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International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme at John McGlashan College

IB Handbook for 2019 and 2020 Student Cohort “Thinking Global, Acting Local�

Preparing students for success in higher education and to be active participants in a global society


International Baccalaureate Handbook

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is a path for our year 12 and 13 students because it embodies the same purpose and the same ideals that we hold and value at John McGlashan College. In this guide, you will find the details of the Diploma Programme and how it is implemented at the College. Contents Contents

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IB Mission Statement

4

IB Learner Profile

4

IB Diploma requirements

6

IB Diploma Core - CAS

7

IB Diploma Core - Theory of Knowledge (TOK)

7

Overnight TOK Camp

7

IB Diploma Core - Extended Essay (EE)

8

IB Diploma Core - Assessment

9

IBDP Subjects on offer for 2020 at the College

10

Start Dates for 2020

11

End Dates for 2020

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IBDP Core Teaching & Study Timeline

12

Internal Assessments

12

IBDP 2020/21 Internal Assessment Calendar

13

ManageBac

13

Turnitin

13

IBDP 2020 External Examination Schedule

13

Assessment in the IBDP

14

Grades

14

Practice and End of Year Assessments

14

Homework / Assignments

15

Costs

16

Recognition of the IB Diploma

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Registration

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University Entrance requirements

16

UPG & PG calculation examples:

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Accessing Exam Results and Sending Results to Universities

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Candidates.ibo.org

18

Use of candidate data

19

Form of the results

19

Enquiry upon results (EUR)

20

Special cases

20

Candidates with incomplete assessment

21

Responsibilities of candidates

21

Malpractice

21

Procedure on malpractice

22

IBDP Course Change Policy

22

Appendix A - IB Subject Assessment Format

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Appendix B - Information Directory

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

IB Mission Statement The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the Organisation works with schools, governments and international Organisations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

Our Vision Statement: Building Foundations for Life Our Mission Statement: Our Mission for John McGlashan College is to grow students who are well-educated men of character. These men will be innovative, lifelong learners who are grounded in the values of the Christian faith. They will be active contributors to local and global societies. Our Aim: We want our students to become well-educated men of character. We want them to learn to have the courage to stand, alone if necessary, for what they believe is right and to use their education and influence for the good of others. Boys will leave this College as men of integrity and conviction.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

IB Learner Profile The aim of IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.

As IB learners we strive to be: ●

INQUIRERS: We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

KNOWLEDGEABLE: We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

THINKERS: We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

COMMUNICATORS: We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

PRINCIPLED: We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

OPEN-MINDED: We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

CARING: We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

RISK-TAKERS: We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change.

BALANCED: We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives-intellectual, physical, and emotional-to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live.

REFLECTIVE: We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

IB Diploma requirements All assessment components for each of the six subjects and the additional Diploma requirements must be completed in order to qualify for the award of the IB Diploma. The six subjects must be selected from six groups as prescribed by the IB for the appropriate examination session. At least three and not more than four subjects being offered at Higher Level and the others at Standard Level. Approximately 240 hours to complete Higher Level courses and 150 hours to complete Standard Level courses In addition to the six subjects, candidates for the IB diploma must complete the following components, known as the IBDP Core: ● ● ●

take a course in Theory Of Knowledge (TOK) and complete the required assessment. This 100 hour course runs over the two-year period of the Diploma Programme complete an approved programme of extra-curricular creativity, activity, and service activities known as CAS complete and submit for assessment an Extended Essay (EE) in a subject available for this purpose.

The IB Diploma will be awarded to a candidate provided all the following requirements have been met. ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

CAS requirements have been met. The candidate’s total points are 24 or more. There is no “N” awarded for theory of knowledge, the extended essay or for a contributing subject. There is no grade E awarded for theory of knowledge and/or the extended essay. There is no grade 1 awarded in a subject/level. There are no more than two grade 2s awarded (HL or SL). There are no more than three grade 3s or below awarded (HL or SL). The candidate has gained 12 points or more on HL subjects (for candidates who register for four HL subjects, the three highest grades count). The candidate has gained 9 points or more on SL subjects (candidates who register for two SL subjects must gain at least 5 points at SL).

