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THE

ISSUE 100

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OCTOBER 2012

BRISTOL ISSUE ONE HUNDRED

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CITY OF BRISTOL www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

o H

MAGAZINE £3.00 where sold

ne n u dred


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CONTENTS October BRISTOL:Layout 2 copy

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contents

October2012 64 88

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25 12

ZEITGEIST

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Five things to do and see in October

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THE CITYIST MR BRISTOW

50

FACE THE MUSIC International bestselling novelist, Lesley Pearse chooses her favourite tunes

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54 58 64

A weekend treat to the coast in a cool and classy VW camper van

It’s our 100th issue so to celebrate we’ve put together 100 fab facts about Bristol

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BIKE BRIGADE WHAT’S ON The best theatre, music and events throughout October

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BACK TO THE FUTURE A cemetery in Bristol is teeming with life

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

88

INTERIOR STATEMENT Understanding colour in the home

96 CITY GARDENING Jane Moore explores the exotic delights of the Bristol and Bath Botanic Gardens

99

PROPERTY A host of premium properties in Bristol

THE

BRISTOL twitter#thebristolmag

70 72

MAGAZINE

SOMERSET’S BUBBLY James Russell visits the Bristol Cider Shop

Bristol is the cycling capital of Britain

36

CALIFORNIA DREAMIN’

FIT & FAB The latest beauty news and product reviews

FAMILY FUN The best places around Bristol to enjoy as a family this half term and Halloween

68

80

EDUCATION The latest news from our schools

BARTLEBY 100TH ISSUE SPECIAL

Discover some of Bristol’s history on a walk through its centre

BRISTOL PEOPLE The movers and shakers across the city

When good just isn’t good enough

25

ARTS & EXHIBITIONS Major exhibitions on show around the city

Arriving in the modern age

20

CAN ALMOST TASTE IT 76 THE WALK We profile food illustrator Emma Dibbens

Our new look page including My Bristol, book review and Twitterati

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68

FOOD & DRINK Foodie news and our wine columnist, Angela Mount

75 RESTAURANT REVIEW We review Wilks restaurant in Redland

ON THE COVER Celebrating One Hundred Issues. Thank you Bristol. www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk October 2012

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The Bristol Magazine 5


Knight Frank October:full page

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Knight Frank

Frenchay An elegant Grade II Listed townhouse with views over Frenchay Common. 3 reception rooms. Kitchen, utility, cloakroom. Master bedroom suite (dressing room & ensuite shower room). 4 further bedrooms, bathroom. Guest suite with sitting room, bedroom & shower room. Cellars. Garden room. Gardens, garage & parking. Planning consent for an Orangery & 1st floor roof terrace.

Guide ÂŁ1,395,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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Knight Frank

Sneyd Park A true Grand Design, and situated on one of Bristol's premier roads, this is a remarkable design classic situated in a private garden complete with hot tub & swimming pool. 32' x 30' open plan family room & kitchen, cinema / snug, study, utility. Four double bedrooms (4 en-suite). Garden, swimming pool, hot tub & gated parking.

Guide ÂŁ1,695,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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Knight Frank

Clifton A stunning 2 bedroom first floor apartment situated within a Grade II Listed townhouse. Drawing room, open plan kitchen. Superb master bedroom. 2nd bedroom/study. Exquisite boutique style shower room. Balcony. Private garage. Shared off-street parking. Extensive communal gardens.

Guide £365,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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Knight Frank

Clifton A Georgian townhouse with views over Christchurch Green. Kitchen/breakfast room, dining room, cloakroom, first floor drawing room, sitting room. Master bedroom suite, 4 further bedrooms (1 ensuite), 2 further bathrooms. Utility, office/playroom. Double garage, roof terrace, decked terrace.

OIRO £1,500,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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EDITOR’Sletter

T

he sharp-eyed among you will have clocked that the usual picture of my good self, the editor, has been replaced this month by the very handsome Daniel Craig – not a purely indulgent act on my part, as I will explain. The Bristol Magazine is this month celebrating its 100th issue and to mark the occasion we’re doing something for charity. We toyed with the idea of the staff abseiling down the side of Avon Gorge, but decided we’d much rather see someone else do some stunts while we watched. So, on Thursday 25 October, we’re proud to be hosting a special advanced screening of the new Bond film, Skyfall in aid of Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal for Bristol Children’s Hospital. The gala showing and party takes place at the Showcase Cinema de Lux in Cabot Circus and we’re laying on all sorts of entertainment to make this a really special 100th birthday. Tickets have been selling faster than a Bond car chase, but if you’d like to enquire about buying tickets do call us on: 0117 974 2800. Meanwhile, we’ve got a lot going on in our 100th issue. We’re having a bit of fun with 100 views of Bristol, bringing you some facts and figures about this ever-changing city of ours and all its glorious diversity. Some you’ll know, some we hope you won’t. As always in The Bristol Magazine, we’ve got the What’s On side of events covered, so you won’t miss out on theatre, art exhibitions and family-friendly events in and around Bristol for half-term later this month. Writer Bethany Wivell has been down to Arnos Vale to discover that the old cemetery is a pretty lively place to visit these days and James Russell has been talking to the chaps at the Bristol Cider Shop about the rise and rise of this much under-rated west country drink. Hannah Walters reports on the millions which are being spent to make Bristol more of a cyclist-friendly place, while I was lucky enough to visit a new restaurant, Wilks, that’s just opened in Redland and is already attracting the right kind of attention for its beautifully prepared modern European food. Mick Ringham has interviewed international best-selling novelist Lesley Pearse about her life and work for our regular feature Face the Music and interior designer Rosalie Fiennes has written an interesting piece about how colour affects our emotions – worth a read before you decide to re-decorate or choose some new cushions. In addition there are all our regular slots, including foodie news, Andrew Swift’s walk and Jane Moore’s gardening advice. The October issue yields a rich harvest of goodies which we lay at your feet in the hope you’ll enjoy reading as much as we enjoyed writing them.

GEORGETTE McCREADY

All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

October 2012

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The Bristol Magazine 11


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ZEITGEIST

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things to do in October

Book

STAR GUESTS: thousands are expected to go to The Mall, Cribbs Causeway to see JLS switch on the lights

Look

Art lovers in Bristol eagerly await the Royal West of England Academy annual autumn show, which features hundreds of works by unknown, emerging and established artists in a variety of media. The 160th Autumn Exhibition runs from 21 October to 30 December. It gives people the chance to enjoy a huge variety of contemporary art, and to buy pieces. The RWA’s galleries have been described as ‘a jewel in the crown of England’s exhibition venues.’ Visitors to this year’s show can spend happy hours upstairs browsing, then pop downstairs to the Papadeli café on the ground floor for tea, cake or a light lunch.

12 The Bristol Magazine

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October 2012

This year’s big stars switching on the Christmas lights at The Mall, Cribbs Causeway are JLS – who will treat the crowds to a concert at the same time. The lights are due to be switched on during the evening of Thursday 8 November, and if the response to Olly Murs coming last year is anything to go by, there will be a huge demand for tickets. The JLS gig is being held to raise funds for the Wallace and Gromit Grand Appeal, which is supporting Bristol Children’s Hospital. New equipment is needed to provide treatment for children with life threatening heart conditions. The Mall at Cribbs Causeway will be giving away 10,000 free tickets, in exchange for a minimum suggested donation of £2 per ticket to Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal. Tickets will be available to collect every day from The Mall’s Information Desk from Saturday 13 October until Thursday 8 November.

Marvel

Party

Congratulations to the keepers at Bristol Zoo who have managed for the first time in captivity to breed a rare Socorro dove chick. The dove is believed to be extinct in the wild, with the last recorded sighting in the wild in 1972. Now there are around just 100 held in captivity in zoos around the world – including 25 birds in six UK zoos. Bristol Zoo’s curator of birds, Nigel Simpson, said: “Sadly these birds now only exist in captivity, so to have this chick hatch and survive 40 years after they were last seen in the wild is a great achievement.” The chick at Bristol Zoo has been raised by foster birds – a pair of European turtle doves – which have a strong track record of raising healthy chicks. It was originally one of two baby birds which hatched, but sadly its sibling didn’t survive.

The Invisible Circus is celebrating its 20th birthday in style, by putting on its biggest show ever, The Happiness Machine, in a Big Top on Creative Common close to Temple Meads Station. The Happiness Machine opens on Thursday 4 October and will run from Thursdays to Saturdays for three weeks before the Big Top goes into winter hibernation. The Invisible Circus is supported by the Arts Council and has performed at events including Glastonbury Festival, Burning Man in the States and WOMAD in New Zealand. Visit: www.invisiblecircus.co.uk for show times.

Sing Gareth Malone has single-handedly made the normally reluctant British public burst into song, finding that it has a voice. His most recent series has seen him persuading the posties of Bristol to form a choir. But later this month there’s a chance for all Bristol men to prove that real men can sing, with the third annual Gathering Voices festival of song. Volunteers are needed to join choir leader Chris Samuel of the Spooky Men’s Chorale to answer the call: “Sing like a bloke.” For a full list of 70 events across the city between 12 and 21 October, visit: www.festivalofsong.org.uk.


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THE CITY

One city . . . one month

The buzz

My BRISTOL We ask Julia Carver curator of visual art at Bristol Museum and Art Gallery what she’s doing this month What brought you to Bristol? My love of the Pop Group! Seriously, I commuted for four years and always felt I was missing out on good gigs, good art, good theatre and a grand city. Now I’m here and lapping it all up. What are you reading? Several things – am I a good multi-tasker or do I just have a short attention span? Jeanette Winterson’s book about the Pendle Witch Trials, The Daylight Gate, Annie Proulx’s Heart Songs and short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorn – all share Puritanism as a theme. What is on your MP3 player? Sylvester – You Make Me Feel Mighty Real, his voice is rich and sensuous as a plum velvet jacket; the Pop Group, We are Time, I love the riff that messes out of control; and Captain Beefheart, Electricity, with a theramin, one of his Magic Band-members’ fathers invented the ghostly sounding instrument, so I hear.

Shop

Greek designer Mary Katrantzou brings her distinctive statement collection of prints exclusively to Harvey Nichols in the south west – as seen on Keira Knightley and Claudia Schiffer, expect them to be seen turning heads at Christmas parties this year.

VOLUNTEER CLIC Sargent, cancer charity for children and young people are daring brave souls to join what at first sounds like an innocent Christmas fancy dress Jingle Bell Drop challenge on Sunday 2 December. They’re inviting volunteers to sign up to take the 200ft abseil off the top of the Premier Inn in central Bristol, while supporters cheer them on from the ground. If you’re up for doing something different, call CLIC’s Sophie on tel: 0117 311 2639.

Twitterati 14 The Bristol Magazine

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Which café or restaurant takes your fancy? The Old Bookshop is my local and I like to catch last orders there: it’s been such a success I still haven’t managed to get a table for a meal. I love the Folk House on Park Street for hearty wholefood and it’s a mellow place to spend a lunch hour.

Who Needs Mr Darcy? by Jean Burnett Published by Sphere, paperback £6.99 Reviewed by Rosie Parry The plot fairly romps along in this funny and charming novel by Bristol author Jean Burnett. It tells the tale of Jane Austen’s anti-heroine, Lydia Wickham, nee Bennet, and what has happened to her since her elopement with George in Pride and Prejudice. Her husband’s early demise on the battlefields of Waterloo leads her on a journey to fulfill her own destiny. Bath, London, Paris and

Which museum or gallery? Real and Imagined Lives, our portrait show at M Shed and Sarah Dobai’s exhibition at WorksIProjects and Arnolfini’s Matti Braun show, then I will be visiting Frieze; also Jack Smith at Tate Modern, RWA’s annual open exhibition and Uriel Orlow at Spike Island. Film or play? Both: my favourite film this year is Martha Marcy May Marlene, an impressionistic take on cults, their appeal, and escaping them. It doesn’t judge, just gets you into her state of mind, which by the end is very fragmented. I’m really looking forward to the newly refurbed Old Vic. What’s next? I’m working on Global to Local: Histories, the next exhibition at the museum and art gallery, which includes work by Ai Weiwei, Walid Raad and Zwelethu Mthethwa. This is part one of three exhibitions surveying the new art collection we’ve been developing in partnership with Arnolfini with a £1m grant from the Art Fund. Histories brings together artists from around the world. It opens in our Level One gallery on 15 December. See www.bristol.gov.uk/museums. ■

Brighton all feature and on a hunt for a marriage that will make her rich; there is nothing that the flirtatious, headstrong Lydia won’t turn her hand to. This is a witty, Bridget Jones’ Diarystyle novel – a fresh and fun take on one of Austen’s more disliked characters, it’ll have you chuckling to yourself throughout – a perfect book to curl up with as the evenings draw in.

We’re following @DrSamuelJohnson, a dictionary of modern life using 18th century language. Typical entry: “I marked my 303rd birthday yesterday and I am sore afraid that my Waitrose Bag for Life may OUT-LIVE me. #waitrosereasons.”

October 2012


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Mr Bristow A CONVERT TO MODERN LIVING

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’m a Cancerian, which I am told means I am attracted to water. After 25 years of living in teetering heritage properties - first a 17th century weaver’s cottage with the dubious luxury of a well in the sitting room that once overflowed to such an extent that water was running out of my letter box, then a grand Georgian pile the roof of which was prone to monsoon-like leaks – I feel that in reality water is attracted to me. The latter property drove me to paranoia. The roof got fixed in the end, but still the slightest pitter patter on the tiles would have me running round with buckets and saucepans trying to predict where the next watery ingress would take place. I’ve recently moved into a modern purpose-built riverside apartment. At first I viewed the languid stream below with suspicion. But really, being several floors up, the main danger, methinks, would be knocking my mobile phone off the balcony balustrade into the murky depths. I wonder what the swans that lurk waiting for my morning toast crusts would make of that? As for ‘modern’, I’ve gone mad for it. No more creaky floorboards, no spidery dust-filled corners. The windows work and are double glazed don’t y’know and when you close them you can’t hear the building site opposite.

BEAUTIFUL KITCHENS FROM £10,000

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October 2012

The heating heats the rooms, not the attic and the kitchen is a dream. I’ve never had a freezer or a dishwasher and now I can’t imagine how I lived all those years without them. My cutlery has come up a dream – “The diamond standard!” I cry as I lay it sparkling into its flash new drawer (My last one had a tendency to deposit spoons and knives on one’s bare feet of a morning if one didn’t open it in a certain way). I used to snigger at those TV ads that showed glamorous people with impossibly tidy clothes rails opening the mirrored doors of their fitted wardrobes with the merest touch of an elegant finger. Now I’m one of them. And I can’t stop rearranging my shirts in colour coded sequences and endlessly and effortlessly sliding the doors back and forth. And to think, I used to be so proud of my hulking great mahogany monstrosity with its built-in linen press back at Jane Austen Towers. The only thing I am a bit disappointed with is the power shower. It’s OK once you’re in there, but I practically have to soap up before I can squeeze through its miniscule doors. I’m a fairly big chap, but this must have been designed to suit those spiky Letraset people so beloved by the producers of architect’s impressions.

To think I used to be so proud of my ❝ hulking great mahogany monstrosity with its built-in linen press back at Jane Austen Towers

And if the same architects designed my lobby, I can’t see my huge new purple sofa ever making it into the building when the boys from DFS turn up. I fear Mr Bristow will be enjoying his flat screen telly with all the mod cons while perched on a beer crate. Though come to think of it, beer crates could be quite the thing in terms of on-trend minimalist décor. Yes, it’s modern all the way for me from now on. ■


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IN AID OF WALLACE & GROMIT’S GRAND APPEAL The Bristol Magazine is honoured to host a special evening of the most hotly anticipated movie event of 2012

THE BRISTOL CHARITY PREMIERE OF

THURS 25th OCTOBER Tickets are only available from The Bristol Magazine for full details see

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

THE

BRISTOL MAGAZINE Editor Georgette McCready Tel: 01225 424592 Email: georgette@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Deputy Editor Samantha Ewart • Email: sam@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Editorial Assistant Rosie Parry • Email: rosie@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Production Manager Jeff Osborne Email: production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Commercial Production Lorna Harrington Email: lorna@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Publisher Steve Miklos Tel: 0117 974 2800 Email: stevem@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Advertising Sales Kathy Williams • Email: kathy@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Katie Larkman • Email: katie@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Sue Parker • Email: sue@thebristolmagazine.co.uk The Bristol Magazine, The Bath Magazine and West Country are published by MC Publishing Ltd and are completely independent of all other local publications.

The Bristol Magazine is distributed free every month to more than 20,000 homes and businesses throughout Bristol. Published by MC Publishing Limited

The Bristol Magazine 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED sales@thebristolmagazine.co.uk • © MC Publishing Ltd 2012 Disclaimer: While every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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Ladies and Girls Clothing and Accessories

10% off full priced stock with this advertisement 127 Coldharbour Road, Redland, Bristol BS6 7SN 0117 9245 478 www.sweetpeafashion.co.uk

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

October 2012

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The Bristol Magazine 19


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FACEtheMUSIC

A REAL LIFE ROMANTIC HEROINE International bestselling novelist Lesley Pearse talks to Mick Ringham about her life and work and chooses the music that brings back many happy memories


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FACEtheMUSIC

LIVING LIFE TO THE FULL: from left to right, Nina Simone, Feeling Good, Bette Midler, Wind Beneath my Wings, and Katie Melua, The Closest Thing to Crazy

F

or anyone who has started to write a novel but been plagued by writer’s block, bestselling author Lesley Pearse has a message – “I have never made a secret of the fact that it is a determination to succeed and, of course, perseverance. I’m good at finishing things, for instance; I don’t believe in writer’s block. I think that’s just an excuse for being lazy.” And having written 20 books with global sales of well over seven million, this is a woman who knows what she’s talking about. Lesley began writing while she was running a playgroup in Bristol, later opening a small card and gift shop in Clifton. When that business ceased trading during the recession of the 90s and Lesley’s third marriage came to an end, she decided to concentrate on writing professionally. As she says: “One door closes and another opens.” Ths old adage proved correct when in 1993, just a few months after her business closed, Lesley’s first novel Georgia was published. She carries out meticulous research and admits to having a ‘mind like a sponge’ when it comes to adsorbing specific periods into which her characters are placed. Working chiefly during the evenings, often into the early hours, she is never one to let go of an original idea or plot for her next novel.

we kept putting it on the record player again ❝ and again and singing along with it really loudly. The next morning . . . I swam across the Thames in my undies

I asked if she identified with any of her characters: “Well, yes to a degree I suppose, especially in the latest book I’m writing, but it’s not always the case. I’m lucky in possessing a vivid imagination so I can conjure up characters and give them personality and values.” As for literary figures she admires, she cites the genius of Dickens and the novels of PD James. When asked about the public’s perception of ‘the airport novel’ she acknowledges that there are some negative issues, for example she feels the cover artwork on some of her novels does not fully reflect their content. “I’m not just about romantic fiction; there are important factual and ethical issues in there as well.” Lesley enjoys her rural life in a small village on the outskirts of Bristol where she has created a glorious cottage garden, which complements her characterful home. Her emotional life is as rich as any of her books. She has survived three marriages, has three daughters and two grandchildren and has enjoyed an incredibly rich and diverse life – an autobiography in waiting perhaps? However, as they say, that’s another story.

Lesley’s top ten: ● Otis Redding – My Girl Like so many of my generation the Swinging Sixties was a www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

wonderful time to be young and carefree. We had just come out of the monochrome world of the 50s into a brave new landscape, full of colour and music. This record always makes me feel cheerful and reminds me of the days when I was someone’s girl. ● Chris Farlowe – Out of Time I first heard this played at a wild party in Putney and we kept putting it on the record player again and again and singing along with it really loudly. The next morning, rather worse for wear, I swam across the Thames in my undies. Foolhardy I know, but I survived to tell the tale. After all these years the record still sounds fresh and Chris Farlowe is still gigging and still sounding great. ● The Beatles – Here Comes the Sun I played this constantly during 1970 when I was pregnant with my eldest daughter. I’d lost a baby the year before, but was convinced this time all would be well. This track is full of optimism and joy, the lyrics and score probably written in hours, but like so many of their songs, have in fact lasted a lifetime. ● Johnny Kidd and the Pirates – Shakin’ All Over They only had one hit record – but what a record! This takes me back to my teenage years. I was 15 at the time and had a crush on a boy who worked in a coffee bar and played this all the time. It also reminds me of growing up and having fun at travelling funfairs, their atmosphere and the music they played on the rides. ● Bette Midler – The Wind Beneath my Wings This emotional and heartfelt recording will always remind me of Lucy, Sammy and Jo, my three wonderful daughters. They alone were the motivation for me to succeed at writing. ● John Lennon – Imagine I chose this because I believe in his sentiments. It was also played as part of the closing ceremony at the London Olympics and was incredibly moving. His stunning lyrics along with such a simple arrangement takes me to a beautiful place. ● Katie Melua – The Closest Thing to Crazy I’ve chosen this song simply because I’ve been there many times. ● Nina Simone – Feeling Good Sung by a lady who lived her life to the full. The song was written in the mid-60s by Antony Newley and has been recorded by many artists, but Simone’s passionate version is simply fabulous. Just listening to the opening lyrics ‘birds flying high – you know how I feel’ sets the mood. I’m going to have this played at my funeral. ● Joe Cocker – Now That the Magic has Gone I adore Joe singing anything and to prove it I have all his albums. Anyone who has seen the clip of him and the Grease Band at Woodstock will understand why this Sheffield boy is a true soul legend. It is really difficult to pick just one number from his back catalogue; however I chose this track as its so plaintive and reminds me of past loves. ● The Beatles – In My Life This little number sums up everything for me. A joyful thank you to all the people who have coloured my life and character. I never tire of this song and could listen to it forever. ■ Lesley Pearse’s latest novel The Promise is published by Penguin. October 2012

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THE PRESSURE TO BE OUTSTANDING

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his month I am endeavouring to raise my standards. Given that schools in Bristol (and elsewhere) are expected to keep improving, it’s the only honourable thing to do. Unfortunately I don’t think there’s an Ofsted-type inspectorate for humble hacks, so I’m going to have to selfassess and then take action, based on said self-assessment. By the end of the year I hope to have raised myself from the slough of Satisfactoriness onto the green hillside of Good. Then, next year (all being well) I will lift my head and stride upward to the peaks of Outstanding. In case you’re completely bewildered, these are the terms used by Ofsted to describe the status of a school. With horrible simplicity schools are judged Outstanding, Good, Satisfactory or – dread word – Inadequate. Come to think of it, they’ve just got rid of the Satisfactory category because it sounds too complacent, and replaced it with Requires Improvement. To anyone who isn’t involved in teaching this must all sound a bit silly. I mean, who can look at their work, hand on heart, and say that it requires no improvement? We are all weak mortals who skimp a bit, whether we’re nine years old and being told for the umpteenth time to ‘Brush properly!’ or, ahem, slightly older and only jogging halfway to the postbox.

In the bizarre logic of Ofsted Good is ❝ not good, because Good is less than Outstanding ❞ If you work in a school, however, you will be well aware that an Ofsted inspection is not funny. It’s not that there’s anything wrong in principle with the performance of schools being independently assessed – I can remember one or two teachers from my distant youth who would have benefited from a prod now and again, if only to check that they were still alive. The problem lies in the culture of fear surrounding the inspection regime. Imagine you’re a headteacher of an average sort of primary school with a stalwart but not necessarily brilliant staff. It could be a very pleasant school, where children are valued and nurtured, but the question is, according to the very specific parameters laid down by Ofsted, ‘Is it Good?’ Does it have the right kind of displays? Are the particular lessons sufficiently challenging for all children? If the school isn’t judged to be ‘Good’ then it must Improve. So far so good, you might think, but what of a school that marches onward and upward (as I hope to) and becomes Good? You’d think that would be fair enough, but you’d be wrong. In the bizarre logic of Ofsted, Good is not good, because Good is less than Outstanding. Now, forgive me if I’m wrong, but I always thought that someone or something was Outstanding because it Stands Out. Bradley Wiggins is Outstanding. Andy Murray is Outstanding. They are incredible performers, who drive themselves harder than most of us can even imagine. The same is true of educational institutions. Oxford University is Outstanding, and the people who go there know they’ll be expected to maintain the high standards set by previous generations. Our imaginary local primary school is now Good, but the heat is on because at the next inspection it needs to show further improvement. The headteacher has to do everything in his or her power to drag the school to the loftiest peaks, but how? The kids are the same. The staff are the same. What can the head do but get more out of the existing material? Work everyone a bit harder. Tighten up. Apply pressure. But in whose interest is this pressure being applied? Will the kids be better educated by having their friendly local school turned into a Dickensian achievement factory? Here am I trying to improve and I’m talking like a fuzzy old liberal. We must stride onwards and upwards, without looking back, raise our ladders on the mountaintops and climb towards the stars. Why else are we here? ■ 22 The Bristol Magazine

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October 2012

Email: info@boutique33.co.uk Tel: 01179 739570 33 Regent St, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 4HR


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VIEWS OF BRISTOL

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Brunel’s Dock by Bristol artist Mike Ogden of Blue Sky Framing and Gallery in Westbury Park

It was June 2004 that the first issue of The Bristol Magazine was launched and now, here we are at the 100th – bigger, better and brighter and still celebrating Bristol’s rich cultural scene

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o mark our 100th issue we’ve gathered together a collection of facts and images from Bristol’s past and present – some of which you may know, and others which we hope will make you look at some aspects of the city in a new light and say: “Well, I never knew that!”

