__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

T E X A S A & M U N I V E R S I T Y | M AY S B U S I N E S S S C H O O L

PA R T N E R S I N T R A N S F O R M I N G L I V E S

FIRST GENERATION: LEADERSHIP AND LEGACY


FIRST GENERATION: LEADERSHIP AND LEGACY As the state’s first public institution

These f irs t-generation s tudent s

of higher education—and today,

come from low-income families or

by far the largest—Texas A&M has

families that do not have a tradition

always had the land-grant mission

of at tending college. Some were

(and now, sea-grant and space-grant

encouraged from the start to get

mission) of educating a broad cross

a college degree and others were

section of the population.

pressured to skip college and enter

This means providing a world-class

the workforce.

Life is full of firsts - first steps, first loves, first jobs. With every “first” comes a change of your future. For first-generation

education that prepares graduates

Nearly all students find it difficult to

for leadership roles from the very

navigate the challenges of financial

star t. Former students not only

aid, academic advising, and career

h a v e l e s s c o l l e ge - r e l a t e d d e b t

mentoring without help. With no

not only their future, but their

than their counterparts elsewhere,

one in their families to turn to, first-

community’s future, too.

but they are much more satisfied

generation students of ten don’t

You will see many images

with the education they received

know what questions to ask or where

adorned with our "I Am First"

at Texas A&M.

to go for answers.

About one quar ter of the 10,757

But Mays Business School has

m e m b e r s o f t h e Te x a s A & M

changed all that.

freshman class of 2018-19 are the first in their families to go to college.

college students, being the first person to attend an institution of higher education redefines

mark throughout this edition of Benefactor. This mark exists to make these first-generation leaders visible and is used to proudly denote first-generation students who – through hard work, perseverance, and grit – defied the odds and paved the way for those behind them to follow suit. This mark is for leaders building a legacy.

1

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL


F i r s t- G e n s t u d e n t s with scholarships F i r s t- G e n s t u d e n t s without scholarships N o n F i r s t- G e n St u d e n t s

Mays leaders understand the value these students bring today and their great promise for Texas and the world tomorrow. In 2013, lec turer Henr y Musoma ’ 0 0 and then-student Marlen Cornejo ’15 founded the Regent s ’ Ambassador

12% 8%

Program, the Mays learning community for first-generation students. M a y s l e a d e r s h e l p f i r s t- ge n e r a t i o n students, like all Mays students, become transformational leaders equipped for today ’s global business context. Mays

UNDERGRAD

943

F ir s t- G en

4 ,7 75 s t ude n t s

d o e s t h is b y e n s u r i n g a w e l co m i n g and inclusive community, by providing ac ademic suppor t and profe s sional development, and by encouraging global learning and awareness. Firs t-generation s tudent s are a high

4% 7%

priority for Dean Eli Jones ’82.

129

After all, Jones knows what it’s like to be a first-generation student at Texas A&M. “I clearly remember sitting in a calculus class, struggling with understanding what the professor was saying and thinking,

MASTER’S

F ir s t- G en

1,149 s t ude n t s

’Now where do I go for help?’” he says. “It was a wake-up call for me since I had no one in my immediate nor extended family to talk to for help.” “I am very thankful for fourth- and fifth-

3%

generation Aggie families—and those who have even deeper roots here at

2

Texas A&M. But I also have a heart for first-generation students who don’t have that kind of support.” Jones then describes what happened just a few weeks ago, at a meeting with his

DOCTORAL

F ir s t- G en

67 s t ude n t s

executive team. Looking around the conference table, all of a sudden, it hit him...

BENEFACTOR 2019

2


DR. ANNIE MCGOWAN

DR. DAVID GRIFFITH

Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs | Gina and William H. Flores ’76 Endowed Professorship in Business | Professor of Accounting

Head of the Department of Marketing | Hallie Vanderhider Chair in Business | Professor of Marketing

DR. JAMES BENJAMIN

Head of the James Benjamin Department of Accounting | Deloitte Leadership Professorship | Professor of Accounting

MR. GREG MARCHI

Assistant Dean of Executive Education

DR. DUANE IRELAND

Executive Associate Dean | Benton Cocanougher Chair in Business | University Distinguished Professor | Professor of Management

DR. ELI JONES ’82

Dean of Mays Business School | Lowry and Peggy Mays Eminent Scholar | Professor of Marketing

Jones’ eyes light up at the memory. “We talk about transformational leadership. We talk about being one of the nation’s top business schools and what we can do to climb even higher.” “Looking around the table at my team, I realized that seven of us are first-generation college graduates ourselves. Talk about transformative!” James Benjamin (pictured on the cover) says, “I had a good experience during my undergraduate program at the University of Maryland, but I wish that I would have been at a school like Texas A&M. The culture at A&M is unique and helps students develop lifelong skills.” David Griffith says, “My mom talked a lot about the importance of college and saving for college. She did her best to squirrel away what she could in the hopes of helping pay for college. I started saving from my paper route money when I was nine.” Duane Ireland says, “During my Ph.D. program, my grandmother asked me if I ever intended to do something other than be a student. First-generation students may feel a bit alone in their family because others have not had a university-level experience.”

DR. RICH METTERS

Head of the Department of Information and Operations Management | Paul M. and Rosalie Robertson Chair in Business Administration | Professor of Information and Operations Management

Greg Marchi says, “My parents didn’t know about the different colleges and universities, or about the application process or choosing a major. The focus was simply on attending and graduating. If I had known more, my undergraduate decisions would likely have been different.” Annie McGowan says, “I grew up working in my dad’s store, and I hated it. I felt like I didn’t have a childhood. But I learned how to keep track of inventory and keep a ledger, and by the time I was 12, I went over our financial reports with our CPA every month. That led me to become an accountant and an accounting professor.” Richard Metters says, “I grew up in a lower-middle-class environment in the Philadelphia area where physicality and macho masculinity ruled. You had to fight to be socially accepted. I didn’t want to fight, so I was the oddball. It took me a year at Stanford before I realized that no one was going to beat me up.” These stories are power ful reminders of the transformational impact that a college education can have, especially for first-generation students. Texas A&M and Mays hold a heightened focus on first-generation students to enable bright, young people to earn a college education through scholarship funding and student success programs. First-generation college graduation is a Texas A&M tradition worthy to be pursued. ◊

