BCN SEEDINGSCAPES Actions and Interactions between the city and the forest

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8th summerschool workshop

BCN-SEEDINGSCAPES Actions and Interactions between the city and the forest

MASTER DIRECTOR WORKSHOP COORDINATOR FACULTY COORDINATOR ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

ENRIC BATLLE PEPA MORÁN MARINA CERVERA LUIS MALDONADO LIDIA CARRILLO JAVIER ZALDÍVAR 1


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BCN-SEEDINGSCAPES Actions and Interactions between the city and the forest

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COLLECTION J

DIRECTOR

ENRIC BATLLE I DURANY COORDINATION TEAM

COLLABORATORS

MARINA CERVERA LUIS MALDONADO PEPA MORÁN

CORINA ANDUEZA ALEJANDRA LIÉBANA MARIE MONTOCCHIO

ASSISTANTS LIDIA CARRILLO JAVIER ZALDÍVAR

MASTER ORGANIZAT PER

EDIT

Carrer Manel Florentín Pérez, 15 08950 Esplugues de Llobregat Barcelona - España Telefon: +34 93 457 9884 Web: www.batlleiroig.com

ENTITATS COL·LABORADORES


INDEX 1 – EMiLA’S INTRODUCTION 7 2 – SUMMER SCHOOL 11 3 – INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE BIENNIAL 15 4 – STUDY AREA 19 5 – TOPIC 25 6 – SITE VISIT AND FIRST APPROACH 29 7 – DEVELOPMENT OF THE VEGETATION MODEL 41 8 – FINAL MASTERPLAN 53 9 – MOWING INTERVENTION 71 10 – MBLANDARCH LECTURES 77 11 – CONCLUSIONS 81 12 – STAFF 87

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1 EMILA’S INTRODUCTION

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1 - EMILA’S INTRODUCTION EMiLA (European Master in Landscape Architecture) brings together five internationally renowned centres of Landscape Architectural education with a common focus on design in Europe: the École Nationale Supérieure de Paysage Versailles/ Marseille (ENSP), the Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture of the Edinburg College of Art / University of Edinburgh (ECA), the Fakultät für Architektur und Landschaft of the Leibniz Universität Hannover (LUH), the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture of the Amsterdam University of the Arts (AUA) and the Schools of Architecture and Agriculture of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya·(UPC BarcelonaTech). The partnership provides long-term collaborative networks between students and academics. Beyond this common strength, the philosophy of each school adds a specific quality to the programme. EMiLA focuses on the development of the variety of cultural landscapes in Europe. It offers teaching on landscape identity research across all European regions, design studio’s on large scale and ‘cross border’ projects and research on the influence of European policy on regional landscape (www.emila.eu). EMiLA partners are jointly working towards the establishment of a common European Master Degree. They have been supported by the European Union’s Lifelong Learning Programme. We are grateful for MBLandArch being part of the EMiLA program.

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2 SUMMER SCHOOL

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2 - SUMMER SCHOOL The Summer School is one of the common modules of the programme and the main opportunity for students and professors is to share knowledge and experience by spending some intense work-days together. Students and academics work annually on contemporary landscape issues of European relevance. In addition, selected universities are invited to take part in this 10-day workshop to allow experience other design approaches and teaching methodologies. The first EMiLA Summer School was organized by the Leibniz Universität Hannover at “Altes Landâ€? near Hamburg in 2009. The idea of a joint curriculum for the programme arose from this successful experience. Since then Summer Schools have been hosted by a different EMiLA partner institution each year. Summer School themes are identified in close consultation with regions where pressing issues are pending to be worked on. It is up to each organizer to welcome students and professors from all over the world. In 2016 venue took place in Barcelona.

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3 INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE BIENNIAL

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3 - INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE BIENNIAL The International Landscape Biennal started on October 2016. In its first week, the staff welcomed its professionals and students who visited Barcelona. It was possible to enjoy a wide variety of events, exhibitions, technical visits, all scheduled to celebrate the profession for five days within the 9th International Biennial of Landscape Architecture in Barcelona. The event was a success, the internationalization of the prize was consolidated and with the help of our sponsors, the profile of the profession is raising. It all began on September 28 in the Cathedral Square, in the heart of the city of Barcelona, where was dressed in green to announce the start of the 9th International Biennial of Landscape Architecture in Barcelona. A mantle of 8,000 aromatic plants covered part of Barcelona’s Plaça Nova, as part of the POP UP GREEN installation developed by the Biennial in collaboration with the Barcelona City Council. The facility sought interaction with citizens to “adopt” plants and take them to other parts of the city (previously located thanks to the students of MBLandArch in their intensive workshop MIND the GAP) to design the landscapes they imagine or claim. On September 29th, the day after POP UP GREEN, the International Landscape Prize Rosa Barba and the International Prize of Landscape Schools were the protagonists. During the first day of the symposium the best projects and interventions on the landscape were studied and discussed. The jury of the Rosa Barba International Landscape Prize, sponsored by the Banco de Sabadell Foundation, had selected 10 projects of landscape around the world to be finalists and, in turn, the school jury had chosen 10 universities withtheir best final projects to be in the final. At the end of the day, the symposium closed with the inaugurations of the exhibitions of the INTERNATIONAL PRIZE OF LANDSCAPE ROSA BARBA and the PRIZE TO THE SCHOOLS OF LANDSCAPE in the COAC and ETSAB. The Rosa Barba International Landscape Prize Exhibition displays selected projects to participate in the award. This year, 312 projects were divided into four categories: Articulation, Intersection, Regeneration and Transition. In parallel, the sample includes the best university projects participating in the Award for Landscape Schools. With a total of 74 participating universities from all over the world, the exhibition at ETSAB was able to take advantage of the opportunity to link this exhibition with the EMiLA Summer workshop that was programmed consecutively to the events of the Biennial. The opportunity created positive synergies such as the incorporation into theexhibition of plantation workbenches that would later be used by EMILA students (MBLandArch Barcelona, ENSPVersailles, LUB Hannover, AHK Amsterdam and ESALA Edinburgh).

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The Biennial continued on September 30 with Tomorrow Landscapes. The slogan chosen by the scientific committee refers to a new climate regime that involves re-designing and managing the territories of nature in struggle. Tomorrow Landscapes wanted to face the future with decision, talking about climate and social policies, declined by the project and ongoing project in landscape architecture. Beyond the reflections on our professional practice for the future, the session of Saturday, October 1 gave voice to interesting initiatives developed by planners and landscapers all over the world. The first storms of autumn put an end to this extraordinary experience and vibrant meeting point, but they gave the starting point of the EMiLA Summer School Seedingscapes international workshop, with the excursion on Sunday 2nd of October, just after the technical visit to the Landscape Restoration of the Garraf Landfill of Batlle I Roig. There began a new and intense adventure for the second frenetic week of October 2016.


4 STUDY AREA

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4 - STUDY AREA BACKGROUND The area of operation was the subject of an international competition in 2012 called “16 Collserola Doors”, with the idea of having a public impact equivalent to the opening of Barcelona Sea at the time of the Olympics. These doors are understood as a geographical scope that the relationship between the Natural Park of Collserola, different surrounding neighborhoods and more general, with the city of Barcelona. The competition was considered to be essential to work in multidisciplinary teams to provide solutions to the following points:

Relationship between the open spaces: Collserola Park – Park of Cervantes Relationship of the city existing districts with the new green corridor Define how come the future users: parking/Public Transport Mountain neighborhood’s: how can they enjoy these infrastructures. Green corridor and its relationship with the streams. Search of places of interest to bring the public to the Park. Implement agricultural activities: recovery of the historic landscape and biodiversity.

