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PORT ORANGE

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VOLUME 1, NO. 49

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

COST OF SCHOOL SAFETY Implementation of School Marshal Program leaves School Board scrambling for $3 million. PAGES 4-5

Next step for half-cent

#KeepOurCityPretty READ MORE ON PAGE 6

Survey: Five Volusia cities haven’t updated impact fees in a decade. PAGE 2 INSIDE SHORTAGE OF OFFICER APPS

Volusia County Sheriff’s Office receives 20 school security officer applications, but the sheriff is looking to fill 50 spots. PAGE 5

YOUR TOWN OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT

Photos by Nichole Osinski

Volusia County Volunteers Co-Founder Alyssa Parnell poses with a shopping cart found in the city.

Debra Keese, registrar at Cypress Creek Elementary School, has received the 2018 Superintendent’s Outstanding Achievement Award from the School District of Volusia County and the FUTURES Foundation for Volusia County Schools.  Keese has 20 years of experience with Volusia County Schools and is “readily available to lend a hand wherever there is a need,” according to the district. Assistant Principal Rebecca Pitchford said Keese makes the school a better place “through her creativity, intellect, thoroughness, efficiency, personality and willingness to do whatever it takes.” 

Batter up PAGE 9

Relay: We can do it! Port Orange comes together to fight cancer. PAGE 3

Photo by Ray Boone

Port Orange’s Brayden Schwedes, with a bat in-hand, walks toward the team’s dugout.


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PortOrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Two arrests made after armed robbery attempt ends with suspect pepper-sprayed

County plans for update to cities’ impact fees while looking at special election for half-cent Officials have discussed holding the election in 2019. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

The attempted robbery happened at a Wendy’s parking lot. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

Two males were arrested on Monday, June 11, after an armed robbery took place on the same day in the Wendy’s parking lot in the 900 block of Dunlawton Ave. The suspects were armed with a Glock 23 .40 caliber handgun and showed the firearm during the robbery. When one of the suspects approached the driver’s side of the vehicle, which had two people in it, the driver deployed a can of pepper spray in the face of the suspect holding the gun.  The suspects then fled without further violence and were later found a few blocks away at a convenience store. The handgun was also recovered from the suspect’s vehicle.  Jimmy Holmgren, 20, was arrested and taken to the Volusia County Branch Jail while the second male, a 17-year-old, was arrested  and transported to the Port Orange Police Department pending information from the department of juvenile justice. 

With the county holding off on putting the half-cent sales tax referendum on the 2018 ballot, officials are now discussing what it would take to have a special election next spring.  Previously, the cities had voted for the approval of a  referendum to the November ballot for consideration of the sales tax increase with funds going toward infrastructure improvements in Volusia County cities and unincorporated areas.  During a Monday, June 11, Round Table of Volusia County Elected Officials meeting, South Daytona City Manager  Joe Yarbrough said a survey showed that 10 cities had transportation impact fees and of those 10, five cities, including South Daytona, hadn’t updated their impact fees in more than 10 years. Yarbrough said the objective is for those cities to work on updating  the impact fees as the county secures a date for the election.  Yarbrough said that one possibility is to have a mailed ballot around March or April with the cost being split between the cities and the county.  “There’s a lot to be done in preparation,” Yarbrough said.  Volusia County Council Chair Ed Kelley said now that the refer-

endum will most likely not be on the November ballot, he is hoping officials can come together and have a special election. He said that if it were up to him, he would have held the election, especially as cities have had workshops for residents. “We all came together, 17 of us, to work together for the good of the residents and that’s all the ones that would benefit ... and the ones that are going to lose in this area are the residents,” Kelley said. “The needs that we currently have are not going to go away.” When the Port Orange City Council voted 5-0 on Tuesday, Feb. 20, to encourage the County Council to add the referendum to the November ballot, Mayor Don Burnette said the council had a responsibility to move this forward so residents could decide if they wanted it or not. Burnette had stated this was something he  was “certainly not going to decide on.”  Oak Hill Mayor Douglas Gibson said he was also in favor of putting the half-cent sales tax on the November ballot. Gibson said that what stymied the referendum was that there was too much focus on the tax funds going toward roads. He said that there needed to be more information about it  also going toward water quality.  Gibson said because of this, he would like to see more residents

I’M DOING WHAT I WANT.

Photo by Nichole Osinski

South Daytona City Manager Joe Yarbrough

educated on what the tax is for and how it will work. “If we’re going to spend $500,000 for an election down the road, why not take $250,000 and use it to educate the voter?” Gibson said, adding that water quality was “the number one

issue that everybody [who] was contacted in that survey felt was important.  I think it’ll pass if it gets on there and we educate the voters.” Email Nichole Oskinski at nichole@portorangeobserver.com

“If we’re going to spend $500,000 for an election down the road, why not take $250,000 and use it to educate the voter?” DOUGLAS GIBSON, Oak Hill Mayor

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Participants received medals before walking around the park. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

R

Tari Cox, Helen Hoffswell and Becky Vering

Photos by Nichole Osinski

ain may have delayed the event, but for the hundreds of people who gathered at Riverwalk Park, it was worth the wait to be a part of the annual Relay for Life to support the American Cancer Society’s mission to fight cancer. And for Port Orange resident Carla Braga, one of the many cancer survivors present during the event on Saturday, June 9, the day held an extra special meaning. She was simply there; she was alive.  Braga’s story began before Jan. 7, 2014, when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Prior to that visit to the doctor, Braga never thought she would be told she had

United for a cure

Councilman Drew Bastian gives Councilman Bob Ford a medal.

“Every breath I took, every moment of my life — my mission was to kill it.” CARLA BRAGA

Carla Braga

Thomasina Rufano, Stephanie Betz and Rudolph

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

cancer. She ate healthily, exercised daily and had no family history of cancer.  “I think my first feeling was that I couldn’t believe it,” Braga said. “The doctor had to actually sit down with me to explain it.” Braga found out that the invasive cancer would need to be treated with chemotherapy. She remembers feeling angry and afraid to die. She also worried about  how she was going to tell her family the diagnosis.  Braga left the doctor’s office crying. Then she started making calls. When she spoke to her mother, she told her there could be tears, but that she needed everyone to be strong because she wanted to surround herself with people who weren’t afraid.  In the following weeks and months, Braga decided that the best way to win a fight is to know the opponent, so she began learning about what was happening in her body. As she did this, she would also imagine herself killing the cancer.  “Every breath I took, every moment of my life, my mission was to kill it,” Braga said. “During chemo as I was sitting there, in my mind, I was killing it.” As she did this, Braga said she began to realize that what she was going through was also about perspective, and she realized that she couldn’t worry or have fears about what was happening. She just had to keep fighting.  Then, a year after her diagnosis, Braga was in remission. On Saturday, she was outside at Relay for Life teaching Zumba. She had won the battle against cancer.  “So many children, so many adults go through cancer,” Braga said. “Relay for Life is a great event for everybody because it involves the whole community.” That sense of community was present throughout the day, from the moment participants took their first lap around the center of the park while surrounded by friends, family and strangers all united through one cause. And for each person the story was different. Some, like Braga, had beat breast cancer;  for others, it had been Lymphoma. The list went on.   However, everyone had come together for the same cause and, as Leslie Castillo, community development senior manager for the American Cancer Society Southeast Region, said, this day was about finding a way to keep fighting for lives.  “Our mission is to save lives faster,” Castillo said. “We want to continuously find breakthroughs.”

