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ATLANTIC AVENUE URBAN DESIGN PLAN

BOKEO, FINCK, KAWASHIMA, KEITH, ROMAINE

CRP 203 | TOKER | SPRING 203


Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction pg.3 Chapter 2 Site Inventory and Site Analysis

pg.5

Chapter 3 Conceptual Development pg.37 Chapter 4 Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities

pg.51

Chapter 5 Form-Based Codes pg.67 References pg.109

At l ant ic Avenue Urb an D esig n Pl an

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1

INTRODUCTION

3


Chapter 1 During the spring of 2011, the City and Regional Planning Department at Cal Poly joined with the Redevelopment Agency of Long Beach to work on an urban design proposal for the North Long Beach area along Atlantic Avenue. Under the instruction of Professor Umut Toker, students in the Department’s CRP 203 Urban Design Studio worked on developing an urban design plan for this area throughout the spring 2011 quarter.

meeting, the students explained their team’s site plan and land use map asking the community to comment on what they felt was strong and weak with the plans thus far. After this final meeting, the teams used all the community feedback and opinions to generate form-based codes and a finalized land use maps. Illustrative site plans and computer based three-dimensional models were developed to show how proposals could affect the project area.

Students worked in the three separate teams of five to develop alternative plans to be presented to the Redevelopment Agency of Long Beach. On April 2, 2011, the students visited the Atlantic Avenue area for the first time to conduct the first community meeting and conduct a thorough inventory of the site. During the meeting, the students led the community on a walkthrough of the site, where community members were asked to photograph elements they liked in the area and elements they disliked in the area. Following the walk, the community members were asked to discuss what they wished the area had and what they wanted the area to retain through the use of wish/have poems. With this information, the teams developed initial conceptual diagrams for the project area. On April 16, 2011, the students went to the Discover North Long Beach showcase to get feedback on the progress that was made thus far. At the event, the community members were asked to rank what they felt was most important based on the information gathered from the first community meeting. They were asked to give feedback on each team’s initial conceptual diagram. With the information gathered from the past two community events, the teams developed a proposed land use maps for the area and a preliminary site plans. On May 7, 2011, the students held their final community meeting at the North Long Beach Public Library. At this

This is one of three alternative urban design proposals developed by the CRP 203 class during spring 2011. Chapter 2 covers site analysis; Chapter 3 discusses the conceptual development process; Chapter 4 introduces proposed land uses and circulation for the project area; and Chapter 5 presents the proposed form-based codes along with the illustrative site plan and three-dimensional renderings. Members of the Spring 2011 CRP Urban Design Studio would like to thank the Redevelopment Agency of Long Beach and the community members for their help and input during the development of this proposal.

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2

SITE INVENTORY AND SITE ANALYSIS

5


Chapter 2

2.1. THE SITE WITHIN ITS IMMEDIATE CONTEXT Location

Figure 2.1 The sites location in the state of California.

Figure 2.2 Long Beach in Los Angeles County.

6

The city of Long Beach is located in Los Angeles County in southern California (Figure 2.1). The city is situated on the coast of southern Los Angeles County (Figure 2.2) and is approximately 25 miles south of Los Angeles and 100 miles north of San Diego. The project site is located in northern Long Beach (Figure 2.3). The site

encompasses four blocks and is surrounded by low-density housing, predominantly singlefamily units (Figure 2.4). Long Beach borders Orange County as well as several cities including Lakewood, Compton, Carson, and Bellflower. The city’s location provides quick and easy access to the attractions in Los Angeles and Orange County. Long Beach is located 20 miles east of Disneyland and Disney’s California Adventure theme parks in Anaheim. It is also a 30-minute drive to all of the attractions in downtown Los Angeles. Access to nearby attractions is easy because several major freeways run through the city including the 405, 710, and 91 freeways. Although the site is located in northern Long Beach, it is only 6 miles from downtown Long Beach and the waterfront (Figure 2.5) and can be reached directly from Atlantic Avenue. The site includes the area from East 59th Street to East


Site Inventory and Analysis

56th Street and the area between Linden Street and Lime Street. The site also includes a bus stop on Atlantic Avenue. To the north of the site is David Starr Jordan High School. History The city of Long Beach was first settled in 1784 under a Spanish land grant to Manuel Nieto, a soldier (Maguglin, n.d.). The land grant included 28,000 acres of Ranch Los Amamitos and 27,000 acre Rancho Los Cerritos (Maguglin, n.d.). Lewellyn Bixby purchased Los Cerritos

Figure 2.3 Site location in the city of Long Beach.

Figure 2.4 Project site in north Long Beach

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Chapter 2 in 1866, who along with his brother and other family became significant developers and ranchers of Long Beach (Maguglin, n.d.). By 1882 Long Beach then known as Willmore City, started developing along the coast (Maguglin, n.d.). The completion of a new railroad along with existing Pacific Railroad helped bring in large amounts of visitors to the area and created a huge demand for housing and places to live (Maguglin, n.d.). By 1888 Willmore City changed its name to Long Beach, referring to the long wide beaches in the area (Maguglin, n.d.). In

1888, Long Beach became an incorporated city (Maguglin, n.d.). Since then, the city has continued to grow and prosper. The Pacific Electric trolley was introduced in 1902, helping Long Beach become the fastest growing city in the United States between 1902-1910 (Downtown Long Beach Associates, n.d.). The city and its continuous growth was fueled by the discovery of oil in 1921 (DLBA, n.d.). In 1933 Long Beach was hit by a magnitude 6.25

Figure 2.6 Destruction following the 1933 earthquake. (http://www.scec.org/ education/images/LB33pic3.jpg)

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Figure 2.5 Downtown Long Beach and waterfront. (http://www. longbeachrealestatehome.com/m/blogs/lbreh/7994878.jpg)


Site Inventory and Analysis

earthquake that destroyed many of the city’s buildings and roads (DLBA, n.d.) (Figure 2.6). The city recovered from this disaster and was rebuilt, three years later even more oil was discovered helping the city grow even more. By 1941 a US naval base was created in the Long Beach harbor (Maguglin, n.d.). During the 1950’s and 1960’s Long Beach began to struggle. Many businesses left downtown Long Beach and were replaced by adult movie houses catering to the nearby naval base (DLBA, n.d.). The rise and growing number of popular suburban cities also helped

draw people away from Long Beach. During the 1970’s several other businesses vacated downtown Long Beach, however; downtown revitalization plans were well underway (DLBA, n.d.). During this time: the Long Beach Convention Center (Figure 2.7), the Promenade, and Long Beach Plaza Mall were constructed (DLBA, n.d.). The 1980’s and 1990’s saw even more development and more additions to downtown Long Beach. By the late 1990’s Downtown Long Beach began to thrive again.

Figure 2.7 The Long Beach Convention Center helped redefine and bring downtown Long Beach back to its former prominence. (http://www.brucewall. com/Long_Beach_Convention_Center_PIC.html)

Today, Long Beach continues to thrive as a port city. Its downtown continues to expand and remains a popular place to live and work. (DLBA, n.d.)

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Chapter 2 2. 2. EXISTING LAND USES ON THE SITE The project area lies along Atlantic Avenue in the North Long Beach area. Currently, Atlantic Avenue accommodates primarily commercial uses. There is very little mixed use integrated into the project area. Most of the existing buildings are one or two stories. At the time of the last site visit, many buildings were vacant. Atlantic Avenue also has multiple empty lots. Most of these have been repurposed as parking lots that serve the neighboring

Figure 2.8 Historic theatre along Atlantic Avenue and adjacent parking lot.

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businesses. There are large empty lots to the East and West of Atlantic Avenue that have been designated as redevelopment areas. Most of these spaces were once residential areas but are now intended to be utilized for future improvement projects. On the corner of Atlantic and 59th street, a large historic theatre (Figure 2.8) and furniture store have been set to be demolished in order to build a library. Collectively, these buildings are roughly 22,000 square feet in the area. The redevelopment area behind these


Site Inventory and Analysis

buildings and the adjacent parking lot cover an area of approximately 79,600 square feet. The aforementioned redevelopment areas are located throughout the project site but mainly concentrated around in the northern portion. Areas available for redevelopment are indicated by a bordering white fence (Figure 2.9). All of these parcels now appear as empty fields but were once mostly homes that were demolished in order to be rebuilt for new structures and uses. A community member

described during the first site visit that many of these fields had been taken over by residents as make-shift parks and recreation areas. Other than these empty lots, the 9th district of Long Beach has very little green space or parks. Linden Avenue (to the west of Atlantic) and Lime Avenue (to the east of Atlanic) are both residential streets. These residential streets are densely developed with single family homes, duplexes, and multiplexes. Along these streets are also multiple churches.

Figure 2.9 White fences designate redevelopment areas.

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Chapter 2

Opportunities

Constraints

-Redevelopment areas provide a lot of opportunity for infill

-The existing density of housing along residential streets could limit the amount of new housing that can be added to the area

-The proximity of residential areas to the main commercial area along Atlantic Avenue. -Multiple schools nearby attract people to the area.

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-There is an existing question surrounding the historic theatre on Atlantic Avenue. Some people believe that it should be preserved while others argue that its historic integrity was already compromised in a retrofitting.


URBAN DESIGN PLAN

Figure 2.10 Existing land uses map.

commercial single-family residential vacant public multi-family residential mixed-use

13

Site Inventory and Analysis

At l ant ic Avenue Urb an D es ig n Pl an

EXISTING LAND USES

industrial


Site Inventory and Analysis

2.3. CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORTATION The majority of the traffic is concentrated on Atlantic Avenue because it is a main thoroughfare through the North Long Beach area (Figure 2.11). Many industrial trucks as well as community members use the avenue as a main axis to get to other areas. South St, which runs East to West, perpendicular to Atlantic Ave, is also very busy with cars. Both of the streets have side parking, which can be dangerous on such busy streets. 56th St, 59th St, Lime Ave, and Linden Ave have

much less traffic than the other two streets (Figure 2.12). These streets are surrounded by residential communities causing them to be used much less by people outside the immediate community. Each of these streets are surrounded by street parking used as extra parking by the residents in the community. The sidewalks along Atlantic Ave are approximately 8 ft wide, but many objects, such as large trash cans, bike racks, and light poles impede on the the pedestrian walking space. This causes a crowded feeling on the street, which

Figure 2.11 Atlantic Avenue and South Street Intersection.

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Chapter 2 can be overwhelming, especially on a busy avenue. The median down Atlantic creates a pedestrian friendly feel, but this feeling is detracted from by the lack of safe pedestrian crossing across Atlantic. The large blocks have crosswalks in the center of the blocks, but they do not require traffic to stop at such crossings. The signals on these pedestrian crossings say, “cross at your own risk. Cars may not stop.� This deters from a pedestrian friendly atmosphere. The safest pedestrian crosswalks are located at street

Figure 2.12 56th Street.

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intersections along Atlantic Avenue. The surrounding streets, 56th, 59th, Lime, and Linden, are all surrounded by small, rundown sidewalks (Figure 2.13). The sidewalks are approximately 5 feet wide with a 5 feet of grass on the side of the street. They are disturbed by the roots of the trees landscaping the area. This creates hazards to pedestrian users, especially to disabled people or people pushing a stroller. Linden and Lime Ave. have no

Figure 2.13 Linden Avenue.


Site Inventory and Analysis

While there are recently designed and placed bike racks located along Atlantic Avenue, there are no designated bike lanes in the surrounding streets. Bikes have to share the road with cars on each street in the area, creating a potentially hazardous environment. The other streets in the project area present the same problem.

Broadway

Secon d St. A, D, 131

173

Norwalk Blvd.

102

Norwalk Blvd.

aker R d. Studeb 173

172

Palo Verde Ave.

Bloomfield

192

172

Palo Verde

172

Los Altos Market Center

173

El Dorado Golf Course

Los Alamitos

Atherton St.

173

Hawaiian Gardens

OCTA #50

172

The Pyramid 171 heim Rd.

Studebaker Rd.

91, 93

Stearns St.

D

Belmont Shore

173

172, 173 Studebaker

Woodruff 92 92 92

Woodruff Ave.

91, 93

112

Bellflower Blvd.

92

81

81 END

D, 171 END Sat/Sun Only 81

VA Medical Center

Bix b 17

yV

1 D (M -F

CSULB

OCTA #60

No Saturday or Sunday Service on Routes:

81

il

45 81 92 93

)

Marina Pacifica

-F)

Belmont Pier

Willow St.

S t.

Ana

OCTA #42(A)

El Dorado Park

1 (M

111, 112 E. Ocean Blvd. Livingston A, D , 1 3 1

Millikan H.S.

OCTA #38

OCTA #42(A)

102

Wilson H.S. 81, 91, 92, 93, 94, 96 B END Colorado Lagoon

Ximeno 111, 112

4th St. B

D

East Wardlow Rd .

102

Campus

1, 11

H

191 END

METRO 101, #62 102 END Carson St. Long Beach 102, 173 Towne Center

17

Bluff Park

PC

OCTA #30

191

D,

A, D

2

s s Lo oyote C

Spring St.

H

111, 112

A t h e r to n

173

11

Recreation Park 7th St.

Termino

B

Heartwell Park

102

Clark Ave. 112

Lakewood Blvd. 111, 112 102

111 131 131

Redondo Ave.

21, 22, 23

91 91

Lakewood High School

93

Artesia Civic Ctr

Artesia H.S. Centralia St.

Centralia St. 101

NORTH

191

191

101

94, 96 END 172

45, 46 END

10th St. 81

91, 92, 93, 94, 96

Museum of Art

91

Bellflower Blvd.

93

Clark Ave.

93, 101, 112

22

Downey Ave.

22 22

Paramount Blvd.

