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new mexico

winter 2019/spring 2020

Working on the Railroad Diego Romero vs. the End of Art Yōkai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist Geodiversity: New Mexico’s Unique Geologic Landscape From Ranches to Rockets: Exploring New Mexico’s Range History

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LOCAL CONFIDENCE

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New Mexico Museums & Historic Sites  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020

Contents

From the secretary

4 · New Mexico: Our Diversity Is Our Strength 11 · Museum of Indian Arts and Culture 13 · New Mexico History Museum 15 · New Mexico Museum of Art 17 · New Mexico Museum of Art 19 · New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science 21 · National Hispanic Cultural Center 23 · New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum 25 · New Mexico Museum of Space History 27 · Museum of International Folk Art 29 · Center for New Mexico Archaeology 31 · Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property 33 · Jemez Historic Site 34 · New Mexico Historic Sites 36 · Calendar Cover: “Tiffanie Twirling,” Garrison Day, Fort Stanton, 2016. Photograph by Timothy Roth; Courtesy NM Historic Sites. Instructional Coordinator Tiffanie Owen is dressed in period costume. “The clouds were low, the air was still, Larry was splitting wood for the fire, John kept the coffee hot while making biscuits, beans and bacon in his crusty castiron skillet. And then it began to snow. I could not resist the urge to move to the parade ground and twirl!” Top: Angel Fire-Wheeler Sunset (detail). Courtesy New Mexico Tourism Department; Agnes Pelton, Awakening (Memory of Father) (detail), 1943, oil on canvas. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Museum purchase, 2005 (2005.27.1) Photo by Blair Clark.

Season’s greetings from the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. Call them what you will, but few things are as enchanting as New Mexico’s most beloved tradition: the lighting of farolitos and luminarias. Equally evocative of the holiday season is the aroma of piñon burning in the fireplace, a steaming bowl of posole, a creamy horchata, and the sweet, crumbly goodness of the perfect biscochito. In an ever-changing world, New Mexicans cherish our traditions. Many of our museums and historic sites offer events that have become part of every family’s traditions. Perhaps this year they will become part of your wintertime traditions as well. In December, all families are welcome at the holidays at the Palace of Governors and Las Posadas procession around the Santa Fe Plaza. Come for the free cookies and hot cider, but stay for a little holiday magic. Don’t forget that the Museum of Art has its own holiday party with fun for the whole family! Holidays at our Historic Sites are equally magical and not to be missed. Visitors can choose from Light Among the Ruins at Jemez Historic Site, Lights of Los Luceros, and Las Noches de Las Luminarias at Fort Selden. Please check the pages at the back of this guide for a calendar of events for the holidays and well into 2020. The new year promises to be a busy one for our museums and historic sites. We will showcase our state’s great diversity, a hallmark of department’s mission. The Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum takes a deep dive into the region’s technological history in the exhibit From Ranches to Rockets. The Museum of Natural History and Science explores New Mexico’s distinct geography with upgraded volcano and earthquake exhibits. The New Mexico History Museum looks at a transformative element that turned New Mexico into a tourist destination: the coming of the railroad. The Museum of Art exposes us to the art of a largely unsung contemporary of Georgia O’Keeffe in the exhibition Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist. The National Hispanic Cultural Center recognizes the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, and all things Peruvian. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture delves deep into the creative mind of the artist in Diego Romero vs. The End of Art. The Museum of International Folk Art immerses us in the otherworldly realm of ghosts, demons, ogres, shapeshifters, and monsters with Yōkai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan. Light those luminarias and farolitos and come join us for some holiday festivities. On behalf of all of us at the Department of Cultural Affairs, we wish you a happy and safe holiday season. We hope to see you in the new year. Sincerely, Debra Garcia y Griego Cabinet Secretary NM Department of Cultural Affairs Marketing Director: Shelley Thompson Editor/writer: Mary Ann Hatchitt Design and Production: Bram Meehan

NCE

Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodgers’ Tax.

T O R E Q U E S T C O P I E S O F T H I S P U B L I C AT I O N , P L E A S E C A L L 5 0 5 - 476 -1 1 3 4 .

newmexicoculture.org/guide  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Healing begins with humanity. Each day, many of our most vulnerable community members face the challenges of homelessness, mental illness, substance abuse, and violence. Anchorum St. Vincent is working side by side with local nonprofits and CHRISTUS St. Vincent to enable more people to find shelter, stabilize their lives, and become part of a stronger community.

Anchorum St. Vincent is helping some of those in greatest need within our community to reclaim their lives. We recently awarded Impact Grants totaling $100,000 to three local nonprofits focusing on adult homelessness. This funding will help to support homeless shelters, transitional housing and respite care beds, and programs assisting homeless families with children.

Anchorum also awarded a total of $250,000 to five nonprofits in Santa Fe, Española, Tesuque, and other communities in rural northern New Mexico that specialize in adult behavioral health. This will enable expanded services in such areas as harm reduction, substance abuse prevention/recovery, grief counseling, and domestic violence interventions. We’re proud to be an active partner in these important programs. They are enabling our people to become whole again, brightening their future— and ours as a community.

 

A 501(c)(3) nonprofit promoting mental health and social advocacy through education and the arts with:

B  S / N M • I O A E • M I 1000 Cordova Place, Suite 436, Santa Fe, NM 87505 • 505.577.7840 michele@compassionatetouchnetwork.org • www.mindsinterrupted.com

To learn more about these Impact Grants, visit Anchorum.org/ImpactGrants

Community. Health. Impact.

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The World Traveler EXPERIENCE THE MANY FACETS OF GEORGIA O’KEEFFE Discover O’Keeffe’s exploration of travel and the natural world with installations in the Museum Galleries.

Top: Harold Stein. Georgia O’Keeffe in Hawaii, 1939. Photographic print. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation. 2006.6.755 Center: Georgia O’Keeffe. Machu Picchu I, 1957. Oil on canvas, 111/8 x 8 inches. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. [2006.5.260]

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HOME AND STUDIO

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MUSEUM STORE

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W

hether you lose yourself in the constellations or in a clear night sky; the majesty of the mountains; the seemingly desolate desert; the ancestry of your people; the art, craftsmanship and traditions of other cultures; the savagery of the Old West or the brutal history of conquest; the fossilized remains of prehistoric creatures; or the beckoning of space, New Mexico is a land of distinction and promise. Diversity occurred in New Mexico, in part, through a confluence of Native, Hispanic, and American cultures meeting in sometimes exceptional ways. With a population just over two million (2,095,428 according to the U.S. Census Bureau 2018 Population Estimates Program), New Mexico is the sixth leastdensely populated state — about seventeen people per square mile. Despite this sparse but growing population, New Mexico’s makeup remains diverse. Native Americans have dwelled here for millennia, and Hispanics and Mexicans for centuries. In addition to these cultures, New Mexico’s population includes more than twenty-eight ethnic groups including Italian, Chinese, Taiwanese, Indonesian, Swedish, German, Filipino, African, and French. New Mexico boasts a population of more than 150,000 veterans of all ethnicities who fought for our freedom in different branches of the military. Many opted to make their homes here after being stationed at one of New Mexico’s five military bases. Forty percent of those veterans are sixty-five or older, survivors of Vietnam, Korea or World War II. It was the Navajo Code Talkers who turned the trajectory of World War II by using their Native language to outfox the Japanese. New Mexicans from all ethnic backgrounds have fought

on behalf of the United States in both World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, both Gulf Wars, Iraq, and Afghanistan. You can show your appreciation to our protectors and first responders this holiday by visiting the New Mexico Veterans Memorial and Museum Center in Albuquerque. Fifth largest in land mass, the sheer expanse of this 121,590-square-mile state offers a variety of climates. On July 31, 2019, temperatures in New Mexico varied an astonishing 61 degrees, from 100 degrees in Tucumcari to 39 degrees at the Angel Fire Airport, according to the National Weather Service. This year skiers and snowboarders were on the slopes through Memorial Day. Soaring to heights of more than 13,100 feet, the mountains of New Mexico receive 300 inches of snow annually. The eight major ski resorts offer lengthy winter seasons often ranging from November through April. Studying, celebrating, and preserving New Mexico’s diversity is part of the mission of the museums and historic sites under the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. Our eight museums are also repositories, holding prized specimen examples, fragments, and remnants, maintaining evidence of our growth and testimony to the power of our shared history. Each institution represents a different facet of our collective treasure trove of art, artifacts, history, and culture, and the individual collections they hold are themselves multifaceted. One of the few American museums that has a monthly budget for feed and hay for its exhibits, the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces offers a new exhibit that covers more than animals. Home on

Left: Taos at center; clockwise from top right: Ghost Ranch, Abiquiu; Bandelier National Monument; Valles Caldera; White Sands Missile Range; Wheeler Peak; Chaco Canyon panorama. Courtesy: New Mexico Tourism Department. Above: New Mexico Veterans Memorial amphitheater (2013). Courtesy: New Mexico Veterans Memorial. newmexicoculture.org/guide || Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Above: General Electric employees posing on the V-2 rocket. GE had the contract to work on the V-2 at the Proving Ground. Photo courtesy of WSMR.

the Range: From Ranches to Rockets examines how the region accommodated the establishment of White Sands Missile Range in the 1940s (pg. 23). That rocket history can be further explored in Alamogordo, where you can catch a glimpse of rare artifacts from space at the New Mexico Museum of Space History. Learn the stories of the visionary pioneers who saw beyond Earth’s mortal coil and whose mission was, indeed, to shoot for the stars. Take time to visit the New Horizons Dome Theater and watch the film Apollo 11 — First Steps (pg. 25). New Mexico’s geology and terrain are a medley, boasting one of the world’s five major geologic riffs. From the mid-Rio Grande Valley to the towering peaks of our mountains, sinkholes, lush forests, and bosques all stand in stark contrast to the beauty of a desolate desert terrain. With increased global seismic activity regularly making the news, the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque explores our geologic diversity in advance of unveiling 6

timely upgrades of both the volcano and earthquake exhibits (pg. 19). New Mexico is home to 19 distinct Pueblos, populations of Apache, Navajo, and various other Native groups. Indigenous people in the state fought hard to preserve their cultures and maintain a foothold against the encroachment of Spanish, Mexican, and United States colonial forces. The strength, tenacity, spirituality, and tradition of each individual tribe is as solid as the bedrock beneath the soil of the Earth they honor and protect. Their art, pottery, weaving, jewelry, and tradition are woven into the fabric of New Mexico. Currently the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture features the exhibition Diego Romero vs. the End of Art. Romero’s pottery techniques are paired with graphic art influences to take on a new and metaphorical villain “the end of art.” Romero’s multifaceted identity, “half Berkeley boy, half Cochiti man,” is evident in this exhibition, the largest showing of his work to date (pg. 11).

