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TEMPLETON

Planning and Design collaborative studies towards a prosperous future

Prepared for: San Luis Obispo County Prepared by: Cal Poly City & Regional Planning


Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Department of City and Regional Planning Professor Zeljka Pavlovich Howard | 2013

The Project Team Jordan Cowell Jeannette Finck Emily Gerger Matt Kawashima ChaneĂŠ Malfavon Derrick Rinauro Tessa Salzman

In Collaboration with County of San Luis Obispo

Special Thanks To Chuck Stevenson Mike Wulkin Airlin Singewald Karen Nall Jeff Lagato Dana Lilley

Acknowledgem


ments


Contents

PREFACE

1

INTRODUCTION

2

Project Overview

5

Planning Approach

6

Guiding Principles

7

BACKGROUND

10

Location and Context

13

Historic Resources

13

Exisiting Characteristics

13

Opportunities & Challenges

17

ENVISION TEMPLETON

20

Vision Statement

23

Planning Goals

23

2030 Concept Proposal

24

DOWNTOWN OPPORTUNITY AREA

28

Existing Characteristics

31

Opportunities & Challenges

33

Visualize Downtown Templeton

33

REFERENCES

56

Works Cited

59

Image Sources

60

Appendix

62


PREFACE The purpose of this report is to convey the proposals by the Community Planning Lab class at Cal Poly for future development in the small unincorporated community of Templeton. This report details the steps that were taken and the outcomes of the planning process in order to record and communicate the recommendations to the San Luis Obispo County Planning and Building Department. The focus of the recommendations in this report revolve around the Main Street and Downtown portions of Templeton and are supported by a number of planning and design studies performed. Working as a client of the San Luis Obispo County Planning Department, the students worked in two phases to compile this study. In Phase 1 the students gathered data on existing economic, environmental and land use conditions and performed community outreach through their Visioning Workshop and Focus Group Workshop. In Phase 2 the class collectively created a vision statement and concept plan for Templeton with the feedback from their outreach efforts in mind. The class then split into three groups, each of which focused on an individual opportunity area that were each identified by community members at the workshops. Using background information from Phase 1 and case studies, the students developed a number of alternative proposals on how Templeton could effectively manage growth in the future. This report focuses specifically on Downtown Templeton. The County will use the information and recommendations when and if funding is available for updating the Templeton Community Plan. The Templeton Planning and Design Study contained in this report was prepared by seven City & Regional Planning students at Cal Poly in the Community Planning Lab including ChaneĂŠ Malfavon, Derrick Rinauro, Emily Gerger, Jeannette Finck, Jordan Cowell, Matt Kawashima and Tessa Salzman. Professor Zeljka Howard supervised and offered assistance as necessary over the course of two ten-week academic quarters.

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CHAPTER

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INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION Purpose & Scope

The results of the students’ planning efforts will be used by the San Luis Obispo County Planning and Building Department as a resource of information for the update of the Templeton Community Plan at a later date.

Background

The purpose of this report is to share a vision for the future of the Templeton community and specifically the Downtown area. The proposed recommendations have developed out of a number of planning and design studies. The elements of the proposal address the opportunities and challenges to the future of Templeton as a thriving social and economic hub for local residents and visitors. A conceptual vision for the community is described and followed by a more detailed look at the Downtown. A variety of housing types, land uses, and open space and streetscape designs have been proposed to enhance the Downtown area’s existing character. Details on economic activities, housing, land use designations and densities, elements of a healthy community, and conservation and safety are also provided. Images are included throughout the report to visually demonstrate the vision of the Templeton community and its Downtown.

INTRODUCTION

Project Overview

Regulatory Context & Governing Documents Envision Templeton

Templeton is an unincorporated community governed by San Luis Obispo County. Five elected representatives make up the San Luis Obispo Board of Supervisors. The County’s General Plan, which includes the Salinas River Area Plan and Framework for Planning, the Templeton Community Design Plan, and development regulations documents such as the Land Use Ordinance (Title 22), guide all development in Templeton. County policies and implementation measures must be consistent with the General Plan. Relevant Agencies

The Templeton Community Service District (TCSD) was created in 1976 in accordance with the Community Service District Law, California Government Code §61000, et seq. The TCSD provides many integral services, including fire protection, water, sewer, drainage, parks, and recreation to residents and property owners of Templeton.

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References

Several regional agencies have jurisdiction over the community as well. These include the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG), Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo), and the Air Pollution Control District (APCD). SLOCOG has a central purpose to examine common regional problems, suggest solutions, provide transportation planning and funding for the region, and serve as a forum for the study and resolution of regional issues. LAFCo is responsible for reviewing and approving or disapproving, wholly or partially, all requests for city or special district boundary changes and latent

Opportunity Area

The Templeton Area Advisory Group (TAAG) is a volunteer board comprised of residents within Templeton. TAAG’s purpose is to gain input from the public and relay recommendations to the San Luis Obispo County Building and Planning Department for projects undergoing development review within Templeton.


powers. The APCD “partners with local communities and businesses to protect public health by implementing regulations and programs to preserve our air quality while assisting the County in meeting outdoor air quality standards” (SLO County). Data & Methodology Preparation of the Templeton Planning and Design Study involved extensive planning efforts conducted by the students of the City and Regional Planning Department from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo. This report builds upon information gathered from community outreach events such as a Visioning Workshop, Focus Group Meeting, and community opinion surveys. The report also used additional information from documents such as the San Luis Obispo County General Plan and the Templeton Circulation Study. New information was gathered from census data, GIS data received from San Luis Obispo County and several meetings with the Planning Department and SLOCOG staff. Planning Approach

The planning process took six months and was divided into two phases— Existing Conditions and Concept Plans. Phase 1- Existing Conditions Phase 1 was a three-month long process that took place from September 2012 to December 2012. The process began by compiling primary and secondary data and reviewing relevant studies, research, and reports by the County of San Luis Obispo. These became the foundation for the students’ work. Next, students gather detailed background information regarding population and housing, land use, environmental resources, circulation and noise, and community facilities. The students used site visits, discussion with County staff members, community workshops, and relevant County documents to thoroughly address each of these topics.

Figure 1.1 Students discuss community values and concerns.

Figure 1.2 The group developing potential concepts for the opportunity areas in Templeton.

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In addition to researching existing characteristics, Phase 1 involved several community outreach events, which are summarized below and detailed further in a separate report. At the first community workshop on October 23, 2012 the attendees were divided into several groups and given the chance to outline the opportunities and challenges they feel define their town. The attendees were also asked various questions about what should be preserved and enhanced in Templeton and what their main concerns are as the planning students move forward (see Figure 1.1). The community feedback was used as the basis for concept plans developed in Phase 2. In addition, the students held a meeting with stakeholders on October 29, 2013 with the purpose of sharing results from the previous workshop and discussing issues and opportunities for the development of new businesses in the Ramada Drive area and Downtown (see Figure 1.2). Stakeholders that were present included Ramada Drive business owners, Main Street business owners, Las Tablas Road medical office users, members from the Templeton Area Advisory Group, Templeton Community Services District, Self Help Housing, Chamber of Commerce and the San Luis Obispo County Government. The last public outreach event held in Phase 1 was hosted on November 28, 2012 and focused on developing potential ideas for the industrial Ramada Drive

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Phase 2- Concept Plans

Background

Phase 2 was a three-month process that took place from January 2013 to March 2013, following the completion of the existing conditions reports. In this phase, the student teams developed alternative plans and proposals for future development in the community as a whole and in three specific focus areas including an expansion area outside of the urban reserve line, Ramada Drive, and the Downtown. This second half of this report focuses specifically on the Downtown area proposal and future vision. Students started Phase 2 by visiting existing project sites in San Jose, California and researching case studies in other communities for guidance and inspiration. The class referred to these case studies as they developed four alternative concept plans for the community. Based on feedback from County staff, the four plans were synthesized into one overall concept plan for the community of Templeton as a whole.

Opportunity Area

Guiding Principles

The alternative concept plans were presented to a second community workshop on February 23, 2013 for comments and input (see Figure 1.3). The meeting started off with a summary of information and comments gathered from the past three months and public opinion surveys. The overall concept for Templeton was showcased as well as two of the three opportunity areas, excluding the expansion area. The comments received from the community were taken into account when the Downtown project team synthesized the two alternative plans to create one that best fit Templeton. The final concept plan for each opportunity area was developed and presented to County staff and stakeholders at Cal Poly on March 13, 2013. The result of Phase 2 was the specific proposal for future development in Downtown Templeton along with supporting goals, policies and implementation measures.

Envision Templeton

Next each focus group developed two alternative concept plans for their respective areas that reflected the synthesis of information and comments from outreach efforts and relevant planning issues.

Figure 1.3 Students share the initial concept plan proposal.

INTRODUCTION

area. This meeting was predominantly attended by business and landowners of the area. Throughout Phase 1, online surveys were available to reach community members and business owners who were unable to attend the public outreach events.

Throughout the planning process the students adhered to several guiding principles in order to ensure complete, logical, thoughtful proposals. Strategic Growth Principles

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References

The project team used Strategic Growth Principles in developing proposals for Templeton and the specific opportunity areas. These principles are meant to create a proactive planning approach that focuses on a balance of environmental, economic, and social equity concerns. Strategic growth is an efficient and environmentally sensitive pattern of development that provides people with a variety of travel, housing and employment choices.


