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Issue 5

CANCER

Latest Research

BREED SPOTLIGHT uif!njtvnefstuppe

pit bull

get along

Tasty Treat Recipes

Top Ten

PHOTOGRAPHY

CATS & DOGS Help them

TRAINING Tips

Wednesday, January 2, 13

take great dog pics


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Wednesday, January 2, 13


W

inter has become my favorite time of year. That may surprise you unless you know that I live in South Florida. I’m originally from the UK though and did not enjoy the cold weather there except for the very rare and much longed for white Christmases. Being “staff” to four cats, this month’s article about cats and dogs is one I wish I had seen before I got my first puppy two years ago. The cats now tolerate Lulu as she is a much calmer dog these days. But now there is a new puppy, Pebbles, in the house and she really wants to make friends with the cats. But they are scared of her. When Pebbles first arrived at 2 weeks old she could barely walk and the cats couldn’t make out what kind of creature she was! Now she is ten weeks and runs like a greyhound. I try not to laugh when I see this 4lb puppy chasing the 15lb tabby through the cat door, but it’s really difficult. My new year’s resolution is to make more effort to create harmony among the animals.....somehow!

My apologies for the lateness of this month’s issue. I sincerely hope all of you that celebrate at this time of year had a joyous holiday. My crew and I would like to wish you a very happy and prosperous 2013.

Dog Park Magazine is dedicated to bringing you interesting dog related articles, news, stories, holistic healthcare, great places to take your dog, and informative and fun videos and photos. Our mission is to promote the bond between dogs and humans through education and entertainment.

We would love to hear from you with feedback, comments, stories and photos. Write to share@dogparkmag.com Wednesday, January 2, 13


Lulu and Pebbles

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Contents Canine Cancer Types, symptoms, treatment and more by Andy Santini

Cats and Dogs How to help them get along by Dina Colton

Training 101 Top ten dog training tips by Patrice Malone

Photography Tips How to take better photos of your pet by Darren Rouse

It’s a Dog’s Life “The First Winter” by Bailey Russell

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Contents Breed Spotlight The Pit Bull - not so “bully” breed by Patrice Malone

Just For Fun The office environment from a dog’s perspective

Park of the Month Jager and friends, Somerset, Pa. by Dina Colton

More recipes for home-made treats Make some for your best friend by Jane Romsey

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Meet Our Crew and their Best Friends

Commander-in-Chief, Dina Colton

Rover Reporter, Andy Santini

Canine Cook, Jane Romsey

Photo Pooch, Maz Scales

General Dog’s Body, Patrice Malone

Treat & Toy Tester, Lulu

Wednesday, January 2, 13


Canine Cancer

It’s a subject that most people don’t want to even think about, but cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs over ten. As with humans, early detec tion is paramount. Make sure you know what signs to look for in your dog. Wednesday, January 2, 13


Types of cancer common in dogs Fifty percent of dogs over the age of 10 develop cancer at some point. The most common ones are malignant lymphoma, which is a tumor of the lymph nodes, mast cell tumors, which is a form of skin cancer, mammary gland tumors or breast cancer, soft tissue sarcomas, and bone cancer. The warning signs of cancer in dogs are very similar to that in people. A lump or a bump, a wound that doesn’t heal, any kind of swelling, enlarged lymph nodes, a lameness or swelling in the bone, abnormal bleeding. Those are all classic signs. But sometimes there are little or no signs, at least early on. So any time an animal isn’t feeling well, or there’s something abnormal or not quite right, the owner needs to bring it to the attention of their veterinarian. Some breeds are more prone to cancers Any time you have an inbred population, you don’t know what else is being inherited along with the traits you want. People like golden retrievers because they look like golden retrievers. But what else is being passed through that line? Golden retrievers have a strong incidence of cancer. So do boxers, flat-coated retrievers, Bernese Mountain dogs. All of those breeds, and others, have specific cancers. That’s showing that there are probably specific genetic components to some cancers. But it’s still a question of how much is genetics versus environmental factors. Because mixed-breed dogs come from a much larger gene pool, they would be less likely to get genetic-based cancers. But that doesn’t prevent them getting spontaneous cancers or environmentally caused cancers. What can I do to help prevent my dog from getting cancer? The biggest thing is spaying your dog. If you spay a dog before its first heat you’ll reduce the chance of mammary cancer eight-fold, just because of the hormonal influence. Good oral care can help decrease oral cancers. And if you’re buying a purebred dog, check its line to see if there’s a specific kind of cancer in that breed’s line. Prevention is difficult because the causes of most cancers is unknown. Rather than trying to prevent cancer, identifying it early and treating it quickly is the better strategy.

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Treatments available for dogs with cancer Probably the majority of the cancers can be dealt with surgically. A lot of the breast cancers, a lot of the mast cell tumors, a lot of skin tumors, soft tissue sarcomas, many of those tumors can be removed surgically and are cured. Even in situations where they have advanced to a lymph node, there are options that can prolong your dog’s life and even cure him. Radiation therapy is available in about 40 facilities around the country. Chemotherapy has become commonplace. Now some places are even doing research and clinical treatment of patients with immunotherapy tumor vaccines, using the immune system to stimulate the destruction of the cancer. The FDA approved the first drug for treating canine cancer in June 2009 There is also a new vaccine against oral melanomas, the most common oral tumor. Radiation therapy and technology is expanding so that the machines currently in use can now treat brain tumors, nasal tumors and deep-seated tumors that previously couldn’t be accessed surgically. Veterinary oncology has progressed amazingly in the past two decades. Twenty years ago, most people didn’t even know dogs got cancer. Today it’s common to find people whose dogs have been treated for cancer. There are so many more facilities for treating canine cancer now, and there are veterinarians who do nothing but treat cancer.  Cure rate Overall, for all malignancies, it’s probably in the 60-plus percent range. There are a lot of dogs with just lumps and bumps that are being taken off by their regular veterinarian and they have a very good long-term prognosis. If the cancers are left untreated, survival times are in only months, not years.