New Mexico Museums & Historic Sites  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Above: Coyote Night Dance, cylindrical jar, n.d., Diego Romero (Cochiti Pueblo). Courtesy of King Galleries. Photograph by Addison Doty. Right: Little Joe on the Launch Pad: The largest rocket to ever have been launched from New Mexico, Little Joe II, was used for testing the Apollo spacecraft launch escape system and command module parachute recovery system in abort mode. Little Joe II was launched from White Sands Missile Range and now stands tall next to the NM Museum of Space History. Courtesy NMMSH.

Now into its 102nd year, the New Mexico Museum of Art’s history tracks with the state’s emergence as a world-class art market. The Museum of Art eclipsed its earlier promise to serve as a home base for New Mexico artists, for the much-anticipated exhibitions of Santa Fe and Taos masters, and for extraordinary displays of contemporary art. Its permanent collection is a virtual who’s who of world-renowned artists who made their homes in New Mexico, and left an indelible mark in the world of art. The Transcendental Painting Group came together in 1938 in Santa Fe. They defied convention by turning their artistic gaze inward to spiritual matters instead of outward to the southwestern desert landscapes, or traditional scenes of Native life popularized by their predecessors and contemporaries. An exhibit at the Museum of Art celebrates the work of one of the Transcendental Painting Group’s founding members, Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist. Although still a relatively obscure American modernist painter, Pelton was a contemporary of Georgia newmexicoculture.org/guide  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Left: Agnes Pelton, Departure, 1952. Oil on canvas. Collection of Mike Stoller and Corky Hale Stoller. Photo by Paul Salveson. Above: A Denver and Rio Grande railroad pile-up on narrow gauge tracks east of Durango, Colorado, ca. 1905. Photograph by F. Connor. Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archive (NMHM/DCA), neg. no. 046973.

O’Keeffe and studied with O’Keeffe’s teacher, Arthur Wesley Dow. Pelton’s interest in spirituality links her to a larger international movement that is only now being properly studied and contextualized. Vibrant and uplifting, Pelton’s abstract works bloom with color, animating an energy in the desert that only she could see (pg. 15). Across the street from the Museum of Art and around the corner from Santa Fe Plaza, the New Mexico History Museum preserves the state’s unique history. Here you can learn about the many flags that have flown over the Palace of the Governors — the seat of the territory’s various governments. You can immerse yourself in the hardships, hopes, fears, and dreams of New Mexico soldiers who served in the First World War and explore the history behind New Mexico’s music, food, traditions, and blending of cultures that inspired the state’s motto, “The Land of Enchantment.” The DCA Cultural Atlas brings all of these places together in one free, downloadable app at atlas.newmexicoculture.org/. The Cultural Atlas is like having your own personal travel guide in your pocket. 8

The coming of the railroad was a watershed moment in nineteenth-century New Mexico, bringing adventurous tourists west and heightening interest in Native cultures, the climate, the geology, and the vistas of the territory. The History Museum’s Working on the Railroad exhibit tells the story of the diversity of the railroad workforce, the tales of the men, women, people of color, and immigrants and the jobs they performed both on and off the tracks (pg. 13). Early next year, the National Hispanic Cultural Center takes note of a critical moment in history. Celebrating the Centennial of the Women’s Vote opens January 25, 2020. Imagery from Peru has crept into modern design, and a new exhibit at the National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum delves into that visual culture. This exhibit explores Peru’s pre-colonial past and postcolonial present, creating a “contemporary past” for this exhibit. El Perú: Art in the Contemporary Past exhibit addresses and breaks stereotypes in Peruvian art (pg. 21). Women breaking stereotypes is the central message of a new exhibit at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology off New Mexico 599 outside of Santa Fe. Women in Archaeology looks at eleven pioneer women who chose a career in a field dominated by men. Through hard work and perseverance, these women created a lasting legacy for the future of the field of archaeology (pg. 27). Take a walk on the wild side, into the world of demons, ogres, ghosts, monsters, shapeshifters, and

New Mexico Museums & Historic Sites || Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Above: Ana de Orbegoso (born 1964 Lima, Peru, lives New York City), La Virgen de La Merced (The Virgin of Mercy), “Urban Virgins” series, 2006. Print on canvas, inkjet. Courtesy of the Artist. Top right: New Mexico CulturePass. Courtesy NM Dept. of Cultural Affairs. Bottom right: Archaeologist Florence Hawley Ellis, director of the University of New Mexico excavations at Gabriel del Yunque in Northern New Mexico, and student. Photo Courtesy of Palace of Governors Photo Archives, New Mexico History Museum.

unexplainable phenomena at the Museum of International Folk Art exhibition: Yōkai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan. From Pokémon to woodblock prints, yōkai imagery dates back centuries in Japan. The exhibit explains how yōkai have endured in Japanese culture for four hundred years (pg. 27). Not everything the Department of Cultural Affairs has to offer is in a museum. There are eight historic sites around the state that offer an opportunity to experience history where it happened. During the holidays, events at our historic sites have been described as particularly heartwarming. The magical glow of farolitos in the ruin of an ancient church is an experience you are not likely to forget at the Jemez Historic Site. Experience this beloved tradition at Los Luceros and Fort Selden this holiday season (pg. 34). Are you still looking for the perfect gift to give this holiday? Consider the gift of culture. The New Mexico CulturePass opens the doors to the state’s entire family of museums and historic sites. You can purchase your CulturePass at any state museum or historic site and begin using it right away.

8 Museums · 7 Historic Sites 1 Ticket · Just $30 Make 2020 the year you and your family take a break from the virtual world and dive deep into the real world of New Mexico’s history and culture. Few places on Earth offer such diversity. For upcoming events throughout the holiday season and through May 2020, check out the events calendar at the back of this guide. Happy Holidays from the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs! newmexicoculture.org/guide || Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Museum of Indian Arts and Culture 710 Camino Lejo on Museum Hill, Santa Fe  ||  505-476-1269  ||  indianartsandculture.org

Diego Romero vs. the End of Art G

rowing up, Diego Romero really wanted to learn pottery, although he fantasized about becoming a comic book artist. It was the fusion of these two dreams that paved the path to his future. Romero described his career, saying that “fate brought me to Otellie Loloma who taught me traditional pottery, which deep down, I had always wanted to learn. Half Berkeley boy, half Cochiti man — making art on the perimeter. Being true to my imperfectness and honest unto myself has helped guide this journey of being an artist for 30 years now.” His singular style, shown in pots and lithographs, reflects this multifaceted identity. His artistic skills evolved during his education at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, the Otis Art Institute in Los Angles, Whether you couldn’t and a master’s program at make the event, or you University of California, want to go back and hear Los Angeles. it again, MIAC’s lectures Diego Romero vs. the on Native American End of Art is the third Arts & Culture are exhibition and largest available for download: assemblage of his work to indianartsandculture. date exploring Native org/audiorecordings/ identity and history. It is featured at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture through 2020. Romero combines Cochiti and other Indigenous pottery techniques with graphic art influences to create a narrative combating a metaphorical villain, the End of Art. Curator Antonio Chavarria brings the shadowy concept dubbed “the End of Art” to the forefront of the exhibition alongside Native identity. With forty works on view, the explores themes of war, women, family, substances and art. The exhibition includes works from Romero’s family members, demonstrating their influences on each other. Video interviews discussing Romero’s journey as an artist will play throughout the exhibition and the exhibition guide is presented as a graphic novel, mirroring the decorative world on view. Tuesday–Sunday 10 a . m.–5 pm., $7 for NM residents with ID, $12 for non-residents; free for children 6 and under. The First Sunday of each month is free for NM residents with ID. Wednesday are free for NM resident seniors (60+) with ID

Top left: Tularosa black-on-gold jar with Tang and gloss glazes, ca. 1992, Diego Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), gift of Tony Abeyta, 54797/12. Photograph by Addison Doty. Top right: Last Boy on Earth, Ceramic Bowl, 2019, Diego Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), Museum Purchase, 60363/12. Additional sponsorship by Shiprock Santa Fe. Photograph by Addison Doty. Bottom: Fallen Angel, ceramic tile, 2017, Diego Romero (Cochiti Pueblo). Courtesy of a Private Collector. Photograph by Addison Doty.