Healthy Communities The project team referenced Healthy Community Principles to guide the development process. These principles focus on a variety of transportation options (see Figure 1.4) including safe pedestrian and bike routes, recreational options, and a close proximity of housing to community services and amenities. Plan elements were developed accordingly. Community Input

Figure 1.4 Proposed bike lanes in Downtown Templeton.

Community input is an important part of the planning process. It is necessary to determine the values of the community and to understand the local perspective. Several community outreach events were held during Phase 1 and 2 to gain as much input and feedback as possible. The results were used as a guiding principle throughout the students’ planning process. San Luis Obispo County Goals In addition to community input, the students used specific goals set forth by the County as a basis for concept development. County goals address economic growth, particularly in the Ramada Drive and Downtown areas, greater variety of housing options and complete streets. Case Studies: Lessons Learned Niwot, Colorado

Figure 1.5 Thriving Downtown Niwot with an old western character.

The Niwot Trail Master Plan provides an effective example of an appropriate multi modal trail plan. It outlines existing conditions of the land, trail recommendations, and implementation strategies for an extensive trail network. The main goals are to create safe, high quality recreational trails as a part of a comprehensive circulation system, minimize environmental and neighborhood impacts, and develop multiple use regional trail linkages to promote alternative transportation modes. Most of the trails are open to bikes, hiking, horses and leashed dogs. There is a total of 6.4 miles of trails with three parking lots as well as picnic areas included in the Plan. This is a great example of what the community members in Templeton are looking for when it comes to the trail system. Niwot also boasts a successful downtown. Restaurants, shopping, and other businesses attract visitors from Boulder, Denver, and Fort Collins. While Niwot is a destination for shopping and dining, it manages to maintain its small town feel as Templeton wishes to do. Most buildings are one-story and built in a western style (see Figure 1.5). Consistent landscaping features embrace both vehicles and pedestrians without one dominating the other. Wide sidewalks and street furniture encourage pedestrians to walk along 2nd Avenue. Niwot has utilized urban guidelines without compromising historic infrastructure. Additionally, Niwot runs a user friendly website that includes an arts and entertainment section, business directory, community directory, list of events, and a ‘What’s HOT in Niwot’ blog. This is a great way for the community to communicate with each other and stay informed on local events.

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Templeton Planning and Design Studies


INTRODUCTION

Morgan Hill, California Morgan Hill was able to successfully renovate their downtown corridor and transform it from a desolate, vehicle-oriented spot to a destination for pedestrians and visitors. For many years downtown Morgan Hill was a place where cars traveled at high speeds, pedestrians were rare and there was little to no outdoor dining. The City decided to address this issue through the creation of a specific plan for the downtown corridor. Features included were various traffic calming measures, increased residential densities and updated zoning to allow outdoor dining.

Background

Figure 1.6 Outdoor dining in Downtown Morgan Hill.

Following implementation of these various measures, the downtown started to become a lively, desirable destination. Bulb-outs and speed humps decreased speeds and increased safety for pedestrians. By allowing increased residential densities the city was able to increase the number of residents physically present in the area, as well as allow residents to live close enough to the resources they need to be able to walk instead of use a vehicle. Another key part to the specific plan was to allow outdoor dining. The climate is very mild in Morgan Hill and with the addition of outdoor dining residents are now much more willing to walk downtown and eat when the weather is nice (see Figure 1.6). Morgan Hill was able to successfully transform the downtown from a desolate area to a marquee destination for residents and visitors through implementation of trafficcalming measures, landscaping, and improved zoning codes.

Envision Templeton Opportunity Area References

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CHAPTER

2


BACKGROUND


BACKGROUND

Templeton and the greater San Luis Obispo area has been inhabited by people for hundreds of years and over time significant artifacts from previous civilizations have been discovered. As development continues in Templeton, the guidelines stipulated in the San Luis Obispo County Land Use Element, California Public Resources Code, and Health/ Safety Code must be referenced. While discovered Native American sites are kept confidential to protect cultural and historical artifacts, the areas around the Salinas River are of most concern because this is where the Salinas Indians used to live. Land Use

References

Existing Characteristics

A total of 2,792 acres of land exist within Templeton’s Urban Reserve Line. Presently, 1,935 acres (69%) of this land is utilized for residential uses while the remaining land is used for commercial, industrial, and other uses. While 78% of the land is developed, 22% remains vacant. Templeton’s full build out potential would accommodate 4,728 new residential units and a total March 2013

Opportunity Area

Templeton maintains a historic western architectural style specifically along Main Street in the Downtown. The residents have expressed a strong desire to uphold this style along with the small town character and environmental aesthetic which define the community. Templeton has a Community Design Plan which outlines how development should be designed in order to achieve the desired character. Figure 2.2 Templeton Historic Buildings designates the historic sites in the community and is supported by the Historic Buildings Table (see appendix) that provides a description of each site.

Envision Templeton

Historic Resources

Templeton possess a rich cultural history, apparent in many aspects of the community. The town currently houses numerous historic buildings erected early in Templeton’s history. The land where Templeton sits was originally sold to the Southern Pacific Railroad, named after Charles F. Crocker’s son, Templeton. In 1886, the town became part of the railroad expansion from San Francisco to the Central Coast, which was the last stop on the railroad line. The railroad expansion helped bring people to the area and shape the town as it is today. Many of the historic buildings can still be seen in the Downtown, and reflect the western style prevalent during past decades.

BACKGROUND

Figure 2.1 Location Map of Templeton with in the state and the county

The Town of Templeton is located in northern San Luis Obispo County approximately 200 miles south of San Francisco and 200 miles north of Los Angeles. The unincorporated community is home to 7,574 residents, and is situated south of Paso Robles and north of Atascadero (see Figure 2.1). The town is located in the heart of the San Luis Obispo County wine country, which acts as a major attraction for visitors to the region. Templeton is divided to the east and west by Highway 101. Downtown Templeton is to the east of Highway 101, the Twin Cities Medical Center is located to the west. The California State Route 46 (SR 46) runs east-west from Cambria to Paso Robles just north of Templeton, connecting the State Route 1 to Highway 101.

Introduction

Location and Context

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Figure 2.2 Templeton Historic Buildings

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Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Table 2.13Existing LandUse UseDistribution Distribution Table Existing Land % of total Acres 69.31% 4.71% 26.16% 12.72% 25.71% 21.48% 7.29% 5.60% 3.35% 5.12% 0.12% 9.22% 5.82% 0.17% 0.87% 2.36%

Developed Acres 1,627.19 129.35 688.30 321.27 488.27 312.43 77.54 93.47 56.09 81.91 3.42 251.19 162.50 4.68 18.15 65.86

% Acres Dev. 84.09% 98.28% 94.23% 90.48% 68.01% 52.10% 38.08% 59.83% 59.96% 57.35% 100.00% 97.63% 100.00% 100.00% 74.81% 100.00%

Vacant Acres 307.88 2.26 42.17 33.79 229.66 287.22 126.10 62.75 37.46 60.91 6.11 6.11 -

% Acres Vacant 15.91% 1.72% 5.77% 9.52% 31.99% 47.90% 61.92% 40.17% 40.04% 42.65% 0.00% 2.37% 0.00% 0.00% 25.19% 0.00%

2,792.02

100.00%

2,190.81

78.47%

601.21

21.53%

Total

Housing

Opportunity Area

Figure 2.3 Example of existing house in Templeton

Templeton currently has a population of 7,674 residents. The community has seen a 63.7% increase in the population since 1960 (US Census Bureau, 2010). Evidence of this population growth is seen in the 56% increase in housing from 1980-1999. During this time, particularly from 1990-1999, there was a large influx of people moving into owner occupied dwellings. Today, owneroccupied dwellings dominate in Templeton with 68.1% of units being owner occupied while only 31.9% are renter-occupied. Residential land uses in Templeton include multi family, single family (see Figure 2.3), suburban, and rural. Combined, these uses make up 1,935 acres or 69% of the total acreage in Templeton. Among these residential land uses, single family makes up 38%; Rural 37%; Suburban 18%; and Multi family 7%. The community has three affordable housing projects which in total provide 125 affordable housing units, or 4% of the entire housing stock (San Luis Obispo County Housing Element).

Envision Templeton

of 12,038 new residents (US Census Bureau, 2010). See Table 2.1 for more details on existing land use distrbution of Templeton.

BACKGROUND

Residential Residential Multi Family Residential Single Family Residential Suburban Residential Rural Commercial Commercial Retail Commercial Services Office Professional Industrial Mixed Use Other Public Facilities Recreation Agriculture Open Space

Acreage 1,935.07 131.61 730.47 355.06 717.93 599.65 203.64 156.22 93.55 142.82 3.42 257.30 162.50 4.68 24.26 65.86

Introduction

Existing Land Use

Economic Activities

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References

Templeton currently has a variety of economic activities, including healthcare, construction, and retail. The medical industry attracts the majority of people who come from outside of Templeton. The Twin Cities Community Hospital is supported by an array of medical facilities and services creating a thriving medical economy. Retail activity is primarily found along Main Street in the downtown area. Construction related activity is found primarily along Ramada Drive in the northern area of Templeton.