A maximum of three examination sessions is allowed in which to satisfy the requirements for the award of the IB Diploma. The sessions need not be consecutive.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

IB Diploma Core - CAS Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) is at the heart of the Diploma Program at the John McGlashan College. CAS is about becoming an active member in the community, a journey of self-discovery; learning who you are and what your full potential can be.

“As a shining beacon of our values, CAS enables students to demonstrate the attributes of the IB learner profile and International Mindedness in real and practical ways, to grow as unique individuals and to recognize their role in relation to others.” Students consult with the CAS coordinator and develop their own personalized CAS plan based on student’s interests, skills, talents, and areas for growth. It is amazing to see all of the ways that our CAS students excel and enrich the College and local community. We also have some traditional CAS projects that have been so successful and important to the community and program that they have passed on from cohort to cohort such as the Town Belt Kaitiaki project. Opportunities are created at the College for our students to be involved in creative pursuits, physical activities and service projects in the local, national and international contexts. These three elements of CAS are not mutually exclusive and students’ involvement in these interwoven areas should challenge them to develop a value system, which enhances their personal growth and fosters more caring and socially responsible attitudes. Our CAS program is designed to be personal, challenging and enjoyable; students have profound life-changing experiences. There is a high level of both support and expectations; students have regular contact time once a week to meet with the CAS coordinator scheduled into their timetables. These provide guidance with the planning, observing, and reflecting processes instrumental in making CAS experiences as valuable and meaningful as possible. In addition, it offers the students opportunities to collaborate and plan with one another and ensure the seven learning outcomes are being targeted and met. This is also an important time to monitor the students as they keep their portfolio in ManageBac up to date. IB Diploma Core - Theory of Knowledge (TOK) TOK is a unique subject that challenges students to question the basis of knowledge. The aim of the course is to develop thinking based on analysis of evidence and expression of opinion through rational argument. The course is taught over three terms in Year 12 and the second term in Year 13. In the first year, the students cover six specific Areas of Knowledge (AOK) that are connected to the other IB subjects, as well as eight Ways of Knowing (WOK). At the end of the second term of year two, the students will receive a predicted grade, which will consist of their presentation grade and essay grades. TOK is what makes the Diploma a superior and more demanding programme and sets it apart from all the others. The IB considers the skills and topics covered in the course very important and for that reason, TOK is a mandatory course.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Overnight TOK Camp At the end of year 1, the IBDP students will attend an overnight IBDP TOK Camp. The camp enables us to dive in deeper with a few of the areas of knowing that we are due to study this year. The boys will also have a chance to prepare and conduct a practice TOK presentation which will help them immensely for their assessment in Year 2. We will also spend time researching and writing the World Studies Extended Essay which is due at the end of term 1 of year 2.

IB Diploma Core - Extended Essay (EE) In order to earn the International Baccalaureate Diploma, it is compulsory for all IB candidates to submit a 4000-word externally assessed Extended Essay (EE) or World Studies Extended Essay (WSEE) on a topic of their choice, in one or more of the IB curriculum subjects. The purpose of the Extended Essay (EE) is to provide students with an opportunity to conduct independent high-level research, with an emphasis on the process of engaging in personal research, communication of ideas and information, and critical thinking. Students are required to devote a minimum of 40 hours, to the essay over the course of twelve months, beginning in year 12. The World Studies Extended Essay (WSEE) is an in-depth, interdisciplinary study of an issue of contemporary global significance. It aims to develop interdisciplinary inquiry, the ability to conduct an investigation whereby students integrate knowledge and modes of thinking from two or more disciplines. An additional aim is to develop a global consciousness consisting of three capabilities: global sensitivity, global understanding and global self. At the College, we conduct a number of briefing sessions for all students in the Diploma Programme to prepare them for the task of the Extended Essay. An introduction to academic writing and the research and writing process, an overview of the objectives and requirements, assessment criteria of the Extended Essay and coaching around good and bad research questions are some aspects that are included. After these sessions, students will be given some time to make their choice of subject and topic. Thereafter, a supervisor will be assigned to guide them through the research and writing process. Each student is supported throughout the process with advice and guidance from their supervising teacher, who should be knowledgeable in that area of study, the Extended Essay Coordinator and the IBDP Coordinator. Students are required to meet with their subject supervisor for a minimum of three times throughout the process. During these formal reflection sessions, the supervisor and student will discuss possible research questions and methodology, strategies for developing ideas, challenges encountered, advice needed, and create a summer work plan. After each of these sessions, students are required to write a written reflection which will be turned in along with their final paper. Students are also encouraged to arrange informal meetings with their supervisors, as necessary. The College is also pleased to offer students an Academic Writing course with the EE coordinator during term four of the first year of the diploma and term 1 of the second year of the diploma. 8


International Baccalaureate Handbook

The purpose of this course is to assist students in refining and enhancing their research, critical thinking, and writing skills. The course will also provide instruction in using academic language to communicate, crafting arguments and supporting claims effectively, citing sources and using intext citations, and principles related to academic honesty and integrity.