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In the case of our area of activity, called “gate 01: Diagonal”, for your interest in connection with the city of Barcelona (connection point of the Diagonal Avenue and the mountain) was considered essential to give solution to the planning of the sector to ensure the continuity of the elements of urban green and natural park (current and new) incorporating a transverse route between the highest point of the city (Diagonal Avenue) to the Mirador de Sant Pere Màrtir (Passeig de les Aigües). We propose integrated solutions of the various existing areas like: Finestrelles water tank and its surrounding environment, St. Peter school and its surroundings, the creek on the border of the neighborhood of Finestrelles, the AGBAR water company building, Sant Pere Màrtir estate, the remains of anti-aircraft batteries of Finestrelles, the Xiprers lookout, etc. The path that we propose studies its start on Diagonal Avenue, the compatibility of its way through the current Park of Cervantes, the crossing of the Ronda de Dalt and the road of Esplugues, the intersection with Passeig de les Aigües, the Xiprers lookout and the upper level which represents Sant Pere Màrtir. From the landscape point of view, it is essential to promote and evaluate the scientific value and to conserve the grasslands, crops and scrubs of Collserola, as well as the creeks that run through the peripheral sectors of the mountain range.


Traditionally, both scientists as well as Governments and citizens have adequately assessed the value of Collserola forests and have equipped them with the corresponding figures of protection (Collserola Park, Natura 2000 network, etc.), while the meadows, crops, scrubs and tall lining have interspersed in the wooded town of Collserola. For this reason there has been fewer studies of this region, fewer research papers, less information on the topic, a negative perception labeling them as degraded spaces. Consequently, the policies of protection and conservation have not always been appreciated or properly managed and have left some good examples out of the current scope of protection. In addition, the aim is to highlight the great ecological value of the meadows, the crops, the weeds and tall of Collserola and the need to take measures for their conservation. This value not only lies in the species or the habitats that are notable but which are not found anywhere else in Collserola — in some cases in Catalonia — but that these plant formations have, in addition, a strategic value for the conservation of the mountain range, since the same species of forested environments use also, at some point of their life cycle, open environments bordering the wooded space of Collserola. The value of these open environments has special relevance in the case of dry grasslands, as some of the most unique organisms that de Collserola. The most famous example is that of maritime meadows, characteristic of the southern and eastern sides of Collserola, which not only have interest from the point of view, but also considerable flower is the value of your Entomological fauna.I

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In this region, you may find many different types of species of organisms found in meadows, crops and weeds. Some of them are the rarest and therefore for more interest of conservation. In a recent study about heteropters, it shows that the 44% of the species studied are found only in the dry grasslands and scrubs. These are the same areas that have the largest number of species of Lepidoptera and Orthoptera in Collserola, 180 species of birds of Collserola, 157 are regularly in the forest and not of environments; for the conservation of the species of mammals is necessary to ensure the maintenance of meadows, crops and scrubs. The Collserola mountain range has an advantageous position at the center of the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona. This huge forest system (8,000 ha) is the result of ecological succession after agricultural and forestry neglect. Nowadays it is a space of high ecological value with a big potential as a public-open space for five million people living around the area. Park borders are simply defined by their direct contact with residential areas and transport infrastructures. Those limits —sometimes as filters, sometimes as barriers—enclose and constrain a complex and heterogeneous set of relationships within the park. The permeability area between the urban and forest systems has a big potential but needs to be explored in depth — our ‘TOMORROW LANDSCAPES’ presents that opportunity for the city and as a design resource. Just a week before the Summer School, there was a wildfire in the study area and its surroundings, which was an important fact to be into considered in the proposals and the workshop reflections.


5 TOPIC

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5 – TOPIC Barcelona EMiLA Summer workshop’ 16 topic aims to construct relations between the city of Barcelona and the forested area of the Natural Park of Collserola, next to the city. The title — ‘BCN SEEDINGscapes: Actions and Interactions between the City and the Forest’ — is an approach to the need of new physical but also perceptive relations between two landscapes that are very close but also radically separated. Since the recognition of the dynamic condition of landscapes as a complex of ecological and social processes, landscape architecture has been looking to integrate this dynamism through imagination and material. This integrative challenge is particularly present in the case of public space, and especially in situations where the vegetation has already started to perform ecologically, despite orderly frames. The metropolitan periphery of Barcelona, most notably the edges in contact with the Natural Park of Collserola, are zones of conflict and complexities. In these landscapes, atypical for their lack of distinct appearance or control, the material expresses the passage of time beyond form, the management of which does not always match the use. This situation is a consequence of the unequal relationships between the systems in contact. The city acts mechanically on the natural environment creating a space of imbalanced exchange, or, in ecological terms, an agitated border. If we get closer, we can observe metabolic processes, which are the fruit of overlapping times. Due to the abandonment of agriculture the vegetation evolves through ecological succession. On both sides of this border, the relationships are asymmetrical and often exploitative. Historically, the city has pushed back the natural system. This has, however, created a set of relations, which can help us to the rethink the future. The landscape project presents an opportunity to generate a variable rather than fixed image, to enhance the capacity of the site to facilitate uses beyond experiences and to enable managers, potential users and proprietors to take part in a work of coalition. Public and factual, parks are already spaces of transformation and creative change, ecologically and socially speaking. What we propose is a strategy that recognizes these capabilities and supports the design of flexible relationships of balances and compensations.

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6 SITE VISIT AND FIRST APPROACH

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6 – SITE VISIT The first contact to the site was about the recognition that exists between the mountain of Collserola and the city of Barcelona. This first approach would allow to students to see in a close way the connections of the mountain with the city, the connections of the mountain itself, the vegetation, the existing habitats in the place, the views to the city, to detect the fire as a problem or as an opportunity, the services of the mountain, and the places available to develop the projects. The place for the departure was the Escola Tècnica Superior d’Arquitectura de Barcelona ETSAB. Then the students walked through the city until they arrived to Collserola, where the first stop was the water deposit of the mountain, then they continue walking up to the Carretera de les Aigües where it was the second stop and finally continued to the Espai Mireia where they have a meal waiting for them. They were required to draw in the site to draw their first imppresions of the walk and the site, so they could have a fresh memory and not be influenced for external factors.

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VISIT TO THE LANDFILL OF VALL D’EN JOAN After the visit to the area of work, the students had the opportunity to visit the landscape restoration of the Vall d’en Joan in the natural park of Garraf. Vall d’ Joan is located in the Natural Park of Garraf, within the municipal districts of Begues and Gavà, in the region of Baix Llobregat (Barcelona). Originally, the area was one of the many narrow valleys making up the foothills near the massif of Garraf. The beginning of its use and exploitation as a landfill dates from 1974 and from then until its closure, it has stored most of the urban waste of Barcelona and the municipalities of its metropolitan area. Complex technical problems arising from the closure and sealing of the landfill determine a work strategy based on rationalization. The organization of stabilizing terraces and supporting slopes, along with the access road for its construction, outlines the landfill geometry, structures the pipelines for the extraction of biogas, and conducts it up to the conversion plant that turns the gas into electrical energy. The Garraf landfill collected garbage from the metropolis of Barcelona for nearly forty years. The project was originally intended as the resolution to be a pedagogical space, a space producing new energies and a new door in the Garraf Natural Park.


This conversion of the landfill into an agricultural landscape is supported by three key issues: topography, water and vegetation. The topographic system had been resolved in the technical project of sealing. Hydraulic requirements for the implementation of the new landscape should be resolved from the project itself. Several drainage systems, laid down in successive terraces, were arranged for this purpose. This conveyed the rainwater into a few reserve water tanks implemented on the borders of the landfill site. Using the energy from the conversion of the biogas, the irrigation system was powered. Finally the process of implantation of vegetation was carried out with indigenous and hardy species, with little need of water and suited to the environment. Its similarity to the organization of an agricultural garden, in the manner of the Italian gardens, which were planted on hillsides and arranged in terraces, showed the way towards turning it into a public space. Its size and its proximity to many urban areas allow its denomination as a Metropolitan Park. In addition to the great opportunity to know a landscape work of this magnitude, explained directly by Enric Batlle, director of MBLandArch and co-author of the work, it was considered key to include the visit in the workshop as an urban and project reflection Within a specific physical space of a natural park, such as Collserola.