21

Cherry Ave.

21, 22, 23 Cherry Ave.

71, 72

131

Orange Ave. Orange Ave.

Centralia St.

112

D END

Anaheim St.

7th St.

101* 102 103*

*Runs on Saturdays

but not on Sundays.

Market Place

For more information, Please call 562-591-2301

Long Beach Marina Pa

Queen C Mary Water Taxis

191

PC

Pacific Ocean

Alamitos A END Bay Landing

y. Hw ) ast Co (M-F ic cif 171 1, 13

Harbor Dept.

Convention Ctr. Shoreline C Village

174 END

Cerritos Del Amo Blvd.

Spring St.

Community Hospital

10th St.

Museum of 81 Latin Amer. Art 91, 92, 93, 94

E. Ocean Blvd . A, D, 21, 22, 23

102, 111

Pacific Coast Hwy.

171, 172, 173, 174 Long Beach Transit 45, 46

Broadway

Signal Hill

111

192 Los Cerritos END Mall South St. 173

172, 192

e

The Catalina Pike C Landing Aquarium A, D END Hotel Maya Catalina Express

1st

Long Beach City College PCC

Lakewood

Artesia

METRO #62

la g

W. Ocean Blvd.

7th St.

4th St. 71, 72 71, 72

LADOT #142

102

71, 72

81

61, 63

Pacific Ave.

181, 190's

Magnolia Ave.

B

Transit C Mall

Kilroy

South St. 192

To Norwalk Green Line Station

183rd St.

Mayfair High School

191

101, 103

111

131

METRO #128

101

Long Beach Airport

Willow St.

New York 71, 72

Civic Center Del Amo Blvd.

Long Beach City College LAC

Boeing

Spring St.

Redondo 131

Poly H.S.

St. Mary Medical Ctr

45, 191, 192, 193

111

Orange Ave.

61, 63

Atlantic Ave.

61, 63, 101, 103

51 1, 51

Anaheim St. METRO #232

Atlantic Ave.

182

PCH

1, 171

71, 72

Pacific Coast Hwy.

191

St. Joseph H.S.

Carson St.

102

Long Long Beach Blvd. 51

181

191, 192, 193

171

Harbor

1

101, 102, 103

Wardlow Rd. 131

Memorial Medical Ctr

61, 63

Magnolia Ave.

Pacific Ave.

1

Pacific Hospital

Bolivar Park

101, 103

21, 22, 23

Los Angeles River

San ta Fe 191 , 19 Ave. 2, 1 93

192

Via Oro Delta Ave.

Santa Fe Ave.

McHelen Ave.

TORRANCE #3

Wardlow

131

1, 131 END 181, 182 Easy Ave.

Bataan

Metro Light Rail Station

San Gabriel

Point of interest

1

Del Amo Blvd.

South St.

Mayfair 192 Park

Lakewood Center Mall

103, END

23 END 101, 103

192

Alondra Blvd. 91, 92, 93 END

91, 92, 93

Direction of bus travel

101, 103 Wardlow Blue Line Station

Willow St.

101, 102, 103 END Cabrillo High School

Bixby Knolls Ctr Carson St.

METRO #266

Flower St. 93

111

End of Route(s)

191

Bellflower

South St. Lakewood Reg. Medical Ctr 111, 112

Candlewood

Scherer Park

Wardlow Rd.

Bus Routes

AquaLink

191, 192

Del Amo Blue Line Station

d. Blv each gB Lon 51

191, 193

Legend AquaBus

Del Amo Blvd.

North Long Beach

Carson St.

Carson

193 END

192

METRO #127

Alondra Blvd. 22 END

Lakewood Blvd. 111

192

192 METRO #202 Carson CAD, CAG

METRO #265

South St.

Market St. METRO #202

Paramount

Cherry Ave. 21, 22, 23

See individual route maps for individual route details

Jordan High School

21

63 END

Garfield

61

Project Area

Rosecrans Ave. #258 Rosecrans Ave. 21, 71, 72 END 71, 72

Alondra 72

71, 72

51, 61 END

METRO #130

71, 72

Artesia Bl.

Artesia Blue Line Station

Bellflower High School

METRO

METRO #260, 762

#60, 760

51

SYSTEM MAP

Compton METRO METRO #130, 205 TORRANCE #6

71, 72

Long Beach Transit

Palo Verde Av 172

The project area is served by 3 bus lines, making it accessible from many areas throughout Long Beach (Figure 2.14). Bus lines 61 and 63 run north and south along Atlantic Avenue and the 192 runs east to west along South Street. Lines 61 and 63 connect the project area to the beach on the south end and to Metro Stations on the north, which connects the area to many parts of the Los Angeles area. The 192 connects the area to communities to the east and west of the site.

90s

designated pedestrian crossings.

Seal Beach 131, 171 (M-F) END

OCTA #1, 42(A)

MAP NOT TO SCALE

Figure 2.14 Bus Map, focusing on lines 61, 63, and 192 (http://www.lbtransit.com/Services/) 54

LBT TG SYSTEM MAP - 2/11

55

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Chapter 2

Opportunities

Constraints

-Bus lines offer opportunity to draw people from out of the immediate community to the redeveloped area.

-Lack of safe pedestrian crosswalks creates an unsafe pedestrian environment.

-Recently built bike racks could create a biking friendly atmosphere, if bike lanes and other amenities were added to the area.

-High volumes of traffic on Atlantic Ave. and South St. creates noise throughout the area and can be a safety hazard for pedestrians and bicyclists.

-The ample amount of street parking allows for easy access to the surrounding buildings and services.

-Narrow, rundown sidewalks located on 56th, 59th, Lime, and Linden create a hazard for pedestrians.

-Being located near a freeway entrance allows easy access to the redeveloped area

-Street parking creates a hazard for bicyclists, who have to share the roads with the cars.

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Traffic Light Stop Sign Traffic Direction Median Street Parking Pedestrian Crosswalks

Figure 2.15 Circulation map.

Site Inventory and Analysis

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Site Inventory and Analysis

2.4 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Temperatures, Rainfall, Climate, Snowfall, Wind, and Sun Trajectory The location of Long Beach influences the weather of the area. The area is located within the South Coast Air Basin. This area is known to have “mild, sunny winters with occasional rain [and] warm, dry summers.” (Planning Department, 1996). The City of Long Beach has a Mediterranean climate that is semi-arid keeping average temperatures between the high 50’s and high 70’s year-round (Figure 2.16). Being connected along the Pacific Ocean and surrounded by coastal mountains keeps the location cool during the summer, as well as during the winter. (Planning Department, 1996) According to City-data. com, the coolest months

begin about November until end of March and the warmest temperatures are within the months of June and September. (city-data. com, n.d.) Long Beach is surrounded by the San Gabriel Mountains in the North and the Santa Ana Mountains to the east. Following the opposite sides of the mountains in the southwest direction is the Pacific Ocean, just a few miles away (NCDC, 2011). The sun’s trajectory changes during the year, but the sun remains over Long Beach the longest during the summer and shorter during the winter (Figure 2.17).

Figure 2.16 Average temperatures of Long Beach compared to the US. city-data.com

Long Beach does not get very much rain throughout the year (Figure 2.18). The peak falls mainly from January to March averaging about three inches for each month. During the winter the wind speeds are averaging about five miles per hour, there is a climax of seven

Figure 2.17 Sun Path Diagram. Green represents the summer path . Blue represents winter path. Orange is the current sun path. http:// www.gaisma.com/

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Chapter 2 to eight miles per hour wind speeds which occurs during March and April (Figure 2.19). By summer the average speed for wind is about six or seven miles per hour. (city-data.com, n.d.) The prevailing wind direction during summer is toward Northwest and during winter it flows toward East (Pacific Gas and Electric, n.d.). Wind speeds are some of the lowest average wind speeds as one of the largest urban areas in the nation. (Planning Department, 1996) There is no snowfall in Long Beach (Figure 2.20). (city-data.com, n.d.).

Humidity in the city is typically between 70%80% in the mornings and between 50%-60% in the afternoons (Figure 2.21). Noise Noise factors that impact that area are from vehicles, buses, trucks, motorcylces, and aircrafts along Atlantic Avenue and from the Long Beach Airport. (1975, pp. Iii) Atlantic Avenue is main route for many people; from observation speed is an issue.

Figure 2.18 Average Precipitation of Long Beach compared to the US. (city-data.com)

Soils

Figure 2.19 Average Wind Speeds of Long Beach compared to the US. (city-data. com)

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Site Inventory and Analysis

The City of Long Beach has four main soil profiles in different sections of the city, which are man-made fills, basal sand and gravel aquifer, sandy/ clay alluvial materials, and sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The first area with the man-made fill is located in the Harbor and Naples; the fill is mostly a mixture of fine sand and silt. The basal sand and gravel aquifer covers the lower regions of the Los Angeles and San Gabriel river. In the northeastern area of Long Beach lays a “thin layer of sandy and clayey alluvial materials. The core of the city is made up of mainly “stratified sedimentary rocks of marine origin.” Which is an arrangement

Figure 2.20 Average snowfall in Long Beach compared to the US. (city-data. com)

of sandstone, siltstone, and shale. (1988, 24-26) Trees The standards for trees on Atlantic Avenue are consistent by having London Plan Trees along the streets and as for the front yard trees there are Bradford Pear Trees mounted on a grass area. (2006, pp.2) From the GIS data other trees that can be found within the boundaries of the site are Carob, Southern Magnolia, Queen Palm, Siberian Elm, Sweet Gum, Bottle Tree, Jacaranda, Brisbane Box, Crepe Myrtle, Holly Oak, Canary Island Pine, Ornamental Pear, Southern Palm, Southern Palm, Canary Island Date Palm, and Carrotwood. Opportunities The climate is mild year round with cool winters

Figure 2.21 Average Humidity of Long Beach compared to the US. (city-data. com)

At l ant ic Avenue Urb an D esig n Pl an

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Chapter 2

and warm summers, with a breeze coming into the site from the ocean. The current use of dought resistant vegetation offers further opportunity to use such vegetation. Constraints

24

Main noise pollution is from the automobiles.

The lack of rain limits the kinds and amount of vegetation that can be put in the project area The roots of current trees disturb the sidewalks creating hazards for pedestrians


Noise

Sun Trajectory Prevailing Winds Tree

Figure 2.22 Natural environment map.

SUMMER PREVAILING WINDS

Site Inventory and Analysis

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WINTER PREVAILING WINDS


Site Inventory and Analysis

2.5. Relevant Documents General Plan Digest General Plan Elements: •

Land Use

Housing

Transportation

Open Space

Conservation

Noise

Public Safety

Historic Preservation

Air Quality

Seismic Safety

Figure 2.22 Birds-eye-view of Long Beach.

General Plan Goals: •

Manage growth

Stimulate economic development

Encourage downtown revitalization

Allow new housing construction

Increase affordable housing stock

Maintain a neighborhood emphasis

Provide quality services

Provide quality education

Facilities Maintenance

Provide adequate water supply

Have function transportation

Arts and culture support

Encourage citizen participation

Maintain financial stability

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Chapter 2 Land Use Element Goals and Objectives:

Open Space Goals and Objectives:

• Define the magnitude and geographic distribution of expected growth

• Develop well-managed, viable ecosystems that support the preservation and enhancement of natural and wildlife habitats.

• Provide at least 1.35 jobs for every household • Recycle existing building and increase density • Provide capacity for over 186,000 housing units • Preserve 97 percent of the existing housing stock

• Preserve, keep clean and upgrade beaches, bluffs, water bodies and natural habitats • Improve appropriate access to natural environments • Design and manage natural habitats to achieve environmental sustainability •

Remediate contaminated sites

Housing Element Goals and Objectives:

Conservation Goals and Objectives:

N/A

Continue sponsoring home buyer seminars

• Assist 50 low income and 50 moderateincome households with home buyer assistance • Promote programs via city newsletters, website, and brochures at public counters. • Pursue additional funding from state housing programs: annually explore funding opportunities with State HCD. Transportation Goals and Objectives: • Maintain or improve urgent ability to move people and goods to and from activity center while reinforcing the quality of life in our neighborhoods. •

Improve and coordinate regional mobility

• Reclassify streets based on their current functions • Reduce peak hour vehicle work trips by 20 percent. • Provide fast, convenient, safe, clean, and dependable transit. •

28

Promote bicycle and pedestrian movement


Site Inventory and Analysis

Noise Goals and Objectives: • To improve the urban environment in order to made Long Beach a more pleasant place to live, work, play, and raise a family. • To establish noise policy guideline and promote noise abutment action programs. • Provide the city with limited maximum noise levels by judicious land use planning policies •

Reduce noise in problem areas.

• Proposed land uses or activities that would act as buffer zones between incompatible land uses. • Protect business and industrial area against intrusion of non-business or nonindustrial land uses, which are highly sensitive to noise. Public Safety Goals and Objectives: • Incorporate public safety consideration into the overall planning process • Reduce loss of life, injuries, damage to property, and economic and social dislocation • Set forth means of correcting and/or mitigating hazards

Historic Preservation goals and objectives: • Maintain and support a comprehensive, citywide historic preservation program to identify and protect Long Beach’s historic, cultural, and archaeological resources. • Protect historic resources from demolition and inappropriate alteration using the City’s regulatory framework, technical assistance, and incentives. • Maintain and expand the inventory of historic resources in Long Beach • Increase public awareness and appreciation of the City’s History and historic cultural and archaeological resources. • Integrate historic preservation policies into City’s community development, economic development, and sustainable-city strategies.

• Inform citizens of potential safety problems and provide information regarding emergency.