To ensure that students are progressing satisfactorily and to aid in planning, the College has established six checkpoints beginning in year 12. They are as follows: 1.

EE or WSEE outline due in October (Year 1)

2.

600-word draft in November (Year 1)

3.

2000 word draft in January (Year 2)

4.

4000 word complete draft in February (Year 2)

5.

Final essay due in March (Year 2)

6.

EE Showcase event April 9th, 2020 (Year 2)

The timeline and checkpoints are shared with students in term three of the first year of the diploma. The Extended Essay Coordinator will guide the students throughout the process during the Academic Writing classes and via the Google classroom. Upon completion, the final essay will be submitted by the Extended Essay Coordinator, to the IB for grading. The EE Showcase event is an opportunity for the IBDP students to celebrate their achievements and present their essays to the wider community. It will be held in the ELC from 3:30pm-4:30pm on April 9th, 2020. Afternoon tea will be provided.

IB Diploma Core - Assessment Performance in theory of knowledge and the extended essay are each graded on a scale of A (maximum) to E (minimum). The CAS requirement is not assessed but must have a satisfactory level of completion. For the IB Diploma, a maximum of 3 points is awarded for combined performance in theory of knowledge and the extended essay. The final Extended Essay grade and Theory of Knowledge grade will be entered in the Diploma Points Matrix to award points towards the student’s Diploma score.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

IBDP Subjects on offer for 2020 at the College

Group 1

2

3

4

5

6

Core

Subject ●

English Literature

School-Supported Self-Taught Language

German

Spanish

Spanish ab initio

English (ESOL)

Economics

History

Physics

Chemistry

Biology

Computer Science

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches

Visual Arts

Music

Theory of Knowledge

Creativity, Activity and Service

Extended Essay

Briefs for each of these subjects can be accessed here.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Start Dates for 2020 Thu 23rd Jan 1pm - 3pm

Year 2 IBDP students - Re-orientation programme - day 1

Fri 24th Jan

9am - 3pm

Year 2 IBDP students - Re-orientation programme - day 2

Mon 27th Jan 1pm - 3pm

Year 1 IBDP students - Re-orientation programme - day 1 Year 2 IBDP students - Re-orientation programme - day 3

Tue 28th Jan 11am - 3pm

Year 1 IBDP students - Re-orientation programme - day 2 Year 2 IBDP students - Re-orientation programme - day 4

Wed 29th Jan 8:40am - 3:15pm

First Full Day Yr 7-13 8:40 am Formal Assembly Yr 7-13, Chapel Pd 1

Yr 7-13 with Form Teachers

Pd 2 - 6 Normal timetable begins Thur 30th Jan

Normal College day

Fri 31st Jan

Normal College day

End Dates for 2020 Year 2 (2020) Cohort Term 4

Week 2

Study Leave

Week 3-5

Exams

Year 1 (2021) Cohort Term 4

Fri 20th Nov

Last classes

Mon 23rd Nov

IBDP TOK Camp Day 1

Tue 24th Nov

IBDP TOK Camp Day 2

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

IBDP Core Teaching & Study Timeline The IBDP Core will be taught over the two year programme and will enable sufficient time for study in the lead up to the examinations in November of the second year of the programme.