newmexicoculture.org/guide  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Pictured is Eldorado Hotel & Spa in Santa Fe

ALBUQUERQUE

Hotel Chaco 855.997.8208 HotelChaco.com Hotel Albuquerque at Old Town 866.505.7829 HotelAbq.com

LAS CRUCES

Hotel Encanto de Las Cruces 866.383.0443 HotelEncanto.com

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New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Avenue in Santa Fe  ||  505-475-5200  || nmhistorymuseum.org

Working on the Railroad at the New Mexico History Museum T

hey came from all over, and through back-breaking manual labor, railroad workers transformed the United States and impacted millions of lives. When the railroad came to New Mexico in 1879, it brought thousands of job opportunities for local people from rural villages, reservations, and larger towns. In addition to the homegrown workforce, the railroad also brought immigrant Chinese, European, and Mexican laborers to New Mexico. On a national scale, by 1920, one out of every fifty citizens had worked for the railroad. This number would only increase during the country’s involvement in the World Wars of the twentieth century. A new exhibit at the New Mexico History Museum, entitled Working on the Railroad, pays tribute to the people who expanded the rail industry throughout New Mexico. Using nearly forty images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and the Library of Congress, this exhibition offers an in-depth look at the men and women who did everything from laying track to dispatching the engines. Working on the Railroad tells a side of New Mexico’s locomotive history that makes no mention of passenger trains or tourism; visitors will leave the exhibition with a greater appreciation of the difficulty of railroad work. All workers are represented — women, people of color, immigrants, young and old — and most jobs are represented too, both on and off the tracks. From steel gangs to machinists, and car cleaners to conductors, every role in the railroad industry served an important purpose. Wrenches, lanterns, tie dating nails, and other objects from the New Mexico History Museum collections will be displayed to give additional life to the photos. Many hands used those tools to ensure that each engine ran smoothly and successfully. Running through 2021, Working on the Railroad is featured in the Mezzanine Gallery of the History Museum near the Fred Harvey installation. The New Mexico History Museum is open Tuesday–Sunday 10 a . m.–5 p. m. October through May, closed Mondays November through April. Admission $7 for New Mexico residents. $12 for non-residents, free for children 6 and under. The first Sunday of each month is free for NM residents with ID. Wednesdays are free for NM resident seniors (60+) with ID.

Top: Santa Fe Railway train at station, Engle, New Mexico, ca. 1890. Photograph by E.J. Westervelt. Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archive (NMHM/ DCA), neg. no. 035879. Bottom: Track laying preparation to drive last spike on Santa Fe Central Railway, 1903. Photograph by C.G. Kaadt. Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archive (NMHM/DCA), neg. no. 014193.

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New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W. Palace, Santa Fe  ||  505-476-5072  ||  nmartmuseum.org

Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist O

n exhibit at the New Mexico Museum of Art through January 5, 2020, the traveling exhibition Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist surveys the works of an artist who made significant contributions within twentieth-century abstraction. Her work remains largely unknown despite being compared to Georgia O’Keeffe for her landscape paintings and studying under Arthur Wesley Dow. The exhibition contextualizes Pelton with her peers in the American modernist abstraction movement currently being studied as part of the canon of art history. The more than forty works on view reflect Pelton’s interests in enigmatic practices such as numerology and Agnes Yogi. Her abstract paintings balance conceptual forms with objects that are haloed and wreathed by unseen sources. Considered a pioneering force in the genre, Pelton’s paintings animate the unseen energy that blooms in the desert. These crystalline studies did not appeal to audiences during Pelton’s life, but set her work at the forefront of modern scholarship about American abstraction of the early 1900s. Coming Nov. 25–Aug. 2020: Included in this major Picturing Passion: Artists traveling exhibition of Interpret the Penitente Pelton’s work is a painting Brotherhood explores how twentieth century artists in the from the New Mexico Southwest — most from outside Museum of Art’s collecthe region — were inspired by the tion, Awakening (Memory Penitentes, a uniquely New of Father). The work, from Mexican phenomenon. 1943, was added to the Museum of Art collection in 2005 and was recently written about by artist Judy Chicago in the book It Speaks to Me: Art that Inspires Artists. “Awakening is a prized, and popular, work from our collection. It will be a real treat for visitors to see our painting in the context of so many other artworks by the artist,” said Merry Scully, senior curator of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Born in 1881, Pelton graduated from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn in 1906 and began painting abstractions in the mid1920s in New York. In 1938, she immersed herself further into symbolic representations and became a founding member of the Transcendental Painting Group, an organization of New Mexican artists focusing on spiritual works. The New Mexico Museum of Art is open 10 a . m. to 5 p. m. daily, May through October; and closed Mondays from November through April. Admission is $7 for New Mexico residents, $12 for non-residents, and free for children 16 and under. The first Sunday of each month is free for New Mexico residents with ID. Wednesdays are free for New Mexico resident seniors (60+) with ID.

Top: Agnes Pelton, Orbits, 1934. Oil on canvas. Collection of Oakland Museum of California, Gift of Concours d’Antiques, the Art Guild of the Oakland Museum of California. Bottom: Agnes Pelton, Awakening (Memory of Father), 1943, oil on canvas. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Museum purchase, 2005 (2005.27.1) Photo by Blair Clark.

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New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W. Palace, Santa Fe  ||  505-476-5072  ||  nmartmuseum.org

The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo T

he New Mexico Museum of Art will host The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo on view January 25, 2020 through April 19, 2020. This traveling exhibition of more than fifty drawings and prints, organized by the British Museum from their extensive collection, tells the story of Italian art beginning with the Renaissance and ending in the mid-nineteenth century through an examination of how artists have depicted the saga of Christ. With works from a variety of artists, including Michelangelo, Fra Bartolommeo, Parmigianino, and Fra Filippo Lippi, this exhibition surveys over 400 years of Italian art history. “It is a special treat to experience the work of Renaissance masters like Michelangelo that rarely make it to the States right here in Santa Fe,” says Christian Waguespack, curator of twentieth-century art at the New Mexico Museum of Art. “The opportunity to share these historic Italian treasures with our local audience,” he continues, “helps us fulfill part of the museum’s mission to bring the art of the world to New Mexico.” The exhibition focuses on the three major stages of Christ’s journey: his birth, in the form of the Nativity; his Crucifixion; and the Resurrection, exploring the different ways that artists envisioned these moments. During the period covered by this exhibition, artists focused heavily on religious themes in their work. Patrons, such as the Catholic Church or private devotees, often prescribed the religious narratives for the paintings instead of the artists, but for artists reinterpreting conventional biblical stories was as innovative ways was to prove their skills. “You certainly don’t need to be Catholic, religious, or spiritual to enjoy the artworks in this exhibition,” explains Waguespack. “These prints and drawings stand alone as testaments to human skill, artistic refinement, and imaginative innovations that have come to define the Italian Renaissance in the popular imagination. This exhibition is as much a story about art in Italy as it is the life of Christ.” This selection of artworks, beginning around 1440 and ending in 1829, charts the evolving depictions of Christ’s story, while also providing a broad overview of the functional purposes, techniques, and major artistic trends of the era. This group of images also traces the role of prints and drawings,which served mainly as preparation for larger paintings or objects of personal devotion during this period. The exhibition opening reception for The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo exhibition is free and open to the public on Friday, Jan. 24, 2020 from 5 to 7 p.m. There will be a lecture and catalog signing on The birth, death and resurrection of Christ: from Michelangelo to Tiepolo by Hugo Chapman, Simon Sainsbury Keeper of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum, Saturday, January 25, in the St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art.

Above: Castiglione, The Crucifixion, 1631–1670, oil paint on paper. ©The Trustees of the British Museum.

The New Mexico Museum of Art is open 10 a . m. to 5 p. m. daily, May through October; and closed Mondays from November through April. Admission is $7 for New Mexico residents, $12 for non-residents, and free for children 16 and under. The first Sunday of each month is free for New Mexico residents with ID. Wednesdays are free for New Mexico resident seniors (60+) with ID.

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New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque  ||  505-841-2800  ||  nmnaturalhistory.org

Geodiversity: The Unique Diversity of New Mexico’s Geologic Landscape T

he cultural diversity of New Mexico is reflected in its people, history, art, culture, and food. But there is another kind of diversity that makes New Mexico special — our landscape. Think about the beauty of New Mexico: the colorful mesas of Ghost Ranch, rugged Wheeler Peak, the Gila Wilderness, Valles Caldera and its hot springs, the Sandia Mountains, the cliffs along the Gila River, or our amazing caverns. The diversity of the landscape, from mountains to mesas to volcanoes to rivers, is due to the diversity of the state’s geology. In New Mexico, the shape of the land is a result of young, dynamic and often stillactive geologic processes. A big part of this diversity includes volcanoes. Our state is an outdoor museum of volcanoes; we have examples of every type. We also have a range of volcano eruptions from 40 million years ago to as recently as 3,000 years ago. Volcanoes have produced our most iconic places. Older volcanism is responsible for Ship Rock, the Mogollon While you’re at the Mountains, Sierra Blanca Museum of Natural History & Science, spend and Cerrillos Hills State Park. Younger volcanism a few minutes in the built the landscape of Rio atrium where the Grande del Norte animatronic Bisti Beast National Monument, the thrills visitors with a cliffs of Bandelier roar every 30 minutes. National Monument, majestic Mount Taylor, the “desert peaks” of Organ Mountains and Desert Peaks National Monument, El Malpais National Monument, Capulin Volcano National Monument, and the rocks of Petrolyph National Monument and Three Rivers Petroglyph Site. And those are just a few! And earthquakes? Yes, we do have earthquakes. Every year New Mexico has numerous magnitude 1 through 3 quakes and we have a probability of a magnitude 4 every decade, magnitude 5 every 20 years, and magnitude 6 every century. So, where can you find out more about the amazing volcanoes and earthquakes of New Mexico? During the coming months, the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science will be upgrading and modernizing its volcano and earthquake exhibits. The exhibits you and your children have loved — made new again. Walk through flowing lava and use an interactive link to find out more about “New Mexico: Land of Volcanoes.” Then, track worldwide earthquakes through our new digital link to the global network in the Quaking Earth exhibit. Come see dynamic New Mexico! Open Daily, 9 a . m.–5 p. m. $8 Adults (13–59) $7 Seniors (60+), $5 Children (3–12). Free to NM residents with ID on the first Sunday of the month and every Wednesday to NM Seniors with ID.