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Chapter 2

Air Quality Goals and Objectives:

Seismic Safety Goals and Objectives:

• Effective coordination of air quality improvement

• Develop implantable mechanisms for a more stringent review of the earthquake potential associated with various projects

• A diverse and efficient ground transportation system that minimizes air pollutant emissions. •

Promote improved technology

Minimize emissions from ships

• Implement a pattern of land uses that can be efficiently served by a diversified transportation system and that directly and indirectly minimizes air pollutants. •

Minimize particulate emissions

• Reduce emissions through reduced energy consumption •

30

Educate city residents

• Utilize seismic safety consideration as a means of encouraging and enhancing desired land use patterns. • Encourage development that would be most in harmony with nature and thus less vulnerable to earthquake damage. • Reduce public exposure to seismic risks. • Inform the public of existing or potential seismic hazards and what to do in times of earthquake events. • Eliminate or reconstruct uses and structures which pose seismic risks.


Site Inventory and Analysis

Zoning 00

Figure 2.23 City of Long Beach Land Use District 28 E 72ND ST

MYRTLE AVE LIME AVE

1

OLIVE AVE

3B

PENFOLD ST

E 67TH ST

BARRY DR

9R

13

3A

1

8A

8N

E ARTESIA BLVD

OLIVE AVE

BELHURST AVE

WHITE AVE

BEECHLEY AVE

MARKER ST

9R

13 MILLMARK AVE

FWY

3A

1

E COOLIDGE ST MYRTLE AVE

9R

AV E ELL A

A CH

E 67TH ST

8N 10

CO

8A

W ARTESIA BLVD

9R

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E 67TH WAY

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POPPY ST

ELM AVE

AV ST

H A R D IN G ST

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GE

60

S AN

8N

ANDERSON AVE

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R FC

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LE

GORDON ST

TH

ADAIR ST

ST

1

1

ADAIR ST

E 60TH ST

LO

9G

SMITH ST

S RI VE

CAMBRIDGE ST

VICTORIA ST

11

JANICE DR

JANICE ST

FO

ALLINGTON ST

Y

Prepared by Dept of Development Services & Dept of Technology Services, GIS

E AV

JA YM

8R

LIME AVE

LINDEN AVE

ELM AVE

E 55TH ST

3A

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8P

8A 3B

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ELLIS ST

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ATLANTIC AVE

IRY AV

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8P

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NORTON ST

8R

8R

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ST

2

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3A

59TH ST

SOUTH ST

W LOUISE ST

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8A

OSGOOD ST

HULLETT ST

LESTER

D CH BLV

CHESTNUT AVE

G BEA

8A

CEDAR AVE

LON

4

ST

ST

DA

FO

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RD

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UT H

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D ST

LOCUST AVE

RE

ANA

LLE TT ST

SO

OO

IL LS

E AV ST

SUS

E 59 TH

LOCUST AVE

OSG

10

Figure 2.22 Site located in Land Use District 28 of Long Beach

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AVE

W

E

AV

E

11

TE

8A

D CH BLV

N AVE

ST

E 63RD ST

E HARCOURT ST

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DAMERON ST A W BA R C L

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ATLAN TIC

G BEA

RAH

TRAFFORD ST

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1

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MYRTLE AVE

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NEECE ST E FORHAN ST E BORT ST

LINDEN AVE

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MURIEL AVE

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OLIVE AVE

NEECE ST

00

E 71ST ST

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E 69TH WAY

WHITE AVE

ORCUTT AVE

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MURIEL AVE

GARDNER ST

GALE AVE

DELTA AVE

HARBOR AVE

CUMMINGS ST

E 69TH ST

E 68TH WAY

BUTLER AVE

D CH BLV G BEA

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ORLEANS WAY

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2 3B

LONG

LON

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BEA CH

13

W 70TH ST

TAYLOR ST

OLIVE AVE

EASTONDALE AVE

ATLANTIC PL

2

W GREENLEAF BLVD

LIME AVE

13

E 72ND ST

Revised : December, 2007

28

Figure 2.24 Project area zoning map.

59TH ST.

LEGEND 2: Mixed Style Homes

ATLANTIC AVE.

3A: Townhomes 3B: Moderate Denisty Residential SOUTH ST.

8A: Traditional Retail Strip Commercial 8P: Pedestrian-Oriented Retail Strip 8R: Mixed Retail/Residential Strip Site Area

56TH ST.

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Chapter 2 Figure 2.25 Commercial Zoning Regulations Use Classification

CNP

CNA

Neighborhood PedestrianOriented Commercial

Neighborhood Commercial AutomobileOriented

Municipal Code Chapter 21.32 21.32 Required Yard Areas Beteen Buildings And Property Lines Front Street (a) Side Street (a) Adjacent to side yard of residential (b)

CCA Community Commercial AutomobileOriented

21.32

21.32

0 0

10 5

0 or 8 (e) 0 or 5 (e)

10 10

10

10

10

10

20

20

5

5

30 6 14

10 6 14

15

15

15

5

5

5

5,000 sf. 28 ft., 2 stories

5,000 sf. 28 ft., 2 stories

10,000 sf. 28 ft., 2 stories

Adjacent to rear or residential (b)(d) 20 20 Adjacent to nonresidential (b)(c ) 5 5 Required Yard Areas Beteen Parking And Property Lines Front Street (a) 30 10 Side Street (a) 6 6 Alley (b) 14 14 Adjacent to residential 15 Adjacent to nonresidential 0 Other Development Standards Min. Lot Size 5,000 sf. Max. Height (f)(g) 28 ft., 2 stories Editor's notes:

CNR Neighborhood Commercial and Residential

(a)  In all cases, minimum setback of 10 ft. from curb face. (b)  Measured from centerline of alley. (c)  Setback may be reduced to 0 ft. if the structure is attached to a building abutting on lot or if no building on an abutting lot is within 5 ft. of property line. (d)  Setback may be reduced to 10 ft. for a single-story commercial building through site plan review. (e)   No setback is required for commercial or residential over ground floor commercial; an 8 ft. front street setback is required for ground-floor residential, and 5 ft. side street setback is required for ground-floor residential. (f)  An accessory structure is limited to 15 ft. in height. (g)  Elevator and mechanical equipment penthouses shall not be included in the measurement of height for commercial buildings.

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Site Inventory and Analysis

Figure 2.26 Residential Zoning Regulations R-2-N

R-3-S

R-3-T

Two-family Residential, Standard Lot

Low-density Multi-Family Residential, Small Lot

Multi-family Residential, Townhouse

21.31

21.31

21.31

15

15

15

4(b)

10% (q)

10% (q)

20

20

20

25 ft., 2 stories

26 ft., 2 stories

28 ft., 2 stories

Max Lot Coverage

6% (o)

250 (p)

N/A

Min. Usable Open Space Floor Area Ratio

0.6 0.6

250 (p) N/A

251 (p) N/A

Use Classification

Municipal Code Chapter Min. Front Setbacks (ft.) (j)(i) Min. Side Setbacks (ft.) (j)(i) Min. Rear Setbacks (ft.) (j)(i)(k) Max. Height (ft.) (d)(h)

Editor's notes:

b. If a lot is twenty-seven feet or less in width, see Section 21.31.215(F), special narrow lot standards. i. Average setback may apply as outlined in Section 21.31.215(C) (Front yard averaging). j. Special standards apply for reverse corner lots as specified in Section 21.31.215 (D) (Rear yard).

Figure 2.27 Residential Parking Requirements

k. The setback shall be measured from the centerline of an abutting alley where such exists. For shallow lots, see Special Standards in Section 21.31.215(D). o. Percent of lot area per unit.

Number of Spaces per Number of Unit Units/Bedrooms 0 BR (not more than 450 SF) 1.00 1 or more BR (451 SF or more) 1.50 2 BR or more 2.00 Guest Parking (b, c, d, e) 1 space/4 units

p. Square foot per unit. See Sections 21.31.230 (Usable Open Space) and 21.31.240 (Privacy Standards) for detailed standards. q. The side yard setback is ten percent of lot width on each side, but in no case shall the interior side yard setback be required to exceed ten feet (be required to exceed except as specified in footnote(s)). The side street side yard setback shall be fifteen percent of lot width, but in no case shall it be required to exceed fifteen feet. Neither setback shall ever be less than five feet.

b. The number of guest parking spaces indicated above in the table shall be the minimum number of guest parking spaces required in any residential district. c. Guest parking shall be required when 4 or more detached or attached dwelling units (including existing units on the site) are proposed as one development. d. When Allowed On Street. On-street parking abutting the lot shall be considered as guest parking according to the standards for

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Chapter 2 Existing Plans and Programs North Village Center Revitalization Program’s aim is to redevelop the Atlantic Avenue corridor between 59th Street and 56th Street. This project includes added services such as a community market and a library. The program developer is Civic/Amcal with a project budget is $30,000,000. The areas of focus are streetscape, facades, and parking (Long Beach Redevelopment Agency).

Figure 2.28 Village Center Concept Plan

The Neighborhood Enhancement Area Program is in place to beautify communities; it offers homeowners rebates for any improvements made to their property. The program rotates between the neighborhoods in North Long Beach. A budget of $750,000/year is disbursed by the RDA and Neighborhood Services Bureau (Long Beach Redevelopment Agency)

Figure 2.30 After the neighborhood enhancement program

Figure 2.29 Before the neighborhood enhancement program

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Site Inventory and Analysis

North Long Beach Design Guidelines Building setback along Atlantic Avenue where the sidewalk is 12’ wide is 0’ for 80% of front façade. If the sidewalk is less than 12’ wide building must be setback to accommodate a 12’ sidewalk width (North Long Beach Design Guidelines).

floor may accommodate residential use but the wall of the second floor wall may not be setback (North Long Beach Design Guidelines). Where alleys are implemented, the façade

facing the alley should reflect the front façade. Alleys are to accommodate business hour commercial deliveries and have entries to the second floor of buildings with residential uses (North Long Beach Design Guidelines).

Parking for commercial developments should be located behind the building (North Long Beach Design Guidelines). Curb cuts to be kept to a minimal and the narrowest width allowed by the code should be used if curb cut is unavoidable (North Long Beach Design Guidelines). Outdoor dining in building setback and on public sidewalks are encouraged (North Long Beach Design Guidelines). A building along Atlantic Avenue must have a commercial use on the first floor. To accommodate commercial use ceiling height on first floor should be at least 14’. Second

Figure 2.31 Building Setbacks and parking solutions.

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3

CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT

37


Chapter 3 3.1. Introduction From the initial community meeting and Long Beach walkthrough, the urban planning studio was able to capture what the residents of Long Beach hope to see in the downtown redevelopment project. During the community meeting, the planning team took notes on the most important improvements that Long Beach residents hope to see in their community. Using this information, the team created a conceptual diagram that takes into account community desires, as well as the additional improvements that the design team hopes to propose. The first community meeting held in Long Beach on Saturday, April 2nd, consisted of a neighborhood walkthrough followed by a community workshop. Approximately 20 members from the community attended the meeting and walkthrough. During the walkthrough, students from the urban design studio listened to and noted the comments made by Long Beach residents. Additionally,

38

community members were given disposable cameras marked with both green and red tags. The cameras with green tags were to be used to photographically document things that residents liked about the area. In contrast, the cameras with a red tag were to be used to show the things that the community of Long Beach did not like about the project area. Following this neighborhood walk was a community meeting to discuss the findings from the previous activities. Generated from this were the “Wish” and “Have” poems. On the “Wish” poem, residents wrote down things that they hoped or wanted to see in the redevelopment of Long Beach. The “Have” poem consisted of existing things that residents hoped to preserve. The urban design studio class took into account all of these findings in order to develop a conceptual diagram for the second community meeting.

Figure 3.1 Students at second meeting describing conceptual diagrams


Conceptual Development 3.2. Community Meeting 1: Findings Commercial Currently, the site offers a very limited amount of commercial stores. The community members’ biggest concern regarding commercial stores was the lack of diversity in store types and cited multiple barber shops and salons on the same block as well as an excess in liquor stores in the area. Another common complaint from the community was the area not providing services for families, the community would like to see people staying in the area for services rather than driving to other parts of town for necessities such as groceries. The community expressed interest in more healthy food options, cafes, and coffee shops. Currently there are only two restaurants in this area, one being Super Mex. One

community member expressed interest in being able to go out at night buying an ice cream, and just hanging out. Along with stores that would offer more food options the community showed an interest in overall more active businesses that would cater to people of all ages from youth to seniors. Diversity in stores that promotes and highlights the community’s diversity was another desire of community members. The large number of vacant stores and lack of diversity in stores creates an under-utilized area along Atlantic Avenue. The large number of working class families in the area would utilize this area if an active and diverse commercial area was created.

