxidants, found especially in veg and fruit, are vital for skin integrity. Which of the following nutrient groups provides the antioxidants best known for helping to give your skin a healthy glow? a) vitamin K, C and B5 b) vitamin C, E and A c) vitamin A, D and K

Whatever your score, we can all benefit from understanding more about the impact of nutrition, not only on our skin, but on every aspect of long term health. You can gain practical tips for better health and wellbeing, at CNM’s special one weekend ‘Food for Health’ course in Bristol on 21st and 22nd January, £65. See CNM’s website for details.

7. Which of the following food sources is considered a ‘beauty food’ due to having both a high omega-3 (fatty acid) profile and protein content? a) salmon b) chicken c) lamb

Wishing you a happy and healthy 2017!

Attend a FREE Open Evening

8. Which of the following foods is considered a plant-based form of essential fatty acids: a) walnuts b) hazelnuts c) almonds 9. a) b) c) d)

Geoffwith Don to find out about part time training CNM Bristol for a career in Naturopathic Nutrition or Naturopathic Acupuncture.

Skin flare ups can be caused through: hormonal or digestive imbalances food allergies leaky gut all of the above

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 79


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Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital reveals length-of-stay down over a third

Patients undergoing total hip and knee replacements at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield are getting back on their feet and back home far quicker than ever before, new data show.

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he length-of-stay in hospital has declined by more than 40 per cent over the past decade, from an average six night stay in 2006 to just three-and-a-half nights in 2015. Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital has been performing orthopaedic surgery for over fifty years and in 2015 helped to improve the lives of more than 1,000 patients through orthopaedic interventions. Mr Nick Howells, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, said: “In Bristol we see patients with all sorts of conditions each year; people with arthritis following sports injuries and those who have developed painful joints due to osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or other less common joint problems. The types 80 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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of treatments we’re able to provide have evolved dramatically from a generation ago.” To support recovery, Nuffield Health’s Bristol Hospital and Fitness & Wellbeing gym last year introduced launch Recovery Plus, a unique programme designed to improve longterm fitness and wellbeing for surgical patients, including those who have undergone hip and knee replacement. Over 150 people have benefitted from the combination of personalised and focused rehabilitation, nutrition and exercise. Mr Howells continued: “Many patients who come in for surgery have been living with reduced fitness and mobility and are often suffering from related illness like obesity or

high blood pressure. Recovery Plus provides a stepping stone from hospital to help people get back to their daily routine, as well as helping to prevent future hospital visits by increasing their overall fitness and wellbeing.”

Recovery Plus gives knee replacement patient new lease of life Angela Morris (64) was initially daunted by the prospect of having both knees replaced but Nuffield Health’s ‘Recovery Plus’ programme soon had her back on track – and now the gym devotee is rarely off it! When joint pain developed into arthritis, Angela Morris, a computer software trainer


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from Yatton, decided to have both of her knees replaced at Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield, in Clifton. Her right knee was replaced first, in August 2015, followed by her left knee in February of this year. Angela explains: “When I had my right knee replaced, I was recommended to make use of Recovery Plus, a complimentary three-month rehabilitation programme offered to all Orthopaedic patients by Nuffield Health. I am so glad I did. I needed the speedy recovery of my right knee because my left knee also required replacement.

I became progressively fitter and stronger.

You don’t have to lose much to make a big difference. For example, when you walk up or down a flight of stairs, the load on your knees is roughly seven times your body weight. If you’re overweight, that adds up very quickly. But losing just one stone will take around seven stone off your knee joint with every step.

“One of the high points was joining weekly circuit training sessions led by Hannah. Quite a few of us had bad knees, backs, wrists, shoulders etc and Hannah managed to remember who suffered from what and suggest variations on each of the exercises tailored to our individual needs.

2. Strengthen your joints with exercise - but take it easy

At the end of the programme, I was so inspired to maintain my new-found fitness that I signed up for a 12 month gym membership and now I go at least four times a week!”

Excessive exercise can cause your joints to wear out prematurely. Many elite sports men and women find they have problems with their joints earlier in life than less active people but that shouldn't put you off exercise.

Angela Morris

The benefits of regular exercise far outweigh the negatives. Building strong, flexible muscle around your hips and knees will ensure joints don’t have to do all the work by themselves. Gentle exercise and stretches focused on your hips and knees can make a big difference to your ability to avoid and recover from injury and reduce wear and tear.

3. Eat well - oils, vitamin E, antioxidants Like a machine with moving parts, our body needs oil to keep joints lubricated and healthy. Eat oily fish rich in omega-3 fats like salmon and mackerel 2-4 times a week. Omega-3 has been linked to reduced joint pain and morning stiffness.

“The Recovery Plus programme started as soon as I’d been discharged from physiotherapy. I was paired up with a personal trainer who assessed me and then devised a set of activities, both in the gym and the pool, tailored to my specific needs and ability. I visited the gym twice a week and the workouts were reviewed regularly in line with my progress. I then had another assessment at the end of the programme so I could see how far I’d come.

Vitamin E has anti-inflammatory properties and healthy levels have been linked to lower risk of joint and bone cell damage. You’ll get plenty by adding avocado, sunflower seeds, nuts and even lobster to your diet.

Expert tips for healthy knees and hips from Nuffield Health

Antioxidants are thought to slow the progression of arthritis inflammation. They’re found in brightly-coloured berries, blueberries are particularly rich in antioxidants.

Wear and tear can happen naturally over time and in some cases surgery, including hip replacements and knee replacements, may be the best course of action. But there are things you can do to reduce your risk of osteoarthritis and ensure your knees and hips function well for many years to come.

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, The Chesterfield is a centre of excellence for orthopaedic surgery. To learn more, or to book a consultation with one of our surgeons please call 0117 405 8978 or visit nuffieldhealth.com/ hospitals/bristol for more information

1. Lighten the load “Recovery Plus not only helped to speed my recovery but also prepared me for the second operation. I was in much better physical shape three months later when my left knee was replaced! As soon as I was able to, I embarked on a second Recovery Plus programme. I had the same personal trainer – a lovely lady called Danni Mohan – and was able to expand my activities to include some fitness classes which I achieved by attending the gym three times a week. “Danni and the team at Nuffield Health really helped me. My balance was very bad at first and I needed lots of reassurance. They encouraged me to push myself so that

There are many good reasons to lose weight and looking after your joints is one of them. Hips and knees are load-bearing joints. The heavier you are, the more load they have to bear and the faster they’ll wear out.

Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital The Chesterfield, 3 Clifton Hill, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1BN Tel: 0117 405 8978 • www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

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WALK | THE WALK

WINTER AT WOODCHESTER A haunted Gothic mansion, ornamental lakes and panoramic views make Andrew Swift’s walk of choice for December

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his month, as winter gets into its stride, we head north to Woodchester, in the Cotswolds, for a walk all the family can enjoy – with a play trail for children, deep woods for dogs to explore, spectacular views through increasingly leafless branches and – perhaps most important – well-maintained paths so that you don’t have to splash and slide around in too many muddy puddles. When the National Trust took over the 500-acre estate at Woodchester in 1994, it had lain undisturbed, apart from sporadic tree felling, for over a century. Hidden in its fastnesses was a vast Gothic mansion, abandoned in 1873 when only partially completed. It is reputed to be one of the most haunted buildings in the country and is home to a

nationally important colony of bats. Since then, the National Trust, aided by an army of volunteers, has transformed Woodchester Park from a tangled wilderness to one of the most popular family destinations in the Cotswolds. The steep-sided valley in which it lies, with a chain of ornamental lakes stretching for over a mile and a quarter, is a delight at any time of year, while hidden tracks, winding high into the woods on either side, lead to panoramic viewpoints created in the 18th century. The play trail at the head of the valley, with beams, bridges, rope swings, musical logs, a zip wire and climbing frames – not to mention a hopscotch court and a rustic seesaw – is also justly popular, not least for its woodland setting, with slopes shelving off precipitously below. Woodchester offers a choice of walks, varying in distance and geared to a range of abilities. If you want to take in the whole park, you are looking at a strenuous walk of over four hours, with some muddy fields en route. The walk described below is far less ambitious and only offers a taste of what Woodchester has to offer. Hopefully, though, having discovered its charms, you will, like many others, return again and again to explore further, and – if you return in summer – to take a look inside the mansion, now cared for by a private trust.

Directions Although not easy to find – and satnavs, I am told, are likely to lead you astray – the following is a relatively straightforward way to get to Woodchester Park. ● Head west from Bristol along the M4, leave at Junction 18 and head north on the A46. After 12 miles, turn left at traffic lights along the A4135. After 2 miles, turn right (signposted to Nympsfield and Frocester). At a T junction, turn right along the B4058. Keep straight on 84 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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This page: Imposing Woodchester Mansion; see if you can spot its gargoyles Opposite page: Lakeside views will reward those prepared to walk a little further


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along this road (ignoring a turning where the B4058 bears right, as well as side roads into Nympsfield village) and after 2.5 miles, at a T junction, turn right along the B4066. After two-thirds of a mile you will see a turning on the right to Woodchester Park. The entrance to the car park (SO799014) is around 300m down this road on the left. Head down the steps from the car park to a broad track where, as a taster for the play trail, you will see a tree trunk bridging a deep gully. Turn right down the track and after 300m, take a track branching up to the left. This leads past an old quarry where beams and tree trunks mark the start of the play trail. As you continue to climb through beech woods, with sheer drops on your right, you pass rope swings, a zip wire, musical logs and a viewpoint with a bench. Follow the path as it curves steeply downhill, following a blue arrow down past a hopscotch court to a seesaw. If you want to head back at this point, turn right, follow the drive past the back of the mansion and continue uphill. Otherwise, turn left to follow the path as it curves round the head of dry valley, with an old icehouse hidden in the undergrowth and a blue tarpaulin covering the remains of an 18th-century temple. Future restoration plans include the reinstatement of the terraced gardens laid out here in the 19th century. At the head of the valley, don’t take a path forking left uphill, but carry on as the main path curves right. After 250m, follow the path as it curves right through a gate and carry on to a T junction. If you want to explore more of the park, bear left to head down the valley past the first of a chain of lakes. You could spend hours exploring the network of paths that lie ahead, and it is impossible to get lost – once you have had enough, just turn round and head back up the valley and you will eventually return to this spot. To head back from here, however, turn right to see Woodchester Mansion in all its forlorn glory ahead. After going through a gate, the path curves round to the mansion, from where a drive leads back to the car park. ■

At a glance... ■

Length: 2.5 miles (with optional extensions)

Approximate time: 1.5 hours

Level of difficulty: Straightforward, although the paths in the first part of the walk are very steep in places

Map: OS Explorer 168

General info: Dogs allowed off the lead in woodland, but need to be controlled where there are sheep. Woodchester Park is open daily from dawn to dusk; nationaltrust.org.uk/woodchester-park

Parking: The NT car park costs £3, but is free to NT members

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#INSTAHOME Katherine Ogilvie shares one of her greatest sources for interior design inspiration and tells us why it influences her on a daily basis...

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ave you ever picked up an interiors magazine or watched an interior design programme on TV and longed to live in or, at least, recreate one of these beautifully showcased homes for yourself – then quickly shaken yourself out of your reverie once you remembered the necessary budget, time and expertise it would take to achieve? Well – I don't know if you've noticed – but there's a new interior design forum that does a lot of the research for you, giving you limitless inspiration and making freshening up your home a little easier. It's called Instagram. If you are anything like I was around a year or so ago (when I thought a hash tag must just be some sort of illegal game of chase) you might be thinking: “Isn’t that just something that kids use to post selfies and photos of what they’ve eaten for dinner?” But, just like I was, you would be wrong: Instagram recently announced that more than 500 million people now use its photo-sharing service, making it one of the fastest growing social networks of all time. More than 95 million images and videos are shared every single day, and among all those hipster food shots, and photos of Selena Gomez (with over 100 million followers, she has the most popular Instagram account), there are also millions of posts solely dedicated to interior design. Boho, monochrome, Scandi, mid-century modern, Cali, industrial – whatever your taste, there’s something for every devoted design addict, and a host of Instagrammers who spend their days posting inspiring images. But that’s not even the best part: now, when you see a photo of a room featuring something that you absolutely love, there’s no need to go trawling stores for a copycat product – you can just ‘like’, comment, and ask a designer or seller directly. Photographer Pati Robins (@patirobins) and her prints are a prime example. “I sold my work for a few years before joining Instagram, but it definitely brought more opportunities and customers,” she says. “Seeing your own work in people’s homes, styled in a different way, is truly amazing and the Instagram community is very supportive.” Creative lighting designer Emma Krause from Light up North (@light_up_north), which specialises in bespoke neon lighting, agrees. She only started her business this spring but has already seen the benefits of sharing on the platform: “We use Instagram to demonstrate our skills and find it an instant way to communicate with customers right through the design process,” she says. Meanwhile, the advantage to you and I is that we get to learn about great independent start-up shops like theirs and have a direct conversation with them. 86 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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For me, the best thing about the world of Insta-interiors is being able to follow the accounts of people from all over the world, who have a style you love. If you have any questions about their home or style, you can just comment on an image and they will, most likely, get back to you with everything you want to know. I’ve found the Instagram community to be a super-friendly lot, although this, by the way, can also be a downside – you may find yourself pulled so far into the Insta-fam that soon, like me, you have your real family moaning that you spend far too much time with them! Here is a list of my own favourite Instagrammers who inspire me every day – take a look...