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

State funding questions remain, as School Board seeks to implement School Marshal Program With the bulk of state funding going toward training costs, the Volusia County School District might have to bear full cost of new personnel. JARLEENE ALMENAS STAFF WRITER

The Volusia County School District is bracing itself to pay millions in hiring costs to put at least one armed school resource officer or guardian at every public school under Florida Legislature’s School Marshal Program, a mandate which the state has allocated $67 million in funding — but not for personnel costs.  (The following discussion took place at a workshop June 7. See Page 5 for a report on the June 12 meeting.) The program is a mandate under Senate Bill 7026, or the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act, which was signed by Gov. Rick Scott in March. To comply, the School District will need to increase its contract with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office by adding four school resource deputies and hiring 44 school guardians plus one overall guardian supervisor. The estimated $3,576,344.24 in per-

Photo by Jarleene Almenas

Volusia County School District Chief Operating Officer Greg Akin talks about funding for the School Marshal Program.

sonnel costs is almost triple of what the School District currently spends, though it has about $1.6 million in allocated state funding for improving overall school safety.  In contrast, the training portion of the School Marshal Program is expected to cost $110,707.08 with $2,209.68 of annual costs. During a Volusia County  School Board workshop on Thursday, June 7, Chief Operating Officer Greg Akin said this is what the state funding is allocated for. “That seems way out of line,” said Carl Persis, District 4 School Board member. Akin said the state didn’t know how much training was going to

cost when legislators decided to allocate $67 million to it. He also said, unlike Volusia, some districts still have yet to figure out how much training will cost them. However, nothing will happen until after July 1 when the state figures out how much it will spend on the School Marshal Program, Akin said. While it is a possibility that money could either be  reallocated from the training funding or the state decides to give school districts more funding for school safety, it’s not guaranteed. District 5 School Board member Melody Johnson said she questioned whether legislators would have to go to session to do that. If that’s the case, and a special session isn’t called, the School District may have to pay the full cost of the new personnel costs before legislators reconvene for the 2019 session.  Johnson said the Board should reach out to municipalities for help. Volusia County has not set aside funds to help the School District. “I just don’t want to hope that Florida will help us,” Johnson said. District 1 School Board Member John Hill suggested that the District employ 70 school guardians instead of renewing contracts with VCSO and local police departments. The District could hire about three school guardians

“Let’s own the program and protect the students. Let’s not just check boxes.” JOHN HILL, District 1 School Board Member

for the cost of a school resource officer, about $94,000 Hill said. Other School Board members pointed out that a school guardian wouldn’t have arresting powers, but Hill said he would rather employ people with a weapon who can protect students rather than a deputy or officer who would be thinking about arrests. He said he would be in favor of contacting retired military veterans, many of whom have already contacted him, for the guardian program. He said he believes the School District should train as many people as possible. “Let’s own the program and protect the students,” Hill said. “Let’s not just check boxes.” School Board Chair Linda Cuthberth, who also represents District 3, suggested the Board consider a substitute pool for the guardian program as well. She also asked if the Board was anticipating any possible budgeting problems that may arise, especially in  the second half of the school year. 

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Schools to hire a combination Volusia sheriff receives just 20 school security of officers and guardians officer applications. He’s looking to hire 50 Asking cities and county to help pay the $3.2 million. STAFF WRITER

With less than two weeks before training is set to begin for the first class of school guardians in Volusia County, the School Board has settled on a plan to hire 44 people plus one supervisor for the program  — the cheapest option, at approximately $3.2 million, that will enable them to comply with Senate Bill 7026, though the board hopes to secure more funding in the coming weeks to hire more law enforcement officers in schools.  At its meeting on Tuesday, June 12, the School Board was presented with three options for the School Marshal Program. The first, which passed 4-1 with District 2 School Board Member Ida Wright opposing, included  32 school safety officers and 38 school guardians. The second option was the most expensive, totaling about $3.5 million, and increased the number of school guardians to 43, while the third option would cost about $3.4 million and would lower the school safety officers to 26 and raise the number of guardians to 49. All options included six substitute school guardians, and each total cost was dependent on the county absorbing the $585,221 in indirect costs from the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office.  “The county has to have some piece in helping us with an unfunded mandate,” said John

Hill, School Board member representing District 1. The School Board discussed its previous request that the county contribute $2 million toward the implementation of the School Marshal Program, which didn’t lead anywhere last time the County Council mentioned it. Volusia County School Superintendent Tom Russell said he was in communication with County Manager Jim Dinneen, who told Russell the county’s chief financial officer was calculating how much the county can contribute.  While some members of the board were hoping to go with an option that would allow for more school safety officers, rather than guardians, at each school, an urgent decision since the School District is behind on the hiring process. Board members agreed they would come back to discuss changes to the plan if it was confirmed they could get more money, whether from municipalities — city councils and commissions will soon receive letters asking for help with funds  — or from the state. School Board Chair Linda Cuthbert said the district is a partner with all the municipalities and that it “would be nice” if they helped, since the schools often help citizens in times of need, such as during storms.  “We need to work together as a team,” Cuthbert said. “It is Team Volusia.”

Volusia Sheriff Mike Chitwood gave citizens an update during a recent neighborhood meeting in Port Orange. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

With Senate Bill 7026 requiring one armed person at each school, the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office is still trying to find ways to place enough security on each campus throughout the county to meet that requirement. However, a shortage of deputies has not helped in the process to provide the needed personnel at schools.   During a Thursday, June 7, neighborhood meeting, Sheriff Mike Chitwood told attendees that the Sheriff’s Office is currently down 40 deputies and that it has been difficult finding qualified people to hire.  Chitwood said that just last week the Sheriff’s Office had 167 applicants, of which only 17 were eligible. He said the main problem was applicants were flunking the drug tests and polygraph exams.  “In 1987 when I became a cop they would ask, did we use marijuana in the last 10 years?” Chitwood said. “Now we ask if you’ve used it in the last 18 months because it’s such a different generation.” But when it comes to putting deputies and school safety officers at each campus, Chitwood said he would like to not only have the bare minimum of armed secu-

LOCAL CRIME

Photo by Nichole Osinski

Sheriff Mike Chitwood

rity but possibly arm qualified former law enforcement officers who now are staff or administration. Because of the bill out of Tallahassee, each middle and high school will eventually need to have either a deputy or police officer on campus, and every elementary school will need a school safety officer such as retired military or law enforcement. These SSOs would need to have a background check, interviews and about 175 hours of training. They would have no powers of arrest and be on campus solely for the purpose of protecting the approximately 60,0000 Volusia students.  Just this year, there were 31 arrests as Volusia Schools. Chitwood said that the Sheriff’s Office probably investigated four times that number of threats. 