Brunel’s original design for the Clifton Suspension Bridge included two giant sphinx sitting on top of each tower. Because the project ran out of money the Egyptian halflion, half-human figures were never installed.

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Writer Derek Robinson is recognised to be the first to put the Bristol accent down on paper for posterity, with the publication of Krek Waiter’s Peak Bristle. Inspired by his American wife’s bafflement at the local dialect – she had been advised to view a flat in ‘Snanz’ and had to have it explained to her that this was Bristol for St Anne’s. With the rise of comedians such as Justin Lee Collins and Russell Howard and thanks to Little Britain’s Vicky Pollard expressions such as ‘gert lush’ are now universally recognised.

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New kid on the Bristol arts scene block is the celebration of street art, See No Evil which centered on Nelson Street in the city centre. This August’s weekend of graffiti inspired art attracted some of street art’s top names, along with crowds of around 50,000.

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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The Clifton Downs Football League is the only football league in the country to play all its matches at home – as it is a stand-alone league not linked to the English football league system. Founded in 1905 it now has 56 teams which play on pitches on the Downs.

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The Bristol Old Vic Theatre is Britain’s oldest working theatre. The King Street building, which has been the subject of a multi-million pound makeover, dates back to 1766. In those early days audiences used to enter the theatre via the front door of a private house.

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The restaurant Browns in Park Street is housed in the former Bristol city museum. The ornate building was originally modelled on the Doge’s Palace in Venice.

St Mary’s Redcliffe Church is Bristol’s tallest building, its spire reaching 292ft. The original spire was hit by lightning in 1446 and the church remained without a spire for 400 years until the current one was erected in 1872. At-Bristol has one of the largest solar panel arrays in the city – on the roof is a solar system which makes electricity from the sun and is big enough to power 11 homes. Seagulls are bad news for solar panels so At-Bristol uses a robotic peregrine falcon as a humane seagull deterrent. The robotic falcon, Brian, moves and squawks to scare seagulls. October 2012

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Bristol characters

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Bristol’s Old Vic Theatre School in Clifton has trained many stars of stage and screen. Alumni include Daniel Day Lewis, pictured, who carried on his links with the city even after he made his name, becoming a patron of the Bristol Old Vic Theatre. Pete Postlethwaite also trained at the theatre school, having to take a job as a sheet metal worker to pay for his training in the acting world. After his death the Old Vic Theatre School set up a scholarship in his name to help other students suffering from financial difficulties.

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Bristol Record Office in Smeaton Road is the place to go to trace your family’s roots. Documents, maps and photographs about local families and communities fill shelves that would cover ten miles if stretched out. So, who do you think you are? Trace your family tree and find out.

Thousands of rail commuters pass her plaque every day at Temple Meads station. But how many of us know why Miss Emma Saunders is honoured as The Railwaymen’s Friend with a plaque? This Victorian philanthropist was aided by a team of women volunteers. Happy 40th anniversary to the Dean Fields Study Centre, Parkend in the Forest of Dean, which gives Bristol children and teenagers the chance to enjoy outdoor activities on residental visits. The old iron works was bought in 1972 by Bristol City Council from the Forestry Commission and up to 3,000 young people from the city a year get to escape to the country where they enjoy adventurous activities, including canoeing, riding the zip wire, orienteering, climbing and building shelters.

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Dancing on Ice judge and former Olympic gold medallist Robin Cousins began his skating career as a nine-year-old boy. Then, the now defunct Bristol Ice Rink, was brand new. He said of the rink: “There were lots of disco lights and a roller rink too, and the very cool Milky Way coffee bar.” Edward Teach, the notorious Blackbeard pirate, was born in Bristol. The fictional Long John Silver was dreamed up in the city by Treasure Island author Robert Louis Stevenson. His drinking den, The Spyglass is said to have been based either on the Llandoger Trow pub in King Street or the Hole in the Wall on the Grove.

The first, so called test tube baby, Louise Brown, was from Bristol. She was born in Oldham on 25 July 1978, thanks to assisted conception, in vitro fertilisation. One of the most famous Victorian sporstmen, WG Grace, the Gloucestershire and England cricket captain, was born in Downend in 1848. William Gilbert Grace was an all-rounder on the cricket field. He trained as a doctor but devoted much of his life to playing amateur cricket, achieving more than 54,000 runs, 2,800 wickets and 124 centuries over his long career.

Swimmer Jacky Portingale, a 62-year-old grandmother from Shirehampton, impressed family, friends and colleagues this summer by successfully tackling the notorious mile and a half swim in the treacherous waters of San Francisco Bay, from the island of Alcatraz. And where did Jacky train to undergo a challenge which ended in death for so many escaped prisoners in the past? The chilly waters of Henleaze Swimming Club, one of the country’s oldest, thriving open water swimming clubs.

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Bristol body builder David Prowse played Darth Vader in the Stars Wars movies. The 6ft 6inch Bristolian, a former Mr Universe, was also responsible for making children in the 1970s look twice before crossing the road, in his guide as the Green Cross Code Guide.

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The tidal range in the Bristol Channel is the second greatest in the world, only beaten by the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, Canada. In Bristol the water level can change as much as 12 metres between low and high tide – which is why the Floating Harbour was constructed. The River Frome is Bristol’s secret river, as much of its stretch through the city is hidden away. The river rises near Chipping Sodbury and flows through Frenchay and Eastville to join the Avon at the Floating Harbour but is hidden under the concrete of the M32 for much of its last section. A weekend of events was recently held to explore the advantages and challenges of living by the River Frome, including water stories, theatre and dance. A plaque at Number 37 Queen Square pays tribute to a soldier who fought against the British in the American War of Independence, but was later hailed a hero in Bristol, where he stayed for a week on his way back to America. Tadeusz Kosciuszko was born to a Polish aristocratic family which had fallen on hard times. Inspired by a fierce belief, he signed up to fight in the War of Independence, where his brilliant tactics staved off the British at Westpoint – seen as a critical turning point in the Americans’ fortunes. He then went on to fight for the freedom of his own country from Russia and his reputation as a soldier spread to Bristol, where he was honoured with speeches, gifts and crowds lined the Avon as he sailed away. The original Bristol Bridge was built of wood. Later, a stone version was built and people began to build houses on it, just as they had done on London Bridge. In Tudor times the shops and houses towered over pedestrians, their upper floors jutting out, blocking the sunlight. It wasn’t until the 18th century, after much wrangling, that the new bridge was opened. We’re all familiar with the modern footbridge, with its distinctive ‘ear pieces’ that crosses the harbour, but how many of us know who Pero was, who gave his name to the bridge? He was Pero Jones, an African slave who worked for the Bristol sugar merchant John Pinney. The old timber framed Hatchet Inn looks somewhat out of place, marooned among cars and modern buildings in Frogmore Street. The pub has a rich history, stretching back to 1606, it is thought and was home to notorious bare knuckle fighters for many years. Its ancient front door is said to conceal layers of human skin beneath its tar and paint.

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Lord Nelson was given the Freedom of the City of Bristol by a grateful city after winning the Battle of Trafalgar. The letter from Nelson thanking the Mayor can still be seen – a testament of how significant an event the battle was to the whole country at the time.

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Ladies Mile on Clifton Down is thought by many to be named after the fashionable ladies of Clifton who, it is said, used to like to promenade along this stretch showing off their frocks and hats. It’s a nice theory, but the truth is that it is more likely to have been given the name by the number of the ‘ladies of the night’ who plied their trade along this now leafy avenue.

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Gloucester Road boasts the largest number of independent traders in one street in the whole of the UK


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A familiar Bristol skyline of pastel coloured terrace houses climbing up the hill at Totterdown. This work, Sunny Day is by Bristol artist Fiona Willis

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A watersid e scene, Bikes and Pero’s Bridge, captured by Bristol artist Gabrielle Voller

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Ask Bristolians where the gallery the Arnolfini got its name and many will be hard-pushed to tell you. In 1960 modern art enthusiast Jeremy Rees and some friends decided that the city needed a modern gallery. He remembered a favourite picture, Dutch artist Jan Van Eyck’s The Marriage of the Arnolfini painted in 1434. It is a portrait of an Italian merchant with his bride and it now hangs in the National Gallery, London.

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Bristol is one of the country’s leaders when it comes to partying, with its year-round calendar of festivals and celebrations. There’s a festival for all tastes, from film, folk and food to the avant-garde Mayfest, the waterside fun of the Harbour Fest and the soaring heights of the world famous International Balloon Fiesta.

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Bristol Zoo, which celebrated its 175th birthday last year, is the sixth oldest zoo in the world and a pioneer in successfully breeding many endangered animals in captivity, including the first chimpanzee to be conceived and born in Europe, in 1934.

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He may have accidentally given his name to a type of casual canvas shoe, but Bristolian Samuel Plimsoll is remembered around the world for campaigning to introduce safety regulations for the maintenance and loading of ships. Until this Victorian MP fought this battle thousands of lives were being lost at sea, having been sent out in unseaworthy vessels, known as ‘coffin ships.’

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Community groups and other small projects across the west of England have been given grants amounting to in excess of £25m since 1986, from the Quartet Community Foundation, formerly the Greater Bristol Trust. The charity helps all kinds of local good causes, from nursery age children on playschemes to elderly people trapped in fuel poverty.

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The perfectly round lead shot that could be fired from a musket was developed just a few hundred yards from St Mary Redcliffe, where an enterprising plumber called William Watts dug down to make cellars in his house and popped a tower on the roof in order to create a big enough drop for the molten lead to form into balls. His tower was demolished in the 1960s to make way for the road bridge.

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If anyone asks you what Bristol is famous for, try throwing a few of the following household names at them – Harveys Bristol Cream, Berni Inns and

Concorde.

The Roman Catholic Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul in Clifton is the most recently consecrated city cathedral in the country, having been consecrated as recently as 1973.

English poet John Betjeman dedicated a poem to Bristol which begins: ‘Green upon the flooded Avon shone the after-storm-wet-sky Quick the struggling withy branches let the leaves of autumn fly And a star shone over Bristol, wonderfully far and high.’

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At the M Shed, the people’s museum of Bristol, visitors can get close to the Flying Flea, a vestige from a hobby once enjoyed in the city in the 1920s and 30s. In Bristol, where so much aeronautical history was made, DIY pilots were building aircraft kits at home and Bristol 800 launching themselves from has been set their gardens and lanes. up to Nervous onlookers, in fear celebrate the signing of of their lives, got the craze the Magna Carta in 1215 for unauthorised flight by Bristol’s King John banned by 1937.

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Runners, dog walkers, kite flyers and others who love the wide open spaces of Clifton Downs need never worry that they will lose this green space to development. An Act of Parliament, the Clifton and Durdham Downs Act of 1861 ensured that the land will be protected in perpetuity. October 2012

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Bristol is a city peopled by creative and enterprising talent. Photographer Kate Berry has been photographing Bristol’s independent businesses for an exhibition she’s holding at the Boston Tea Party in Clifton until the end of October. Mark’s Bakery in Southville was one of her subjects. She says: “This place comes with zero pretentiousness. The focus on selling seems to even be secondary to the art and practice of bread-making. The team there work 5am to 6pm, most days, because they love what they do. It's a pretty special place.”

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In 1941 a bombing raid was launched on Bristol by the German Luftwaffe – killing 180 people in the city. Redcliffe Boys School playground took a direct hit, blasting a hole into the 15th century Redcliffe Caves below. For a further eight years, until the crater was filled in, boys enjoyed the thrill of peering into the depths.

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The last public hanging in Bristol took place in Cumberland Road – where the ruins of the Victorian New Gaol stand. A 17-year-old servant Sarah Harriet Thomas was found guilty of killing her employer Miss Elizabeth Jefferies – beating her to death in her bed. Sarah Thomas was dragged screaming to the gallows. So upsetting were the scenes that even seasoned executioner William Calcraft was moved and the prison governor is reported to have fainted.

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The rare Whitebeam tree is on the world’s Red Data floral protection list – it can only be found growing in Bristol.

Bradley Stoke based South Glos Hockey Club holds the record for the longest hockey match in history – at 31 hours continuous play in aid of Cots for Tots.

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In the last 20 years, four chefs who trained at the City of Bristol College have gained Michelin Stars, with Martin Burge (head chef at Whatley Manor) gaining two stars. Josh Eggleton (The Pony and Trap) and Peter Sanchez (Casamia) have been training future generations of chefs through the College’s apprenticeship scheme.

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Education charity Ablaze is working in Bristol to raise the life aspirations of primary school children at Christ the King Primary School in Filwood, giving them access to experiences that they have never had and give them the chance to question and learn from people who do great things over the course of the year-long scheme. This will include visits from the Lord Mayor of Bristol, the Red Cross, Meet a Medic, Airbus, Rolls Royce and Bristol Old Vic.

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Primark’s city centre store stands on the site of 16th century plague pits – cleared in the 1950s.

53-62 Made in Bristol Glassmaking – Bristol was famous for its glassmaking long before Bristol Blue Glass. In the 18th century more than 60 glasshouses made over half the bottles and window glass in Britain. The remnants of only one furnace is left – once the tallest in the city, now it is just a stump that has been transformed into a restaurant next to St Mary Redcliffe Church. The Boxkite was the first aircraft produced by the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company (later the Bristol Aeroplane Company). Many early British aviators learnt to fly in a Boxkite. A 1963 replica of the Bristol Boxkite hangs in the Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery.

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The Red Maids’ School is the oldest surviving girls’ school in England, dating back to 1634

business was so successful that chocolate factories were built in Broadmead. Wills – In its heyday Wills cigarette factory in Hartcliffe was the largest tobacco factory in Europe, employing 4,500 and producing 350 million cigarettes a week. Its biggest selling product was Woodbines, the favourite smoke of soldiers in the First World War.

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Elizabeth Blackwell – the first woman doctor was born in Bristol and lived here most of her life

lemondrinks but in the 1930s they took the humble blackcurrant and created a concentrated drink rich in Vitamin C. Bristol cutters – Bristol is a tricky port to get in and out of, being six miles inland and reached via the Avon Gorge. This is how the Bristol pilots and their nimble ships, the Bristol cutters came to play such a valuable role in getting ships in and out of the port.

TV series Casualty, Doctor Who, Being Human, Skins, Animal Magic, Teachers were filmed in Bristol and Deal or No Deal is still filmed at Endemol in Paintworks.

Aardmann Animations – Aardmann was born in Bristol in 1976, by Peter Lord and David Sproxton, creators of Morph. They were joined by Nick Park and the trio went on to make The Wrong Trousers, Chicken Run and The Curse of the Were-Rabbit.

Hot air balloons – Cameron Balloons is one of the country’s best known balloon makers. Don Cameron used to make them in the early 70s in a church hall in Cotham, winning onlookers’ hearts and building a growing following.

Fry’s Chocolate – Joseph Fry opened a sweet shop in Small Street, Bristol in 1756. The

Ribena – A small firm, HW Carter & Company at Ashton Gate, used to make orange and

Concorde – The world’s first commercial supersonic jet was designed and built in Filton.

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The Bristol Hippodrome celebrates its 100th anniversary this December. Its magnificent gold and red interior was designed by Frank Matcham, one of the major theatre designers of his era. He also designed the Tower Ballroom in Blackpool.

Pieminister’s founders Jon and Tristan

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One of the great culinary success stories to come out of Bristol has been Pieminister. Founded on a kitchen table by friends Jon Simon and Tristan Hogg, the business was launched in 2003 and has gone from strength to strength with its distinctive branding and fierce customer loyalty. The Westbury on Trym Pieminister HQ, where the pies are made, is about to expand. Production in this upper crust business stands at 26,000 pies a week.

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The painted gorillas, launched on the city in 2011 to mark Bristol Zoo’s 175th birthday, are a gift that just keeps on giving. The latest pair, Jackorilla and Juborilla, are standing guard by Clifton Suspension Bridge and will be auctioned at the end of October to raise funds for The Friends of Bristol Haematology appeal.

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A trio of giant pandas launched the arrival of Bristol’s Wildscreen festival this autumn. The furry film-makers were out on the streets of Bristol filming homo sapiens bristolensis in its natural habitat. The Wildscreen festival runs from 13 to 26 October this year and for the first time will include a programme of free events, open to all. Highlights will include an opportunity to get very close to the animals in BBC’s Frozen Planet with an augmented reality experience at the M Shed; the first of its kind outside The States and an opportunity to interact with the animals of the Polar region. Giant images of rare animals will be released across the city when they are projected onto the harbour’s glass fronted buildings in an experience called Glimpsed which will run throughout the fringe festival.

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Temple Meads takes its name from the low lying meadowland which ran near the River Avon south of Bristol, lying in Somerset beyond the 13th century wall which was built to protect the city districts of Redcliffe and Temple.

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The former church of St George’s is familiar to audiences as a venue for all kinds of music, from classical to folk and jazz, and for its fine acoustics. The early 19th century building is Bristol’s only so-called Waterloo Church. Following the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815, the country was in confident mood and Parliament voted funds for the building of new churches – of which St George’s on Brandon Hill was one.

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Hundreds of people were injured, some fatally, during the Bristol Riots in Queen Square in 1831. The mob were attacked by armed Dragoons and Isambard Kingdom Brunel was called away from his work on the suspension bridge to be sworn in as a special constable. Many years later, in 1937, a road was laid diagonally through the square and it remained open to traffic until 1992.

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The beautiful sailing ship the Matthew, a replica of John Cabot’s original 15th century craft that sailed to North America, is a familiar sight in Bristol Harbour. She retains some of the feisty spirit of her predecessor, having navigated around the busy coastal waters of southern England this summer to join the flotilla of crafts taking part in the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee floating pageant down the Thames. After a few adventures with heavy weather, the Matthew made it safely back home to Bristol.

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The medieval Gaunt’s Hospital, also known as St Mark’s chapel, is wedged between a Fopp store and the Music Room, but it’s worth a look round as it retains some of the city’s finest medieval stained glass windows from the Continent.

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the late 19th century ships that sailed all over the world could moor up in the city centre. There was a harbour alongside where the Hippodrome stands. If you enjoy a pint or a glass of wine with your culture, Bristol’s the place to be. There’s comedy at the Hen & Chicken in Southville and plays at The Wardrobe Theatre over the White Bear, St Michael’s Hill, and the Alma Tavern, Clifton.

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The traders and businesses of Clifton are being asked this autumn to vote for a Government backed BID (Business Improvement District) scheme. If the majority of traders vote in favour a shared pool

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David Attenborough’s 1979 Life on Earth ground-breaking series was produced by the Natural History Unit in Bristol

of funds, raised from a levy of all businesses in the area, will be used to promote Clifton. It will also be used for projects such as paying for the Christmas lights.

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The BBC in Whiteladies Road opened in 1934 with four studios – for orchestral, drama, sound effects and

talking.

Sailors in 17th century Bristol believed witches were stopping their ships in their tracks – the truth is more prosaic. It’s more likely it was tiny remora fish getting in the ship’s propellers.

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There are 34 places around the world that are called Bristol – they’re mostly towns and villages in the States, but there are also populated Bristols in Canada, Jamaica, Peru and Costa Rica.

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Bristol was the first city outside London to set up a committee for the abolition of the slave trade.

90-99 Iconic buildings Bristol’s top ten landmarks (in our opinion): 1 Bristol Cathedral 2 St Mary Redcliffe 3 The Wills Building 4 Clifton Suspension Bridge 5 Bristol Old Vic 6 Cabot Tower 7 M Shed 8 The Council House 9 Temple Meads Station 10 Colston Hall

80-89 Musical Bristol These musical stars all have Bristol links: 1. Alison Goldfrapp 2. Massive Attack 3. Portishead 4. Bananarama 5. Roni Size 6. Sean Moore of Manic Street Preachers 7. Beth Rowley 8. Kosheen 9. Russ Conway 10. Andy Sheppard

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The first issue of The Bristol Magazine was in June 2004, in which editor Lindsey Harrad interviewed David Farr and Simon Reade, joint artistic directors at the Old Vic. For the record, The Bristol Magazine still has the largest distribution of any magazine in the city.

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CITYcycling

TWO WHEELS BETTER After being awarded £11m by the Government to promote cycling and bike riding facilities, Hannah Walters saddles up to explore the UK’s premier cycling city, Bristol

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ristol is a great place to live for anyone who has been inspired by Britain’s biking success at the Tour de France and the Olympics this year. Named Britain’s first Cycling City in 2008, it was granted £11 million by the Department for Transport to promote cycling and improve its bike riding facilities. The resulting developments in the infrastructure of Bristol’s highways and the introduction of new cycle paths have been one step in transforming the city into a more bike-friendly zone. But for Bristol’s bike-riders, it’s the innovative schemes, community projects and local initiatives that make the biggest difference to the experience of inner-city cycling. From bike recycling projects to cycle repair schemes and even a carnival of cycling, the ‘Cycling City’ has a lot to offer. The city is home to a number of initiatives geared towards promoting cycling, offering support to bike owners and enabling new, inexperienced and disadvantaged to riders get into the saddle. One of these is a small, local charity called Life Cycle, which has been helping cyclists in Bristol since 1996. Ed Norton, marketing and fundraising co-ordinator for the charity, said: “Life Cycle are keen to make cycling an activity which involves and enlivens the local community as well as empowering individuals. We want to get more people out and about on their bikes, staying healthy and having fun.” The charity offers training sessions for children and adults throughout the year, providing help and advice for complete beginners through to returning cyclists and those who simply want more confidence to ride on Bristol’s busy highways. One of their major schemes, run in partnership with the Council’s Cycling City team, is Bike Back. This bike recycling project enlists the help of experienced mechanics and prisoners at Bristol Prison to refurbish donated bikes. The overhauled bikes are then sold at Life Cycle Bike Sales, held in the centre of Bristol every eight weeks. These affordable bikes allow people on low incomes to get cycling. 32 The Bristol Magazine

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Another local scheme, the Bristol Bike Project, also aims to repair and recycle used bikes. The Stokes Croft-based, not-forprofit company has been serving the local community since 2010. Their Earn-A-Bike scheme offers residents a chance to build their own bike by helping project mechanics in one-to-one cycle repair workshops. Working in co-operation with more than 50 organizations in and around Bristol, including Bristol Refugee Rights and Bristol Drugs Project, the scheme is designed to help people learn basic mechanical skills and have access to a bike of their own. The project’s Bike Kitchen, which takes place every Thursday evening, is also designed to minimise the number of bikes which end up on the landfill. The weekly workshops encourage locals who already have knowledge of bike mechanics to come along and repair their own bikes.

The Bristol Bike Train is aimed ❝ at helping potential commuters to become more confident about riding in rush hour traffic

Jamie Fraser, workshop coordinator for the project, believes in the benefits of a hands-on approach to bike repair. He said: “Getting involved in the mechanical side of things is hugely beneficial, by providing people from all walks of life with an opportunity to acquire and share new skills, develop a degree of self reliance and interact with people outside of their immediate peer group.” Bristol City Council’s Cycling City project can also help those who already have a bike but would like some extra support. One scheme, the Bristol Bike Train, is aimed at helping potential commuters to become more confident about riding in rush hour traffic.