Agriculture, specifically viticulture and wine related business is an activity found within Templeton and in the area surrounding the community. Vineyards are popular in the region and bring tourists to the area. Natural Environment

Figure 2.4 Natural environment of Templeton

Environmental factors ranging from geological, biological, and watershed currently affect future development within Templeton. The Jolon Fault running along the northeast corner of the community’s Urban Reserve Line poses the threat of erosion, landslide, and other serious hazards. Additionally, the sloping hillsides on the western community pose similar threats. Oak woodland habitat can be found throughout the community but exists primarily outside of the urban reserve line (San Luis Obispo County Conservation and Open Space Element). Further analysis of this native habitat would be necessary for any future development. The Salinas River Flood zone and the Toad Creek watershed (see Figure 2.4) affect large areas of Templeton with the potential for flooding (Templeton Drainage and Flood Control Study, 2011). Community Services & Facilities Community Services include recreation, education, utilities, and public safety. Each service and facility serves Templeton through unique amenities and resources. The local fire and sheriff departments meet current needs in Templeton. The Fire Department utilizes a pool of volunteer firefighters and several full-time employees while the Sheriff Department has a facility within the Templeton urban reserve line to provide fast response times. The schools and parks in Templeton are two areas of concern for the community. There are four schools in Templeton and several acres of parks and open space. However, the Templeton School District has been over capacity since 2002, and the amount of park space is inadequate based on the San Luis Obispo County criteria. Currently, the three existing parks, Templeton Park, Templeton Skate Park and Bethel Park, cover 9.3 acres, or approximately 69 acres short of the County requirement (Community Services Report, 2011). In addition to the three parks in Templeton, there are sports fields at the local schools and a large sports field just north of Downtown. Public utilities are not a primary concern in the community because they are all currently supplying the demand. According to the Templeton CSD Water System Update Master Plan, the community currently has a greater water supply than it does demand, partially due to the Lake Nacimiento Project (Wallace Group, 2005). Additionally, the Chicago Grande Landfill serving Templeton is expected to serve Templeton until 2042. Circulation The primary access to Templeton is US Highway 101, running north-south, and State Highway 46, running east-west. In addition, there are a few smaller connection routes running from north to south and from east to west. Most roads within Templeton meet the County’s level of service (LOS) standards. However, there are a number of roads, primarily major connector roads, which fall below the County LOS standards including the Ramada Drive-

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Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Opportunities and Challenges

Introduction

Highway 46 Intersection and the Main Street at Vineyard Drive Intersection. Public transit within Templeton is limited to a single bus and a park-and-ride stop due to lack of demand and fiscal challenges. Bicycling and pedestrian facilities are constrained due to the lack of infrastructure such as bike lanes and sidewalks in many places. Additionally, the Union Pacific Railroad runs just east of the community’s Urban Reserve Line. Opportunities Land Use

Ramada Drive is currently underutilized as a light industrial district for Templeton. Focusing development on this area has the potential to bring more economic activity to the community as well as new amenities to residents.

Population, Housing and Economics There are locations existing in Templeton conducive to a diversity of housing projects or retail and commercial services. This opportunity offers the potential to serve an increasing population’s housing and retail needs, while expanding the job market.

Natural Environmental Conditions Most of the identified natural hazards are located outside of the Templeton urban reserve line. Major areas in Templeton such as Ramada Drive, Las Tablas Road, and the Downtown area are largely unaffected by environmental constraints. While flooding and landslide affect part of the community, the impacts may be mitigated.

Opportunity Area

Templeton’s location, its wine and agriculture industry and its small town, rural characteristic are attractive features that bring in tourism. Currently, the specialized industries in Templeton are construction, manufacturing, retail, healthcare services and education. These industries offer potential for economic growth as they expand in the future.

Envision Templeton

Templeton also has the opportunity to use a high-tech fiber optic cable. Fully developing access may serve to attract technology-related businesses to settle in Templeton.

BACKGROUND

Templeton’s vacant and underutilized lots provide many opportunities for development. The Main Street corridor has room for infill projects. Vacant and underutilized lots may be repurposed to accommodate the additional needs of Templeton without additional expansion into the surrounding open space. Vacant land along Las Tablas Road may also be utilized to continue medicalrelated development.

Community Facilities

Figure 2.5 Twin Cities Hospital

Templeton also takes pride in its high quality school system. While the schools are full, they appeal to families and residents outside of Templeton and thus expanding facilities may become a viable option. March 2013

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References

Templeton has a large regional medical center (see Figure 2.5) with facilities that attract people from around the County and offer easy access to medical services for Templeton residents. There is a strong potential for this center to expand in the future bringing more jobs and visitors from outside Templeton.


Recently, there have been utility upgrades in water services that allow for greater allocation of water to Templeton. The increased capacity allows for more potential development and growth. Templeton is surrounded by open space that provides recreational opportunities. These areas offer space for new parks and recreational facilities to serve the community. Circulation Templeton has the potential to make street improvements that will allow for safer pedestrian and bicycle activity throughout the town, and specifically in school zones. These improvements enhance connectivity, increase the use of alternative modes of transportation and provide recreational opportunities to residents. While there currently are limited public transportation options, Templeton could accommodate an increased frequency of buses with few changes to the existing infrastructure. Challenges Land Use Templeton has vacant, underutilized parcels concentrated along Ramada Drive and in its Downtown along Main Street. Although this is also an opportunity, development is a challenge along Ramada Drive in particular due to impact fees related to road and public utility infrastructure improvements. Additionally, many community members are reluctant towards diversifying housing options. Residents of Templeton have expressed opposition to increasing density in the area. Large, single-family lots are generally preferred over multi-family developments. Population, Housing and Economics Population, housing availability and economic activities are interrelated because as one grows, the others must also adjust. These aspects of a community are also closely tied to existing land uses. Templeton currently has few housing options for residents and families who work in the medical or agricultural industries and earn middle level incomes. As these economic sectors grow and the economy diversifies a wider variety of housing options will be necessary. Furthermore, population projections demonstrate that the number of people in Templeton is growing faster than the previously projected rate. Another challenge related to population will be increasing the capacity of the schools. Natural Environmental Conditions Hazards related to the natural setting in Templeton such as flooding and landslide risk may impede development. In particular, the Toad Creek flood

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Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Introduction

zone affects the Ramada Road and Downtown area. New development in these areas will need to consider and mitigate flooding hazards. The northwestern portion of Templeton may be affected by landslide and therefore additional housing or development will need to address the possibility. Community Facilities

The Twin Cities Hospital may also need to expand its facilities in the near future. This has been identified as a challenge because there are no identifiable means of funding for such a project.

BACKGROUND

Providing adequate community services is a challenge as there is a need for expansion to accommodate future growth and capacity. For example, the schools in Templeton are all at, or above capacity. There are no current plans for permanent expansion. Expected population growth will also require a costly wastewater system update. Templeton is lacking sufficient parkland to provide adequate acreage for residents.

Circulation

Figure 2.6 Circulation on North Main St.

Within the urban reserve line, there are intermittent pathways that lack continuity. Pedestrian movement is restricted because of lack of sidewalks. This poses challenges to achieving American Disability Act accessibility as well.

Opportunity Area

Community members have identified that there are drainage problems along the northern section of Main Street. This is consistent with the flooding zones identified by natural hazard research. This flooding could indicate a need for additional infrastructure improvements. New and proposed development must take this into consideration and adapt with flood mitigation or other measures.

Envision Templeton

The main challenges identified in Templeton are related to the high levels of traffic and congestion on Vineyard Drive, Main Street, and Las Tablas Road. There are especially high amounts of traffic during peak travel times in the morning and the evening. Because these roads are already at capacity, new development or growth may require expensive and large-scale infrastructure improvements. Furthermore, the high levels of traffic pose potentially dangerous impacts to bike and pedestrian safety (see Figure 2.6).

References

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CHAPTER

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ENVISION TEMPLETON


ENVISION TEMPLETON

Planning Goals

Through the pride and focused leadership of its citizens, Templeton will continue to thrive as a complete and healthy small town that celebrates the natural aesthetics of the landscape. An exceptional quality of life shall be ensured for its residents through fostering a diverse, local economy and guaranteeing the exceptional provision of amenities. Through enhancing the historic, small town character, Templeton will become a marquee destination in San Luis Obispo County. The community will continue to uphold vibrant and secure neighborhoods for current residents and future generations. To provide adequate outdoor recreation that promotes a healthy, active lifestyle for residents.

II.

To improve development opportunities which create a vibrant economic base with a variety of choices for community members.

III.

To manage growth in a way that maintains existing community design guidelines and development restrictions.

IV.

To offer a variety of high quality housing that provides opportunities for all social and economic groups.

V.

To offset vehicular congestion by enhancing and encouraging alternative mobility through increased regional transit options, bicycling and pedestrian infrastructure, and recreational trails.

VI.

To embrace the function, productivity and long-term capability of environmentally sensitive and important natural communities and wildlife habitats.

VII.

To sustain Templeton’s distinguished educational system by increasing youth programs and increasing capacity.