Top: Sunset over Wheeler Peak from Angel Fire. Courtesy: New Mexico Tourism Department. Bottom left: Walk through flowing lava as you enter the volcano in the newly revised New Mexico: Land of Volcanoes exhibit at the NM Museum of Natural History & Science. Bottom right: Map of the Rio Grande Rift. Courtesy: NM Museum of Natural History & Science.

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National Hispanic Cultural Center 1701 4th St. SW, Albuquerque  ||  505-246-2261  ||  nhccnm.org

Breaking Down Stereotypes About Peruvian Art L

lamas are popping up on clothing designs and home décor. Traditional weaving patterns are now sources for contemporary style magazines. Foodies are savoring Peru’s culinary contributions. Tourists flocking to Peru now have the government there considering a move to establish an airport between Cusco and Machu Picchu. You need to travel no further than the National Hispanic Cultural Center (NHCC) in Albuquerque to immerse yourself in all things Peruvian. El Perú: Art in the Contemporary Past is at NHCC’s Art Museum through May 31, 2020. Designed to breakdown stereotypes of what people may expect to see in a Peruvian art exhibit, it features the work of two photographers, a multimedia artist, and a ceramicist. Each artist explores the Peruvian pre-colonial and colonial past while addressing race, class, and inclusion in the contemporary present. Works include photography, sculpture, ceramics, painting, video, and multimedia in juxtaposition with examples of their historical antecedents. Artists featured include Baldomero Alejos (1924–1976), a photographer from Ayacucho whose archive was hidden by family during the reign of the Shining Path. Ana de Orbegoso is a multimedia artist inspired by the Cuzco School, pre-Columbian pottery and Peruvian history and identity. Kukuli Velarde is a ceramicist who addresses class racism and exclusion in her ceramics. Lorry Salcedo is a photographer whose striking black and white images connect the Peruvian past to its present. Peruvian artists have produced significant visual culture for centuries. Yet, when one thinks of Peru, usually the first thing that comes to mind is the country’s past: pre-Columbian ceramics; Andean ruins and other ancient Coming January 25 sites; colonial religious paintings; through June 30, 2020: Celebrating the and “folk” arts. Both the preCentennial of the colonial and colonial past provide Women’s Vote, featuring incredible historical richness and Latinas from the cultural context for understanding international Hispanic present day Peru. This exhibition diaspora, instrumental delves into how the layered in women’s suffrage complexity of culture influenced by worldwide. the past plays out in the present. Artists with deep connections to Peru are highly aware that the Indigenous pre-colonial past and post-colonial present are omniscient in Peruvian identity — thus, the idea of a “Contemporary Past” for this exhibit. Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a . m. –5 p.m, Tuesday–Sunday. $6 Adults (17+), $5 for NM Residents (17+), Free for: Youth (16 & under), Seniors (60+) on Wednesdays, Veterans & US Active Duty Military Personnel through Labor Day, and NM Residents on the first Sunday of each month.

Top: Kukuli Velarde (born 1962 Cusco, Peru, lives Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), La Linda NAZCA, 2011. Low fire clay, underglazes, glazes, metal, gold leaf, luster. Collection of the Artist. Bottom: Baldomero Alejos (born 1902 Santiago de Chocorvos, Peru, died 1976, Lima, Peru). Graciela Romero de Alarcón y su familia (Graciela Romero de Alarcón and her Family), 1930. Gelatin silver print copy from original negative. Collection of Archivo Fotográfico de Baldomero Alejos.

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Bufanda De Seda by Jennifer Shada Watercolor on Paper 56 x 40in 2018

The World of Frida NOV. 8 JAN. 25

CARLSBAD MUSEUM & ART CENTER 418 W. Fox St. Free Admission 575-887-0276 Supported By Lodger’s Tax

Organized by carrie lederer curator of exhibitions bedford gallery lesher center for the arts walnut creek, ca

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New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum 4100 Dripping Springs Road, Las Cruces ||  575-522-4100  ||  nmfarmandranchmuseum.org

From Ranches to Rockets: Farm & Ranch Museum Explores Range History A

new exhibit at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces explores the dramatic transformation of life in the Tularosa Basin in the 1940s and beyond. Home on the Range: From Ranches to Rockets stretches through two galleries and will be on display until August 16, 2020. Visitors will learn about ranch life in the Tularosa Basin and the surrounding mountains, and how events taking place halfway around the world brought about changes that for many ranchers were permanent. The transition of public ranchland into private U.S. government property was not uncommon in the American West. Yet the transformation of the basin into a missile testing facility was a uniquely New Mexican experience. The story begins when ranchers from Texas settled in the basin in the late 1800s. There, they found grass tall and plentiful. According to the Museum’s history curator, Leah Tookey, what the settlers didn’t know was that they arrived during a particularly wet climactic period and that raising cattle would not be as profitable as they once believed. The challengAnimals are one of the things that ing, and sometimes rewarding, lifemake the New Mexico Farm & style these ranch families chose Ranch Heritage Museum unique. changed dramatically in 1942. The “living collection” includes After the Japanese attack on seven different breeds of beef Pearl Harbor thrust the United cattle, a milk cow, horses, sheep, States into World War II, an execugoats and a burro. tive order established a military training range in the region. The ranchers were told they needed to remove their livestock and they would be allowed back at the end of the war. The families performed their patriotic duties and complied with the orders. Most would never return. While the basin was used to test rockets, missiles and bombs — including the atomic bomb in 1945 — it was also used to launch the country’s space program and other scientific programs, some in the private sector. “For decades, White Sands Missile Range has been referred to as a huge outdoor laboratory, a place where weapons and civilian projects can be tested,” said Jim Eckles, longtime public information officer for the Range, and co-curator of the exhibit with Leah Tookey. The exhibit features everything from replica structures, including a ranch house, tool shed, and a military block house, to items as big as a V-2 rocket engine and a Loki Dart rocket, and as small as toys and kitchen utensils. Interactive activities for children include games, making paper rockets, and feeling the texture of mohair. Monday–Saturday 9 a . m.–5 p. m. Sunday, Noon–5 p. m. The barns close at 4 p. m. each day, but visitors may still walk to see the livestock until 5 p. m. Adults $5; seniors (60+) $4; children (4–17) $3; active US military and veterans $2; children 3 and under and museum members with card, free.

Top: Burro drawing water at the Tucker ranch, ca. 1930. Photo courtesy of Human Systems Research and WSMR. Middle: Red Stone Missile launch at White Sands Missile Range. Photo by Judsen Caruthers. Bottom: Job Lucero, Joe DiMatteo, Bertha Lucero Nestor, and Natalia Lucero on the tank at the Jose Lucero Ranch, circa 1931–36. Photo courtesy of Human Systems Research and WSMR.

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Learn, think, imagine, draw your own conclusions, and SHOP! Visit our museum store for excellent customer service, tax-exempt purchases, and merchandise that will knock your socks off!

601 Eubank Blvd SE

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Open Daily 9 am to 5 pm

nuclearmuseum.org

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New Mexico Museum of Space History 3198 NM 2001, Alamogordo || 575-437-2840 || nmspacemuseum.org

From Southern New Mexico to the Moon — Celebrating Apollo F

ifty years ago, the imagination of the world took flight with America’s Apollo missions to the Moon. Today, a new era of dreamers is joining the celebration of Apollo, and, at the same time, embracing the future of space travel as NASA, private industry, and several other countries are aiming for the Earth’s nearest neighbor and beyond. At the New Mexico Museum of Space History, the Apollo program takes center stage. On the museum’s second floor, a wall of brightly colored backlit panels showcase the work of artist Chrystal Jackson, one of the forty-seven artists commissioned by NASA in the 1960s to document living and working at Cape Canaveral, Florida, during the Space Race. From square dancers on the beach to behind the scenes at the launch pad, these artists were given unprecedented access to the heartbeat of NASA’s space program. Throughout the room in cases, visitors can catch a glimpse of rare artifacts such as John Glenn’s EKG from space, a cutaway Apollo suit assembly, Apollo Service Propulsion System Engine, and many other items that bring the era to life. As they wind your way through the museum, visitors will be encouraged to look for the framed photos of the International Space Hall of Fame Inductees. People can stop and read about the The Great Southwest inductees’ contributions to space Star Party is May 15, 16, research and how they helped shape & 17, 2020 with off-site the world of today. These visionary viewing at scheduled pioneers from around the globe at dark sky locations. built the foundation that launched The star party guests the Apollo missions. includes guest speakers, From the Little Joe II rocket off-site excursions, standing tall above the museum’s workshops, mouthrocket park to Astronaut Memorial watering foods, and Garden and the Daisy Track unparalleled New exhibit, the museum pays tribute to Mexico hospitality. the Tularosa Basin — the “birthplace of America’s space and missile programs.” Here, astronaut safety, engine testing, and many mission critical programs were put through their paces. Inside the New Horizons Dome Theater, visitors can take a trip back in time to the golden era of space exploration as they watch Apollo 11 — First Steps, a large-format film created from previously unseen footage of the historic mission, using original audio from mission control, newscasters, and more to give the feeling of being there. Monday and Wednesday–Saturday, 10 a.m — 5 p.m; Sunday, Noon–5 p. m. Closed Tuesdays. Admission $8 Adults, $6 Children (4–12); Senior (60+)/Military/NM Residents $7, free for children 3 & under.