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CITYcycling

CYCLING CITY: left, the annual Naked Bike Ride in Bristol, part of a global movement to make us all aware of how vulnerable cyclists are Right, the cyclists welcome sign at the Clifton Suspension Bridge

Running most weekday mornings to the city centre and the Filton business district, the Bike Train allows workers to gain experience of commuting to work with a group of cyclists. But it’s not only early-morning commuters who can benefit from the project, which aims to help cyclists of all skill levels and ages. The Roadshow Team are a group of twelve part-time members of staff committed to helping Bristolians get riding. Sara Sanders, the Travel Roadshow manager, outlined some of the services on offer: “Travel Advisors are on hand to support people looking to start cycling. Through the Travel Advisor team you can register to borrow a bike for a month and see if cycling is for you, as well as having an accompanied cycle ride from your home to university or work on your first journey.” The team also use their local knowledge to help cyclists find the quietest and safest routes around the city. Bristol is also home to a number of community projects and cycle groups which organise fun events and bike outings. The Bristol Cycling Campaign, which holds regular meetings and campaigns for safer cycling in the city, runs regular leisure rides in Bristol and the surrounding area.

These rides vary in length and difficulty, ranging from events including the Living Heart ride to Bordeaux, designed for experienced riders, to less difficult outings such as the River Chew ride, which are suitable for beginners. A popular event for the city’s riders, Bristol’s Biggest Bike Ride is a free, non-competitive bike ride which saw its 19th outing this June. Suitable for cyclists of all ages and experiences, the ride – organised by Bristol City Council – features four different routes ranging from a distance of nine to 38 miles. Bristol Cycle Festival, a not-for-profit fringe festival held annually since 2010. Running over nine days, the festival stages bike-riding events run by individuals and groups from around the city, with a series of popular annual fixtures such as the Two-Wheeled Drive-In Cinema and the UK’s only cycle carnival, Carnivelo. This month also sees the return of the annual cycling race event, Oktoberfest, at Ashton Court (taking place on 13 October). So, whatever your level of experience, there’s no excuse not to get on your bike. ■

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www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

October 2012

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SCOTTISH CASHMERE SALE www.capitalcashmere.com

Racecourse, Bath Friday/Saturday, 19/20 October

10.00am - 4.00pm Free Entrance Probably the largest collection in the UK All at huge reductions on normal shop prices All Top Makes from Scotland

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THEBRISTOLMAGAZINE THEBESTOFBRISTOL PERFECTLYCOVERED BRISTOLSBIGGESTMAGAZINE PERFECTLYDELIVERED TOADVERTISETEL: 0117 9742800 34 The Bristol Magazine

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WHAT’Son THEATRE, DANCE & COMEDY – listed by venue even his sexual ambivalence found seed. After a notorious marriage and bitter divorce, he made his luxury home on the French Riviera, entertaining the great and good, royalty, literati, prostitutes, and his one great love. Anthony Curtis, a Maugham biographer, brings the extraordinary panorama of his life to the stage. Performed in the Brewery Theatre.

Dombey and Son at the Tobacco Factory

A Love Like Salt, Friday 12 & Saturday 13 October, 8pm Aided by the dramatic, driving rhythms of a skilled and inventive strings and accordian trio and under the direction of Sally Cookson, storyteller Daniel Morden lures the audience onto a rollercoaster ride in this haunting, hypnotic fusion of music and word. The Devil’s Violin Company unlocks the forgotten folk tales that inspired some of English literature’s greatest works.

Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, Tuesday 16 – Saturday 27 October, 7.30pm

A life’s worth B r i s t o l H i p p o d ro m e

T he Toba cc o F ac to ry

St Augustine’s Parade, Bristol. Box office tel: 0844 847 2325 www.bristolhippodrome.org.uk

Raleigh Road, Southville, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 902 0344 www.tobaccofactory.com

Based on Pushkin’s masterpiece of Russian literature, Tchaikovsky’s great opera tells of the fated love between the innocent Tatyana and the world-weary cynic Eugene Onegin. Tatyana declares her true love for Onegin, a love that is tragically rejected. The ensuing maelstrom of emotions ends in a duel between Onegin and his best friend, poet, Lensky, which leaves Lensky dead. Years later, at the St Petersburg Ball, Onegin, by chance, meets Tatyana once again and realises his mistake, but now the married Tatyana is unable to accept Onegin’s love.

The Lion King, Until Saturday 17 November, please contact the theatre for times Disney’s The Lion King began its first ever UK tour in August and its first stop was the Bristol Hippodrome. Involving 52 performers, 150 people in production and 700 costumes, the show has been ingeniously adapted from Disney’s classic film and this spectacular production explodes with colours and effects, all set to the enchanting rhythms of Africa. With impressive staging and highly imaginative costumes, masks and puppets, The Lion King uses theatrical magic to tell the story of Simba’s journey to reclaim his kingdom.

Eugene Onegin

Mr Maugham at Home

Mr Maugham at Home, Tuesday 9 – Saturday 20 October, 7.45pm Bridging Oscar Wilde and James Bond, this is the secret life of William Somerset Maugham. Fabulous wealth flowed from Maugham’s books, from Hollywood, Broadway, the West End to television. He produced classic novels, plays and short stories, such as The Painted Veil and Rain. But behind popular acclaim lay tragedy. Orphaned by eight, within a lonely boyhood, his reserve, stoicism, stammer and

The Lion King

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Faith Fall, Tuesday 23 – Saturday 27 October, lunch and show from 12.30pm each day; dinner and show on Friday from 5.30pm This is the second lunchtime play at the Tobacco Factory from Glasgow’s A Play, a Pie and a Pint. It is set to be a dark, emotional thriller from an exciting new voice, Frances Poet. Christina is dying. Adam knew she was dying when he met her at a faith healing where they were paired together to pray for each other. But she didn’t know that he was a reporter, attending the healing under false pretences, his faithless prayers hollow. Performed in the Brewery Theatre.


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Dombey and Son, Monday 29 & Tuesday 30 October, 8pm The Red Dog Theatre Company presents this play told with Dickens’ characteristic humour, indignation and pathos – they bring a rogues’ gallery of unforgettable characters vividly and imaginatively to life, to delight, outrage, and entertain. For Dombey, money and the power it brings are the only gods worth worshipping. But can money buy him everything he dreams of? What of love, or life itself? This adaptation is a tale of pride and passion, generosity and greed, of human foibles and the society which breeds them – it blurs the boundaries between visual art and theatre.

You’re Not Like the Other Girls Chrissy, Tuesday 23 – Saturday 27 October, 8pm; matinees: Thursday, 2pm, Saturday, 3pm This is the true story of an eccentric young French woman’s affair with a shy English teacher, set against the backdrop of the Second World War. Set in Paris in 1945, Christiane waits for a ticket to England that will reunite her with her fiancé. While she waits, this irrepressible mademoiselle recounts the love story between her and a tongue-tied English teacher from Staffordshire. Performed in the studio.

B ri stol Old Vic

Comings and Goings, Every Tuesday 23 October – 27 November, 6.45pm

Wild Oats, Until Saturday 20 October, please contact the theatre for times

Does My Society Look Big in This? Wednesday 10 – Friday 19 October, 7.30pm The post-millennial glow of optimism may have dimmed, but our instinct to speak out burns bright. Bristol Old Vic’s artistic director, Tom Morris joins forces with writer Stephen Brown and the cast of Wild Oats to deliver a thudding piece of satirical polemic that sifts the biggest news stories of today and unearths the truth that lurks behind the headlines.

Storytelling on the Barge, Friday 19 October, 6.30pm This is two performance events on the Seeds of Change: A Floating Ballast Seed Garden indebted to the art of storytelling. Travel to the garden by ferry for an evening of rendezvous with two performers, each with a story to tell.

King Street, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 987 77877 www.bristololdvic.org.uk

This is the first production to be staged in the newly re-vamped theatre and opens the autumn/winter season. Jack Rover is an actor. Committed, quick-witted and capable of slipping into a new identity with the merest arc of an eyebrow. The trouble is, there’s one character he hasn’t quite mastered – his own. John O’Keeffe’s careering caper of cross purposes, mistaken identity and confusion is a classic romp of a comedy.

extraordinary performances in Bristol. IBT presents Pieter Ampe and Guilherme Garrido’s mischievous, Still Standing You. An outstanding success of In Between Time Festival, this show is a one-off. Offering a wry glimpse at male friendship, dancers Ampe and Garrido shamelessly seek out what they mean to each other. Friends, lovers, rivals, enemies, this show entwines ruggedness, anger and love in one great, all-encompassing embrace.

Arnolfini institute a programme of short, sharp Tuesday evening performances, defiantly low-fi and deliberately informal. Join the team in the café bar for new ideas and an artist encounter. Performances will be announced weekly via Twitter: @ArnolfiniArts.

C ir c o m ed i a St Paul’s Church, Portland Square, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 922 3686 www.circomedia.com You’re Not Like the Other Girls Chrissy

‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore, Wednesday 24 October – Saturday 3 November, 7.30pm; matinees: Saturday, 2.30pm This vivid and violent Jacobean tragedy shows a brother and sister’s passionate descent into hell. Incest, religion and corrupt morality collide in this shocking and controversial play. Cheek by Jowl has toured to more than 300 cities in 40 countries and the company is an Artistic Associate at the Barbican, London.

Does My Society Look Big in This?

Sensual Africa, Friday 26 October, 7.30pm As part of Black History Month, contemporary dance company Tavaziva returns to Circomedia with Sensual Africa a choreographic work of art crafted with sublime precision, following Bawren Tavaziva’s inspirational trip to one of Africa’s most beautiful and compact countries, Malawi. Tavaziva Dance injects its own interpretation on the complexities of the Tumbuka and Chewa tribes’ movements and music, exploring the distinctive rituals that boys and girls go through to become men and women.

H o r f i el d Pa r is h H a l l Wellington Hill, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 9695716 www.horfieldtheatre.co.uk

‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore

A r n o lf in i Ring, Tuesday 16 – Saturday 20 October, 7pm; Thursday – Saturday, 7pm & 9pm This is a sound jouney in complete darkness from director David Rosenberg, writer Glen Neath and producers, Fuel. Performed in the studio.

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

16 Narrow Quay, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 917 2300 www.arnolfini.org.uk

Still Standing You, Saturday 6 October, 7.30pm In Between Time is the international production company behind some of the most

Calendar Girls, Wednesday 31 October – Saturday 3 November, 7.30pm; matinee: Saturday, 2pm This is an amateur performance based on the motion picture by Juliette Towhidi and Tim Firth. A group of extraordinary women, members of a very ordinary Yorkshire WI, persuade one another to pose for a charity calendar with a difference. Overcoming their initial reserve and riding the wrath of the outraged WI, the friends drop their dressing gowns. But as media interest snowballs, the Calendar Girls find themselves exposed.

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WHAT’Son MUS IC – listed by date Susanna, Thursday 11 October, 8pm St George’s Bristol, Great George Street, Bristol. Tickets £19 from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Pop/jazz vocalist and pianist Susanna Wallumrød and her Magical Orchestra return to the UK following her eighth album Wild Dog. She will perform songs from her whole Susanna/Susanna and the Magical Band catalogue; performing both the wide-ranging covers with which she has become synonymous, and her self-penned originals.

Fringe Jazz, Thursday 18 October, 8pm The Bristol Fringe Café Bar, 32 Princess Victoria Street, Clifton Village, Bristol. Andy Sheppard’s The Pushy Doctors come to this new venue, formerly The Greyhound, with Tony Orrell on drums, Dan Moore on the keyboard and Andy on the saxophone.

Bristol Bach Choir, Saturday 20 October, 7.30pm St Mary Redcliffe, Bristol. Tickets on tel: 0117 214 0721 or visit: www.bristolbach.org.uk Bristol Bach Choir presents its concert featuring Duruflé’s Requiem and Arvo Pärt’s

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Berliner Messe. The incomparable setting of the Requiem text by Duruflé is a triumphant fusion of Gregorian chant with sensual Romantic harmony and Pärt’s Berliner Messe is a work of extreme poignant serenity. The concert will also feature individual soloists.

Bristol Bach Choir

Bath Choral Society, Saturday 20 October, 7.30pm Bath Abbey, Bath. Tickets from Bath Box office on tel: 01225 463362 or visit: www.bathboxoffice.org.uk Following two critically-acclaimed concerts with its new musical director, Will Dawes, the Society performs Hadyn’s late masterpiece, The Seasons, providing an excellent pictorial antidote to thoughts of winter. The soprano is Elizabeth Weisberg, the tenor John McMunn and on bass is Alex Ashworth.

Viktoria Mullova plays Bach, Monday 22 October, 7.30pm St George’s Bristol, Great George Street, Bristol. Tickets £25 from the box office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk Viktoria’s interpretations of Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas have graced numerous recordings, the composer’s astonishing melodic phrasing as refined, elegant and expressive as ever in her hands: but witness it live in concert and it is sure to live long in the memory. She performs J S Bach’s Sonata No 1 in G Minor, Partita for Violin Solo No 3 in E and Partita for Violin Solo No 2 in D minor.

City of Bristol Choir, Saturday 10 November, 7.30pm Colston Hall, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 922 3686 or visit: www.colstonhall.org City of Bristol Choir and Exultate Singers join forces with professional orchestra The Bristol Ensemble to perform two of the classical world’s most dramatic and moving pieces, Sir William Walton’s Belshazzar’s Feast and Herbet Howells’ Hymnus Paradisi. The choir will be joined by Grammy award-winning bass soloist Jonathon Lemalu, Welsh National Opera’s Andrew Tortise and soprano Claire Ormshaw.


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WHAT’Son OTHER EVENTS – listed by date Author Event: Foraging Walk on Brandon Hill with Adele Nozedar, Sunday 7 October, 2pm

Launch Party for the West Bristol Arts Trail Weekend, Friday 12 October, 7pm

Avon Wildlife Trust Building, Jacobs Wells Road, Bristol. Tickets £5 from Stanfords, 29 Corn Street, Bristol or tel: 0117 9299966 Adele Nozedar, author of The Hedgerow Handbook will lead a foraging walk over Brandon Hill pointing out the history and folklore of many of our common plants as well as their medicinal and culinary uses. Adele will sign copies in the shop after the walk.

Alma Tavern & Theatre, 18-20 Alma Vale Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 973 5171 Alma Tavern & Theatre welcomes you to an evening of drinks in the newly refurbished surroundings, with music, theatre and food to celebrate the beginning of the West Bristol Arts Trail weekend.

Traditional Botanical Painting and Drawing Course, from Monday 8 October, 1pm – 4.30pm

Colston Hall, Bristol. For further information contact Amitabha Buddhist Centre in Bristol on tel: 0117 9745160 or visit: www.meditationinbristol.org Internationally-renowned Buddhist Kadam Bridget Heyes will present this one-off free public talk. Kadam Bridget is known for her clear and inspiring teachings. She will demystify ancient knowledge and inspire confidence that we can all find lasting happiness.

University of Bristol Botanic Garden, Stoke Park Road, Bristol. £360, tel: 0117 331 4906 or visit: www.bristol.ac.uk/botanic-garden This 21-week course is primarily aimed at both beginners and those wishing to improve existing skills and provides a foundation for drawing and painting botanical plants from observation. Jenny Brooks is a professional art teacher who specialises in botanical painting and drawing. She studied fine art at Bath Academy of Art and has taught professionally for more than 20 years. The use of line, texture, tone and form are the key learning elements as well as use of watercolour.

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to classic animal-related music to mark the official bonfire night at the park.

Ancient Wisdom for a Modern World, Tuesday 23 October, 7pm

Fireworks Go Wild, Friday 2 – Saturday 3 November Longleat Safari Park, Wiltshire. Tel: 01985 844400 or visit: www.longleat.co.uk There will be a spectacular firework display set

Fireworks Go Wild at Longleat Safari Park

An evening with Clare Balding, Monday 19 November, 6pm Bristol Grammar School, Bristol. Tickets £8/£7. For further information visit: www.bristolgrammarschool.co.uk Bristol Grammar School and Viking invite you to an evening with award-winning broadcaster and writer Clare Balding, talking about her memoir My Animals and Other Family. The evening will include light refreshments as well as book sales by Blackwells.


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7th October 2012 At Gordano School Portishead BS20 7QR Sale no. 33

Viewing Sunday 7th October 9am-1pm Auction Sunday 7th October from 1.30pm Closing date for anyone wishing to place items in the November auction is 7th October Free Valuations and advice

For a free catalogue telephone 01275 390520 Or visit www.portisheadstampauctions.com (10 days prior) Philatelic Auctioneers’ standard terms and conditions of sale (1985 review)


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THE HAIRCOLOUR YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR!

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CITY OF THE DEAD LIVES ON The Victorian cemetery Arnos Vale has become a rural oasis in the city. Bethany Wivell ventures beyond the gates to explore this fascinating corner of Bristol

A

mere few yards away from the constant roar of traffic along the A4 at Brislington lies something of an urban sanctuary – 45 acres of undisturbed natural woodland teeming with wildlife and history and exuding an air of calm. And, as I found out on my first visit there’s an awful lot more to Arnos Vale cemetery than 350,000 Victorian graves and four Grade II listed buildings. The cemetery was established in 1837. In those days Brislington was a small countryside parish and, as burials in cities were seen as a health risk, the site offered an ideal location to bury the city’s dead. Since its first burial in 1839, Arnos Vale has continued to operate as a working cemetery and has recently celebrated its 175th anniversary. But while the site continues to provide funeral services, over the past few years Arnos Vale has become a widely used and incredibly popular facility for the local community. In the late 1980s it was threatened with development, leading to a long campaign in which thousands of people campaigned to have the green space preserved for posterity. Thanks to them, the Friends of Arnos Vale, and Bristol City Council, the cemetery was saved and in 2005, the Arnos Vale Cemetery Trust was awarded a major grant worth £4.8million from Heritage Lottery Fund and English Heritage to restore the site, which was officially handed over to visitors in May 2010. The site now contains a spacious learning centre, facilities for events hire, a café, visitor reception and a shop. The cemetery’s four Grade II* listed buildings have also been restored, including the historic crematorium, where an original Rogutt furnace is on public display. The site is intended to offer new ways to engage visitors and involve communities of all backgrounds and ages with the cemetery as a microcosm of Bristol’s history, and community green space in the heart of the city.

It’s a resting place for a ❝ population equivalent to 75 per cent of the living city of Bristol, so it is full of fascinating stories

Felicia Smith, public engagement manager, said: “Arnos Vale is one of the earliest garden cemeteries in the British Isles and as you wander round, you’ll discover the beauty of its neo-classical design. It is also a resting place for a population equivalent to 75 per cent of the living city of Bristol, so it is full of fascinating stories and is an important physical record of Bristol’s social history.” Admiral James Hosken, first Captain of the SS Great Britain; Mary Carpenter, social reformer and founder of Red Maids’ School and George Muller, Evangelist ,and director of Ashley Down Orphanage, are just a few of the famous names buried here. Understanding more about Arnos Vale’s rich history, it comes as no surprise to learn that when the site was put up for sale, the threat of closure caused a public uproar. Felicia said: “We believe Arnos Vale is a national exemplar of 46 The Bristol Magazine

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how a Victorian cemetery can be brought back to its former glory. Visitors, young and old, come to explore the site and we are now classed as one of Bristol’s top visitor attractions. We are, at last, managing to remove the cautionary question mark that comes with being a cemetery and become a hub for the community.” Arnos Vale boasts an event schedule similar to those of the city’s busiest community centres with a typical week comprising of: yoga and tai chi sessions, food markets and all sorts of art classes. Alongside this, a seasonal calendar of family events including: Halloween bat walks, Stomping Story sessions and Christmas craft making has been designed to keep the cemetery busy throughout the year. The site is also home to an abundance of wildlife and a number of notable species unusually found in this region. The Arcadian landscape, designed by Charles Underwood, who is himself buried at Arnos Vale, has soothing qualities and its curving paths and heart-shaped processional route was believed result in the moral improvement of its visitors. While there are 45 acres in total, only 12 are open to the public at one time, so there is always more to explore and plenty of opportunity to reflect on the condition of your soul. And if you’re lucky, you’ll discover a spot of yarn bombing, where

SENSE OF PEACE: Arnos Vale has plenty to interest social historians and wildlife enthusiasts


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ON SAFARI: left to right, deer safely graze, fine specimen trees around the cemetery, and visitors gather for events at Arnos Vale

knitters have adorned the place with brightly coloured pieces of homemade artwork, or even catch a few wild deer grazing along the way. So that’s the past and the present covered but what about the future? Felicia said: “We are working very hard to create a sustainable future for Arnos Vale. We have 120 volunteers on our books and we expect to see a continual growth of local interest. “We have a licence to perform wedding ceremonies so we will be promoting this additional service and we’re busy crafting next year’s events schedule.” Far from being a city of the dead it would seem that Arnos Vale Cemetery is in fact, very much alive. ■ For more information and a calender of forthcoming events, visit: www.arnosvale.org.uk.

Autumn events at Arnos Vale ● Night at the Cemetery, Saturday 27 October, from 7pm. Join a torchlit tour of the necropolis and learn about the folk customs and funeral etiquette of Victorian society. ● Halloween Twilight Walk for families, Wednesday 31 October, 3.30 – 4.30pm. Dress up and bring a torch. ● War Graves Tour, Saturday 10 November, 1.30 - 3pm.

£14,000 £2,950

Jewellery Valuation Day £30,000

Monday 22nd October • 10am - 1pm & 2pm - 5pm

Clevedon Salerooms will hold a FREE JEWELLERY & WATCH VALUATION DAY at the Salerooms when their experienced valuers will provide free, no-obligation verbal auction estimates on the above items. Owners may then choose to consign items to the pre-Christmas Quarterly Specialist Sale on the 15th November, traditionally the best time of the year for selling jewellery. Clevedon Salerooms have an excellent reputation for selling fine quality jewellery and watches and our high resolution images, online catalogues and live Internet bidding all ensure that our vendors’ jewellery achieves its maximum potential. If you wish to speak to one of our valuers please call the Salerooms on 01934 830111.

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers The Auction Centre Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT Tel: 01934 830111 www.clevedon-salerooms.com

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FRESH APPEAL Hannah Stuart-Leach meets the Bristol artist who brightens up our breakfast tables with her artwork on everyday supermarket products

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ou may not recognise artist Emma Dibben’s face but you may be familiar with her inky gauche renderings of fruit and vegetables from your breakfast juice carton. Emma, who works in a studio in Jamaica Street, is an illustrator for Waitrose, drawing our attention to crisp, healthy fruit and vegetables with her distinctive packaging artwork. Since leaving Falmouth College of Arts in 2004, Emma has barely stopped. Just six months after graduating, she got her first commission from Waitrose – working first for their Food Illustrated magazine, before moving onto design packaging for the Waitrose Essentials range. She says:“It’s funny when it’s recycling day, when you see your work lying in the gutter… that always makes me laugh.” Emma, a nature-lover and keen experimental cook, has since built an enviable portfolio, including commissions for The Guardian, Condé Naste Traveller and BBC CountryFile. But, she tells me, her decisions about which work to take up are carefully considered. “Clients are important to me, I think about their ethics, and there are people I wouldn’t work with.” “How about Tesco?” I playfully venture, given that we are just down the street from the scene of the infamous Tesco riots last Easter. “No, never! I wouldn’t go in those shops. I did get a phonecall – somebody approached me on behalf of Tesco. But no, I definitely wouldn’t go there.” Emma’s studio is rather like a country kitchen, with the earthy tones of its decor and charming, higgledy-piggledy arrangement of its overflowing storage. Although on the second floor of the four-storey building, it is away from the main thoroughfare, “I like my space because it’s kind of tucked away, so you can have a little bit of quiet.” While she works, she sometimes likes to listen to music or tune into Gardeners’ Question Time on Radio 4. But what is it like working among the 42 other resident artists? “JSA totally changed things for me,” says Emma. “You see people joining the studios and their careers just taking off, it really does help massively. I suppose it’s because people informally mentor each other. It’s great to have so many people around that I can get advice from.” Before being accepted, she was illustrating from her bedroom in between two bar jobs. So she’s especially grateful for where she now finds herself – a beautiful room with a wide-open view looking out toward Cotham. She says: “It can be really isolating if you have to just work from home on your own, unless you’ve got a good studio set up that’s quite removed from your living space.” I imagine Emma being very at home with Peter Rabbit in the pages of a Beatrix Potter book. Especially when she tells me about her allotment, which she tends in her free time. It was a gift from friends when she moved to Bristol to help her settle into city life. “When I came here I was really missing Cornwall and being by the sea, and just trying to re-adjust to being back in a city I suppose. Then my friends gave me this as a birthday present, and it just spiraled from there.” Emma is originally from Sheffield. “Rather than having a rural background it’s more about being out in nature,” she explains, telling me how her parents used to take the family on long walks in the Peak District. “It’s one of my favourite, favourite places.” 48 The Bristol Magazine

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But Emma is smitten by the west country too, particularly Dorset, and hopes to enjoy a gentler pace of life there one day. “I do always think I’d like to get some land somewhere and move to the countryside.” Although Emma’s art is not restricted to food – it has ranged from French street scenes to scientific imaginings of sea creatures – it is a theme she’d like to continue while travelling. “But,” she adds, “I’m thinking I’ll work on more stuff that I’d like to exhibit,” explaining that there’s a big difference between that and the work she is commissioned to do. Although often still inspired by the natural world, she likes to use totally different mediums, particularly oils and mixed media. She is delighted by the varieties of plants she grows on her allotment as she enjoys drawing fruits and vegetables best when they’re in season. She’s been nurturing chioggia, an Italian beetroot which has concentric red and white rings, believed to be formed each full moon. Happily, she now has the opportunity to go in search of even more exotic roots. “For the first time, because I’ve normally always had regular commissions, I’m just really free to do whatever, which is really nice and I’m quite enjoying it.” ■ For more on Emma Dibben, her illustrations and flourishing allotment, visit www.emmadibben.com. To read about the Jamaica Street Artists, see www.jamaicastreetartists.co.uk. This feature was first published in the autumn issue of the RWA’s Art magazine. For information on the Royal West of England Academy, see www.rwa.org.uk.