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Canine Splenic Hemangiosarcoma According to the Golden Retriever Health Survey , conducted in 1998 and published in 2000, one in five Goldens will develop hemangiosarcoma of the spleen, a malignant form of cancer. In addition, one in eight Golden Retrievers will be diagnosed with another malignant cancer called lymphosarcoma. Hemangiosarcoma is cancer of the endothelial cells - the cells that line blood vessels. Unlike other cancers, it is almost exclusively a disease of dogs. Dogs of any breed and age can develop hemangiosarcoma, but it is most commonly seen in dogs over the age of six, and in the following breeds: • Golden Retrievers • German Shepherd Dogs • Portuguese Water Dogs • Bernese Mountain Dogs • Flat Coated Retrievers • Boxers • Skye Terriers Hemangiosarcoma generally develops slowly and no signs of disease are present in the early stages. Even dogs with large tumors will show no symptoms early on. Unfortunately, by the time a dog is symptomatic he is usually in an advanced stage of this life-threatening disease. Fewer than half the dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy survive more than six months after diagnosis. And many dogs die from uncontrolled internal bleeding before or during treatment.

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Detection and Standard Treatments There have been no significant advancements in the traditional treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma in 20 or 30 years, probably because it's not a type of cancer humans get, so research funds are limited. Unfortunately, available standard treatments can only moderately extend the life of a dog with this disease - they do not provide a cure or give the animal extra years of life. As for early detection, there are currently no specific testing methods that detect the disease. An experienced pathologist might be able to pick up subtle abnormalities in bloodwork, but even at that, a definitive diagnosis can't be made from a blood sample. I do recommend having annual bloodwork done on all high-risk breeds, and a CBC (complete blood count) done on high-risk breeds over 10 years of age every 6 months. At my practice, mild anemia has been the most consistent clue there could be an underlying issue requiring further diagnostics. Because the disease isn't diagnosed until it is advanced, standard treatment is surgery to remove the spleen, followed by aggressive chemotherapy. Sometimes surgery isn't possible or practical, for example in cases of extensive spread to other organs. Average survival time for dogs treated with surgery alone is about 90 days; 180 days is the average survival period for dogs that undergo both surgery and chemotherapy. Routine Ultrasounds for High-Risk Breeds The spleen can be seen easily with ultrasound imaging. High risk tumors will appear as large, irregular masses with numerous blood-filled cavities separated by thin walls of tissue. About half of all canine splenic tumors are malignant, and with early detection it's possible to remove the spleen before the cancer metastasizes to other abdominal organs or the heart. Since there is a chance the heart may be aected as well, if a tumor is found on the spleen, the heart should also be visualized with ultrasound. If the heart is involved, surgery is probably not a good option due to the risks of anesthesia, as well as the fact that once the splenic tumor has metastasized to the heart, prognosis is poor. Wednesday, January 2, 13


If a splenic tumor is benign, surgery to remove the spleen can prevent an abdominal hemorrhage in the future. Prophylactic splenectomy (removing a healthy spleen to prevent development of splenic hemangiosarcoma) is unlikely to provide a benefit because this particular type of cancer cell originates in the bone marrow. It is assumed if a target organ is removed that the transformed cells will simply find another organ to invade. In addition, the spleen has an important role to play, and while dogs can function without one, it will have an impact on their health. The spleen removes old blood cells and contaminants from the blood and circulatory system. It works with the immune system to defend the body from disease. It is the only resource for red blood cells other than bone marrow. Drawbacks to Yearly Ultrasounds Ultrasound equipment is expensive, so not every veterinary oďŹƒce is able to oer the procedure. Because the equipment is expensive, the cost to pet owners can be significant. The cost will also depend on who does the procedure. If you take your pet to a specialist in internal medicine, it will probably cost more than if your vet is able to do it himself. There are also traveling ultrasound specialists who go from clinic to clinic as appointments are set for them. A general range for the procedure is from $300 to $600. Another potential drawback is the skill of the person performing the ultrasound. It's to your benefit to insure the vet or other professional who performs the procedure is competent and experienced. Another Cancer Detection Tool to Consider A blood test is now available that detects the presence of a universal marker for malignant cell growth for 85 percent of common canine cancers, and with 95 percent specificity. The test is highly accurate in detecting the presence of malignancy, but it cannot specify the type of cancer, what stage it is at, or if it has spread. Vet oďŹƒces are able to send blood samples away for processing, with results returned in about a week. Estimated cost to pet owners should be $90 to $120, plus shipping. Wednesday, January 2, 13


Researchers Shocked by Mushroom Study Results In a study conducted at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine and published recently in an open-access article in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, dogs with hemangiosarcoma were given a compound derived from a type of mushroom, Coriolus versicolor.