Residential Uses Currently, there is a variety of housing types found in the area. Surrounding neighborhoods contain single-family homes, multiplexes, and duplexes. In addition to this existing mediumdensity housing, residents expressed that they would like to provide more housing that would accommodate young people, seniors and families. Long Beach residents expressed interest in preserving the housing that currently exists while also integrating additional forms of housing. Many people would be interested in utilizing mixed-use development to provide housing alongside commercial development.

also define the street as a main corridor. Open Spaces/ Parks During the Community Awareness Walk there was a strong interest in using some of the available open space as a community center or gathering spot. The overall proposal for open space and park is oriented toward the youth, many of which have interest in biking, rollerblading and skating activities. A local community

Mixed-Uses Currently, the project site has very few mixed-use buildings. In the first meeting, the community expressed a desire to have more mixed-use buildings in order to bring up the density of the area. They felt adding mixed-use along Atlantic Avenue would not only bring more people to the area, but

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Chapter 3

member also pointed out during the Awareness Walk that many children in the neighborhood use the open grass area to play soccer. Vegetation can be found in the medians on the road. The community members requested to keep the medians and include more vegetation throughout the area. It would be practical to use vegetation that requires low-maintenance. Public Buildings Currently, the site is mainly commercial-use with little public amenities. The community felt that one of the vacant blocks along Atlantic Avenue would be a great place to put publicuse buildings to serve to immediate community. There have been plans proposed to put a library on the north-east block of the project site. The community felt that this would also be a good location for other

40

public use buildings, such as a community center, recreation center, or day care. They believed that offering such amenities would create more community involvement and draw people to the site, making it more of a central hub. Circulation Vehicular flow is most dominant North and South of Atlantic Avenue. Along Atlantic Avenue are store fronts that include street parking. Street parking is not only vital for the current commercial/ retail, but also the residents on Lime and Linden Avenue. There are no bike lanes currently on Atlantic Avenue, but there is a proposed bike master plan that would include Atlantic Avenue. The circulation flow for pedestrians is


Conceptual Development

constantly being staggered all over the project site. The leveling of the sidewalk around the residential area is destroyed from the protruding tree roots; this makes it difficult to keeping a steady stroll around the neighborhood. The crowding of poles, trash bins, and bike racks take up a majority of space on the sidewalk leaving very little room for actual walking. A concern brought up from a community member was making accessibility for disabled residents/ people around the project area easier. Overall a safer pedestrian crossing is needed. The speeding of vehicles on Atlantic is dangerous especially at the mid-block crossing, where there is a clear crossing for pedestrian but vehicles are not obligated to stop. There were recommendations to examine traffic calming

ideas that would help slowdown the traffic. There is public transportation available in the Village Center. Bus 192 stop is located on South Street going East/West and Bus 61 and 63 follows a route facing North/ South on Atlantic Avenue. The bus stop along Atlantic Avenue does not have a designated turn in, so it causes a sudden stop in traffic for the cars behind it. Urban Design Atlantic Avenue currently features a large number of old buildings. Community members’ output on the existing buildings was split; some liked the old buildings while Figure 3.2 Team member discussing bicycle circulation with a community others wanted to see them member replaced. Some felt that the old architecture of buildings should be preserved and incorporated into any futureA t l a n t i c A v e n u e U r b a n D e s i g n P l a n development. Others felt 41


Chapter 3 that the old style should be completely replaced with a more contemporary design. One of the biggest concerns was the width of sidewalks and walking space along both sides of Atlantic Avenue. People wanted the area to have more foot traffic and a more neighborhood feel.

Figure 3.3 Dislikes found at first meeting; many elements have to do with the lack of consistent urban design

A place that could serve as a gathering area for the community was also a common desire of members attending the first community meeting. One person said they wanted something like a “town square or plaza�. Interactive and lively street corners was another idea from some community members. Sustainability and Natural Resources

Figure 3.4 Likes found at first meeting; many elements have to do with the use of drought resistant vegetation

The median down the center of Atlantic Avenue is currently landscaped with drought-resistant plants that complement the natural environment of Long Beach. The community wants to continue with this and add drought resistant plants to further streetscaping and parks added to the area. Conceptual Diagram Process

42

After the first meeting, the students came together and discussed the most important findings from the community. The team then

put together a rough conceptual diagram of the community’s desires. With the findings from the meeting in mind, each student looked through architecture and planning magazines to find real life examples and inspiration for the ideas of the community members. Using the best of these photos, the team put together a collage. Using the ideas from the collage and the rough conceptual diagram, the team developed a more finalized diagram to show the community at the next meeting.


Intersection Parking Plaza Green Belt Open Space Public Use Commercial Mixed Use-Retail Mixed use-Office Medium Density Residential Vehicular Traffic Alley Pedestiran Access

Lime Avenue

Atlantic Avenue

Linden Avenue

South Street

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Conceptual Development

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Conceptual Development

Figure 3.5 Example of corner plaza www.sitephocus.com

3.3. Rationale Behind Conceptual Diagram The conceptual diagram is based on the team’s interpretation’s of needs and wants of the community. The team used the community’s input on land use, circulation, public space structure, urban design, and sustainability to create this diagram. The design begins with creating central nodes of gathering for the community members.

The team did this by creating corner plazas at the intersections of 56th and Atlantic and 59th and Atlantic (figure 3.5). These plazas at each end of the project site tie the area together creating a sense of identity and enhancing the pedestrian friendly atmosphere as desired by the community members (figure 3.6).. The central node is proposed to be at the intersection of South St. and Atlantic Ave. This node would bring together amenities that the community wants in the area. A small urban market, (figure 3.7)

Figure 3.6 Example of nodes http://www.uic.edu/aa/college/turrell/7_imagecredits/imagecreditsFrame.htm

Figure 3.7 Example of urban market http://sanfrancisco.grubstreet.com/2011/02/fresh_easy_opening_three_possi.html

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Chapter 3

a quiet neighborhood restaurant, and a retail building at each corner is proposed to bring together community needs at the center of the area. The team suggests leaving the gas station, currently, located at the south-east corner of the intersection. Making a modern looking gas station would enhance the corner and keep the needed service in the area. To enhance pedestrian and bicycle circulation on the site, the team suggests removing the side parking along Atlantic Avenue. By removing this there would be room for the much desired bike lane and to widen side walks. Adding these would create the pedestrian and bicycle

46

Figure 3.8 Example of traffic calming http://streetswiki.wikispaces.com/Curb+Extensions


Conceptual Development

friendly atmosphere the public wanted. In addition, this would allow for traffic calming techniques to be added to the area, such as bulb outs (figure 3.8). The parking would be moved to parking structures along Linden and Lime Ave and to the alleys behind the buildings. The parking structures will be set back with green belts so it does not impede too much on the residential feel of the area. The north-eastern block is proposed to be dedicated to public buildings and open space. The community desires a library and some kind of recreation or community center be placed in the area. Because of this, the team proposed an area dedicated to this land use. The area would

Figure 3.9 Example of open space with public art http://www.ci.emeryville.ca.us/index.aspx?NID=547

be a combination of buildings defining public open space (figure 3.9 and 3.10). The library will be located toward the back of this block so it is away from the hustle and bustle of the main street keeping the quiet and peaceful atmosphere of any good library (figure 3.11). On one corner there is proposed recreation and community center and on the other a quiet neighborhood restaurant.

Figure 3.10 Example of a possible use in the open space http://blog.islandreal.com/anna-maria-island/holmes-beach-skate-park/

Figure 3.11 Example of library http://www.books.sioux-city.k12.ia.us/vnews/display.v/ART/4730c96d635e8

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Chapter 3

Figure 3.12 Example of mixed-use development http://www.onebiosphere.com/mixeduse3.jpg

Figure 3.13 Example of cut through plaza www.sitephocus.com

48

Along Atlantic Ave the buildings are proposed to be mostly mixed-use with retail on the bottom and residential on the upper levels. This would add a variety of housing options to the area as the community wanted (figure 3.12). Along Linden and Lime Avenue, the team suggests putting mixed-use with office at the bottom and residential on the top. This would bring more people to the area making it a hub of economic activity. On the north west block, the team suggest putting a cut through plaza connecting the residents


Traffic Calming Intersection Parking Plaza Green Belt Open Space Public Use Commercial Mixed Use-Retail Mixed use-Office Medium Density Residential Vehicular Traffic Alley Pedestiran Access Bicycle Access

49

Conceptual Development

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4

LAND USE, CIRCULATION, AND COMMUNITY AMENITIES

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Chapter 4 4.1. Introduction After the first and second community meetings, the team used the information gathered to develop a proposed land use map, cross sections, and an initial hand rendered draft illustrative site plan. At the second meeting, the team received input based on a conceptual diagram and design concepts. For the most part, the ideas were received positively, but there was general concern about density, parking, and circulation. The team tried to address these issues in the proposed land use map, which was being prepared to bring to the third community meeting. Using the land use map, the team also developed a draft illustrative site plan. These two maps were brought to the final community meeting for feedback. After the meeting, street sections were developed

based on the input from the meetings. With the community’s wishes in mind, the team developed and proposed the following land uses for the project site: -Commercial -Single Family Residential -Medium Density Residential -Mixed Use-Retail and Commercial -Mixed Use-Retail and Office -Public Buildings -Public Green Space -Public Promenade -Special Mixed Use 1 -Special Mixed Use 2 -Parking

Figure 4.2 Students discuss their proposed land uses with community member

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Figure 4.1 At the third community meeting students met with residents at the North Long Beach Library.


Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities 4.2. Proposed Land Uses After two community meetings the team developed proposed land uses based on input from community members. The team proposed that the housing density decreases from Atlantic Avenue outwards in both directions. Housing density would decrease outwards from Atlantic Avenue towards Linden and Lime Streets. Housing along Atlantic Avenue would be mixed use with retail on the first floor. Medium density residential units are proposed along the east side of Linden Avenue and west side of Lime Avenue. Units would front the streets while alleys would provide access and parking behind them. Single-family residential units currently exist along both Linden and Lime avenues with several medium density residential units. The team suggests that all of these units are single family residential.

Commercial businesses are proposed along South Street; however, the mixed use along Atlantic Avenue would provide additional commercial uses. A grocery store would be placed at the Atlantic Avenue and South Street intersection. Mixed use with residential above retail is proposed for where Atlantic Avenue intersects 59th Street and 56th Street. At these locations, plazas would be created at the corners of these intersections. They would serve as small gathering areas and points of interest for pedestrians. Placement of the plazas would create unique areas that encourage pedestrian circulation up and down Atlantic Avenue. Mixed use with offices over retail is proposed for where AutoZone is currently located. Office space in the area would increase the number of people using the

area and create a more active and lively area. A promenade cutting from Linden Avenue to Atlantic Avenue is proposed for the block that is currently vacant. The promenade would go through the suggested mixed use and connect to the library and community center on the other side of Atlantic Avenue. This connection would also provide easy access to Atlantic Avenue for residents along Linden Avenue. Civic and public land use is proposed for the Atlantic Avenue and 59th Street intersection. The library and community center would make up this area. The location of these facilities is accessible for both nearby residents and people visiting the area. Open space and parks are proposed around the civic and public land. These would create a shared space that the library, office, and single family residential units could share. This open space would also add to the aesthetics of the area. They would also provide a buffer for the single-family residential units but also allow residents easy access to the commercial activity along Atlantic Avenue.

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Chapter 4

Figure 4.3 Before- View of commercial development along Atlantic Avenue

Figure 4.4 After- View of mixed-used development along Atlantic with traffic calming measures

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Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities

Figure 4.5 Before- View of redevelopment area on Atlantic Avenue

Figure 4.6 After- View of proposed promenade connecting Linden Avenue and Atlantic Avenue

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Chapter 4

Figure 4.7 Before- View of corner of Atlantic Avenue and South Street

Figure 4.8 After- View of corner Atlantic Avenue and South Street with bulbouts and streetscaping

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Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities

Figure 4.9 Before- View of commercial development along Atlantic Avenue

Figure 4.10 After- View of proposed mixed-use with upper story residential

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Figure 4.11 Proposed land uses in the project area

Legend Single-Family Residential Townhomes

Commercial

Mixed Use (Apartments above Retail)

Mixed Use (Office above Retail)

Civic & Public

Parks & Open Space

Parking

Village Center Mixed Use

Promenade Mixed Use

Promenade

Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities

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Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities

Figure 4.12 Currently, Atlantic Avenue has two lanes going in each direction with a median and street parking on either side. Because the community wanted to increase street life, safety and bicycle access to the area, the team proposes removing the street parking along Atlantic Avenue and make up for this loss of parking through alley way parking and structures. By removing the street parking, there would be plenty of space on the street to add bike lanes and enlarge the sidewalks. Street calming efforts, such as bulb outs and raised mid-block crosswalks will be added to the street to increase pedestrian safety.

Figure 4.13 Currently, South St has two lanes running in each direction with a center turing lane. The team proposes the street stays relatively the same. Because of the want for increased pedestrian safety, the team suggests adding crosswalks at the intersections of Linden and South and Lime and South. In addition, more streetscaping is suggested on south to increase street life. At l ant ic Avenue Urb an D esig n Pl an

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Chapter 4

Figure 4.14 The team proposes leaving the lay out of these two streets the same with one lane going in each direction and room for side parking on each side of the street. To address the issue of safety, the team suggests adding streetscape improvements and replacing the trees which disrupt the sidewalk creating a hazard with smaller trees that thrive in the natural environment of Long Beach.

Figure 4.15 Similarly to Lime and Linden, the team suggests leaving the layout of 56th and 59th the same with one lane going in each direction and side parking on either side of the street. To improve safety, the team suggests replacing any trees that create a hazard and widen sidewalk by narrowing the green belt which separates it from the street.

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Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities 4.4. Community Amenities Promenade The plan proposes a promenade feature located mid-block to connect residences on Linden to the proposed future library located on Atlantic. In past community meetings, residents expressed their desires for a connecting element between residential and commercial areas. This promenade would address this need. The promenade would serve as a safe pedestrian thoroughfare and additionally increase the aesthetic value of the block. A promenade feature would create additional opportunities for commercial uses and add interesting architectural elements to North Long Beach. Street life would improve through the introduction of more restaurants and coffee shops located along the promenade. Civic and Public Buildings From the beginning of the project in North Long Beach, community members discussed with the students the need to introduce a library into the

area. In the proposed re-development plan, a library and community center would be built on the corner of Atlantic and 59th. Locating the library in a central area makes access possible for all residents. Users of the library would be able to utilize other available features offered within the library structure. The library would serve the community of Long Beach by augmenting the educational opportunities available to residents. Additionally, a community center would be located in close proximity to the library. A community center would provide recreational opportunities for nearby residents. Both the library and community center would contain large spaces that could be utilized for community gatherings, events, or meetings.

open spaces. Currently, there are very few parks for people to use. During project site visits, students were told by community members that open lots designated as redevelopment areas had been reclaimed by some residents as “parks� in which they could play sports. As part of the redevelopment plan, students hope to introduce more parks. These green spaces would be landscaped to add to the aesthetics of the neighborhood. Residents could use the available open spaces for outdoor events, recreation, or other desired uses. Since these proposed open spaces would be closely connected to neighborhoods, the library, and community center, it would safely allow children to play without exposure to traffic.