Internal Assessments All assignments are due by the College submission dates set out below. Please note that final deadlines (day/month) will be confirmed closer to the date by the subject teachers and communicated to the students and parents at that time. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that he/she makes a careful note of the due date for each assignment – for written work and oral presentations – and presents this work on time. IB Diploma deadlines are placed on the College’s IA Calendar and are regularly communicated to the parents. The College will not accept that a student has not been informed of IB coursework deadlines. Students who anticipate having difficulty meeting a deadline must see the teacher well before the due date to discuss strategies, which will allow them to meet their commitments. Students with an absence for the day that an assignment was due must hand in the assignment by email and the official submission portal (Google Classroom or ManageBac), or on their return by negotiation with their teacher. Students who are absent from major presentations (i.e. TOK presentations and English IOC etc.) due to illness are required to present a doctor’s certificate. The student will be required to present the day they return to school. Note: Dates are subject to change. Please discuss your final dates with your teacher.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

IBDP 2020/21 Internal Assessment Calendar Figure: A screenshot of the Google Calendar. Follow the (link here) for an up-to-date version.

ManageBac ManageBac is the learning management system that we use to manage all internal assessment within the IBDP. Each internal assessment will be on the ManageBac calendar. The students will be expected to upload their internal assessment work to ManageBac. ManageBac also enables the students to record their CAS experiences and manage their CAS portfolio. Turnitin Turnitin is another programme which is linked to ManagBac. Turnitin enables students and teachers to check for accidental plagiarism and it helps prepare students for success in secondary education, higher education, and beyond by laying the foundation for original thinking, authentic writing, and academic integrity practices that will last a lifetime. IBDP 2020 External Examination Schedule IBDP November 2020 Exam Schedule The November 2021 schedule is published in the latter stages of 2020.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Assessment in the IBDP Examiners are appointed by the IB to assess candidates' work in Diploma Programme examinations and other forms of external assessment using common mark schemes. Most courses also require additional work, which is internally assessed and externally moderated. (All components must be submitted for assessment to receive a grade for a course.)

Grades Performance in each subject is graded on a scale of 7 points (maximum) down to 1 point (minimum). Performance in theory of knowledge and the extended essay are each graded on a scale of A (maximum) to E (minimum). The CAS requirement is not assessed. The maximum total DP point’s score is 45 (three points from the IB Core). Table 1: Point obtained and description of achievement Point

Description

7

Excellent

6

Very Good

5

Good

4

Satisfactory

3

Weak

2

Poor

1

Very Poor

Practice and End of Year Assessments Year 12 (2021 Cohort) End of year examinations will take place in weeks 9 and 10 of term 3. Make up exams are available for students who, for some legitimate reason, can not take the exam at the regular hour. Legitimate excuses may include; illness, death in the family, accident, requirement to appear in court, or having too many exams in a 24 hour period according to the IBDP policy. Documentation is required. Students who miss an exam without any excuse will have no mark for that assessment. No mark for exam would result in an “Incomplete” (INC) appearing on their transcript.

The structure of make up exams may differ from the format of the regularly scheduled exam, and is at the instructor's discretion. The instructor has flexibility and discretion regarding the nature of make up exams. The key point is that an instructor has provided the opportunity for make up work due to legitimate excuses.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Year 13 (2020 Cohort) Practice examinations will take place in weeks 9 and 10 of term 3. Lessons will resume after the Practice examination period and attendance is expected. IB Diploma Programme examinations will commence in the last week of October. Make up exams are available for students who, for some legitimate reason, cannot take the exam at the regular time. After the IBDP exams, Year 13 students will only be expected to report to school for the prize-giving ceremony, graduation rehearsals and graduation.

Homework / Assignments ● ●

● ●

Students are responsible for finding out what new assignments there may be and when they are due. Homework is an extension of the regular daily schoolwork and is given in all courses. The functions of homework are to help students prepare for classes, and develop the skills of Organisation, time management, independent responsibility, self-direction and self-discipline. Long-range assignments such as reports and projects take careful planning and Organisation on the part of the student. Parents are encouraged to assist in monitoring student progress toward the completion of the assignments, but should not do the students’ work for them. Parents can be most helpful to their children by providing a routine time and a place that is conducive to undisturbed study. Students can seek help in developing more effective study skills from their teachers, counselors, and the learning support department. The amount of homework assigned normally increases as the student progresses through school and varies throughout the year. The nature of the homework will vary but it can be assumed that students will always be required to be reading set texts in preparation for lessons and reading around all of their subjects as a matter of course. Getting work done on time requires careful planning, Organisation, determination, and self-discipline. These qualities are important in the later working-careers of students and in their personal lives. To promote the habit of punctuality, while recognizing that difficulties can arise, our policy is that all assignments are due by the deadline set by the teacher (Diploma coursework or any other assignment). It is the class teacher’s responsibility to ensure that the due date – for written work and oral presentations – is clearly understood by all of the students in the class. IB Diploma deadlines are placed in the College’s DP Handbook and made available to the parents. Students who anticipate having difficulty meeting a deadline must see the teacher well before the due date to discuss a possible extension. An extension may be granted if the teacher judges that there is an acceptable and legitimate reason. Students with an absence for the day that an assignment was due should hand in the assignment by e-mail where possible or on their return. They are also responsible for finding out what new assignments there may be and when they are due.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Costs To be an IBDP student at John McGlashan College, it costs $280 per term invoiced at $560 per semester. Costs cover: IB Registration fees, IB Examination fees, overnight Camp and College related resource fees.