3

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL


TABLE OF CONTENT S 01 FIRST GENERATION: LEADERSHIP AND LEGACY 07 TRANSFORMATIONAL PRIORITIES 08 IT’S RICK Y DILLARD JR.’S BUSINESS TO FUND SCHOLARSHIPS

A MESSAGE FROM T HE DE A N At Mays Business School, we are continuously learning and moving for ward. We are in the business of transforming lives, and we are always looking for ways to refine our processes for doing so. During this season of market disruption, we are aggressively implementing the strategic plan that we created together a few years ago. We thank those who have helped us get to this

his unique leadership style in the Mays Transformational Leadership Academy (MTLA). In this issue, we also share stories of Mays Partner of the Year, Reynolds and Reynolds, as well as people who have supported our success. One such person whose legacy continues through his own involvement and that of two sons who attend Mays, one who has committed a planned gift, and one who has given personal

point: our generous benefactors. We

investments of time and energy.

appreciate your investment in Mays.

Enjoy l ear ning m o re ab o u t o ur

This issue of Benefactor magazine

school. And know no matter your

focuses on the people who bring fresh approaches and an insatiable thirst for learning: first-generation college students.

d i s t a n c e o r t i m e a w a y, y o u ’ r e always Mays. Gig ’em!

10 SCHOLARSHIPS TRANSFORMING LIVES CRAIG C. BROWN ’75, MARK D. TAYLOR ’83 13 CATHY HELMBRECHT ’85: MA XIMIZING IMPACT THROUGH CORPORATE MATCHING FUNDS 16 HOUSTON COUPLE’S SUPPORT HELPING TO DEVELOP THE NEXT GENERATION OF ENTREPRENEURS: CINDY ’92 AND DAMON DIAMANTARAS ’92 18 ENSURING THEIR LEGACY THROUGH PLANNED GIVING: STEPHANIE ’96 AND SCOT T HARRIS ’95 19 PARTNER OF THE YEAR: REYNOLDS AND REYNOLDS 24 LEADING BY EX AMPLE: FACULT Y & STAFF SUPPORT

Recent first-generation graduate Rick y Dillard, Jr. ’19 has helped shape future generations through Eli Jones ’82

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Blake Parrish | CREATIVE MANAGER Brie Pampell | CONTRIBUTING WRITERS, EDITORS, & DESIGNERS Cynthia Billington, Leon Contreras, Duane Ireland, Kiri Isaac, Naomi Johnson, Ann Kellett, Melissa Lund, Dorian Martin, Kelli Reynolds, Camden Wolf | PHOTOGR APHY Leon Contreras (cover), Butch Ireland, Michael Kellett, Brie Pampell, Corey Dean Stone

mays.tamu.edu © Mays Business School 2019

BENEFACTOR 2019

4


Established in 1968, Mays Business School has been working to advance the world’s prosperity and provide a better future for generations who follow. Because of the support and dedication of Lifetime Partners, those who have cumulatively contributed $250,000 or more by December 31, 2018, Mays Business School’s plans are becoming realities. The generosity of Lifetime Partners allows Mays to be a vibrant learning organization, create impactful knowledge, and develop transformational leaders.

LIFE TIME PARTNER S $ 4 5,000,000 + Peggy & L. Lowry Mays ’57

Reliant Energy

$2,000,000 +

$ 10,000,000 +

The H.G. Ash Foundation

Artie & Dorothy McFerrin

The Roy F. & Joann Cole

Foundation

$ 7,000,000 + The Reynolds and Reynolds Company

$5,000,000 + Gina & Anthony Bahr ’91 Kay A. ’02 & Jerry S. Cox ’72

$3,000,000 +

Mitte Foundation ConocoPhillips ExxonMobil Charles Koch Foundation

PwC Ed Rachal Foundation Kathleen L. & J. Rogers Rainey, Jr. ’44 Helaine & Gerald L. Ray ’54 Robyn L. ’89 & Alan B. Roberts ’78

Denise & David C. Baggett ’81

Adam C. Sinn ’00

Beaumont Foundation of America

Texas A&M Research Foundation

Demi N. & John R. III

Elizabeth H. & James R. Whatley ’47

Carmichael ’73

Mays Business School - Center

Gina L. & William H. Flores ’76

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Phillips 66

Patricia & Grant E. Sims ’77

EY

5

Paula & Ronald S. Letbetter ’70

$ 1,000,000 +

Lisa ’85 & Peter H. Currie ’85

for Executive Development

KPMG

Ford Motor Company

Barbara & Donald Zale ’55 & M.B. & Edna Zale Foundation Elizabeth & Graham Weston ’86


$500,000 + AT&T Bank of America Sandra L. & Ronnie W. Barclay ’68 Foreman R. Bennett ’27 BP Corporation

Carol L. & G. David Van Houten, Jr. ’71

Macy’s Marathon Oil

Hallie A. Vanderhider

Maria B. & Michael K. McEvoy ’79

Cynthia J. ’84 & Anthony

Sandra K. & Bryan N. Mitchell ’70

R. Weber ’84 Earline & A.P. Wiley, Jr. ’46

Donald H. Niederer ’53 Neiman Marcus Group

J. Campbell Murrell Fund

$250,000 +

Newfield Exploration

Chevron

Aggie Real Estate Network

Rebecca ’74 & William

Brandon C. Coleman, Jr. ’78

American Institute of Certified

& Carri B. Coleman ’84

Public Accountants Foundation

S. Nichols III ’74 Sharee & David R. Norcom ’73

Jorge A. Bermudez ’73

Rhonda & Todd Overbargen ’88

Blue Bell Creameries

Karen Pape ’80

Becky ’76 & Monty L. Davis ’77

Diana & Todd O. Brock ’85

Florence & M. Bookman Peters ’59

Deloitte

Pamela M. & Barent W. Cater ’77

Shannon ’86 & Wayne Roberts ’85

Cydney Collier Donnell ’81

Jerry Crider ’65

Sewell

Mark H. Ely ’83

The Cullen Trust for

Deborah D. Shelton

Ashley R. ’88 & David L. Coolidge ’87

Harriet D. & Joe B. Foster ’56

Higher Education

Syracuse University

G.W. Glezen, Jr. ’56

Kay M. & G. Steven Dawson ’80

Jamey & Richard C. Tanner ’53

Halliburton

Dell

Texas Bankers Foundation

The Herman F. Heep & Minnie

Dillard’s

Shelley & Joseph V. Tortorice, Jr. ’70

Duke Energy Foundation

Walmart

Howard W. Horne ’47

Energy Future Holdings

Shannon H. ’90 & Chris B. Work ’90

JCPenney

Janis A. & John T. Eubanks ’62

Kelly P. ’86 & Robert E. Jordan ’85

Gallery Furniture

Marian J. ’82 & Willie T.