Parks and Open Spaces Surrounding the library and community center are proposed green

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Chapter 4

Plazas The land uses proposed by the urban design team suggest a public plaza to be located at the end of the promenade and leading to the entrance of the library building. A plaza located here would not only create an attractive entrance to the library, it would also create the opportunity to introduce landscape features and public art to the redevelopment proposal. Feedback from Long Beach residents was encouraging about the introduction of more public spaces. Most community members were encouraged by the idea of having more designated community space. Critical corners found in the project area such as the intersection of 56th and Atlantic, Atlantic and South, and 59th and Atlantic would be designed to allow for small corner plazas.

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While these plazas would be small in scale, they would create attractive spaces on the four corners of each intersection. Small plazas would be advantageous because they would allow for outdoor seating at restaurants as well as make the Atlantic corridor more attractive. Public Art In an effort to preserve and display the rich history of Long Beach, a monument is proposed to be located within the plaza at the front of the library. Although the student-generated plan suggests the removal of the theatre, students still hope to fulfill the community’s desire for some historic preservation by introducing features that display and explain a timeline of the area’s history. This monument or timeline could contain information about the historic theatre as well as the spire currently found on the theatre building. This plaza may also have features that explain other historical

elements of Long Beach. Additional space may be used for public art projects or to exhibit other community displays. Community Garden A community garden is proposed to be placed on the empty lot located on the corner of 56th and Linden. Currently, there is no community garden located in close proximity to the residents living on Linden or Lime Avenue. Introducing a garden could be used as an educational opportunity for school-aged children or be used by residents who are interested in gardening. Allowing a garden to be implemented on this corner would make the area more attractive to both residents and visitors. This garden would also help to increase the open space desired by North Long Beach residents.


Land Use, Circulation and Community Amenities 4.5. May 7, 2011 Community Event On May 7, 2011 the urban design team shared their land use proposal and illustrative site plan at the North Long Beach Library. The team was able to communicate and receive feedback from the community members on the proposed land use and a more developed conceptual plan, more detailed from the first conceptual plan provided at the second community meeting. Overall the third community meeting was successful, there was an agreement with the conceptual diagram and the community members. Positive comments that were given about the proposed ideas consisted of promenade, public spaces, on-site parking, and the variety of uses. Centering the project site area with the promenade and the library was most liked; also part of this focal point is the park pockets. The promenade is proposed to connect the residents on Linden Avenue to the library and residents on Lime Avenue. Many community

members showed interest in the proposed open space and park area surrounding the library. Street life was shown from the hand renderings on the conceptual diagram that several people would like to see in the project site, an example would be having seating outdoors. On the conceptual diagram there is proposed on-site parking, which was valuable to the community. On-site parking was removed from the store fronts. The parking spaces would be accounted for in the alley. The positive feedback emphasized incorporating different uses. Community members would like to see more uses in the project area, these would vary by having restaurants, cafes, a grocery store and more public service offices. There were some concerning issues on parking and the preservation of the theater. There was also hesitation about increasing density in the project site area because many community members were picturing four story high buildings and townhomes, but

Figure 4.16 Community members share their opinions with students

after further explanation that the increased density would be mixed-use type buildings concerns were changed to interest. By increasing the density the community distressed about having enough parking spaces for the overall site. In responses to the parking dilemma the team proposed to include a parking structure within the site. It would be located near the grocery store and another on the corner of South Street and Lime Avenue. Another issue surrounded the theater, a historical element. The proposal from the team would be to redevelop the building but incorporate the history.

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5

FORM BASED CODES

67


Chapter 5

This chapter presents the form-based codes that the team developed for the Atlantic Avenue project area. These codes will help guide development in the direction the team envisioned. The form-based codes are divided by land uses and include provisions for setbacks, height limits, and parking requirements. The codes also guide development for streetscaping in the project area by including provisions for lane width, sidewalk width, and plants. Community amenities have their own codes to dictate how the public space should be integrated into the area. Along with the form-based codes this chapter includes three-dimensional renderings and an illustrative site plan to show how the form-based codes could be applied.

Figure 5.1 View of mixed use office above retail

68


Formed Based Codes

Figure 5.2 Mixed use along Atlantic Avenue

Figure 5.3 View looking north along Atlantic Avenue

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Chapter 5

Figure 5.4 View of public library and architectural feature

Figure 5.5 Pedestrian crossing on Atlantic Avenue

70


Figure 5.6 Illustrative Site Plan.

From Based Codes

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Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Mixed M Use e-Corners

Location of mixed-use corners within n the m land use map

Diagram off build-to-line

Allowed land use(s)) Ground flo oor

Com mmercial

 

Second flo oor

Ressidential

Third floorr

Res sidential

oposed to bring a The comm ercial on the ffirst floor is pro o the area and d will keep witth the theme a already street life to present on Atlantic Aven nue and South h Street. ments on the ssecond and th hird floors will bring The apartm more peop ple to the area a. These people should add d to the density of tthe area and b bring more ec conomic activiity, which shou uld help the bu usinesses of tthe area. In ad ddition the added height along A Atlantic Avenu ue would help p better of place to the e define the aarea giving a better sense o pedestrian .

Siting an nd building placement

Build-to-Line

Build-to-lin ne Maximum uilding allowed bu depth from m street front

On each corner faciing the inte ersection the build b to liine should be 10 feet in from the parrcel line Along the street front f the build to line ould be along the sho pro operty line On side parcel lin nes 90 feet



  

The 10 feett build-to-liness should creatte a corner pla aza. These plazzas, which will be located att the corners o of 56th ntic Street and Atlantic Aven ue and 59th Sttreet and Atlan hould create a sense of con nnection throu ugh the Avenue, sh North Villag ge project areea. The rest of the buildingss should be bu uilt to the prop perty ntic Ave and th he cross stree et line in ordeer to give Atlan definition. ngs should bee built to the siide parcel line es. This The buildin will keep a consistent faççade on Atlan ntic Avenue an nd allow build ings to share walls. ot be more tha an 90 feet dee ep. This Each build ing should no ws for vehicula ar access and d parking in th he depth allow back. It is rrecommended d that when possible buildings do d 60 feet deep p so that each building can take not exceed full advantaage of natural lighting. At l ant ic Avenue Urb an D esig n Pl an

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Mixed-Use M e Corners

Diagram of o maximum an nd minimum building b heigh hts with h respected grround to ceilin ng heights

gram of canop py and percentage of window Diag openings

Building form Maximum building height

74

35feet The building b heigh hts in this regu ulation area sh hould be consistent with thee rest of Atlanttic Avenue. A 25 feet minim mum help define the e street. and a 35 feet maxiimum would h The ground g floor ccommercial an nd second floo or office shou uld be at lea ast 10 feet tall . This will allow w for an adeq quate amount of space for each usee.

Minimum building heigh ht

25feet

Minimum ground floor ceiling heiight

10feet

Minimum upper floor(s)) ceiling heiight

10feet

Balconies and canopies s

ed Canopiies and Balconies are stronngly encourage  Bo oth balconies and a canopiess have the abillity to enhance e the appeara ance of a street by ma aking it more architecturallyy interesting. a balc conies could h help add to the e sense of street life by brin nging  In addition, ressidences out of o their homess and on to th eir balconies overlooking th he stre eet.  Ba alconies overlo ooking the plaazas are particcularly encourraged for the rea asons listed above.

Roof articu ulation

The roo ofs should be flat with skylig ghts for naturaal lighting.  The roof r on these buildings sho ould be flat to be consistentt with the roofss of the surrounding bu uildings. or natural lighting in the  Theyy should have skylights. Thiis will allow fo residences.

Ground flo oor openings and articulation n

80% off the ground flo oor should be e openings an d they should d start no highe er than tw wo feet from the sidewalk. Buuildings shoulld be broken u up into multiplle facadess no larger tha an 60feet eachh.  80% openings on the t ground flo oor would enccourage intera action between n the estrians and th he buildings th hey are walkin ng by. pede e  The building b should be divided into multiple ffacades in ord der to keep the feelin ng of human scale s created by the other b buildings on A Atlantic Ave.


Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Mixed-Use M e Corners

Diagram m of main enttrance and parrking access

Diagram m of parking ac ccess

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss

Main entrance location

Main en ntrance should d be located d within the corrner plaza. Second dary entrancess may be located along g d the both Atllantic Ave and crossing g street.

Access fro om parking, if any

A backk entrance sho ould be inclu uded for rear parking g

m entrancee for these buildings should d be located w within  The main the plaza. p This will help facilitate e activity within the area.  A seccondary entraance maybe used on either Atlantic Ave oor the crosss street if the sstoreowner fin nds it necessa ary.  Theree should be a back entrancce. This entrannce will be maainly for em mployees, and d deliveries.

Vehicle access a Number of o required parking spaces

1 per evvery 600 squa are feet of commercial c 1 per dw welling unit

Allowed parking types and locations

A 30fee et setback from m the rearr property line will create vehicular v acce ess and allo ow room for parking g for the employyees and the residences above.

 Parkiing should bee located in thee rear of the ssite. A 30feet sset backk will create ad dequate room m for vehicular access and parking.

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Mixed M Use e-Commerrcial and O Office

Diagram m of mixed-use e commercial and office on Atla antic Avenue within w the land use map

Diagram of se etbacks and b build-to-line

Allowed land use(s)) Ground flo oor

Comme ercial

Second flo oor

Office

Th he commercia al on the first ffloor is propossed to bring a street life to tthe arrea and keep with the them me already present on Atlanttic Avenue an nd So outh Street. Th he offices of th he second flo or are propossed to bring ne eeded service es to the area for the e community m members. In a addition, the o offices could h help drraw more peo ople to the areea, in turn help ping the comm mercial uses d down stairs.

Siting an nd building placement First Floorr setback Second Floor ne Build-to-lin Build-to-lin ne Maximum allowed building depth et from stree front

76

5 feet On pa arcel line On sid de parcel lines

60 feet

The goal is to o keep this areea consistent with the rest o of Atlantic Ave enue. The buildingss should help define the stre eet and create e a walkable a area. The first floor should have a minimum off a five foot se etback. This allow room forr outdoor seatting. setback would widen the ssidewalk and a d create more street life. These should The second floor should bee built to the p parcel line. Th his will create sshade on the street. uilt to the side e parcel lines. This will keep pa The buildingss should be bu consistent faรง รงade on Atlanntic Avenue an nd allow buildiings to share walls. The buildingss should be no o more than 6 60feet deep be ecause this is the depth at whic ch natural lightt can reach.


Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Mixed-Use M e Commerrcial and Office

Diagram m of maximum m and minimum m building heig ghts with respected ground to ceiiling heights

Diagram of canopy and d percentage of window ope ening

Building form Maximum building height

28 feet

Minimum building height

22 feet

Minimum ground ng height floor ceilin

10 feet

Minimum upper eiling height floor(s) ce

10 feet

Balconies and canopies

Canopies arre encouraged d. The second d floor should create a cano opy over the ffirst.  The sec cond floor sho ould create a ccanopy over th he first. This c canopy would create shade s on the street s for a mo ore welcoming g atmosphere e.

Roof articu ulation

The roofs sh hould be flat with w sky lights for natural lighting.  The roof on o these buildiings should b be flat to be co onsistent with the roofs of th he ng buildings. surroundin  Buildings in this area sh hould have skyy lights. This w will allow for n natural lighting g in the officess.

Ground flo oor openings and n articulation

80% of the ground g floor should be opeenings and the ey should starrt no higher than two feet from m the sidewalkk. Because thhe back is ope en to public op pen space it should featu ure the same thing. t The bui lding should b be broken up into multiple facades no larger than 60 0 feet each.  Because both b the front and back of tthe buildings w will be seen by pedestrianss, they should inc clude 80% ope enings. The laarge window sspace would c create visibilityy into the store. ng should be divided into m multiple facades in order to keep the feelling of  The buildin human scale created byy the other bu uildings on Atla antic Ave.

The build ding heights in n this regulatio on area should be consisten nt with the resst of Atlantic A Avenue. A 22 ffeet minimum m and a 28 fee et maximum w would help deffine the streeet. und floor comm mercial and second floor office The grou should b be at least 10 ffeet tall. This w will allow for a an h uses. adequatee amount of sspace for each

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Mixed-Use M e Commerrcial and O Office

Parking g at the prop posed parkking structurre.

Diagram off main entranc ce

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss

Main entrance location

Main en ntrance should be b located on the w a street with second e on the entrance side fac cing the public open o space

Access fro om parking, if any

 There T should be two main eentrances one e on the streett front and the e other o on the back b facing thee public open n space.  The T two entran nces would atttract pedestrians from either area. en space, the  Because B of itss proximity to tthe public ope ere is no directt car c access to the building. TThere should be loading zo ones in the fro ont along a South Street S and Atlaantic Avenue.

None N

Vehicle access a Number of o required parking spaces Allowed parking types and locations

78

1 per evvery 600 square feet f of commercial 1 per offfice unit Parking will be located in the e across structure South Street S

 Parking P should d be located iin the parking structure loca ated across frrom the t regulation area on Sout h Street. The close proximity will allow people p to easily get from th heir cars to the eir desired loc cation.


