Page 1

THE ULTIMATE SEWING MAGAZINE

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2014

THE NEWEST

DESIGNER TRENDS FOR FALL!

FREE PATTERN OFFER SEE PAGE 90 FOR DETAILS

TOOLS OF THE TRADE:

COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO FUSIBLES HOW TO RECREATE A

$1,000 HANDBAG

LITTLE VOGUE FASHIONS FOR GIRLS

VOGUEPATTERNS.COM

SAMPLER


Vogue Patterns August/September 2014

FEATURES

16 A Golden Opportunity The Haute Couture Club of Chicago celebrates 50 years of tailoring and fine sewing. by Wendy Grossman

20 Souvenir Sewing How to turn mementos into lasting treasures. by Kathryn Brenne

26 Wool: It’s Not Just From Sheep A closer look at the many varieties of wool and where they come from. by Kathy Augustine

30 Inside Curves, Outside Curves: Smooth and Easy Workroom tips to make the sewing easier and the results more beautiful. by Marcy Tilton

32 Tote-al Luxury Learn the secrets of making a bag that can match the most expensive ones detail for detail. by Kathryn Brenne

46 Pressing On A comprehensive guide to fusible notions that make sewing easier and faster. by Linda Turner Griepentrog

ON THE COVER Guy Laroche’s exuberant bowed blouse, V1416, Misses’ 6—22. Ring: Extasia. Earrings: Annie Hammer. Hair and makeup Joseph Boggess.

Ralph Rucci V1404

2 VOGUE PATTERNS

53


FASHION

IN EVERY ISSUE

52 Fall’s Designer Choices

6 Editor’s Letter

Bring drama to daytime with a fabulous array of wear-towork looks.

70 The Classic Jacket Claire Shaeffer’s latest masterpiece, full of the couture details you love.

72 The Vogue Wardrobe Five mix-and-match pieces, in one pattern, that make the most of your wardrobe.

76 Suitably Chic Marcy Tilton’s take on the modern suit. It’s all about ease.

8 What Are You Sewing? 10 Must-Haves 12 Star Blogger 14 Web Watch RESOURCES

88 Guide to Pattern and Fabric Requirements 91 Body Measurement Charts 92 Shop & Sew Marketplace 96 Fabric and Accessory Guide

78 Today’s Fit by Sandra Betzina Graphic seaming steals the show on her two newest designs.

80 An Artist’s Eye

Claire Shaeffer V8991

70

Katherine Tilton brings us two new looks to showcase elegant fabrics.

84 Wrapped Attention A collection of spectacular evening wraps to finish off your outfit.

86 Little Vogue A new collection of charming designs for little girls.

20

FASHION REPORT

44 Accessory Trends Get the scoop on the newest looks in jewelry for the season.

79 16

Today's Fit by Sandra Betzina V1411

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2014 3


TIPS & TECHNIQUES

Souvenir Sewing

Create a lasting memory by fashioning a stylish modern garment from traditional old-world fabrics. BY KATHRYN BRENNE

During a recent trip to Ecuador I was excited to visit one of the largest and finest textile markets in South America. The town of Otavalo is known for its brightly colored hand-woven fabrics, a tradition that dates back to pre-Incan times. I hoped to find a few pieces that I could make into clothing as a beautiful, practical souvenir from my trip. Saturday is the busiest market day, so we started early on the two-hour drive from Quito. Along the way we saw many local people in traditional costume carrying their wares to market. The women’s garb consists of a hand-embroidered white blouse with flared sleeves and a length of fabric (often with the selvedge writing showing) wrapped around the waist to form a long dark skirt, which is held in place with a length of braid used as a sash. Often the skirts swing open as the women walk to reveal flashes of a white or cream underskirt. Their long hair is worn pulled back and wrapped with a piece of braid, and their necks are adorned with multiple strands of gold beads. Depend-

20 VOGUE PATTERNS

ing on the climate and region, they may add a shawl and hat to the ensemble. Textiles from the Otavalo region are sold around the world, and while we were there, I was able to visit the Artesania el Gran Condor weaving studio and co-op to see a demonstration of their process. At this particular studio, they still perform all of the techniques by hand for a very high quality product. The alpaca hair and wool are carded and combed, hand spun, and dyed using natural ingredients including seeds, plants, nuts, and cochineal insects (found on cacti), sometimes mixed with lime juice to produce variations in color. Some of the weavers sit on the ground to use simple back-strap looms, while others use Seen in Otavalo. Above, clockwise from top left: Embroidered wall hangings at the market; seeds used to dye yarn at Artesania el Gran Condor; shawls at the market; plants used to dye yarn at Artesania el Gran Condor.