VIII.

To improve infrastructure to effectively serve projected growth levels thereby ensuring the well-being and safety of the community.

IX.

To develop gateways and a system of signage that eases wayfinding within the community and creates a sense of place.

X.

To pursue policy-advancing, smart, citizen-focused leadership that enhances community confidence in future infrastructure projects.

XI.

To create a sense of place through built and natural characteristics and historic resources, while protecting the uniqueness of Templeton’s historic character.

XII.

To preserve natural resources while continuing to provide high quality services for residents.

Background

I.

Introduction

Vision Statement

ENVISION TEMPLETON Opportunity Area References

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2030 Concept Proposal

The Envision Templeton 2030 Concept (see Figure 3.1) promotes quintessential community values through directing development to underutilized properties, encouraging Accessory Development Units, intensifying housing in the Medical District, enhancing Downtown’s Main Street as a historic and active commercial core, and strengthening Ramada Drive to be an essential economic driver of North County. The Downtown corridor along Main Street will increase mixed use development (including primarily office and commercial activities) and the choice of available housing types. Currently, there are primarily single family residences, however the zoning will allow for higher densities than are currently being utilized. In addition to mixed use and increased housing options, Main Street will implement traffic calming measures and allot space along the train tracks for a park to serve as the De Anza trail head. The Ramada Drive corridor will continue to operate as a primarily industrial area, while incorporating few commercial services. There will be land designated for parks and the development of sports fields. There will also be an additional north-south arterial road that will connect to Main Street and incorporate the elements of a complete street.

Figure 3.2 Example of pedestrian and bicycle trail from San Diego, CA.

Las Tablas Road will continue to build on the currently existing medical facilities and transform into a regional medical hub. There will be increased medical office space and senior housing as well as outdoor recreational space. To more effectively serve the medical center patrons, there will be retail development that addresses additional needs such as restaurants or shopping. The concept focuses on healthy and sustainable circulation enhancements through the implementation of complete streets, or streets designed to safely support all modes of travel. A new trail network along the Toad Creek Riparian zone will be developed to provide better connectivity between the east and west sides of Templeton. This trail network will connect to the de Anza Trail as well as provide additional routes north and south. Open Space and Recreation The Templeton 2030 Concept Plan envisions providing adequate park space within the community (see Figure 3.5, page 27). The Plan proposes an additional park southeast of the Granary to serve as a trailhead or rest stop on the de Anza Trail covering approximately four acres. The Plan also envisions a network of pedestrian and bicycle trails throughout the community connecting the Downtown core to the rest of Templeton (see Figure 3.2).

Figure 3.3 Example of low impact development from Lake County, IL.

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Infrastructure and Public Facilities The Concept Plan proposes traffic calming strategies and additional pedestrian and bicycling infrastructure along Main Street and Vineyard Drive. Additionally, the Plan proposes streetscaping elements such as planting trees and shrubs to provide shade for pedestrians throughout the Templeton community. Low impact development design principles are also proposed to prevent annual flooding in vulnerable areas and to recharge the depleted ground water reservoir (see Figure 3.3).

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Figure 3.1 Envision Templeton Concept Proposal Map

Introduction

Background

ENVISION TEMPLETON Opportunity Area

References

25

March 2013


Housing Supply The Plan proposes increasing the amount of multi-unit residential housing options available (see Figure 3.4). This will reduce the need for outward expansion and accommodate population growth in the future. The Plan also envisions maintaining the current architectural aesthetic and upholding the safe, community oriented character of Templeton’s existing neighborhoods. Smart Growth and Healthy Communities

Figure 3.4 Example of multi-unit residential housing options

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Smart Growth is one of the keys to developing a healthy city and is defined as “…building urban, suburban and rural communities with housing and transportation choices near jobs, shops and schools. This approach supports local economies and protects the environment” (CDC). In addition to smart growth, the Plan addresses the practice of Healthy Communities which promotes walkability, encourages alternative transportation options and creates a community where no individual mode of transportation takes priority over the needs of another. “The Center for Disease Control’s Healthy Communities Program works with communities through local, state and territory, and national partnerships to improve community leaders and stakeholders' skills and commitments for establishing, advancing, and maintaining effective population-based strategies that reduce the burden of chronic disease and achieve health equity” (CDC). The concept addresses these two ideas through various traffic calming measures, improved pedestrian facilities, more outdoor recreation options, increased mixed use and increased housing options.

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Figure 3.5 Proposed Open Space and Recreation

Introduction

Background

ENVISION TEMPLETON Opportunity Area

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CHAPTER

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DOWNTOWN OPPORTUNITY AREA


Downtown Opportunity Area Downtown Templeton is the heart and center of the community of Templeton, and supports the majority of shopping and retail options within the city. The Downtown area runs along the eastern part of Templeton Urban Reserve Line (URL) and parallels Highway 101. Figure 4.2 shows the location of Downtown in the context of the community. The Downtown area is identified as all areas to the west of Old County Road, to the east of the Union Pacific railroad tracks, to the south of 8th street, and to the north of Gibson Road. These specific boundaries can be seen in Figure .

Figure 4.1 Templeton Feed and Grain

Existing Land Use

Total 1)

% of total Acres 44.98% 21.49% 23.49% 0.00% 0.00% 40.43% 27.64% 6.48% 5.38% 0.71% 0.23% 14.59% 8.39% 6.19% 0.00% 0.00%

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Developed Acres % Acres Dev. Vacant Acres 29.71 44.77% 0.14 14.19 21.38% 0.07 15.52 23.39% 0.07 0.00% 0.00 0.00% 0.00 17.79 26.81% 9.04 11.21 16.89% 7.13 2.39 3.60% 1.91 3.57 5.38% 0.00 0.47 0.71% 0.00 0.15 0.23% 0.00 9.68 14.59% 0.00 5.57 8.39% 0.00 4.11 6.19% 0.00 0.00% 0.00 0.00% 0.00

57.18

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References

Residential Residential Multi Family Residential Single Family Residential Suburban Residential Rural Commercial Commercial Retail Commercial Services Office Professional Industrial Mixed Use Other Public Facilities Recreation Agriculture Open Space

Acreage 1 29.85 14.26 15.59 26.83 18.34 4.30 3.57 0.47 0.15 9.68 5.57 4.11 -

OPPORTUNITY AREA

Table5: 4.1: Existing LandCore Uses Downtown Table Downtown Study Area

13.83%

Total acres were acquired though GIS data calculations. The GIS data was supplied by the County of San Luis Obispo

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Envision Templeton

Downtown Templeton has a variety of different land uses, but its most prevalent land uses are commercial and retail. Commercial retail options are found almost exclusively on parcels fronting Main Street in Downtown. Residential uses, both single family and multi-family, are found in the areas surrounding Main Street. Table 4.1 shows the distribution of current land uses found in Downtown Templeton. A total of 66.36 total acres can be found in the Downtown, with commercial and residential uses occupying a total of 26.83 and 29.85 acres, respectively. Templeton Park and the skate park occupy 4.11 acres of recreation land (Templeton Land Use Study, 2011).

Background

A number of historic buildings exist within the Downtown core of Templeton. Historic buildings date back to the late 1800s when Templeton was the last stop on the Union Pacific Railroad line that started in San Francisco. The specific locations of historic buildings in the community can be found in Figure 4.1. The historic Templeton Feed and Grain building is an especially recognizable landmark in the community towering above surrounding buildings in Downtown (see Figure 4.1). More detailed information regarding the specific locations and history of each historical building can be found the Historic Buildings Table (see Appendix).

Introduction

Existing Characteristics

31


Figure 4.2 Downtown Location Map

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Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Opportunities and Challenges

Opportunities

Background

Although Templeton is unincorporated, its close proximity to incorporated cities such as Paso Robles and Atascadero ensures sufficient amenities and services for residents. Templeton has a variety of public facilities such as recreational sports fields, parks and a strong public school system. Templeton Park and the potential connection to the de Anza Trail also offer recreational opportunities that may be expanded on in the future.

Introduction

A number of opportunities related to future development in Downtown Templeton have been identified in order to capitalize on positive attributes of the community. The existing housing stock and the vacant and underutilized lots provide opportunities for a flexible and diverse variety of land uses in the future, while the unique, existing architectural style and the wide streets offer the opportunity to establish a strong Downtown identity. The Downtown area also presents a strong economic base through its small, local businesses, wine stores and other boutiques, and Templeton Feed & Granary. Future economic growth could be dramatically enhanced through the potential fiber optic connection as well.

Challenges

Another challenge will be to develop a strong identity for Downtown Templeton through gateways and signage, multi modal streetscaping, and an enhanced connection between Main Street and Templeton Park. These existing opportunities and challenges guided the team as the vision and future development proposals for the Downtown area were formulated. Visualize Downtown Templeton Vison Statement

OPPORTUNITY AREA

The housing stock, the school’s capacity for more students, and new businesses and services will all have to be augmented if Templeton is to serve an increasing population in the future.

Envision Templeton

While there are many opportunities in Downtown Templeton, there are also a number of challenges that must be considered to make informed proposals for future development. Heavy traffic at certain intersections, lacking pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure and providing sufficient parking are challenges that will only intensify as more people begin to visit Downtown. The most significant circulation challenges are a result of truck traffic to the Granary, congested intersections around the schools at certain hours and the low level of service at the Las Tablas and Main Street intersection.