@marciekdesigns In our own backyard is artist Marcie, who styles up any room with colour, panache and a touch of pink. Meet her in person at her market stall in Stokes Croft.

@lou­_a_watkins “The 1930s drift into mid-century, then bump into the ’70s, and they all hang out together in a vintage meets modern mix,” is how fellow Bristolian Lou describes her style. I head here for the wittiest banter on Instagram and her huge knowledge of art and vintage finds.

@lmalyondraws Lisa Malyon is a Bristol artist specialising in contemporary architectural illustrations featuring Bristol and beyond. Aside from her fantastic prints, check out her hand-drawn lampshades. Gorgeous and unique.

@dig_haushizzle We are so lucky to have this unique decorative antique and interior shop in Bristol. The owners, Cassandra and Edward, buy only what they love themselves and post inspiring photos of their stock on Instagram.

@newiconsofprint An Instagram fairytale if ever you heard one. This Bristol-based company (which sells amazing original typography and photographic prints) was started by Mellony and Becky – who connected via Instagram and started their business before they actually met in person.


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INTERIORS

@cowboykate_ Kate’s dark, eclectic, laidback, boho glam will have you racing to the shops to re-paint your home. She also sells beautiful sheepskin hides.

@archer.t.j Tina Archer is addicted to the dark side of interiors – you’ll be hardpressed to find anyone who does ‘quirky bits’ better.

@lucy_makemeloved A self-proclaimed interior junkie who mixes dark and light interiors effortlessly. The only problem with following her is that each time she posts something you feel compelled to recreate it immediately.

@deecampling Obsessed with neutral colours mixed with natural textures, and a lover of fairy lights and tea – better pour yourself a cup to give you time to soak up her cool styling ideas.

@aboutthishaus What she doesn’t know about Scandi isn’t worth knowing. Her posts are beautifully photographed and she’s lovely to chat to, to boot!

@kerrylockwood It’s all about the detail with Kerry. Head to her account for styling touches that will help you create a home you never want to leave.

@_lisa_dawson_ This vintage devotee is a goldmine for inspirational home touches (and you’re certain to contract a major case of room envy).

@artyhomestudio My kindred spirit on many things interior. Aside from having great tastes, she is the queen of colour, shelfies and anything you want to know about plants.

@artynads This artist and design lover can style up a vignette like nobody’s business. If you don’t rush out to buy some blackboard paint and chalk after viewing her posts, I’d be highly surprised.

@2littleoneslondon She calls her style Scandinavian modern meets French bistro, with touches of industrial chic – I just call it awesome. ■ • See Katherine's daily interior posts and weekly post on her favourite independent interiors shops on Instagram @katherine.ogilvie. Or contact her via bs9interiordesign.com for her affordable design services.

Katherine is inspired daily by her Insta-fam, including photographer Pati Robins – we spotted one of her prints on the shelves here

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PROPERTY | PICK

Through the keyhole... Introducing Clifton Lodge: an appealing five-bedroom Victorian townhouse enjoying an elevated position, sweeping skyline vistas, and an enviable balcony

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fter entering Clifton Lodge at 37 Upper Belgrave Road – via a Victorian-style, open-fronted porch with a stained glass canopy, you’ll find yourself in a hall with an ornate ceiling arch and elegant carved staircase both ascending to the first floor and descending to the lower ground floor. Choose to stay on the ground floor, and you’ll come across the drawing room – a fine dual aspect principal reception room with charming bay and sash windows with far-reaching city views, a period fireplace with a coal-effect gas fire, cast iron surround, slate hearth and Carrera mantelpiece – plus a separate WC and a utility room. Then there’s one of our favourite spaces in this property – bright, well-proportioned and loosely divided into a dining area as well as a bespoke kitchen by The Kitchen Man of Clifton Village. The latter features solid oak flooring, pelmet lighting and inset ceiling downlighters, and is fitted with an array of shaker-style units, granite worktops, undermount double sink and appliances including a Falcon range cooker, eye-level microwave/oven, dishwasher, fridge/freezer and an additional fridge unit. Meanwhile, the dining area lays claim to an ornate cast iron fireplace with slate hearth, and double-glazed double doors opening out onto a balcony that has this year been reconstructed with hardwood flooring and balustrading, and offers plenty of room for your garden furniture. Head down to the lower ground floor and find a handy wine cellar, plus a bedroom overlooking the rear garden; while if you head up to the first floor, you’ll see a master 88 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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bedroom with en-suite shower room and sash windows with stained glass. Go up again, to the second floor, and three further bedrooms await, via a part-galleried landing with skylight window. Each has panoramic views taking in various landmarks across the city, and is served by a bathroom with a ‘P’-shaped bath and wall-mounted electric shower with handheld attachment, in addition to a separate WC – we bet that proves useful when it comes to those early morning queues. Outside, there’s a front garden which is easily maintained, with dwarf stone wall, wrought iron balustrading and steps descending to a lower sunken courtyard where there’s a useful barrelled ceiling storage area. Meanwhile, the back garden enjoys a sunny south-easterly aspect and timber decking – which means its also easy to keep up together if, like us, time is the commodity you have least of – plus there’s a cute garden pond, uplighters, and ample space for barbecuing in the warmer months. Ideal. n

PROPERTY PROFILE Guide price: £1,000,000 Agent: Richard Harding, 124 Whiteladies Rd, BS8 2RP Contact: 0117 946 6690; richardharding.co.uk

Main image: It’s wonderful to look out over the sun-lit decking with a steaming hot cuppa in winter months, or barbecue on it when the warmer seasons roll round Opposite page, clockwise from top: Gorgeous contemporary reception spaces; the bright and roomy kitchen/dining area; one of the spacious bedrooms; the property’s classic exterior


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PROPERTY | PICK

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GARDENING

WILLOW WONDERLAND Margaux Speirs recommends getting into the spirit of the season by creating your own Christmassy garden decoration