STILL LIFE: Emma Dibben at work in her Jamaica Street studio Inset, Emma’s bright, zesty oranges


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ARTSgardens &EXHIBITIONS CITY Moish Sokal, extract from Sisters

WEST BRISTOL ARTS TRAIL

Anna Christy, Reflections on Bristol Floating Harbour

Various venues Various venues across West Bristol. Map available from: www.westbristolarts.com

13 & 14 October

▲ MOISH SOKAL

RWA 160TH AUTUMN EXHIBITION

Grant Bradley Gallery Number One St Peter’s Court, Bedminster Parade, Bristol. Tel: 0117 963 7673 www.grantbradleygallery.co.uk

TELLING TALES

5 October – 3 November Established Somerset-based artist Moish Sokal shows his vivid watercolours in Bristol for the first time in his show Colour of the World. His exhibition includes recent work from his global travels, as well as his beloved English countryside.

Guild Gallery 68/70 Park Street, Bristol. Tel: 0117 926 5548 www.bristolguild.co.uk

6 – 27 October

NICHOLAS HELY-HUTCHINSON Sky Blue Framing and Gallery 27 North View, Westbury Park, Bristol. Tel: 0117 973 3995 www.skybluefineart.com

October – November Nicholas is best known for his unique interpretation of English countryside and coastal paths. There will also be a new range of limited edition prints.

The West Bristol Arts Trail takes place across homes and other venues and is a celebration of local creativity. The weekend presents the chance to view, and perhaps buy, diverse works of art. Around 100 artists will be displaying their work, ranging from 2D and 3D textile work to pottery and multi-media paintings.

A submission at last year’s Autumn Exhibition

The 11 members of Bath Textile Artists present this exhibition looking at ancestors’ stories as a theme in their work.

RWA Queens Road, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 973 5129 www.rwa.org.uk

21 October – 30 December

Nicholas Hely-Hutchinson, Cliff Top Walk

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Bringing to a close a fantastic year of exhibitions at the RWA, the Autumn Exhibition showcases the cream of painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture and architecture selected and curated by an expert panel from thousands of submitted works. Last year’s exhibition featured 508 works by 338 artists, with every piece for sale. This year there will also be an art clinic – a service to guide new collectors in purchasing artwork.

Chris Harley, Untitled


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Mats Rydstern Oct 13 - Nov 7

Solo Exhibition

Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

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“Citroner” by Mats Rydstern

Tel 0117 929 2527

www.limetreegallery.com

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ARTS&EXHIBITIONS SIGHT OF SOUND

Suzanne Partridge, Scape Goat

MATS RYDSTERN

Mats Rydstern, Stilleben med Rod Kaffekanna

View Art Gallery 159-161 Hotwell Road, Bristol. Tel: 05603 116753. www.viewartgallery.co.uk

▲ REAL AND IMAGINED LIVES

Until 11 November This exhibition explores how music and sound influences the visual arts. Sight of Sound takes you on a symphonic journey that stimulates multiple senses. The show features a diverse group of artwork by local and international artists whose creativity has been taken to new dimensions.

Lime Tree Gallery 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 929 2527 www.limetreegallery.com

13 October – 7 November Lime Tree Gallery is the only gallery outside Sweden to represent Mats, and he has built up a considerable following in this country. This will be the first chance to see his new works in almost three years. His exhibited works comprises mostly his landscapes, nudes, and still life pieces.

AUTUMN EXHIBITION MATTI BRAUN

Coldharbour Framery & Gallery 111 Coldharbour Road, Westbury Park, Bristol. Tel: 0117 944 6244 www.coldharbourgallery.co.uk

Opens 15 October Around 25 artists from Bristol and the south west show their work alongside the latest painting and prints from regulars Jenny Urquhart and Abigail McDougall. There will also be new pieces from Merlyn Chesterman, North Devon artist and expert in the Chinese art of wood-cuts. Mary Dearden joins the regular ceramicists.

Unknown Artist, 1723 unknown woman possibly Lady Arabella Stuart © National Portrait Gallery, London

M Shed Princes Wharf, Wapping Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 352 6600 www.mshed.org

20 October – 6 January ART ON THE HILL Various venues Various venues across South Bristol www.artonthehill.org.uk

On loan from the National Portrait Gallery, London this exhibition looks at identity through fame and anonymity, reality and fiction and how people will be remembered.

Arnolfini 16 Narrow Quay, Bristol. Tel: 0117 917 2300 www.arnolfini.org.uk

6 October – 6 January

6 & 7 October The Windmill Hill and Victoria Park Arts Trail is an annual event taking place across South Bristol. Around 90 artists and performers will be exhibiting and performing a wide range of work in private houses and community venues. On Sunday the trail will close with a Jubilee prom concert in St Michael’s Church. 52 The Bristol Magazine

Matti Braun, R.T S.R V.S

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Ida Kar, Iris Murdoch 1957 © National Portrait Gallery, London

Matti Braun’s solo exhibition, Gost Log, will present a selection of key works by the Cologne-based artist from the last 15 years, along with new works. Matti is interested in the way in which meaning shifts between different contexts. His practice explores cultural misunderstandings and their impact on forms and ideas. His work is often based on concrete histories and stories of people and notions, but abstracts away from these into his own formal and conceptual explorations.


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News in brief ■ Laura Hilton has taken over from Mike Rowland as visitor services manager of Clifton Suspension Bridge. Mike has retired after 11 years, while Laura joins the team from the Olympic Park, where she managed sales and retail opportunities during the Games, following six years in Staffordshire working with museums. Laura will be working towards the bridge’s 150th anniversary on 8 December 2014. “I have always been fascinated by industrial history and the chance to work with such an amazing structure is a dream come true. I am looking forward to developing new resources for visitors – and exploring the hidden history of the bridge” said Laura.

Memory Lane built for elderly residents A mock 1950s street has been created within the grounds of a care home in Winterbourne, designed for elderly residents to enjoy and to spark memories of their youth. Residents of Blossom Fields care home for the elderly and The Grove, specialist dementia care home next door will be able to literally walk down Memory Lane and visit a Post Office, with a genuine George VI post box in the wall, the White Horse pub, a telephone box and a bus stop with a seat. Christopher Taylor, senior manager at Grove Care, said:

“Some of the people we care for ask staff if they can go out to the shops, the pub or to the bus. This will enable staff to allow them to get their coats on and go down to Memory Lane. It is a safe environment for them.

We are filling the street with 1950s memorabilia – ration books, old newspapers, shop window displays, posters and groceries that will all create interest and prompt conversations and memories.”

■ Water Babies in Bristol, part of the national baby swimming lessons network, has been crowned Best Independent Business in Great Britain at The Great Exhibition 2012 Awards.

Cracking effort from the lawyers in Lycra Winners are voted for by the public in categories spanning across arts, culture and business. Bryony Johnstone from Water Babies Bristol said: “Baby swimming lessons are a great activity for babies and parents to enjoy and offer the chance for parents to meet other mums and dads. Our aim is to create a really fun, sociable and energetic atmosphere so we are touched that parents who have enjoyed our lessons took the time to vote for us.”

A team of lawyers from Burges Salmon in Bristol has completed a three day cycle challenge, covering over 320 miles from one of the great cheesemaking sites, Wensleydale all the way back to Bristol – all while towing a 21kg truckle of cheese. The cycling challenge is part of a campaign to raise up to £25,000 for the firm’s Charity of the Year, Wallace and Gromit’s Bristol-based Grand Appeal. Burges Salmon partner Keith Beattie, who took part in the ride, said: “We wanted a fun way of supporting this serious cause and,

given the Wallace and Gromit link, it had to involve Wensleydale cheese. The ride itself was incredible and gruelling all at the same time – but we have had fantastic support.” Burges Salmon partner Richard Knight and his wife Irene experienced first-hand work of the hospital’s cardiac team when their daughter Ellen was born in June last year with two major heart defects. At eight days old she underwent surgery, which saved her life. Sponsors can visit: www.justgiving.com/ wensleydaletobristolbybike.

Exemplary dozen to be recognised for long service to city hospital Nuffield Health is to honour the work of some of its longest serving staff at an awards ceremony to be held at the Bristol Hospital later this month. Twelve members of staff represent a combined 140 years of serving Bristol’s healthcare needs. The long service awards will be presented by Ashley Livesey, hospital director, Elaine Collins, 54 The Bristol Magazine

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head of clinical services, and Graeme Stacey, commercial manager. Ashley Livesey said: “With the new state-of-the-art medical facility well on its way at our Chesterfield Hospital site in Clifton, we are making a significant investment in the future health and wellbeing of Bristol and this commitment is matched by our staff’s dedication to

the local community.” The Long Service Awards is a group-wide scheme of recognition for outstanding service. The 12 are: Sharon Carpentieri, theatre practitioner, 20 years of service, Susan Moore, healthcare assistant, 15 years, Jeanette Garrett, healthcare assistant, 15 years, Susan Phillips, medical records clerk, ten years of service, Andrea Georgeart,

clinical services manager, ten years of service, Imelda Jilhano, staff nurse, ten years, Josie Matute, staff nurse, ten years, Shelly Torren, theatre practitioner, ten years, Ninebeth Buccat, staff nurse, ten years, Susan Deal, staff nurse, ten years, Eithne Noonan, staff nurse, ten years, Tina Lewis, porter, ten years, and Halina Davies, theatre practitioner, ten years.


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News in brief ■ A busy summer schedule has rocketed Bedminster fireworks company Skyburst to a record-breaking year. Alan Christie, managing director, said the company turned over £151,000 between June and September. Skyburst presented 101 displays and are now gearing up for their busiest time of year. Alan said: “October-November looks set to be bigger than ever with turnover expected to be around £280,000 over a total of 120 displays.” ■ Legal recruitment consultancy, Austen Lloyd is opening a new office in Queen Square under a deal secured by property consultants Jones Lang LaSalle. Austen Lloyd will relocate from north Somerset as part of an ongoing national expansion project. The company, which recruits legal candidates from the newly qualified to partner level roles in private practices and in-house organisations, is undergoing a recruitment drive to meet demand. ■ Sharp Family Law has appointed family law specialist Tina MarshallKelliher to its team, serving Bath and the surrounding area. Tina combines her years of legal expertise with her perspective as a mother and understands that families want to avoid divorce having destructive consequences for family members. ■ The government has allocated £12m in matched funding to kick start its Green Deal energy efficiency scheme in seven cities – including Bristol – in which money will be allocated to retrofit homes and non-domestic properties to improve energy efficiency. At The Big Green Show, visitors will be able to talk to impartial experts on every aspect of the Green Deal, including the potential problems. The show is held at the National Self Build and Renovation Centre (NSBRC) and runs from 26 – 28 October. Admission to the show is free.

REUNION: ex-Wills workers got together at the Old Imperial Tobacco Factory recently to see how their former workplace has been transformed into homes as the Lakeshore project. Some 120 exemployees enjoyed a tour of the ecofriendly site, in which some homes are being sold by developer Urban Splash on a shared ownership scheme

Private bank extends services to city A new private bank is being launched in Bristol. Jeff Durant, regional director for Bristol and the south west at Duncan Lawrie Private Bank hosted a launch reception where guests sampled local food and drink, to celebrate the best of British. Jeff is working on the growth and expansion of the bank in Bristol and specifically,

developing its private banking operation, which will officially launch in 2013. Jeff, with a career spanning 28 years, is keen to convey the message that there is an alternative, more traditional and personalised banking option for aspiring professionals and those seeking better wealth advice. He said: “There is a huge

opportunity for us in Bristol, where we believe there is a significant need for private banking and the strong client-led service offering that we provide.” The private banking operation will sit alongside the existing financial planning and investment management services that the bank offers. Visit: www.duncanlawrie.com

Free solar power assessment for homes Bristol based company Solarsense has seen a rise in interest in renewable energy from homeowners and businesses – in partly due to the recent nine per cent rise in fuel costs. Homes installing solar photovoltaic (PV) panels can get the Feed-In Tariff (FiT), a cash incentive that’s guaranteed for 20 years and index linked. Even at today’s lower FiT rates, this is as good an investment as it ever was. Under the FiT, people are paid for each unit of electricity they generate, plus all this electricity is free to offset bills.

Homeowners can sell the surplus to utility companies. Interest is also now growing in solar thermal, which use the sun’s energy to heat hot water, together with heat pumps that extract energy from the air or ground to warm the home. These systems will be eligible for grants and payments under the Renewable Heat Incentive and Premium Payments Scheme; as will Solarsense’s new 90 per cent fuel efficient biomass wood pellet boiler. Solarsense has almost 20 years experience installing thousands

of solar energy and solar thermal systems, as well as a growing number of heat pumps. In 2011 the business was voted Company of the Year by the Renewable Energy Association. Solarsense offers a free noobligation survey of homes to check suitability for PV panels, and for other renewable technologies. Once the installation is complete, homeowners will be given an Energy Performance Certificate – an essential document if they want to sell or rent the property.

Bristolian Katherine Sparkes has been named a 2012 Ten Outstanding Young Person of the World (TOYP) recipient in the category of moral and/or environmental leadership in the Junior Chamber International’s world-wide award scheme which recognises outstanding young professionals. Previous winners include John F Kennedy, Henry Kissinger, and Elvis Presley. Each year, ten young citizens are selected following a series of judging panels as well as a public 56 The Bristol Magazine

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vote. The top ten will be honoured at the 2012 JCI TOYP Ceremony in Taipei, Taiwan next month. Katherine has been named for her dedication and contribution to moral and environmental leadership. She set up her own business, Flamingo aged 22, specialising in making corporate social responsibility accessible for all. Her work has taken her around the globe building schools, installing water supplies, training teachers and health care professions and providing supplies

October 2012

to underprivileged people in the UK and abroad. Her aim is always to help people help themselves and each project is developed to be sustainable and give long-term benefits that can transform lives. Furthermore, they bring tangible results for the businesses involved. Katherine said: “We are committed for the long haul and strive to ensure CSR can create mutually beneficial relationships between businesses and those in need.”

Katherine Sparkes

Global recognition for young entrepreneur


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It’s not all in the Planning Laura Wilkinson Property Law Specialist with AMD Solicitors looks at considerations you should bear in mind before putting up that extension.

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ou may have read very recently that the Government has just announced a relaxation in Planning Laws from 1 October 2012 in an attempt to boost the economy by encouraging people to improve their homes. Previously planning consent was required to erect an extension of up to 4 metres deep on detached properties and 3 metres deep on semi-detached or terraced properties. No consent will now be required to erect an extension of up to 8 metres deep on detached properties and 6 metres deep on others. In addition the previous “maximum volume allowance” for ground floor extensions has been removed although it will still apply to loft conversion. Loft conversions for detached properties will not now need planning consent provided that any dormer windows do not add more than 50 cubic metres to the property. As a result of the relaxation of these rules home owners should be able to carry out extensions or alterations to their property without the previous bureaucracy and delay involved in the past. Needless to say, before carrying out any extension or alteration works to your property you should always contact the Local Planning Office to ensure that there are no consents required for the work. You should be aware that other consents for example Building Regulation, Listed Building or Conservation Area Consents may be required. In addition, if any of the building work you are proposing comes within a certain distance of the boundary of your property than the Party Wall Act applies and you will have to serve appropriate notices on your neighbours. You should also check your Title Deeds or ask your solicitor to do so to see if there is a restrictive covenant against your property. Restrictive covenants in title documents are quite common on both older and newer built properties. Even if imposed in very old title deeds they may still be binding and could either prevent such work being undertaken at all or may require you to get consent of a previous land owner. If you do not have your title deeds but have a registered title you can obtain a copy from HM Land Registry. Your solicitor will be able to advise you further. Therefore, provided the new development falls within the latest guidelines, neighbours will not be in a position to object to the work carried out. Good news perhaps for some householders but not always necessarily good news for the neighbours! For further information about this or any other property matters please contact Laura or a member of her team on 0117 9621205 or email laurawilkinson@amdsolicitors.com.

BRISTOL IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS FROM CHINA Mark Pooley of local Chartered Accountants, Hollingdale Pooley, is visiting China in November 2012 as part of the Bristol Trade Mission to Guangzhou, Hangzhou, and Shanghai. The trade mission is being organised and supported by the Bristol Branch of the Institute of Directors, Bristol City Council and The Bristol China Partnership with the aim of increasing: • exports to China by businesses based in Bristol and the South West; and • inward investment from Chinese businesses to the region. Government figures show that currently only 5% of businesses in Bristol and the South West export goods or services. A key growth policy of the government is to encourage private sector businesses to export. China is the second largest economy in the world and growing rapidly. The trade mission gives Bristol businesses the opportunity to make the first step in developing a strategy to sell their goods and services to a dynamic and growing economy. Hollingdale Pooley has joined a consortium of professional advisors in Bristol, Red Dragon Advisors, to provide Chinese and other overseas companies with a “one stop shop” advice service of how to set up a branch or subsidiary in Bristol and the South West. The consortium members are: • • • • •

Gregg Latchams, Solicitors HR and Training Solutions Ltd, HR Advisors Systemagic, Business IT Support Join in China, Business Advice Agency Hollingdale Pooley, Chartered Accountants

Mark will report back to Bristol magazine his experiences in China.

© AMD Solicitors

Winner of the local law firm of the year award 2011

Telephone us on (0117) 9621205 or visit our website www.amdsolicitors.com www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Hollingdale Pooley Bramford House, 23 Westfield Park, Clifton, Bristol BS6 6LT

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News in brief INVESTING IN THEIR FUTURE

Calder House

■ Calder House, which specialises in helping dyslexic children return to mainstream education, is championing an exciting new approach to improve pupils’ ‘working memory.’ The school, between Bath and Chippenham, is among the first in the country to start using an innovative application called Cog Med, which is specifically designed to develop working memory skills. The school has hosted a training day to explain the benefits of this approach to other schools and educators. Calder House director of studies, Ian Perks, said: “Working memory is what allows us to store information in our minds for short periods of time and to use this information. Recent research indicates that it may be the single most important factor in determining general intellectual ability. Developing our pupils’ working memory is an important step on the path to improving a wide range of other learning skills and helping dyslexic children to achieve their full potential.” Calder House has an Outstanding rating from Ofsted. Children typically spend just over two years at the school before returning to mainstream education. ■ Pupils at Bristol’s The Red Maids’ School have been crowned the UK’s top ‘greenagers’ after creating an eco-friendly scheme, encouraging teens in Westburyon-Trym, to celebrate and enjoy their natural environment. Survival expert Ray Mears called for pupils across the UK to devise a group activity that inspired their fellow teens’ sense of adventure, to encourage them to put their gadgets down and have fun in the great outdoors. The Red Maids’ School project, to encourage fellow pupils to spend time outdoors by rewarding them with pedalpowered smoothies, impressed Ray Mears and the judges with its originality and creativity. The winning schools will now have the opportunity to take part in a survival master class, and mini-adventure, with Ray Mears at The Outward Bound Trust’s Ullswater Centre in the Lake District next month, thanks to sponsors npower.

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Clifton College has opened two new day houses in its prep school to celebrate its 150th anniversary, the culmination of a £12.5m investment over five years. The project has seen significant sums invested across the school, which has developed top of the range sports facilities to rival the best in the region, state-of-the-art science and music schools, including 17 rehearsal rooms and a recording studio, and a refurbishment of the Redgrave Theatre. The final step in the process was the opening of a £3.2m day house property. The new building consists of two separate day houses for boys and girls, each with its own study area, lounge, fully fitted games room and cooking and shower facilities for their 8-13 year old residents. John Milne, headmaster of the prep school said: “Over the past five years our approach has been to combine excellence in teaching and learning with the widest range of extra-curricular opportunities, all supported by a substantial investment in sporting and pastoral facilities. The impact of this approach is

already being seen, with record A-Level results achieved last year which saw 56 per cent of all results graded A* and A, and 16 pupils awarded places at Oxbridge.” Clifton College has also made a range of scholarships, awards and bursaries available for gifted children. These awards are for high achieving pupils in a variety of disciplines including

academia, sport, music and even organ playing. Open days are being held to offer parents and pupils the chance to find out more, with the open day for Pre and Upper Schools taking place on 6 October, the sixth form open evening being held on 10 October, and alternative appointments available on request.

E-learning helps take sting out of maths A Bristol parent who was struggling to help her children with their GCSE maths is celebrating the success of her online teaching programme, Stuck on Homework. Helen Royle, of Henleaze, and partner Teresa Watts, ex-colleagues at the BBC and ITV set up their business in 2009. They applied for a grant from the Technology Strategy Board to do a feasibility study and spent four months testing the idea with GCSE pupils, teachers and education organisations. With

investment from Sir Terry Leahy, the outgoing CEO of Tesco, they built the site and filmed more than 200 video lessons with maths teacher Rebecca Johnson. The results of a recent survey showed 82 per cent of those students who took GCSE maths using Stuck on Homework had guaranteed or improved their predicted exam result, while 59 per cent of those student subscribers increased their results by between one and three grades by subscribing to Stuck on Homework.

Make an informed choice for sixth form The St Brendan’s College campus was recently re-built and more parents and students are opting to look at what the only dedicated sixth form college in the area is able to offer. There’s a wide range of courses, such as the International Baccalaureate, A-Levels, BTEC level 3 and level 2, and GCSEs. Students are able to combine almost any blend of A Levels and BTEC Level 3 to create a programme which meets their needs. Support for students was judged Outstanding by Oftsed

for 2012. Students benefit from a wide range of educational visits and enrichment activities and obtain excellent results. Many progress from St Brendan’s to university, employment or apprenticeships. The College has a faith base and regards each person as an individual creation of God. Principal, Michael Jaffrain said: “We welcome all who are happy to be educated in a college which promotes an awareness of faith, tolerance and respect for others, in a manner which enriches each and every

student.” A series of open events is being held for students to make informed decisions about courses, view the facilities and to hear at first-hand about all aspects of life at St Brendan’s from staff and students. Open events are taking place on Saturday 20 October (10.30am – 2pm), Wed 24 October (6pm – 9pm) and Thurs 25 October (6pm – 9pm). Details about courses can be found, visit: www.stbrendanssixthform.com, or for a prospectus, tel: 0117 977 7766.


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HALFtermGUIDE Tyntesfield

Half Term Halloween Rosie Parry picks out the best places around Bristol to entertain the kids Halloween Festival at Bristol Zoo Gardens

At-Bristol Harbourside, Bristol. Tel: 0845 345 1235 www.at-bristol.org.uk At-Bristol has plenty of events and activities to keep children of all ages and interests happy this half term. This science hub enables children to explore the world through many machines and props, often created and made by the team at AtBristol. Until 12 October they can try their hand at sporty activities in the Try-Athlon Live Lab: discover how muscles work and why making a simple movement might not be quite so straightforward after all… A family science show, Good Vibrations, begins daily from 13 October until 2 December. You can explore how sound is made and how sound waves get around as well as have the chance to play some instruments. For little ones, the storytelling sessions continue at 11.30am in the holidays, taking them on imaginative adventures full of sounds, actions and interactive experiments. For Halloween, AtBristol gets really gory with its Dissection Lab from 13 October until 5 November. Children can get under the skin of what makes our bodies tick by using body paints to visualise veins, muscles and bones. There will be real organ dissections and they can make their own fake blood specimen to take home.