Downtown Templeton will thrive as a social and economic community focal point that embraces its small town charm and expands on its local amenities while fostering an attractive, relaxed, and walkable environment for residents to enjoy References

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Goals

I. Promote a healthy, vibrant Downtown by providing outdoor gathering spaces and recreational opportunities adjacent and close to Main Street. II. Provide sufficient public facilities that can accommodate the current and future needs of downtown residential and business activity and growth.

Concept Plan Proposal

1

Figure 4.4 Wayfinding Signage

III.

Offset vehicular congestion by enhancing and encouraging pedestrian and bicycle activity through additional infrastructure and traffic calming strategies along Main Street.

IV.

Provide a variety of high quality housing types that are within close proximity to Downtown amenities and services.

The concept plan for Downtown Templeton (see Figure 4.7) is characterized by increased economic activity along Main Street, a variety of housing types, place making through wayfinding features and highlighting historic features, and multimodal circulation options. The plan proposes increased opportunity for commercial, retail, and office spaces fronting Main Street and a variety of housing types behind these businesses creating a horizontal mixed use form. The plan focuses on defining the Downtown core as a unique place within Templeton through a Western themed entrance archway and coordinating wayfinding signage. If the Templeton Feed and Grain should ever relocate or is no longer economically viable, the plan proposes restoring and reusing the historic Granary building for a public market space or a venue for community events in order to maintain the site as a source of historic pride for the community. The plan emphasizes multi modal transportation through the addition of bike lanes, bulbouts as a traffic calming measure and focus on pedestrian infrastructure through sidewalks, stop signs, and designated crossings. An additional parking lot at the south end of Main Street and enhanced pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure will encourage visitors to walk the streets, thereby increasing pedestrian traffic for businesses. A variety of housing types including single family, duplex, and townhomes are proposed and will have design standards that will maintain the neighborhoods through landscaping, street facing entrances, and planned parking. A significant addition to the Downtown area is the proposed de Anza Trail head which will connect the entire community to the de Anza Trail that is planned to run from Atascadero to Paso Robles.

Key Features 2 TEMPLETON

Wayfinding Western-style wayfinding signage will allow tourists and visitors to travel easily and also serve as public art (see Figure 4.4). Main Archway Located at the South entrance of Downtown on Main Street, this archway will create an identity for Templeton (see Figure 4.5).

Figure 4.5 Main Entry Archway

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Figure 4.7 Proposed Concept Plan Introduction

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Complete Street Bulb-outs help create safer intersections for pedestrians and provide aesthetically pleasing vegetation. Bike lanes will help alleviate auto oriented streetscapes (see Figure 4.6). Repurpose Granary The Granary will be repurposed as an outdoor public space that can be used for events, farmers market, and recreational uses (see Figure 4.8).

Figure 4.6 Bulbout with landscaping and designated crosswalks

De Anza Trailhead The de Anza Trail Head will encourage recreational activity and attract residents of neighboring towns. The trailhead entrance will act as a gateway to Templeton (see Figure 4.9). Public Space & Recreation

Built Environment Characteristics

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As Templeton continues to grow, the Downtown Concept Plan seeks to develop additional parks including a new park southeast of Templeton Feed & Mill along the railroad tracks and a park along Ramada Drive to provide more outdoor space for Templeton residents. The Plan also highlights the Downtown as a destination for commuters and recreators via the de Anza Trail head proposed to be located north of the granary to the east of Main Street. A public space is also proposed adjacent to the granary as a semi-permanent outdoor public market and gathering space. This location will be flexible and encourage community interaction with vegetation and outdoor furniture. It will attract economic activity while celebrating Templeton’s historic resources and character.

Figure 4.8 Repurposed Granary

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Infrastructure and Public Facilities The vision for Downtown Templeton is to serve all of its residents and their economic and social needs. In order to do this utility infrastructure, as well as the circulation system of the Downtown must be capable of supplying demand.

Figure 4.9 De Anza Trailhead

If or when the Templeton Feed & Grain becomes economically unviable to operate, or relocates, it is envisioned that that space will be repurposed into a venue for entertainment events, semi-permanent markets, or other public services. Circulation Mobility and accessibility to Downtown Templeton relies on Main Street which acts as the primary thoroughfare. Main Street and its multiple cross streets will serve as as the backbone of the circulation system in the Downtown corridor, providing pedestrians and vehicles access to the businesses, neighborhoods and freeway on ramps within proximity. In the future Main Street will be a comfortable, safe street for all modes of transportation. In order to accomplish this the low levels of service at the

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Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Figure 4.10 Class II Bike Lane

Background

The Concept Plan proposes traffic calming strategies and additional pedestrian and bicycling infrastructure on Main Street as well. A Class II bike lane is proposed (see Figure 4.10) as a separate lane, designated by a different color. In addition to bike lanes there will be bulb-outs, stop signs, landscaping and street furniture throughout Downtown. These elements tend to slow driving speeds and shorten crossing distances for pedestrians in the case of bulb-outs. The proposed landscaping elements include trees and shrubs to provide shade for pedestrians and low impact development techniques to prevent annual flooding and recharge the depleted ground water reservoir. Lastly, the proposed connection to the de Anza Trail will increase access to and from Templeton.

Introduction

intersection at the north end of Main Street and the intersection directly off Highway 101 at Vineyard Drive that leads to Main Street must be enhanced.

Envision Templeton OPPORTUNITY AREA References

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Land Use Designations

Figure 4.11 Commercial Service

Commercial Services Commercial Service (see Figure 4.11) land use designation is located on the edge of the downtown core as it transitions towards Ramada Drive. This is in order to provide areas for commercial service uses (see Figure 4.12) that are more compatible with the downtown core. In addition, the location of the Templeton Feed and Grain is zoned commercial service in order to maintain the building and business as a unique asset of Downtown. They are to be accessed from collector and arterial streets to avoid use of residential streets for access or deliveries. In general, commercial service buildings should be consistent with the County’s Community Design guidelines and the character of Downtown as a whole (see Table 4.2). Allowable Uses: May include a variety of commercial uses and small scale industrial uses, including: • Commercial Services • Retail • Nurseries • Templeton Feed and Grain For further information, see Allowable Land Uses and Permit Requirements in the County of San Luis Obispo Framework for Planning (Inland) document. Table 4.2: Commercial Services Development Standards Maximum Height 2 Stories Minimum Parcel Size 6,000 sq. ft. Density Up to 38 units per acre See Templeton Community Design Design Guidelines

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Figure 4.13 Office Professional

Office Professional The proposal seeks to provide more opportunities for office professional uses (see Figure 4.13) located in the Downtown area. This is consistent with the County goal of providing “office and professional development in downtown community centers and civic areas” (Framework for Planning, 6-17). The Office Professional land use designation is located on the edges of the downtown core (see Figure 4.14) in order to maintain a pedestrian oriented atmosphere in the central part of Main Street. Access to office buildings should be located on arterial or collector roads to avoid increased congestion on neighborhood streets. Office buildings are not to exceed two stories (see Table 4.3) and are to be consistent with the County’s Community Design Guidelines and the small, pedestrian scale of Templeton and specifically the Downtown area. Allowable Uses: May include a variety of Office Professional Uses including:

•Medical Offices

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•Artist Studios

For further information, see Allowable Land Uses and Permit Requirements

Table 4.3: Office Professional Development Standards Maximum Height 2 Stories Minimum Parcel Size 6,000 sq. ft. 40% to 100% site coverage for nonDensity residential buildings See Templeton Community Design Design Guidelines

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Single Family Residential

Figure 4.15 Single Family Residential

The proposal seeks to maintain much of the single-family homes (see Figure 4.15) that exist in the Downtown area. The purpose of this land use designation is to provide housing within a neighborhood context “where social interaction [is] facilitated by allowing compatible non-residential uses such as small convenience stores, parks, and schools� (Framework for Planning, 6-16) The plan seeks to provide areas for single-family homes (see Figure 4.17) on urban-sized lots of less than one acre. The proposal maintains the current county densities of single-family housing of 1 to 7 dwelling units per acre (see Table 4.4). These homes should not exceed two stories and or cover more than 60% of the site. Allowable Uses:

•Single Family Homes Table 4.4: Single Family Residential Development Standards Average Density 7 units per acre Average Parcel Size 7,000 sq. ft. Average SF/Dwelling 2,500 sq. ft. Height 1-2 Stories

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Figure 4.16 Townhomes

The proposal seeks to integrate more multi-family housing in the Downtown area specifically in the northeast portion (see Figure 4.18). In accordance with County standards, the purpose of the multi-family land use designation is “to provide areas for residential development with a wide range of housing densities and housing types, including single-family dwellings, multi-family dwellings and mobile home developments” (Framework for Planning, 6-16). Multi-family development is most appropriate in Downtown close to neighborhood commercial and public facilities. The plan calls for (see Table 4.5) densities of 1 to 18 units per acre, which is lower than current County density standards that allow for 1 to 38 dwellings per acre. This change is to ensure consistency in appearance and character (see Figure 4.16) with the existing Downtown neighborhoods. The proposal recommends two multifamily housing types: townhomes and duplexes. Allowable Uses:

•Townhomes: Townhomes are considered medium density single- family homes; normally double level, some with shared driveways. Table 4.5: Multi Family Residential Development Standards Average Density 12 units per acre Average Net Lot Area 3,500 sq. ft. Average SF/Dwelling 1,800 sq. ft. Height 2 Story

Figure 4.19 Duplex style housing

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•Duplexes - Duplexes (see Figure 4.19) are also considered medium density. A “duplex” means a building with two homes sharing the driveway and a party wall. These are usually double level with individual garages (see Table 4.16).