Recognition of the IB Diploma The IB actively promotes wide recognition and acceptance of the IB diploma as a basis for entry to courses at universities and other institutions of higher education, but the requirements of individual institutions and the relevant authorities of a country are subject to change beyond the IB's control. Candidates bear the responsibility of verifying the entry requirements of the universities and other institutions of higher education to which they are interested in applying. Registration All students must be registered by the College’s DP coordinator for each intended examination session and must take the requisite courses and examinations within the College. Registrations and payment of fees must be made by the relevant deadlines. The following categories of registration are available. ●

Diploma: candidates intending to complete the requirements for the award of an IB diploma.

Retake: Diploma candidates who are seeking to improve on their results. The highest grade obtained for a subject will contribute towards the IB diploma.

Anticipated: Diploma candidates who are sitting part of their diploma in an earlier examination session.

Refer to the College’s Admissions Policy.

University Entrance requirements All Universities have different entry requirements. The University of Otago for example requires 26 points to gain Preferential Entry into the specific course of study chosen by the applicant. Anything less than 26 points could qualify for Competitive Entry into the University.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

University Predicted Grades (UPG) for University Entrance Colleges and universities frequently require predicted grades on applications for admission. Predicted grades at the end of Year 12 will be computed according to the DP Subject Guide assessment weightings for each subject.

● ● ●

End of year exam grades will be used as external assessment grades in the computation. Internal assessment grades will be awarded by the teacher based on course work designated as internal assessment assignments. These predicted grades will be used for university applications until the Term 2 reports for Year 13 are issued.

At the end of each year, the IBDP coordinator will collate an expected predicted grade based on student performance in the course. Predicted grades sent to universities after the Term 3 reports for Year 13 will use this update grade. Note: Students who require Extended Essay (EE) grades for college/university applications must submit their final essay to their supervisor by 15 April. UPG & PG calculation examples: Biology HL or SL (post school exam s) ■ External assessment

80%

■ Internal assessment

20%

EOY exam grade

6

IA work grade

4

(6×0.8) + (4×0.2) = 4.8 + 0.8

5.6

PG (Round down)

5

Biology HL or SL (prior to school exam s) ■ External assessment

80%

■ Internal assessment

20%

In-class test average (6 7 6 7 7 6)

6.5

IA work grade

6

(6.5×0.8) + (6×0.2) = 5.2 + 1.2

6.4

UPG (Round down)

6

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Accessing Exam Results and Sending Results to Universities • All students registered for IB exams will receive a specific candidate code and PIN to gain access to their exam scores at https://candidates.ibo.org. • The date to assess the website for results is in early January. (To be confirmed by the IB at a later date.) • The IB will send exam results to the applied universities/admission centre free of charge for the first six requests. • After results are published, students may submit additional results requests directly to the IBO at https://candidates.ibo.org Candidates.ibo.org Students should access the website: https://candidates.ibo.org to upload coursework, join the IBO Alumni, Get exam results, request transcripts, access IBO support materials. A sample homepage on https://candidates.ibo.org is below:

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Use of candidate data Data relating to a candidate including data such as name, address, email addresses, date of birth, and phone numbers may be used for the following purposes:

● ●

● ● ● ● ●

registering candidates in the DP and administering the DP to provide DP support and services for the candidate including providing information to institutions of higher education (such as universities and colleges or governmental authorities related to admission to institutions of higher education) research and statistical analysis related to the IB Organisation’s mission advertising and promotional purposes for the IB Organisation educational, training, commercial and other compatible purposes to engage in and process transactions with the candidate or school to fulfill statutory, regulatory, reporting and/or legal obligations.