Bristol Zoo Gardens Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 9747300 www.bristolzoo.org.uk Spooky thrills can be had by all at Bristol Zoo Gardens during its annual Halloween Festival in half term from 27 – 31 October. Build up the suspense until Halloween night with a host of activities including a hauntingly good trail around the zoo gardens, scary face painting,

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competitions, spooky storytelling, creepy costumes and much more. Then, on Halloween night, 31 October, join the zoo for Fright Night in which the entire zoo will be dark and filled with terrifyingly ghostly creatures of the night – out loose and hungry. This evening of terror is for children aged 14 and above. Dinozoo also continues until 4 November, so this is your last chance to get up close to moving, roaring, hissing, growling dinosaurs... if you dare – watch out for the creatures who spray water.

Windmill Hill City Farm Philip Street, Bedminster, Bristol. www.windmillhillcityfarm.org.uk Windmill Hill City Farm is an independent community project with lots to see and do. During half term you can enjoy a local, family day out at its Apple Day on 21 October from noon until 7pm. There will be a whole range of activities including Punch & Judy, a farmers’ market where you can sample and take home local produce, food stalls, storytelling, family and children’s yoga, knitting classes, face painting and music, as well as apple bobbing. LifeCycle UK will be running all sorts of cycling activities including a kids bike swap and individual cycling lessons. There will also be a barbecue with the farm’s own sausages and vegetarian options. The Bristol Farm Shop will be running the bar, selling local beers and cider and Phil Lyons from BCFM will be treating everyone to some fantastic country and western tunes. This will truly be a wonderful day out for all the family. On the weekend before the event as part of the farm’s Active Citizens project supported by the Nominet Trust, you are also invited to join in with a foraging walk on 14 October at 2pm (meet at the farm) to collect apples from local, public spaces to be pressed in the farm’s new apple press on Apple Day.

Bristol Old Vic King Street, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 987 7877 www.bristololdvic.org.uk The refurbished Bristol Old Vic opens its doors to children for the chance to enjoy some half term havoc. If you’re stuck for inspiration, just sit back and relax while the kids have the freedom of the theatre to play games, make a mess and run wild. There will be drawing activities, pirate games and seaside treasure hunts as well as the offer of a picnic for £3.50. The Sea Show by Squashbox Theatre will also be in town from 29 – 31 October between 11am and 2pm; a quirky and fun mix of puppet show, natural history and comedy cabaret. Meet Morweena the beautiful mermaid, Ruan the seagull and salty seadog Captain Pemburthy and celebrate the sea with tall tales, silly slapstick, facts, live music and songs – fun for children and adults of all ages.

Tyntesfield Near Wraxall, North Somerset. Tel: 01275 461 900 www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Embrace the glorious autumnal weather and changing landscape during half term at Tyntesfield. The whole family can enjoy an autumn walk guided by Tyntesfield ranger Darren on 26 October from 10.30am until noon. You will be on the look out for autumn colour, from foliage to fungi while you take in the beautiful grounds. From 27 – 31 October there will be pumpkins galore to celebrate Halloween as the Tyntesfield-grown pumpkins and squashes are on display. There will be a special pumpkin menu in the restaurant and a pumpkin trail around the estate suitable for all ages. On > >


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DO YOU HAVE A SPARE ROOM? FRIENDLY HOSTS WANTED FOR OUR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS We are looking for welcoming, hospitable hosts to accommodate our international students. • Long and short stays available • Great experience • Great rates of pay For more information, please contact: Elaine Sawyer Accommodation Officer 27 Oakfield Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2AT Tel: 0117 909 0911 Fax: 0117 907 7181 Email: elaine@ihbristol.com Web: www.ihbristol.com

Study Travel Exams Holidays

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HALFtermGUIDE SS Great Britain

Spookfest at Longleat Safari Park

Storytelling at At-Bristol

> > Wednesday bring along your own and take part in the best cut pumpkin competition – with bonus prizes for fancy dress too. What better place to enjoy autumn half term than in the woods and at Tyntesfield children can learn how to make a fantastic den out of materials from the woodland floor during the den building day on 29 October. If you would like to take part as a family, however, Tyntesfield are putting on a Family Survival Day – Wild in the Woods – on 3 November, from 10.30am until 3pm as a funpacked day of activities to enjoy outdoors together, including den building, fire-lighting and cooking.

SS Great Britain Great Western Dockyard, Ferry Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 926 0680 www.ssgreatbritain.org The SS Great Britain is a fantastic place to take children this half term to explore the past, have fun and learn at the same time. You can descend under the glass sea; step back in time in the dockyard museum; and discover the true stories of passengers and crew on board the ship. There is a new Victorian soundscape to be enjoyed as a family as the first class dining saloon comes to life in Sounds of the 1800s. You can meander through the stages of dinner starting with guests sitting down to eat, through to tables waiting to be cleared and guests partaking in a spot of gambling, which was generally forbidden. The clinking of cutlery and fine china mingles with the hum of voices as you walk through the saloon, eavesdropping on conversations from another era. Or you can explore the ship through the eyes of passengers and crew on a fun Traveller’s Trail, reuniting passengers with their lost luggage or follow a Victorian guide to the ship re-written by a mischievous passenger, Olcher Fedden. Visitors to the ship and its website are also invited to take a journey to find 66 The Bristol Magazine

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out more about the ship’s most famous Captain – Captain John Gray, who loved the ship but mysteriously disappeared in 1872. Online children can practice diplomacy by solving a dispute with passengers; promoting them to first mate and making an animated Gray climb the ship’s mast with a button bashing game.

Westonbirt Arboretum Tetbury, Gloucestershire. Tel: 01666 880220 www.forestry.gov.uk/westonbirt Inspire the children this half term with autumn’s bounty at Westonbirt Arboretum. From 29 October – 2 November daily you can discover the grounds as a family; meet the traffic light tree and plant a seed to take home. And if the children are preparing for the horrors of Halloween then look out for dead men’s fingers. There will be different seed and leaf craft activities each day. Autumn can be a tough time of the year for birds so at the bird viewing shelter on 21 October you can feed the birds with the RSPB; and make an apple bird feeder to take home. There are also many trails you can follow including wildlife trails, orienteering and cryptic quizzes – a great way to spend time together as a family in the fresh air.

St George’s Bristol Great George Street, off Park Street. Bristol. Box office tel: 0845 40 24 001 www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk St George’s Bristol is one of the leading concert halls in the country and on 29 October children can get ghoulish during its Halloween Playshop at 2.30pm. They are encouraged to come dressed in white, red or black and take part in a session of spooky song, dance and drama games. Or for little ones (3-8 years), join the Bristol Ensemble on 4 November for Bangin’ Brass.

The Sea Show at Bristol Old Vic

Slimbridge Wetland Centre Slimbridge, Gloucestershire. Tel: 01453 891900 www.wwt.org.uk As a haven for birds and wildlife and on the shores of the Severn Estuary, the WWT Slimbridge Wetland Centre is a great place to get away from it all. From 20 – 31 October Slimbridge is turning all spooky and you can take your little monsters to see Duckula, Crane Brain and Freaky Flamingo who are hiding along the Halloween trail through the grounds. If you visit all the Halloween creatures, the kids can decorate their own Halloween cupcake and receive an extra treat if they are dressed up as their favourite scary character. For something less ghoulish, there will also be a programme of activities from 20 – 28 October focusing on the conservation projects that are currently running at the centre. Activities will include: a trail identifying the projects and progress, paper and craft activities, and a map game.

Longleat Safari Park Longleat, Warminster, Wiltshire. Tel: 01985 844400 www.longleat.co.uk There’s a host of Halloween-themed thrills and chills taking place at Longleat over the half term. It’s a great day out for all the family and you will be able to enjoy everything from close encounters with giant bats and creepy crawlies to ghastly ghost tours around Longleat House – search for the mysterious Grey Lady, Longleat’s very own resident ghost. This Spookfest runs from 25 October until 4 November. You can take the pumpkin trail, see magic tricks, balloon modelling and spooky face painting. There will also be a fireworks display on 26 & 27 October to the sound of Halloween-inspired music.


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WEEKENDbreak

CLASSIC TURNS HEADS Many of us dream of owning a classic camper van.Georgette McCready took one out for the weekend to find out if driving and sleeping in a vintage VW is as good as it sounds

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eet Marshall Rawlings. He’s 33, gorgeous and he was mine for a whole, delightful weekend. We met in Westbury-on-Trym on a Friday lunchtime and by tea time were snuggled up together, all cosy, in a field on a campsite in sunny Dorset. Of course it helped that we’d picked the weekend of a perfect Indian summer, so although the Co-op had mince pies out on the shelves I was slapping on the suncream and boldly swimming off the golden sands of Studland Bay while Marshall waited patiently for me in the car park, keeping my towel warm. If you want to make friends on a campsite, my advice is to roll up with a vintage VW camper van. Almost as soon as we pulled up people came over to admire Marshall and to ask how long we’d been together. I came clean and admitted that he wasn’t strictly mine, that we’d got him on weekend hire from Cool Classy Campers, whose business is to restore VWs and send them out on the road to delight a whole range of travellers, from young trendies to families on bucket and spade holidays, to the more mature couple looking for something as a comfortable alternative to camping. We’re generally very happy with our tent, but the VW camper takes camping up to a whole new level, especially when given the vagaries of the British weather. We hooked Marshall up so we had electric light on board, while other luxuries included a fridge, a two-ring gas hob, a small table that slots in easily to a hole in the floor and a range of ingenious little cubbyholes for storage, all hand-built by Philip Heaton, furniture maker. He and his wife, Sarah Millmore, run Cool Classy Campers, and as Sarah is a professional upholsterer all the vans in their stable are stylishly kitted out with designer fabrics. Marshall came over from the States a few years back, a little battered by life. But with a new two-litre engine and a complete re-fit, he runs beautifully. He still retains his left-hand drive and has a massive steering wheel, which makes driving at first a challenge, and then a kick, as you master hill starts with an umbrella handled handbrake, or remember to change gear with the right hand. Once you get behind the wheel there’s the pleasure of pootling along A-roads, knowing you’ve got everything on board – hell, you could even reach for a cold beer from the fridge while stopped at traffic lights. We, of course, were more sensible than that, and stopped pretending to be starring in an episode of Scooby Doo, long enough to stop for a wander round Blandford Forum and indulge in a cream tea. I’m not going to divulge the name of the campsite we found near Swanage, as it’s run on a first-come, first-served basis, which means if I recommend it you may not be able to get in – or worse, you might beat me to it next year. The Isle of Purbeck is a great weekend destination. If it’s warm and sunny, as it was when we were there, take a picnic off to the beach, safe in the knowledge that all your cheese will be fine in the van fridge. And, rain or shine, it’s a great place for walkers. There is the coastal path, providing the opportunity to stop off at the eccentric and rather wonderful Square and Compass at Worth Matravers. This 18th century inn houses a small fossil museum and regularly hosts live music, particularly folk. Its menu is simple – you can choose a pie or a pasty. The drinks menu is considerably more varied and includes a wide range of cider, some of which

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should be approached with caution if you’re planning much walking after lunch. The undulating coast path takes in some impressive views, mainly of the wide bay, looking over Swanage and towards Poole. On the way down to Swanage take a small diversion to look at Dancing Ledge, a spectacular flat outcrop of rock so named as it’s said to be the size of a ballroom. Swanage is one of those seaside towns which takes you straight back to the 1950s, with its stumpy pier, fish and chip cafés and long sandy beach. Inland is the jewel in Purbeck’s crown, Corfe Castle, which stands proud on its mount, dominating the landscape for miles around. The National Trust owned castle was a Royalist stronghold during the English Civil War, besieged twice by Parliamentarians and later reduced to ruins by Cromwell. In the evening, we watch the sun go down over the ancient stone walls as the Dorset sheep nibble happily at the turf, sitting at a table and chairs beside Marshall and sipping a glass of chilled Cava, thoughtfully provided to all customers by Cool Classy Campers. Dinner is cooked on the stove, the washing up dealt with and stowed neatly away, eventually we settle down for the night, warm and snug behind the flowery curtains. While we’re away our car has been looked after in Westburyon-Trym and all we have to do is deposit our clothes and bedding in our car, sweep out the sand and hand over the keys. Although owning a VW camper is many people’s California Dream, hiring one for a holiday makes a pretty convenient substitute. I am not surprised to hear that brides often choose a VW as their wedding vehicle, suitably decked out in ribbons. ■ For more information about Cool Classy Campers’ fleet, visit: www.coolclassycampers.co.uk

STEP BACK IN TIME: main picture, the restored VW from Cool Classy Campers Left, Corfe Castle dominates the landscape Right, the candy stripe interior of Marshall Rawlings


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FOOD&DRINK

LABOUR OF THEIR FRUITS As the apples ripen in the famous orchards of Somerset James Russell visits the specialist shop which is converting so many Bristolians to the pleasures of real cider

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hristmas Steps has always been one of Bristol’s hidden treasures but nowadays there is even more reason to visit the historic shopping street. Well, perhaps not ‘street’. Would ‘lane’ be better? No, it’s a staircase, and halfway up, just at the point where you’re wishing that a) there was an escalator or b) you’d been fell-running more often, you come to a shop that could only really be in Bristol. Compared to the old stone steps and the buildings on either side this is a new shop, but it belongs to a venerable west country tradition; they don’t call our part of the world Ciderland for nothing. Two years have passed since Peter Snowman and Nick Davis took the plunge and opened the Bristol Cider Shop. For this I feel slightly responsible, as they made the decision after coming along to the launch of my book The Naked Guide to Cider, the main premise of which is that anyone can make cider if they’re prepared to work hard and stick to a few basic rules. The same evidently applies to selling cider…

We said, if we sell it, we sell it. ❝ What we don’t sell, we’ll have to drink ❞

“We’d been thinking about opening a shop simply because there wasn’t one,” Peter explained when I visited his cider emporium recently. “Then the night of the launch we decided to go for it. “We had very few preconceptions. It was impossible to know beforehand what it would be like because there wasn’t a cider shop before this. Basically it was a complete punt.” The initial strategy was brilliantly simple. The entrepreneurial duo drove round Somerset in a van and bought numerous barrels of cider from producers they knew by reputation. Peter explained the marketing strategy at the time: “We said if we sell it, we sell it. What we don’t sell, we’ll have to drink.” They needn’t have worried. When the shop opened on 1 December 2010 people turned up in droves, consuming so much cider that Peter and Nick had to restock three times a week. It 70 The Bristol Magazine

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wasn’t until January that things calmed down sufficiently for them to start thinking properly about what they were trying to achieve. They’d known from the start that they didn’t want to sell just any old cider, but early success enabled them to focus their ambitions more clearly. Today they operate with a few simple rules; they sell only ciders and perries made using 100 per cent juice, by producers based within 50 miles of Bristol, and no product goes on sale until they’ve tried it to make sure it’s up to scratch (which must be a terrible chore!). That they’re able to do this is thanks to a delightful coincidence of geography and history. Bristol is surrounded on all sides by countryside perfectly suited to the growing of cider apples and perry pears, with a soft, damp climate that allows fruit to mature slowly; the cider apple harvest begins in late August with the popular Bristol apple Morgan Sweet and continues well into November, by which time you’re collecting late varieties with rich and complex flavours. Cidermaking was well established in the region before the Dissolution of the Monasteries, but in the latter part of the 17th century cider and perry of previously unheard-of excellence began to rival wine as the drink of choice among fashionable Londoners (diarist Samuel Pepys being one). These new delights were strong, dry and sparkly. In fact there is ample evidence that cider was being made in the Three Counties by the Champagne Method – many years before its supposed invention in France. Subsequently cider took a turn down market, and acquired its associations with rustic drunkenness, but the finer traditions were preserved here and there and in recent years there has been a fabulous renaissance in cider and perry led mainly by producers in Somerset, Devon, the Three Counties and the Welsh borders. If you visit the Bristol Cider Shop you’ll find, therefore, not only traditional farmhouse cider but also perries and ciders made to such high standards that they knock supermarket sparkling wines into a cocked hat. Names like Olivers, Once Upon A Tree and Ashridge may be unfamiliar, but try one of their bottle-fermented or bottle-conditioned ciders or perries and you will be astounded. Most of the producers represented at the shop

RISING STARS: ciders and perries all made by producers within 50 miles of Bristol continue the long tradition of cidermaking


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FOOD&DRINK work on a small scale, so they’re less well known than the bigname brands. The upside is that Peter and Nick deal personally, on a regular basis, with the producers themselves; not only can they tell you which cider or perry is most likely to dazzle your individual tastebuds but they can also give you insights into the making of each one. While I was in the shop one evening a steady stream of people came through the door, some looking for a flagon of farmhouse cider from a well-respected producer like Roger Wilkins, while others were in search of something more sophisticated. Like an old-fashioned wine merchant, Peter offered suggestions and advice based on his experience, along with the odd anecdote about the world of cider. In a way the Bristol Cider Shop is an old-fashioned shop, one based around the shopkeeper’s personal interest and connections, but in other ways it is very much of the moment. There’s a lively website, online shop and blog, and an increasing focus on events. This month there are two cidermaking days, giving would-be makers the opportunity to go out to a traditional Gloucestershire orchard, collect apples and press juice for their own cider, and there is also an ongoing programme of cider dinners, visits to producers and so on. An Apple Day event is planned for Saturday 20 October. “The level of interest in quality cider really is amazing,” Peter says, “Ten years ago there just wasn’t the demand for a shop like ours, but now cider and perry are massively on the rise as part of the local-organic food movement. And as demand increases the number of producers increases too. People who started out making cider for fun are upping production.” Meanwhile, people are now coming to Bristol just to visit the shop. If you go along, you’ll see why. ■ Visit www.bristolcidershop.co.uk. The Bristol Cider Shop features on the new Bristol Cider Map, available with the updated edition of The Naked Guide to Cider – out soon from Tangent Books.

The Star & Dove

The Star & Dove, formally The Cumberland Hotel with emphasis on Old English fayre. Extensive wine list, six rotating local real ales, forty bottled beers and utilising over a dozen independent organic suppliers The tavern serves up small plates of British fayre  The dining room serves 12th-18th century historically referenced dishes with a technical modern approach  Christmas Tudor feast, Gala diner from Henry VIII 11th year of Reign £25ph The Star and Dove 75-7St. Lukes rd, Totterdown, Bristol BS3 4FR • Tel: 01179 332 892

www.staranddove.co.uk www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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FOOD&DRINK

Quick bites ■ Half-term sees the latest Love Food Festival at Paintworks taking on a Halloween theme. On Sunday 28 October from 10.30am until 4pm there’ll be entertainment for all ages, including an indoor food market, global street food, children’s activities, a bar, café, and music. Local sculptors Hiatt Evans and Laurens Nockels will be carving Jack’o’lanterns for people bringing their own pumpkins, or who buy a gourd or pumpkin on the day. Childen can take part in a fancy dress competition, toffee apple making made with a foraged berry recipe, children’s capoeira workshops and arts and crafts tables to make bat-bunting, witches hats and ghoulish masks. ■ Cornish food producers will be proving there’s more to the county than pasties and clotted cream as they prepare to cross the Tamar and invade Brunel’s Old Station in Bristol over the weekend of 3/4 November. From award-winning ales such as Sharp’s Doom Bar and St Austell Brewery’s Tribute, to champion cheeses such as Cornish Blue and from succulent grassreared meats to designer-inspired chocolates, Cornwall has one of the richest larders in the world. Headlining in the demonstration theatre is twoMichelin starred chef Nathan Outlaw, who appears on BBC’s Great British Menu and Saturday Kitchen. Fellow west country chef Mitch Tonks will partner Nathan in an seafood special demonstration on Sunday 4 November. Throughout the weekend the stage will play host to other masterclasses, tasting sessions and challenges. Entrance to the show is £5.

Natural winner Heavenly Hedgerows, which is based in Keynsham, has won gold and silver at the Taste of the West Awards. Owner, Chris Westgate, said: “This is the first year I have entered. It’s a real boost for a small business like mine.” Heavenly Hedgerows received gold for its hawthorn jelly and silver for its elderberry and bramble jam. It was also short-listed for the Bristol Local Food Producers Awards and Bath Good Food Awards in two categories. Chris said: “It’s the public votes that make products for the Bath Good Food Awards, so we couldn’t have made it this far without your help.” Heavenly Hedgerows makes foods from hedgerow fruits and berries. Visit: www.heavenlyhedgerows.co.uk.

University hosts two-day food festival Top chefs and west country food and drink producers will be gathered under one roof over the weekend of 27/28 October for the second annual Bristol Home and Food Festival. Over the two days top chefs, including BBC TV’s Saturday Kitchen star Martin Blunos will be putting on live demonstrations.

There will be dozens of exhibitors showing their wares, from furnishings to wine, and from home improvements to Bristol’s own locally produced 6 O’Clock Gin, pictured. There will be the chance to sample all kinds of west country produce. The festival is at the University of the West of England exhibition

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October 2012

and conference centre at Frenchay and there is parking on site. Visit: www.homeandfood festival.co.uk for more information on the festival.

Chefs race against cars in cook-off

■ The award-winning Arch House Deli in Clifton is holding a series of free tasting sessions each Saturday morning this autumn, offering small niche producers and suppliers with the chance to showcase their products to customers. On Saturday 20 October it’s the turn of Bath Harvest, which AGAINST THE CLOCK: chef Toby Gritten in produces rapeseed oil.

72 The Bristol Magazine

IN THE WORKPLACE: Chris Westgate gathering berries

Three of Bristol’s finest chefs were put on the spot to cook an omelette in the time it takes a convertible AudiR8 Spider to raise and lower its roof electronically – just 30 seconds – as part of a culinary themed launch of the new Audi A3. Toby Gritten, Chris Wicks and Martin Blunos all took to the stage for the challenge, then each prepared a course for guests to sample. The stage and kitchen were laid on by Nailsea Electricals. Chris Wicks prepared scallops, Toby Gritten venison and Martin Blunos demonstrated how to make

his trademark dish of egg and soldiers. This included his top tips for cleaning removing the top off a raw egg without breaking the shell. On hand to make sure the guests at the Audi showroom, Cribbs Causeway, were enjoying canapes made earlier by the chefs were catering and hospitality students from the City of Bristol College. Audi is one of the sponsors of The Chefs’ Forum, which combines a network system for chefs to bringing on new talent from students at the City of Bristol College.


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www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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THE WINE COLUMN Angela Mount, wine and food critic, chooses wines for autumn suppers and Bonfire Night

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fter a whisper of sunshine and heat in mid September, we can hope for a glimmer of warmth in October, but that may well be more from the food we are cooking and the wine we are drinking. This month I’ve been thinking about evenings drawing in, and as the skies darken ever earlier, we instinctively start to move to the indoor hub of our homes, the kitchen, and draw the curtains closed. This month, I’m looking at top choices for one pot suppers. Wines that will go with the stews, braised dishes and casseroles, that we love. Wines that will be perfect for the weekend gatherings and for keeping warm on Bonfire Night. Rather than choose the wine first, I’ve turned things on their head and chosen wines to match four typical autumn dishes. Thai chicken curry Mariona Moscatel, Alicante 2011 I love discovering unusual wines, and here’s one of them. Made from the naturally sweet grape Moscatel, with a touch of Sauvignon blanc, in Alicante, southern Spain, this is a such a vibrant, deliciously fruity wine. Bold aromas of white peach, and honeysuckle, followed by intensely fruity flavours and a zesty crisp finish. The perfect wine to cope with sweet coconut, chilli and heat. Classic fish stew Picpoul de Pinet Roquemoliere 2011 Just because the nights are closing in, it doesn’t mean we have to give up on fresh, lively white wines. Fish stew, in all its various guises, cries out for a crisp, zesty white wine, which works with cream or tomato based sauces. And this wine is great as an aperitif, or as a glass for the chef. From the southern French region, this delightful dry white is full of vibrant citrus fruit character with a tangy, mouth-tingling edge. Lasagne or spicy spaghetti Boheme Primitivo del Salento 2011 This is a ridiculously low-priced, soft spicy red, from the wonderful island of Sicily, which is absolutely spot on with simple braised casseroles, pasta dishes and stews. It’s just so food friendly, it’s packed with ripe cherry fruit, a touch of mocha and a sprinkling of herbs, with an appealing, savoury and beguiling edge – try it with any pasta dish. Spiced beef casserole Crasto 2010, Douro, Portugal Portuguese wines are so often overlooked, but are some of my favourites. This one is a real treat; it’s from the Douro region, in northern Portugal which is where all Port is produced, and is made from the same grapes. It’s rich and powerful, with a deep, fig and plum character, and a hint of dark chocolate. Velvety and intense, it’s a classic autumn warmer.