General Electric Company

Belle Heep Foundation

Langston II ’81 Trisha & L.C. “Chaz” Neely ’62 Rhonda & Todd A. Overbergen ’88 Wanda & Louis Paletta, II ’78

Sam K. & Barnett L. Gershen ’69 Tracy & Randy Hale ’85 Patricia & Raymond R. Hannigan ’61

Randall’s Food Markets

Kathy & Terry E. Hatchett ’68

The Summerfield G.

HEB

Roberts Foundation Nancy & Mike Shaw ’68 Shell Oil Company Ruby & Earle A. Shields, Jr. ’41 John H. Speer ’71 Robin ’76 & Robert Starnes ’72

Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo Barbara & Paul W. Kruse ’77 Betty & Paul J. Leming, Jr. ’52 Angie ’84 & William R. Lemmons, Jr. ’83 Sherry & David J. Lesar BENEFACTOR 2019

6


TRANSFORMATIONAL PRIORITIES DIVERSIT Y AND INCLUSION Mays Business School has an ambitious

recruitment, climate and inclusion,

diversity plan designed to enhance

retention and education, and community

accountability, climate, and equity.

relations. Foundation Excellence Award

The charge of the Office of Diversity

(FEA) scholarships help recruit and

and Inclusion is to create and lead the

retain outstanding underrepresented

execution of the Mays strategic goal for

undergraduate students.

diversity along the following dimensions:

REIMAGINE WEHNER Mays Business School is located on West

learning spaces, innovative academic

Campus in the Wehner Building, which

technology, spaces for distance education,

is more than 20 years old. Mays is at

the Mays Transformation Center, and the

maximum capacity, limiting the ability

Mays Innovation Research Center. The Mays

to innovate and expand programs. An

Family Foundation donated $15 million to

expansion would include new active

launch the "Reimagine Wehner" process.

DEAN’S EXCELLENCE FUND Departments and programs need

Business Studies, the Data Analytics

discretionary excellence funds to support

Initiative, the Master of Real Estate

student, faculty, and staff development

degree, the Center for Human Resource

opportunities, along with access to research

Management, the Center for Retailing

data. Areas in need of support include the

Studies, the Petroleum Ventures Program,

Reynolds and Reynolds Sales Leadership

and the Commercial Banking Program.

Institute, the Center for International

7

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL


IT ’ S RICK Y DILL A RD, JR .’ S BUSINESS TO FUND SCHOL AR SHIPS Writ ten by Camden Wolf ’21 Ricky Dillard, Jr. ’19 graduated from Mays Business School with a degree in management, the first college student in his family. To Dillard, being a first-generation graduate means “hope, a better life, prosperity, new heights, and a new precedent.” Scholarships that Dillard received played a critical role in his success at Texas A&M. Throughout his college career, Dillard benefit ted from a range of awards, including the Regents' Scholarship, Century Scholarship, The “Exciting” Singing Hills Baptist Church Scholarship, and the Lancaster ISD Board of Trustees Scholarship. Every opportunity counted. As a student, Dillard self lessly gave back to Mays Business School and other first-generation students. He served as the Chief Logistics Officer for the Mays Transformational Leadership Academy, a program serving a diverse set of rising high school seniors. He also volunteered and spoke with several students at his hometown high school, Lancaster High. Dillard will star t working as a Consulting Analyst with Accenture in Dallas in August. He is dedicated to increasing his impact on first-generation college students by giving. “I will make it my business to fund scholarships for firstgeneration college students,” shares Dillard. ◊

Watch a video about Ricky’s First-Generation Journey tx.ag/rickydillard

Camden Wolf ’21, is a Junior Business Honors/Finance major from Austin, T X . He is interested in a career in consulting.

BENEFACTOR 2019

8


TRANSFORMATIONAL PRIORITIES

MCFERRIN CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP Mays Business School’s goal is to enhance

has been able to provide business start-up

entrepreneurial student education by

acceleration, competitive opportunities,

providing training, networking, and

work experiences, and financial support

assistance to enterprising students,

to aspiring entrepreneurs in the Aggie

faculty, and former students. With the

community and across the world. Mays

support of the Mays volunteer network,

hosted the 2018 SEC Pitch Competition,

corporate supporters, faculty, and staff,

drawing teams from across the country.

the McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STUDIES The Center for International Business

operations, but relies on private-sector

Studies (CIBS) is responsible for

donations and grants for research, outreach,

internationalizing the business programs

and educational enrichment programs.

at Mays Business School. CIBS receives university support for its administrative

BUSINESS HONORS Business Honors is the flagship

Mays compete with other leading honors

Business School. A base endowment and an

programs, both regionally and nationally.

endowment to provide scholarship support would allow this program to attain even

9

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

greater stature and success and would help

undergraduate academic program at Mays


SCHOL AR SHIPS TR ANSFORMING LIVES Over the last 30 years, public college tuition has increased 213%. Despite the fact that many students have the talent to excel in higher education, many do not have the means. Aggies that help Aggies transform lives. Former students, like these below, invest their time, talent, and treasure to impact young Aggies and cultivate the Mays vibrant learning organization.