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o get us into a festive frame of mind, a friend and I have signed up to make a willow reindeer at the Bristol Adult Education Centre in Stoke Bishop. My reindeer may not look like this one but, having invested a few hours in making it, I shall be very proud to show it off, lit up with fairy lights, on my balcony over Christmas. The class tutor, Sarah Jayne Edwards, takes adult pupils throughout the year on all sorts of willow-making workshops: after the last Natural Christmas Decoration Workshop on 10 December, the next one is on making a life-size urban fox as a piece of garden art. From 2 to 24 December, you can see some of her art on display at the St Nicholas Christmas Market near Corn Street, where she was commissioned to make two giant reindeer, a couple of wolves, some owls and a woven willow tree at the gateway to the enchanted winter garden. Between January and April she also makes living willow sculptures so, for example, she will lead a team of volunteers to plant a growing play house and tunnel for Lantern Pre-School at Redland Parish halls in February. You can find out more about her workshops and commissions by contacting Sarah on hello@sarahjaynegardens.co.uk. The willow for her work is sourced from Musgrove Willows, near Bridgwater in Somerset. In the warmer months, you can enjoy a visit to this third-generation family business, walk through the ‘withy beds’, see willow being processed in the sorting and stripping shed, and watch craftsmen at work making baskets, fencing and coffins – their busiest product line. On their 100-acre farm they grow over 60 willow varieties and the range of colours is astonishing. For the reindeer (or any structure which is to be left outside) you need to buy willow with its bark still on. For it to be flexible enough to weave, it has to be soaked for at least a week – so assuming you are not giving up your bath tub for this long, you will need to buy a willow soaking bag. Between January and April, green willow is available to buy which is sufficiently pliable to use without pre-soaking (and it is this willow which is used for living sculptures as the twigs are so full of latent life, they will grow almost as soon as they meet wet soil). You could try making a willow sculpture by buying the willow yourself and using internet tutorials. A one-metre reindeer takes about £15 of materials (5 kilos of 5-6ft stems) and will take you about half a day to make. However, I think a group class is both more fun and successful: you and your friends (adults or teenagers) could have a half day or full day class tailored for you by Sarah Edwards or the in-house teachers at Musgrove Willow, so together you could make a whole flock of geese,

PLANT OF THE MONTH: We won’t expect to see pussy willow catkins for another couple of months but another fun catkin bearer which makes a great impact in a December garden is the corkscrew witch hazel (Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’). This is a rather eccentric-looking shrub whose twigs and branches spiral and twist in weird profusion but in midwinter, when its catkins are beginning to form and the frost makes it sparkle, it is a wonder to behold. Once the leaves appear, you hardly notice its twisted branches but in December it is a personal favourite and also beloved of flower arrangers. Happy in any soil, sun or part-shade, it is easy to grow but needs a large space about 4.5m high and wide. Its added bonus is edible nuts in autumn.

herd of deer or sty of piglets, while laughing, chatting and learning. Apart from willows grown for weaving, there are all sorts of that make great garden plants. Stately weeping willow trees (e.g. Salix x sepulcralis var. chrysocoma) can be grown as large ornamental trees in damp gardens (especially water sides). The coloured stems of Salix alba ‘Britzenesis’ (also known as ‘Chermesina’) are invaluable in winter, particularly when pruned heavily every spring, as it is the young stems which are fiery orange. If you have space for two of these, you can alternate annual coppicing so that one bears gorgeous fluffy catkins every spring, while the other puts on its winter fire show. Coppicing them this way keeps them at about 2 metres, which is manageable in a small garden, whereas left alone, they would reach a height of 25 metres. In a very small garden Salix caprea ‘Kilmarnock’ is a good choice as it only grows to about 2m tall and wide; a weeping pussy willow, it bears cascades of powder puff catkins with bright yellow anthers in early spring. Salix alba ‘Sericea’ is a small silver-leaved tree which as nature intended, would grow to about 15m, but which can be pruned back to 30cm (1ft) above the ground each spring or alternate spring before coming into leaf – in order to limit its size and encourage it to produce vigorous upright stems with intensely silver leaves. There is even a rockery size willow, Salix lanata, growing to about 1.2m (4ft). This variety has broad, woolly leaves, silver grey and lovely yellow anthered catkins. All willows need fairly damp soil but this dwarf species is more tolerant than others of quite dry soil. One important thing to note about willows is that the majority are dioecious – that is, they bear male and female flowers on different trees. As the female catkins are less conspicuous, normally grey or green, but the male catkins ripen to showy yellow balls of fluff, you should choose males for your ornamental trees and shrubs. Chew Valley Trees has a good selection of willows and their website is really helpful in describing the growing conditions the trees need to thrive. n • Margaux Speirs is a qualified garden designer and runs her business, Margaux Speirs Garden Design, from her home in Bristol. For further information, visit her website, margauxspeirsgardendesign.co.uk, or telephone 07903 779910 THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

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BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

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toke Park Road South is a private no through road comprising a number of detached family homes varying in age and architectural style set in established and mature gardens. The property was designed in 1998 to provide light and spacious living and the ability to extend the accommodation if required. The house is on two floors with a large entrance hall with useful for storage for the family paraphernalia. The drawing room has a triple aspect with STUV wood burning stove and French doors leading to the terrace and gardens. There is also access to the study area which has plenty of storage and views of the garden. The sleek and practical kitchen/breakfast/sitting room also has French doors leading outside and the ground floor extends further to a utility room, office, cloakroom and integral double garage. This is where the opportunity to extend the living accommodation comes in, as the garage could be converted subject to consents. Upstairs yet another study area on the first floor landing could head off teenage arguments over space and there is a master bedroom with en suite bathroom and walk in cupboard, a guest bedroom also with en suite, three further bedrooms and a family bathroom. The house is set in level, lawned gardens enclosed by mature hedging and fencing. There are a number of beautiful trees and a large terrace for family dining and entertaining. Number 6 offers the perfect modern home for the family to grow and spread out. Viewing and full particulars are available from Knight Frank Clifton.

SNEYD PARK BRISTOL

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999

Guide price £1,500,000

THEBRISTOLMAG.CO.UK

• Five bedroom modern family home • Possibility to further extend living accommodation • Large, level gardens • Family bathroom plus two en suite bathrooms • Office plus two further study areas.

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THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE 93


Be inspired with office space at the Old Brewery The Old Brewery in Pill offers a dynamic workplace environment and the opportunity to occupy contemporary office space within historic buildings that were last used for brewing beer in 1912. Set in a popular office park, the Old Brewery Business Park has been the subject of a high quality conversion with the buildings having been sympathetically converted to provide modern airy architecture, whilst retaining elements of the buildings historic past. The Distillery totals 6,380 sq ft and offers studio style office accommodation in a historic building with many charming features such as exposed beams and feature brick archways.