According to researchers, the patients given this compound had the longest survival times ever reported for dogs with this form of cancer. This is certainly promising news, as this mushroom compound could offer an alternative to chemotherapy or a complementary treatment to traditional cancer therapies for dogs and people. Coriolus versicolor Coriolus versicolor, which goes by a variety of names including Trametes versicolor, Polyporus versicolor and the Yunzhi mushroom, is a common mushroom found throughout the world. “Versicolor” means “of several colors.” This mushroom is also commonly referred to as turkey tail because it looks a bit like the tail of a wild turkey.

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Coriolus versicolor has been used as a medicinal mushroom in traditional Chinese medicine for over 2,000 years. The substance in the mushroom believed to be beneficial in fighting cancer is polysaccharopeptide, or PSP. Cimino Brown and Reetz are planning further trials of the Coriolus versicolor compound in dogs with hemangiosarcoma to confirm and refine their results. These studies will compare the compound to a placebo for dogs not undergoing chemotherapy, and will also evaluate PSP treatment against traditional chemo treatment. “Although hemangiosarcoma is a very sad and devastating disease,” Cimino Brown said, “in the long term, if we prove that this works, this treatment can be a really nice alternative for owners to have increased quality time with their pet at the end of its life.”

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The Penn Mushroom Study Historically, studies of humans with cancer haven’t necessarily measured whether people taking PSP live longer than other patients. So Penn faculty members Dorothy Cimino Brown and Jennifer Reetz set out to discover how long dogs with naturally occurring hemangiosarcoma lived when given the mushroom compound, brand name I’m-Yunity. Hemangiosarcoma typically affects the spleen in canines, and it is commonly seen in Golden Retrievers and German Shepherds. The study involved 15 dogs with the disease. They were separated into three groups of five, and each group received a different dose of a formulation of PSP, either 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. The dogs’ owners gave the capsules daily, and once a month they brought their pets to Penn’s Ryan Veterinary Hospital for bloodwork and ultrasounds to measure the progress of the cancer. Based on the factors the researchers were assessing, which was how quickly the tumors developed and/or spread and how long the dogs lived, the study results suggested the mushroom compound was effective in fighting the cancer. Shocking Results Researcher Cimino Brown had this to say: “We were shocked. Prior to this, the longest reported median survival time of dogs with hemangiosarcoma of the spleen that underwent no further treatment was 86 days. We had dogs that lived beyond a year with nothing other than this mushroom as treatment.” The study showed no statistically significant differences in survival between the three dosage groups, but the median survival time was longest in the 100 mg group at 199 days. The results were so astonishing the researchers asked their Penn Vet pathologist colleagues to reconfirm from tissue biopsies that the dogs really had hemangiosarcoma (they did). Preferable to Chemotherapy for Some Pet Owners Many owners of dogs with hemangiosarcoma opt out of chemotherapy treatments. Chemo for this disease doesn’t dramatically improve survival time, is expensive, and requires several trips back and forth to the vet, which is stressful for both pet and pet owner. Wednesday, January 2, 13


What You Can to Keep Your Dog as Healthy as Possible The causes of cancer in dogs are not well understood, but there are a number of things you can do to give your beloved pup the best possible chance at avoiding disease, or fighting it off. • Feed a nutritionally balanced, species appropriate diet which includes the right amounts of essential fatty acids. • Insure regular and adequate exercise. • Brush your dog’s teeth every day. • Keep your dog's immune system strong and resilient. • Eliminate exposure to chemical toxins including tobacco smoke. • Reduce the number of unnecessary vaccines. • Supply a whole food antioxidant.

Wednesday, January 2, 13


Cats and Dogs Can They Get Along?

One of the main reasons cats and dogs don’t get along is the signals they use to communicate are so different. When a dog wags his tail he is showing friendliness and that he’s no threat. When a cat waves her tail she is warning you to back off. To a dog, the waving or wagging tail is an invitation to come closer. Alas, the poor dog usually gets a hiss and a scratch for his boldness! Wednesday, January 2, 13


Most dogs can be taught to tolerate cats if their owners are willing to be patient and consistent. Some dogs take longer to train than others and the difference is usually due to the dog's level of "prey drive". Nature designed canines to be predators — to chase and catch smaller animals for food. Although dogs have been domesticated for thousands of years, they still act upon the instincts nature gave them. Through generations of selective breeding, people have modified these instincts. By decreasing the effects of some and enhancing the effects of others, we've been able to develop a wide variety of different breeds of dogs, each meant to serve a different purpose or perform a certain function. A dog's instinct to chase and catch something is called his “prey drive.” Throw a stuffed toy for a puppy and watch his prey drive in action as he chases it, catches it, then shakes it to “kill” it. Breeds and individual dogs vary in the intensity of their prey drives. Breeds created specifically for killing other animals — most terriers, for example, were intended to kill rats — have very high prey drives. In other breeds, the prey drive has been altered to suit an entirely different purpose. In the Border Collie, a herding breed, the instinct to chase and catch animals has been modified to chase and gather them together. Prey drive can also be modified by training. Drug sniffing and arson detection dogs have high prey drives that have been redirected toward objects - these dogs are taught that illegal drugs and fire accelerants are “prey.” Although we think of the Greyhound as a racing dog, it was originally bred for hunting, using its great speed to chase down hares and other fast creatures. Consequently, it has a high prey drive and is inclined to chase cats.