During Thursday’s meeting, Chitwood said that between April 1 and June 5 of this year, there were 194 tickets written, 224 traffic stops and 16 arrests made in the Port Orange area.  Chitwood said that after the last neighborhood meeting, one of the captains came up with a strategy to align patrol zones in the area as well. Chitwood said there had been one burglary where copper was stolen from a house that was under construction and another where a Mercedes that was taken from Spruce Creek was later found in New Mexico.  Chitwood said the Sheriff’s Office is still trying to understand how someone could get through the security, especially as keys are needed.  However, arrests that have been made seem to make a dent in overall crime, he said.   “There are certain members of the community that, when they go to jail, there’s no crime,” Chitwood said. “So, clearly some of the individuals you’re telling us about are in custody still and as a result, you can see almost nothing happening.” Email nichole@portorangeobserver.com.

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

PORT ORANGE

Observer “If we are to build a better world, we must remember that the guiding principle is this — a policy of freedom for the individual is the only truly progressive policy.” FRIEDRICH HAYEK “Road to Serfdom,” 1944 Publisher John Walsh, jwalsh@ portorangeobserver.com Executive Editor Brian McMillan, editor@ portorangeobserver.com Staff Writer Nichole Osinski, nichole@ portorangeobserver.com Sports Writer Ray Boone, ray@ palmcoastobserver.com Real Estate Editor Wayne Grant, business@ ormondbeachobserver.com Advertising Manager Jaci Centofanti, jaclyn@ palmcoastobserver.com Senior Account Manager Hallie Hydrick, hallie@ palmcoastobserver.com Account Manager Patty Corkhill, patty@ ormondbeachobserver.com Classifieds Shawne Ordonez, shawne@ ormondbeachobserver.com Advertising Graphic Designer Kristin Thomas, kristin@ palmcoastobserver.com Circulation Manager Dave Brooks, david@ horizonroad.com Office Manager Maureen Walsh, maureen@ palmcoastobserver.com

Port Orange Public Information Officer Christine Martindale, Volusia County Volunteers Founder Kristine Bruckart and Co-Founder Alyssa Parnell.

Residents join forces to clean up Port Orange and ‘keep our city pretty’ One group found two couches that had been dumped in the city. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

#KeepOurCityPretty. It’s a new anti-litter hashtag that’s been generated from the city of Port Orange in an effort to help residents be mindful and take that extra step to keep the community, and the surrounding environment, clean. That mindset was evident on Saturday, June 9, as about 40

people gathered at Buschman Park before heading out to different locations to pick up trash and anything that could be recycled. The community roadside cleanup effort was a collaboration between the city and non-profit Volusia County Volunteers. At 9 a.m. participants got in their vehicles, some in groups, some on their own, to search the area and bring back what they had found to be brought to two dumpsters, one for trash, the other for recyclables. “We’re hoping that ... we’ll have more people jumping on board with ‘keep our city pretty’ and make an influence even further

Heidi Hales-Walker

DELIVERY Tatum Walker

than Port Orange and that it will cross lines and help spread the love all over the county,” Volusia County Volunteers Co-Founder Alyssa Parnell said. Port Orange Public Information Officer Christine Martindale said that the day was about more than simply cleaning up the city; it was about educating the public on why this initiative was started and how residents can help in the future. “The importance of today was to promote our city’s initiative and was something important ... for residents to take pride in where they live and where they work,” Martindale said. “But it doesn’t stop there.” At 11 a.m., there were more than a few large plastic trash bags filled with trash sitting in a pile. There were couches, a shopping cart, a large mirror and an assortment of other intact and broken items that

Photos by Nichole Osinski

had been left on the ground. The group that had brought in the two couches, plus even more trash, won the day’s Most Weight Collected prize. A Most Unique Find award was presented to the group that brought in the shopping cart, and Most Recyclables went to the group that had about 11 to 15 pounds of recyclable items collected.  And while it had been a rewarding two hours, organizers aren’t planning to stop there.  “I’m just looking forward to more people coming out for the next one and more connections being made each time,” Volusia County Volunteers Founder Kristine Bruckart said. “In the community, we’d like to improve people’s attitudes on how they treat where they live and their environment. We hope that makes a positive impact all around.”

The Port Orange Observer is published every Thursday. To suspend or stop delivery, call Circulation Manager David Brooks, at 338-5080.

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Who’s the Raddest Dad? Port Orange father puts family above all else

Ormond Beach father focuses on memories

Meet the Port Orange winner of this year’s Rad Dad contest.

Meet the Ormond Beach winner of this year’s Rad Dad contest.

JARLEENE ALMENAS

JARLEENE ALMENAS

STAFF WRITER

STAFF WRITER

Port Orange resident John O’Connor loves when his daughter puts the top down on her convertible, cranks up the oldies on the radio and drives down to have lunch at Goodrich’s on the river. Their daddy-daughter lunches are reminiscent of when Kat Atwood was a child in the 1970s and O’Connor would take the family on a picnic or camping in a small-popup camper along the St. John’s river. She said she and her siblings didn’t have much growing up, but they never knew that because of the way her father raised her. “Family first,” Atwood said.  “Family always. That’s always what he said.” O’Connor moved to the U.S. from Glasgow, Scotland, and gained citizenship before joining the Navy, where he dedicated 32 years of service. All of his children followed in his military footsteps. He taught his children to work hard for anything they wanted, teaching them the difference between a “want” and a “need,” Atwood said. If they really wanted something, Atwood said her father  taught them to work for it. “That was always huge, because we all went on to raise our families the same way,” Atwood said. She was also able to share a very special moment with her father during her 22-year-service in the Navy. When she became a

Ormond Beach resident John Ross spends a lot of time with his 5-year-old son, Jake. Their family has a saying: “We’re always making memories.” Whether it is driving to Walt Disney World for the first time and watching Jake’s eyes light up as he gazes  at the fireworks, or simply going down to the beach and playing in the sand together, Ross and his wife treasure those moments. They take many photos and have mugs with their special memories around the house.  “You don’t just have a kid, and that’s it, move on,” Ross said. “You have a child and that becomes a big part of your life. I want Jake to have so many memories of our time together and that he knows that if there’s anything he needs — if he’s feeling pressured or he’s feeling down, if he’s happy and excited — he can share it all with me.” Ross was nominated for the Ormond Beach Observer’s Rad Dad contest by his son, Jake, and wife, Beth. She said Ross is an amazing stay-at-home father who strives to teach their son kindness every day. She said their favorite song is Tim McGraw’s “Humble and Kind” because that’s what they are. “They both make me so proud to be a wife and mother to two beautiful people on the inside and out,” she wrote in an email to the

Courtesy photo

John O’Connor and Kat Atwood at Goodrich’s.

senior chief petty officer, it was O’Connor, a retired master chief petty officer, who pinned her anchors on her collar.  As a grandfather, Atwood said her father has been able to hold all the babies in the family and put them to sleep “in a heartbeat” as if the babies themselves could sense his calming spirit. Atwood will always remember his unconditional love for them, as children and now as adults. Now 81, O’Connor calls bingo at the Our Lady of Hope Roman Catholic Church, where he’s also a lecturer. He is still adventurous, Atwood said, and likes to travel. He also recently celebrated his 60th wedding anniversary. He never told them they couldn’t do something; on the contrary, he encouraged them to meet their goals. Atwood said her father’s refusal to be idle made her and her siblings into “doers.” It set the standard for the kind of man she married, Atwood said.  “He’s just so much to so many people, and he wants nothing in return,” Atwood said. “He just wants people to be happy and get along.”

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Courtesy photo

Ormond Beach’s Rad Dad winner, John Ross, with his 5-year-old son, Jake.