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For today’s office occupier, The Distillery offers the best of both worlds – a character building with all the comforts of a modern office to include passenger lift, raised access floors, comfort cooling and heating and shower facilities. There is also good onsite car parking. Finola Ingham, Associate Director of Burston Cook comments “The business park has excellent transport links being located approximately 1 mile from Junction 19 of the M5 and Clifton only a short drive away”. Finola also comments “The rent we are quoting is competitive and for occupiers seeking statement offices with all the modern amenities, we would encourage you to view the building with us”. For further details please contact the joint agents GVA, or Finola Ingham at Burston Cook on 0117 9349977.

(0117) 934 9977 www.burstoncook.co.uk Burston Cook December 2.indd 1

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OFFICES –

(0117) 934 9977

PRIME OFFICES

CLIFTON VILLAGE

• Portis Fields, Portishead

• Shop to rent • Fitted as a hair salon

• C 1,000 sq ft • New lease

• 4 car spaces

• Only £9,000 pax

• Rent - £13.95 psf

66 PARK STREET, BS1

CLIFTON VILLAGE

• Prime shop unit

• D1 Medical use

• 1,941 sq ft sales

• Fully fitted out to a high standard

• Excellent footfall

• New lease - £14,500 pax • Also suit shop use

• New lease ZETLAND ROAD SHOP • Busy trading location

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L SO

• Prime city centre

• New lease

• 2,014 sq ft

• Only £9,750

• Guide £350,000 THE DISTILLERY

WESTBURY MEWS, WESTBURY ON TRYM

• An amazing high specification office building

• Mews offices • 1,184 sq ft

• studio style open plan space

• New flexible lease

• 6,380 sq ft

• Only £12.50 psf CLIFTON OFFICES TO LET

NORTH ROAD, BISHOPSTON

• Light and airy office suite

• 3,875 sq ft office building - Mainly open plan • To be refurbished • New flexible lease – low rent.

• 737 sq ft • Only £8,500 pax • Flexible short lease

FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Burston Cook December 2.indd 3

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

FOR SALE – INVESTMENT OR OCCUPIER • Superb studio offices

• 415 sq ft shop

Julian Cook

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte BA Hons

• Sales / Lettings • Acquisitions • Valuations • Landlord & tenant • Auction Sales

• Rent reviews • Property Management • Investment Sales / Purchase • Development & Planning • Dilapidations Advice

23/11/2016 13:53


BURSTON COOK

A Life For A Cure Meningitus Appeal “Huge thanks to Burston Cook for their continued support and generosity” – Michelle Bresnahan (founder)

400 miles in 4 days! Julian Cook will dig out his bike in 2017 targeting £5,000 for local Charities

Congratulations to Charlie Kershaw on his promotion this year to Associate Director

Clifton’s largest occupational sale comprising 11,000 sq ft HQ to Studio Six handled by Burston Cook Supporting Bristol’s Dino Zamparelli in this years Porsche Carrera Cup

Julian Cook FRICS

Jayne Rixon MRICS

Burston Cook December 2.indd 4

Charlie Kershaw MRICS

Finola Ingham MRICS

Tom Coyte BA Hons

• • • • •

Sales / Lettings Acquisitions Valuations Landlord & tenant Auction Sales

• • • • •

Rent reviews Property Management Investment Sales / Purchase Development & Planning Dilapidations Advice

23/11/2016 13:54


A LOOK BACK AT 2016 EGI AWARDS WINNERS... In this years awards ceremony Finola was announced as Bristol’s most active commercial property deal maker - The team have now held the award for 3 years!

D . L . . n SO llio

i m £33

£33 million worth of freehold transactions negotiated by us so far in 2016

Celebrating Bristol Rugby’s return to the English Premiership. ‘Proud to support Bristol Rugby’

Helping Clifton Celebrate 2016 Tour of Britain by contributing towards the Big Screen Event

THANKS TO ALL FROM BURSTON COOK AND BEST WISHES FOR 2017 Burston Cook December 2.indd 5

23/11/2016 13:54


P98.qxp_Layout 23 24/11/2016 12:03 Page 49

98 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

|

DECEMBER 2016


OF

ER R

FE

www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 973 4940

LE

£3 MIU E PR

T

OF DER FE R

0 £4 MIU E PR

Commercial Agency

22 Richmond Hill, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 1BA

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

R DE UN FER OF

CLIFTON

£18,500p.a + PREMIUM

0

Well presented and fully fitted restaurant (approx 520sqft) with additional basement kitchen and customer toilets. An assignment of the existing lease is offered with an ingoing premium of £79,950 to include a full inventory*.

CLIFTON

£1,500,000

Opportunity to purchase this substantial three storey commercial property, situated in a prime location on one of Bristol’s best known High Streets. The terraced freehold property comprises a large ground floor restaurant/bar with an independent first and second floor nightclub. Early enquiries are recommended.

CLIFTON

£525,000

Mixed use investment comprising a ground floor takeaway and basement with a large, self contained 3 bedroom first and second floor maisonette fully let producing £33,840 per annum. Early enquiries are recommended.

WESTBURY PARK

£12,500 p.a

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

Very well presented shop of approximately 600sqft with additional rear kitchen, toilet and shower. An assignment of the existing lease is offered with a £10,000 premium given the existing tenants improvements.

Sales & Lettings Urgent requirement for freehold investments throughout Bristol

W ON NE CTI RU T S IN

0

£19,922 p.a

HENLEAZE

Commercial

Large corner commercial premises of just over 1,100sqft currently used as an office benefiting from a retail frontage and additional forecourt. The property is situated just off Kellaway Avenue, Westbury Park within a short distance of Henleaze Road, Coldharbour Road and the Durdham Downs.

UM

W ON NE CTI RU T S IN

Freehold & Leasehold Properties

Industrial/Retail required

Rent Reviews

Licensed Premises & Cafes

Contact us today to arrange a free, no obligation valuation

UM

UM

£12,000 p.a

REDLAND

Corner shop of approximately 400sqft situated in a prime position just off Whiteladies Road. An assignment of the existing Full Repairing and Insuring lease is offered.

T LE ED RE AG

M

IU

0

SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

T LE ED RE AG

YATTON

£175,000

Well presented light industrial unit currently used as offices (approximately 2,395sqft) benefiting from air conditioning and off-street parking to the front. The unit is let to ‘The Costain Group PLC’ at £15,500 per annum on an effectively Full Repairing and Insuring basis.

BRISTOL’S FASTEST GROWING COMMERCIAL AGENT Commercial Team: 0117 973 4940 SI RE MIL A Q UI R RE D

R DE UN FER OF

KINGSDOWN

£11,000 p.a

Well presented top floor office of approximately 910sqft. Offered for let on a new Internal Repairing lease. Rent to include buildings insurance, building maintenance, communal cleaning and business rates.