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There are several eective ways to train a dog with a high prey drive to live peacefully with cats or other small pets. Using a friend or family member to help you, set up several short daily training sessions. With the dog wearing a training collar and leash, put him on a sit/stay beside you. Have your friend hold the cat on the other side of the room. Your dog will probably be very curious and even excited at seeing the cat, but insist that he remain in the sit/stay position. Praise your dog for sitting calmly. Have your friend bring the cat a few steps closer. If your dog continues to stay quietly at your side, wonderful! Praise him for it. If he tries to lunge at the cat, though, give him a stern, fierce-sounding “NO! LEAVE IT!â€? along with a short, sharp jerk on the lead and put him back in the sit-stay position. As soon as he is sitting calmly again, praise him sincerely. Continue bringing the cat closer, a few feet at a time, repeating the corrections as needed and making sure to praise the dog when he sits quietly and ignores the cat. Have patience. Depending on the intensity of your dog, you might only be able to gain a few feet each session.

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When your dog is able to sit calmly even when the cat is right next to him, you're ready to proceed to the next step. Release the dog from his sit/stay and let him walk around the room with the cat present. Leave his lead on so you can easily catch him and give the necessary correction if he gives any sign of wanting to chase the cat. Your supervision at this point is critical - to be effective, you must be able to correct the dog each and every time he even thinks about going after the cat. If he's allowed to chase her, even once, he'll want to try it again and you'll have to start your training over from the beginning. Some dogs learn quickly, others may take weeks to become trustworthy around cats. Until you're sure the dog will remember his training, don't leave them together unsupervised!

If your cat and dog still don’t really get along, make sure you have some high places where the cat can “escape” and hang out.

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How to Train a Cat & Dog to Like Each Other Without Attacking

Video Internet Connection Required

This video shows another method of introducing a dog and cat.

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Cat and Dog Best Friends

Video Internet Connection Required

I wish mine would be like these two! Maybe it’s because they have the same color scheme......

Video Internet Connection Required

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Dog Training Top Ten Tips 10 top dog training tips. 10 simple tips to help anyone train a dog, You can start using these basic tips on dogs as young as 4 months. They work great for older dogs too, which are sometimes easier to train than younger dogs. Training your dog can be a positive, rewarding bonding experience if done properly. These tips are basic and simple, and easy enough for kids as young as ten.

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1. Train early 2. Train gently 3. Positive reinforcement 4. Use name 5. Avoid commands you can’t enforce 6. One command equals one response 7. Use one word commands 8. Use soft voice 9. Use name positively 10. Don’t give attention for bad behavior

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1. Train Early Train your puppy early. While older dogs can be taught new tricks, what’s learned earliest is often learned quickest and easiest. One of the best things you can do for your pup is to make sure he is crate trained as young as you can. 2. Train Gently Train your dog gently. Use positive, motivational methods. Keep the obedience sessions fun, exciting and upbeat. Never get angry with your dog if he is unresponsive. It’s better to do several short sessions of five or ten minutes each day than one long session per week. That way you will hold your dog’s attention and he won’t get bored.

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3. Positive Reinforcement Reinforce good behavior with positive speech or with a treat. Never reward bad behavior. Make sure you use a treat that your dog really loves. Mine is a total cheese hound and also loves roast chicken. Timing is everything so make sure you reward your dog immediately after the desired behavior is performed. 4. Use Name Always use your dog’s name first when giving a command. You have to ensure the dog knows you are talking to him and that you have his attention before you give the command.

5. Avoid Commands You Can’t Enforce Avoid giving commands that you know you cannot enforce. If you give commands that are neither complied with or enforced, your dog will come to learn that commands are optional.

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6. One Command Equals One Response Only give your dog one command at a time. One command should equal one response. Give one command and gently enforce it. Don’t give another command until the dog has responded appropriately. 7. Use One Word Commands Don’t give combined commands such as “sitdown”. This can confuse your dog. Say either “sit” or “down”. 8. Use Soft Voice Use a soft voice when you give your dog a command. Make sure you sound positive and never yell or sound angry or frustrated. Dogs sense our emotions.

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9. Use Name Positively Make sure to use your dog’s name positively and not in conjunction with punishment. Positive reinforcement using treats and praise are always the best methods to have a happy, obedient and faithful dog. 10. Don’t Give Attention for Bad Behavior Don’t give your dog too much attention when he has misbehaved. Paying him attention when he is naughty will only reinforce that behavior. Try ignoring him for a little while and he will soon get the message.

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Every interaction you have with your dog is a training session. So it’s important to be aware of what you may be doing to reward inappropriate behaviors throughout the day, especially when you are not having planned training sessions. Dogs care about your body language and actions more than your words. Consequently, you should focus on the messages your body is giving, pay attention to your pet’s response, and cut down on the words you use. Animals perform behaviors that have been reinforced. In order to change a behavior it’s important to reinforce desired behaviors, but we also have to remove reinforcers or motivators for unwanted behaviors. Training is a skill like playing tennis, dancing or playing the piano. Little variations in how you move and on the timing of the movements and rewards make a big difference in whether you can communicate your intentions to your pet. If you’re not getting good results, try a different way.

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Positive reinforcement is not just about giving treats for good behavior, it’s about moving and performing the exercises in a manner and speed that make it fun. It’s also about using everything your pet likes or wants, to your advantage—toys, petting, attention, access to go outside or come in, fetch..... and more. The goal of training is to make behaving well fun for the pet. Dogs are more likely to behave well when good behavior is fun. The walk is not a time for your dog to blow you off and do his own thing, rather it’s a time for you to bond with your dog and have fun. Practice exercises during your walk where your dog focuses on you as if you’re playing games. The goal is that the walk becomes like an enjoyable conversation. Dogs, cats, horses and other pets need exercise every day. For dogs, walks provide not only exercise but they are crucial for continued socialization to people, new environments, and other pets.