Top: Artist Chrystal Jackson was chosen by NASA, along with several other artists, to portray what they saw at Cape Canaveral and Cocoa Beach while man prepared to go to the moon. In this piece, Jackson saw more than just a man at a desk. Dr. Hans Gruene was the assistant director for launch operations. He was a member of the Paperclip Scientists, brought to America from Germany after World War II. In his office, besides his secretary Jennifer Jenkins, were models of the Saturn V rocket and the Lunar Excursion Module. Courtesy NMMSH. Bottom: Tombaugh Tries a Computer: Clyde Tombaugh, the discoverer of Pluto, tries out a computer at the NM Museum of Space History circa 1980. The museum’s education building was named after Tombaugh and houses the New Horizons Dome Theater and Planetarium. Courtesy NMMSH.

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City of Rocks State Park // NMParks.com

A DIFFERENT KIND OF MUSEUM

Over 35 interactive indoor & outdoor exhibits! From bubbles and face paint to trains and dress up.

Weekly STEAM programs free with admission! runs Nov. 29Dec. 31, 2019!

public gardens • classes • events santafebotanicalgarden.org • 505.471.9103 715 Camino Lejo • Museum Hill • Santa Fe

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santafechildrensmuseum.org

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Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe  ||  505-476-1200  ||  internationalfolkart.org

Yōkai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan P

repare for a spine-tingling experience in a haunted house featuring ghostly storytelling provided by Yōkai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan, a new exhibition at the Museum of International Folk Art (MoIFA). Yōkai are supernatural beings — ghosts, demons, ogres, shapeshifters, and monsters linked to strange and unexplainable phenomena. “While yōkai are a big part of Japanese pop culture right now, they have been a part of Japanese pop culture as far back as the Edo period,” explains Felicia KatzHarris, MoIFA senior curator. “It has been a lot of fun to research some of the Pokémon characters,” she continues, “and see their connection to creatures featured in scrolls, such as the Hyakki Yagyo (“Night Parade of 100 Demons”), painted hundreds of years ago.” On exhibition at MoIFA from Dec. 8, 2019 through Jan. 10, 2021, Yōkai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan explains how these icons gained popularity beyond religious contexts beginning in the late 1300s, how they appear throughout Japanese history, and how they continue to influence modern entertainment Also at MoIFA through and culture. MoIFA is one of the first museMarch 7, 2021, Música ums to present a large-scale yōkai-centered Buena: Hispano Folk exhibition in the United States. It traces the Music of New Mexico interpretations of yōkai from original blockexplores four centuries printing to modern culture, tracking the of inherited musical development of yōkai imagery over four styles born of the many hundred years of Japanese culture. cultures at the roots of Depictions of yōkai, although often frightNew Mexico music ening, were also rendered comedically. As through video, sound supernatural imagery grew in popularity, instruments and live artists featured yōkai on garments, samurai performance. weaponry, toys, and in theatrical characters. Artists imagined what yōkai creatures looked like by referencing folklore and oral history, creating a visual narrative. Scholars believe that the act of naming and rendering visuals of these strange beings gave people a way to talk about shared experiences, contributing to the spread and popularity of yōkai and yōkai stories. Open 10 a . m.– 5 p. m. Tuesdays through Sundays, closed Mondays for the months of November through April; from May through October, the museum is open daily 10 a . m.–5 p. m. Admission $7 for New Mexico residents with ID. $12 for non-residents, free for children 6 and under. The first Sunday of each month is free for New Mexico residents with ID. Wednesdays are free for New Mexico resident seniors (60+) with ID.

Top left: White hannya noh mask by Ichiyu Terai. Kyoto, Japan. 2017. Museum of International Folk Art, International Folk Art Foundation (T.2017.101.1a-d). Photograph by Addison Doty. Top right: “Yugao” from The Tale Of Genji. Woodblock print from the series, One Hundred Aspects of the Moon. By artist Taiso Yoshitoshi, Japan, 1886. Artist: Taiso Yoshitoshi; Gift from the collection of Else and Joseph Chapman, Museum of International Folk Art; Photo by Addison Doty. Bottom: Netsuke in the form of a Demon, Japan, late 19th–early 20th century. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John G. Meem, Museum of International Folk Art; Photo by Addison Doty.

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505.685.1000

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Center for New Mexico Archaeology 7 Old Cochiti Road, Santa Fe  ||  505-476-4404  ||  www.nmarchaeology.org

Women in Archaeology Exhibit at CNMA T

he science of archaeology and studying New Mexico’s fascinating 12,000-year cultural heritage is part of the mission of the Center for New Mexico Archaeology (CNMA). Historically, archaeology was an unlikely career choice for women, but the ones who had the courage to make the leap also made lasting impressions. CNMA is shared by Office of Archaeological Studies (OAS) and Museum of Indian Arts & Cultures’ (MIAC) Archaeological Research Collections (ARC). Currently nine out of fourteen staff members at the OAS are women as well as the three staff members of MIAC’s ARC. “We hope that people will realize that women in the field of archaeology have long-standing and deep roots here in the American Southwest, and women around this work have dug in deep and left their marks,” says C.L. Kieffer Nail, PhD, co-curator of the new exhibit Women in Archaeology on display at the CNMA through Oct. 9, 2020. “Early on in our field, women were discouraged from pursing advanced degrees and conducting field work,” Nail continues. “This exhibit highlights the work of 11 pioneer women in archaeology in this region, and on some major early and modern contributors to archaeology throughout the world.” The exhibit features biographies of 11 women who worked in the Southwest. Some of these women The Center for New were directly or indirectly associMexico Archaeology ated with Museum of Indian Arts & team is behind the excavations at the Palace Culture and objects they excavated of the Governors, the in the field are on display. These Railyard, Santa Fe include not only items from New County Courthouse, and Mexico, but also Central America many other locations where some of the women also throughout the state. worked. In addition to focusing on these women pioneers, the exhibit provides an historical overview of women in the field of archaeology and highlights major accomplishments by women in the field on a global scale. “Through their work, the women featured in this exhibit turned archaeology into the field it is, leaving a lasting legacy for the future of the discipline,” says exhibit co-curator Emily Hurley. “By highlighting their work and contributions, our hope to help inspire future generations of women to pursue a career in archaeology.” There is no charge to see the Women in Archaeology exhibit. It is featured in the lobby of CNMA, a research facility open Monday through Friday from 8 a . m.–5 p. m. The Center for New Mexico Archaeology is at 7 Old Cochiti Road, Caja Del Rio exit off NM 599.

Top: Archaeologist Bertha Parker Pallan (Abenaki/Seneca). Bertha was one of the first Native American female archaeologists. Here she is holding two atlatl darts from the Gypsum Cave Excavations conducted by the Southwest Museum where she served as a secretary, archaeologist, and ethnographer. Photo Courtesy of Smithsonian Institute @ Flickr Commons. Right: MIAC Research Associate Leon Natker assists a young visitor in finding artifacts on the survey course designed to teach visitors the importance of recording artifact locations and the difficulty of recording surface collections. Photograph by Amy Montoya. Photo Courtesy of Museum of Indian Arts & Culture.

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El Palacio magazine, first published as not much more than a pamphlet in 1913, continues to serve up the art, history, and culture of the Southwest with verve and style. El Palacio: The name endures. While the title acknowledges the museum’s first home, the magazine itself has become a royal residence — a “house eminently splendid”— for the narrative that is New Mexico. Explore 106 years of stories for free at ElPalacio.org.

Counterclockwise from lower right: Chocolatero, ceramic from China, 17th c., lid from Mexico, 18th c.; stone molcajete late 19th–early 20th c.; wood molinillo, late 19th–early 20th c.; copper chocolate pot, 19th c.; Talavera plate, 1750–1800; stone metate y mano, late 19th–early 20th c.; Talavera pitcher, Mexico, 1775–1810. Photo by Kitty Leaken.

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Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property 2346 Calle Principal, Old Mesilla Plaza, Mesilla, NM 88046 || 575-202-1638 || nmhistoricsites.org/taylor-mesilla

Celebrating the Life and Enduring Legacy of J. Paul Taylor T

he annals of New Mexico history are filled with the stories of people who have contributed to their communities, their tribes, their governments, and our culture. Few stories can compare in sheer volume to the near century of service, involvement, vision, and leadership exhibited by J. Paul Taylor. A long-time educator in Las Cruces Public Schools, Taylor served nine consecutive terms as a representative in the New Mexico Legislature, and on numerous nonprofit and organizational boards, including the Museum of New Mexico Board of Regents. Taylor has received awards and accolades too numerous to mention. The son of a native Texan dairy owner in El Paso and a mother who traced her New Mexican roots back to Coronado, Mr. Taylor’s intellect, commitment, work ethic, warmth, and charm have been exceptional assets in many New Mexico arenas for decades. Mr. Taylor celebrated his 99th birthday at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces last August. The birthday celebration, which honors Mr. Taylor as a friend, benefactor and civic leader, is sponsored annually by the Friends of the Taylor Family Monument, in partnership with the Department of Cultural Affairs and New Mexico Historic Sites. In 2003, Taylor and his late wife, Mary Daniels Taylor, and their family generously bequeathed their historic adobe home and two adjoining stores to the Museum of New Mexico as a historic site. Their collections of Spanish Colonial, Mexican, and New Mexican artwork, along with furniture, rugs, pottery, and textiles from all over the world, were included in the donation. The Taylor-Barela-Reynolds-Mesilla Historic Site, as it is called, provides an exceptional setting for visitors to understand and appreciate the history, culture, and architecture of Mesilla and the Southwest borderlands. Generations of New Mexicans and visitors from all over the world will experience New Mexico through its lens.

The Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property is one of nine Historic Sites managed by the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. It is open to the public by appointment only. A limited number of group and school tours can be arranged by calling 575-202-1638.

Top left: J. Paul Taylor in front of church in Old Mesilla. Courtesy: NM Historic Sites. Top right: J. Paul Taylor as a young man in front of his Old Mesilla home. Courtesy: NM Historic Sites. Middle: Taylor Home in Old Mesilla. Courtesy: NM Historic Sites Bottom right: Interior hallway of J. Paul Taylor home in Old Mesilla. Courtesy: NM Historic Sites.

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where do you belong? Los Luceros Historic Site. Photograph by Jim O’Donnell.

The Cultural Atlas of New Mexico leads you to historic churches and other cultural places throughout the Land of Enchantment. Organized by region, proximity and interest, the Cultural Atlas will help you find where you belong.

http://atlas.nmculture.org

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Jemez Historic Site 18160 NM-4, Jemez Springs, NM 87025 || (575) 829–3530 || nmhistoricsites.org/jemez

Award-Winning New Exhibit on Display at Jemez Historic Site N

ew Mexico Historic Sites and the Pueblo of Jemez won the Archaeology Heritage Preservation Award in May of this year from the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division and the New Mexico Cultural Properties Review Committee. The award was presented at the 2019 New Mexico Historic Preservation Awards for collaboration during the Dig Giusewa archaeology program. New Mexico Historic Sites director Patrick Moore, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Christopher Toya, manager Matthew Barbour, coordinator Ethan Ortega, and coordinator Marlon Magdalena attended the ceremony to receive the honor presented by Department of Cultural Affairs Cabinet Secretary Debra Garcia y Griego and Cultural Properties Review committee member and historical archaeologist Douglas Boggess. Dig Giusewa focused on archaeological investigations of a large rectangular room just north of the visitor center at Jemez Historic Site. Over the course of the fall and spring field seasons, New Mexico Historic Sites staff, Jemez Pueblo tribal members, University of New Mexico graduate students, and Friends of Coronado and Jemez Historic Site volunteers worked to address long-held questions about the Jemez people involving their origins and how their lives changed after the arrival of the Spanish. This resulted in the collection of over 10,000 artifacts and the documentation of structures thought to have been abandoned during the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The Archaeology Heritage Preservation Award is the second award given to New Mexico Historic Sites Public Archaeology Program since its inception in 2017. The first was an Award of Merit given by the American Association of State and Local History to the Coronado Historic Site and the Friends of Coronado and Jemez Historic Site for the Dig Kuaua project in 2018. One of two posters released this year during Historic Preservation Month featured the Dig Giusewa excavation at Jemez Historic Site. The image was taken by Dan Monaghan of the New Mexico Department of Tourism. Copies of the poster are available at both Coronado and Jemez Historic Sites. The massive overhaul of the Jemez Historic Site visitors center was completed by students enrolled in the New Mexico Highlands University Program in Interactive Cultural Technology (PICT). This program is coordinated by the chair of the Media Arts and Technology Department, Miriam Langer. The new visitor experience includes 3-D projection mapping, an oral history video, a children’s activity booklet, updated trail guide, and visitor center tourist kiosk. Both the award-winning and new exhibits are on display at Jemez Historic Site, 18160 Highway 4 in Jemez Springs. Open Wednesday through Sunday, 8:30 a . m .–5 p. m . Admission is $5 per adult. Children and Jemez Tribal Members are free.

Top: First Lt. Governor Galvan prepares to cut the ribbon at Jemez Historic Site. Photo by Richard Loffredo. Middle: New Mexico Highlands PICT Program students with Historic Site staff. Photo by Richard Loffredo. Bottom: Vistors experience the new exhibit at Jemez Historic Site. Photo by Richard Loffredo.

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New Mexico Historic Sites See below for location and contact information

Seasonal Magic at New Mexico Historic Sites

Left: Wagon in the snow at Fort Selden. Courtesy New Mexico Historic Sites. Above: Virgen de Guadalupe carving, part of J. Paul Taylor Nacimiento collection. Courtesy New Mexico Historic Sites. Right: San Jose de los Jemez Mission church during the Light Among the Ruins winter event. Photo by Eric Maldonado.

H

oliday magic at New Mexico Historic Sites is all about the lights. Ask any newcomer what they like most about New Mexico during the holidays and the answer, almost universally, is luminarias, or farolitos. The decorations are deceptively simple — a bit of sand to anchor a votive candle in a brown lunch sack, folded over at the top — but the effect is heartwarming, soul-feeding, and memorable. Take advantage of these holiday events at our New Mexico Historic Sites this season. The holiday events start with Light Among the Ruins at the Jemez Historic Site on two evenings: Saturday, Nov. 30, and Saturday Dec. 14 from 5–9 p.m. Experience the magic of hundreds of farolitos, Native American flute music, Jemez Pueblo Dancers, and bonfires. On Saturday, Dec. 7, make a journey to enjoy the Lights of Los Luceros at New Mexico’s newest historic site. From 4–9 p.m. experience the sights, sounds, smells and tastes of northern New Mexico’s holiday traditions.

That same weekend, the Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial hosts a poignant evening with December Letters from the Reservation, Dec. 7 from 4–7 p.m. Patrons will be treated to a light supper, followed by a journey into the past with readings of archival letters from December 1863 through 1867. Las Noches de Las Luminarias at Fort Selden Historic Site is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 14 from 6–9 p.m. Enjoy the magic of more than 800 candles around the fort ruins, accompanied by holiday music, a cozy campfire, and a warm cup of cheer. Spend an afternoon viewing more than 185 nativity scenes on display in the Taylor family home, at the Nacimiento Open House with J. Paul Taylor. Doors will be open from 12:30–4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15. For directions, or more information about these events, visit NMHistoricSites.org.

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Coronado Historic Site

Jemez Historic Site

485 Kuaua Road, Bernalillo, NM 87004 505-867-5351 || nmhistoricsites.org/coronado

18160 NM-4, Jemez Springs, NM 87025 575-829-3530 || nmhistoricsites.org/jemez

8:30 a . m.–5 p. m. Wednesday through Monday. Closed Tuesdays. Admission is $5.

8:30 a . m.–5 p. m. Wednesday through Sunday. Closed Monday and Tuesdays. Admission is $5.

Ft. Sumner Historic Site/ Bosque Redondo Memorial

Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property

3647 Billy the Kid Drive, Fort Sumner, NM 88119 575-355-2573 || nmhistoricsites.org/bosque-redondo

2346 Calle Principal, Old Mesilla Plaza, Mesilla, NM 88046 575-202-1638 || nmhistoricsites.org/taylor-mesilla

8:30 a . m.–4:30 p. m. Wednesdays through Sunday. Closed Monday and Tuesday. Admission is Free.

Taylor-Mesilla historic property is not open to the public on a daily basis. A limited number of group and school tours can be arranged by calling 575-202-1638

Ft. Selden Historic Site

Los Luceros Historic Site

1280 Fort Selden Road, Radium Springs, NM 88054 575-526-8911 || nmhistoricsites.org/fort-selden

253 County Road 41, Los Luceros, NM 87511 505-476-1165 || nmhistoricsites.org/los-luceros

8:30 a . m.–4:30 p. m. Wednesdays through Sunday. Admission is $5.

9 a . m.–5 p. m. Thursdays through Mondays. Admission is free. Donations accepted.

Ft. Stanton Historic Site

Lincoln Historic Site

Hwy 380 South of Capitan, left on NM 220. Capitan, NM 88323 575-354-0341 (museum) || nmhistoricsites.org/fort-stanton

Lincoln, NM 88338 575-653-4025 || nmhistoricsites.org/lincoln

8 a . m.–5 p. m., daily. Museum open 10 a . m.–4 p. m. daily. Admission is free.

9 a . m.–5 p. m. daily. (Seven of the nine buildings begin closing at 4:30.) Admission is $5.

Admission to New Mexico Historic Sites is free to New Mexico residents on the first Sunday of each month. Children sixteen and under are always admitted free. Wednesday admission is free to New Mexico seniors with ID. A combination ticket good for admission to both Jemez and Coronado Historic Sites is available for $7. newmexicoculture.org/guide  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020 35

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Calendar ONGOING TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH JANUARY 5, 10 a . m .–5 p. m .

Southwest of Eden: The Art of Adam and Eve

fauna in their surroundings. Admission is $6 for adults (17+) and $5 for New Mexico residents. DAILY FROM MID-JANUARY THROUGH MAY 17, 9 a . m .–5 p. m .

Reclaimed Creations

demonstrated in the exhibit which focuses on animals in motion. Ganz classifies her work as “three-dimensional impressionism.” TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH JANUARY 26, 10 a . m .–7 p. m .