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In recent times, the growth of ecological awareness has led to consider whether this broad set of public spaces with such different uses and regulations could have a second common goal: to build a metropolitan environmental network that infiltrates all corners of the city . Public spaces, also understood as an environmental network, could be the backbone of the metropolitan territories. The streets, squares and parks of our cities can be renaturalized and connected with the agricultural and natural spaces existing in the environment of our cities, as is the case of Collserola mountain. The purpose of the restoration of the Vall d’en Joan Landfill fulfills perfectly the objectives set out in the workshop: - To create a network of urban spaces with all the possible connectivities, which have ecological, urban and metropolitan continuity and make productivity compatible with its public use. - To design a set of productive and equipped spaces where to promote biodiversity, energy production, water control, the cultivation of food of proximity and the possibility of living with different uses that reinforce its social character. - To promote a system of open spaces that should be built from projects that allow the movement of urban and ecological flows, resolving the successive interruptions of the desired continuities. - To achieve a very important strategic goal for the future of our cities: that walkers, cyclists, public transport, water, air and life can flow freely through our metropolis.


FIRST APPROACH During the first day of the workshop the concept was to rethink the approach of the site. The objective for the students was to present a postcard. Postcards are the minimal way to express an idea about a landscape. It was proposed to be accompanied by a moto that would express and complete, with the minimum words, the main concept of the project. The approach is not only analytical but projectual.The slogans chosen were: CONNECT TO DISCONNECT CONNECTION THROUGH VIEW PANTA REI TRANSITION WITH THE GREEN ZOOM IN, ZOOM OUT CULTIVATING TRANSITITIONS MOVING PERSPECTIVES STAIRS FROM COLLSEROLA

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Sophia Holtkemper, Andrés Felipe Trujillo, Malgorzata Styjek

Olivia Torelli, Begoña Castañón, Jesús Cereceres, Federico Grizzo

CULTIVATING TRANSITIONS


Felicitas Wiener, Claudia de Sas, Neus Soto Gil

Rana Benyahya, Ja Young Cho, InĂŠs Sanfeliu

Panta Rei I was once on a mountain close to the diagonal. It was dry and burnt. I missed the water and the brown earth down my feet too. Some seeds spread on the grown. Wind. Some green low vegetation have been already grown up within these few days. Hope. Regeneration. Wind. Energy. Energy was flowing on the site, from people, from vegetation but also from the city. The city, was so close, as we could observe from different points. It is the second layer of this landscape. Flow of cars and people. Continuous activity. Wind. Energy. Life.

Panta Rei

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I was once on a mountain close to the diagonal. It was dry and burnt. I missed the water and the brown earth down my feet too. Some seeds spread on the grown. Wind. Some green low vegetation have been already grown up within these few days. Hope. Regeneration. Wind. Energy. Energy was flowing on the site, from people, from vegetation but also from the city. The city, was so close, as we could observe from different points. It is the second layer of this landscape. Flow of cars and people. Continuous activity. Wind. Energy. Life.


Marianne Cabanis, Grabriela Baca, Maria Paula Pfaff

Yuleska Ziade, Adrià Ribas, Roser Jonás

Stairs from Collserola


Hester Koelman, Juanita Leal, Xi He

Laura Vossen, Corina Andueza, Huiting Huang

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7 DEVELOPMENT OF THE VEGETATION MODEL

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7 – DEVELOPMENT OF THE VEGETATION MODEL The prototypes were meant to be experimental models, fragments aiming to physically test project hypothesis, to recognize their performance and analyze their capacity of replication. For being models, they don’t pretend to be anything else than abstractions, and do not carry the complex specificities of the place. The particular conditions of the landscape are involved later and at another scale in the design process. The Vegetal Model gave the student the opportunity to experiment with a living and evolving material (seedlings of 5 to 15 cm in height supplied in tray).

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Through this exploration, students had to focus on two main points: The spatial construction: The plant material became a physical element able to materialize the project, representing areas of the project. The constructions took place in the outdoor gardens of the School of Architecture. On the other hand, the photographic manipulation of pictures taken onsite, involving actors and references, allowed to introduce the experience of the physical, tangible space. The temporal evolution: The models photographs’ sequence and the subsequent manipulation of these allowed to generate a reflection on the temporal evolution of vegetation, on its processes of growth and succession, and on the management applied to each phase. The students explained in their own words the meaning of their vegetation models.


CONNECT TO DISCONNECT Laura Vossen, Corina Andueza, Huiting Huang What our group wanted to achieve through the vegetation model was to show mainly the connection and the principal path to the Collserola’s mountain and how this path goes blurring, losing and naturalizing as we approach the mountaintop. Starting with the entrance door, which would receive the visitors with a great vegetation wall (achieve with the use of bricks and plants). Then it would enter the main road that would lead to the water tank covers with new plantations (also represented with bricks). Ultimately, the path (represented with vegetation and gravel) will fade away in the nature to give the users freedom to explore and connect with the mountain, but at the same time provide a disconnection with the city routine by walking trough the green zones, but also through the “change� zones, that is to say, zone were the fire means the beginning of life (represented with wood and padded plants)

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ZOOM IN, ZOOM OUT Hester Koelman, Juanita Leal, Xi He The concept “Zoom in // Zoom out� entails making people pay more attention to the mountain and its beauty (zooming in), but on the other hand letting them stop and turn around more, zooming out towards the city of Barcelona and enjoying the far stretched views. This way, a contrast between these two very different scales arises. The controlling of the speed will be done using sensations that can already be found on the mountain. Through the vegetation model we want to highlight the intention of create an opportunity to stop and turn, setting contrasts with the plants, its forms, colors and different sizes


FACING C

FACING COLLSEROLA Olivia Torelli, Begoña Castañón, Jesús Cereceres, Federico Grizzo

In the model that we created during the EMILA workshop we came with the idea of designing a zigzag path through Collserola, creating a visual experience through vegetation and providing it with stations that could work as viewing points or resting areas as well as water retention ponds, improving the conditions around them making it possible for new vegetation to grow attracting different kinds of animals and insects, improving the biodiversity of the zone.

STRICT SEPARATION SEPARATION CITY/PARK CITY/PARK STRICT

FEAR FEAR

PEOPLE LIVING NEX

FACING COLLSE ACING COLLSERO

THE ISLAND ISLAND OF O THE SOIL EROSIO EROSIO SOIL

In the limit of the city with the mountain we designed a gradient from the consolidated city towards nature with the use of urban gardens, creating a sense of transition (city-nature) and changing the relationship with Collserola.