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Throw your dog’s food bowl away. Animals in the wild spend hours searching for food. They are hardwired to enjoy this behavior and studies show that given a choice, all species studied prefer to work for their food once they know how to rather than getting it for free. The best way to use food as entertainment and enrichment for the pet is to use it in training and games when you’re home as this provides both food and structured interactions with you. You can also place food in toys and puzzles made specifically for such purposes of entertaining your dog. Make sure your dog is healthy and eating a balanced diet.

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Dog Photography

Top tips to take better pics of your pooch. www.digital-photography-school.com Wednesday, January 2, 13


Start with Your Pet’s Personality Before you start photographing your dog ask yourself what sets it apart from other dogs? Think about what type of personality it has and then attempt to capture some of that in your shots. For example if everyone knows your pet as a sleepy, lazy or placid little thing set up your photo shoot around it’s bed or where it goes after a meal to lie in the sun and you’ll have every chance of capturing a shot that sums your pet right up. Alternatively, if your pet is hyperactive, inquisitive and always on the move it might be better to do your shoot at a local park where it’s racing around, jumping for balls or playing with other animals.

Think about Context In choosing the location to photograph your pet you might want to consider a variety of other factors also. For starters choose a place where your dog will be comfortable and at ease. Also consider the familiarity of the location and the emotions that it will evoke in you as the pets owner. For example you might have a place that you and your dog have had some special moments together that will mean a lot in the future as you look back over your shots. Lastly consider the background of your shots. Ultimately you don’t want your backgrounds to be distracting from your photo – sometimes the best locations are the plainest ones – a large patch of green grass, a well lit room with white walls and plain carpet etc. can be ideal.

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Get in Close Dogs come in all shapes and sizes but in most cases they are smaller than a human and as a result they tend to end up getting a little lost in photos unless you make an effort to get up close to them. Of course, getting close is not always easy, especially if you have a pet that likes to move around, but it’s worth making the effort as the detail that can be gained and the personality that can be captured by an up close and personal photo shoot with a pet can really lift a photo to a new level. If you can’t physically get close to your pet get your camera equipped with a zoom lens. The added benefit of a long focal length is that it will help with isolating your pet in terms of depth of field (ie. give you a nice blurry background so that your dog is center of attention with no distractions).

Get On Their Level Get down on your dog’s level where you can look at them eye to eye. Images taken by a photographer standing up and looking down not only leave you too far away from your subject but they also mean the shots end up having a very ‘human perspective’. Getting down to your pet’s level means you enter their world and get a glimpse of what life looks like from their angle – you’ll be impressed by the results as they are more personal and have a real element of intimacy. Wednesday, January 2, 13


Mix Up Your Framing Pets, like human subjects, look different from different angles so framing them in a variety of ways can bring out different perspectives to your shots. In your photo shoot take some tightly cropped facial shots (even focussing right in on single features like eyes, noses, ears, whiskers etc) but also make sure you take three- quarter body shots as well as full body shots. In this way you end up with a series of shots that give viewers of your photos a full perspective on who your pet is.

Lighting Light makes a big difference in any photography and when it comes to pets it’s especially important. In general I wouldn’t recommend using a flash as they tend to distract pets and in some cases will even frighten them. The other issue with flashes is that they can create spooky red-eye problems with some animals (in the same way they do with humans). Natural light is a much better option than using a flash, so where possible outside photo shoots tend to work best (or at least in a well lit window inside). The only exception for using a flash is when your pet has very dark (or black) fur as it tends to absorb light and a flash can add detail. With dark fury pets you might want to slightly over expose your images for this same reason. Alternatively with white pets you run the risk of over exposing shots so try to find a location out of direct sunlight and definitely avoid a flash.

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Include People One of the best things you can do to add context to a shot is to include the special people in the life of your dog in the image. Shots with the owner or other family members interacting with your pet can make the images incredibly special for years to come. You might like to try posed shots but sometimes it’s the candid shots of owner and pet at play (or snoozing together in front of a fire) that really capture the character of the pet and evoke emotion. Freeze the Action Many pets present a challenge to photographers because they are active and always on the move. The key with any subject that’s on the move is to freeze their action by using a fast shutter speed.

Most digital cameras these days will allow you to shoot in full manual mode if you feel confident to get the mix between shutter and aperture right – alternatively you can work in shutter priority mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera automatically does the rest by picking a good aperture to work with your shutter speed. The last alternative is to use ‘sports’ mode which will mean the camera will select the fastest shutter speed possible for your situation. Once you’ve got your shutter speed nice and fast make sure your camera is always at the ready so you can anticipate the actions of your pet. If they are a fast mover you might also want to consider shooting in continuous mode (burst mode) to take a quick series of shots in a row. This can also lead to a wonderful sequence of shots that work well together. Wednesday, January 2, 13


Be Playful Pets can be playful little critters and rather than attempting to contain this to get them posed for that special shot it’s often very eective to go with their playfulness and make it a central feature of your image. Include their toys, stimulate them to look longingly into your camera by holding a special treat above your head or take a picture with them sitting on top of you mid wrestle etc. Make your photo shoot a fun experience for both you and your pet and your shots are likely to reflect it.

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Catch them Unawares Posed shots can be fun and effective but one thing I love to do (whether it be with animals or people) is to photograph them candidly paparazzi style. I have very fond memories of stalking a friend’s dog as he played in a back yard one day. I took shots while he dug up flowers, as he buried a bone, as he chased a bee around and as he sat contentedly with his head sticking out of his dog house. The whole time I photographed him he was barely aware of my presence so the shots were very natural without me distracting the dog from his ‘business’.