Estate Agents

ALMONDSBURY

Lettings & Management

Maggs & Allen Commercial December.indd 1

£295,000

Three storey office building of approximately 2,530sqft with the added benefit of 7 allocated parking spaces. Offered for sale with vacant possession the property is situated in a modern complex in Almondsbury, providing easy access to the M32 and A38.

Auctioneers

WESTBURY PARK

£8,500 p.a

Rare opportunity to lease a lock-up shop unit of approximately 350sqft in this very sought after position in Westbury Park. The property benefits from an open plan retail area with rear kitchen and WC as well as use of the front forecourt which would suit parking or possibly a seating area.

W ON NE CTI U TR S IN

CITY CENTRE

£11,055 p.a

Fully fitted city centre café of approximately 775sqft (Gross Internal Area) situated just off St Mary Redcliffe Roundabout in a central position. An assignment of the existing lease is offered with an ingoing premium of £25,000 to include a full inventory.

Commercial Agency

MONTPELIER

£450,000

An exciting opportunity to purchase this unique five storey mixed-use property situated in a prominent position on Cheltenham Road within Bristols creative quarter. The property is currently arranged as an art gallery with studio and workshop space on the ground floor with three floors of light and spacious living accommodation above.

Chartered Surveyors

Land & New Homes

21/11/2016 16:17


Andrews - Bristol - December.qxp_Layout 3 21/11/2016 13:06 Page 1

Clifton Julian Road, Sneyd Park, BS9 ÂŁ440,000

Bishopston Egerton Road, BS7 ÂŁ485,000

Bishopston

The apartment is situated just off Durdham Downs in the popular genteel suburb of Sneyd Park. A spacious three bedroom first floor apartment situated in an attractive Victorian building within a minutes walk of Durdham Downs in desirable Sneyd Park. The property occupies a corner plot and as such enjoys a relatively open aspect affording a bright and airy feel within the flat. Energy Efficiency Rating: F

A fantastic three bedroom home located in a very popular location of Bishopston and within the Redland Green School catchment. This home is brimming with charm and character. Offering a downstairs cloakroom, drawing room, dining room and a contemporary kitchen which was recently fitted and features integrated Neff appliances. There is a family bathroom on the first floor with white three piece suite. The rear garden benefits from lawn, patio and rear access. A truly desirable location. Energy Efficiency Rating: E


Andrews - Bristol - December.qxp_Layout 3 21/11/2016 13:06 Page 2

Yate North Road, Bristol, BS37 7LG £595,000

Fabulous executive family home offers exciting proportions with it’s 4 receptions rooms laid out generously across the ground floor and with the bonus of a double garage with loft storage above, some might see the potential for an annex or a work studio. A stunning kitchen, separate utility room and WC complete the huge footprint of this fantastic home. Upstairs comprises of 4 double bedrooms, en-suite and a family bathroom. Outside there is parking for cars and a rear garden overlooking farmer’s fields. Energy Efficiency Rating: D

Keynsham Chandos Road, Keynsham BS31 £365,000

Located within fantastic access to the train station and other facilities of Keynsham including the shops and Memorial park is where you will find this great family home. The lounge extends into the conservatory giving you an extra reception room to enjoy when entertaining your family and friends. The kitchen/diner is another spacious room giving you access to the utility room and WC. Upstairs there are three bedrooms, bedrooms one and two have feature fireplaces. Energy Efficiency Rating: E

Yate Keynsham


Bristol Property column DEC .qxp_Layout 1 24/11/2016 14:19 Page 1

CITY | BUSINESS

THINKING PROPERTY ROBIN ENGLEY, ASSOCIATE AT KNIGHT FRANK ESTATE AGENTS BRISTOL

QUALITY SOLICITORS

A

s we reach the end the of year, Knight Frank Bristol has time to reflect on a challenging yet positive year which has seen some very turbulent headlines and political changes. Throughout 2016 we have seen changes to stamp duty for second homes, a Brexit vote that many did not see coming and a US president-elect that has caused a number of shock waves both within America and further afield.

The one constant that can be relied on throughout the South West is the shortage of stock. With apartments and family homes selling well throughout the year the demand remains incredibly strong without the stock to facilitate this. With a recent drop in the value of the pound is has also become clear that foreign investors are also clearly attracted to our property market. An overriding feature for many of our transactions here in Clifton is the importance of quality solicitors which act for both sellers and buyers. Its our firm belief that a good solicitor can reduce the time taken between offer accepted and an exchange by a matter of weeks. Not only that a good solicitor can make a stressful and emotional transaction a lot more comfortable. Knight Frank has maintained a strong relationship with TLT solicitors who have proven time and time again to have the knowledge and experience to advise clients in the most practical and efficient manner. Peter Kimpton, head of the residential property team, TLT says: "A proactive lawyer makes all the difference. After an offer of sale or purchase has been accepted, there are often delays, which can be stressful; not least because complications can occur and in some instances the deal can fall through. "During this process, a client requires a lawyer that not only understands their requirements, but one that is proactive in the service they deliver. A lawyer practicing in this manner will go over and above the expected level of service and can significantly reduce not only risks of the transaction falling through, but also stress and time. "Anticipating problems rather than reacting to them is important and keeping all parties involved updated at every stage of the transaction is vital. Lawyers must be responsive, personable and immediately available whether by email or telephone or in person. "Having specialist local knowledge is key in understanding property transactions. A lawyer who has the breadth of experience needed to deal with diverse issues as well as the expertise to advise on a wide range of residential property types is crucial. For example, a specialist understanding of all title issues is a must and the ability to advise on a variety of specialist fields such as planning, listed building implications and conservation matters is critical. "It is therefore essential that a lawyer is able to provide a holistic service and is prepared to take the time to truly understand the unique nature of each property transaction and the clients' requirements. "At TLT we believe that this makes the difference between a mediocre service with the inherent risks, stresses and potential disappointments and that of meeting and fulfilling a clients' needs and expectations." Knight Frank Bristol would like to wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. If 2017 is a year that you are contemplating a move, Knight Frank would love to help. Please call us for a view on price and market update. n Robin Engley, Knight Frank, Regent House, 27a Regent Street, Clifton Bristol. BS8 4HR Tel: 0117 317 1999

102 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

| DECEMBER 2016

Portishead estate agent invests in iconic marina location

A

lready a well-known name in Portishead and Bristol, Cliftons Estate Agents has chosen Port Marines signature ‘Mirage’ building as its new office location. Recognising Portishead as a huge growth area Cliftons wanted a prominent position to showcase Portishead properties for sale and to let. Branch Manager Anthony Briggs said: "Our success has been down to our honest approach, excellent customer service, reasonable fees and the outlets in which we market our properties. During 2016 our lettings portfolio has gone from strength to strength and as such our new office will have a dedicated team specialising in property rentals giving us the ability to expand even further. Cliftons can assure clients we will be with them every step of the way, this is another reason why our clients come back to us time and time again.” Managing Director Philip Stolworthy said: “I am proud to see how far we have come in such a short space of time in Portishead. This is down to the teams’ excellent customer service and dedication. The new office is a shining example to everyone’s hard work over the last 2 years.” Cliftons Estate Agents is an independent owner managed company that specializes in marketing substantial family homes as well as luxury apartments in Clifton, Bristol, Portishead and North Somerset.