Observer. Ross used to coach collegiate and club volleyball before becoming a stay-at-home dad. His job forced him to be gone most nights and weekends, and after Jake, who  has achondroplasia, was born, he didn’t want to miss out on precious time. The other night, he was able to see the fruit of that precious time. For the first time, Jake read P. D. Eastman’s “Go, Dog. Go!” without missing any words. “I was like, ‘Oh my gosh,’” said Ross, laughing. “You’re growing up too fast. Stop.” Ross didn’t have a father who was around growing up, and he said he told himself if he ever had a child, he wanted to be someone he or she could look up to, count on and help guide through life. He said fatherhood is not just about the title. “You have to be there,” Ross said. “You have to put time in.”

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Volusia County numbers higher than nation when it comes to households in ‘deep poverty’ Individuals in deep poverty are living in households with income below 50% of the Federal Poverty Level. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

Almost 8% of households in Volusia County fall below what the U.S. Census Bureau defines as deep poverty, or individuals living in households with an income below 50% of the Federal Poverty Level, according to  the latest five-year American community Survey estimates.  The data was presented June 12 during the annual Volusia County  Human Services Advisory Board where issues such as homelessness, health care and education were also discussed. Human Services Manager Clayton Jackson said that the county’s deep poverty numbers are a little higher than the nation’s, while overall low-income numbers do not fare as well as the state and country.  “In Volusia County we are a little bit more impoverished than the state and country,” Jackson said, adding that around 9% of the households in Daytona Beach fall within that extreme level of poverty. However, Jackson said that typically a trend can can be noticed throughout the county in relation to poverty and the areas that usually have higher poverty numbers.   When it comes to the  aver-

age medium income for Volusia, 125,908 households have an average family income of $69,065 with median income of $52,950 while Florida’s median is $59,139 and the U.S. median is $67,871.  The report also showed that 15% of the county’s population is without health insurance, a little lower than the state average but still higher than the country.  About 10% of Volusia’s population does not have a high school diploma, but Jackson said that the county does offer multiple programs for individuals to work toward their GED. Another program, the  Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program is currently providing 15% of the county’s population with food stamps.  PRIORITIES OF THE POOR

Human Services Manager Clayton Jackson

During a focus group portion of Tuesday’s meeting, members discussed what they thought were the top priorities for individuals in the poverty bracket. Members ranked housing as a top priority followed by health care and nutrition and food. However, Jackson said a previous survey had been done where individuals who were in a low-income bracket were asked what the thought were top

priorities. Those that were asked said employment and job training were a top priority, followed by housing.  “You’re probably looking at a third of Volusia County households being eligible for our services,” Jackson said. “That really kind of hits you right there.”

Photo by Nichole Osinski

“You’re probably looking at a third of Volusia County households being eligible for our services. That really kind of hits you right there.” CLAYTON JACKSON, Human Services Manager

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JUNE 14, 2018

SPORTS Should high schools have full-contact football practice in summer?

The best of Babe Ruth Photos by Ray Boone

Port Orange’s Aubrey Brant sprints toward first base.

Coaches of teams in District 9 of the Babe Ruth League watch the next generation grow. RAY BOONE STAFF WRITER

A Port Orange’s Parker Engle prepares to hit a ball against Flagler.

s Tom Strickland walks off the diamond toward to dugout where his frustrated team awaits, he’s slightly disappointed. His team struggled — to hit, to pitch, to field — in its 10-0 loss to Ormond Beach. Still, Strickland, who has coached youth baseball in Port Orange since 2005, can remember a time before the city had its own all-star team. Over the past week, the city’s top youth baseball players headlined the competition at the Babe Ruth League’s All-Star Tournament at the Flagler County Recreational Area in Bunnell. Strickland, who is in his fourth go-around as head coach of Port

Xander Porter (No. 8) leaps onto second base against Flagler.

Port Orange’s Brayden Schwedes, with a bat in-hand, walks toward the team’s dugout.

Orange’s 12U team, said it has been a pleasure to watch the area’s “next generation” grow — both physically and skill-wise. “It’s been awesome,” he said. “Just to have to opportunity to come out with these guys year after year, and I’ve been watching some of these kids since they were 5, 6 years old. Watching them grow up and develop as ball players is really, really cool.” Although Strickland’s team lost on Saturday, there were still highlights: They dominated Sanford 13-3 on Wednesday, June 6, and squeaked out a 10-9 win over Flagler on Thursday, June 7. “I thought Ormond was going to be the team to beat in this tournament,” he said. Port Orange plays in District 9 of the Babe Ruth League. DeBary, New Smyrna Beach and South Daytona Beach are also a part of the district. Age groups start as young as 4 for T-ball up to the 15U division. The teams are composed of the top performers from the recreational baseball season. “Most of the kids and parents have had a really good time,” said Barry Clymer, who has been the commissioner of District 9 for the past decade. “Just to see this whole atmosphere is so much fun. This is a great atmosphere for baseball.”

RAY BOONE STAFF WRITER

FHSAA rules restrict teams to weightlifting and conditioning.

H

igh school football teams are only allowed to “condition” their players during summer workouts, according to the Florida High School Athletic Association. Under Article 21-1-3, the FHSAA defines what conditioning is — and what it is not. Conditioning “is NOT teaching sport-specific skills and drills and does NOT involve the use of sport-specific equipment.” But most high school teams, including the majority of the area’s teams, have found a way around this: Nearly every week throughout the summer, high school football players sign up to compete in 7-on-7 flag football games. But here’s the problem: While skill players (quarterbacks, receivers, defensive backs, linebackers and so on) can work on their technique at these events, non-skill players — linemen in particular — are left out to dry. So, should teams be permitted to have full-contact football practices, which the FHSAA prohibits until fall camp, during the summer? This scenario brings forth both problems and conflict. On one hand, it could prove beneficial to provide all athletes a chance to work on their skills — not just their conditioning. Is it fair that one group gets to work on the totality of their game, while the other is limited to essentially just weightlifting and running? No. However, although summer workouts are not mandatory, should teens be subjugated to additional full-contact practices even after enduring a full season and spring practice? There could be negative side effects healthwise. But, there should be common ground. While the health of young athletes should always be No. 1 on the list of priorities, legitimate opportunities should be afforded to all athletes who have a desire to improve their skills. Email Ray Boone at ray@palmcoastobserver.com.