Try a Wide Angle Lens One of the techniques I’ve experimented with lately is using a wider angle lens. This allows you to get in close but also fit in a lot of the pet. The other benefit of it is that using a wider angle lens will often give your image a little distortion that will give your image a new creative and fun perspective.

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......and finally.......always have your camera with you when taking your dog out. You never know when the perfect picture moment may present itself. Point and shoot cameras that fit in your pocket are a great purchase and easy to carry with you at all times.

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Park of the Month

Georgian Place Road and Lake Road, Somerset, PA

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I

t is truly remarkable what one person with a dream can do when they set their heart and mind on something. Many of us have dreams but not many of us have the dedication and persitence to turn those dreams into reality. Jim Achison from Rockwood, PA did. Jim was given his first pup, a Jack Russell Terrier, by his daughter Jenna. On a trip away from home, Jim and his dog, Jager, discovered the joys of an off-leash dog park. “Jager had so much fun running with the other dogs. Creating a dog park in Somerset County became a dream of mine after that.”

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Jim got together with other like-minded pet owners and founded the nonprofit organization, Wings of Change, Inc. The owners of Georgian Place Shopping, Soar Inc. generously donated 5.5 acres of land. Next came the task of raising funds. Events were organized; a community flea market; a Steelers football/basketball game; a dog walk. The group was awarded two grants by the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies. A fence sponsorship campaign was set up. Local trucking, excavating and landscaping companies donated time, labor and heavy equipment, and services were donated by surveyors, lawyers, accountants and architects to help transform the undeveloped land into a beautiful dog park. The Somerset County Technology Center partnered with the dog park to provide manpower, while the high school students from the Building Trades Maintenance program and the adult students in the Heavy Equipment Operator Training Program are given actual real life experience opportunities.

Wednesday, January 2, 13


Wednesday, January 2, 13


Wednesday, January 2, 13


Wednesday, January 2, 13


It is phenomenal what has been achieved in so short a time. The fence was erected in August, grass seed in September and the walking trail covered with ground limestone in November. 70% of the park has been built by volunteers from the community.

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If you would like more information or to make a donation, please go to www.somersetdogpark.org

Jim’s wife Sharon with Jager, who sparked the dream, and his new brother Kobi.

Wednesday, January 2, 13


It’s a Dog’s Life The World according to Bailey

The First Winter Well, it is finally here. Winter. It is a season devoid of familiarity, a wonderland I had yet to experience. I was born in Missouri, the show-me state, in June of 2005 but within eight weeks, I was in sunny hot Florida where I would reside for the next several years. Wednesday, January 2, 13


Florida has something that they call a winter. Christmas decorations go up and the temperature drops five degrees. I only knew it was wintertime because that was when the dreaded reindeer antlers would be fixed upon my head leaving me feeling miserable and less of a dog with each passing moment. All of that changed when we moved to Philadelphia this year. Here it is cold. It’s not just a few degrees drop. One day you wake up and its a tolerable fifty degrees outside. The next day, the temperature has dropped twenty degrees.

My family jewels would have frozen if they hadn’t been removed many years ago! The snow is not exactly my ideal choice of place to do my business. I perch myself very cautiously for fear of getting snow on my butt.

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Of course, my owner has taken this as an opportunity to dress me and my brother in sweaters. We have several of them. I look ridiculous in most of them although I must admit that I am fond of my white turtleneck with the little moose print. In my opinion, I look like a scholar when I wear it and I think it suits me. I even hold my head a little higher on the days when I wear it. The sweaters are not so bad but my owner has taken things to a whole new level now.

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She bought us boots. Boots!!! Dear God! Doesn’t she know that dogs were not meant to wear sweaters let alone boots??? It took her about an hour to put all 8 boots on me and my brother. Sammy did not know quite what to do. He kept kicking his back legs out. He forgot how to walk.

I stood there impervious to my surroundings until I was forced on the boot march. I chose to deal with the situation by hopping. That seemed to work. I got through the humiliation of wearing the boots but I really take issue with the fact that these moments were videotaped so my owner can amuse herself with our clumsiness.

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Winter has not been all bad though. Today, I got to see the snow fall from the sky for the first time. Considering how much I love the rain, this was a real treat. I can actually catch the flakes in my mouth. Sammy and I ran all over the cold white substance, cooling our paws but still being ever careful with our derrières. Somebody mentioned the possibility of a snowball fight. That should be something to see!

Write to me...... bailey@dogparkmag.com

Wednesday, January 2, 13


Breed Spotlight e Pit Bull Terrier

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The much maligned Pit Bull is a dog that is surrounded by fear, controversy, mis-information and negative publicity. Not a specific breed, the term "Pit Bull" actually refers to at least 3 different breeds: the American Pit Bull Terrier, the Americ an Staffordshire Terrier, and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Given the label “bully breeds” a name derived from their historical use, not their personality.

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The “Bully” Breeds Several other breeds of dogs are also commonly referred to as pitbull types or bully breeds. The Bull Terrier (BT), the Miniature Bull Terrier and the American Bulldog. All six share common ancestors and some history. The interwoven breeds share names and characteristics so closely related that people often get them confused. You might be surprised to learn that some of America's most beloved dogs are considered bullies. From large-and-in-charge boxers to small and stout Boston terriers, there are a variety of dogs that fall under the category of "bully breeds." Many of these dogs have unfair reputations for being dangerously aggressive -especially pit bull breeds like the S t a ff o r d s h i r e b u l l t e r r i e r, American Staffordshire terrier and American pit bull terrier -but they actually make for very loyal and loving pets. So how did these canines get the title "bully breed" in the first place?