CRAIG C. BROWN ’ 75 “[Seeing the growth A&M provides students] makes it easy to want to recruit students to experience this. A&M provides an opportunity to maximize their personal growth. To achieve the most they can in life… It’s a wonderful feeling to see what wonderful things they accomplish. It’s like the gift of the Magi. He is giving, but that isn’t the greatest gift. The greatest gift is what the students do with their lives. No greater reward than to see them become outstanding.”

MARK D. TAY LOR ’83 “Partnership means active participation. It means more than writing the check… As a transformational leader, we have the opportunity to be on the global stage. If we want to support our vision, we have to continue to focus more on students around the world. And how our transformational leaders will lead organizations around the world.”

BENEFACTOR 2019

10


TRANSFORMATIONAL PRIORITIES

JAMES BENJAMIN DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING NAMING The $10 million goal in commitments

their excellence. Mays undergraduate

was raised in the campaign to name the

and graduate programs both rank in

accounting department after Department

the Top Ten in the nation. Contribute an

Head James Benjamin. The Department of

endowed level gift of $25,000 or more

Accounting must have adequate resources

or an online donation of $25 or more at

to recruit and retain top students and

give.am/JamesBenjamin.

faculty. The accounting programs offered at Mays are nationally recognized for

ENDOWED LECTURESHIPS, PROFESSORSHIPS, AND CHAIRS Lectureships are intended to support the

and full professors. Chairs help Mays

work of non-tenure-track faculty who

recruit top scholars. Support for these

demonstrate extraordinary achievements

individuals is a positive recruitment and

in teaching, innovation in teaching

retention strategy. Endowed and named

effectiveness, curriculum development,

professorships provide additional summer

and student support. Professorships are

support and research funding to help retain

important to retain productive associate

productive faculty members.

EXPANDING RESEARCH SUPPORT Mays faculty members engage in a wide

As part of Texas A&M University, a Tier One

variety of research and research-related

Research University, Mays develops high-

activities (such as mentoring Ph.D.

impact knowledge to advance the world’s

students). Funds are needed to support

prosperity. Support and designations help

this work in a variety of ways, such as

recruit top talent in faculty to become

professional travel and the ability to

members of the Mays family.

access data.

To support these Mays Transformational Priorities, contact Brian Bishop at 979-862-3615 or bbishop@txamfoundation.com.

11

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL


FACULT Y CHAIR AND PROFESSOR SHIP APPOINTMENT S AND RE APPOINTMENT S Gifts fund the backbone of the school – the faculty members who teach and conduct high-impact research. The following faculty appointments and reappointments were made effective Fall 2019.

APPOINTMENTS

REAPPOINTMENTS

DANIEL COHEN, ACCOUNTING

MIKE WITHERS, MANAGEMENT

DENNIS LASSILA, ACCOUNTING

Arthur Andersen Chair in Accounting

Gina and Anthony Bahr ’91 Professorship in Business

Deborah D. Shelton Professor in Taxation

HARI SRIDHAR, MARKETING

CHRIS WOLFE, ACCOUNTING

Joe B. Foster ’56 Chair in Business Leadership

Deborah D. Shelton Accounting Systems Professor

Endowed chair holders receive one of the highest honors that can be bestowed on a faculty member. The highest level of per formance and national and international recognition of that performance are inherent guidelines for appointment of a chair holder. Chair holders have an expectation of unquestionable excellence in at least one of the three professional performance dimensions: research, teaching, and/or service. Excellence should be evidenced by several years of outstanding performance based on national an d in ter na t ional s t an dards for en do we d chair holders.

Endowed professorship holders receive a high honor as well as recognition of consistently ou t s t anding per for mance and abili t y. T he institutional expectation of a distinguished record of performance in one of the three professional per formance dimensions must be met, with research generally taking precedence.

BENEFACTOR 2019

12


WHEN CATHY WORKS HELMBRECHT ’85 WAS GROWING UP IN DALLAS, COLLEGE HAD ALWAYS BEEN THE EXPECTED NEXT STEP. HOWEVER, EXPECTATIONS DON’T PAY TUITION. “We were a family of five with a single mother, so we had to make our own way,” she said. Coming from a family of college graduates, she knew there was no question that she would pursue higher education, it was merely a matter of how. Her prospects brightened when she was awarded several scholarships to attend Texas A&M. “I don’t know how I would have gotten through school without that help,” she said. The multiple scholarship donors’ generosity was the catapult to a history of proven success. Helmbrecht has spent her thirty-four-year career with PricewaterhouseCoopers, the largest professional ser vices company in the world. She is currently a partner based at the company’s Dallas office.

CATHY HELMBRECHT: MAXIMIZING IMPACT THROUGH CORPORATE MATCHING FUNDS

FINDING HER PAT H A ND HELPING T ODAY ’S S T UDEN T S FIND T HEIRS She discovered her true vocation—accounting—while at Texas A&M. “I didn’t even know what accounting was,” she said. “I was a computer science major, and my adviser said I needed a minor and suggested accounting, so I took ACCT 229 the first semester of my freshman year. A year and a half later, I realized I enjoyed accounting much more than computer science and made the switch.” Since graduating in 1985, Helmbrecht has generously given back, returning to campus repeatedly to give presentations and mentor students. “I want to share my experiences so that students understand what you have to do to be successful,” she said. To Helmbrecht, that means much more than just talking about the highlights of her distinguished career. “You’ve got to tell your story—to speak candidly,” she said. “Don’t just share the good parts, but also share the tough parts. Students need to know how you came through them and how they may have changed you.”