Stoke Bishop

Henleaze

Redland

substantial 1920’s detached family home with extensive central hallway, living room which in turn leads to family garden, kitchen/diner, integral double garage, four double bedrooms and spacious family bathroom with five-piece suite. Further benefits include ample gardens to front, rear and side, extensive views to first floor with dual aspect to master bedroom. EPC D.

Filled with character throughout and significantly extended is this 1920’s family home positioned adjacent to Henleaze Infant and Junior School. Three receptions to ground floor with kitchen to rear including access to a 20m, southerly facing garden. The two upper floors offer four bedrooms, bathroom and an en-suite WC. Marketed with no onward chain.

A superbly presented and extended 1930’s home positioned within a highly desirable culde-sac. The ground floor offers a high quality John Lewis of Hungerford kitchen/diner, living room, dining room, separate office, utility area and downstairs cloakroom/WC. To the first floor there are three bedrooms and bathroom. Situated within close proximity to many local schools. EPC D.

Price Guide £800,000

£650,000

£635,000

Stoke Bishop

Henbury

Westbury-on-Trym

A substantial, natural four bedroom family home positioned within a quiet back water of Stoke Bishop offering two receptions; rear with access to a private, 25m, south westerly facing garden, and kitchen/breakfast room to the ground floor. There are four bedrooms, bathroom, additional shower room and loft conversion to the two upper floors. EPC D.

A fantastic opportunity to purchase a detached home presented to a superb standard. The accommodation comprises living room, conservatory, dining room with access to basement, office, modern kitchen/diner, three double bedrooms, two en-suites and family bathroom. The property benefits from a landscaped garden measuring 25m in length with single garage to rear. EPC C.

Benefitting from driveway and garage to rear, a beautifully renovated three bedroom semi-detached family home with a quality contemporary theme throughout. The accommodation comprises; open plan living area to rear, modern kitchen and bathroom, downstairs cloakroom/WC, level access to Westbury-on-Trym village shops and amenities and great public transport routes. EPC D.

Price Guide £585,000

£525,000

Price Guide £800,000

CJ Hole December.indd 1

21/11/2016 12:05


Clifton t: 0117 923 8238 (sales) t: 0117 946 6588 (lettings) clifton@cjhole.co.uk

www.cjhole.com ‘It’s starting to feel a lot like Christmas’. Thank goodness. Seasons Greetings! I’m not sure where to begin in this final note of the year? 2016 has been a rollercoaster ride with political events dominating the agenda. And there’s no doubt that has had an impact on the property market. Fewer people are moving and speculators are sitting on their hands. However here in our corner of north Bristol, although that is reflected in fewer properties for sale, prices are holding firm and there are definitely committed buyers out there. The tyrekickers are few and far between: what we have are credible, ‘have to’ buyers

and sellers in a less competitive market place. Many people choose not to move at this time of year but I have always maintained it’s not a bad time to sell or invest (Christmas busyness aside). What’s more, in an uncertain world, bricks and mortar can be very appealing. Wishing you all the best for the festive period. See in you in 2017. Howard Davis M.N.A.E.A Managing Director - CJ Hole Clifton

STOKE BISHOP Guide Price £459,950 A beautiful family home in a cul-de-sac location. The property consists: Contemporary kitchen, dining room overlooking the rear garden, lounge with dual aspect windows, cloakroom, four bedrooms and bathroom. There is off street parking, garage and garden to the front plus a southerly facing garden to the rear (we understand there is currently planning permission for an extension to the rear of the property). EPC E

CITY CENTRE Guide Price £515,000 A contemporary apartment in a great central location. The property offers: An open plan living space with clearly defined areas for the kitchen, lounge and dining areas with access onto a private terrace. There are three double bedrooms, two with en suites plus a main bathroom. An allocated parking space is accessed via electric gates with secure bike storage and communal bin store. A beautiful property offering a great deal of space and light.. EPC C

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton December.indd 1

Other offices also located at: Bishopston, Clifton, Hanham, Henleaze & Southville

21/11/2016 12:04


REDLAND Guide Price ÂŁ335,000 A beautifully presented first floor apartment with a garage located on the very popular Chandos Road. The apartment comprises of: Entrance lobby with window, inner hallway with storage cupboards and doors to all rooms, fabulous size living room with space for a generous dining table, separate kitchen, two double bedrooms plus a lovely bathroom. There is a communal garden to the front of the building. EPC D

FAILAND Guide Price ÂŁ650,000 A detached family home with generous proportioned rooms located in the village of Failand. The property is offered chain free and is an exciting prospect for families seeking to escape to the country. The property offers fabulous living/entertaining space both inside and out and consists of: Lounge with triple aspect windows, modern kitchen/diner, dining room, study, four double bedrooms, en suite shower room, family bathroom. Large garden, garage and parking. EPC D

Download our dedicated iPhone App today

CJ Hole Clifton December.indd 2

Other offices also located at: Bishopston, Clifton, Hanham, Henleaze & Southville

21/11/2016 12:05


Ocean December.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2016 11:34 Page 1


Ocean December.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2016 11:34 Page 2


Property Concept December.qxp_Layout 5 21/11/2016 11:35 Page 1

MANAGEMENT • SALES • LETTING • CONSULTANCY

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

guide: £1,450,000

guide: £1,200,000

guide: £1,100,000

Clifton

Clifton

Leigh Woods

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

Due to a very successful year selling property in many areas of our city Property Concept have willing and able purchasers looking to move. Please call our Sales Team on 0117 970 6119 for a free sales valuation with no obligation

SOLD guide: £375,000 City Centre

(prices quoted are the guide prices at the time of sale)

SOLD guide: £800,000

YOUR HOME. OUR PASSION.