National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum

New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science

Bringing Together: Recent Acquisitions

Approximately 50 works of art from the Joyce Kaser Collection that examine the various ways New Mexican artists and others visually portray Adam and Eve, as well as the flora and

Japanese artist Sayaka Ganz uses discarded and reclaimed household objects, such as plastic spoons and spatulas, to create animal sculptures. Ganz’s love of animals is

New Mexico Museum of Art A selection of artworks acquired by the museum over the past five years. Whether acquired by gift or purchase, every item is carefully chosen to add to the richness of the museum collection. Spotlights on recent gifts include two glass collections, contemporary artwork, the finalization of the Lucy Lippard gift, and several significant paintings. Loose groupings will explore and present the breadth and depth of the Museum’s collection. How a collection is “brought together” is the undercurrent of the text and wall panels. TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH JANUARY 26, 10 a . m .–5 p. m .

Girard’s Modern Folk in the Lloyd’s Treasure Chest Museum of International Folk Art Girard’s Modern Folk examines the particular ways in which renowned midcentury-American designer Alexander Girard looked to the motifs, patterns, palettes, and compositions of traditional arts as inspiration for his distinctive textiles. Comparisons between his design work and objects from his folk-art collection illustrate this marriage of “modern” and “folk.” Also on view are unique objects by Girard currently in the museum’s permanent collection. TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH FEBRUARY 1, 10 a . m .–5 p. m .

The Massacre of Don Pedro Villasur New Mexico History Museum This exhibition features twenty-three original graphic history artworks by Santa Fe artist Turner Avery Mark-Jacobs. This exhibit narrates the history of an ill-fated Spanish colonial military expedition that set out from Santa Fe in 1720, a story that is also depicted in the museum’s Segesser Hide paintings. TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH FEBRUARY 28, 10 a . m .–5 p. m .

Atomic Histories: Remembering New Mexico’s Nuclear Past New Mexico History Museum

Above: The Massacre of Don Pedro Villasur, Turner Avery Mark-Jacobs.

This exhibit explores the connection between New Mexico and the coming of the Nuclear Age. It traces the remarkable contributions of thousands of New Mexicans involved in writing New Mexico’s Atomic Histories for the last 75 years.

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Calendar

Above: Julian and Maria Martinez, 1918–1920. Polychrome bowl. Julian’s fine hand is shown here in the steady lines and characteristically inventive designs. Below: Jen Schachter and Todd Blatt, We the Rosies: fabricated by the We the Builders team, 2018. Photo: Seth McFarland.

Mexico’s working women. This exhibit celebrates the many women who worked beyond social expectations, inspiring future generations. DAILY THROUGH AUGUST 20, MONDAYS– SATURDAYS, 9 a . m .–5 p. m ., SUNDAYS, NOON–5 p. m .

Saddle Makers of the Southwest

New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum

TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH MARCH 1, 10 a . m .–5 p. m .

We the Rosies: Women at Work New Mexico History Museum

This exhibit celebrates the iconic symbol Rosie the Riveter, which has stood as an international symbol of women’s labor and empowerment since the 1940s. The exhibit showcases a 3-D printed sculpture of Rosie, created through the joint effort of 700 people, containing 2,625 individual parts, and including profiles of New

The Museum’s Horse & Cattle Barn is the site of a new, long-term exhibit celebrating the art of saddle making, an important part of ranching history in New Mexico and the Southwest. The saddle was the most critical tool of the cowboy, one of the most expensive purchases he would make. This exhibit also provides a leather-stamping activity for children. TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH AUGUST 31, 10 a . m .–5 p. m .

San Ildefonso Pottery: 1600–1930 Museum of Indian Arts & Culture

San Ildefonso Pottery is an exhibit showcasing the little-known pottery style and artists of

San Ildefonso Pueblo. Before there was Santa Fe and before the idea of “art colony” was born, there was San Ildefonso, a small village of extraordinarily visionary artists whose ceramic legacy is rich and meaningful. TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS THROUGH MAY 31, 10 a . m .–5 p. m .

El Perú: Art in the Contemporary Past National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum Designed to breakdown stereotypes of what people may expect to see in Peruvian art, this exhibit features the work of two photographers, a multimedia artist, and a ceramicist. Each artist explores the Peruvian pre-colonial and colonial past while addressing race, class, and inclusion in the contemporary present. Works include photography, sculpture, ceramics, painting, and multimedia in juxtaposition with examples of their historical antecedents.

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Calendar NOVEMBER SATURDAY & SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23 & 24, 9 a . m .–5 p. m . (SAT), 10 a . m .–4 p. m . (SUN.)

Homegrown: A New Mexico Food Show & Gift Market

between two bonfires. The Historic Site will also host an arts and crafts fair and have food available for purchase. For more information visit www.nmhistoricsites.org/jemez.

the Old Town area will close at 3 p. m . to prepare for the event. The event is free and open to the public.

DECEMBER

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, JANUARY 3, FEBRUARY 7, MARCH 6, APRIL 3, MAY 1, 9 a . m .–10 a . m .

New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER. 4, 1 p. m .–4 p. m .

This sixth-annual event showcases the food grown in New Mexico. More than seventy vendors from around the state will sell their products as the gift-giving season approaches. Food items for sampling and purchasing include award-winning salsas, pies, cookies, sauces, honey, jerky, candy, cheese, beans, wine and much more. The Museum partners with the New Mexico Department of Agriculture for this event. The Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum is located at 4100 Dripping Springs Road, Las Cruces. Admission is $5 per carload. For more information call 575-5224100 or visit www.nmfarmandranchmuseum. org.

Library Open House

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30 AND SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 5 p. m .–9 p. m .

New Mexico Museum of Art Explore the Museum of Art’s collection of handmade holiday cards exchanged by artists in New Mexico. These delightful works show the creativity and relationships between artists such as Gustave Baumann, Will Shuster, Gerald Cassidy, Olive Rush, Jozef Bakos, Sheldon Parsons, Willard Nash, Walter Ufer, Willard Clark, Dorothy Dunn, Joseph Imhof, and Agnes Sims. This is an informal opportunity to browse books and artist files, ask questions, exchange recommendations with the librarian, and see what’s new. For more information visit www. nmartmuseum.org/visit/events. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 5–9 p. m .

Light among the Ruins.

Old Town Holiday Stroll

The ruins of Giusewa Pueblo and San José de los Jemez Mission will be decorated with hundreds of farolitos. Each evening’s program will include traditional Native American flute music and Jemez Pueblo dancers performing

The Museum opens its doors along with other businesses in Historic Old Town Albuquerque for the annual holiday stroll Tree lighting on the Plaza Don Luiz at 6 p. m . Streets throughout

Jemez Historic Site

New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science

Launch Pad Lecture New Mexico Museum of Space History The Launch Pad Lecture Series is held on the first Friday of each month on the first floor of the museum and is free to attend. Museum staff, and sometimes special guest speakers, discuss topics ranging from space history to space future. For more information visit www. nmspacemuseum.org ƒƒ Dec. 6: The Voice of NASA: Paul Haney, Speaker: Michael Shinabery ƒƒ Jan. 3: Comets: Nomads of the Universe, Speaker: Coordinator Tony Gondola ƒƒ Feb. 7: Clyde Tombaugh: A Farm Boy Looks Skyward, Speaker: Michael Shinabery ƒƒ Mar. 6: Preserving the Moon, Speaker: Dr. Beth O’Leary ƒƒ Apr. 3: Apollo 13, Speaker: Chris Orwoll ƒƒ May 1: Atomic Age Feminists: How Hollywood Portrayed Women & Science, Speaker: Sue Taylor

Above: Gustave Baumann Christmas card, 1924. Woodcut, 1924, printed on Chinese paper. New Mexico History Museum Collection.

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Calendar

Above: Tengu Toy Figures (Kokeshi), Tohoku District, Japan, ca.1960. Gift of the Girard Foundation Collection, Museum of International Folk Art; Photo by Addison Doty.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1–4 p. m .

SATURDAY, DECEMBER. 7, 5 p. m .–10 p. m .

Exhibition Opening: Yōkai: Japanese Ghosts and Demons

Farolitos at Los Luceros

Museum of International Folk Art

Come join the holiday festivities, including farolitos/luminarias and other Northern New Mexico holiday traditions at the newest New Mexico Historic Site. For more information call 505-476-1165 or visit www.nmhistoricsites.org/ los-luceros.

Yōkai are part of Japanese pop-culture dating back as far as the Edo period. Yōkai are supernatural beings — ghosts, demons, ogres, shapeshifters, and monsters linked to strange and unexplainable phenomena SATURDAY & SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7 & 8, 10 a . m .–4 p. m .

Young Native Artists Winter Show & Sale New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors Children and Grandchildren of artists associated with the Palace of the Governors’ Portal Program will demonstrate and sell their own arts and crafts in the New Mexico History Museum’s Meem Community Room. This is a free event.

Los Luceros Historic Site

SATURDAY, DECEMBER, 7, 4 p. m .–7 p. m .