Table 4.6: Duplex Development Standards Average Density 18 units/acre Parcel Area 21,600 sq. ft. Total Units/Parcel 8 units Average SF/Dwelling 1,500 - 2,000 sq. ft. Height 2 Story

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Commercial Retail Commercial Retail is utilized at locations (see Figure 4.21) where it is convenient to provide services and uses for highway travelers, vacationers and tourists. In addition, Commercial Retail is used to provide a central location for businesses offering a wide variety of products (see Figure 4.20) to meet the daily shopping needs of residents. Commercial Retail is a collection of land uses that are economically and physically compatible as well as mutually supportive, and easily accessible and apparent from major transportation routes. Figure 4.20 Commercial retail

The central core along Main Street will have the heaviest pedestrian traffic and is the most visible location for business to locate. Commercial Retail has a maximum building height of two stories (see Table 4.7). Allowable Uses:

•Commercial Business

•Restaurant

Table 4.7: Commercial Retail Development Standards Maximum Height 2 Stories Maximum Parcel Size 2.6 acres Parcel Size 6,000 sq. ft.- 2.6 acres See Templeton Community Design Design Guidelines

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Recreation Recreation is utilized to set aside areas to provide outdoor recreational space (see Figure 4.22) where compatible with surrounding uses. Recreation designates locations that are suitable for outdoor sports facilities, park space, lakes, etc (see Figure 4.24). The recreation land use designation is appropriate for both private and public lands. See Table 4.8 for development standards. Allowable Uses:

Figure 4.22 Recreational path

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•Parks of any size category (i.e. Regional, Neighborhood, State, etc)

•Sports Facilities with the exception of professional sports arenas. Table 4.8: Recreation Development Standards Maximum Building Height 2 Stories Maximum Parcel Size 20 acres Inside URL : 6,000 sq. ft. - 20 acres Outside URL : Parcel Size 1 - 20 acres See Templeton Community Design Design Guidelines

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Mixed Use Mixed Use designates locations that are best suited for multiple uses. Mixed Use is recommended to be used in the Downtown (see Figure 4.25) where it will help create a walkable, pedestrian oriented environment (see Figure 4.23). Mixed Use will be composed primarily (see Table 4.9) of two story buildings with office space above commercial retail. Mixed Use will promote pedestrian traffic and will adhere to the County Design Guidelines. Residential units are not allowed on the ground floor. Figure 4.23 Mixed Use

Allowable Uses:

•Commercial Retail

•Commercial Service

•Office Professional

•Residential Units Table 4.9: Mixed Use Development Standards Maximum Building Height 2 Stories Maximum Parcel Size 2.5 acres Parcel Size 6,000 sq. ft. - 2.5 acres See Templeton Community Design Design Guidelines

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Design Characteristics

Proposed Layout of Main Street Main Street measures 60 feet wide from sidewalk to sidewalk and currently accommodates two traffic lanes—one going each direction—and parallel parking on each side. The Concept Plan proposes a new layout for Main Street in the Downtown area. The street will consist of two traffic lanes at twelve feet each, Class II bike lanes at five feet each, parallel parking on both sides measuring nine feet each and finally a median on both sides measuring four feet each. Due to the fact that the existing buildings on Main Street are unevenly set back from the street, the available sidewalk width varies. However, the ideal sidewalk for this streetscape layout will measure eight feet wide. Traffic Calming Measures The current configuration of Main Street allows for cars to travel faster than the speed limit. The concept proposes the addition of three stop signs along Main Street to slow the speed of traffic and create a safer environment for pedestrians and cyclists. Bulb outs (see Figure 4.26) are also proposed at these intersections to shorten the distance pedestrians have to walk across the lanes of traffic. Streetscape Streetscaping will be added to Main Street to increase the ambiance and atmosphere in the Downtown. Trees, benches, streetlights, and other landscaping will be added along the sidewalk to improve the pedestrian experience. See Images for an example of appropriate streetscaping.

Figure 4.26 Bulb-outs for traffic calming

Gateways and Wayfinding Signs The plan calls for a system of wayfinding signs and gateways. The gateways are meant to denote the beginning and end of the downtown corridor along Main Street. The design of these gateways will be consistent with the western, small town character of the Downtown (see Figure 4.27) the height, style, and font should all be taken into consideration when determining design. See Images for examples of appropriate gateways.

Figure 4.27 Gateway

52

Wayfinding signs will be located throughout the Downtown area and Templeton as a whole. These will be directional signs that lead pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers to important destinations throughout Downtown by displaying how many blocks or minutes it will take to arrive. These locations include the Historic Feed and Grain, Templeton Park, the Community Center, and the de Anza Trail Head. The signs will use appropriate material, font, and design to ensure they are consistent with the western style of Downtown, while clearly directing people to their desired locations (see Figure 4.4).

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Goal: Promote a healthy, vibrant Downtown by providing outdoor gathering spaces and recreational opportunities adjacent and close to Main Street. Policy: Continue to designate and develop public spaces within new developments and in unused lots.

Introduction

Implementation Measures

Strategy: Create a committee in the Templeton Area Advisory Group that focuses on parks and open space standards. Policy: Increase local food production by increasing the availability and sustainability of community gardens. Background

Strategy: Partner with local groups (such as the nursery of schools) who are interested in incorporating what they do into the existing garden space off of Main St. Goal: Provide sufficient public facilities that can accommodate the current and future needs of Downtown residential and business activity and growth.

Strategy: Take inventory of existing infrastructure and make projections for necessary increases in infrastructure according to population projections.

Policy: Create a complete street along the Main Street corridor emphasizing alternative modes of transportation to encourage community activity and connectivity within Templeton and North County.

Strategy: Provide traffic calming measures including: bulbouts, stop signs, designated crosswalks and landscaping.

OPPORTUNITY AREA

Goal: Offset vehicular congestion by enhancing and encouraging pedestrian and bicycle activity through additional infrastructure and traffic calming strategies along Main Street.

Envision Templeton

Policy: Ensure sufficient utility and circulation infrastructure for projected future activity in downtown

Strategy: Create a Class 2 bike lane along Main Street

Strategy: Encourage the development of the de Anza trail to provide connectivity and access to and from Atascadero and Paso Robles. References

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Goal: Provide a variety of high quality housing types that are thoughtful and inclusive of all economic and social groups that are within close proximity to Downtown amenities and services. Policy: Maximize housing stock within the downtown core by designating land uses to housing. Strategy: Expand existing land use designations to provide for a variety of housing specifically single-family detached, single family attached and multi-family. Strategy: Encourage development that maintains existing neighborhood quality and characteristics. Strategy: Allow for flexible zoning, which can accommodate a range of housing styles

54

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


CHAPTER

5


REFERENCES


REFERENCES Chicago grade landfill. (2008). Retrieved from http://www. chicagogradelandfill.com/ City-data.com. (2012). Templeton, California. Retrieved on November 2, 2012, from http://www.city-data.com/city/Templeton-California.html

Introduction

Works Cited

Conservation and open space element (2010). San Luis Obispo County. Retrieved from http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/Elements/COSE.pdf County of San Luis Obispo, (2012). Complete communities research summary. Retrieved from website: http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/ pdfscommsummary.pdf

County of San Luis Obispo, (2012). Draft facilities inventory report: Templeton. Retrieved from website: www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/ facilitiesinventory/3_Templeton. pdf

Housing element (2009). San Luis Obispo County. Retrieved from http://www. slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/Elements/Housing+Element.pdf Mark, L. (2012, October 29). Interview by M Kawashima & J Cowell [Personal Interview]. Stakeholders interview Salinas River Area Plan (2009). County of san luis obispo. Retrieved from http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/Area+Plans/ Salinas+River+Inland+Area+Plan.pdf

San Luis Obispo County Sheriff. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.slosheriff. org/ San Luis Obispo County. 1992. The County Noise Element. Prepared by Brown-­Buntin Associates, Inc.

Opportunity Area

San Luis Obispo county code, land use ordinance (2010). Salinas river planning area (Title 22). Retrieved from: http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/ PL/Land

Envision Templeton

Healthy Communities Program (n.d.). Cdc’s healthy communities program overview. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthycommunitiesprogram/

Background

County of San Luis Obispo, (2006). Parks and recreation element of the general plan. Retrieved from website: http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/ PL/Elements/Parks and Recreation Element.pdf

Templeton 2004 community profile (2004). California polytechnic state university San Luis obispo city and regional planning department. San Luis Obispo, CA.