13

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL


T HE NE X T S T EP: SCHOL A RSHIP FUNDING WI T H DOUBLE T HE IMPAC T And now, Helmbrecht has taken another critical step to help future generations of Mays students. By setting up scholarships for accounting students, she and her Longhorn husband, Bill, hope not only to help future Aggies earn their degrees, but also to reinforce the Aggie values of selfless service and loyalty so that recipients will continue to help pave the way for future generations. “One of my scholarships is for students with financial need,” Helmbrecht said. “I was in that boat and know how they feel and want to help ease their burden.” Helmbrecht doubled her gift through her employer’s matching gift policy. “ P r i c e w a t e r h o u s e C o o p e r s w a n t s t o m a ke a difference, and they demonstrate this by matching the donations that employees give for scholarships,” she said. “This doubled the amount I gave. This is an amazing benefit that many other companies offer, too.” While Helmbrecht was the first in her family to attend Texas A&M, several others followed, including her

“ONE OF MY SCHOLARSHIPS IS FOR STUDENTS WITH FINANCIAL NEED. I WAS IN THAT BOAT AND KNOW HOW THEY FEEL AND WANT TO HELP EASE THEIR BURDEN."

son, Will Helmbrecht ’21, a finance major. “Since my time there, I have seen the business school come into its own. Much has changed, but the bond these students have with each other, with

CATHY WORKS HELMBRECHT ’85

Mays Business School, and with the university is second to none.” ◊

Ways to give

ANNUAL

ENDOWED

ESTATE

give.am/supportmays

Cash

Cash

Bequest (will)

Stock

Beneficiary (IRA, life insurance)

Land

Charitable trust Charitable annuity BENEFACTOR 2019

14


INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTOR S | 2018 Ronda & Geoffrey D.

$ 1,000,000 +

Avery & Martin Walker ’74

Dorothy F. Jersild McFerrin ’65

Patsy C. & David S. Wesson ’82

$250,000 - $999,999

$50,000 - $99,999

Kathy C. & Terry E. Hatchett ’68

Jerry Crider ’65

Jami & David B. Daniel ’89

Cathy ’85 & William Helmbrecht

Tracy & Randy Hale ’85

Fern & Eli Jones, III ’82

Sandy & Randy Hill ’83

Wanda & Louis Paletta, II ’78

Mark Kelly ’79

Wanda & Fred L. Hughes ’49

Rhonda K. Reger ’79 &

Cynthia A. ’90 & Christian

Marian J. ’82 & Willie T.

Jeffrey S. Piland

Greenwade ’83 Lesley ’02 & Barry S. Guinn ’00

A. McClain ’90

Langston, II ’81

Adam C. Sinn ’00

Rhonda & Jeff Miller ’88

M. Ann & Charles P. Manning ’82

Elizabeth & Graham Weston ’86

Florence & Bookman Peters ’59

Pat & COL Gene Marshall ’60

Shannon ’90 & Chris Work ’90

Peggy & Carl Sewell

Karen Pape ’80

Jean & Jason L. Signor ’99

Debra & Robert Penshorn ’89

Amy ’83 & Jim Stolarski ’83

Robert Scott ’78

Jennifer & S. Wil VanLoh Jr.

Kristi & Brent D. Smith ’97

$ 100,000 - $24 9,999 Amina & Raja Akram ’95 Stacy ’91 & Daren Austin ’92 Kay A. ’02 & Jerry S. Cox ’72

$25,000 - $ 4 9,999

Becky ’76 & Monty L. Davis ’77

Jeanine ’99 & Conover

Lynn & Creed L. Ford, III ’75 Edward F. Fugger, Jr. ’90 Evelyn A. ’84 & Stephen P. Harding ’84 Sue Ellen ’81 & Philip T. Miner III ’80

15

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

H. Able III ’98 Holly & Philip A. Choyce ’89

Michelle ’88 & Todd Stuedtner ’87 Carrie ’98 & Jack Suh ’97 Lauren ’16 & Alden R. Warr ’16 Allison ’96 & Don Whitaker ’96

Cydney Collier Donnell ’81 Laura & Kim Eubanks ’79 Karen & Rodney Faldyn ’88 Laura ’85 & David Fulton

Continues on page 17


HOUS TON COUPLE’S SUPPORT HELPING T O DEVELOP T HE NE X T GENERATION OF EN T REPRENEURS FIRS T- GENER AT ION A ND EN T REPRENEURS Damon Diamantaras ’92 was born into an entrepreneurial family. However, Damon and his wife, Cindy ’92, give much of the credit for their success to Mays Business School, the college that made them first-generation lifelong learners. Now the pair are sharing their hard-won insights from growing their business, The Go Solution, with Mays up and coming entrepreneurs. The Houston couple also established the Cindy ’92 and Damon Diamantaras ’92 McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship Endowed Excellence Fund through a gift of $50,000 in 2015. “Entrepreneurship is one of Mays’ Grand Challenges in our strategic plan,” said Dean Eli Jones ’82. “Entrepreneurs have so much potential to enhance economic development, which ultimately will advance the world’s prosperity. Cindy and Damon’s generous support is helping us educate the next generation of entrepreneurs through the

“CINDY AND DAMON’S GENEROUS SUPPORT IS HELPING US EDUCATE THE NEX T GENERATION OF ENTREPRENEURS THROUGH THE MCFERRIN CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP."

McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship.”

T HE T R A NSFORM AT IV E AGGIEL A ND E XPERIENCE The Diamantarases are grateful for how their time in Aggieland

ELI JONES ’82, DEAN, MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

has been a transformational experience. “My experiences at Mays were tremendous, and Texas A&M is where my life changed forever,” said Damon, who serves on the Dean’s Advisory Board. “That’s the best decision I’ve made during my entire life because that’s where the adult version of me was formed. Ever since I made that decision, things have gone well for me.” ◊

BENEFACTOR 2019

16


INDIV IDUAL CONTRIBUTOR S | 2018

(cont .)

$ 10,000 - $24 ,999

The Honorable Martha J. Wong

Barbara & Paul W. Kruse ’77

Felicia & Herbert D. Baker ’81

Ali & Nelson K. Wood ’02

Frances & Charles C.