Classifieds 16 Real Estate 14

JUNE 14, 2018

YOUR NEIGHBORS The award is presented by the Florida Health Care Association each year. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

W

hen last year’s hurricane hit, Theresa Finn knew she had a responsibility for the patients and staff at the Port Orange Nursing and Rehab Center where she worked. She packed a few of her belongings, brought along her dog and spent days at the center helping her team keep everything running as the storm blew through.  It was this kind of dedication in her profession as a registered nurse that won Finn the statewide Nurse Administrator of the Year award by the Florida Health Care Association. She was recognized for this honor during the association’s 2018 Long Term Care Excellence in Nursing Awards. Southern Healthcare Management Regional Clinical Director Mary Buffkin, who nominated Finn, wrote in her nomination letter that Finn “knows every resident and staff member in her center personally. The facility has a five-star rating, with five stars in quality measures — which directly relates to her leadership style.” Finn’s journey to working at the center, where she is the director of nursing, started when she was in high school in New York. She was a part of a class called science for service, where students volun-

“I have a great nursing team, and I would be happy if we all stayed here together. For the future, I don’t see myself going anywhere else.” THERESA FINN

teered at a local hospital. While working in that environment, Finn knew this was a future she could see herself. “It’s something you have your whole life,” Finn said.   Fast forward to the present year and Finn has been an RN for more than 30 years with work in the hospital, veterans nursing home and now long-term care, which she first went into when she moved to Florida in 2007.  But it was when she walked through the Port Orange Nursing and Rehab Center doors that she knew she was home.  “You just know,” Finn said. “When I was interviewed, I said, ‘There is no one that wants to work here more than I do.’” Finn has now been at the center for eight years and is responsible for instructing nurses, several of whom  have moved up from an LPN to an RN in the past year. In

addition to her leadership role, Finn also strives to take care of each patient’s individual needs. Each morning, she is part of a meeting to discuss where every patient is at. Part of Finn’s job is to also make rounds visiting those patients and letting them know her open-door policy if they need help with anything. Another reason Finn received the award was the amount of time she spends at the center. She takes calls 24-7, which means if her phone rings in the middle of the night, she is up. That usually means her husband is up as well, but because he is also a nurse, Finn said he understands her schedule and that they “speak the same language.” Day to day, Finn said she enjoys teaching the nurses and communicating with the families. She also sees a need in Florida for taking care of both skilled nursing patients, who are usually being worked with after surgery,  and long-term patients. It was an area of healthcare she decided she wanted to be in when she moved to the area and one she plans to continue being a part of even longer. “I have a great nursing team, and I would be happy if we all stayed here together,” Finn said. “For the future, I don’t see myself going anywhere else.”

Theresa Finn, director of nurses

Meet the best nurse administrator in Florida

Photos by Nichole Osinski

Theresa Finn, director of nurses; Aida Turns, rehab aid; and Patrcia Palacios, occupational therapist.


PORT ORANGE OBSERVER

PortOrangeObserver.com

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The danger of leaving a child in a car was demonstrated by staff of Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center in Daytona Beach on June 7 as Dr. Steve Swearingen, emergency medicine physician, sat in a car with windows up for 15 minutes. Swearingen kept track of his heart rate, blood pressure, temperature and oxygen level with a monitor in the car, while providing a running commentary on Facebook Live post by the hospital. As the staff waited for the time for the demonstration, the temperature in the car reached 107 degrees, even with the front doors open, showing that an open window does not keep a car from reaching a dangerous temperature. Since 1998, there have been 749 deaths nationwide due to pediatric vehicular heatstroke, according to a statement provided by the hospital. Recent studies show a vehicle parked in the sun for just an hour reached an average cabin temperature of 116 degrees. In child-death cases, the parents often state they forgot the child was in the car. Lindsay Cashio, hospital spokeswoman, said parents should use a method to remind them whenever a child

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

BUSINESS OBSERVER HOSPITALS NAME PR DIRECTOR

Hospital brings attention to the problem with a live demonstration.

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Kelly Ferguson

Photo by Wayne Grant

Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center Spokeswoman Lindsay Cashio records Dr. Steve Swearingen for a Facebook Live post of a hot car danger demonstration.

is in the car. For example, she said the parent could leave a purse or cell phone in the backseat with the child. Another method is to keep a stuffed animal in the child car seat, and place the toy in the front seat whenever a child is in the car seat. When a core body temperature of 107 degrees or greater is reached, cells are damaged and internal organs begin to shut down. This cascade of events can rapidly lead to death, and happens much faster with a child, according to Heather Churchwell, a paramedic who was on hand to monitor the test. Swearingen said hot cars are also a problem for animals. Some-

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times people will crack a window, but this does not prevent the car from becoming hot. He said if a person sees a child or animal in hot car, they should call 911. The car was cooled before the test. When the test began and Swearingen got in the car, a bank of clouds blocked the sun, but the temperature in the car rose to 102

degrees. “I feel a little woozy,” he said after exiting the car. “I’m glad to be out.” He added that if it had been sunny, he’s not sure he could have lasted the 15 minutes. He said he was mostly concerned about his heart rate, which climbed to 110 beats per minute.

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PORT ORANGE OBSERVER

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PortOrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Three juvenile green sea turtles return to the sea after rehabilitation The Marine Science Center has treated 86 sea turtles in 2018 so far. NICHOLE OSINSKI STAFF WRITER

“Goodbye turtles!” A little boy called out to the three sea turtles that were being carried out past the sandbar and back into the ocean as a crowd watched from the beach cheering and snapping photos. And unlike some of the other releases the Marine Science Center has headed up in the past, these turtles were much smaller and had much more growing to do. The juvenile green sea turtles — Ixora, Ulmus and Nysa — were released on Wednesday, June 6, and were shown to the crowd before being released.  Two of the turtles, Ixora and Ulmus, were being released after a little more than a month of rehabilitation.  Ixora was found on May 12 after being washed into the docks at a marina in Ponce Inlet  and was initially unable to dive. The turtle also had an elec-

trolyte imbalance and low blood glucose level that caused it to become lethargic. Rehab for Ixora consisted of dextrose, fluids, antibiotics, vitamins and calcium, which led to the turtle’s  buoyancy problem being resolved. She was five pounds when released.  “[That’s]  not even a month’s turnaround,” Shell Webster, Marine Science Center  Education Department, said. “That’s a great thing for a turtle to get back out within a month.” Ulmus was found on March 16 entangled in fishing line, floating just inside the Ponce de Leon Inlet area. The turtle was underweight, dehydrated, lethargic and covered in barnacles and algae, indicating that it had been debilitated for some time. Ulmus was treated with antibiotics, vitamins, antiparasitic medication and fluids. She weighed around eight pounds upon her release.  Finally, there was Nysa who was found before the other two in January. According to Turtle Rehabilitation Manager  Melissa Ranly, Nysa had severe digestive blockage due to sea grass being packed inside her. Ranly said it

took a long time for Nysa to be cleared, but she was eventually well enough to start eating and reach a weight of almost 12 pounds. According to Ranly, so far this year, the Marine Science Center has treated 86 sea turtles. 

“[That’s] not even a month’s turnaround. That’s a great thing for a turtle to get back out within a month.” SHELL WEBSTER, Marine Science Center Education Department

Ulmus

Photo courtesy of the Marine Science Center

Elisha Ali, an intern, holds Ulmus, Alli Bernstein, assistant manager for sea turtle rehab, holds Nysa and McKenzie Mungai, an intern, holds Ixora. Nysa and Ixora are prepared to be released.

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PortOrangeObserver.com

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

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McKenzie Mungai, an intern, lets beachgoers look at Ixora while Alli Bernstein, assistant manager for sea turtle rehab, holds Nysa.

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REAL ESTATE

PORT ORANGE OBSERVER

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PortOrangeObserver.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Top transaction: $419,000 $220,000. Built in 1999, the villa has three bedrooms, 2.5 baths and 1,618 square feet. It sold in 2004 for $169,900.