REFERENCES

Templeton historical museum society. (2008). Historical Museum Society. Retrieved from: http://www.templetonmuseum.com/ Twin cities community hospital. (2012). Retrieved from: http://www. twincitieshospital.com/enUS/Pages/default.aspx United States Census Bureau (2010). Templeton cdp, california. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml

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US Census Bureau. (n.d.) State and county quickfacts. Retreived from: http:// quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0678162.html United States Fire Administration, (2006). Structure fire response times. Retrieved from: http://www.usfa.fema.gov/ downloads/pdf/statistics/v5i7. pdf Wallace Group. Templeton Community Service District (2005). Wastewater collection system master plan update. Retrieved from: http://templetoncsd. org/Library/Sewer/Wastewater_Master_Plan_Update_2005.pdf Wallace Group (2005). Water system master plan update. Retrieved from http://www.templetoncsd.org/DocumentCenter/View/11 Zillow Real Estate Network. (2012). Templeton Houses and Condos. Retrieved from http://www.zillow.com/local-info/CA-Templeton-homes/r_41200/

Image Sources

Figure 1.5: http://www.colorado.com/cities-and-towns/niwot Figure 1.6: http://www.world-stay.com/en/us/california/morgan-hill/ Figure 3.3: http://greencitiesbluewaters.wordpress.com/2012/09/17/happygreen-infrastructure-week/ Figure 3.2: http://architypesource.com/projects/932-first-san-diego-riverimprovement-project Figure 3.4: http://www.creonline.com/blog/why-apartment-buildings-aresuch-popular-investments/ Figure 4.2: http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4002/4549376197_f44914a3ae_m. jpg Figure 4.5: http://www.viawayfinding.com/ Figure 4.4: http://discoverredmond.com/images/bg.jpg Figure 4.6: http://pps.org/imagedb/image-display?image_ id=26750&size=md&hs=73649754 Figure 4.8: http://www.rusticbride.com/california/santa-margarita-ranch Figure 4.10: http://www.smartgrowthamerica.org/complete-streets/ complete-streets-fundamentals Figure 4.11: http://ustreetgirl.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/v-street-bike-lane. jpg Figure 4.13: http://www.ci.windsor.ca.us/index.aspx?NID=188 Figure 4.16: http://www.theneighborhoodsnh.com/assets/img/content/ woodview-townhome-condos/woodview-townhome-condo.jpg Figure 4.20: http://cdn.colorado.com/sites/colorado.com/files/styles/ lightboxed_600_338/public/niwot.jpg Figure 4.23: http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2173/2315353778_e2a7f28bca_z. jpg

60

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Introduction

Figure 4.26: http://ladotbikeblog.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/ snapshot-2011-01-20-11-52-16.jpg Figure 4.27: http://www.greenmamaspad.com/2012/02/our-day-atskywalker-ranch-starwars3d.html Acknowledgements Photo: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Hs3JiJC3jI0/T73otFjrWI/AAAAAAAAC5U/KplHyOGzRr0/s1600/Pomar+Junction+3+-+Erik+Wait.. JPG Preface Photo: http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/c0.110.851.315/ p851x315/474753_10150854384664616_709337756_o.jpg

Background

Envision Templeton Photo:http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_1X6M5TMQkCI/ SwDQkmFPnBI/AAAAAAAAAd0/9WKi223PaHU/s1600/IMG_1123.JPG Opportunity Area : http://pimage4.homesandland.com/image/A05N/4/84/ A05N188844.jpg References: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xJeBWfrpmx4/S7ApuUWLolI/ AAAAAAAAB5Y/9FS01iTx7co/s1600/Central+CA+coast+vineyards.jpg

Envision Templeton Opportunity Area REFERENCES

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Appendix

Case Study Downtown Morgan Hill, California Geographic Location: Southern Santa Clara County; Northern California Community characteristics, project type/activities: Smaller community; a lot of residents who commute up to the bay area for tech jobs in the heart of the Silicon Valley. There are also residents who work the agricultural jobs surrounding the community. Downtown was recently renovated to create a more walkable, pedestrian friendly zone. The median was expanded and includes many large oak trees to provide shading for pedestrians. Outdoor dining options have rapidly expanded and multiple traffic calming measures have been implemented. There are mainly dining options in downtown, but there are a few boutique shops mixed in as well. Another recent renovation created residential units and offices above the first floor uses. There are also annual festivals such as the Mushroom Mardi Gras and 4th of July Parade where the street is closed to traffic. Size of the project– land area and population:

Approximately: .05 square miles

City Population: 38,000

Distance of the community from a larger city:

24 miles south of San Jose

15 miles north of Gilroy

Main economic Activities:

Retail/Dining

Accessibility to a major highway:

Highway 101 runs through the middle of town

California State Route 152

Lessons Learned Morgan Hill was able to successfully renovate their downtown corridor and transform it from a desolate, vehicle-oriented spot to a destination for pedestrians and visitors. For many years downtown Morgan Hill was a place where cars traveled at high speeds, pedestrians were rare and there was little to no outdoor dining. The City decided to address this issue through the creation of a specific plan for the downtown corridor. Features included were various traffic calming measures, increased residential densities and updated zoning to allow outdoor dining. Following implementation of these various measures, the downtown started to become a lively, desirable destination. Bulb-outs and speed humps decreased speeds and increased safety for pedestrians. By allowing increased residential densities the city was able to increase the number of residents physically present in the area, as well as allow residents to live close enough to the resources they need 62

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Introduction

to be able to walk instead of use a vehicle. Another key part to the specific plan was to allow outdoor dining. The climate is very mild in Morgan Hill and with the addition of outdoor dining residents are now much more willing to walk downtown and eat when the weather is nice. Morgan Hill was able to successfully transform the downtown from a desolate area to a marquee destination for residents and visitors through implementation of trafficcalming measures, landscaping, and improved zoning codes. Case Study Downtown Niwot, Colorado Geographic Location: Northern Colorado in Boulder County along the foothills of the Rocky Mountains.

Approximately: 4.1 square miles City Population(2010): 4,006

Envision Templeton

Size of project – land area and population:

Background

Niwot is characterized by a rural, historical setting, several agricultural operations and small shops and art scenes. The majority of the housing in Niwot is rural residential which consists of one acre lots. There is also a suburban district that consists of multifamily units measuring approximately 7,500 square feet with a maximum of nine dwelling units per acre allowed. There are two Niwot Rural Community District areas, which have strict design guidelines and development standards. These areas have permitted uses of banks, churches, food establishments, small overnight lodging and professional offices. These guidelines have been put in place to preserve Niwot’s heritage as an agriculturally based commercial center.

Population Density: 988 people per square mile

Distance of the community from a larger city: 10 minute drive to Boulder

35 miles Northwest of Denver

Opportunity Area

Main economic Activities:

Professional and management

Scientific

Administrative Health care

Social assistance

Manufacturing

Accessibility to a major highway:

The Niwot Trail Master Plan provides an effective example of an appropriate multi modal trail plan. It outlines existing conditions of the land, trail recommendations, and implementation strategies for an extensive trail network. The main goals are to create safe, high quality recreational trails as a part of a comprehensive circulation system, minimize environmental and March 2013

63

REFERENCES

Lessons Learned


neighborhood impacts, and develop multiple use regional trail linkages to promote alternative transportation modes. Most of the trails are open to bikes, hiking, horses and leashed dogs. There is a total of 6.4 miles of trails with three parking lots as well as picnic areas included in the Plan. This is a great example of what the community members in Templeton are looking for when it comes to the trail system. Niwot also boasts a successful downtown. Restaurants, shopping, and other businesses attract visitors from Boulder, Denver, and Fort Collins. While Niwot is a destination for shopping and dining, it manages to maintain its small scale. Most buildings are one-story and built in a western style. Consistent landscaping features embrace both vehicles and pedestrians without one dominating the other. Wide sidewalks and street furniture encourage pedestrians to walk along 2nd Avenue. Niwot has utilized urban guidelines without compromising historic infrastructure. Additionally, Niwot runs a user friendly website that includes an arts and entertainment section, business directory, community directory, list of events, and a ‘What’s HOT in Niwot’ blog. This is a great way for the community to communicate with each other and stay informed on local events.

64

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Description

1

309 Main St.

T he Alber Horstman House. Originally located at 610 Main Street, the house was moved to the museum property in 1994. Horstman was an early town butcher with a slaughterhouse near the east end of town.

309 Main St.

Southern Pacific Railroad warehouse. Originally located about 100 yards from the current site, it was moved in 1948 by Henery and Ed Hove, who used it as a mchanic's garage. It was moved to the curent location in 2001

3

321 Main St.

West Coast Land Company office, incorporated on March 27, 1886, the land grant ranchos, subdivided and resold them as town and farm lots. In the first 6 months of sales, over $500,000 in land had been sold from this building.

4

4th and Main St.

T empleton Feed and Grain. Originally buikt as a garage in 1913 by Fred Schutte, dealer in Chevrolet cars and illinois ractors. T he grain mill was started by H. Ruth, Sr. in the 1930s. T he present mill is the largest within 100 miles of templeton.

5

412 Main St.

Central Hotel. Built in 1898 at 2nd and Crocker as a house and later studio of A.W Peterson, T empleton's first photograpger. T he Building was moved to this location in 1913.