Angela ’89 & David Brown ’89

Amber E. ’02 & Preston

Jyl G. & Randy Cain ’82

H. Young ’02

Lisa ’85 & Peter H. Currie ’85

$5,000 - $9,999

Cynthia R. ’92 & Damon

Douglas Abbott

E. Diamantaras ’92 Catherine A. Flax-Kosecki ’85 Carol ’85 & Patrick E. Gaas ’85 Hans T. George ’91 Julia G. & Thomas B. Harris IV ’80 Jo & David A. Hendrick ’85 Carolyn & Gregory M. Hoffman Ann & Stephen W. Lacey Shawn Lafferty ’90 Mariah A. Mackay ’13 Matthew A. Malinsky ’93 Laurie & David S. Matthews Craig R. McMahen ’89 Richard D. Metters Natashia N. ’00 & Sammy L. Miller Jr. ’00 Stacy Nahas ’92 Debbie & Scott Ozanus ’81 Helen K. & Daniel L. Sparks ’89

Gina & Anthony F. Bahr ’91

Gina A. ’95 & Carl A. Luna ’91 Emily ’91 & David M. McCutcheon ’92 Taryn N. ’07 & Kyle D. Mitchan ’06 Lawrence Patrick Morris ’88

Denise ’86 & Andy Beakey III ’84

Merita ’86 & Stephen Parker ’88

Kimberly N. & Brian S. Bishop ’91

Karen ’88 & Clyde Pehl ’85

Vickie ’82 & David Bolen ’81

Kelly Ann & William

Kathy & William J. Booth ’80

P. Ramey, III ’95

Maren ’01 & Gary Brauchle ’95

Shelly & Tyler D. Reeves ’93

Valerie & James R. Byrd ’57

Kimberly D. & Wallace P. Reid ’92

Presha & Garry Lynn Carr ’97

Jerrianne Richter

Theresa & Chris Cooper ’89

Jean & Foster C. Rinefort, Jr. ’76

Cathy C. & William W. Davis ’75

Tawnya ’98 & David R. Smart ’98

Sheila & Michael R.

Jim Stark ’84

Descheneaux ’89

Michelle ’88 & Todd Steudtner ’87

Kevin D. ’91 & Heather L. Faske ’98

Mandy ’99 & Ryan Stewart ’98

Tina & Paul Frost Gardner ’66

Tara & Billy Strain, Jr. ’94

Margaret & Mark C. Gibson ’11

Christine & Mark D. Taylor ’83

Diane ’90 & Michael

Patricia & John C. Vanderhider ’81

L. Harding, II ’90

Pamela Y. Storey

Kenneth & Jannie Prestridge Herchuk ’84

Laine D. ’81 & Ted C. Totah ’80

Sandra ’96 & Shad A. Higdon ’95

Allen & Mary M. Wheat ’78

Carrie B. & Timothy Joseph Hill ’89

Sandra & Wesley L. White ’84

Esther K. ’98 & Bernhard Krieg ’98

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Marsha & David K. Lockett ’76

Christy ’95 & Brian Baumann ’95

Debra ’86 & John E. Harper ’82

17

Paula & R. Steve Letbetter ’70

Cynthia ’82 & Fred Balda ’82

Caren ’88 & John Steffes ’87

Allan W. ’83 & Cynthia B. Taylor ’84

Laningham ’60

William D. Wood ’81 Kathryn ’87 & Darren Woods ’87 *Over 350 individuals donated less than $5,000 each.


E NSURING T HEIR L EG A C Y T HROUGH P L A NNE D GI V ING They loved their time in Aggieland, but because there

SCO T T ’95 A ND S T EPH A NIE H A RRIS ’96 CRUNCH NUMBERS FOR A LIV ING.

was no financial planning degree available, Stephanie

As financial planners, they help others plan their best lives, which includes legacy planning. The Harrises go fur ther than just advising others to be mindful with their giving; they give mindfully, too. “ We t alk to client s ever y day about being intentional in their giving,” said Stephanie. “It only makes sense for us to do it ourselves.”

A DIFFEREN T T IME, A DIFFEREN T CA MPUS The Harrises both attended Texas A&M. Scott received his degree in Information and Operations Management while his wife, Stephanie, received hers in

attended classes in Houston to get her certification. Texas A&M and financial planning are both near and dear

“ YOU CAN GET A GOOD EDUCATION IN MANY PLACES, BUT YOU CAN’T FIND THE AGGIE SPIRIT ANYWHERE ELSE."

Applied Mathematics.

SCOT T HARRIS ’95

“Stephanie had always been interested in personal finance but was unaware of a financial planning degree option until after graduation because A&M didn’t offer a program at the time,” Scott explained.

to the Harrises. One of their biggest hopes is for Aggies to join the financial planning industry and, subsequently, help people to make impactful, planned gifts.

PL A NNED GIV ING IS IN T EN T ION A L GIV ING Because of the generosity of individuals and corporate donors – using present donations and planned giving (usually, a cash gift to a charity upon the donor’s passing) – taking specialized classes outside of Aggieland is no longer necessary. Mays students have many more opportunities on campus with world-class faculty – including a minor in financial planning. “We hope that [our planned gift] brings Texas

A&M a bit closer to offering a major in financial planning,” Scott said. “After all, you can get a good education in many places, but you can’t find the Aggie Spirit anywhere else.”◊

BENEFACTOR 2019

18


ENDURING REL ATIONSHIP WITH RE YNOLDS AND RE YNOLDS LE ADS TO TOP HONOR Reynolds and Reynolds’ commitment

The Reynolds and Reynolds

endowment to support the Reynolds

to developing meaningful

relationship with Mays began many

and Rey nolds Entrepreneur ship

relationships with Mays Business

years ago through their increasing

Bootcamp for Veterans and

School students and faculty as well

invol vement w i t h s t udent s and

commi t te d $1 million to create

as their signif icant philanthropic

facult y. Rey nolds and Rey nolds

the ReyRey Café in the proposed

support resulted in their selection

employees regularly ser ve as

May s building e xpansion. More

as the 2019 Partner of the Year.

speakers, panelists, and mentors. In

recently, Reynolds and Reynolds

addition, company representatives

dedicated a $4 million endowment

conduct more than 300 individual

for t he Re y no l ds an d Re y n ol ds

role plays with Mays students

Sales Leadership Institute, an

every semester.

interdisciplinar y program that

The company ’s suppor t of Mays programs has grown over the years. “The investments that Reynolds and Reynolds have made are significant,” said Dean Eli Jones ’82. “But it ’s

Over the past four years, the

more than the money. We have

company established a $2 million

great relationships with these folks. They ’ ve been par tners for quite a while, and they have hired numerous Aggies.”