STRONG SLOPES

TURNING OUR BACKS

TORRENTIAL RAIN RAIN TORRENTIAL

LACK OF OF GENTLE GENTLE DD LACK

STRICT SEPARATION CITY/PARK EPARATION CITY/PARK FEAR TO CLIMB UPFEAR TO CLIMB UP

PEOPLENEXT LIVING TO COLLSEROL PLE LIVING TO NEXT COLLSEROLA

THE ISLANDPARK OF COLLSEROLA PARK THE ISLAND OF COLLSEROLA STRONG SLOPES NG SLOPES SOIL EROSION SOIL EROSION

PR

TURNING BACKS TO THE MOUNTAIN URNING OUR BACKSOUR TO THE MOUNTAIN

RAIN DIRECT LACK OFCONNECTION GENTLE DIRECT CONNECTION TIAL RAINTORRENTIAL LACK OF GENTLE 11

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Today :: Juxtaposition Juxtaposition Barcelona/Collsero Barcelona/Collsero Today

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Today : Juxtaposition Barcelona/Collserola Step 1 : Construct the fram day : Juxtaposition Barcelona/Collserola Step 1 : Construct the frame


STAIRS FROM COLLSEROLA Yuleska Ziade, Adrià Ribas, Roser Jonás Our idea of model was to recreate the terraces that are used in agriculture to solve the topography in the area of the project, Collserola. For that, we used wooden sticks to recreate the typical stone walls and we covered them with real vegetation. We designed the walls doing a “zig zag”, creating ramps to solve the unevenness and painting in the mountain some type of stairs. Once we designed the model, we used it to experiment with the infiltration of the water and trying to keep it in some wetlands created on the terraces in order to establish different ecosystems during the year, always depending on the quantity of water. The model helped us a lot to redesign the topography in order to achieve our purpose.


PANTA REI Rana Benyahya, Ja Young Cho, Inés Sanfeliu Working on these models, we tried to represent the idea of movement and flow that we perceived on the working area. The fact that the site was deeply influenced by the wind for its process of destruction - fire – as well as for the process of regeneration – seeding – was defining our starting point. The first model explores the possibility of creating a new landscape based on the agglomeration of material due to movement and in this case due to ants’ movement. The second model was exploring the phasing and how could the landscape change over time with the help of wind. Considering the direction of the wind, some areas could be planted to enable a future seeding process due to wind and natural processes. Finally the third model was a representation of the area of work and the relation between Collserola and the Diagonal Avenue. The two concept described on the two other models were also represented in this last one trying to present a global image of the working situation.

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CONNECTION THROUGH VIEW Sophia Holtkemper, Andrés Felipe Trujillo, Malgorzata Styjek The general concept of our model is to connect ecologically and socially to the sector known as “road of waters” through a series of points identified as potential viewpoints that allow to observe the urban landscapes, the sea and the mountain through the strategy of Stepping stones. We seek that the viewpoints are strategic points of improvement of habitats through the planting of plants that tolerate salinity, extreme conditions of sunning, and water deficit typical of Mediterranean ecosystems. In this way we generate fragments of habitats separated from each other by a small distance, being arranged in such a way that the species can make shorts movements and move along a path through the landscape matrix. In the same way these points become lookouts and rest areas for visitors who access the park by a path with a steep slope, linking the mountain with the city.


FIRE-WORKS Felicitas Wiener, Claudia de Sas, Neus Soto Gil The fire models the landscape, it changes the conditions of the forest, it changes the vegetation, it’s part of the carbon and fuel cycle of the ecosystem. Currently forestry strategies are based in fire prevention and direct action against fire. In the 1970s, 10% of forestry investment was destined for fires, in 2017 it was 91%. Faced with this endless situation, new strategies are proposed based on the management of the forest, knowing more the natural processes to avoid the fires of large scale. In Catalonia after agricultural abandonment, forests have been abandoned. This situation, without forest management, without herbivores and without natural fire regime, has provoked that the forests have a lot of fuel. Therefore, the fires are getting bigger and uncontrolled. The proposal is born from the need to return to the natural cycle of the forest, enhancing the dynamism and life in it. Through grazing and returning the herbivore to its place. It is proposed to recover the landscape of spots or mosaic in the area, which allows the appearance of the fire in a controlled and low intensity.

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8 FINAL MASTERPLAN

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8 - FINAL MASTERPLAN The aim of the workshop was to present “A preliminary plan showing proposed ultimate site development” (ASLA 2016). Each group had to propose a Master Plan that summarized the ideas raised through the different approaches of the site –trans-scale, material, agency and representation-. The Master Plan can be understood as a development of the motto, the idea of the conceptual and material proposal of each group.

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FACING COLLSEROLA Olivia Torelli, Begoña Castañón, Jesús Cereceres, Federico Grizzo

FACING COLLSEROLA STRICT SEPARATION CITY/PARK

FEAR TO CLIMB UP

PROGRESSIVE TRANSITION THROUGH AGRICULTURE

PEOPLE LIVING NEXT TO COLLSEROLA STRONG SLOPES

THE ISLAND OF COLLSEROLA PARK SOIL EROSION

INVITING THE PEOPLE

PROPOSING DIFFERENT WAYS OF INTERACTING WITH THE PARK

TURNING OUR BACKS TO THE MOUNTAIN

TORRENTIAL RAIN

DEVELOP BIODIVERSITY

SLOWING DOWN THE WATER RUNOFF

LACK OF GENTLE DIRECT CONNECTION

ELABORATING PROCESS WITH LIVING MATERIALS

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Today : Juxtaposition Barcelona/Collserola

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Step 1 : Construct the frame

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Pedestrian path + water circulation

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+ Sport tracks

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+ Stations + Urban gardens

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+ Seeds spread by water + Water storage

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+ Biodiversity

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+ Multifunctional stations

Step 2 : Let the system grow

Step 3 : Obtain continous buffer area

Path Park of Collserola City of Barcelona

Stations

Vegetation propagation

Interconnection between the spots

Urban gardens

WATER Storage

Runoff

PATHS Sport track Walking path

VEGETATION SPREAD

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BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo.

SUPPORTED BY:

AMB FONS BLANC I AGRUPAT

SENSE FONS AGRUPAT

GROUP Nº

2

FACING COLLSEROLA

Begoña Castañon Jesus Cereceres Federico Grizzo Olivia Torrelli


FACING COLLSEROLA USING THE DYNAMIC OF THE VEGETAL SPRAWL

CONNECTION THROUGH THE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM

A PROGRESSIVE TRANSITION in ALTITUDE and in the TIME Collserola Park Native vegetation

Plantation

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Growth

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Managment

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Pasture (sheep,goat)

Manual mower string/saw head

Manual mower string/saw head

Manual mower string/saw head + Mowing platform

Urban gardens City of Barcelona

WORKING WITH LOCAL VEGETATION

Tomatoe Solanum lycopersicum

Cherry tree Prunus cerasus

Wild mint Mentha arvensis

Arbutus Arbutus unedo

Oak Quercus ilex

Pine Pinus pinea

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"Maquis" Mediterranean bush

PART OF THE GREEN NETWORK ZOOM : A MULTIFUNCTIONAL STATION Essential element of the system

Water runoff Water storage Path Cultivated terraces

Water storage and fruit trees terraces

1/500

A fertil area in the mountain

A point of view of the city of Barcelona

Earth movements +

+ -

BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

GROUP Nº

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo. SUPPORTED BY:

AMB FONS BLANC I AGRUPAT

SENSE FONS AGRUPAT

57

2

FACING COLLSEROLA

Begoña Castañon Jesus Cereceres Federico Grizzo Olivia Torrelli


FIRE-WORKS Felicitas Wiener, Claudia de Sas, Neus Soto Gil

FIRE_WORKS WILDFIRES IN COLLSEROLA

FIRE BREATH OF SANT PERE MÀRTIR

since 1980s

hubs + slopes and their potential to spread fires WEATHER CONDITIONS: drought + high temperature + wind

wind driven

REQUIREMENTS: fuel + oxygen + heat slope driven

poject area sant pere màrtir

fuel driven

WILDFIRE CAUSES NATURAL

vulcano

ARTIFICIAL ...