WAYNE GRANT REAL ESTATE EDITOR

A

house in the Sabal Creek neighborhood was the top real estate transaction for May 6 through May 12 in Port Orange and South Daytona. Steven Nguyen and Tam Pham sold 6070 Sabal Creek Blvd. to Amy Locklear, of Port Orange, for $419,000. Built in 2001, the house has four bedrooms, three baths, a swimming pool and 2,864 square feet. It sold in 2016 for $407,500.

Courtesy photo

The top seller has four bedrooms and three bathrooms.

PORT ORANGE Allandale Robert and Bonnie Jones, and Harry and Gail Turner, of Lansdale, Pennsylvania, sold 121 Niver St. to Joe and Kathy Dowding, of Port Orange, for $100,000. Built in 1982, the manufactured home has two bedrooms, two baths and 840 square feet. It sold in 2004 for $100,000.

Carolyn Foster, of Port Orange, sold 5264 Taylor Ave. to Concealed Carry 4U LLC, of Port Orange, for $67,000. Built in 1971, the manufactured home has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,056 square feet. It sold in 2016 for $45,000. Barefoot Park Jeffrey Nickell, of Port Orange, sold 101 Barefoot Trail to Brian Addair, of Port Orange, for $65,000. Built in 1973, the manufactured home has three

bedrooms, two baths and 744 square feet. It sold in 2016 for $59,000. Countryside Federal National Mortgage Association, of Dallas, sold 733 Hunt Club Trail to Brent Merilson, as trustee, for $250,000. Built in 1986, the house has three bedrooms, two baths, a fireplace, swimming pool and 1,876 square feet. It sold in 1989 for $175,000. Countryside West Barbara McKenzie, of Port Orange, sold 5784 Falling Tree Lane to Karen and William VanderVenter, of Port Orange, for $310,000. Built in 1997, the house has three bedrooms, two baths, a fireplace and 2,003 square feet. It sold in 1997 for $146,162. Cypress Head Lilly Hamner sold 65 Golf Villa Drive to William and Stephanie Roberson, of Port Orange, for

Groves Gil Yedid, of Davie, sold 3845 Long Grove Lane to Michael and Toni Sehon, of Port Orange, for $205,600. Built in 1991, the house has three bedrooms, two baths, a fireplace and 1,649 square feet. It sold in 1997 for $32,065. Ken Bern Kayvan Zomorodian, of Ormond Beach, sold 480 Reed Canal Road, Unit 36, to Amie MacDonald, of Ormond Beach, for $74,000. Built in 1986, the condo has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,024 square feet. It sold in 2011 for $37,000. Little Town Joseph Sincavage sold 821 Little Town Road to Kyle and Chelsea Campbell, of Port Orange, for $180,000. Built in 1995, the house has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,356 square feet. It sold in 2015 for $120,000.

Oakland Park Dena Merz sold 6078 Central Park Blvd. to Sean and Melissa Renz, of Port Orange, for $285,000. Built in 1993, the house has three bedrooms, two baths, a swimming pool and 2,027 square feet. It sold in 1996 for $103,300. Riverwood Plantation James McCown, individually and as trustee, sold 6214 Poplar Grove Drive to Gary and Nicole Jennings, of Port Orange, for $229,900. Built in 1993, the house has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,521 square feet. It sold in 1993 for $90,000. Spruce Creek Fly-In Roy and Marylan Soderman, of Port Orange, sold 1888 Seclusion Drive to Jeremy and Reni Grimes, of Port Orange, for $244,000. Built in 1985, the house has three bedrooms, two baths, a fireplace and 2,441 square feet. It sold in 2001 for $165,000. Sunset Cove Melissa Hope and Ian Cuthbert, of Arlington, Texas, sold

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Dunlawton Brent Merilson, individually and as trustee, sold 705 Herbert St. to Mary Talluto, of Port Orange, for $290,000. Built in 1996, the house has three bedrooms, two baths, a fireplace and 1,655 square feet. It sold in March for $187,100.

Not in Subdivision Rroyal Properties LLC, of Tampa, sold 810 Lafayette St. to Susan Byrnes, of Port Orange, for $140,000. Built in 1947, the house has two bedrooms, one bath and 945 square feet. It sold in 2016 for $70,000.

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This 2 BR, 2 BA top floor unit features waterviews from every room. Main living area consist of large living room, dining area and kitchen with breakfast bar, stainless steel appliances and plenty of cabinet space. Enjoy spectacular oceanviews from your master suite. Outside find a spacious balcony with waterviews as far as the eye can see. $250,000. MLS#1043738 Call Buzzy Porter at 386-405-1000.

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This 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 3 car garage home sits on a premium lot with no neighbors directly to your left and lake and preserve in the back. From the moment you walk in you can see the attention to detail the owners have put into this home. $370,000. MLS# 1043985. Call Buzzy Porter at 386-405-1000.

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PORT ORANGE OBSERVER

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SOUTH DAYTONA Ronald and Marsha Tucholski sold 2801 S. Ridgewood Ave., Unit 1101, to Darryl and Brenda Rivernider, of New Providence, New Jersey, for $247,000. Built in 2008, the condo has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,436 square feet. It sold in 2008 for $370,372.

CROSSWORD

Susan Gabriel, individually and as trustee, sold 2801 S. Ridgewood Ave., Unit 601, to Marian Williams, of South Daytona, for $222,000. Built in 2008, the condo has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,436 square feet. It sold in 2015 for $198,000. Kathleen Swafford sold 2958 Carriage Drive to Robert and Lillian Barker, of Bedford, New York, for $160,000. Built in 1981, the house has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,200 square feet. It sold in 1986 for $55,500. Mohammad Baragabah, of Port Orange, sold 352 Slayton Ave. to Michael and Theresa Garcia, of South Daytona, for $145,000. Built in 1963, the house has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,278 square feet. It sold in 2013 for $66,000. John Adams, of Adams, Cameron & Co. Realtors, contributed to this report.

ACROSS

1 Big-time clipper 7 Musical Frederic 13 Word before beta 16 Paulo or Vicente place name 19 Kay Thompson’s hotel kid 20 Morning love song 21 Rowboat feature 23 Four worldly things 26 Two-masted vessel 27 Twisty trunks 28 “Bunny” under the bed 29 “Gone With the Wind” manor

30 Lifesaver 32 Hungers 34 Attack from everywhere 36 Dr. Seuss character 39 Marriage indicator 41 Word with “real” or “a life” 43 Puts one’s feet up 47 “Dear me!” alternative 49 Extermination job 52 Italian hotspot, briefly 56 “Not ___ shabby” 57 Three worldly things 61 Jung’s feminine side 62 Bye-bye alternative 63 Hole in the face

SATURDAY, JUNE 16 HALF WALL ADOPT A DOG CHALLANGE When: 2 p.m. Where: Half Wall Port Orange, 3770 S. Nova Road Details: Individuals can have fun with friends and help rescue dogs with Sophie’s Circle Pet Food Pantry and Dog Rescue at Half Wall Port Orange. Each month, Half Wall Port Orange will host an adoption event with the goal of one dog being adopted each month during 2018, with an end goal to find homes for 12 animals

115 Quick, in an office 117 Appendectomy prover 120 Title of respect 122 Type of spray or cavity 124 Abalone production 128 Five worldly things 132 Consider almost seriously 133 Old home on the range 134 Run behind schedule 135 Creatures from way out 136 Took the bait 137 Stretch outward 138 Denim and other fabrics

PORCHDOGS TO PERFORM AT PORT ORANGE LIBRARY When: 2 p.m. Where: Port Orange Regional Library Cost: Free The Porchdogs will bring their own brand of Louisiana Cajun and zydeco music to the Port Orange Regional Library during this free concert. The trio has had repeat long-term engagements at Walt Disney World, Universal Studios Orlando and other theme parks. They also perform regularly at the Iron Horse Saloon during Bike Week and Biketoberfest. The free concert is sponsored by the Friends of the Port Orange Regional Library. Reservations are not required. Call 322-5152, option 4.

