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19-410 CSNO Prospect Brochure 7/15/10 4:19 PM Page 1

Priorities for the Future The Center for the Study of New Orleans at Loyola has identified five projects that require private support in order for the center to continue to foster a critical understanding of New Orleans and aid in its renewal.

Endowment ($2 million)

Public Programs ($50,000/year)

An endowment of $2 million will provide approximately $100,000 for an annual operating fund to support the center’s daily operations.

The Center for the Study of New Orleans will continue its popular public programming on a regular basis. Four programs will be presented each academic year featuring noted scholars on New Orleans subjects.

Resident Fellowships ($40,000/year) The center will select fellows who will be responsible for conducting research and holding colloquia to discuss their projects with other scholars in the area. One fellow will be a scholar-in-residence for a semester during the academic year, and will teach one course for the New Orleans Studies minor in addition to conducting research and presenting his/her findings in a public talk. ($30,000) Two graduate students will come to Loyola during the summer to conduct research and to lecture for the New Orleans Institute. ($5,000 each)

The New Orleans Institute ($20,000/year) This institute will consist of two academic courses and a series of speakers, field trips, and events that will immerse students in the culture, society, and environment of New Orleans. Students will be selected by the center’s steering committee on the basis of their GPAs and interest in the subject. Stipends and free tuition accompany the institute’s selections. New Orleans Exchange Program ($1,000/student) This program will allow students from other Jesuit universities to exchange places with Loyola students for one semester and take courses in the New Orleans Studies minor. Exchange students will be selected on the basis of their GPAs and a written essay explaining their interest in the subject.

“The New Orleans studies minor draws on the deep expertise of our faculty in the academic study of New Orleans—its history, music, art, literature, ecology, politics, and social structures. It offers students a unique chance for interdisciplinary study through the prism of place and for experiential learning in a city that’s like no other.” —Provost Edward J. Kvet

To find out how your support can create opportunities for the College of Social Sciences and the Center for the Study of New Orleans, please contact: College of Social Sciences Stephanie Hotard, Development Officer sahotard@loyno.edu (504) 861-5775 giving.loyno.edu

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

Center for the Study of New Orleans


19-410 CSNO Prospect Brochure 7/15/10 4:19 PM Page 3

Jesuits have shaped and educated New Orleans since its beginning. Their relationship with the city runs deep and continues today in the esteemed academic institutions they oversee. Loyola University New Orleans actively nurtures this legacy and has established the Center for the Study of New Orleans to continue this tradition.

The CSNO is a cross-disciplinary resource hub that promotes research and reflection on the history, society, culture, and environment of New Orleans. Its event series, academic minor, and associated activities comprise the first national scholarly center that studies a specific city. The CSNO builds upon the scholarly resources and deep knowledge of New Orleans that Loyola possesses. Core Jesuit values inform the center’s operations, which integrate social justice and analytical thinking into courses, internships, research, and public programming. These values propel the center’s efforts to promote a critical understanding of New Orleans and to aid its renewal.

The CSNO helps shape strong citizens of New Orleans and encourages those who leave to become outgoing ambassadors for the city. It solidifies bonds between students and their communities both inside the university and out. It also increases the likelihood that they will fulfill their mission of becoming graduates who take their place in this ever-changing world as competent, concerned, responsible members who make a visible difference in New Orleans, as well as in their home communities.

New Orleans is a city of paradoxes and hard truths, of beautiful spirit and rich tradition, of myriad cultures and fascinating individuals— the CSNO explores them all.

The Center for the Study of New Orleans (CSNO) operates in our classrooms and community. Its public programming draws New Orleanians to the Loyola campus for events, and the center’s New Orleans Studies academic minor encourages students to learn about the city in which they live:

In the classroom, students in Dr. Sue Mennino’s course Race, Class, and Schools in New Orleans explore these social dynamics, and then experience them firsthand volunteering at places such as the Edible Schoolyard at the Samuel K. Green charter school.

At the CSNO’s inaugural event, author Jason Berry read from his book Up From the Cradle of Jazz: New Orleans Music Since World War II. He was accompanied by a band featuring local musical masters Dr. Michael White on clarinet and John Boutté on vocals.

Meanwhile, Dr. Bob Thomas immerses his students in the Louisiana wetlands—figuratively, in his Ecology of the Mississippi Delta class that explores how the ecosystem influences New Orleans’ commerce and culture—and literally, on field trips to the unique and delicate region.

In fall 2010, Professor Lisa Martin will lead a panel discussion about how the New Orleans Saints’ journey to the Super Bowl affected the city of New Orleans socially, culturally, and economically, and how it contributed to a sense of renewal across the city’s demographics. A full schedule of programming will follow throughout the year.

A New Academic Minor: New Orleans Studies The new academic minor explores the rich array of possibilities New Orleans offers for scholarly investigation. The program’s interdisciplinary structure requires students to take one course in New Orleans history and develop a curriculum tailored to their specialties. Courses such as Sociology of Mardi Gras, New Orleans in Literature, Social Justice in New Orleans, and History of New Orleans Music provide students with a broad scope through which they can view a unique American city.

SELECT CLASSES

Each class in the 21-credit program reflects Jesuit ideals that encourage critical thinking and social justice in relation to the city that Loyola calls home.

Social Justice in New Orleans

Crescent City People Sociology of Mardi Gras New Orleans in Literature New Orleans and Film New Orleans: Immigrant City, American City Mississippi River Delta Ecology Southern Women Writers New Orleans: Creole and Caribbean Black Theatre: 1940 – Present Ruin, Resurrection, and Recovery: The Story of Hurricane Katrina


19-410 CSNO Prospect Brochure 7/15/10 4:19 PM Page 3

Jesuits have shaped and educated New Orleans since its beginning. Their relationship with the city runs deep and continues today in the esteemed academic institutions they oversee. Loyola University New Orleans actively nurtures this legacy and has established the Center for the Study of New Orleans to continue this tradition.