Formed Based Codes Name of o Regulattion: Single Family Residentia R al

D Diagram of se etbacks and build-to-line Locatio on of single fam mily residentia al on Linden Avenue and a Lime Aven nue within the land use map p

Allowed land use(s)) Ground flo oor

Resiidential

This area a will be zoned d as single-fam mily residentia al in order to maintain the neighborh hood characte er and low-de ensity feel.

Second flo oor

Resiidential

Maintaining the neighb borhood as so olely residentia al can create a nts that live there as well ass comfortable environmeent for residen ople that walk or bike throug as. gh these area other peo

Siting an nd building placement Build-to-lin ne or setback on nt street fron

10 fe eet

Build-to-lin ne or setback on sides

10 fo oot setback on n side to allow for eway drive

Maximum uilding allowed bu depth from m street fron nt

eet 60 fe

A ten-foo ot setback at th he front of eacch house will maintain stree et presence e while simultaaneously allow wing for a sma all front yard. Having homes set bacck from the strreet allows forr front-yard on that can imp prove the aessthetics of the street vegetatio environm ment. There sho ould also be a setback on tthe side of ea ach home to allow for a drive eway. Residen nts may choo ose the side off their house o on which the ey want to placce their drivew way. Maximum m allowed buil ding depth sh hould be 60 fe eet from the sttreet front. Hom mes should n ot be larger th han this in ord der to allow for sufficient natural lightin ng within the h home.

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Single S Fam mily Resid dential

Diagram of o maximum an nd minimum building b heigh hts with h respected grround to ceilin ng heights Diag gram of balcon ny

Building form

80

Maximum building height

25 feet

Minimum building height

16 feet

Minimum oor ground flo ceiling heiight

10 feet

Minimum upper floor(s) ceiling heiight

10 feet

Balconies and canopies

Balconiies are allowed as architecttural features on single-fam mily homes. Ho owever, they should have a minim mum depth of 6 feet and a m maximum dep pth of 10 feet. Canopies may also be b added to homes h as arch hitectural featu ures or window evices. w shading de er, they may only o be constructed using w wood or metall materials. Howeve Both ba alconies and canopies c are encouraged e to o create a divverse appeara ance to residential areas of o Long Beach h. Allowing balconies can allso encourage e a friendlier n neighborhood d atmosp phere because e street presence will increaase.

Roof n articulation

ot specified fo or the residenttial areas of LLong Beach. Roof articulation is no s no roof type preference fo or this area in order to enco ourage a diverrsity of archite ectural There is styles and a a variety of o appearance es from the strreet. Additiona ally, Long Bea ach has few climate limitations tha at would dicta ate built roof fo orm. Given th hat the city of Long Beach does not receeive significan nt amounts of snow or rain, roof overhan ngs are allowe ed with a maxximum depth o of 2 to 3 feet.

Ground flo oor openings and n articulation

Front po orches and en ntryway canop pies are highlyy encouraged d on single-fam mily homes. These features f can create c a varietyy of building ffaรงades and a an appealing residential street environment.

Buildings should havve a maximum m height of 25 5 feet in order to ain a lower den nsity feel. A m maximum height of 25 feet a allows mainta single-family homess to be built with two storiess. Lower building heigh hts should up phold the traditional charactter of orhood. Havin ng lower rooflines create a a residential neighbo ce. friendlier streetscapee and pedestrrian experienc d uses on botth stories sho uld be strictly residential. W Within Allowed these residential r bui ldings, a miniimum ceiling h height of 10 fe eet can cre eate light and spacious roo oms in newly b build homes.


Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Single S Fam mily Resid dential

Diagram m of main enttrance and parrking access

Diagram m of parking ac ccess

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss Main entrance location

Entranc ce should be located facing street s front.

Access fro om parking, if any

hrough enter th back en ntrances where parking p is provided.

Main entrance locations for ssingle-family h homes are pro oposed to be t street fron nt. Main entran nces should b be facing stree ets located facing the ecause it crea ates a more w walkable and p pedestrian-frie endly street be en nvironment.

Vehicle ac ccess Number of o required parking spaces

2 per un nit

Allowed parking types and locations

arking Side pa accesse ed from alley wa ay.

Fo or single-family homes, it iss recommende ed that parkin ng space shou uld be prrovided for two vehicles. It iis encouraged d that each ho ome has a drriveway on one side of the h home to allow w for parking. T The driveway en ntrance should d be from alleey to minimize e curb cuts and add to pe edestrian safe ety on the streeet. Prroviding parking locations o on each lot will remove som me of the parkking fro om the streetss and also con ntribute to a m more pedestria an-friendly street.

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Medium-D M Density Re esidential

.

Location of medium-de ensity residenttial on Linden enue within lan nd use map Avenue and Lime Ave

Diiagram of setb backs and buiild-to-line

Allowed land use(s))

Ground flo oor

Resid dential

Second flo oor

Resid dential

The proposed lan nd use is med dium-density residential in th he regulation area a because the e initial plan waas having a hierarchy patte ern where the core e of the site is high density and then movves to medium m-density to lo owdensity residentia al neighborhoo ods. The medium-density residentiaal relates to the surrounding g land uses h-density, mixxed-use and lo owbecause it acts as a buffer betw ween the high mily homes. In ncreasing residential would d also increase density, single fam dents are in w walking distanc ce the pedestrian exxperience becaause the resid he variety of uses. to th

Siting an nd building placement

82

Build-to-lin ne or setback on nt street fron

back 10 feet on n Setb stree et front

Build-to-lin ne or setback on sides

Build d-to-line on the Nortth Side (excep ption corn ner parcels)

nd Buildings placed on the parcels facing Linden Avenue an Lime Avenue sho ould be reside ential. The stre eet front is back 10 feet to o give the res idents a front yard. Having the setb nortth side a build d-to line it will enhance natu ural lighting. Settting the maxim mum building depth to 60 fe eet designate es eno ough space in rear side of the parcel; 10 feet for an alley drivveway and an extra 20 feet ffor parking. M Moving parking acc cess to the alleey way allows more desirab ble pedestrian nfrien ndly environm ment.


Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Medium M Density D Residential

Diagram of maximum m and minimu um building he eight with respect to o ground to ce eiling heights

Diagram of b balcony

Building form Maximum building height

25 feet

Minimum building heigh ht

15 feet

Minimum ground floor ceiling heiight

9 feet

Minimum upper floor(s)) ceiling heiight

8 feet

Balconies and canopies s

Within thee regulation a area the land u use on the gro ound floor and d the upper flo oor is residentiial. From floorr o ceiling surfa ace the minim mum height on n the surface to first floor is 9 feet; if there is an uppe er floor the m height is 8 fe eet. If the build ding has only a minimum ground flloor the minim mum height is 15 feet and iff there el the maximum m building height was an aadditional leve would bee 25 feet. This would take in nto account fo or the option off different type es of roofing. .

It is encouraged e that if there is a second floo or a balcony b be included to enha ance lighting and a overlooki ng the neighb borhood.

Roof articu ulation

There e is no prefere ence on the ro oof articulation n, the overall building heig ght was se et to provide enough h space for th he many optio ons.

Ground flo oor openings and articulation

Front doors d should face f the streeet front toward ds Linden Avenue.

Maximum uilding allowed bu depth from m street fron nt

60 feet

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Medium-D Density Re esidential

Diagram of o main entrances and parkiing access

Diagram of parking acc cess

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss Main entrance location

Linden Avenue A and Lim me Avenue

Access fro om parking, if any

Back allleyways

uildings on Lin nden Avenue sshould have ttheir main entrrance facing Bu Lin nden Avenue and buildingss. On Lime Avvenue should have their ma ain en ntrance facing Lime Avenuee. Proposing tto have the m main entrance face the e street will prrovide a neigh hborhood feeling by having residents fac ce ea ach other.

Vehicle access a

84

Number of o required parking spaces

ng 1 parkin places per p dwelling g unit

Allowed parking types and locations

Side parking and alle ey parking

g can be in thee street front o or in the alley. The drivewayys in Alllowed parking the e alley going into i the mediu um-density residential shou uld be private for the e residents, but adjacent to o those parkin ng are the pub blic parking avvailable for the e mixed-use d developments..


Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Mixed M Use e (residenttial above commerc cial)

Diagram of se etbacks and b build-to-line Location of o mixed-use on Atlantic Avvenue within th he d use map land

Allowed land use(s)) Ground flo oor

Comme ercial

Second flo oor

Residen ntial

Third floorr

Residen ntial

his proposed land use is inttended to pro ovide the area with housing and Th co ommercial use es. Housing aalong Atlantic Avenue would d add street liffe an nd create a more lively areaa throughout tthe day. Addittional commercial sp pace would prrovide for the community and draw visito ors to the area a.

Siting an nd building placement Build-to-lin ne or setbackk on street front

Build-to o-line is the fron nt propertyy line

Build-to-lin ne or setbackk on sides

Build-to o-line is the side e propertyy lines

Maximum allowed building m depth from street fron nt

60 feet unless skylightts or natural lighting l systemss(s) are provided

A pedestrian frriendly and ap ppealing comm mercial area is the target attmosphere forr this area.  Buildings in th his area shou ld have storeffronts facing the street to draw visitors to the shop and sp pend time in th he area.  First floor setb backs should increase side ewalk width an nd encourage e walking.  Build-to-lines on the adjaceent property liines are intend ded to increasse mmercial shop ps and create e a more appe ealing shoppin ng space for com destination fo or visitors.  Requiring a maximum m buillding depth off 60 feet allow ws natural lightt into the interior of the buildingss. This is a susstainable apprroach that willl help n in the area. lower energy consumption

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Mixed M Use e (residenttial above commerc cial)

Diagram of maximum and a minimum building heights with respect to ground g to ceilin ng heights Diiagrams of caanopy and perrcentage of wiindow opening

Building form Maximum building height

38 fe eet

Minimum building height

18 fe eet

Minimum ground ng height floor ceilin

14 fe eet

Minimum upper eiling height floor(s) ce

9 feet

Balconies and canopies

Roof articu ulation

Ground flo oor openings and n articulation

86

 Building heeights in the a area are intend ded to maximiize space in th he area but still give the area a sense of human scaale and define e the street.  The first flo oor of this area a should be used for comm mercial econd and third floors shou uld be and retail sstores while se utilized as rresidential space.  All distancees for ceiling h heights will be e measured from finished maaterial to finish hed material.

Balconies and d/or canopiess are mandato ry if the buildin ng goes up to o three stories. 40% of second floo or facades mu ust have opennings either in the form of su unspace or recessed balc cony.  Flat roofs are a encourage ed however, sh hed or hipped d roofs are allo owed because e of their horizontality and continuity with o other buildingss in the area. b cannot exttend further th han 4 feet bec cause there sh hould  Overhangs are allowed but be a clearlyy defined publlic space Ground floor openings will cover a minim mum 80% d because seccond floor sho ould fulfill this function.  Awnings are not required und floor spac ce should be reserved for o openings. Thiss would create e  80% of grou more invitin ng storefronts as well as allo ow for maximu um visibility fo or safety. Span ndrel panels should be a maximum of 2 feett tall to add so olidity and cre eate a base fo or nd display pla atforms. windows an


Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Mixed M Use e (residenttial above commerc cial)

Diagram of o building witth main entran nce and parkin ng access a

Diagram m of parking access

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss Main entrance location

Main en ntrance should d be on street s front (Atlantic c Avenue)

Access fro om parking, if any

Rear en ntrance for residen nts and employyees

g store fronts aand main entrrances on Atla antic Avenue w will  Having relate to o the existing buildings and d increase pedestrian circu ulation up and d down Atlanticc Avenue.  Rear paarking in the aalleys should pprovide easy access to thee building gs for both ressidents and e employees alikke. Moving vehicular parking to the rear of the e building is in ntended to asize a pedesttrian friendly e environment. empha

Vehicle ac ccess

Number of required paces parking sp

1 parking space/ per dwellling unit. 0 square feet of o 1 space/750 commercial space.

Allowed parking types and locations

Parking will be b located in the t alleys behind d the buildingss

Additional parkking should be e served by parking A he area sttructures in th M Moving parking g to the alleyss behind the b uildings is inte ended to crea ate a more ndly atmosphere. p edestrian frien

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Promenad P de Mixed-U Use

Locatio on of promena ade mixed-use e on Atlantic Avenue within n the land use e map

Diagraam of build-to--line

Allowed land use(s)) Ground flo oor

Comme ercialRetail

Second flo oor

Residen ntial

Third floorr

Residen ntial

The promenade p mixed-use m areaa should have e commercial-retail uses loc cated on th he ground floo or. The second s and th hird floor shou uld be used fo or residential u uses. These uses are suggested in orrder to mainta ain the mixed-u use characterr of the area. a ggested for th e first floor in order to enco ourage pedesttrian Commercial is sug c though the promenade. p TThe promenad de is also inten nded to promote traffic traffic c from the surrounding resid dential areas to the comme ercial areas.

Siting an nd building placement

88

Build-to-lin ne on de promenad frontage

Build-to o-line on street frront

Build-to-lin ne or setbackk on sides

20 foot setback orth from No propertyy line (See rattionale)

Maximum allowed building m depth from street fron nt

p Whole parcel length

nade frontage to property lin ne, A build-to-line is suggested aat the promen us faรงade is d desired throug gh the crreating a continuous faรงadee. A continuou prromenade to create c an arch hitecturally ap ppealing area. Also, elimina ating sp paces betwee en buildings w would create a well-defined public space.. Th here should be a 20 foot seetback from th he North prope erty line exclusively to o accommoda ate the suggessted parking lo ocated in the alleyway. Th he mixed-use promenade b buildings that are facing a sstreet front sho ould ha ave a build-to line on the st reet front. Doiing so will reta ain the archite ectural prresence estab blished on thee surrounding retail/commercial buildingss. Placing comme ercial building s at the streett front promottes a lively stre eet nvironment. en Maximum build ding depth is aalready restriccted by setbac cks to allow fo or arking in alley. Therefore, th he building de epth should be e located at th he pa prroperty line to allow for a m aximum build ding depth aro ound 25-30 fee et. Th his building sizze will allow fo or adequate lighting and ve entilation.