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

Clifton SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

guide: £550,000

guide: £375,000

guide: £224,950

Clifton

Long Ashton

Harbourside

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

21 Princess Victoria Street

Tel 0117 970 6119

enquiries@propertyconcept.co.uk

Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BX

Fax 0117 970 6109

www.propertyconcept.co.uk


Property Concept December.qxp_Layout 5 21/11/2016 11:36 Page 2

MANAGEMENT • SALES • LETTING • CONSULTANCY

LET

LET

LET

£1250 pcm

£1295 pcm

£1550 pcm

City Centre - 2 Bed

Leigh Woods - 2 Bed

Clifton - 2 Bed

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

LET £1045 pcm City Centre 2 Bed

2016 has been our best year yet for letting and managing properties within Bristol and surrounding areas. For lettings advice and a free valuation with no obligation, please contact our Lettings Team on 0117 970 6119 YOUR HOME. OUR PASSION.

LET £2000 pcm Cliftonwood - 4 Bed SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

LET

LET

LET

£1195 pcm

£1100 pcm

£3200 pcm

Clifton - 2 Bed

Cricket Ground - 2 Bed

Clifton - 6 Bed

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

SIMILAR PROPERTIES WANTED

21 Princess Victoria Street

Tel 0117 970 6119

enquiries@propertyconcept.co.uk

Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BX

Fax 0117 970 6109

www.propertyconcept.co.uk


Fine & Country December.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2016 11:37 Page 1

Sneyd Park | Bristol

Guide Price £1,500,000

A fabulous “Stride” build detached family home of circa 4500 sq ft, with versatile family accommodation over two floors. To the front is exceptionally generous off-street parking, with an enclosed family garden to the rear. Drawing room, dining room and family room. Family kitchen/breakfast room. Range of useful store rooms; utility and two cloakrooms. Outstanding master bedroom suite with two dressing rooms and en-suite shower room. Four further double bedrooms and two bath/shower rooms. Superb rear garden, double garage and off-street parking. EPC Rating: F


Fine & Country December.qxp_Layout 1 21/11/2016 11:37 Page 2

Harbourside | Bristol

Guide Price: OIEO £820,000

Redcliffe Parade East is a most sought after address in an elevated position over looking Bristol’s Floating Harbour. With the river running 50 yards below you are truly in the heart of Bristol’s historic and much revered Docks. A stunning Grade II listed, Georgian mid terraced home in the historic setting of Bristol’s Harbourside and Docks. With the blend of period features and modern convenience this property is a wonderful place to call home. EPC Rating: Exempt


Richard Harding December.qxp_Layout 6 21/11/2016 11:39 Page 1

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

CLYDE PARK, REDLAND guide £1,750,000

One of Redland’s finest homes in prospect, with an extraordinarily large (115ft) rear garden. An attractive and impressive 7 bedroom, 3 reception Victorian period detached residence in a most favoured setting with an exceptionally rare and secluded westerly facing garden of circa 65ft x 45ft, a further kitchen garden of 50ft x 45ft and driveway parking. The house enjoys a charming ‘lived in’ and homely atmosphere offering further potential to personalise, adapt and re-appoint in the fullness of time.

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


Richard Harding December.qxp_Layout 6 21/11/2016 11:39 Page 2

Richard Harding Chartered Surveyors • Estate Agents • Auctioneers • Valuers

REDLAND guide £1,095,000

A handsome and large 5 double bedroom, 3 reception room Victorian semi-detached family home located in a quiet and leafy Redland location, within just 600 metres of Redland Green School. Further benefitting from a generous extended kitchen/dining room, many original features, off-road parking and a 50ft x 30ft south easterly facing rear garden. Generous lower ground floor and loft space provide further added potential for conversion into accommodation (subject to necessary consents), currently valuable storage space. A classic well-proportioned Redland home offering ample accommodation, a sunny garden and much more.

HENLEAZE guide £985,000

An incredibly spacious (over 3700 sq. ft.), 3 reception, 7 bedroom semi-detached period family home situated in a prime Henleaze location, just yards from Durdham Downs. Enjoying magnificent large rooms with high ceilings, many period fireplaces and features as well as a sociable kitchen/dining room, a 50ft x 32ft rear garden, off street parking and a garage. Great location virtually fronting Durdham Downs on Westbury Road within 600 metres of Elmlea and St Ursula’s Primary Schools and only a short level walk to the shops, cafes and restaurants of Henleaze Road, North View and Waitrose supermarket. Nearby bus connections to central areas. A superb family home with impressive character and room proportions throughout.

Professional, Reliable, Successful

0117 946 6690 www.richardharding.co.uk 124 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol BS8 2RP


PortLand View.qxp_Layout 1 25/11/2016 10:08 Page 1

BRISTOL PROPERTY | IN FOCUS

PORTLAND VIEW An exciting development of two and three bedroom luxurious apartments and townhouses in the heart of the city Barnett Developments began breathing new life into Portland Square in 2012, when Nick Barnett realised that this spectacular yet overlooked Georgian square was ripe for development, as it sits right in the heart of Bristol yet so close to major transport links, and boasts some of the most stunning architecture in the entire city. Starting with Portland Heights, then 22-24 Portland Square, Barnett Developments set a new standard with their uncompromising approach to quality and livability, and both developments sold out in record time. Many other developers have now followed their lead, and property prices around the square have surged by over 10% per annum in the last three years. There really is no better Bristol locale: the boutiques of Cabot Circus and the buzzing independent culture of Gloucester Road are right at your doorstep, and the M32, Temple Meads and Bristol International Airport are all a short drive away. You too can be a part of this thriving new community in Portland Square with Barnett Developments’ third project: Portland View. It’s their most ambitious project yet, with 37 wonderfully varied properties: two- and three-bedroom apartments; four bold and unique townhouses; and the crown jewel of them all, the Penthouse. Every property in Portland View exemplifies the ideal at the heart of Barnett Developments: living in style. Nick and Lorna Barnett, the company’s directors, have lived in every single one of their developments thus far - they consider this the only way to truly perfect their craft. The result is an unprecedented blend of practicality and luxury, with every last little detail finessed to perfection. It’s this commitment to excellence that has kept their clients coming back for

114 THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE

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DECEMBER 2016

more: many of the Portland View apartments have already been sold to owners of other Barnett Developments properties. The location and the quality of the finish of each apartment has to be seen to be believed, and the remaining properties are selling fast, so arrange a viewing today and we guarantee that you, like us, will fall in love with Portland View. For further information contact Cliftons Estate Agents: 0117 946 6363, or email sales@cliftonsestateagents.co.uk n


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Seasonal greetings to the thousands of home movers we have dealt with in North West Bristol over the past dozen years. We hope you all have a lovely Christmas and are very happy in your homes. With 2017 around the corner our highly experienced partners and team are more than delighted to provide you with an initial indication of market value to assist you with your plans for next year if you are contemplating a move.

STOKE BISHOP

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Leese & Nagle December.indd 1

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21/11/2016 11:40


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The Bristol Magazine December 2016