lightning

intensive sun

cigarette lit

pyromaniacs

fireworks

reflections

electric sparks

metallic sparks

campfires

WIND AND SUN MOVEMENT IN AREA

BEGIN OF REGENERATIVE FIRES ~ 1-3 years ~ 5-7 years todays shrubland ~ 20 years

forest shrubland burned

grassland

ENVIROMENTAL MANAGMENT

july morning

meadow

TOOLS

regeneration

meadows + reviving paths

burned area

dense shrubs

sparse forest

dense forest

grassland

AMB FONS BLANC I AGRUPAT

SENSE FONS AGRUPAT

meadow

break vertical unity of fuel sparse shrubs

break vertical unity of fuel

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo. SUPPORTED BY:

keep state of succession

break horizontal unity of fuel

open shrubland

BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

july afternoon

open shrubs

break horizontal unity of fuel open forest

sparse forest

GROUP Nº

3

FIRE_WORKS - MOVING PERSPECTIVES

C. Ros, C. De Sas, F. Wiener, N. Soto


MOVING PERSPECTIVES IN COLLSEROLA

6

26th october 201 fire on monday

five days after wild

grassland

eneration r half a year of reg

burned area afte

open shrubland

dense shrubland

MANAGMENT PROPOSAL scale 1:5.000

sparse pine forest

N

sparse mixed forest dense mixed forest

burned areas

pasture

CURRENT SITUATION scale 1:20.000

planting

cutting controlled burning ridge

valley avinguda de les aigües

POSSIBLE EVOLUTION I scale 1:20.000

streets + paths short cuts

POSSIBLE EVOLUTION II scale 1:20.000

BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

GROUP Nº

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo. SUPPORTED BY:

AMB FONS BLANC I AGRUPAT

SENSE FONS AGRUPAT

59

3

FIRE_WORKS - MOVING PERSPECTIVES

C. Ros, C. De Sas, F. Wiener, N. Soto


PANTA REI Rana Benyahya, Ja Young Cho, Inés Sanfeliu

PANTA REI I was once in a mountain close to the diagonal. It was dry and burned. I was missing the water and the brown earth down my feets too. Some seeds spreeded on the grown. Wind. Some green low vegetation seems to have growing up within these few days. Hope. Regeneration. Wind. Energy. Energy was owing on the site, from people, from vegetation but also from the city. The city, was so close, as we could observe from different points. It is the second layer of this landscape. Flow of cars and people. Continuos activity.

WIND ENERGY FLOW VEGETATION CONNECT REGENERATION EVOLUTION LAYERS

12

N

11

1

NO

NE

10

2

9O

E3

4

8

SO

SE 5

7

S 6

BCN B C SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo. SUPPORTED BY:

GROUP Nº

4

PANTA REI Rana Benyahya Ja Young Cho Ines Sanfeliu


Brachypodium retusum Family: Poaceae

Ulex parviorus Family: Fabaceae

Spartium junceum Family: Fabaceae

Centaurea aspera Family: Asteraceae

Galium lucidum Family: Rubiaceae

Foeniculum vulgare Family: Apiaceae

Globularia alypum Family: Plantaginaceae

Onon O On no on n niis is n a ri at rix Ononis natrix F Fa ami miily m y: P Pa ap piilion liionác oná on ác ce ea as Family: Papilionáceas

R Ru uta t c ha h alle epe pens pens n is is Ruta chalepensis F Fa ami mily ly:: R Ru uta tace cea ceae ae e Family: Rutaceae

Echium um mv ullga garre vulgare Family ly: Bora B ora agina ace eae ae Family: Boraginaceae

Sedu Se S edu dum s se edi edi difo form me Sedum sediforme F Fa miily m y: Cr C ras assu sula lace ace ceae ae Family: Crassulaceae

C arl rlin i ac ory ymb mbos osa Carlina corymbosa Fami mily mi ly: As ly A ste te era race ce eae ae Family: Asteraceae

La L ava and ndul u a st toe oech chas s Lavandula stoechas Fa Fami ami m ly y: La ami m ac a ea ae Family: Lamiaceae

U Uros Ur ro os spe perrm mum mum md ae al ec cha amp m iiii Urospermum dalechampii Fa F ami mily: mily ly: As ly ste era rac ce eae ae Family: Asteraceae

E Ec ch hiium mv ulga ulga ul are e-L Echium vulgare Fami Fa am miily:B ly y:B Bo orrrag agin ag nac cea eae Family:Boraginaceae

Co onv nvolvu olvu ol vulu us al a lth ha ae eoid oiide des des Convolvulus althaeoides Fa ami milly y: Co onvvol olvu lvu vula lace la ceae ce eae ae Family: Convolvulaceae

P Paro Pa arony rro on ny y ych chia ch ia a rge rg en nte tea a Paronychia argentea Fa ami mily y: C Ca ary ryop ophy op ophy hyllllac acea e e Family: Caryophyllaceae

44

BCN B C SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

GROUP Nº

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo.

SUPPORTED BY:

61

Ga Gala lact cttit c ite es ttomentosa es om o men ento ento to s sa a Galactites F Fa miily ly:: A As ste tera rac ce ea ae e Family: Asteraceae

PANTA REI

Rana Benyahya Ja Young Cho Ines Sanfeliu


STAIRS FROM COLLSEROLA Yuleska Ziade, Adrià Ribas, Roser Jonás

First Impression


Analysis

Vegetation Diagram

Road Structure

Fauna

Section 1

Ecosystems Structure

Vegetation Structure

Water Structure

Section 2 Model

Views

63


ZOOM IN, ZOOM OUT Hester Koelman, Juanita Leal, Xi He

THIS PROJECT CREATES AN EXPERIENCE ROUTE IN THE MOUNTAINS OF COLLSEROLA, CONNECTING PEOPLE FROM THE CITY MORE TO THE MOUNTAIN.

ZOOM IN // ZOOM OUT

THE CONCEPT “ZOOM IN // ZOOM OUT” ENTAILS MAKING PEOPLE PAY MORE ATTENTION TO THE MOUNTAIN AND ITS BEAUTY (ZOOMING IN), BUT ON THE OTHER HAND LETTING THEM STOP AND TURN AROUND MORE, ZOOMING OUT TOWARDS THE CITY OF BARCELONA AND ENJOYING THE FARSTRETCHED VIEWS. THIS WAY, A CONTRAST BETWEEN THESE TWO VERY DIFFERENT SCALES ARISES.

THE CONTROLLING OF THE SPEED WILL BE DONE USING SENSATIONS THAT CAN ALREADY BE FOUND ON THE MOUNTAIN. THESE SENSATIONS WILL BE USED AND EXAGGERATED AT SPECIFIC POINTS ON THE ROUTE TO ADRESS TO PEOPLES CURIOSITY TO SURPRISE THEM AND LETTING THEM STOP THERE. THIS WAY THEY WILL PROBABLY TURN AROUND AND ENJOY THE VIEW OVER THE CITY. THESE POINTS CAN NOT FORCE THEM TO STOP, BUT CREATE AN OPPORTUNITY TO STOP AND TURN.

THE DESIGN CONSISTS OF A PATHWAY THAT SLOWS PEOPLE DOWN AT CERTAIN POINTS AND THIS ENABLES THEM TO ENJOY THE WAY UP AND THE WAY DOWN THE MOUNTAIN MORE.

THESE SENSATIONS ARE: SOUND (OF THE CITY; ANIMALS; THE WIND RUSTLING LEAVES OF THE VEGETATION); THE FEELING OF WIND; SIGHT (CONTROLLED BY VEGETATION; DIFFERENCES IN COLOR OF THE VEGETATION); TOUCH (ROUGHNESS OF THE PATHWAY; TEXTURES OF PLANTS); SCENT OF VEGETATION.