THURSDAY, JUNE 14 WINE GLASS PAINTING When: 7 p.m. Where: Port Orange Mellow Mushroom Cost: $25 for two wine glasses Details: Art Rageous is teaming up with Mellow Mushroom of Port Orange for a Wine Glass Painting Event. All materials, stencils, ideas, paint and aprons are supplied. Attendees may purchase beverages and food. Call 9477661. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 24 BEGINNER YOGA WORKSHOP When: 10:30 a.m. Where: Port Orange Kula Yoga Studio Cost: $20 Details: In this special workshop, participants will learn the most basic and fundamentally important aspects of yoga to build a solid foundation for the longevity of the practice. This workshop provides a brief background on what yoga is as well as breathing techniques that are common to the yoga practice and fundamental yoga postures and how to adapt them to an individual’s abilities and needs. Call 872-3569. 

51 Certain NFLer 53 “Dukes of Hazzard” spinoff 54 Render a crushing defeat 55 Brother’s daughter, e.g. 58 Queen in India (var.) 59 Galileo’s surname 60 Commonly brewed beverage 66 Where to find a new auto 68 Short summary 71 Easy golf shot 73 Like some orange juice 74 Glitch 76 Open admission 77 “From ___ Eternity” DOWN 78 Cordwood units 1 At one’s ___ and call 79 Passenger on the ark 2 Burn balm 3 Game for third-stringers 80 ___’clock (22nd hour) 82 Bucks or smackers 4 Beer variety 84 Ammonia feature 5 Book near Job 85 Works in a film 6 Dreaming stage 86 Baccarat box 7 Head of the mob 87 Be on the payroll 8 “Get there faster!” 9 Requiring extremely large 89 ___ spumante (Italian wine) clothing 93 Boardwalk structure 10 Rhythm relative 94 Half nelson, for one 11 Declaration at an altar 12 Brainy, socially inept one 95 Lion’s prey, sometimes 96 Some loaves 13 Chasers in oaters 102 Backbreaker of a 14 Stops abruptly proverb 15 Fierce anger 104 Surgical cutter 16 Picnic staple 106 Pistonless engine name 17 Maker of PCs 109 Noted Cremona artisan 18 Creole cookery item 110 Boat? Bigger. 22 Starbucks selection 111 Word with band or circular 24 Repentant one 113 Gray-brown shade 25 Make into a knight 64 Coated cote mamas 85 Moving on an ocean 114 Colorado city 31 Thunderhead at Dol65 Exploratory mission, liner 116 Mr. Picasso lywood, e.g. briefly 88 “Leave me alone!” for 117 Stuff with cake, e.g. 33 Big-time hauler 66 Suez, for one one 118 Become obstructed, 35 Gaslight and Dead-ball 67 Pelvic parts 90 Airline departing Israel as blood 36 Bush expedition 69 Person provers 91 Really, really like 119 Irving and Tan 37 United, politically (var.) 70 When-you’re-getting- 92 Three worldly things 121 “G’day” receiver 38 Things studied at home letters 97 Real attachment? 123 Having already hit the Hogwarts 72 Shortens, as a snap98 Lock, stock and barrel hay 40 Van Susteren with 99 Delectable shot 125 Blazer, e.g. reports 100 Assign a score to 75 “Understand my 126 IRA’s first name? 42 Sports car option 101 Feel in your spirit point?” 127 ___ out a living 44 Tuck away, as cargo 76 Doctor’s office sounds 103 “___ be seeing you” 129 Bill in the air 45 Made into two? 105 Eject, as lava 79 Courage, figuratively 130 Oscar winner Harrison 46 Some Asian sauces 107 Word with Alamos 81 Daily consumption 131 Leno’s old employer 48 Variety of wrestler 108 Airline seat features 83 Break a Command50 Rickman and Alda ment 112 Spreadsheet info

WORLD AFFAIRS by Timothy B. Parker

©2018 Universal Uclick

32ND-ANNUAL MAYOR’S INVITATIONAL GOLF TOURNAMENT When: 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Where: Golf Course at Cypress Head Cost: $70 per person Details: The Mayor’s Invitational Golf Tournament is back with proceeds from this year’s tournament directly benefitting the Port Orange Parks and Recreation youth scholarship fund. Teams of four will take on 18 holes in a scramble format to win the Mayor’s Golf Tournament Trophy. Continental breakfast, cart and green fees, range balls, golf polo, two free drink tickets, door prizes and awards buffet luncheon will be provided for all participants. Call 506-5934. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 30 FOOD TRUCK WARS When: Noon to 7 p.m. Where: Riverfront Park Details: The competition is for five awards: casual cuisine, top food sales, ticket taker, delectable dessert and people’s choice award. There will also be live music from MISS INTENT, a kids area and beer garden. A portion of the proceeds will benefit local charities. Visit http://foodtruckwars.com.

CELEBRITY CIPHER

By Luis Campos Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

“Z VRENOR ZDDC VRENYPR Z KNH N PNHZPUZE VBPP NU N WREBWH PUBWR... KR’H PNC, ‘ZDDC, DRU OR N EBLLRR, FZDKU!” – ZDDC ABA “H CBTRP RHZX FB RHMX EBWXMXW HL JXBJRX’U DXYWFU YLP GHLPU; FDYF CBTRP NX ETL. H’RR RXYMX FDX CBWRP GK YWF” – UTVH ATYFWB Puzzle Two Clue: V equals Z

Waters Edge Jamie Musselwhite, individually and as trustee, sold 6823 Amici Court to Gonzalo and Caroline Arzon, of Port Orange, for $253,000. Built in 2006, the house has three bedrooms, two baths and 1,772 square feet. It sold in 2007 for $211,000.

Charles and Heather Shuler, of Orange City, sold 2801 S. Ridgewood Ave., Unit 1014, to Brian Masters, of South Daytona, for $245,000. Built in 2008, the condo has two bedrooms, two baths and 1,615 square feet. It sold in 2012 for $222,900.

FRIDAY, JUNE 22

this year. Sophie’s Circle is a registered nonprofit corporation that operates a pet food bank in Volusia County. Call 690-6771. 

Puzzle One Clue: F equals L

SATURDAY, JUNE 16

MAY 6 - MAY 12

Twin Gates Constance and Roy Bentley, of South Daytona, sold 65 Golden Gate Circle to Michael Knoblock, of Port Orange, for $56,000. Built in 1991, the manufactured home has two bedrooms, 1.5 baths and 784 square feet. It sold in 2005 for $49,900.

15

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

YOU R CAL E NDAR

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

3832 Sunset Cove Drive to David and Brandi Peres, of Port Orange, for $262,900. Built in 2007, the house has four bedrooms, two baths and 2,908 square feet. It sold in 2007 for $230,900.