OCTOBER’S CHOICE Wine with beef: Red wines are the order of the day here, and this is where the big, full bodied classics come into their own. For roast beef opt for a cabernet-based red, such as a claret, or Australian or Chilean cabernet sauvignon. Hearty stews need richer, bolder wines, such as Chateauneuf, Californian Zinfandel,or a rich, ripe malbec from Argentina, such as the sumptuously rich and powerful Vistalba Corte B, with its seductively powerful, dense blackberry fruit and spice flavours. Great Western Wine is at Wells Road, Bath BA2 3AP, tel: 01225 322810. Visit: www.greatwesternwine.co.uk. 74 The Bristol Magazine

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Roste a Piggie The Star & Dove Totterdown prides itself on producing recipes adapted from historic dishes. This is an abbreviated version of a pork dish from the recipes of Thomas Austin of 1450. The Star & Dove chefs would normally serve this pork dish with the following additions: pork tenderloin, Bramley apple pudding, white cabbage bhaji, Devils on horseback, black pudding puree and bacon dust. The last item is made by freezing, then grating bacon before dehydrating it in the oven with just the pilot light on until it becomes intensely bacon-flavoured dust.

Triple pressed pork belly 1 whole pork belly • 5 – 6 chopped carrots 1 bunch of chopped celery • 6 chopped onions 2 star anise • 5 bay leaves Bunch of thyme/rosemary • 50ml of apple vinegar 1. Cut the belly into three equal sizes, add one belly to a pan with two thirds of the chopped vegetables and herbs, cover with water, and bring to a slow simmer for four hours. Let the belly cool in the liquid. Lay the remaining vegetables on a tray and top with the two remaining pork bellies and cling film, cook overnight (12 hours) at 100 degrees. 2. Once cooked, remove the cling film and peel of the pork skin and baste with the pan juices. Remove the braised pork while warm. Reserve the liquid, lay upside down on a parchment covered board. Lay the two roast pork bellies on top, upside down to create a belly stack. Lay parchment on top followed by a chopping board and weigh down with a heavy object and leave in the fridge for eight to ten hours. 3. Once set remove the pork belly, square off, divide in to eight equal squares by scoring with a knife. With an apple corer remove two thirds of the meat of each square, ensuring you keep the meat in order to use as a plug later on. 4. Pass the liquid through a fine sieve and chill till the fat sets. Remove from fridge and take off solid fat and add to large pan with a pinch of ginger, cinnamon and mace and reduce to a syrup, take off heat and add 50ml of apple vinegar and finely grated nutmeg.

Raisin and rosemary stuffing sauce 175 ml of red wine • 25ml of Pedro Xieminez 1 star anise • 1 bay leaf • 50g brown sugar • 200g raisins 1. Add all the ingredients to a pan except the raisins and bring up to a simmer, reduce to three quarters of its volume, take off the heat add a large sprig of rosemary and cling film and allow to steep for one to two hours. Once infused cover the raisins and steep again overnight. The following day, add the contents to a pan and bring up to a simmer. Puree and sieve. Assembling the finished dish Pre heat a frying pan on a moderate heat, add oil and allow to get hot then add the squares of pork belly, skin side down, careful as it tends to spit. Once the skin starts to crisp up add to a preheated oven at 200c for eight minutes. Once warmed through add your raisin stuffing sauce to the hollowed out reservation of each pork belly portion. The Star & Dove then adds all its other prepared ingredients, stands the pork belly on its end, garnishes it all with baby sage and serves.


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Wilks 1 - 3 Chandos Road, Redland BS6 6PG. Tel: 0117 973 7999

REVIEW

REACHING FOR A STAR? VISUALLY PLEASING: chef James Wilkins ensures his food is as good to eat as it is to look at

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ithin weeks of chef James Wilkins opening his new restaurant in Chandos Road, Redland, Bristol’s top chefs were booking tables to come along and taste for themselves what the new boy in town had to offer. And because you don’t see that with every new restaurant that opens, I figured it had to be A Sign. The main reason they wanted to check out his mettle was because James used to work for Michel Bras, a real hero for chefs, whose restaurant in a village in the Aubec region has a worldwide reputation. After working alongside Bras James had then gone on, with his French fianceé Christine, to work in Japan and Istanbul before wanting to go solo back in the UK. James and Christine looked all over southern England for the right venue and the former Culinaria restaurant in Bristol, whose owners had retired, looked like a good act to follow. Another foodie legend, Keith Floyd, had also run a restaurant in the same street.

a beautiful, warm golden ❝ orange redolent of perfect autumn days, the roasted squash delicately spiked with cumin

So, I was very curious to taste for myself James’s own brand of creative European cuisine. We chose a set lunch (two courses for £16, or three for £19) but the menu is flexible, so if you wanted to order a few small plates to share, with a glass of wine from what looks like a very good wine list, you could. The lunch deal also extends to early evenings, until 6.45pm. All the best chefs understand that we eat with our eyes first. My starter of a seasonal squash velouté was a beautiful, warm golden orange redolent of perfect autumnal days, the roasted squash delicately spiked with cumin and the soup shot through with a swirl of another flavour reminiscent of a seasonal hedgerow forage – hazelnut oil. This was accompanied by good artisan bread made by Mark’s Bakery in Southville. My companion’s maple cured salmon fillet was perfectly matched to some creamy, soft goats cheese, a smidgeon of beetroot puree and a couple of quivering spoonfuls of intensely flavoured apple jelly so good you’d want to take home a jar to have with cheese. www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

We were tempted by the sound of courgette flower stuffed with cob nuts and apricots, with sauteéd girolles, and at £7 all that skill and flavour represents good value to my mind. But I enjoyed instead a fillet of perfectly cooked, slightly crispy on the outside, melt-in-the-mouth rainbow trout with a selection of vegetables lightly seasoned with fennel. Out of curiosity my lunch partner chose a main course of beetroot which turned out to be a visual treat of brightest purple, fuchsia and orange and a tribute to the chef’s ability to source really good local ingredients and prepare them with cunning simplicity, so that the beetroot tasted as good as you’d wish it to be. We enjoyed some Chilean Sauvignon Blanc (Tantehue 2011 from Bodegas Ventisquero to be precise) which is £3.25 for a standard glass and £16.50 a bottle. It was so good we interrupted our conversation after our first sips to simultaneously tell each other how special it tasted. The word on the chefs’ scene in Bristol is that this newcomer may confidently set his sights on a Michelin star. He has pitched his prices reasonably enough for the curious foodies to come and see for themselves. The venue is simply but stylishly decorated. We’d noticed a distinctive butter knife featured on the centre of each table, its wide base allowing the blade to stand upright. Curious, we asked about this, it’s a tribute to Michel Blas and Christine’s native village, Laguiole where knives are made at the local forge and exported all over the world. We weren’t going to have a pudding but the menu looked so good and we’d been so impressed by the flavours we’d enjoyed so far. The cocoa meringue with coffee ice cream I’d ordered came, looking so much like a neat alien spacecraft that it raised a smile. I was instructed to tap it hard with my spoon. Instead of an alien inside there was a clever egg of homemade ice cream, with a ‘yolk’ of almond and vanilla reminiscent of amaretti biscuits. Unusual and utterly memorable. While my friend enjoyed her poached pear with cinnamon spice and walnut crunch we agreed that this was clever stuff – deceptively simple in execution, while leaving you in no doubt that you couldn’t do it at home. If, however, you did want to pass one of James’s seasonal dishes, say, a haunch of local venison with quince, chestnuts and rainbow chard, you can order from his ‘food to go’ fridge or freezer. He can even take your own casserole dish and make his dish in it, for the ultimate in dinner party sang froid. Have your best poker face ready if you really want to pass it off as your own though. ■ GMc October 2012

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OUT&ABOUT

IN SEARCH OF BRIGSTOW Andrew Swift takes us on a walk around Bristol city centre, giving us the chance to take a closer look at some of the historic buildings we may not usually notice

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o celebrate the 100th edition of The Bristol Magazine, this month’s walk follows the course of the old city walls, crosses rivers long since buried underground and seeks out some of Bristol’s oldest buildings. It starts – appropriately enough for a city named after its bridge – at Bristol Bridge over the River Avon, beside the Floating Harbour. Head north past St Nicholas Church and turn left along St Nicholas Street, following the course of the old walls as the street curves round to Corn Street. Head straight on along Leonard Lane (to the right of Stanfords), its name recalling St Leonard’s Church which once straddled Corn Street. As you follow the course of the old wall, look on the left for plaques marking the boundary between St Leonard’s and St Stephen’s parishes. An archway, roofed with ancient beams, leads into Small Street. Cross and continue along Bell Lane. After passing the church of St John on the Wall, you find yourself high above street level, in a labyrinth of elevated walkways designed in the 1960s to raise pedestrians above the traffic. Signposts to Greyfriars and Whitefriars recall long-lost religious foundations. It is a heady, almost surreal, amalgam of ancient and nearly modern. Carry on along Tower Lane, and, when you reach the Pithay, turn left down it. Turn left along All Saints Street, cross and carry on along Bridewell Street, at the far end of which was a bridge over the River Frome. The street was named after a bridewell or prison that stood here. Cross the road ahead, turn right and then left by the Bay Horse. Cross the road ahead, cross again to the right and turn left alongside the wall of St James’s churchyard. Carry on past the White Hart to St James’s Priory, founded in 1129, and the oldest surviving building in Bristol. Head back past the White Hart, go up the steps beside it, and turn right by the tower through the churchyard. Cross the dual carriageway and turn left along Horsefair. Just past M&S, turn right through the Arcade, built in 1824-5. Facing you when you reach Broadmead is the old Greyhound Inn, opened in 1620 but now the entrance to the Galleries shopping centre. Turn left, carry on across the roundabout and turn right along Quakers Friars. The building ahead is part of a Dominican Friary founded around 1227. Turn left when you reach it and then right to see the 18th century Friends Meeting House adjoining it. Turn right along Philadelphia Street to Merchant Street, where the Merchant Taylors almshouses of 1701 are now a coffee shop. Turn left along Merchant Street, cross Newgate, climb the steps opposite and turn left along the terrace. Climb the steps at the end and turn left to a look-out point on the foundations of a tower in the wall of Bristol Castle. Turn right, head past the playground to an ochre-coloured building containing vaulted chambers from the castle and go through the archway to the left. Turn right along Castle Street (one of the city’s busiest streets before it was bombed in 1940), follow it as it swings left and turn right along a footpath beside part of the castle moat. As you turn right alongside the river, look up to the right to see a surviving piece of castle wall. Head up to the shell of St Peter’s Church, walk along the north side of it – once the site of Peter Street – and carry on across a footbridge to the ruins of St Mary le Port Church. Turn left and right alongside the river to return to Bristol Bridge. Turn right up High Street to the crossroads with Corn and Broad Streets. This was the site of the High Cross, the heart of the old city, with Christ Church and All Saints on opposite corners. There was a third church – St Ewen’s – where the old council house – now a bank – stands today. 76 The Bristol Magazine

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Carry on along Broad Street and turn right beside Horts into Tailors Court. A shell porch on the left is adorned with the arms of the Merchant Taylors. At the end is St John’s churchyard. As you head back to Broad Street, look for two medieval carvings to the left of the archway. Turn right along Broad Street, go through St John’s Archway and left along Quay Street – which, as its name indicates, once ran along the waterfront. Turn left along Small Street and right along Corn Street. All Bar One, on the corner as you turn right into St Stephen’s Street, stands on the site of St Werburgh’s Church. In 1879, its tower was dismantled and re-erected in north-east Bristol as part of a new St Werbugh’s Church – now converted to a climbing centre. At the end of St Stephen’s Street, cross Colston Avenue, once a broad river filled with sailing ships, and turn right. Turn left up Zed Alley, right down to the Three Horseshoes, then left to the gateway of St Bartholomew’s Hospital and up Christmas Steps. Turn left at the top by Foster’s Almshouses and then right by the Gryphon along Trenchard Street. On the right, now converted to flats, is the first post-Reformation Roman Catholic church in Bristol, opened in 1790. Carry on past the back of Colston Hall (built on the site of a Carmelite Priory) and the Hatchet Inn, dating from 1606. After going under Park Street Bridge, Brunel’s Royal Western Hotel –

CHANGING LANDSCAPE: main picture, the arms of the Merchant Taylors in Tailors Court Below, left, looking west along Corn Street to St Werburgh’s, whose tower was dismantled and re-erected on a new site in 1879 Below, right, the old Greyhound Inn in Broadmead


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WEATHERED: left to right, the coat of arms on the Merchant Almshouses in King Street, and the bombed shell of St Peter’s Church in Castle Park

now offices – faces you across the road. Turn left up College Street to the library and turn left past the cathedral – founded as an abbey in 1140. On the far side of College Green, the Lord Mayor’s Chapel can be seen sitting amid a row of shops. It was built around 1230 as the chapel of Gaunt’s Hospital. The modern extension to the Royal Hotel, which you pass as

you head down to St Augustine’s Parade, stands on the site of St Augustine’s Church, demolished in 1962. At the bottom, head across to the Radisson Blu on Broad Quay, and bear right and then left along King Street, past the Merchants’ Almshouses. The old marsh wall lay behind the buildings on the left and sections of it are incorporated into some of the older ones. Turn left at the end along Welsh Back to return to Bristol Bridge. ■

Bespoke Kitchen Design Handmade in Bristol

Morley Grove offers a wide range ot Bespoke kitchens from the ultra modern handleless kitchen to the classic shaker. Any design you have in mind we can accomodate all at fantastic prices to suit your budget. Morley Grove Kitchens : 110 Coldharbour Road, Redland, Bristol BS6 7SB 0117 915 0095 : www.morleygrove.co.uk

Morley g M G rove Kitchens

Open times : 9.30am - 5.30pm Mon-Fri • 10.00am - 3pm Sat

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Autumn shades

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here’s no shortage of colour in the makeup palettes this season, from warm hues of red and orange to rich purples and khaki greens. While eye shadows are peacock-inspired, red lips are a must with any outfit for evening glamour. Whether glossy or matte velvet, the crimson tide of red lips is designed to look and feel seductive, with a dense, fullbodied texture. The statement you want to make depends on what you do with the rest of your make-up. Dark eyes with winged liner and bright red lips work for the bold and beautiful look, while for ultra luxe, opt for glossy lips and nude eyes exuding a mannequin-like glamour.

Breakthrough Beast Cancer • October is breast cancer awareness month. In recognition of this, many of the top beauty brands have gone pink and produced limited edition products that will be sold to help raise money for The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Keep your eyes peeled for pink and help raise vital funds for this important research charity. We love that Origins has turned its Rejuvenating Hand Treatment and Peace of Mind On-the-spot Relief pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2012. This limited-edition duo features two Origins favourites on a pink clip, perfect to attach to your keys or handbag for immediate relief of dry hands or stress and anxiety. Peace of Mind On-the-spot Relief is still a best-seller thanks to the powerfully soothing properties of key ingredients basil, eucalyptus and peppermint that help fight stress and fatigue. Massage a few dabs on the back of the neck, temples and earlobes to help banish pressure, tension and ease your troubled mind. Cost: £10, available from House of Fraser. Throughout October, Origins will donate £2 from every UK purchase to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

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Above, Dior; clockwise from top right, Guerlain Kiss Kiss Gloss, £21; Dior Addict lipsticks, £24; Guerlain Rose Aux Joues blush duo, £32.50; Dior 5 Couleurs Designer eyeshadows, £40; and Guerlain Rouge G de Guerlain L’Extrait liquid lip colour, £29.50

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SKIN DEEP The latest health and beauty news and product reviews from Samantha Ewart

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▲ BODY BEAUTIFUL ESSENTIALS ❶ Treat skin to a delightful detox and spa pampering from the comfort of your home with the Ayurveda range from Rituals. The Himalaya Clay (£11.90) is gorgeous – apply a thick layer all over dry skin, massaging in for three minutes to clear the skin of toxins and promote energy flow. Available from www.rituals.com ❷ The Liz Earle Cleanse & Polish Hot Cloth Cleanser with a muslin cloth gently removes daily grime and make-up to leave skin clear, smooth and exceptionally clean, revealing fresh, radiant skin whatever your skin type. As a new special edition working with The Prince’s Trust, it has been given a twist with a unique blend of rose and lavender essential oils to calm and relax your senses and ensure a good night’s sleep. ❸ Nourish and tone your skin with Jergens Skin Firming Daily Toning Moisturiser. It contains collagen, elastin and essential moisturisers for perfectly flawless, firm skin. £4.99 available from Boots.


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hair@morgan’s 15 Lower Redland Rd, Redland, Bristol BS6 6TB Tel : 0117 9730001

We would like to invite you to our new warm, relaxed and friendly salon

Specialising in colour and styling and working together with our expert colour technicians

As a special offer we would like to offer All Clients 15% off with this advert 8.30am - Late Every day

Lanza

Products used La Biosthetique Colours GHD Stockist Offers valid until 30th November 2012

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SLEEK NEW SALON OPENS Be Première Hair has opened its first luxurious salon in Clifton Village offering the very best in styling straight from the catwalk and red carpet

INFECTION PREVENTION WEEK Nuffield Health in Bristol is gearing up for Infection Prevention Awareness Week - a worldwide health drive which focuses on the importance of Infection Prevention which spreads the message that cleanliness is everyone’s business

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his season, hair fashions switch between ultra feminine and statement-making. On the catwalk we’ve seen sleek side partings, pretty ballerina buns, vintage up-dos and charming plaits to bold heavy fringes, textured choppy locks and striking dip-dyed colour tips. Whatever your preferred style, you can be assured of a look that is not only suited to your individual taste but also on trend at Bristol’s newest salon, Be Première Hair, which has opened in Regent Street, Clifton. The company, which originates from Cape Town, aims to provide exceptional levels of service and quality. The salon’s art director, Robert Baker, says: “Clifton is a fantastic area and a wonderful destination where we are surrounded by designer shops and cool venues which fits well with the experience we provide for our clients.” Robert, whose career has spanned other top salon groups and the world of the red carpet and catwalk, says the philosophy is simple: “I like to create hair around the individual, as each client is unique. Hair is very much about personality as well as lifestyle and working with a client’s expectations is the most important thing to me, so I always spend time talking and listening to each client beforehand so they feel comfortable and confident about the direction we are going. This is why I love the salon motto: ‘Red carpet. Catwalk. You.’ We aim to make our clients feel like they are just about to step onto that red carpet every time they leave the salon.” Consultation over hair products is key and Robert achieves a flawless route to styling perfection through his choice of products that help to prepare, define and deliver the ultimate finish for the client, as well as making hair as perfect and healthy as it can be. The salon interior design is chic, sumptuous and striking, with bespoke Italian furniture and fittings unique to the UK, balanced by a lovely welcoming atmosphere. ■

READER OFFER:

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he week, which runs from the 15-19 of October, is an opportunity for experts to raise awareness with staff and the community about the importance of infection prevention. Throughout the week, Nuffield Health will be running events, displays and educational seminars that encourage staff, patients and visitors to learn more about the risks of infection and what they can do to prevent it. Elaine Fenlon who is part of the Infection Prevention Team for Nuffield Health is helping to organise the week’s activities: “Information will be placed throughout the hospital, turning the building into a mini exhibition on the causes of infection. We’ll be taking a proactive but fun approach to the campaign with quizzes and competitions to test staff, patient and visitor knowledge. I am confident that over the week we will show staff and patients alike how they as individuals they can help prevent infection through simple measures of improved cleanliness such as hand hygiene.” Nuffield Health is also launching a nation-wide Dump the Junk campaign to clear any unnecessary documents, files and equipment out of each hospital, simplifying the workplace resulting in less cluttered areas for improved cleaning conditions. Nuffield Health in Bristol has won awards within the company for its approach to infection prevention and control, including being recognised in 2011 as the most innovative hospital for pushing the boundaries of infection prevention with the projects it undertook. The Bristol Nuffield Hospital continues to remain infection free, with no reported incidents of MRSA. Ashley Livesey, Hospital Director comments on the importance of keeping these standards and continuing to raise awareness beyond the week in October: “We pride ourselves on offering the highest standards of clinical care and our results prove that we are getting it right. We aim to use Infection Prevention Week as a catalyst to raise awareness and communicate the hospital’s commitment to guarantee the highest standards of cleanliness and patient safety. We are dedicated to reducing the risks of Healthcare Associated Infection (HCAI) through the identification and elimination of infection risks and our patients can be assured that they are being treated in one of the safest and cleanest hospitals in the country.” Nuffield Health Bristol Hospital, Upper Byron Place, Bristol, Avon BS8 1JU. Tel: 0117 987 2727 Web: www.nuffieldhealth.com/hospitals/bristol

Throughout October readers of The Bristol Magazine can find a complimentary £10 voucher via: www.facebook.com/BePremiereHairUK. You will also receive a hair treatment with a relaxing head massage to demonstrate the very best salon experience. To book, contact tel: 0117 973 0050, email Clifton@BePremiereHair.co.uk or feel free to call in to meet Robert and the team at 14 Regent Street, Clifton.

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CENTRE4HEALTH CLINIC At Whiteladies Health Centre with Susanna Priest

Lymphatic Management, uses a light medical massage to reduce oedema and stimulate the lymphatis system, this is called Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD). For MLD Therapy patients often have, swollen limbs or ankles, lymphedema, Lipoedema, Pre and Post-Operative Shoulder, Hip and Knee replacements, Cosmetic Surgery and the need to detox. Decongestive Lymphatic Therapy combines MLD and specialist bandaging to reduce swelling and improve mobility and appearance. A Compression Hosiery fitting service if offered using attractive modern hosiery (no Norah Batty tights!) Before setting up our service in Bristol I was working in a major NHS London Hospital in the Lymphatic Departments. ElectroMagnetic Stimulation (EMS), a gentle, effective therapy helping conditions like arthritis, back pain, joint pain, sports injuries, MS and fractures. 'M'Technique™, a hypnotic massage for stress and insomnia, which I practiced at NHS Cheltenham Hospital. Bristol: Tuesday and Friday • Whiteladies Health Centre, Whatley Road, Clifton, BS8 2PU Nailsworth: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday • Suite 2, 2 Market Street, Nailsworth, Stroud, Glos GL5 5AB. Free car parking.

www.centre4health.co.uk FOR DETAILS AND TESTIMONIALS

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Tel: 07867 934677 / 01453 836230 susanna@centre4health.co.uk


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Eating to Enhance Fertility Advice from The College of Naturopathic Medicine (CNM)

Women who are planning to conceive a child are often confused about what they could be eating to enhance their fertility. Here’s some advice from Jacquie Lane, lecturer at CNM.

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ow to give yourself the best chance of conceiving and having a healthy baby is a question people often ask. Many are worried that the toxic burden of our twenty-first century environment, lifestyle and food supply can play havoc with natural processes, but there are things you can do to reduce the risk, says Jacquie. Eating organic food will reduce your exposure to hormones and pesticides. To reduce exposure to xenoestrogens (these are man-made compounds that can mimic the effects of oestrogen), avoid eating foods wrapped in plastic cling film. It is advisable to drink water out of glass bottles rather than plastic ones. Another tip is to buy fresh salad rather than buying bagged salad, due to possible toxins or bacteria enclosed. It goes without saying that you should cut out smoking. Avoid microwaving food, which denatures it. Try to cut out caffeine and tannin and drink more herbal teas instead. Fresh ginger and/or lemon with hot water will all help your liver eliminate toxins. You can boost your nutrient intake and aid bowel elimination by eating a rainbow assortment of at least 7 portions of vegetables and fruit daily, to get a good intake of health protecting compounds. Try to include protein and complex carbohydrates at each meal, and eat a wide variety of whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa, whole wheat, rye, and spelt, in breads or pasta. Essential fatty acids are vital to regulate hormones. You should endeavour to eat oily fish 3 times per week, such as salmon, mackerel, and herrings, but limit your tuna intake due to potential mercury content. Incorporate seeds into your daily diet such as flax, pumpkin, sunflower, or sesame. You can use these in salads, or grind and add them to porridge. Alternatively you could use the cold pressed oils in salad dressings. Vitamin E should be plentiful in your diet, and can www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

be found in cold pressed vegetable oils, wheat germ, sunflower and sesame seeds, and sardines. Zinc is also required and good sources of it are fresh ginger root and some seeds. If you are going to take supplements, then focus on essential fatty acids: Omega 3 (EPA & DHA) 1000mg/day, and a good quality pregnancy multivitamin and mineral supplement. You could also opt for a probiotic which includes at least 8 billion probiotic cultures, to help the body dispose of unwanted excess hormones. A naturopathic nutritional therapist would be able to give you a personal diet plan tailor made for your circumstances and constitution. Don’t overlook your general lifestyle : Yoga and walking are great for metabolism and stress reduction.