19

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

develops Texas A&M students as future sales professionals and advances the sales profession. ◊


GROWING PARTNER SHIP SPARK S CRE ATION OF THE RE YNOLDS AND RE YNOLDS SALES LE ADER SHIP INS TITUTE The creation of the Reynolds and

Mays of f icials appreciate the

Reynolds Sales Leadership Institute

partnership’s steady growth. “This

" WE BELIEVE STRONGLY THAT

in Mays Business School at Texas

ins t i t u te w a s f o r ge d t ha n k s to

A&M is a testament to the power

the relationship bet ween Sarah

of the relationship between Sarah

Strat ta and Janet Parish. It also

MULTIPLIER AND CAN MAKE A

Strat ta, Recruiting Manager, and

ref lec ts the increasingly close

Janet Parish, director of the institute.

wor k ing relat ionships bet we en

LASTING IMPACT ON STUDENTS

T heir profe s sional p ar t ner ship,

other individuals in Reynolds

which star ted in 2010, enhanced

and Reynolds and Mays Business

the working relationship between

School over the years,” said Dean

Reynolds and Reynolds and Mays.

Eli Jones ’82. “The company wants

The level of collaboration is impressive: increased involvement by the company ’s employees in Mays sales programs; deeper conversations bet ween par tners about the role that sales will play in students’ lives; and a financial commi tment of $ 4 million. T he institute advances the sales profession in three areas: teaching, research, and outreach through executive development.

HIGHER EDUCATION IS A GREAT

AND COMMUNITIES ALIKE. THAT IMPACT WILL EXPAND AS STUDENTS GROW AND MOVE

to help students understand the

THROUGH COLLEGE AND BEYOND.

importance of sales in their lives.

SO, WE’RE PLEASED TO SEE OUR

Their commitment to making this happen through contributing their

RELATIONSHIP WITH TEXAS A& M,

knowledge and expertise as well

AND SPECIFICALLY, MAYS, CONTINUE

as the company ’s inves tment is what sets this par tnership apar t and illustrates why Reynolds and

TO EXPAND AND STRENGTHEN ACROSS A NUMBER OF AREAS."

Reynolds was named Mays Business School’s 2019 Partner of the Year.” ◊

ROBERT BURNE T T ’87, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT, RE YNOLDS AND RE YNOLDS

Left to Right: Ashlyn Tutor and Sarah Stratta of Reynolds and Reynolds and Janet Parish and Andrew Loring of the Reynolds and Reynolds Sales Leadership Institute Below: Hari Sridhar, Director of Research, Reynolds and Reynolds Sales Leadership Institute

20


CORPOR ATE AND FOUNDATIONS | 2018 $5,000,000 +

RBN Energy

The Reynolds and

Sewell Automotive

Foundation

SparrowHawk, LLC

Shell Oil Company

Textron, Incorporated

Tesoro Companies, Incorporated

Cindy & Tony Weber Foundation

Total Gas and Power North

Reynolds Company

$2,000,000 + The H. G. Ash Foundation Mays Family Foundation

$250,000 - $999,999 The Jerry and Kay Cox Foundation J. Campbell Murrell Fund KPMG Foundation Mike Shaw Management Inc. Texas Bankers Foundation

$ 100,000 - $24 9,999 C.C. Creations Inc. Charles Koch Foundation EY Foundation Halliburton Foundation, Incorporated Phillips 66 Company Summerfield G. Roberts Foundation

YourCause, LLC

$25,000 - $ 4 9,999 Asset Risk Management, LLC AT&T BDO USA, LLP BP Corporation North America, Incorporated William and Catherine Bryce Memorial Trust Central Bank Chevron U.S.A. Inc. Cockrell Foundation ConocoPhillips Dealer Computer Services, Incorporated The Guill Family Foundation H. Fund H.E.B. Grocery Company

$50,000 - $99,999 Deloitte Foundation ENGIE Energy Marketing NA, Inc. ExxonMobil PepsiCo

21

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Alan & Jacqueline Mitchell Foundation Motiva Enterprises, LLC

Frank J. & Jean Raymond

America, Inc. Wells Fargo

$ 10,000 - $24 ,990 Academy, LTD Aggie Real Estate Network Altria Group, Incorporated Anadarko Petroleum Corporation Avison Young (USA) Inc. Barnes and Noble College Booksellers, LLC Brierley & Partners, Inc. Buxton Company Caldwell Companies Caliber Holdings Corporation Camden Property Trust Castleton Commodities Trading GP LLC Mark A. Chapman Foundation Charles Schwab and Company, Inc. Cheniere Energy Shared Services, Inc. Citizens State Bank Communities Foundation of Texas


Dillard’s

Walgreens

Koch Industries, Inc.

Dollar General Corporation, LLC

Zale Delaware, Incorporated

Lowery Property Advisors, LLC

EDF Trading North America, LLC Enterprise Holdings Foundation Francesca’s Services Corporation Goosehead Insurance Grant Thornton Foundation Green Bank Hewlett Packard Enterprise Higginbotham Community Fund Hotel Valencia Corporation Howard Energy Partners, LLC. Iscential, Inc. Keyence Corp of America Koch Supply & Trading, LP

$5,000 - $9,999 Accent Wire-Tie Amegy Bank of Texas Apple, Inc. Axis Group, LLC BHP Billiton BKRK Investments, Ltd. Craig and Galen Brown Foundation, Inc. Caddis Partners, LLC CBRE Chevron Phillips Chemical Company, LP

Macy’s / Bloomingdale’s

Citizens National Bank

Mercuria Energy Trading Inc.

Commerce Bank

Noble Energy, Inc.

Community Bank & Trust

Pioneer Natural Resources USA

Community National Bank

Society of Industrial and

Covey Investments, LLC

Office Realtors Stage Stores, Incorporated Tauber Oil Company Texas Instruments Foundation Texas Retailers Education Foundation Tres Aguilas Management, LLC USG Energy Gas Producer Holdings, LLC

Enbridge Foundaton

Moody National Bank Nature Nate’s Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas PC Popp Hutcheson, PLLC PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Protiviti, Inc. Q10 Kinghorn, Driver, Hough & Co. Real Foundations Root, Inc. Schneider Electric Buildings The Signorelli Company Southwest Airlines Company TRI-KES The USAA Foundation, A Charitable Trust Valero Services, Inc. Veritex Community Bank *Nearly 150 corporations donated less than $5,000 each.