SIGHT - VIEW

SIGHT - COLOR

SIGHT - VEGETATION

FEEL - TEXTURES OF THE PATH

FEEL - TOUCH

SCENT

CONCEPT: DIFFERENT SPEEDS AND SENSATIONS

TOOLBOX

MOUNTAIN: THREE DIFFERENT PARTS WITH DIFFERENT RHYTHMS

BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo. SUPPORTED BY:

AMB FONS BLANC I AGRUPAT

SENSE FONS AGRUPAT

GROUP Nº

7

LEMA / ZOOM IN // ZOOM OUT

Juanita Leal Ochoa, Hester Koelman, Xi He


alfalfa

populus nigra lantana strigocamara

rosmarinus

papaver rhoeas

BRIDGE CONNECTION FROM THE PARK TO THE MOUNTAIN

LOWER PART OF THE MOUNTAIN

AREA AROUND THE WATER TANK

UPPER PART OF THE MOUNTAIN

FEEL AND TURN

connection to the park

view to the city

controlling speed with roughness of the path scent: lavender plants plateaus for resting differences in roughness of the path textures/colors/scent of the vegetation

ZOOM OUT

ZOOM IN

ZOOM OUT

ZOOM IN BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

GROUP Nº

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo.

SUPPORTED BY:

AMB FONS BLANC I AGRUPAT

SENSE FONS AGRUPAT

65

7

LEMA / ZOOM IN // ZOOM OUT

Juanita Leal Ochoa, Hester Koelman, Xi He


CONNECT TO DISCONNECT Laura Vossen, Corina Andueza, Huiting Huang

ConneCt to DisConneCt

Masterplan 1:3.500

Steps to adapt the ponds to the specific places

Making a gentle, respectful gesture towards the mountain to enhance it’s natural form of water collection.

Selecting suitable places that will be able to collect water but are also reachable.

Adapting the form of the pond to the character of the place - the slope, the orientation.

finding the character of the mountain - the slope, the valley, the basin Overviewplan

Using the slope to collect rain water.

rebuilding current obstacles into a friendly welcome and creating a visual connection between mountain and city

Collecting dew / making it stay longer by using the extracted soil to produce shade in the mornings.

satisfying the curiosity and designing freedom

BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

creating small initiative points for further development by itself

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo. SUPPORTED BY:

GROUP Nº

8

CONNECT TO DISCONNECT

Corina Andueza | Huiting Huang | Laura Vossen


ConneCt to DisConneCt The mountain provides

water

environment

We provide

earthen ponds

seeds, local species

strategy to helping the mountain connect itself

Time provides connect - to the mountain

nesting places

disconnect - from the city

shelter food water

resting spots

Pinus picea

Quercus ilex

Quercus coccifera

Sarothamnus catalaunicus

Ulex parfiflorus

Erica arborea

Convolvulus althaeoides

Galactites tomentosa

Hyparrenia hirta

planting of local trees and shrubs such as: genista (Ulex parviflorus), holly oak (Quercus ilex) or stone pine (Pinus picea)

development of trails and paths over time by users - animals and humans attraction of animals of the area by the offer of food , shelter and breeding areas provided by the spots attractiveness also of dry ponds for recreational usage and resting place for explorers of the mountain - disconnection of the city

establishment of local flora over time such as thatching grass (Hyparrenia hirta), mallow bindweed (Convolvulus althaeoides) or purple milk thistle (Galactites tomentosa)

occasional filling of the pond with water, average rainy days per month: 9

BCN SEEDINGSCAPES_ACTIONS AND INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE FOREST

GROUP Nº

8th EMiLA Summerschool 29TH SEPTEMBER - 7TH OCTOBER 2016 E. Batlle, P. Morán, L. Maldonado, J. Zaldivar, M. Cervera, M. Prominsky, F. Crémel, D. Marskamp, K. Busche, G. Giorgi, L. Carrillo. SUPPORTED BY:

67

8

CONNECT TO DISCONNECT

Corina Andueza | Huiting Huang | Laura Vossen


WATERING COLLSEROLA Marianne Cabanis, Grabriela Baca, Maria Paula Pfaff WATERING COlLSEROLA Gabriela Baca, Marianne Cabanis, Maria Paula Pfaff Group 5

01 Analysis

THE MOUNTAIN System of water in the Collserola mountains

Water Way

Canalisation

Wet meadows and grassland

Natural park de la Serra de Collserola in Barcelona

Collserola and Carretera de les Aigües

View from Mirador de Finestrelles towards Barcelona

View from Collserola

WATERING COLLSEROLA

Gabriela Baca, Marianne Cabanis, Maria Paula Pfaff Group 5

02 Follow the rainwater Focus on Follow the rainwater

Section AA’ - 1/100°

Section BB’ - 1/100°

plan - 1/100°


CONNECTION THROUGH VIEW CONNECTION THROUGH VIEW Sophia Holtkemper, AndrĂŠs Felipe Trujillo, Malgorzata Styjek Transformation stategies

CONNECTION THROUGH VIEW

Forest

Forest View

City View

Transformation stategies stategies Transformation

Vegetati

Forest Forest

ForestView View Forest

CityView View City SeaView View Sea City City

Vegetation stategies stategies Vegetation Forest View - Forestal Area Connection to the Mountain

Forestal Area Pinus picea

Quercus dehesa

ForestView View--Forestal ForestalArea Area Forest Connectionto tothe theMountain Mountain Connection

ForestalArea Area Forestal

Macchia Macchia

Pinuspicea picea Pinus

Arbutusunedo unedo Arbutus Cytisusscoparius scoparius Cytisus

Quercusdehesa dehesa Quercus

Development over

Developmentover overtime time Development

ROUGH VIEW

1. Strategy: sowin

Strategy:planting plantingand andcreating creating 2.2.Strategy: terasses terasses

Strategy:sowing sowingseeds seeds 1.1.Strategy:

NECTION THROUGH VIEW Forest

Forest View

mation stategies

Masterplan1:2000 1:2000 Masterplan

City View

CityView View--Macchia Macchia City Connectionto tothe theCity City Connection

Sea View City

Sea

Masterplan 1:2000 Forest

City View - Macchia Connection to the City

Vegetation stategies

Forest View

City View

Sea View City

Sea

Vegetation stategies

SeaView View--salt-resistant salt-resistantVegetation Vegetation Sea Connectionto tothe thesea sea Connection

Forestal Area

MalgorzataStry Stry Malgorzata

salt-resistant Vegetation

Macchia

Pinus picea

Arbutus unedo Cytisus scoparius

Quercus dehesa

Artemisia nana Festuca eliah

Forest

Forest View

City View

rea ntain

Development over time Sea View City

Forestal Area

Sea

Sea View - salt-resistant Vegetation Connection to the sea

Pinus picea

Quercus dehesa

Vegetation stategies

Forestal Area Quercus dehesa

Arbutus unedo Cytisus scoparius

Artemisia nana Festuca eliah

Development over time

1. Strategy: sowing seeds

Pinus picea

salt-resistant Vegetation

Macchia

salt-resistant Vegetation

Macchia

Arbutus unedo Cytisus scoparius

1. Strategy: sowing seeds

Artemisia nana Festuca eliah

2. Strategy: planting and creating terasses

2. Strategy: planting and creating terasses

3. Strategy: creating good conditions for vegetation to sattle

3. Strategy: creating good conditions for vegetation to sattle

Development over time

1. Strategy: sowing seeds

2. Strategy: planting and creating terasses

3. Strategy: creating good conditions for vegetation to sattle

Masterplan 1:2000 Masterplan 1:2000

y

Masterplan 1:2000

Sea View - salt-resistant Vegetation Connection to the sea

Sea View - salt-resistant Vegetation Connection to the sea

Malgorzata Stryjek, Andres Trujillo, Malgorzata Stryjek, Andres Trujillo,Sophia Sophia Holtkemper Holtkemper

Malgorzata Stryjek, Andres Trujillo, Sophia Holtkemper

69



9 MOWING INTERVENTION

71



9 – MOWING INTERVENTION The mowing intervention in Finestrelles was focused on a landscape nearby the school, where different mowing systems could take place (manual, machinery, grazing) so the EMiLA students could prove in an Alfalfa field, the effects of the different mowing. The journey was completed with the arrival from Collserolla of a flock of sheep with their shepherd showing the students the different possibilities of linking the city and the forest. The happening was a social demand for the connection of the city with its surroundings that concluded with the agreement between the Mayor, the AMB Manager and the shepherd to maintain these kind of activities in the future.