Turning a souvenir into a wearable garment just calls for a little imagination. An alpaca shawl purchased at the market in Otavalo, Ecuador is transformed into a sophisticated wrap top with a few modiďŹ cations to V8926. Earrings: Rivka Friedman. Bracelet: Charlene K.

CREATIVE EXPRESSION

V8926

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2014 21


TOOLS OF THE TRADE

Pressing On

From fashion to crafts to home décor, fusibles are indispensible partners in the creative process. Today, modern technology puts them in places you may never have dreamed of. Discover the wide range of products available for all your DIY projects. BY LINDA TURNER GRIEPENTROG

When fusibles first appeared on the sewing scene, many people treated them with a degree of skepticism. Early fusible technology tended to be unreliable, especially after washing and drying, and even now the bubbling, puckering, and other ugly failures of the past make some purists wary. But today’s fusible products have come a long way, and improved technology has yielded a plethora of versatile and reliable products that are as varied as the sewers who use them. Here’s a look at some fusible products available today and ideas on how they can improve your sewing projects by making them easier and faster to complete, while keeping a professional finish. INTERFACING

You probably have a few favorite fusible interfacings already, but if you haven’t explored your options recently you might be in for a nice surprise. These days, every imaginable kind of interfacing can be found in fusible form. Knits, wovens, non-wovens, and weft insertions; look for them in white, black, beige and gray. If you’re a quilter or crafter, there are also fusible interfacings printed with patterns on them for ease in piecing. Some interfacings are designed to fuse at lower temperatures, for use on delicate fabrics. Even traditional tailoring products like hair canvases now come ready to fuse. Interfacing widths vary from 20" to 60" wide, depending on the source, but if width is a concern, simply butt the edges together and fuse—nary a seam in sight. Before selecting a fusible interfacing for a garment, test-fuse a sample with a scrap of the project fabric to test for ad-

46 VOGUE PATTERNS

hesion and make sure the finished hand is compatible with your project. When you’re ready to move on to your actual garment, some sewers like to trim the seam allowance off the interfacing before fusing to reduce bulk in the seam. This is a matter of preference. Fusible interfacing has become a mainstay in garment construction, but it can also be added behind a fabric for more opacity and body, to stabilize a limp bouclé, to add structure to a satin bodice, or if you want to appliqué a light color over a dark one. WEBS AND ADHESIVES

Fusible interfacings fill a wide range of sewing niches, but sometimes you need to stick one ordinary fabric to another.

For these situations, fusible webs may be the answer. Fusible webs come in several forms: by the yard, in pre-cut sheets or rolls, and in tapes of varying widths. They also come in different weights from light to heavy. Some webs are actually web-like in appearance, while others are extruded films. Use fusible webs with or without stitching to attach appliqués, trims, and binding. Narrow strips of web can also be used to stick pieces in place during construction, taking the place of pins. Use a fusible web tape to secure zippers before stitching for a neat finish and perfectly aligned ends. The tape can also be used to hold up hems while adding a little extra body in both knits and wovens. Lighter versions can be great for hemming laces and mesh, where you don’t want visible stitching. In lightweight knits, a strip of fusible web inside the hem will keep it from rolling. Tasks like hand-sewing facings to a shoulder seam can be eliminated entirely with a small square of fusible web and a pass of the iron. For ease of use, most fusible webs have a protective paper backing on one or both sides. If you’re cutting shapes, the paper is convenient to draw on. If both sides are protected, the combo can even go through an inkjet printer for crisp, reproducible shapes. If you want something to be fusible and it’s not, another way to transform it is to use a heat-activated liquid or spray. Simply apply it to the wrong side of the fabric as directed and the fabric piece becomes fusible, with even less fuss than cutting web for the same purpose. (continued on page 49)


Fusibles Reference Chart

Listed below are fusible products by category and manufacturer. For more information, including where to buy them, visit the manufacturers’ websites listed at the end of the article. FUSIBLE INTERFACING

FUSIBLE STRATEGIES To avoid fickle interfacings and other fusing disasters, follow these helpful hints: Pre-wash or dry clean fabric