Train to Become a Nutritional Therapist Study part-time for a diploma in Naturopathic Nutrition at CNM Bristol. Reserve your place on our next free-to-attend Open Evening on Wednesday 7th November at 6.30pm – 8.30pm by calling 01342 410 505.

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INTERIORdesigns

Over the last 50 years Pasquale Natuzzi has â?? built a brand synonymous with quality and cutting edge design. He talks to The Bristol Magazine about the secrets to his success and what to expect from interior design in 2012

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DESIGNS FOR LIFE Over the last 50 years Pasquale Natuzzi has built a brand synonymous with quality and cutting edge design. He talks to TBM about the secrets to his success and what trends to expect in interior design

CUTTING EDGE DESIGN: Opposite page: top; the Cambre daybed is a design characterised by style and comfort; below right; Natuzzi’s Etoile sofa available in Cassidy leather, the thickest possible leather that can be used for upholstery, and far left; the Opera is a stylish new sectional sofa, available in a variety of configurations and colour options. Above: the man behind the success Pasquale Natuzzi

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ver the last 50 years, Pasquale Natuzzi has not only democratised the leather sofa; he’s also made his brand synonymous with quality, durability and cutting-edge Italian design. “Ever since I was a boy, I have searched for beauty,” says Pasquale Natuzzi, the Chairman and Chief Executive of the Natuzzi Group, Italy’s most successful producer of interior design. “You might say I’m passionate about aesthetics; everything from matching colours to elegance in form and the harmony of geometric shapes appeals to me. I love living in a comfortable home, because it’s a place that brings together both friends and family.” Natuzzi’s combination of comfort and cutting-edge design has made him a global leader in the creative of superlative furniture. Having established his company more than 50 years ago, the interior-design brand famed for its clean lines and unparalleled comfort now offers ‘total living in total harmony’ solutions, with a comprehensive range of furnishings and accessories. According to independent research conducted by the French Publishing Group in conjunction with IPSO Marketing Research, Natuzzi is the most recognisable interior design brand among consumer luxury brands across all categories. Natuzzi’s trademark leather sofas – some with softly undulating arms, others formed of independent sections slotted together like puzzle pieces – are all hand-finished by craftsmen at the company’s headquarters in Santeramo in Colle, in the Bari province of Italy. Thanks to a focus on quality, provenance, and a ‘Made in Italy’ USP, Natuzzi now has more than 300 stores, 11 factories, 6,700 employees and a turnover of €486.4 million in 2011. “This is the secret of the Natuzzi success,” says the man that steers the design ship. “It’s a secret that seduces 4,000 customers every day. It is a long legacy of values, born in the heart of Apulia and now spreading to the world’s greatest cities.” Pasquale is the son of a cabinetmaker, and he began his career at 19 producing hand-crafted sofas and armchairs to sell at a local market. He founded the Natuzzi company in 1959; however, it was a trip to the USA in the 1980s that propelled his business from local to international. “Starting to work in America set in motion a chain reaction for massive growth and allowed us to push forward into the brand we are today,” says Pasquale. “The scale of the country and the space for opportunity really opened my eyes to the potential our business had at the time,” he says. “I thought, if I can bring Italian furniture into this market at a fair price, then we really have a great opportunity here.” By democratising the leather sofa – a commodity that was once only available to the

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wealthy – Pasquale broke the North American market, resulting in his self-confessed career highlight. “The company’s listing on Wall Street on 13th May 1993 was an extremely important event for the Natuzzi Group as a whole,” he says. “After years of hard work, commitment and tenacity, this important step provided confirmation of our success.” Pasquale insists that working in America did little to change his Italian aesthetic, the modernity of his trademark style speaks of a universal appeal wedged not in Italian ancestry but in contemporary design evolution and innovation. “We’re very trend aware,” says Natuzzi. “Every day, 120 specialists in the Natuzzi Style Centre dream up sketches that pair materials in a mix of innovation and class, from leather to fabric, wood to steel, glass to porcelain. Our Style Centre team is committed to anticipating global trends and to setting them.” Pasquale’s current focus on technology, for instance, speaks of his forward-thinking take on interior design. It’s not enough for things to be just smart now,” he says. “They need to be innovative and useful. Without innovation, you cannot appreciate wellbeing. Technology improves your life in some way, whether by allowing you to relax and enjoy music from the comfort of your sofa – as with our ‘Surround’ model (an mp3 docking station is housed in the corner section of the sofa) – or to cook a family meal in the most efficient way.” Pasquale predicts that this year’s interior design buzzwords will be durability and sensible technology. “Both of these are a clear reaction to the recession and the way economies affect the way we live,” he says. People are looking for lasting products, in both durability and appeal. Statement sofas are fun, but this year I’m confident that people will want elegance that is built to last by craftsmen using the best possible materials. Leather has a big part to play here, too; there’s nothing else that looks so beautiful for so long.” Highlights of this year’s Natuzzi interior design collection include the new ‘Opera’ model, a sleek sectional sofa upholstered in leather and the bright, retro-style ‘Erasmo’ sofa which is guaranteed to brighten up your home. Natuzzi has also teamed up with renowned Italian perfumer Laura Tonatto to create the brand’s first room fragrance, named “Antonisa”, a bespoke, fresh scent. Products also include Murano glassware, lighting ranges, dining tables, innovative storage solutions and much, much more. As Pasquale explains, “with our ‘total living’ designs, we can offer customers not only products but a complete Natuzzi lifestyle.” ■ Find your nearest dealer at www.natuzzi.co.uk October 2012

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TRUE COLOURS Interior designer Rosalie Fiennes looks at how we use colour in our homes to enhance our moods and gives advice on how to make different hues work in rooms around the house

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he purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love colour the most,” so said John Ruskin. It is a universal truth that the colour of our surroundings has a big impact on us all. Sometimes this is conscious – coming upon a vase of glowing red tulips, for instance, which makes us catch our breath with the sheer impact of the colour. Sometimes it is a subconscious reaction. One particular room will make us feel happy and positive. But another space may, for some reason, lower our spirits and sap our energy. This can be directly because of colour. Everyone sees colour differently. Our perception of colour relies on one of our senses only – unlike other things that can be heard and seen and touched. Although, oddly enough, I have heard it said that colour can be felt as vibrations by those with only limited sight. Interestingly, on the subject of colour, there is a gender difference. According to research, about seven or eight per cent of all men have a form of colour blindness – mostly a difficulty in distinguishing red from green. Only a tiny proportion of women suffer from this – maybe less than one per cent. Colour can even affect our physical wellbeing. Colour zone therapy maintains that certain colours can help to heal and repair specific illnesses and imbalances. I believe that colour, and our reaction to it, is a very emotional thing. There are also very good scientific reasons why we see colours in a certain way, and these reinforce our perceptions. But it seems to me that our reaction to colour comes from the gut. A deep and instinctive reaction. As a designer, I often find that clients say to me – ‘I really hate this or that colour.’ Or, ‘I really love red or yellow. It’s my absolute favourite.’ Nothing halfhearted there. Colour is such a huge and fascinating subject – too much to cover in just a few words – but this guide may help you in choosing colours for your space. Let’s start with the strongest, most regal and energetic primary colour: Red: dominant and dynamic, it is often used in advertising – Coca Cola, and SALE signs are just two examples. The lens of 88 The Bristol Magazine

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the eye has to adjust to take in its wavelength. As the focal point for red lies behind the retina, red objects look closer than they are. In fact, red has the longest wavelength, and the lowest energy, of all visible light. It’s a colour much used for ‘social’ spaces such as dining rooms and restaurants, as it stimulates the appetite. Orange: this is a secondary colour created by mixing together equal quantities of red and yellow. Its name came from the Arabic word meaning fruit – nananj. Orange is a lovely warm colour, some call it the colour of joy – it’s strongly linked to autumn, Halloween, turning leaves and pumpkins. Good for promoting positive thinking and happiness. Yellow: a primary colour with a narrow band in the colour spectrum. Most of the yellows we see come from a mix of yellow and green light. Yellow is cheering and uplifting, like sunshine. Best to use it in a cooler aspect, rather than full south. A soft shade works well in a living room as long as you take into account the effect of both daylight and artificial light.

HUES WITH LOVE: main picture, green is calming and restful Top: yellow is cheering and uplifting, but care is needed with the light in a room Red used on a stairwell is dynamic

some call it the colour of joy – it’s strongly ❝ linked to autumn, Halloween, turning leaves and pumpkins. Good for promoting positive thinking and happiness

Green: like nature, this secondary colour is relaxing, and tranquil. Midway on the colour spectrum, the focal length is right on the retina, and so it is very easy to look at. Calming and restful. Think of cool, green woods and forests. Green is the colour of balance, and is often used for work places and, for many years, theatres have had Green Rooms where actors wait for their calls to go on stage. Blue: at the cool end of the spectrum, blue is the third primary colour – calm and contemplative. It is the antithesis of red, being


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transparent, where red is opaque and solid. Blue is often used in bedrooms or spaces for relaxation, perhaps reflecting our natural affinity with a clear, blue sky. It is said to be good for asthmatics, and for reducing blood pressure. As with all colours, take care where you use blue as it can be quite melancholy and cold, depending on the aspect of the room. Blue combined with a north light may not be a happy space. Purple: a secondary colour made by mixing red and blue, purple is another royal colour. Strong, rich and powerful, it was the colour of emperors. At the paler end of the spectrum, violet and lavender are more delicate and refined. The colour of mourning in Victorian times, purple has been fashionable in recent years for interior spaces. Remember, colour doesn’t have to be bright. All of these colours can be lighter when mixed with white – as in a tint. Or, mixed with black, to create a darker shade.

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How much colour?

This is where many people come unstuck. Often they are frightened of colour. But you don’t have to have a whole room of colour, it’s just as valid to use mid-tone neutrals as a background, and add a spark of colour – perhaps with a chair, or a sofa. Or one wall, or even a cushion or a painting. Paint is easy to change. Cushions are easy to change. Even a chair can be re-covered, if you don’t like it. So be brave and follow your heart. Colour is fun and can change your life. ■ Colour consultation and interior design in Somerset, and further afield contact: Rosalie Fiennes Architectural Interior Design, Burcott Manor, Near Wells, Somerset BA5 1NH. Visit: www.rosaliefiennes.com or email rosalie.fiennes@googlemail.com. Tel: 01749 672234.

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ON THE BLOCK Kit Stone’s painted Butcher’s Block features a beautiful end grain top wooden top that lifts out for easy cleaning and a knife drawer. RRP: £775. Kit Stone, 18 Portland Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 370 2453

TRANSFORM LIGHTING TIME

Reface your existing work surfaces with beautiful new solid worktops made from Italian granite, quartz or recycled glass, in a single day. With beautiful tops that fit ‘over the top’. Granite Transformations. Tel: 0117 962 5416

Simply lovely - The Renoir Silk Drum Pendant, with 3 lights & glass diffuser. Available in 3 sizes and 15 silk colours. The 600mm (shown) is priced at £199. The Lighting Warehouse Tel: 0117 963 5943

KITCHEN DETAIL Here’s a made to measure chef’s pantry, the door racks are constructed of solid oak and it features a lovely internal quartz stone worktop Silestone Blanco Zeus, there’s also internal lighting. Detail Kitchens offer many fantastic touches like this when they fit their kitchens. Detail Kitchens. Tel: 0117 973 5838 www.detailkitchens.co.uk

INTERIOR

HOT ART Available exclusively from Intoto Kitchens in Bristol, The Vasso Glass Radiator offers elegance, style and versatility with a slim-line finish that sits virtually flush to the wall. Intoto Kitchens. Tel: 0117 946 6433 www.intoto.co.uk

finishing

TOUCHES Looking for some interior inspiration? TBM’s pick of the latest trends

FEATURE HEATING HOT WATER The definitive 100°c boiling water tap from Quooker, throw away your energy sapping kettle and replace it with an eco friendly boiling water tap. Priced at £830 with a free installation from Morley Grove Kitchens. Morley Grove Kitchens. Tel: 0117 915 0059 www.morleygrove.co.uk

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DRU Excellence gas fires have authentic log firebeds and interior finishes in smooth black, natural stone or grey slate. The dual burner allows you to switch between two flame settings. Feature Fireplaces, www.feature-fireplaces.co.uk Tel: 01934 628142


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Are you looking for new lighting for any area at the home? Are you overwhelmed with the options available? Can’t find the solution to your problem? Come and see the experts to help you through the options available. We have one of the largest displays in our freshly refitted showroom Lighting design service available. Our showroom displays fittings from the UK, European and Worldwide sources. For all areas of the home and garden. Decorative low energy on display. Tel: 0117 963 5943 • Fax: 0117 963 4735

Unit 2, Sheene Way, Bedminster, Bristol BS3 4TA Email: enquiries@lightingwarehousebristol.co.uk • Web: www.lightingwarehousebristol.co.uk • Opening hours: Mon - Sat 9:00am - 5:30pm

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AUTUMNgardens

BOTANICAL BLISS Take a seasonal stroll through a botanical garden near you this autumn and enjoy the fruits of other gardeners’ labours. Jane Moore visits the Bath and Bristol sites and finds tranquility and inspiration

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he trouble with working as a full-time gardener is that during the busy summer months you don’t have much time to visit other gardens. The regular round of weeding, mowing, watering (although not this year) and edging is enough to ensure that I’m kept fully occupied during the working week. And at the weekend, truth be told, it’s nice to get away from gardening and do something completely different. So my garden visiting tends to peak in autumn, winter and spring and that timing rather limits the available options. On the other hand, it does make you get out and about at unusual times of the year. It’s also great for picking up ideas and plants for all year round interest which is good for your garden.

Open all year round The Botanic Gardens of Bristol and Bath are open all year round and, while the Bristol garden might cost you a couple of pounds, Bath is completely free which means you can pop in as often as you want. Working at the Priory has put me within a stone’s throw of one of the best gardens that Bath has to offer. And did I mention that it’s free? The Botanic Garden up in the topmost corner of Victoria Park has been my friend and inspiration for the past few years. It’s the nearest garden to me and the lovely collection of mature plants makes it a great place for checking out spring blossom, autumn colour and winter interest. There is always something to catch your eye in the collection and when I’m feeling a bit fed up or jaded or downright stuck for inspiration, the Botanic Garden always gives me a lift. Right now I’m thinking about autumn colour and I know the Botanics will be ablaze towards the end of the month with fiery cherry leaves and smoke bushes. Later on in the season I’ll go to the gardens to look for ideas for evergreen interest and winter structure and in February I’ll cheer myself up with the displays of snowdrops and crocus. 96 The Bristol Magazine

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October 2012

Young and old While Bath’s Botanic Garden is over 100 years old, Bristol’s is a mere decade or so young having undergone a move away from its original home. The garden now covers nearly two hectares and was the first new Botanic Garden to be created for some 40 years. As a consequence, the curators and designers have had a wonderful opportunity to create a meaningful collection of plants that is both useful to the university as a teaching resource but also offers plenty of interest for the local community. A regular programme of lectures, events, training courses and workshops supplement the gardens natural delights which are considerable. Arranged in four core collections the botanically minded gardener can follow the path of the Evolution Collection of plants while the herbalist sniffs their way through the Useful Plants Collection. Being a local lass one of my first enthusiasms was for wild flowers and the Local Flora and Rare Native Plant Collection is one of my favourite areas and just goes to show what a ecologically rich area we all live in. Most of the tender perennials in the Mediterranean Collection will probably be tucked up for the winter by now but the huge glasshouse is a great place to have a warm up.

Make the most of it I know I’m lucky having Bath Botanic garden on my doorstep but I’m always amazed how much I get from every visit. It’s open every day until 4pm in winter unless there is a special event or something on. Bristol Botanic Garden I don’t get to nearly so often for obvious reasons but it too is free or donations from Monday to Friday 10am to 4pm from the start of November until the end of March. In October it’s open Monday to Friday and Sundays from 10am to 4.30pm and it costs £3.50 admission – worth it for the autumn colour and the glasshouse alone. ■ Jane Moore is the award-winning gardener at The Priory, Bath. Follow her on Twitter @janethegardener or read her blog, www.janethegardener.wordpress.com

SECRET LIFE OF PLANTS: main picture, Bristol’s Botanic Garden may only be ten years old but it charts thousands of years of plant evolution


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AUTUMNgardens

PLEASURE GARDENS: Bath’s Botanic Garden Left to right, a late summer display of dahlias and the Jekyll-inspired long border PICTURES: David Hargrave

In the garden this month ● Keep sweeping up fallen leaves, especially off the lawn where they will shade out the grass and on gravel paths where they’ll turn into a mushy mess. ● Get busy in the borders dividing up herbaceous perennials, discarding the worn out centres of clumps and keeping the active outer edges, replanting them as you go. ● Divide rhubarb crowns. ● Lift and pot any tender plants and move them into somewhere sheltered but light at the start of the month

before we get a serious frost. We tuck up all our salvias, lemons, brugmansias and arum lilies in the greenhouse now. ● Cut back perennials – but not all of them – just chop back those that look brown and tired leaving some stems for winter structure and to provide shelter and seeds for the birds. ● Prune and train in climbing roses now before it gets too cold to feel your fingers. Not only is it a great job to get out of the way but it also makes the garden look so much more ordered and under control for the winter.

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October 2012

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The Bristol Magazine 97


Bristol Classified - October 2012:Layout 4

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15:33

the directory Business Services

Page 1

to advertise in this section call 0117 974 2800 Miscellaneous

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Do you have historical family photographs, diaries, items of clothing etc, of sentimental value, but are worried that you have no one to leave them to? These items and the stories that go with them are of great value to social historians, but are often just thrown away. My new service offers to find homes for your family’s history, in the relevant museums or local archives, place photo's online and send diaries to the National Diary Repository. You then have the peace of mind that your ancestors’ history is preserved for posterity. Please visit my website at www.alicekingmalee.com for further details, or ring me on 01225 830747.

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98 The Bristol Magazine

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October 2012


KF PIF full Page June:PIF Full Page

27/9/12

18:20

Page 69

BRISTOLproperty

T

he Blue House is a stunning architecturally-designed steel and timber frame family house. Featured on Channel Four’s Grand Designs the house was conceived and delivered by a renowned commercial architect and is set within and enclosed on a very private plot on one of Sneyd Park’s most sought after roads. Numerous unique features combine to provide two floors of accommodation with a dramatic full height atrium style reception space, fully glazed from top to bottom in solar controlled glass which keeps summer heat out and winter warmth in. As a result there is an incredible natural light and the limestone flooring with fully-zoned under floor heating add to the feeling of space. The living areas on the ground floor are largely open plan and are enhanced by a Nordic style wood burning stove with a flue stretching up into the double height ceiling. There is a charming snug complete with blackout blinds and projector which create a super family cinema. The kitchen zone is suitably sleek and minimalist, adding to the clean lines of the rest of the house. Up the floating staircase lie four superb double bedrooms each with its own en suite bath or shower room. The galleried landing which overhangs the living space below has privacy glass to the bedrooms which can be set to opaque at the flick of a switch. The sliding glass doors from the family living space ensure a seamless flow to the outside of the property where the luxury continues with a tiled al fresco dining area, a heated swimming pool and fabulous hot tub which ensure all round use of the garden. There is a further area of lawn and a planted wild meadow garden. Parking is in the form of a garage, car port and the driveway which provide space for numerous vehicles. This is a fabulous party house which would keep the fun going all year round. Those wishing to view should contact agents Knight Frank.

THE BLUE HOUSE MARINERS DRIVE BRISTOL • Open plan sitting/dining/kitchen area • Family room/cinema • 4 Bedrooms •4 Bathrooms • Swimming pool • Eco technology

Guide Price: £1,695,000

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

October 2012

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The Bristol Magazine 99


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Page 100

WEST

COUNTRY on sale at all good newsagents FOR A BETTER VIEW OF THE WEST MAKE SURE YOU NEVER MISS AN ISSUE!

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2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or telephone 01225 424 499 for card payments Mr/Mrs/Ms....................Forename ......................................Surname .............................. Address.............................................................................................................................. .......................................................................................................................................... Postcode ........................................Daytime telephone No ..............................................

100 The Bristol Magazine

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October 2012


Alexander May October:Layout 1

26/9/12

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Page 1

Westbury on Trym branch: 01179 500 118 25 Canford Lane, Westbury on Trym, Bristol, BS9 3DQ

TC

Long Ashton branch: 01275 393 956 50 Weston Road, Long Ashton, Bristol, BS41 9HH

SS

Cambridge Crescent, Westbury On Trym

£350,000

Miners Close, Long Ashton

Guide Price £599,950

Southdown Road, Westbury On Trym

£425,000

Elming House, Backwell

Guide Price £799,950

Southmead Road, Westbury On Trym/Southmead Border

£190,000

Sixty Acres Close, Failand

Guide Price £465,000

Refurbished to an excellent standard. In the heart of Westbury On Trym Village, three bedrooms, open plan kitchen/dining/day room, lawned rear garden, utility room & ground floor cloaks, GCH and double glazing, no onward chain

Situated in a prominent position. Detached family home with a side extension and a full width rear extension. Entrance hall extended and connecting reception rooms with doors to the rear garden, extended kitchen, ground floor annexe reception/bedroom 4 , 3 Bedrooms plus first floor family bathroom. The property is double glazed and warmed by a gas central heating system. Outside can be found front and rear gardens, as well as a driveway leading to an attached garage. No onward

Great Investment Opportunity, 3 units in 1, Main rental unit (currently used as a printing business by the vendors), additional unit (has been let out in the past to a separate company), and a first floor apartment. The accommodation in the apartment comprises; Good sized lounge, separate kitchen, two bedrooms and a bathroom. Further benefits include double glazing as well as gas central heating. There is also Rear Access, No Onward Chain. Situated in a busy location on Southmead Road.

This immaculately presented family home is situated in a much sought after private road in Long Ashton. Internally the property benefits from three reception rooms plus a very spacious kitchendining room, utility and WC. The first floor comprises four double bedrooms, the master of which boasts spacious en-suite amenities, plus a family bathroom. The floor also includes a very expansive living area which is perfect for a large family. The property includes private rear gardens a double garage and off street parking

Elming House is an outstanding example of Regency elegance and splendour. Steeped in a wealth of history, this magnificent Grade II listed family home has been sympathetically refurbished by the current vendors to create a true home of distinction, retaining many of the original character and period features. Elming House is one of four properties, converted in c1980’s, that make-up the main building of Brockley Hall, a country mansion, that is set in three acres of landscaped gardens, surrounded by mature trees and neighbouring farmland and woodland.

This contemporary family home is located in the semi-rural area of Failand, which is c2miles away from the cosmopolitan Clifton Village. The property includes four bedrooms and three bathrooms catering for all family needs. The kitchen- diner is very attractive with natural oak flooring throughout giving it a classy finish. The conservatory is a great feature of the property, is spacious and looks out onto the private and generous westerly facing garden. Further includes a large gated driveway

www.alexandermay.co.uk


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents

NEW SHOPS TO RENT

(0117) 934 9977

PRINCESS VICTORIA STREET

BLACKBOY HILL (WHITELAdIES ROAd)

Prime shop in Clifton Village – 305 sq ft. Excellent trading position – Only £14,500 pax.

Prominent shop to rent with c 690 sq ft. sales plus upper floors in all totaling c 2100 sq ft. New lease £19,500 pax.

74 WHITELAdIES ROAd

CLIFTON VILLAGE

V prominent corner shop with A2 (estate agency consent) of c 1,017 sq ft – Upper floor offices 2,230 sq ft also available with or without the shop – New lease.