Candidates or their legal guardians may inquire as to the nature of the candidate data processed about him or her by their school to the extent permitted under data protection or privacy law applicable to the candidate and their respective School.

Form of the results Diploma Candidates Successful IB Diploma Candidates will receive an IB Diploma and a document entitled “Diploma Programme (DP) Results” listing the total IB Diploma points score, the subject grades, confirmation of the completion of all CAS requirements and any points awarded and individual grades for the combination of theory of knowledge and the extended essay. An IB Diploma Candidate who fails to satisfy the requirements for the award of an IB Diploma will receive DP Course Results indicating the grades obtained in individual subjects, together with results in theory of knowledge and the extended essay, and confirmation of the completion of all CAS requirements, as appropriate.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Bilingual IB Diploma Candidates The bilingual diploma is awarded to a successful candidate who fulfills one or both of the following criteria: ● completion of two languages selected from group 1 with the award of a grade 3 or higher in both ● completion of one of the subjects from group 3 or group 4 in a language that is not the same as the candidate’s group 1 language. The candidate must attain a grade 3 or higher in both the group 1 language and the subject from group 3 or 4. Refer to the College’s Language Policy. Enquiry upon results (EUR) A candidate’s assessment material may be re-marked, returned to the College (in electronic format or as a photocopy) and/or subject to re-moderation (for internal assessment) as part of the enquiry upon results service, the details and fees for which can be obtained from the College’s DP coordinator. The following are available when requested by a coordinator. ● ● ● ● ●

Category 1 re-mark: The re-mark of externally assessed material for an individual candidate Category 1 report: A report on a category 1 re-mark for an individual candidate Category 2A: The return of externally assessed material by component for all candidates Category 2B: The return of externally assessed material by subject/level for an individual candidate Category 3 re-moderation: The re-moderation of marks for internal assessment by subject/level

A $USD 123 fee is payable for the Category 1 re-mark (except when a grade is changed as a consequence of a category 1 re-mark). The categories for enquiries upon results are normally independent of each other and may be requested in any order up to 15 September/15 March, two months after the issue of results. Re-marking a candidate’s assessment material may lead to a higher or a lower grade for the subject. Special Assessment cases A learning support requirement(s) is any permanent or temporary requirement(s) that could put a candidate at a disadvantage and prevent him or her from being able to demonstrate their skills and knowledge adequately or as may otherwise be defined by law. The IB Organisation is able to authorize inclusive assessment arrangements for a candidate with assessment access requirements. Requests for this consideration are made through the College’s DP coordinator. If a candidate's performance has been affected by adverse circumstances, the final award committee may give special consideration to the case, provided that this would not give an advantage in comparison with other candidates. Requests for this consideration are made through the College’s DP coordinator. Refer to the College’s Inclusive Access Policy.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Candidates with incomplete assessment “Incomplete assessment” means that a candidate has not submitted one or more components of the assessment requirements in a subject. In cases of incomplete assessment in a subject, the IB Organisation may, at its discretion, award a grade for the subject if an acceptable reason is provided by the College for the incomplete assessment being beyond the candidate’s control, and the candidate has submitted sufficient work, leading to at least 50% of the total marks available in that subject and including an externally assessed component. Any application for special consideration in cases of incomplete assessment must be submitted to the IB Organisation by the College’s DP coordinator on behalf of the candidate. The application must be received within 10 calendar days of the completion of the final assessment component of the subject. Responsibilities of candidates There is an expectation that IB students model exemplary behaviour, conduct and appearance. They should maintain good standing at the College. Candidates are required to act in a responsible and ethical manner throughout their participation in the Diploma Programme and examinations. Candidates are required to act in a responsible and ethical manner throughout their participation in the Diploma Programme and examinations. In particular, candidates must avoid any form of malpractice. IB students are required to attend classes on a regular basis to meet the minimum instructional hours set by the IB. Malpractice The IB Organisation defines academic misconduct as behaviour (whether deliberate or inadvertent) that results in, or may result in, the candidate or any other candidate gaining an unfair advantage in one or more components of assessment. Behaviour that may disadvantage another candidate is also regarded as academic misconduct. Academic misconduct is a breach of these regulations and includes, but is not restricted to, the following: ●