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The term "bully" can invoke a sense of terror and intimidation, so it's no wonder many people believe these breeds pose a danger to society. However, the term actually has nothing to do with the dogs' temperament or behavior, and everything to do with their origin and history. Bully breeds all come from the same root stock called Molosser, which is a breed that originated in ancient Greece. Molossers were big dogs with large bones and muscles, pendant ears and short muzzles. The bullies that we know today were created as a result of Molossers combining with other breeds, like the Old English bulldog or masti breeds. Though they were originally bred to protect livestock and property, some breeders and owners began to use the dogs for other, unsavory purposes. For example, during the 19th century in England, they were used in blood sports like bull baiting, and some believe this is where Molosser descendants first came to be known as "bully breeds."

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At the turn of the 20th century, the British parliament established laws to outlaw blood sports and more immigrants traveled to the United States, bringing bully breeds with them. Once in America, these pups began serving in various professional roles. For example, a pit bull named Stubby became the first American war dog during World War I, when he served with a platoon in Germany. There, he saved countless lives and became a decorated war hero upon his return to the U.S. This early example of a bully breed's heroism and loyalty helped catapult bullies to the status of beloved household pets. Their popularity continued to grow throughout the mid-1900s, and a bully breed dog's image appeared on pro-America propaganda materials during World War II. There's no doubt bully breeds had become America's dog by the 1950s. So what changed?

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You could probably trace the beginning of bully bias back to the 1980s, when gangs began using pit bull breeds for protection or as status symbols. According to the ASPCA, another probable cause is the media's misidentification of dogs involved in attacks. One often overlooked fact is that any dog may attack if it's neglected, abused or trained to be aggressive. Bully breeds are normally gentle dogs when they're cared for properly, and they have many qualities that make them great pets for active people with lots of time to give. They are very social and extremely loyal to their owners. Thanks to their athletic bodies and exceptional intelligence, they are very energetic and generally excel in agility. Believe it or not, bully breeds are very good with children, too. As with any dog, you should supervise bullies when they're around strangers, children or other pets. There's no doubt bully breeds have been given a bad name, but many animal lovers are dedicated to restoring their image and proving they deserve to be among America's favorite dogs again.

Wednesday, January 2, 13


Last month I introduced you to Ashley Own Hill the founder of Lucky Dog Rescue in Meridian, Mississippi. Many of Ashley’s rescues are Pit Bulls. Here’s what she has to say about them. “Pit Bulls are arguably the most tortured "breed" in the world. (Remember: the term "Pit Bull" actually refers to at least 3 different breeds: the American Pit Bull Terrier, the American Staffordshire Terrier, and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.) These dogs have been used and abused by humans for insanely cruel purposes... resulting in their bad reputation and perceived tough-guy image. This is not their fault. Pit Bulls are often subjected to inhumane, painful, sadistic practices, such as dogfighting. They are exploited. They are tortured. They are hated. Other Pit Bulls are chained and used for "protection." Many are used as "breeding machines." Some are used for "bait." In most cases, these guard dogs, breeder dogs, and bait dogs are severely mistreated, starved, and neglected all their lives. But more than that... these tortured Pit Bulls live each and every day... without love. Let's talk dogs for a second. Not breeds. Just dogs...A dog --any dog-- exists for one reason: companionship. That's their entire purpose on this Earth. Dogs live for us. They'd die for us. Dogs love us more than they love themselves. So... when you deny a  dog --any dog-- of that companionship, you deny  them of their very purpose in life. And when you strip a dog --any dog-- of their most basic needs: food, water, shelter, and exercise... you slowly kill their spirit. But sadly... Pit Bulls are rarely desired for companionship. Yet...it's their only wish. Pit Bulls are rarely given food, walks, or warmth.  These are their  only needs. Pit Bulls need and desire these things... just as much as every other dog. But far too often, their most basic needs and desires... are denied. Despite all of this, these dogs live each day with the hope that maybe today will be better. "Maybe I'll please them today." "Maybe they'll feed me today." "Maybe they'll walk me today." "Maybe they'll love me today." Because every day --no matter what you do to a Pit Bull-- a Pit Bull will still love you. However, in the eyes of their abusers, these dogs are completely disposable. They have  no value, no worth, and no  feelings. The owner determines the dog's "purpose," and the dog must fulfill that purpose... just to survive another day. Wednesday, January 2, 13