Frost National Bank General Motors LLC GoDish.com, LLC Haynes and Boone Foundation High Tech Flooring and Design Houlihan Lokey, Inc. Kiewit Corporation

BENEFACTOR 2019

22


INTRODUCING

GREG MARCHI Assistant Dean of Executive Education (979) 458-6517 | gmarchi@mays.tamu.edu

LET CED DEVELOP YOUR NEXT CEO 23

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Center for Executive Development MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL


LE ADING BY E X AMPLE: FACULT Y & S TAFF SUPPORT

Brian S. Bishop ’91

Richard D. Metters

Paul S. Busch

Kristopher D. Muir

Cydney Collier Donnell ’81

Ramona L. Paetzold

Eli Jones, III ’82

John R. Robinson

Richard H. Lester ’03

Michael K. Shaub

Mary Lea McAnally

87% FUNDED

BENEFACTOR 2019

24


ADVICE

GIVE RECEIVE

ENGAGE WITH MAYS Current and Former students

Visit: Aggie.firsthand.co

AGGIEvisors For more information: Cindy Billington, alumni@mays.tamu.edu

NE W GIF T S , ENDOWMENT S , COMMITMENT S Amina & Raja J. Akram ’95

Mr. Hans T. George ’91

The H.G. Ash Foundation

Melinda ’87 & Guy Grace

Stacy & Daren E. Austin ’92

Lesley ’02 & Barry S. Guinn ’00

Bret C. Baccus ’89

Tracy & Randy Hale ’85

Kimberly N. & Brian S. Bishop ’91

Evelyn A. ’84 & Stephen P. Harding ’84

Vickie ’82 & David J. Bolen ’81 Derrith & Robert D. Bondurant ’80 William and Catherine Bryce Foundation Mary Bryant Burch ’80 C. C. Creations Caldwell Companies Chevron Frank Cinatl, III ’56 Jerry Crider ’65 David B. Daniel ’89 Lynn & Creed L. Ford, III ’75 Shane M. Frazier ’98 Edward F. Fugger, Jr. ’90

25

MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Rhonda K. Reger ’79 & Jeffrey S. Piland The Reynolds and Reynolds Company Shannon ’86 & Wayne Roberts ’85 Summerfield Roberts Foundation

Stephanie ’96 & Scott Harris ’95

Nancy & Mike Shaw ’68

William & Catherine W. Helmbrecht ’85

Jean & Jason L. Signor ’99

Sandy & Randy Hill ’83

Caren W. ’88 & John W. Steffes ’87

Shea & John A. Huser ’89 Jennifer & Drew Koecher ’88

Debbie ’90 & Robert Blake Steudtner ’91

KPMG Foundation

Michelle ’88 & Todd Stuedtner ’87

Sue Ellen ’81 & Philip T. Miner III ’80

Avery & Martin Walker ’74

Laney ’99 & Roger Montemayor ’99

Lauren ’16 & Alden R. Warr ’16

Wanda & Louis Paletta, II ’78

Patsy C. & David S. Wesson ’82

Florence & M. Bookman Peters ’59 Family

Elizabeth & Graham Weston ’86

John W. Phillips ’90 Phillips 66

Kristi & Brent D. Smith ’97

Ali & Nelson K. Wood ’02 Shannon H. ’90 & Chris B. Work ’90


NE W DE V ELOPMENT AC TI V IT Y

VA LUES BY ENDOWMENT T Y PE Book Value

2015 New commitments (ENDOWED) Total cash gifts (NON-ENDOWED) Total

$11,874,735 $3,951,154 $15,825,889

2016 New commitments (ENDOWED) Total cash gifts (NON-ENDOWED) Total

Faculty Chairs

$32,622,541

$43,760,016

25.60%

Faculty Professorships

$15,526,435

$24,423,112

14.29%

Faculty Fellowships

$4,557,884

$6,038,892

3.53%

Graduate Fellowships

$3,010,156

$3,943,945

2.31%

Scholarships

$28,290,235

$32,470,909

18.99%

General

$48,793,110

$60,310,239

35.28%

$132,800,361

$170,947,113

100.00%

TOTALS

$19,393,688 $2,839,267 $22,232,955

ENDOWMENT M A RK E T VA LUES $164.2 $170.9

$175

2017 New commitments (ENDOWED)

$14,843,020

Total cash gifts (NON-ENDOWED)

$33,958,658

Total

$48,801,678

2018 New commitments (ENDOWED) Total cash gifts (NON-ENDOWED) Total

Market Value

$27,264,336

$134.1 $134.0 $138.2 $124.1

$140

$105

$88.2

$101.0 $98.5

$97.3 $93.6

$108.5

$82.2

$70

$35

$6,188,056 $33,452,392

$0 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Development Team give.am/supportmays

STEPHEN CISNEROS DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 979.845.1452 scisneros@txamfoundation.com

JORDAN BUYS DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 979.458.1452 jbuys@txamfoundation.com

CASSIE BELL ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 979.845.2775 cassiebell@txamfoundation.com

BRIAN BISHOP ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR DEVELOPMENT

979.862.3615 bbishop@txamfoundation.com

DAMARA LOTTEN ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 979.862.7247 dlotten@txamfoundation.com

BENEFACTOR 2019

26


Mays Business School 4113 TAMU College Station, TX 77843-4113

WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE CONFERENCE Laura Arnold | Arnold Ventures Scheduled to appear

OCTOBER mays.tamu.edu/WLIC

Profile for Mays Business School

Benefactor 2019 | First Generation: Leadership and Legacy  

This issue of Benefactor magazine focuses on the people who bring fresh approaches and an insatiable thirst for learning: first-generation c...

Benefactor 2019 | First Generation: Leadership and Legacy  

This issue of Benefactor magazine focuses on the people who bring fresh approaches and an insatiable thirst for learning: first-generation c...