416 Main St.

T empleton's first building. Originally located at 6th and South Main Street and used as a meeting hall, then Jacobiwitz and Goliver's store, this building is the only survivor of the 1897 fire that destroyed the business district. IT was moved here in 1903 by Joel Pate, who used it was a general mechandise sotre. T he upper floor was removed and is now a home.

7

5th and Main St.

(Northwest Corner). Hans Peterson Building. Petersen pruchased the building from Mr. Griffith in 1888 and operated a farm supply store, including hardware and groceries. After the 1897 fire, the building was rebuilt. It has been operated as Hewitt Harware since

8

5th and Main St.

(across Main Street from Hewitt). Stage Stop. T he original site of the stage stop in 1886. T he railroad tracks ended at T empleton and the passengers had to catch the stage to San Luis Obispo.

9

508 Main St.

Wm. Horstman Building (center portion of AJ Spurs). Horstman operated a mercantile here in 1891. He leased the right side of the building as a nursery and the left side as anotions sotre. T empleton's first post office was in the room (the banquet room).

10

520 Main St.

McDaniel General Merchandise. Buil in 1920 by J.J McDaniel, the first rural mail carrier. He deliverd mail to the west of T empleton on a tri-weekly basis.

11

590 Main St.

Built as a service station in 1921 by Philip Crum and George Bland.

12

613 Main St.

Fred Schutte Home. Built in 1912 by Schutte who purchased 1000 acres at Bethel Raod and Wineyard Drive. He subdivided 400 acres as the Oakridge Orchard Development Company.

13

619 Main St.

Albert Bland Home. T he Blands raised turkeys and chikens on Vineyard Drive. T he Poultry fed the soldiers who were stationed in the area in both Worl Wars.

14

628 Main St.

Gilmore Gas Station. Built in 1923. It later became a Shell Station.

15

700 Main St.

Arebalo Home. Built around 1930.

2

6

Envision Templeton

Building Location

Background

Location on Map

Introduction

Historic Buildings Table Templeton Historical Buildings

Opportunity Area REFERENCES

March 2013

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Historic Buildings Table Templeton Historical Buildings

66

Location on Map

Building Location

Description

16

750 Main St.

Elijah Carr house. Carr was the town's postmaster from 1903-1913.

17

725 Main St.

Bennett-T hompson Servie Station. Built in the arly 1930;s the property also boasted two tourist cabins. (see # 19)

18

805 Main St.

American Legion Hall, Post 220, was dedicated in 1925. Most of the abor had been volunteered and the legion borrowed $5,000 which they repaid within two years from the profits of community dances.

19

817 Main St.

T ourist cabin, T wo cabins were moved from # 17 and remodled as one house.

20

215 8th St.

Elementary School. T he long building faceing Main Street was completed in 1923. Aldoph Sciot's vinyard was condemned by the district in 1921 so the site could be used as the athetic field.

21

715 Blackburn St.

Built in 1920. Home of Nettie Plumm, a member of one of T empleton's pioneer families.

22

707 Blackburn St.

Larsen home built around 1920. Walter and Elizabeth Larson have lived here for 70 years plus

23

700 Crocker St.

Cressio home. T he beginning of 1917, Joe Cressio was the villagge blacksmith.

24

701 Crocker St.

Fruits home. Childhood home of Robert "Grannie" Fruits and his brother Patrick.

25

689 Crocker St.

Community Church. Builtaround 1900.with funds from Cora Adams, a member of a T empleton pioneer family.

26

622 Crocker St.

Dan and Ruth Gambel home. Dan trucked oakwood and charcoal to the railroad for shipment to San Jose. Ruth was an amateur singer, and they raised nin children in this home.

27

608 Crocker St.

Skinner home. Built in 1887 by the family of Ruth Gambel

28

615 Crocker St.

Jarrett home. Mrs. Jarrett, a widow with two sons, was a teacher at the original T empleton school. One son died in 1924 in the town's swimming hole in the Salinas River.

29

6th and Crocker St.

Presbyterian Church. Chartered on May 5, 1887, the building was dedicated on November 11, 1888. A new church structure was added in 1995

30

311 6th St.

311 6th Street. Presbyterian Church manse. Built in 1892 by the Rev. Isaac Baird, who sold the home to the church for a manse (minister's house)

Templeton Planning and Design Studies


Location on Map

519 Crocker St.

Howard home. T his is the upper floor of T empleton's first building (see number 6). T he owners wife complained of living "over a store" and upper floor was moved to this site. For 60-plus years, home of Velora Howard, who spearheaded T empleton's museum society and annual 4th of july celebrations.

505 Crocker St.

Carl Petersen home. Orginally shingle-sided, it was built by the son of Hans Peteren (see number 7). Carl was the town's constable and upon his death his wife, Grace, was appointed to his position. She was later elected Justice of the Peace and served in that office until the present court system was devised.

5th Street

1909 bell. T he bell is the lone remnant of T empleton's early firedepartment. It was used to call the firemen, to notify residents of other disasters, and it was tolled upon the death of prominent residents. As late as 1983, it was still used during a power failure.

35

412 Crocker St.

Sward home. Built in 1887 by the first pastor of Bethel Lutheran Church. When SwardDief, his widow took in boarders. Bethel Lutheran Church buried four pastors in its first 15 years. All the widows moved into the Sward house and lived together.

36

406 Crocker St.

Walgren home. Built in 1887.

37

400 Crocker St.

Ruthledge was the "night watch" or "fire watch" and walked the streets each night with a lantern, He collected the mail from the night train took it to the post office.

38

401 Crocker St.

Railroad employees' home. Built in the early 1890s by Southern Pacific Railroad Company for their employees. T he company later sold the home.

39

120 4th St.

Sharp home. Built around 1925.

40 41

319 Crocker St. 317 Crocker St.

Kaiser home. Built around 1910.

42

300 Crocker St.

Neils Johnson home. Built around 1890. Johnson was a landowner and sold 1,000 acres to Fred Schutte (see number 12).

43

3rd and Crocker St.

Bethel Lutheran Church. T he congregation was organized in 1887, and the building was completed in 1891. Until the 1940s services were conducted in Swedish for T empleton's ;arge Swedish Community.

44

3rd and Crocker St.

Parish Hall. Built in 1914 with funds raised by Julia Anderson.

45

270 Old County Road

31

32

33

34

Opportunity Area

Templeton Park

When the township was laid out, this property was designated as a town park. T he cannon, which shot a 100-pound ball 3 miles, came by rail from the naval arsenal in Benecia, California. T he pool, built in 1954, was dedicated to John Ruskovich, a member of the San Luis Obispo County Board of supervisors. T he bandstand, built in 1976 as part of the bicentenial celebration, is dedicated to the late local music educator, Donald Colvig.

Envision Templeton

Description

Background

Building Location

Introduction

Historic Buildings Table Templeton Historical Buildings

Simler home. Built around 1920.

Frederickson home. Built around 1890. Originally the home of Dr. S. Helgsen, T empleton's first woman doctor, the home was purchased in 1891 by Gustav Fredrickson.

REFERENCES

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Historic Buildings Table Templeton Historical Buildings Location on Map 46 47

Building Location 260 Old County Road 180 Old County Road

48

191 1st St.

49

87 Old County Road

50

85 Old County

51

72 Main St.

Downey home. Built in 1890, Downey operated a custom thresher and later drayage (hauling) business.

52

91 Main St.

C.H Philips home. Built in 1886 by founder/manager of the West Coast Land Company (see number 3). Philips moved from San Luis Obispo to prove it was possible to raise a family here. In Souther Pacific Railroad. T he home is better known as the Wessel house whose members lived there for 50 years plus.

53

99 Main St.

Churchill home. Built in 1887 for the manager of the Salinas Valley Lumber Co. Which later become the Southern Pacific Milling Co., dealers in building and farm supplies.

54

110 Main St.

Eddy Milinery. Site of T empleton's first millinery store.

55

118 Main St.

Eddy home. Built in 1887 by a wealthy Frenchman, F.M Baumard. Grandpa and Granma Eddy lived in this home.

56

225 Main St.

Seaside Oil Company. Opened in 1928 by Philip Crum as the only oil distributorship in town.

57

211 Main St.

Built around 1932

58

110 3rd St.

59

68

306 Main St.

Templeton Planning and Design Studies

Description Built around 1931. Built around 1930. Shoe and harness shop. Built in 1886 by Mr. Muggler, the building was originally located at 5th and South Main Nelson home. T he family of Helma Nelson, mother of Mel Fredrickson, Mel was born in it in 1908. Nelson home. Built around 1910. Helma (Nelson) Fredrickson's mother, Mrs. Nelson, lived in this home.

Holloway home. Built in 1887 by Karl Fischer, who operated the town's dairy Holloway home for 70 years plus. Blacksmith home. Built by Joe Cressio on land purchased from Peter A. Nyberg on March 12, 1918. Operated by Cressio until his health failed in about 1947 Sold to Robert T ullock on August 15, 1950 and operated by him until his death February 29, 1996. It is still owned by the T ullock family.


California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Department of City and Regional Planning March 2013

Templeton Community Plan Studies  

Team's assessment and proposal for Downtown Templeton.

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