Brand

Name

Type and Weight

Bosal

Fusible Non-Woven Featherweight

non-woven, light

Bosal

Fusible Non-Woven

non-woven, firm

Bosal

Pro Fuse Shirt-Fuse

non-woven, firm

Bosal

Pro Fuse Tailor-weight Medium

non-woven, medium

Bosal

Pro Fuse

tricot knit, light

Bosal

Sheer Fuse

tricot knit, light

Bosal

Soft Fusible Tricot-8 way stretch

tricot knit, light

Bosal

Envy Silk

woven, light

Bosal

Fashion-Fuse

woven, medium

Bosal

Fusible Hair Canvas

woven, firm

C & T Publishing

fast2fuse Light

double-sided, light

C & T Publishing

fast2fuse Medium

double-sided, medium

C & T Publishing

fast2fuse Heavy

double-sided, heavy

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Tricot Deluxe

knit, light

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Weft Supreme Medium

weft, medium

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Weft Supreme Light

weft, light

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Sheer Elegance Couture

woven, light

moisture level, and fusing time,

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Sheer Elegance Light

woven, light

as well as care instructions once

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Sheer Elegance Medium

woven, medium

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Tailor Hair Canvas

woven, firm

scrap of the project fabric before

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Woven Light Crisp

woven, lightly crisp

fusing your fabric pieces. If you

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Woven Shirt Crisp

woven, crisp

Fashion Sewing Supply

Pro-Woven Super Crisp

woven, extra crisp

before fusing, as some factory finishes interfere with the adhesives. Thoroughly read the product instructions to determine the appropriate fusing temperature,

the project is finished. Test-fuse interfacings on a

don’t like the resulting hand, try another type. When fusing, use a lift-and-

HTC

So-Sheer

knit, soft

press motion— sliding the iron can

HTC

Sof-Knit (cool fuse)

knit, soft

move the interfacing—and leave

HTC

Fusi-Knit

tricot knit, soft

site amount of time. Turn the piece

HTC

Fusi-Form Lightweight

non-woven, light

over after the initial fusing and use

HTC

Fusi-Form Suitweight

non-woven, firm

the iron on the opposite side to

HTC

Sheer D’Light Featherweight

non-woven, soft

HTC

Sheer D’Light Lightweight

non-woven, soft

HTC

Sheer D’Light Medium weight

non-woven, medium

HTC

Armo Weft

weft insertion, medium

the iron in one place for the requi-

ensure proper fusing. Then allow the piece to thoroughly cool on the pressing surface before moving it. Don’t over-fuse, as too much heat can damage the adhesive

HTC

Whisper Weft

weft insertion, soft

the ironing board from adhesive

HTC

Form-Flex All Purpose

woven, firm

mishaps. Use a press cloth, non-

HTC

Fusible Acro (hair canvas)

woven, firm

HTC

Touch O’Gold (cool fuse)

woven, light

Some fusible products come with

Palmer Pletsch

Perfect Fuse Sheer

weft, light

a protective sheet for use as a

Palmer Pletsch

Perfect Fuse Light

weft, light

Palmer Pletsch

Perfect Fuse Medium

weft, medium

Palmer Pletsch

Perfect Fuse Tailor Ultra

weft, medium to firm

surface. Protect the iron and

stick pressing sheet, or iron cover above and below the project.

barrier. Keep iron cleaner handy.

(continued on page 48) AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2014 47


tracy

54


HAIR AND MAKEUP: JOSEPH BOGGESS WWW.VOGUEPATTERNS.COM

Interesting lines and a knockout print are a great recipe for a day-to-night dress. Opposite page: TRACY REESE brings us a comfy knit dress with kimono sleeves, ruched waistband, and gathered surplice neckline. V1405, Misses’ 8–24. This page: A silk print is just the thing for the waist gathers and uttery back godet of this RACHEL COMEY dress. V1406, Misses’ 6–22. Bracelet: Extasia.

rachel

55


WWW.VOGUEPATTERNS.COM

Marcy Tilton’s take on the modern suit. It’s all about ease.

HAIR AND MAKEUP: JOSEPH BOGGESS

SUITABLYchic 76


Marcy Tilton’s loose tting jackets and pants are loaded with details. The curved pockets follow the shape of the curved hem, then fold onto themselves to create soft pleats. (See Marcy’s tips for sewing curves on page 30.) The pants, with center front and back topstitched seams, have interesting origamilike folds at the hem to rein in the fullness. All V9035, Misses’ 6–22. Opposite page, earrings: Kevia. Bracelet: Annie Hammer. Shoes: French Sole. This page, earrings: Annie Hammer. Shoes: French Sole.

77


WWW.VOGUEPATTERNS.COM

HAIR AND MAKEUP: JOSEPH BOGGESS

45%OFF Cover Price

Subscribe Now!

Lynn Mizono V1413

67

Vogue Patterns Magazine August/September 2014 Sampler  

PRESSING ON A comprehensive guide to fusible notions that make sewing easier and faster. TOTE-AL LUXURY Learn the secrets of making a bag th...

Vogue Patterns Magazine August/September 2014 Sampler  

PRESSING ON A comprehensive guide to fusible notions that make sewing easier and faster. TOTE-AL LUXURY Learn the secrets of making a bag th...