Formed Based Codes Name of o regulation area: Promenad P de Mixed-U Use

Diagram m of maximum m and minimum m building heiight witth respect to ground to ceiiling heights

Diag gram of canop py, balcony, a and percentag ge of w window openin ng

Building form Maximum building height

38 feet

Minimum building height

28 feet

Minimum ground ng height floor ceilin

14 feet

Minimum upper eiling height floor(s) ce

9 feet

Balconies and canopies

Balconies arre suggested on the second d floor of build dings and sho ould be recesssed 5 feet. The app pearance of balconies b will aadd life to the e promenade. If buildings ha ave a third floor, th hey should havve a terrace aalong the entirre length of this level. This terrace will allow a for light to t enter the bu uilding and prrovide an additional amenityy to residents living in the build ding. Addition nally, the third floor terrace m may have fabric opies and terrraces are enccouraged to ad dd interest to canopies or trellises. Cano paces and pro ovide addition nal shading on n the top storiies of the build ding. residential sp

Roof articu ulation

Allowed rooff styles are shed and gablee. Flat roofs arre suggested to maintain th he horizontality established on o surrounding g buildings an nd the rest of the overall nt. If shed rooffs are implemeented, the low w sloped end should match h up developmen with adjacen nt building fascia. Overhang gs should be a utilizing awnings on achieved by u the ground floor, recessed d balconies o n the second floor, and a te errace with a ttrellis f on the third floor

Ground flo oor openings and articulation n

A minimum of o 80% openin ngs is suggessted to be use ed for retail use. Retail build dings on the groun nd floor of the promenade sshould have la arge windowss to display rettail for sale and also o allow natura al light to enteer the building . Awnings are e encouraged to be placed on th he ground floo or windows. Aw e wnings add ccharacter and interest to the building faรงa ade. They will also provide shade on side ewalks for ped destrian usage. These awnin ngs are allowe ed to extend 330 inches beyo ond the faรงad de.

The T maximum m building heig ght for the mixxed-use prome enade development d should s be 38 feet. This heig ght will allow ffor a three sto ory building b to be constructed tthat allows forr retail uses on n the ground ffloor and a two storie es of residentiaal. The T minimum building heig ht should be sset to 28 feet. This height w would allow a for a two o-story buildin g. Both two a and three storyy buildings are e encouraged e to o create diverssity of building g heights and d add architectural in nterest to the promenade. On O the first floor, ceiling hei ghts are sugg gested to be a minimum of 14 feet. Ceilings of o this height w will accommo odate retail uses and provid de sufficient s spac ce to carry outt this suggest ed use.

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Chapter 5 Name of o regulation area: Promenad P de Mixed-U Use

Diagra am of building with main enttrances and accesss of parking

Diagram of parking acc cess

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss Main entrance location

Should be located off the nade promen frontage e.

Access fro om parking, if any

a Direct access from strreet parking on t the Linden to promen nade.

To o encourage easy e access, eentrances to rretail and com mmercial de evelopment on n the ground ffloor should b be located off the frontage o of the e promenade. Entrances sh hould be placced here to allow pedestrian ns wa alking through h the promenaade to easily e enter the shop ps located alo ong the e length. Th he promenade e should havee direct parking g access from m the existing strreet parking th hat is located along Linden. The promen nade should be ussed solely for pedestrian p usse. Vehicle use e should not b be allowed in tthe are ea in order to create a safee and walkable e throughway.

Vehicle ac ccess Number of o required parking spaces

Allowed parking types and locations

90

e / 750 squarre feet 1 space of comm mercial use 1 space e / dwelling un nit hould be a There sh designa ated loading zone for disab bled users alo ong Linden Street. S

ccommodate all users, there will be a de esignated load ding To ac zone e for disabled needs along Linden Street.


Formed Based Codes Mixed Use U Parkin ng Structu ure

Location n of mixed-use e parking structure on Linde en Avenue and a South Stre eet

Diagram of ssetbacks and build-to-line

Allowed land use(s))

Ground flo oor

ail/commerciall Reta and parking half commercial behiind it will be parkking

Second flo oor

Parking 3 floor parking rd

This area should s providee parking for b both visitors a and residents in the area. The first f floor shou uld provide rettail stores while the second d and third floorss should provid de parking. Parking structu ures should prrovide parking forr the area, butt still maximize e the amount of other land uses in the area a. The structur es should ble end in with surrrounding buildings and contrib bute to the peedestrian expe erience with re etail stores fac cing the South Street. S

Siting an nd building placement Set-back on o street fron nt

0 feet

Build-to-lin ne on sides

Lind den and Lime at 10 feet from property line

Maximum uilding allowed bu depth from m street fron nt

e Rear property line

 First floor retail stores should be fro onted on South Street cture should b be close to the e sidewalk  The struc  The area a should be peedestrian frien ndly and shou uld be able to get from the area onto Atlaantic Avenue safely and co onveniently. operty line willl maximize area for parking g  Building to the rear pro a third floorrs should be sshaded or parrtially shaded for  Second and vehicles

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Chapter 5 Mixed Use U Parkin ng Structu ure

Diagram of o maximum and a minimum building heigh ht with respect to grround to ceiling heights

Diagrram of canopyy and percenttage of window w openings

Building form Maximum building height

38 feet

Minimum building height

38 feet

Minimum oor ground flo ceiling heiight

14 feet

Minimum upper eiling floor(s) ce height

9 feet

Balconies and canopies

Roof articu ulation Ground flo oor openings and n articulation

92

 The proposed building h height is 38 fe eet in order to allow for the on the two up pper stories wh hile maximum amount of paarking added o dating retail o on the lower flo oor. accommod  Ceiling heiight on the gro ound floor sha all be 14 feet tto provide a spacious retail r area.  The upper parking storiees should havve ceiling heig ghts of 9 feet.

b shall be allowed. No balconies Cano es from the fro ont faรงade. opies may exttend 30 inche Balc conies, terrace es, patios, sun nspaces, and roof gardens could enhanc ce the street live along Atlantic Ave enue and are encouraged. e e allowed on u uppers levels only Canopies are ause they are not necessary on the grou nd floor due tto the building g set-back from m beca the street s and the resulting building overhang nded sidewalkks. g of the exten  If a balcony iss designed it should s front o f the public sq quare or park. c can extend 30 incches from fron nt faรงade  No balconies on first floor canopies  3rdd floor open to o air recommended shading g devices with h pv arrays

80% % openings witth 2 foot max height h spanieel panel.


Formed Based Codes Mixed Use U Parkin ng Structu ure

Diagrram of parking g access

Diagra am of main en ntrances and access a to parkking

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss Main entra ance location

uth Street Sou

Access fro om parking, if any

cess from park rking acc to retail r use at re ear reta ail for personn nel onlly

 Entra ances on Sou uth Street shou uld be clearly visible for veh hicles.

 Addiitional parkingg will add morre pedestrian activity to the area  Receessed entry foor pedestrian aaccess  Enteer and exit vehhicular accesss should be prrovided from aalley on south street

Vehicle ac ccess Number of o p required parking spaces

Allowed parking types and locations

1 space s / 300 squ uare feet

eet, Covered, off-stre tollled parking.

 Parkking will provid de a convenient place for co ommercial an nd resid dential uses in n the area.  Parkking will bring additional peedestrians to tthe area and ccreate a mo ore active areaa  Parkking should bee accessible from alleywayss only

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Chapter 5 Civic

Diagram of se etbacks and b build-to line Location of civic buildin ngs within the e land use map p

Allowed land use(s)) Ground flo oor

public

Second flo oor

public

Th he area enclossed by Atlanti c Avenue, Lim me, 56th, and S South Street iss de esignated as the t public cen nter for the Atllantic corridorr redevelopme ent to esstablish a central activity areea for the com mmunity. A co ommunity center, lib brary, and pub blic square aree permitted in n this zone. Th hese uses will act to ga ather and hold d people to crreate a public core for the 9th District.

Siting an nd building placement

94

Build-to-lin ne or setbackk on street front

5 feet frrom street frront

Build-to-lin ne or setbackk on sides

Build to o property line

Maximum allowed building m depth from street fron nt

60 feet

ng Atlantic Avvenue will have e a 5 foot set--back to allow w for a  Buildings alon wider sidewalk, except at sstreet intersecctions where a 10’ X 10’ build-to dhered to in orrder to enhancce visibility in that intersection. line will be ad hould be awayy from the side ewalk on Atlan ntic Avenue, b but  The library sh fronting of a public p square and facing Attlantic Avenue e. The library should be sett back 10’ from m Lime Streett to buffer the residential un nits on Lime Street frrom civic usess.  The buildingss should front on Atlantic Avvenue and/or a public plaza a, which will ope en to Atlantic A Avenue on on ne side and fo ormed by public buildings of th he other threee sides. On the e same blockk as the civic a and public zone iss a park. The buildings sho ould have spac ces that take in the park, so that boundary bettween park an nd building is a ambiguous.  The buildingss should front the street, so that the stree et has a clearlyy defined boundary that ped destrian can re ecognize.  The maximum m depth of thee building is to o ensure that p part of the parcels can merge with the park an nd have sitting g or learning sspace.  The maximum m depth ensurres access to natural lightin ng.


Formed Based Codes Civic

Diagram m of maximum m and minimum building height with w respect to ground to ceiiling heights

Diagram o of canopy and d percentage o of window ope ening

Building form Maximum building height

28 feet

Minimum building height

18 feet

Minimum oor ground flo ceiling height

14 feet

Minimum upper floor(s) ceiling height

9 feet

Balconies and canopies

 The proposed p build ding heights w will define the street as a sp pace.  The building b heightts on the stree et will allow fo or a sense of p place and will w promote p edestrian com mfort by keepiing the buildin ng to huma an scale.  Land uses allowed d will be publicc in nature, su uch as a public c d community ccenter. Public c buildings will not squarre, library, and have a mix of usess. oof floor ceilin ng height of 14 4’ is proposed d to establish  The ro horizo ontal lines on the facades a at the same le evel on each building in the proj ect boundaryy. This will allow w for buildings on ent parcels to o reference ea ach other and create some differe contin nuity. Upper flloor ceiling he eights at set to o do the same e.

Balconies, terrac ces, patios, su unspaces, and d roof gardenss will enhance e the street life e ng Atlantic Avvenue and are e encouraged.. Canopies are e allowed on upper levels o only if alon a balcony is desiigned it should front the pu blic square orr park.

Roof n articulation

oofs are encourages, but hipped and sheed roofs are a allowed due to o their horizon ntality. Flat ro Overh hangs are allowed, but mayy not extend m more than 4 fe eet. This is so that the public c space e created has a cap and is clearly defined.

Ground flo oor openings and n articulation

c buildings gro ound floor sho ould be 70 peercent opening gs with glass doors and ribbon Public windo ows. This will allow a for pede estrians to seee into the build dings and activities being housing inside and d influence the em to go in an nd participate.

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Chapter 5 Civic

Parkin ng at the proposed parrking structture.

Diagram of building witth main entran nce

Pedestrian Access to Buildingss Main entra ance location

Accessed A from m building frontage along g public square

Access fro om parking, if any

Back entrance es from on street parking g should be provided p for disabled d users

The entran ces are to front the square because this can nd will help to o add to the life for the public square an ould still front tthe ensure its ssuccess. The buildings sho street to keeep a continuo ous definition to the street. This space is a heart for the ccommunity.

Vehicle access a

96

Number of o required parking sp paces

1 space / 500 0 square feet

Allowed parking types and locations

All A parking should be on e street or in the community pa arking structures. Fo or disabled persons p shou uld be provided p on street s parking p with easy e access to the e buildings.

Since the ccore of the community is orriented toward d the pedestrian , all parking a and vehicular a access should d be kept off sitee to eliminate traffic conflictts and make tthe communityy core safer.