● ● ●

plagiarism—this is defined as the representation, intentionally or unintentionally, of the ideas, words or work of another person without proper, clear and explicit acknowledgment collusion—this is defined as supporting academic misconduct by another candidate, for example, allowing one’s work to be copied or submitted for assessment by another duplication of work—this is defined as the presentation of the same work for different assessment components and/or DP core requirements misconduct during an IB examination (for example, taking unauthorized material into an examination, behaviour that disrupts the examination or distracts other candidates, or communicating with another candidate) any other behaviour that gains an unfair advantage for a candidate or that affects the results of another candidate (for example, falsifying a CAS record, disclosure of information to and receipt of information from candidates about the content of an examination paper within 24 hours after a written examination via any form of communication/media).

Refer to the College’s Academic Honesty Policy.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Procedure on malpractice When a teacher, supervisor, coordinator, administrator, examiner, or the IB Organisation establishes evidence to suspect academic misconduct by a candidate, the College will be required to conduct an investigation and provide the IB Organisation with statements and other relevant documentation concerning the case. Candidates suspected of academic misconduct must be invited, through the College’s DP coordinator, to present a written statement that addresses the suspicion of academic misconduct. The outcome is determined by the College Administration and IB Organisation. Refer to the College’s Academic Honesty Policy. IBDP Course Change Policy The College conducts a pre-IB Diploma orientation session for the candidates prior to commencement of a new academic year, to familiarize students with the IBDP curriculum overview and subject options offered. Upon completion of the course selection procedure exceptions would be made if it was determined that students were in the wrong courses for academic reasons; ● ● ●

the course is too challenging with little or no chance of a grade of 2 or above the course is not challenging enough so the chances of receiving a 6 or above on the exams right now is very high transfers from HL to SL will be granted so long as there are 3 remaining HL courses to obtain the diploma

Refer to the College’s Admissions Policy.

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Appendix A - IB Subject Assessment Format Group 1 Subjects English A: Literature SL/HL

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International Baccalaureate Handbook

Group 2 Subjects Language B

Language B: ab initio

24


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Group 3 Subjects Economics i) Higher Level

ii) Standard Level

25


International Baccalaureate Handbook

History

i) Higher Level

ii) Standard Level

26


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Group 4 Subjects Biology (i)

Higher Level

(i)

Standard Level

27


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Chemistry (i)

Higher Level

(i)

Standard Level

28


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Physics (i)

Higher Level

(ii)

Standard Level

29


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Computer Science (ii) Standard Level

30


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Group 5 Subjects Mathematics (ii)

Standard Level (Assessment Nov 2020 cohort only)

31


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches SL & HL (Assessment from 2021 cohort only)

32


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations SL & HL (Assessment from 2021 cohort only)

33


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Group 6 Subjects Visual Art

(i) Higher Level

34


International Baccalaureate Handbook

(ii) Standard Level

35


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Music

(i) Higher Level

36


International Baccalaureate Handbook

(ii) Standard Level

37


International Baccalaureate Handbook

DP Core Theory of Knowledge

Extended Essay

38


International Baccalaureate Handbook

Appendix B - Information Directory

IBDP Coordinator: Brendan Porter E-mail: brendan.porter@mcglashan.school.nz Cell: 0273091185 TOK Coordinator: Melissa Bell E-mail: melissa.bell@mcglashan.school.nz CAS Coordinator: Brendan Porter E-mail: brendan.porter@mcglashan.school.nz Extended Essay Coordinator: Brendan Porter E-mail: brendan.porter@mcglashan.school.nz Library and Research Coordinator: Pam Garry E-mail: pam.garry@mcglashan.school.nz Pamoja Online Courses – Site-based Coordinator: Chris Knopp E-mail: chris.knopp@mcglashan.school.nz School Supported Self-Taught Language Coordinator: Richard Mountain E-mail: richard.mountain@mcglashan.school.nz NZ Universities Guidance Counsellor: Rachael Gardiner E-mail: rachael.gardiner@mcglashan.school.nz Overseas Universities Guidance Counsellor: Brendan Porter E-mail: brendan.porter@mcglashan.school.nz Principal: Neil Garry E-mail: neil.garry@mcglashan.school.nz

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Profile for John McGlashan College

IBDP Handbook Cohort 2020-2021  

IBDP Handbook Cohort 2020-2021  

Profile for mcglashan