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©2018 NEA, Inc.

SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

©2018 Andrews McMeel Syndicate

6-14-18


– Iggy Pop

$75. Call 203-560-6066.

Puzzle Two Solution: “I would like to live forever in people’s hearts and minds; that would be fun. I’ll leave the world my art.” – Suzi Quatro

GEORGE FOREMAN Electric indoor/outdoor grill (GGR200RDDS) w/ stand $35.00 386-569-0721. HANDICAPPED SHOWER chair $15.00; 50+ Red Hat Items $50. Call 386-437-344.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

KASON HOWE K53 cooler door handle $75; Graber 2” hitch bike carrier $50. 203-560-6066.

This week’s Sudoku answers

KING SIZE Simmons Beauty Rest pillowtop mattress & box spring. Great cond., $100. 986-8940.

Items Under $200 For Sale JAIL MATTRESS hospital bed sz, ex cond $100; Trapeze, fits hosp bed, ex cond $100. 386-212-8926.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

SEMI ELECTRIC hospital bed with mattress. Good condition $200. Call 386-212-8926.

KITCHEN TABLE - tile top, medium brown wood, Items Under $200 For Sale 3’x5’. $100 Firm. Call 386-313-5871. LADIES BICYCLE, good condition, wide seat. Jamis Boss Cruiser $125. Call 386-569-0307.

Items Under $200 For Sale

PATIO TABLE, rect glass top, 4 arm chairs w/cushions, BBQItems grill w/extra side burner $125/all. Under $200 For 225-6691. Sale

JAIL MATTRESS hospital bed sz, ex cond $100; Trapeze, fits hosp bed, ex cond $100. 386-212-8926.

SINGER SEWING machine, new in box $160. Also have sewing cabinet 200/both OBO. 386-437-7058.

SEMI ELECTRIC hospital bed with mattress. Good condition $200. Call 386-212-8926. Items Under $200 For Sale

SMALL METAL pet crate $20; Leather pet carrier Home Services case $15; Handicapped walker $15. 386-437-3441.

AQUASCAPE SFA 3000 2900GPH 5’ head pump $75. Call 203-560-6066. GEORGE FOREMAN Electric indoor/outdoor grill (GGR200RDDS) w/ stand $35.00 386-569-0721. HANDICAPPED SHOWER chair $15.00; 50+ Red Hat Items $50. Call 386-437-344. KASON HOWE K53 cooler door handle $75; Graber 2” hitch bike carrier $50. 203-560-6066. KING SIZE Simmons Beauty Rest pillowtop mattress & box spring. Great cond., $100. 986-8940. KITCHEN TABLE - tile top, medium brown wood, 3’x5’. $100 Firm. Call 386-313-5871. LADIES BICYCLE, good condition, wide seat. Jamis Boss Cruiser $125. Call 386-569-0307. PATIO TABLE, rect glass top, 4 arm chairs w/cushions, BBQ grill w/extra side burner $125/all. 225-6691.

Classified Ads Bring Results 386-447-9723

SINGER SEWING machine, new in box $160. Also have sewing cabinet 200/both OBO. 386-437-7058. SMALL METAL pet crate $20; Leather pet carrier case $15; Handicapped walker $15. 386-437-3441. SMART PHONE, Samsung J7, unlkd, Metro PCS, 2 y/o, all accy, perf cond $100/OBO 386-447-7746. TOW BAR - Falcon 2 with safety cables $175.00. Call 386-445-8885. TROYBILT 2800 PSI Pressure Washer - Clean/like new. Only $175.00 - (386) 302-5357 - ask for Ted. SOFA W/COVER $100; Double reclining Loveseat $100; Glass top Dinette $50. Call 386−313−1085.

11 Fayy Lane

AMERICAN SIGNATURE Table $125 OBO. Great condition/New $299. Call (386) 864−3442.

PALM HARBOR HOME

Immaculately maintained AQUARIUM WITH 4 BD/2BA Standwith− 26 gallon, all heated saltwater pool in Palm Harbor!Call (386) 313−5754. accessories and fish $125. • New roof in 2017 • Comes with new water heater With mirror. Maple hues. BEDROOM DRESSER installed Like• Fence new. Can2017 provide pics. $200 (678) 770−7639. • One year home warranty included CHICCO STROLLER with cup holders and $239,900 storage bin $25; PackinPlay $15. (386) 263−7509.

SMART PHONE, Samsung J7, unlkd, Metro PCS, 2 y/o, all accy, perf cond $100/OBO 386-447-7746. TOW BAR - Falcon 2 with safety cables $175.00. Call 386-445-8885. TROYBILT 2800 PSI Pressure Washer - Clean/like new. Only $175.00 - (386) 302-5357 - ask for Ted.

This week’s Celebrity Cipher answers

This week’s Celebrity Cipher answers

Puzzle One Solution: “I became Iggy because I had a sadistic boss at a record store... he’d say, ‘Iggy, get me a coffee, light!” This week’s Celebrity Cipher–answers Iggy Pop Puzzle One Solution: Puzzle TwoIggy Solution: “I became because I had a sadistic “Iboss would to live forever insay, people’s at alike record store... he’d ‘Iggy, Home Services get meand a coffee, light!” hearts minds; that would be fun. I’ll – Iggy Pop leave the world my art.” – Suzi Quatro Puzzle Two Solution: “I would to liveSudoku forever in people’s Thislike week’s answers hearts and minds; that would be fun. I’ll leave the world my art.” – Suzi Quatro

Puzzle Two Solution: “I would like to live forever in people’s hearts and minds; that would be fun. I’ll Announcements leave the world my art.” – Suzi under Quatro FOUND BOAT - Paddle Boat lodged my

dock in the C Section on Memorial Day. Please call ©2018 NEA, Inc. This week’s Sudoku and identify your boat and weanswers will arrange a reunion! 386-569-9873. ThisCall week’s Crossword answers

This week’s Sudoku answers

SOFA W/COVER $100; Double reclining Loveseat $100; Glass top Dinette $50. Call 386−313−1085. AMERICAN SIGNATURE Table $125 OBO. Great condition/New $299. Call (386) 864−3442. AQUARIUM WITH Stand − 26 gallon, all accessories and fish $125. Call (386) 313−5754. BEDROOM DRESSER With mirror. Maple hues. Like new. Can provide pics. $200 (678) 770−7639. CHICCO STROLLER with cup holders and storage bin $25; PackinPlay $15. (386) 263−7509. HANGING LIGHT Nice, Frosted Globe, Single Bulb $30. Call (386) 316−9990.

Announcements NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes

©2018 NEA, Inc.

This week’s Crossword answers

2018

©2018 NEA, Inc.

This week’s Crossword answers ©2018 NEA, Inc.

This week’s Crossword answers

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Paul Berton Custom Canvas located at 40 Clubhouse Dr., Apt 108 in the County of Flagler in the City of Palm Coast, Florida 32137 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL.

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Announcements

Puzzle One Solution: “I became Iggy because I had a sadistic boss at a record store... he’d say, ‘Iggy, get me a coffee, light!” – Iggy Pop

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2018

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Paul Berton Custom Canvas located at 40 Clubhouse Dr., Apt 108 in the County of Flagler in the City of Palm Coast, Florida 32137 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL.

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