73



75


FARM THE CITY Productive lands helps recover biodiversity: cleaning air, improving water usage, provides for use of new, sustainable materials, and produces a wide range of by-products and food. Metropolitan agriculture is improving to be the most economic maintenance system. It reclaims land we have ignored and turns it into a new, sustainable and dynamic philosophy for cities. “We can farm the city, we can cultivate the recovery of life by encouraging the public use of these productive spaces”.

10 – MBLANDARCH CONFERENCES


10 MBLANDARCH LECTURES

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78


10 – MBLANDARCH LECTURES Eugenia Vidal. Architect, Urban Planning Service. AMB Urban Planning Services Management Green Metropolitan Infraestructure: The Collserola Park. The conference of Eugènia Vidal serves as an introduction to the territorial context in which the Collserola Park is located and specifically the project area. In addition, the conference presents the most relevant themes that have been incorporated into the urban planning that is currently being drafted, highlighting the importance of border or contact spaces between the Park and the bordering municipalities as a project object.

Dina Alsawi / Jona Garcia. Service Promotion and Conservation of Public Space. AMB Public Space Management Marc Castellnou. Chief Inspector. GRAF- Fire Unit Government of Catalonia Pep Mascaro. Collserola Park Consortium Project Leader Management Lab was the title proposed for three conferences with the objective of introducing diverse ways of approaching the management of the public space and the landscape by experienced professionals of different public administrations. The target was to find common lines of project, to engage in meaningful discussion, dialogue and exchange of views between speakers and attendees.

79



11 CONCLUSIONS

81



WEATHER CONDITIONS: drought + high temperature + wind

11 – CONCLUSIONS

wind driven

REQUIREMENTS: fuel + oxygen + heat slope driven

CONNECTION THROUGH VIEW

ea màrtir

Sophia Holtkemper (EMiLA-LUH), Andrés Felipe Trujillo (MBLandArch) and Malgorzata fuel driven Styjek (U. Lisboa)

We first know through our eyes. The group proposed to place three viewpoints using existing or proposed elements to be surrounded by newly-managed vegetation areas. The design ARTIFICIAL ... interprets obstacles as an opportunity to provide ‘new ways of seeing’. The final proposal makes clear choices of vegetation and its management through time, linking two key topics in the area: ecology and leisure. The group recognized vegetation strategies existing in the place that could be activated in specific locations. The proposal is connected with the prototype work through the study of the development of types of landscapes and their temporal evolution

e sun

cigarette lit

FACING COLLSEROLA pyromaniacs fireworks

reflections

electric sparks

metallic sparks

campfires

Olivia Torelli (EMiLA-ENSPV), Begoña Castañón and Jesús Cereceres (MBLandArch) and Federico Grizzo (U. Buenos Aires) WIND AND SUN MOVEMENT IN AREA

years

7 years

~ 20 years

Agriculture is a way of taking care of the land it occupies. Fifty years ago, all mountain slopes at the AMB were cultivated. In this case, farming –as gardening- means carefully spreading vegetation by providing the proper conditions for it at the ‘stations’: safe accesses over the motorway and two new paths criss-crossing the slope to climb it up softly along with plain terraces for soil retention and a way of storing and driving the scarce water. The group understood the vegetation sprawl characteristic from the site and is introduced as an active agent in the project, generating a system of water storage, walking network and vegetation succession. FIRE-WORKS Felicitas Wiener (EMiLA-LUH), Claudia de Sas and Neus Soto Gil (MBLandArch)

shrubland

meadow

Fire-Works as perspective changer and this project takes advantage of the most striking experience of the workshop: the site got burned just a week before the visit. The design is based on the relationship between big fires and people, and aim to understand the fire-edge exposition to sun and wind as a way of identifying areas of fire management introducing sheep to keep the fuel down. By doing so, the group introduced time and life in their planning. The group analyzed the fire spread potential of the area, defining different areas of management morning july afternoon depending on thejuly vegetation coverage. TOOLS

regeneration burned area

keep state of succession grassland

meadow

break horizontal unity of fuel dense shrubs

break vertical unity of fuel sparse shrubs

83

open shrubs


te, from so from e, as we points. It ndscape. ontinuos

PANTA REI Everything flows Rana Benyahya (EMiLA-UPC), Ja Young Cho (EMiLA-LUH) and Inés Sanfeliu (MBLandArch) One of the surprises of our first approach to the mountain was the vagueness of the limit between what is seemly urban and what we commonly understand as ‘natural’. Panta Rei focuses on the fringe in/between both spatial and administrative realities, sticking on the difference of the place that makes it rich and interesting: its position. work clearly shows VegetationThe Diagram the material possibilities of the place and the potential of the edge as a relational space is translated into the project through physical connections that spread into the city, transforming and introducing new public space into the existing neighborhoods.

ON

Structure

Fauna

WATERING COLLSEROLA 12

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Section 1

11

Marianne Cabanis (EMiLA-ENSPV), Grabriela Baca (MBLandArch),MªPaula Pfaff (U. Buenos A.) Structure

Follow the water. The history of how Barcelona has solved the draining of its public space since the XIXth century, is the story of how our way of understanding rain water as a resource has changed. An outstanding result of the proposal is the way in which the group works along the border. It could be understood as a strategy for all Collserola. On the other hand, it is one of the only proposals that provide a new atmosphere to the place reducing rainwater spread and providing rainwater pounds are the main strategy that structures the whole slope of the mountain. Afterwards, what is visible are the effects of water storage: vegetation.

Structure

cture

STAIRS FROM COLLSEROLA Yuleska Ziade (EMiLA-UPC), Adrià Ribas (and Roser Jonás (ETSAB) The group based its understanding of the place in the contrast between the slope of the mountain and the flatness of the activities in the city. A path structures the space and connect the city with the mountain network of paths. A sequence of terraces creates spaces for Section 2 biodiversity and leisure. Views

1

NO

NE

10

2

9O

E3

4

8

SO

SE 5

7

S 6


THEM TO STOP, NS WILL STOP ANDBETURN. FIC POINTS ES THE CURIOSOF CITY; ANITHEM STOP OF THE VEGETAABLY TURN HT (CONTROLLED R COLOR THE CITY. OF THE MS TO STOP,PATHOF THE AND TURN. OF VEGETATION.

E CITY; ANIHE VEGETAONTROLLED OR OF THE THE PATHEGETATION.

ZOOM IN – ZOOM OUT CONCEPT: DIFFERENT SPEEDS AND Juanita SENSATIONS Hester Koelman (EMiLA-AAA), Leal (MBLandArch) and Xi He (MBLandArch)

A Dutch walks up a mountain, looking at his feet, feeling the stony soil underneath. The closest view, how to place your own feet, makes the difference. The work shows how a different experience of landscape can make us notice details we usually don’t even pay attention to, and make them appear outstanding. It is proposed experience route that connects people with the mountain. The path design CONCEPT: DIFFERENTanSPEEDS AND SENSATIONS

creates a “walking rhythm” linking speed with perception, The sequence of stops is designed to intensify perception of the place and through the senses as well as working as animal habitats.