The CSNO is a cross-disciplinary resource hub that promotes research and reflection on the history, society, culture, and environment of New Orleans. Its event series, academic minor, and associated activities comprise the first national scholarly center that studies a specific city. The CSNO builds upon the scholarly resources and deep knowledge of New Orleans that Loyola possesses. Core Jesuit values inform the center’s operations, which integrate social justice and analytical thinking into courses, internships, research, and public programming. These values propel the center’s efforts to promote a critical understanding of New Orleans and to aid its renewal.

The CSNO helps shape strong citizens of New Orleans and encourages those who leave to become outgoing ambassadors for the city. It solidifies bonds between students and their communities both inside the university and out. It also increases the likelihood that they will fulfill their mission of becoming graduates who take their place in this ever-changing world as competent, concerned, responsible members who make a visible difference in New Orleans, as well as in their home communities.

New Orleans is a city of paradoxes and hard truths, of beautiful spirit and rich tradition, of myriad cultures and fascinating individuals— the CSNO explores them all.

The Center for the Study of New Orleans (CSNO) operates in our classrooms and community. Its public programming draws New Orleanians to the Loyola campus for events, and the center’s New Orleans Studies academic minor encourages students to learn about the city in which they live:

In the classroom, students in Dr. Sue Mennino’s course Race, Class, and Schools in New Orleans explore these social dynamics, and then experience them firsthand volunteering at places such as the Edible Schoolyard at the Samuel K. Green charter school.

At the CSNO’s inaugural event, author Jason Berry read from his book Up From the Cradle of Jazz: New Orleans Music Since World War II. He was accompanied by a band featuring local musical masters Dr. Michael White on clarinet and John Boutté on vocals.

Meanwhile, Dr. Bob Thomas immerses his students in the Louisiana wetlands—figuratively, in his Ecology of the Mississippi Delta class that explores how the ecosystem influences New Orleans’ commerce and culture—and literally, on field trips to the unique and delicate region.

In fall 2010, Professor Lisa Martin will lead a panel discussion about how the New Orleans Saints’ journey to the Super Bowl affected the city of New Orleans socially, culturally, and economically, and how it contributed to a sense of renewal across the city’s demographics. A full schedule of programming will follow throughout the year.

A New Academic Minor: New Orleans Studies The new academic minor explores the rich array of possibilities New Orleans offers for scholarly investigation. The program’s interdisciplinary structure requires students to take one course in New Orleans history and develop a curriculum tailored to their specialties. Courses such as Sociology of Mardi Gras, New Orleans in Literature, Social Justice in New Orleans, and History of New Orleans Music provide students with a broad scope through which they can view a unique American city.

SELECT CLASSES

Each class in the 21-credit program reflects Jesuit ideals that encourage critical thinking and social justice in relation to the city that Loyola calls home.

Social Justice in New Orleans

Crescent City People Sociology of Mardi Gras New Orleans in Literature New Orleans and Film New Orleans: Immigrant City, American City Mississippi River Delta Ecology Southern Women Writers New Orleans: Creole and Caribbean Black Theatre: 1940 – Present Ruin, Resurrection, and Recovery: The Story of Hurricane Katrina


19-410 CSNO Prospect Brochure 7/15/10 4:19 PM Page 1

Priorities for the Future The Center for the Study of New Orleans at Loyola has identified five projects that require private support in order for the center to continue to foster a critical understanding of New Orleans and aid in its renewal.

Endowment ($2 million)

Public Programs ($50,000/year)

An endowment of $2 million will provide approximately $100,000 for an annual operating fund to support the center’s daily operations.

The Center for the Study of New Orleans will continue its popular public programming on a regular basis. Four programs will be presented each academic year featuring noted scholars on New Orleans subjects.

Resident Fellowships ($40,000/year) The center will select fellows who will be responsible for conducting research and holding colloquia to discuss their projects with other scholars in the area. One fellow will be a scholar-in-residence for a semester during the academic year, and will teach one course for the New Orleans Studies minor in addition to conducting research and presenting his/her findings in a public talk. ($30,000) Two graduate students will come to Loyola during the summer to conduct research and to lecture for the New Orleans Institute. ($5,000 each)

The New Orleans Institute ($20,000/year) This institute will consist of two academic courses and a series of speakers, field trips, and events that will immerse students in the culture, society, and environment of New Orleans. Students will be selected by the center’s steering committee on the basis of their GPAs and interest in the subject. Stipends and free tuition accompany the institute’s selections. New Orleans Exchange Program ($1,000/student) This program will allow students from other Jesuit universities to exchange places with Loyola students for one semester and take courses in the New Orleans Studies minor. Exchange students will be selected on the basis of their GPAs and a written essay explaining their interest in the subject.

“The New Orleans studies minor draws on the deep expertise of our faculty in the academic study of New Orleans—its history, music, art, literature, ecology, politics, and social structures. It offers students a unique chance for interdisciplinary study through the prism of place and for experiential learning in a city that’s like no other.” —Provost Edward J. Kvet

To find out how your support can create opportunities for the College of Social Sciences and the Center for the Study of New Orleans, please contact: College of Social Sciences Stephanie Hotard, Development Officer sahotard@loyno.edu (504) 861-5775 giving.loyno.edu

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

Center for the Study of New Orleans

Center for the Study of New Orleans Brochure  

Loyola University New Orleans Center for the Study of New Orleans Brochure Prospect Donor Brochure

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