When these tortured Pit Bulls have  fulfilled their "purpose" or when they fail to fulfill that purpose, they're often dumped to die, or killed. When  a  Pit Bull is dumped, where do they go? That's the next heartbreaking reality for these dogs. Many rescued Pit Bulls end up in animal shelters. And many of those shelters have strict policies regarding bully breeds (Often, these policies are enforced in an attempt to protect these dogs from further abuse. I DO NOT wish to bash any shelter policies here, only to explain the reality for many Pit Bulls). Some shelters require that all Pit Bulls and Pit Bull mixes be euthanized. Others may deem Pit Bulls as "rescue-only," meaning that only an animal rescue group can pull the dogs from the shelter. So... that means they have hope, right? From rescue groups? That's the third devastating reality for Pit Bulls. Many animal rescue organizations cannot or do not take Pit Bulls. For starters, many  rescue groups  are located in areas with Breed Specific Legislation (BSL). So, it's actually illegal for those rescues to take any Pit Bulls. Other rescue groups may choose not to take bully breeds for various reasons. This decision is often made because it's much more difficult to find good, quality homes for these dogs... and the process takes time. With Pit Bulls, the pet adoption process takes much longer than with other breeds. Due to societal bias --and BSL-- the adopter pool for  Pit Bulls  is  much smaller than for  other dogs. So when a rescue group has limited space and resources, they may not be able to accommodate a Pit Bull until adoption. Which  ties into the next no-other-hope reality for Pit Bulls: adoption. As I said, the pool of adopters for Pit Bulls is  vastly  smaller than for any other breed of dog. This is true for many reasons: the misinformation, the societal misconception, the judgment without merit... these things threaten every Pit Bull's future. Also, for some potential Pit Bull adopters, BSL prevents any chance of adoption. For others, their landlords, their insurance companies, and the opinions of family and friends deter desires to adopt a Pit Bull. Wednesday, January 2, 13


And so, after a lifetime of abuse, many Pit Bulls are simply waiting to die. Today... right now, at this very second... thousands upon thousands of Pit Bulls are suffering. Thousands and thousands more are waiting in shelters... for their chance at forever. For their first shot at love. For many, the suffering will never end. For most, love will never arrive. For the majority, death will get here first. Except for a lucky few. The Lucky Dogs. And that's why I save them. I don't do it because it's easy. I do it because they're worth it.” Ashley Owen Hill

What do you say to people who are either terrified of the Pit Bull breed and/or think they should be banned as pets? “The public has been fed this insanely false information by the media and they believe it. In their minds there are dogs and then there are Pit Bulls. It’s almost like they believe a Pit Bull is a different species that will attack at any second. I try to explain to them that a Pit Bull is no different than any other large breed dog. Labs, Boxers, Shepherds… they are all strong and capable of harm if threatened and mistreated, but they are also all loving, amazing dogs when raised in loving homes. The Pit Bull breed is no different. One thing I tell people is this: I have known every breed of dog throughout my life. And my personal dog is a Pit Bull. That should tell you something. Why would I choose to have a “vicious” dog for my personal dog? Why would I use my life to fight for them, if they were so awful? They are amazingly smart, loving dogs, and they are every bit as deserving of life as any other breed.”

Wednesday, January 2, 13


Super Dog Tret - Amazing Pit Bull

Video Internet Connection Required

Nala Gets Rescued

Video Internet Connection Required

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Dangerous Dog?

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Office Environment from a Dog Perspective

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Secretary

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Intern

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Wednesday, January 2, 13


5.01 pm

At home after work

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Friday night Saturday morning

Sick leave

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Faking sick leave

Received lay-off notice

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VACATION!

Wednesday, January 2, 13


healthy dog snacks

1 3/4 cups plain flour 2 tsp toasted wheat germ 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/4 cup sesame seeds rind of 1 lemon 12 tsp butter or margarine 1/2 cup ground walnuts 1/2 tsp vanilla extract Combine all the ingredients. Knead until thoroughly blended. Divide into 6 parts. Roll each into a log. Wrap loosely in wax paper. Freeze. When needed, thaw and slice into 1/2 thick slices (across roll). Preheat oven to 375F. Place cookies on an un-greased cookie pan. Bake about 12 minutes. Makes 6-8 cookies per roll.

Wednesday, January 2, 13


veggie bones

3 cups minced parsley 1/4 cup carrots, chopped very fine 1/4 cup shredded mozzarella or parmesan cheese 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 3/4 cups whole wheat flour 2 tablespoons bran 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 to 1 cup of water Preheat oven to 350F. Rack in middle. Lightly grease large baking sheet Stir together parsley, carrots, cheese, and oil. combine all the dry ingredients and add to veggies. Gradually add 1/2 cup of water, mixing well. Make a moist but not wet dough. If needed, add a little more water. Knead for one minute. Roll dough out to 1/2 inch thickness. Using cookie cutter or a glass, cut out the shapes and transfer them to the baking sheet. Gather the scraps and re-roll and cut. Bake for 20-30 minutes until biscuits have browned and hardened slightly. (They will harden more as they cool.) Speed cooling by placing them on wire racks. Store in airtight container.Â

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breakfast bars

12 cups oatmeal 4 cups whole wheat flour SUPE 8 eggs R 3/4 cup oil EASY ! 2/3 cup honey 1/2 cup molasses 2 cups milk 1 large can solid pack pumpkin (optional) 3 to 4 mashed bananas (optional)

Preheat oven to 325° F. Grease 2 cookie sheets Put everything into a VERY large bowl. Mix this whole mess together, pat onto cookie sheets & bake at 325 for 1 hour. After 1 hour turn oven o, crack oven door & allow cookies to cool in oven. Break into whatever size you want . These freeze really well.

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Thank you for reading this issue of Dog Park Magazine. We hope you enjoyed it as much as we enjoyed putting it together for you. We would love to hear from you with feedback, comments, stories and photos.

Comments and tips - share@dogparkmag.com It’s a Dog’s Life - bailey@dogparkmag.com Dog Park of the Month - park@dogparkmag.com Reader Rescue Stories - rescue@dogparkmag.com

If you liked our magazine PLEASE, CLICK HERE and give us a 5 STAR rating. It would really help us out!

Bye!

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Wednesday, January 2, 13

Dog Park Magazine Issue 5  

dog park mag is great and fun

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