MOUNTAIN: THREE DIFFERENT PARTS WITH DIFFERENT RHYTHMS

C

D

CONNECT TO DISCONNECT onneCt to isConneCt The mountain provides Laura Vossen (EMiLA-LUH), Corina Andueza (MBLandArch) and Huiting Huang (MBLandArch) water

environment

The project proposes a system of earth ponds to collect water, this fact changes the conditions

We provide MOUNTAIN: THREEworking DIFFERENT WITH DIFFERENT RHYTHMS of the place asPARTS an “starter” to initiate the transformation of the place, no only for

biodiversity but also for the coexistence of human and animals in different moments of the day. earthen ponds

seeds, local species

strategy to helping the mountain connect itself

How could we achieve the mountain self-management? The work proposed a series of hot spots of biodiversity to colonize the area. A first doubt could be how to place the spots. The design is based on the water network, so water led the decision. To collect water you need to dig a hole and then, you must think of what to do with the remaining soil: and this is what a project of landscape architecture is about!

Time provides connect - to the mountain

nesting places

disconnect - from the city

shelter food resting spots

Pinus picea

Quercus ilex

Quercus coccifera

water

Sarothamnus catalaunicus

Ulex parfiflorus

Erica arborea

85 planting of local trees and shrubs such as: genista (Ulex parviflorus), holly oak

Convolvulus althaeoides

Galactites tomentosa

Hyparrenia hirta



12 STAFF

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12 – STAFF MBLandArch Coordination Team Enric Batlle (ETSAB/UPC) MBLandArch Director PhD Architect, Landscape Architect and Director of the MBLandArch. Enric has been involved with UPC and other educational institutions since 1982. His PhD thesis “The Garden of the Metropolis” received, among others, the UPC’s Extraordinary Doctorate Prize and FAD2012. He has published numerous articles in professional journals. In 1981 he founded ‘Batlle i Roig Arquitectes’, a multidisciplinary office that has won many national and international competitions and awards and whose work has been widely published. Marina Cervera Alonso de Medina (ETSAB/UPC) MBLandArch International Coordinator Degree in Architecture in 2003 and and Higher Degree as Master in Landscape Architecture from ETSAB (UPC) and Master in Urban and Regional Planning DUOTETSAB-UPC. Adjunct professor for ETSAB, DUOT, teaching at MBLandArch since 2016. She also teaches in Master’s Program in Landscape Architecture (Fundació UPC) and has lectured around the world in conferences, seminars and International workshops. She is also Executive Director of the Landscape Architecture Office at COAC, and as a Member of the Executive Committee of the International Biennial of Landscape Barcelona. Luís Maldonado (ESAB/UPC) MBLandArch EMiLA’s Coordinator Architect, lectures at the bachelor degree in Environmental & Landscape Engineering and at the MBLandArch of the UPC·BarcelonaTech. His ongoing research and professional practice deals with new forms of beauty and nature; and with open space design and planning linking agro- forestry to landscape and cities crossing processes.

Pepa Moran (ETSAB/UPC) MBLandArch Coordinator Degree in Architecture ETSAV (Valencia), and Higher Degree as Masters in Landscape Architecture Master of Landscape Architecture and Master in Urban and Regional Planning DUOT-ETSAB-UPC. Professor of the Master of Landscape Architecture-UPC since 2006. Coordinator of the MBLandArch-ETSAB-UPC and associate professor in the MBLandArch-ETSAB-UPC since 2016. Since 2007 she also developes her professional practice conbined with the development of the doctoral thesis in the Department of Urban Planning at ETSAB DUOT: the dynamic condition in landscape architecture.

Assistants Lidia Carrillo (ETSAB/UPC) MBLandArch Assistant Coordinator Architect with Honors at ETSAV, Valencia, and Landscape Architect with honors at UPC, Barcelona. Since 2016 she has been working for Batlle i Roig She is specialised in analysis and representation of landscape. Her current research focuses on the natural beauty of the obsolete spaces, the invisible landscapes.

Javier Zaldívar (ETSAB/UPC) MBLandArch Assistant Professor Architect and MBLandArch Master by Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya-UPC. He worked at Batlle i Roig Arquitectes until 2013, he was manager team for the new seafront in Rio de Janeiro, until 2015. Actually, he combines professional activity at his own office, JZ Paisajismo,with teaching as assistant professor at MBLandArch,UPC.

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12 – STAFF EMiLA Françoise Crémel (ENSPV) Works in Paris in Full Contact as landscape artist and in a team Paris U on larger urban scales. At a crossroad between research and practice, she builds her thesis, on body attendance within the design, from her position as landscaper and as project teacher. Member of the LAREP, Research engineer in the ENSP she has just defended a PH.D. thesis “Being landscape, a multi faced exercise” supervised by M. Gilles Clément.

Giulio Giorgi (ENSPV), M. Sc. in Agroecology at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences and Landscape diploma certificate by the ENSP. He’s assistant coordinator and teacher at the ENSP, lecturer for public visits to Parisian large-scale parks and collaborator for Locuscape landscape office. Since 2012 he has been working for several private landscape architecture studios and public landscape consulting offices.

Martin Prominski (LUH) Is Full Professor and chair of “Designing Urban Landscapes” at Leibniz University Hannover, Germany. He has a PhD from TU Berlin (2003) and is a registered landscape architect. His current research focuses on design research strategies, qualification of urban landscapes, and concepts of nature and culture.

Kendra Busche (LUH), M. Sc. Landscape Architecture at TU Berlin and University of Copenhagen. She’s Teaching and Research Assistant at Leibniz University Hannover “Designing Urban Landscapes”. After different working experiences in Germany and Switzerland she’s currently working at the “gruppe F Landschaftsarchitekten” Berlin since 2012.

Donald Marskamp (AHK/AAA) Landscape Architecture at the Academy of Architecture in Amsterdam. But for the time being, he is focus on his own company - MARS Studio, Spatial Design - in Rotterdam. Donald Marskamp sees the landscape as a slow living artwork. In which he explores and uses the poetic beauty of the existing landscape. He likes to work on the interface between architecture, landscape, interior and art. Donald seeks the tension of tactile nature with the mathematical systems and structures devised by humans.

Trainee Corina Andueza (MBLandArch-ETSAB/UPC) Architect in the Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV). Currently she is doing a Master Degree in Landscape Architecture (UPC) and she has been involveD as a Trainee in the MBLandARch since 2016.


MBLandArch collaborates with the School of Agriculture of Barcelona of the UPC and with the participation of diverse university departments, professors and professionals from diverse disciplines for the development of the different subjects, of the special workshops that are developed periodically and of the MBLandArch Lectures. MBLandArch deals with projects that, in most cases, are linked to collaboration agreements with the public administration and the professional world, allowing us a real vision of the current problems of landscaping and a direct contact with the entities and people who develop it. The students of our Master also have the opportunity to take a professional practice in several public or private offices of recognized prestige. MBLandArch has collaboration and exchange agreements with several international universities and belongs to EMILA (European Master of International Landscape Architects), a joint program with other European universities (Amsterdam, Edinburgh, Hanover and Versailles) that gives the opportunity to five students of each of the universities to spend the second and third semester in two different universities, obtaining the corresponding recognition. MBLandArch is recognized by IFLA (International Federation of Landscape Architects), an international association that recognizes and accredits the professional activity of landscape architects and landscape architects

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The landscape architecture is interested in all the exterior spaces and, from the design of public space that Barcelona has projected to the world, we have returned to look at the large scale and we have incorporated the language of ecology. In relation to the large scale, landscape architecture is related to geography, land management, social sciences and all urban decisions that, day by day, build the reality of our cities. Ecology, biology, agronomy, the different environmental sciences and the various landscape engineering projects are all part of the decisions we make, from the most global to the most local, from those most related to environmental problems to the most simple ideas that we can use in the conservation, restoration, or construction of our landscape. This multi-disciplinary and trans-scalar vision, which is typical of landscape architecture, is also built without renouncing the capabilities of the world of art and architecture that have traditionally nurtured our profession and which have been so brilliantly developed by the School of Architecture of Barcelona. Enric Batlle, Director of MBLandArch

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