Formed Based Codes Street name: n Atla antic Aven nue

Cross sectio on of Atlantic A Avenue

Streetscaping Design sp peed

30 mph

Right-of-w way width

80 feet

Curb face to curb face width w

62 feet

Traffic lane es

2 northbound n 2 southbound s

Bicycle lan nes

1 northbound n 1 southbound s

Side parking

N/A A

Curb radii

10

Street pavvement material(s)

asp phalt

Sidewalk width w

7 fe eet-both sidess

Sidewalk pavement p ma aterial(s)

con ncrete

Pedestrian n crossing loc cation (s)

Mid dblock and at inte ersections

Pedestrian n crossing ma aterial(s)

Raiised brick

 Thee goal of this sstreet design iis to create an n actiive and widelyy used comme ercial area. n w vehicular sp peed will create a pedestrian  Low frien ndly area whe ere crossing A Atlantic Avenue e is safee.  Wid de sidewalks w will encourage e pedestrian actiivity along the e street while b bike lanes will bring ncourage alterrnative method in vvisitors and en ds of nsportation tran  Raissed pedestria an crossings w will slow vehicular speeed and create e safe areas ffor pedestrians to crosss

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Chapter 5 Street name: n Atla antic Aven nue

Street light for f vehicles

Jacaaranda Tree

Amerrican Smoke T Tree

Street light l for pedesstrian

Streetscaping

98

Lighting tyype 1, objectivve

LED Ped destrian Light

Lighting tyype 1, height

12 feet

Lighting tyype 1, frequencyy

Every 35 5 feet

Lighting tyype 2, objectivve

LED Stre eet Light

Lighting tyype 2, height

20feet

Lighting tyype 2, frequencyy

Every 60 0 feet

Street tree e type 1, species

Jacarand da

Street tree e type 1, frequencyy

60 feet

Street tree e type 2, species

American n Smoke Tree e

Street tree e type 2, frequencyy

60 feet

 A weell-lit area will ccreate a safe area for pedeestrians use a at night  Lightting will only illluminate the sstreet and minim mize blight  Both h trees are nattive to the area a destrians  Treess will provide shade for ped  Treess will create a more defined d space betwe een storeefronts and the e street  Treess are local to the area and drought tolera ant; wateer usage will b be minimized


Formed Based Codes Street name: n Sou uth Street

cross-sec ction of South S Street

Streetscaping Design sp peed

30 MPH

Right-of-w way width

80 feet

Curb face to curb face width w

62 feet

Traffic lane es

2 eastbound e and d2 westbound

Bicycle lan nes

1 eastbound e and d1 westbound

Side parking

N/A A

Curb radii

10 feet

Street pavvement material(s)

asp phalt

Sidewalk width w

9 fe eet

Sidewalk pavement p ma aterial(s)

con ncrete

Pedestrian n crossing loc cation (s)

i At intersections

Pedestrian n crossing ma aterial(s)

bric ck

The o overall street ccharacter is ta argeted at the activee commercial uses. It is also one of the m main interssections crosssing Atlantic A Avenue. The biike dewalks would d contribute to o an laness and wide sid he lowered sp peed limits and d the activee street life. Th brickeed crosswalkss will enhance e the pedestria an lifestyyle. The comm mercial uses c could become e more utilizeed with the acttive life create ed by these physi cal propertiess.

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Chapter 5 Street name: n Sou uth Street

Strreet lighting

Jacarandaa

merican Smoke e Tree Am

Pedestrrian lighting

Streetscaping

100

Lighting tyype 1, objectivve

LED L pedestrian n lights

Lighting tyype 1, height

12 1 feet

Lighting tyype 1, frequen ncy

Every E 35

Lighting tyype 2, objectivve

LED L street ligh hts

Lighting tyype 2, height

20 2 feet

Lighting tyype 2, frequen ncy

Every E 60 feet

Street tree e type 1, species

Jacaranda J

Street tree e type 1, frequ uency

60 6 feet

Street tree e type 2, species

American A Smo oke Tree

Street tree e type 2, frequ uency

60 6 feet

The overall sstreet characte er is targeted at the active comm mercial uses. Itt is also one o of the main intersecctions crossin ng Atlantic Ave enue. The bike lane es and wide ssidewalks wou uld contribute to o an active stre eet life. The ed limits and the bricked lowered spee crosswalks w will enhance th he pedestrian lifestyle. The commercial u uses could h the active life e become morre utilized with created by th hese physical properties.


Formed Based Codes Street name: n Lim me Avenue e

cro oss-section off Linden and LLime Avenue

Streetscaping Design sp peed

25 mph

Right-of-w way width

60 feet

Curb face to curb face width w

36 feet

Traffic lane es

1 northbound n an nd 1 sou uthbound

Bicycle lan nes

N/A A

Side parking

On n both sides off the eet stre

Curb radii

10 feet

Street pavvement material(s)

asp phalt

Sidewalk width w

8 fe eet

Sidewalk pavement p ma aterial(s)

con ncrete

Pedestrian n crossing loc cation (s)

i At intersections

Pedestrian n crossing ma aterial(s)

paiinted

The o overall street ccharacter is ta argeted at a qu uiet resideential street. T To ensure this the speed lim mit is reducced to 25 mile es per hour. Im mprovements propo osed to the streetscaping in nclude repavin ng the si dewalk to cre eate a safer pe edestrian uses experrience. Physiccal properties relate to the u in thee streets by alllowing residen nts to explore their neigh hborhood and visit the nearrby commercia al areass safely.

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Chapter 5 Street name: n Lim me Street

Strreet lighting

Jacaranda

merican Smoke e Tree Am

Pedestrrian lighting

Streetscaping

102

Lighting tyype 1, objectivve

LED D pedestrian lights l

Lighting tyype 1, height

12 feet

Lighting tyype 1, frequen ncy

Eve ery 60

Lighting tyype 2, objectivve

LED D street lightss

Lighting tyype 2, height

20 feet

Lighting tyype 2, frequen ncy

Eve ery 60 feet

Street tree e type 1, species

Jac caranda

Street tree e type 1, frequ uency

60 feet

Street tree e type 2, species

Am merican Smoke e Tree

Street tree e type 2, frequ uency

60 feet

TThe overall stre eet character is targeted at the aactive commerrcial uses. It iss also one of tthe m main intersectiions crossing Atlantic Avenue. TThe bike laness and wide sid dewalks would d an active stree et life. The lowe ered ccontribute to a nd the bricked d crosswalks w will s peed limits an eenhance the p edestrian lifesstyle. The ccommercial usses could become more utilized w with the active life created b by these physical p properties.


Formed Based Codes Street name: n 56thh, 59th, and d Linden Street S

Crosss section of 56 5 th and 59th s treet

Streetscaping Design sp peed

25 MPH

Right-of-w way width

50 feet

Curb face to curb face width w

36 feet

Traffic lane es

1 eastbound e and d1 westbound

Bicycle lan nes

N/A A

Side parking

On n both sid des of the stre eet

Curb radii

10 feet

Street pavvement material(s)

asp phalt

Sidewalk width w

8 fe eet

Sidewalk pavement p ma aterial(s)

con ncrete

Pedestrian n crossing loc cation (s)

At ersections inte

Pedestrian n crossing ma aterial(s)

paiinted

The overall sstreet characte er is targeted at a quiet eed limit residential sttreet. To ensure this the spe o 25 miles perr hour. Improvvements is reduced to proposed to the streetsca aping include repaving an the sidewalkk to create a sa afer pedestria Physical prop perties relate to o the uses experience. P in the streetss by allowing rresidents to exxplore their neighbo orhood and visit the nearbyy commercial areas safely.

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Chapter 5 Street name: n 56thh, 59th, and d Linden Street S

Street S lighting

Jacarandaa

merican Smoke e Tree Am

Pedestrian lighting

Streetscaping

104

Lighting tyype 1, objectivve

LED L pedestrian n lights

Lighting tyype 1, height

12 1 feet

Lighting tyype 1, frequen ncy

Every E 60 feet

Lighting tyype 2, objectivve

LED L street ligh hts

Lighting tyype 2, height

20 2 feet

Lighting tyype 2, frequen ncy

Every E 60 feet

Street tree e type 1, species

Jacaranda J

Street tree e type 1, frequ uency

5 trees

Street tree e type 2, species

American A Smo oke Tree

Street tree e type 2, frequ uency

5 trees

The overall sttreet character is targeted a at the ercial uses. It is also one off the active comme main intersecctions crossing g Atlantic Avenue. The bike lane es and wide sidewalks woulld contribute to an active street life. The low wered and the bricke ed crosswalkss will speed limits a enhance the p pedestrian life estyle. The commercial u uses could become more utilized with the active e life created by these physsical properties.


Formed Based Codes Public Square S

eye view from m Atlantic lookin ing down into Bird’s e public square.

Location of o the public square s within the t land use map m

Features s Proposed location

Centrrally located on prom menade axis in comm munity core bllock.

Target use e or activity

Public c gathering sp pace.

Target atm mosphere

Outdo oor seating arreas and other o places fo or peop ple to dwell and d watch h life unfold.

This amenity shou uld act as a co ore for commu unity gatheering and outrreach events. This space shou uld be enclose ed of three sid des and open to ntic Avenue on n one. The bu uildings that d define Atlan the sspace should be terraced ensure that the e nd inviting. Th here should b be a squaare is well lit an landm mark element placed rough hly in the midd dle of the ssquare to act a as an anchor for the space. This mark should b be a re-though ht squire or to ower landm of so ome kind.

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Chapter 5 Lime Sttreet Com mmunity Pa ark

Sketch Up rendering of c community pa arks on Lime S Street

Location of communityy park within th he land use map m Features

106

Proposed location

On Lime Street

Target use e or activity

Quiet, protected nt environmen

Target atm mosphere

Hidden nd gardens an tree defined d groves.

The park should be d densely plante ed with foot p paths cutting h to connect t o library, public square, and community through center. The park sho ould have garrdens, groves, and nooks to o vary macy within th he park. The park is targete ed for all the the intim membe ers of the ninth h district and should tie the e urban core togethe er with green sspace.


Formed Based Codes Commu unity amenity name e: Promena ade

Sketch Up re rendering of prromenade

Location of the promen nade within the land use ma ap

Proposed location

Midbloc ck between Atlantic Avenue, A Linden Avenue and 59thh Street

Target use e or activity

Passengers from Linden towards Atlantic

Target ere atmosphe

A line of tree in the center. Pedestrrian exclusivve. A seatin ng area public space. s

The promena ade should bee an inviting pu ublic area with h outdoor sea ating and be availa able for a varieety of activitiess within the sp pace. To strengthen the pedestrian experience th he promenade e will also connect ue straight thro ough Atlantic Avenue to the e residents on Linden Avenu proposed public/communiity space. ees through th he center of th he promenade e will provide The line of tre shade and de efine the overaall public spacce to a more human scale. Even with the e trees shading g parts of the area, the spa ace will still be e well lit and visible through natu ral lighting. The overall go oal of the prom menade atmo osphere is to h have the spac ce be a destination and not only a cut-through h from Linden Avenue to ervices and re etail available o on Atlantic. There should be ccommercial se oor. the ground flo

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Chapter 5 Commu unity Ame enity Name e: Linden Avenue A U Urban Gard den

Vegetabless in the urban garden

Location n of the Urban Garden on Lin nden Avenue and d 56th Street wiithin the land use u map

Features s

108

Proposed location

Linden Streett at 56th Street

Target use e or activity

5 feet x 5 feet d above ground planter boxess and lockable e chest for gardening supplies.

Target atm mosphere

Semi-private

The urb ban garden o of Linden Stree et should be maintaained and plan nted by comm munity membe ers so that theey have an op pportunity to in nteract with ea ach other aand be able to o grow their ow wn food within n walking g distance fro om their reside ence. There sshould be a 100 feet setbackk in which no gardening oc ccurs where trees and shrrubs should be planted to a add privacy to the garden. some p


References Barmann, J. (2011, February 22). Fresh & easy opening three, possibly four stores in san francisco. Grub Street San Francisco, Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.grubstreet.com/2011/02/fresh_easy_opening_three_possi.html Bruce wall systems corporation. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.brucewall.com/ Long_Beach_Convention_Center_PIC.html City-data. (2010) http://www.city-data.com/city/Long-Beach-California.html. Department of Planning and Building. (October 1988). Seismic Safety Element. City of Long Beach General Plan. Long Beach, CA. Retrieved from: http://www.lbds.info/civica/ filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=2544 Department of Planning and Building. (3 October 2006). Atlantic AvenuePlanned Development District PD-25. City of Long Beach. Long Beach, CA. Retrieved from: http:// www.lbds.info/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=2470. Downtown Long Beach Associates (DLBA). (n.d.). Long Beach History. downtownlongbeach.org. Retrieved March 29, 2011, from http://www.downtownlongbeach.org/Long_Beach_History Emeryville, california. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.ci.emeryville.ca.us/index.aspx?NID=547 Gaisma. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.gaisma.com/en/location/long-beachcalifornia.html Island realestate. (2011). Retrieved from http://blog.islandreal.com/anna-mariaisland/holmes- beach-skate-park/ Library department sioux city community schools. (2011). Retrieved from http:// www.books.sioux-city.k12.ia.us/vnews/display.v/ART/4730c96d635e8 Long beach realestate-long beach condo. (2011). Retrieved from http:// www.longbeachrealestatehome.com/m/blogs/lbreh/7994878.jpgImages Long beach transit. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.lbtransit.com/Services/ Maguglin, Bob. (n.d.). Long Beach History Timeline. visitlongbeach.com. Retrieved March 29, 2011, from http://www.visitlongbeach.com/static/index.cfm?contentID=714&navid=30 NCDC. (7 April 2011). Long Beach Daughtry Field. NCDC: Weather Station. Long Beach, CA. Retrieved from: http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgiwin/ wwcgi.dllwwDI~StnSrch~StnID~20001598. One bioshpere. (2009). Retrieved from http://www.onebiosphere.com/mixeduse3.jpg Â

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Pacific Gas and Electric Company. California Climate. Zone 8: Long Beach. Retrieved from:   http://www.pge.com/includes/docs/pdfs/about/edusafety/training/pec/toolbox/arch/climat e/california_climate_zone_08.pdf Planning Department. (3 December 1996). City of Long Beach Air Quality Element. General Plan. Long Beach, CA. Retrieved from: http://www.lbds.info/civica/filebank/ blobdload.asp?BlobID=2437. Planning Department. (5 March 1975). Noise Element. Long Beach General Plan. Long Beach, CA. Retrieved from: http://www.lbds.info/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=3051 Site phocus. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.sitephocus.com Southern california earthquake center. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.scec.org/education/images/LB33pic3.jpg Streetswiki. (2011). Retrieved from http://streetswiki.wikispaces.com/Curb+Extensions University of illinios at chicago. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.uic.edu/aa/college/turrell7_imagecredits/imagecreditsFrame.htm    

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