Fronting onto Portland St, a boutique shop of 356 sq ft – New lease at only £10,000 pax.

dRUId HILL, STOKE BISHOP

13 CHANdOS ROAd, REdLANd

Situated in an established neighbourhood parade – Lock up shop of 422 sq ft.

Large shop with estate agency use of c 985 sq ft. New lease. Only £8,950 pax.

New lease. Only £7,500 pax.

FISHPONdS ROAd SHOP

PARK ROW, BRISTOL

Prominent shop in busy shopping area serving Fishponds – 608 sq ft fitted to a good standard.

Prominent shop situated opposite the university. 711 sq ft over 2 floors. New lease - £14,900 per annum, exclusive.

New lease - £11,750 pax.

We can help you

• Sales • Lettings • • Valuations • Rent reviews • • Acquisitions advice • Investments • • Development advice • Landlord & tenant • Keep un to date with our latest news... www.burstoncook.co.uk Julian Cook

Jayne Rixon

Andrew Oliver

David Ball

EGi Top 3 Regional agent based on regional transactions handled, encompassing Bristol, Bath and Swindon 2011.

Please telephone Julian Cook FRICS Jayne Rixon MRICS or Andrew Oliver MRICS or David Ball BA MSc (Hons) (0117) 934 9977 Burston Cook October.indd 1

Awards ‘08, ‘09, ‘10, ‘11 24/09/2012 18:52


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents

INVESTMENTS AND OFFICES INVESTMENT FOR SALE

(0117) 934 9977

1 FARLEIGH COURT, FLAX BOURTON

Business units for sale from £93,000 – Let until Jan 2018 with rental income of 9 % return.

A most attractive office of 1,525 sq ft with good parking and high quality fittings.

- A wise purchase for investors -

New lease £12.50 per sq ft.

FOR SALE – CITY CENTRE

CLIFTON OFFICES Attractive offices of 1,277 sq ft situated in a convenient location. NEW FLEXIBLE LEASE

C 12,000 sq ft of ‘loft style’ commercial space with large penthouse flat behind Georgian Façade with potential for full residential conversion.

ONLY £1000 pcm, exclusive

Only £875,000 INVESTMENT FOR SALE - FULLY LET – CHELTENHAM ROAD

WHITELADIES ROAD, CLIFTON Large open plan A3 unit with excellent trading position with concertina windows.

Gross income - £61,500 pax. Large restaurant plus two three bed maisonettes OIRO £725,000

New lease available and no ingoing premium.

CITY CENTRE OFFICES

CLIFTON OFFICES

High quality offices in a peaceful courtyard setting at the heart of BS1 – from 1,172 – 3,568 sq ft. Flexible leases at only £9.75 per sq ft.

Office suite of 1,572 sq ft plus 3 car parking spaces. Great location. New flexible lease.

We can help you

• Sales • Lettings • • Valuations • Rent reviews • • Acquisitions advice • Investments • • Development advice • Landlord & tenant • Keep un to date with our latest news... www.burstoncook.co.uk Julian Cook

Jayne Rixon

Andrew Oliver

David Ball

EGi Top 3 Regional agent based on regional transactions handled, encompassing Bristol, Bath and Swindon 2011.

Please telephone Julian Cook FRICS Jayne Rixon MRICS or Andrew Oliver MRICS or David Ball BA MSc (Hons) (0117) 934 9977 Burston Cook October.indd 4

Awards ‘08, ‘09, ‘10, ‘11 25/09/2012 16:01


PLEASE READ WHAT OUR CLIENTS SAY ABOUT BURSTON COOK

Handelsbanken Burston Cook worked with us in acquiring new premises for Handelsbanken Clifton. The agency worked tirelessly towards a completion. Burston Cook provided tremendous support and advice during the negotiation stages and then continued the process, constantly liaising with various agents and professionals during the legal process. We thoroughly recommend the services offered by Burston Cook and look forward to retaining the local relationship with the team in the future.

“I just wanted to say thank you very much for all your time and effort. You’ve been fantastic!” Perfectly Posh, Independent Retailer

Solicitor & property owner “Many thanks for your successful efforts in selling the property and for your help and advice throughout” P Stevens Esq.

“This has been challenging at time. Your input and ability to move things forward and get things done is admirable..” S Durrant Est. Private Retailer

Genius Consultancy We had a demanding brief to acquire offices in a desirable City centre location. Burston Cook were really impressive and straight on the case, managing the purchase effortlessly and took the whole strain out of the process for us. We would highly recommend them P Gibbons Esq, MD

Bellwind-Edis Ltd Burston Cook is different and is not just another commercial agent following the crowd and doing the job with the same preconceived ideas as all the others. Too many agents give the impression that they are a clique. Burston Cook are well respected by their peers but from a clients point of view I want someone who can think outside the box and work hard at looking after my interests as if it were theirs. The proof of the pudding is found in results. My firm came up with a new and novel way of letting office space and involved two respected international agents to act for us but without success. One of those agents suggested a joint agency with Burston Cook, one of the good things they did do, for Burston Cook was the only agent that introduced that key pivotal tenant that gets the letting program underway. I would not hesitate to recommend Burston Cook.

Jelf Group plc This move has been possible due to the professional assistance of one of our long term business partners. Burston Cook, who have facilitated our search and fulfilled our brief.

May I take this opportunity to say thank you for your excellent input during the deal. You come highly recommended Ms Bidwell, Private Retailer

WE ACT FOR A WIDE RANGE OF

(0117) 934 9977 Burston Cook October.indd 2

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er

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A SELECTION OF OUR LATEST TESTIMONIALS Lloyd’s Register Lloyd’s Register instructed Burston Cook to carry out a search for 6,000-8,000 sq ft of office space in Bristol for one of its local subsidiary companies - Human Engineering Ltd. Burston Cook were appointed to lead the instruction and provide professional services from the outset. As a result, Lloyd’s Register secured a superb deal in Clifton. We completed the transaction in May of this year and certainly would not have managed the smooth process or secured the deal we did without the help of Burston Cook. We are so delighted with the service which we received that we have since instructed Burston Cook to handle a lease renewal on one our other offices in Bristol. We have no hesitation at all in highly recommending Burston Cook property consultants.

CX Partners We very much appreciated your experience and advice when it came to the Heads of Terms on the property and I have no doubt we would not have achieved all of the terms we wanted, or in fact recognised terms we could negotiate to our advantage without your input. It took the stress away from us and let us get on with the other elements of the move!

Against the odds, Burston Cook secured a tenant in a matter of weeks on excellent terms Their strategic negotiations and professionalism is impressive Ms. Z Miner Retailer

Duncan Lawrie Private Banking Duncan Lawrie Private Banking had a very demanding requirement for a new office that would support our ambitious growth plans in Bristol and reflect our traditional values coupled with our modern approach to delivering excellent client service. Burston Cook met the challenge with great enthusiasm, support and understanding and through his diligence and perseverance he secured our new office building where there seemed no hope of success. We were delighted. Thank you Burston Cook

Chescombe Trust The Trust engaged Burton Cook as sole agents for the sale our our nursing home in Bristol. Although a difficult and volatile market, a carefully planned and coordinated marketing campaign resulting in a sale price exceeding the original independent valuation. The trust has been delighted with Burston Cook’s performance” Chairman Chescombe Trust

You took all the worry out of the whole process by giving wise advice to me and taking care of things efficiently at every stage. Things went so smoothly that at times I forgot that I was selling the property! You really helped me think through all the options, prioritise them and understand the implications of each stage. Thank you! J Burrough, private property owner.

Western Power Distribution Burston Cook have been extremely effective in their advice from their initial recommendations through to negotiations and completion of the lease. Burston Cook have worked for Burston Cook on a number of properties and I would not hesitate to recommend them. D Withers, Estates Manager

We would like to thank you and Burston Cook as a whole for all your patience, professionalism, expertise and hard work in securing this letting for us and for bringing closure to this particularly difficult period. With kind regards from both of us Mr & Mrs Hynam. Private retail jewelers.

LOCAL AND NATIONAL CLIENTS

(0117) 934 9977 Burston Cook October.indd 3

25/09/2012 14:21


Burston Cook October.indd 6

24/09/2012 18:51


www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 949 1888 60 Northumbria Drive, Henleaze, Bristol, BS9 4HW

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Commercial Sales & Lettings

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STOKE BISHOP

£135,000/£10,000 p.a.

Self contained ground floor lock up shop/office unit (approx 875sqft) currently used as an Accountants benefiting from gas central heating and secure shutters to the front. Situated in a varied parade of shops and amenities. New lease available.

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SOUTHVILLE AVONMOUTH VILLAGE

£50,000

Very well presented and recently renovated lock up shop unit (approx 500sqft) benefiting from A1/ A2 planning use. Currently arranged as various treatment rooms with electric shutters and burglar alarm. Situated in Avonmouth village. To be sold with vacant possession.

GLOS ROAD NORTH

£25,000 p.a.

Extended and spacious double fronted shop unit, circa 2,500sqft gross, benefiting from rear yard providing off street parking for ample vehicles. Situated in a busy position on Gloucester Road North arranged predominately as retail space with additional rear office and storages areas.

N

Vacant commercial freehold property situated on North Street in Southville. The property is arranged as a ground floor shop unit (approx 700sqft) with rear double garage/workshop. In addition the property comprises a very well presented large 2 bedroom, 2 reception maisonette to the first and second floors. N

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ALMONDSBURY

HENLEAZE

£6,900 p.a.

KINGSWOOD

£235,000

Well presented ground floor offices (approx 630sqft (net internal area) arranged as large open plan office with further interconnecting meeting room. Benefits from communal toilets (plus disabled toilet), gas central heating and off street parking for 2 vehicles to the front. New lease available.

Mixed used investment arranged as spacious ground floor shop (in excess of 1,000sqft) let on a 5 year lease with 2 additional self contained one bedroom flats to upper levels. The property is fully let producing £21,400pa, representing a gross yield of 9.1%.

E IC ON PR CTI U D RE

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£12,000 p.a.

Extended ground floor lock up shop unit (over 1100sqft net floor area) arranged as retail space with additional rear cafe and rear access. Situated in the highly desirable Henleaze Road. New lease available.

Estate Agents

£350,000

Lettings & Auctioneers Management

Maggs & Allen Oct Commercial.indd 1

BRISLINGTON

£135,000

Freehold property arranged as ground floor shop unit (approx 650sqft gross) with additional flat above. Situated in a prominent position on Sandy Park Road, amongst a varied parade of shops and amenities. To be sold with vacant possession.

Commercial/ Investment

MONTPELIER

£15,000 p.a.

Opportunity to lease a newly constructed live/work unit with allocated parking. The property consists of a ground floor office/workshop/studio space of approximately 500sqft with a self contained 2 bedroom apartment above.

Chartered Land/New Homes Surveyors

Energy Assessors

24/09/2012 17:55


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£469,950 Westbury-On-Trym

4 bedroom semi-detached home built circa 1927, still retained are many period features including stained glass windows, a stunning wood panelled entrance hall and some fireplaces. Situated conveniently for Henleaze primary school and the superb mixture of shops and cafés on Henleaze Road this property is sure to appeal to the largely family market this location attracts.

£450,000 Bishopston

An extended 4 bedroom 1930’s family home positioned on Abbey Road in the highly sought after village of Westbury-OnTrym, close to local amenities and public transport links. With a sunny aspect rear garden and a further extension to the rear of the property, this is a perfect family home. Marketed with no onward chain.

£425,000

An elevated and spacious extended family home ideally located for local primary schools. With 4 double bedrooms a kitchen measuring 22 foot and a garden measuring approximately 60ft and arranged over 3 floors, this house offers flexible accommodation and exceptional square footage.

Westbury-on-trym 0117 962 1973

westburysales@oceanhome.co.uk

Westbury-On-Trym

£425,000 Stoke Bishop

A beautifully appointed semi-detached family home occupying a prime position on Stoke Lane close to the many local amenities. This lovely home offers three double bedrooms with two bathrooms, extended living room and separate dining room. The property has an integral garage, off street parking and a landscaped rear garden

Henbury Village

£300,000 Coombe Dingle

Situated in the historic Henbury Village and occupying a wonderful secluded position just moments from the open expanse of the Blaise Castle Estate nestles 'Castle Gate'. Complementing the historic period facades of the surrounding area this contemporary link detached family home has three bedrooms and two reception rooms.

wills and probate

£385,000 Coombe Dingle

This three bedroom, semi-detached family home is located on the quiet Coombe Bridge Avenue, Stoke Bishop. Boasting a 100 foot rear garden which in turn backs onto the picturesque Dingle, this property offers the ideal mix of peaceful surroundings with easy access to Bristol.

£285,000 Henleaze

Nestled within a quiet backwater of Coombe Dingle, a short walk from the Blaise Castle Estate, is number 11 Arbutus Drive. A fine example of a bay fronted 1950's family home with over a 70 foot rear garden and off street parking for at least 3 vehicles.

European legal services

£315,000

A beautifully refurbished family home that is located in a prime position at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac and boasts fantastic views across Coombe Dingle and Stoke Bishop. Ready to move into and with no onward chain, this property is generating substantial interest.

£280,000

This beautifully presented two bedroom first floor apartment is set within an imposing period house in Henleaze, which also benefits from a single garage. With generous proportions throughout and exceptional square footage. Positioned within walking distance to the Downs and to Henleaze High Street.

property lawyers


Ocean fp October:Layout 1

Redcliffe

24/9/12

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£165,000 Redland

A two double bedroom ground floor flat with ensuite shower to the master bedroom in Redcliffe Backs with ALLOCATED PARKING SPACE. Guild Court is a modern development which is located ideally for Bristol Temple meads, Floating Harbour, City centre and Queens square. No 13 offers spacious lounge/diner opening to a kitchen with many fitted appliances, two double bedrooms, a modern bathroom with white suite and shower over the bath.

£235,000 Redcliffe

A spacious and impressive first floor period apartment in the heart of Redland with many period features including corniceing, fireplaces, ceiling rose and stripped floors which compliment the well laid out accommodation that presents as lounge/diner with bay window, separate kitchen, two double bedrooms and a modern bathroom. Located conveniently for Whiteladies Road, Chandos Road, BRI Hospital and Bristol University.

£250,000

A stunning duplex penthouse apartment in the sought after Redcliffe Point building with a fabulous lounge/diner with sliding doors to a 18'10 x 4'8 balcony, the living space opens up to a kitchen/breakfast room on the split landing with many fitted appliances and a breakfast bar, downstairs there is a main bathroom, bedroom 1 with fitted wardrobes and ensuite shower room, bedroom 2 with a 19' x 12'4 private roof garden.

Clifton 0117 946 6007

cliftonsales@oceanhome.co.uk

Waterfront

£269,950 Redland

A generous two double bedroom modern apartment with views across the water to the SS Great Britain. The property offers spacious accommodation with an impressive 36' open plan living room/kitchen, two double bedrooms both with balconies and an en-suite to the master. There is a main bathroom off the wide hallway with a utility cupboard. The apartment also comes with secure off-street parking for two cars.

Cotham

£399,950 Redland

A three bed detached house set in this elevated position on Trelawney Road with far reaching views over Redland. To the ground floor are open plan reception rooms with bay to the front and double doors opening on to the rear garden and a kitchen that is open plan into a conservatory. The first floor consists of all bedrooms and a bathroom. At the rear of the property is a landscaped garden with a brick built workshop/office/playroom.

estate agents

£299,995 Hotwells

A simply exquisite top floor apartment in the sought after Blenheim Rd which is situated a few hundred yards from the Downs and convenient for Whiteladies Road and Henleaze shops. Offering spacious and extremely light accommodation including a raised lounge area that connects via stairs to a beautiful kitchen/diner, three bedrooms including the 17'7 x 15'7 master bedroom and an off street parking space.

£619,950 Clifton

An attractive family home arranged over four levels with an abundance of original features including cast iron fireplaces, cornicing and sash windows. There is five bedrooms, large living room and a 22’ kitchen/dining room. On the garden level there is a separate entrance to the front which has up until recently been used as a lettable flat. This is composed of two large centrally heated reception rooms, a cellar room and a storage cupboard.

letting agents

surveyors

£369,950

This wonderful period home in the always popular location of Albermarle Terrace, and is superbly placed for Clifton Village, the docks and Hotwells primary school. The property is presented over four floors and consists of; sitting, two vaulted storage areas, stunning kitchen/diner with access to the south facing garden and sunroom, downstairs WC, 2nd reception room, four bedrooms including a beautiful loft conversion & family bathroom.

£849,995

A beautifully appointed 5 bedroom semi detached family home in a prestigious location presented over 4 floors and consists Two reception rooms, dining room, Kitchen/Breakfast room, utility room, 5 bedrooms, main family bathroom, ensuite shower room to bedroom 2 and a separate WC. Externally the property offers up a beautiful south facing garden and a parking space at the front of the house.

mortgage brokers


CJ Hole october.indd 1

24/09/2012 17:56


Henleaze

Westbury-on-Trym

Westbury Park

This well presented detached Voke built family home offers; hallway with exposed beams, two receptions, breakfast/utility, kitchen/breakfast room, conservatory and cloakroom/WC. First and Second floor boast five bedrooms and three bathrooms. Practical landscaped garden, parking for two vehicles and detached garage. Marketed with a complete chain.

Arranged over three floors this semi-detached Coach House has recently been remodelled to a high specification including a Boulevard fitted kitchen/diner with Neff appliances, three/four bedrooms; master with en-suite and dressing room, sitting room, bathroom and shower room. Integral garage, small roof terrace and utility.

Within the APR for Redland Green School, a superb example of a period family home positioned within Westbury Park with a South Westerly facing garden. This three storey spacious property offers; two receptions, spacious kitchen/diner, larder and garage. Four bedrooms; master with en-suite and bathroom.

GUIDE PRICE: £750,000

PRICE: £429,950

PRICE £439,000

Montpelier

St. Andrews

Horfield

A truly unique period property offered for sale with no onward chain. Currently the accommodation comprises an entrance hallway, two reception rooms, a kitchen / breakfast room and a cloakroom. On the first floor can be found four double bedrooms and a bathroom. Further benefits include a garage (accessed via the property) and small courtyard style garden.

Highly impressive six bedroom, four reception room semi-detached period property. Offered to the market with no onward chain this double bayed home contains a wealth of period features including a grand entrance vestibule and hallway. Located on an elevated corner plot, externally the property offers a driveway for off street parking framed by manicured gardens.

A superb spacious semi-detached property presented to the highest of decorative standards with comprehensive work undertaken in recent years. The property provides two large separate reception rooms, both with bay windows, a good sized modern fitted kitchen and three generously sized bedrooms. Further benefits include a detached garage and a driveway.

£350,000

CJ Hole october.indd 3

£550,000

£323,000

25/09/2012 16:25


The Apartment Company Oct:Layout 3

Harbourside

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Offers in Excess of ÂŁ260,000

Two Bedrooms | Living/Dining Room | Kitchen | Bathroom | En-suite Shower Room | Private Terrace | Under-croft Parking | Harbourside Location Situated on Bristol's historic harbourside this immaculate two bedroom apartment is just minutes walk from the SS Great Britain, the M-Shed and the city centre which you can also reach by water taxi. The property has the benefit of a private terrace and undercroft parking.

Keynsham

Offers in Excess of ÂŁ250,000

2/3 Bedrooms | 1/2 Reception Rooms | Kitchen | En suite Shower Room | Bathroom | Off-street Parking | Ground Floor | Under-floor Heating | Communal Gardens | No onward chain An immaculately presented apartment with flexible accommodation offering 2-3 bedrooms and 1-2 receptions with open-plan kitchen, main bathroom and en suite bathroom to the master bedroom. There are lovely rural views and private balcony to the rear overlooking the communal gardens and two allocated off-street parking spaces to the front of the property.


The Apartment Company Oct:Layout 3

Clifton

21/9/12

13:29

Page 2

Offers in Excess of ÂŁ310,000

Two Bedrooms | Sitting Room | Kitchen | Study/Box Room | Bathroom | En-Suite Shower Room | Off-street Parking | Gas Central Heating | Excellent Location An elegant first floor apartment in a substantial Victorian building close to Whiteladies Road and The Downs. This apartment has the distinct advantage of off-street parking. The accommodation is well- planned with the sitting room and kitchen to the front of the property and two bedrooms (one with en-suite shower room) to the rear. In addition is a box room/study - ideal for storage or study.

Clifton

Offers in Excess of ÂŁ280,000

Period apartment | Beautifully presented | Amazing views | Two bedrooms | Spacious living room | Modern kitchen | Family bathroom | En Suite shower | Roof terrace Beautifully presented 2 bedroom period apartment with fantastic views over The Downs to the front and the City to the rear. The well balanced accommodation comprises spacious living room, modern fitted kitchen with integrated appliances, master bedroom with en-suite shower room, 2nd double bedroom and bathroom. The apartment enjoys direct access to a roof terrace via a spiral staircase from the kitchen.


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Sneyd Park £665,000

A spacious 5 bedroom modern detached house occupying a large corner plot with gardens to three sides. Two reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room is extended out to an adjoining conservatory. A study, utility and cloakroom complete the ground floor. 5 double bedrooms, master with en suite and family bathroom. Double garage and plenty of parking.

Redland £800,000

Stunning period home with immaculate accommodation arranged over 4 floors, located a stone’s throw from Whiteladies Road, yet affording peace and quiet. A superb Grade II listed semi-detached house with 5/6 beds and a decent garden which is located to the front and side and the added advantage of parking!

Redland £269,995

Immaculate hall floor garden flat with accommodation comprising: Hall, Large Sitting Room, Kitchen/Breakfast Room, 2 generous double bedrooms and a larger than average bathroom. Outside, the flat boasts gardens to both front and back, the rear being particularly private indeed. Highly recommended.

Leese & Nagle October.indd 1

Stoke Bishop £620,000

A beautifully appointed classic 1930’s four bedroom semidetached house with 100 ft long garden. Much improved in recent years it now provide a very comfortable and spacious home being ideally suited to families as it is just around the corner from Elmlea schools.

Kingsdown Guide Price £580,000

Beautiful Georgian townhouse overlooking Freemantle Square. Sympathetically upgraded it effortlessly combines luxurious modern fittings with a great deal of retained period features and charm.The accommodation is arranged over four floors, the lower two offering living accommodation and the upper two providing four bedrooms and two bathrooms.

Westbury-on-Trym £315,000

Attractive 3 bedroom semi detached house with fantastic level rear garden situated in a particularly quiet part of Westbury-on-Trym. The house would benefit from some updating in the fullness and as such represents a blank canvas for someone wishing to stamp their mark on a property. No onward chain.

Redland Guide Price £800,000

Wonderful Victorian 5/6 bed home with 2 bed flat underneath. Elevated position just off Whiteladies Road with views to the rear over the city. Great for those who want a home and income, or even a “work from home” option. Absolutely superb!

Westbury Park £750,000

An attractive and substantial five double bedroom family home situated on an extremely popular tree lined road in Westbury Park. Immaculately presented throughout this house retains numerous period features and the layout is ideally suited to growing families with extended kitchen/family space opening onto the rear garden.

Clifton £325,000

This period hall floor 2 bedroom apartment boasts well proportioned accommodation and level access to a private rear garden. Retaining period features throughout, from high ceilings and original sash windows, this property has an abundance of character. It is located on a quiet residential road a short distance from Whiteladies Road.

24/09/2012 17:53


30% OFF ALL BESPOKE SOFA ORDERS

SOFA Library October 2012 fp:Layout 1

25/9/12

15:49

Page 100

The Sofa Library make beautiful hand built bespoke upholstery in three weeks at our Bristol factory. Over 60 styles - ranging from period and historical pieces through to the most contemporary shapes and in all sizes from chair to four seater and above. Size alterations to fit your space exactly cost about an extra £50 Express Range sofas in three different styles ready in 7-10 days - hundreds of fabric choices and presently half price from £799 for a two seater We also fabricate hand made curtains and every type of blind in about two/three weeks and make made to measure cabinet furniture in either solid oak or other timbers Up to 25% off wardrobe orders 180cm wardrobes from £350

5 metre corner robes from £1300

56/60, Whiteladies Rd, BS8 2PY

Just past Clifton Down Shopping Centre Mon-Sat 9.30 - 5.30/Sun 12 - 5

TEL: 01173 292746

The Bristol magazine  

The Bristol Magazine is a glossy monthly magazine for the city of Bristol, England