December Letters from the Reservation Ft. Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial The evening will begin with a light supper of pork posole, tortillas, and a winter cake served with coffee or hot chocolate. Supper will be followed by a journey into the memorial’s auditorium where local residents and staff will tell the story of life on the reservation using archival letters from the months of December

(1863–1867). There is no admission fee for this event and the food is free as long as it lasts. Please join us and listen to history unfold. SATURDAY & SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7 & 8, 2 p. m . & 7 p. m . SATURDAY, 2 p. m . SUNDAY

Baila! Baila! presents Christmas in New Mexico National Hispanic Cultural Center Baila! Baila!’s annual holiday show is a whirlwind extravaganza, taking audiences on a journey through the sights and sounds of Christmas in New Mexico. Music, song, and dance with a traditional Southwestern flair, as well as unique segments saluting Christmas traditions from around the world, will delight theatregoers of all ages. In 2019, the show will also include a performance of Señora Scrooge, a bilingual, musical comedy adaptation of A Christmas Carol. Special guest performances include a live mariachi and an appearance by company founder Israela Garcia.

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Calendar

Above: Chaco Canyon, Star Trails, April 2018. Courtesy: New Mexico Tourism Department. Below: Perspective rendering: Dynamic Bisti Beast in New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science lobby, 2019. Courtesy NM Dept. of Cultural Affairs.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 5:30 p. m .–8 p. m .

Sensory Friendly Night at the Museum New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science

The bright lights and loud sounds of the museum exhibits, such as the Bisti Beast, will be turned down to accommodate those with sensory issues. Visitors can also enjoy

a special show at the planetarium. The admission price is $5. For more information visit www.nmnaturalhistory.org. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 6:30 p. m .–8 p. m .

Revealing Untold Stories of Chaco Canyon: Archaeocosmology

New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science Anna Sofaer and her colleagues, Robert Weiner and Richard Friedman, will share their latest research findings, revealing the extent of

the Chaco culture across an area the size of Ohio. They will review the Chacoan complex solar and lunar astronomy and suggest a wider window on the American Southwest with comparisons to cosmology centers around the ancient world. Their research includes 3-D models of the hundreds of outlying Great Houses throughout the Chaco world; and new results from the recent use of LiDAR technology to document enigmatic Chaco “roads.” Preregistration is encouraged or tickets can be purchased at the door the evening of the event if seats are available. For more information visit www.NMnaturalhistory.org or email jayne.aubele@state.nm.us with questions.

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Calendar FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 4–7 p. m .

Holiday Stroll on Museum Hill —F   ree Admission

Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, Museum of International Folk Art, Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian ƒƒ At MIAC: Tewa Women’s Choir 5 & 7 p. m ., Native American Dances 5:30 & 6:30 p. m . Renate Yazzie (Diné), pianist, tree lighting, ornament workshop, western holiday music played in Navajo, refreshments. ƒƒ At MoIFA: Pasión Flamenca — flamenco holiday songs from 5:15–6:45 p. m . in the Vernick Auditorium. Paint a gourd ornament for the holidays, and enjoy refreshments in the Atrium 4–7 p. m . ƒƒ At Wheelwright, cider and biscochitos, 15% off gifts in the Case Trading Post. ƒƒ At Santa Fe Botanical Garden: GLOW — A Winter Lights Event at the Garden, 5–8 p. m . (last entry 7:30) $10 Advanced; $12 Day of event. Children 12 and under are free. Visit Santa! Live music by Stephanie Hatfield and Bill Palmer. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 5:30 p. m .–8 p. m .

Christmas at the Palace

New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors Santa Fe’s beloved Christmas at the Palace brings the community together for an evening of hot cider, cookies, live music, and a chance to operate an antique printing press, participate in old fashioned activities, and visit with Mr. and Mrs. Claus — all in the legendary magic of the Palace of the Governors and courtyard. This is a free, family event, but donations of non-perishable food is welcomed. The History Museum and Palace will close at 3 p. m . to prepare for this event. The event is located at 105 W. Palace Ave, Santa Fe. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 6–9 p. m .

Las Noches de Las Luminarias Ft. Selden Historic Site

Join us for this Southwest tradition as over eight hundred glowing candles surround the fort ruins. Enjoy holiday music, a cozy campfire, and a warm cup of cheer as you tour the grounds. Make your own holiday decorations while you enjoy the sights and sounds of the season. Please dress warmly. Admission is $5 for adults and children 16 and under are free, cash or check only please. The historic site is located off NM I-25, exit 19, Radium Springs — follow the signs. For more information call 575–202–1638. SATURDAY, DEC. 14, JAN. 11, FEB. 8, MARCH. 14, APRIL 11, MAY 11,10 a . m .– NOON

Above: Santa Claus visits with children in the Palace Courtyard during the Christmas at the Palace event. Photo by Nicholas Chiarella.

and more! Science Saturday is held inside the Tombaugh Education Building located at the top of Hwy 2001, Alamogordo. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 12:30 p. m .–4:30 p. m .

Nacimiento Open House with J. Paul Taylor Taylor-Mesilla Historic Property

Join us for a fascinating afternoon as you view more than 185 nacimientos (nativity scenes) on display in the Taylor family home. This impressive collection and the open house have become a local holiday tradition. The home is located at 2346 Calle Principal on the Old Mesilla Plaza. Free to members of the Friends of the Taylor Family Monument and $5 for non-members. This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Taylor Family Monument and New Mexico Historic Sites. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 5:30 p. m .–7 p. m .

Las Posadas

New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, NOON–4 p. m .

Holiday Open House New Mexico Museum of Art

The Holiday Open House is a round-robin of puppet plays, art making projects, photos with Santa Claus, and other activities. ƒƒ Marionette plays “A Really Big Party for Papa Gus” at 1:30 p. m .–2 p. m . & 3 p. m .–3:30 p. m . in the St. Francis Auditorium ƒƒ Make Your Own Stick Puppet noon–4 p. m . in the main lobby ƒƒ Find Freckles noon–4 p. m . Freckles the marionette is hiding somewhere in the museum. As you go through the galleries looking for Freckles, pick up clues that will lead you to find him and win a prize!

The annual candle-lit procession of Las Posadas travels around the Santa Fe Plaza and concludes in the Palace Courtyard. This version of an old Hispanic tradition, celebrated around the world, recreates Mary and Joseph’s search for a place to give birth to the Baby Jesus — and includes Devils who deny the Holy Family a place of rest. The public is invited to stay for carols, cookies, and hot cider in the Palace Courtyard. The History Museum and Palace will close at 3 p. m . to prepare for this free event.

ƒƒ Selfies with Santa! 3:30 p. m .–4 p. m . in the St. Francis Auditorium

FRIDAY–SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20–22, 7

New Mexico Museum of Space History

p. m . FRIDAY–SUNDAY, 2 p. m . SATURDAY &

SUNDAY

Science Saturday!

Festival Ballet Albuquerque presents The Nutcracker in the Land of Enchantment

On the second Saturday of every month, kids get to be the scientists — mom and dad can help. Join museum educators as they bring science down to earth and across the universe. Hands on activities, planetarium programs,

This original production, now in its seventh year at the NHCC, transports the beloved holiday classic to territorial New Mexico in the late 1800s. While maintaining the classical grace and family of the original story, the

New Mexico Museum of Space History

ballet incorporates elements showcasing our state’s heritage and traditions, including Spanish dancers, southwestern snakes, sheep and shepherdesses, a lively fandango, a storyteller doll with children, and lavish western Victorian-era costumes. A live orchestra performs under the baton of Maestro Guillermo Figueroa.

National Hispanic Cultural Center

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 25

All Museums & Historic Sites Closed SATURDAY, DECEMBER 28 AND SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 9 a . m .–10 a . m .

Into the Vault: The Role of New Mexico in Early Space Exploration ƒƒ Dec. 27: The Role of New Mexico in Early Space Exploration ƒƒ Mar. 21: Acceleration & De-Acceleration: From Goddard to Manhigh. Into the Vault quarterly tour is free to the public. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation. Presentation by Museum Curator Sue Taylor and Assistant Curator Jim Mayberry. For more information call 575–437–2840 or visit www.nmspacemuseum.org.

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Calendar JANUARY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1

All Museums & Historic Sites Closed THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 6 p. m .–8 p. m .

Educator’s Evening! New Mexico Museum of Space History This special event just for teachers features hors d’ouevres, demonstrations, door prizes, and goody bags. For more information call 575–437– 2840 or visit www.nmspacemuseum.org. SATURDAY, JANUARY 18 AND SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 9 a . m .–NOON

Preservation Workshop New Mexico Museum of Space History ƒƒ Jan. 18: A Beginners Guide to the Care and Feeding of your collections ƒƒ April 18: How to Properly Display and Preserve Your Photos The Preservation Workshop, presented by Museum Curator Sue Taylor and Assistant Curator Jim Mayberry, is free to the public. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation. For more information call 575–437–2840 or visit www.nmspacemuseum.org. TUESDAYS–SUNDAYS, JANUARY 25–JUNE 30, 8:30 a . m .–5 p. m .

Celebrating the Centennial of the Women’s Vote National Hispanic Cultural Center, History & Literary Arts Hallway Celebrating the Centennial of the Women’s Vote features Latinas from the international Hispanic diaspora who were instrumental in women’s suffrage worldwide. This exhibit is free and open to the public. SATURDAY, JANUARY 25–SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 9 a . m .–5 p. m . (SAT.) 10 a . m .–4 p. m . (SUN.)

Antique Treasures Show New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum Antique vendors from around the state will have items for sale, and independent appraisers will be on hand to look at items that visitors bring to the show. Visitors may also play “stump the chump” by bringing in items that might confound our curators. The museum is located 4100 Dripping Springs Road, Las Cruces. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for senior citizens, and $3 for children ages four to seventeen. For more information call 575-522-4100 or visit www.nmfarmandranchmuseum.org.

JANUARY 26–FEBRUARY 1, MONDAY, WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, 10 a . m .–5 p. m ., SUNDAY, NOON–5 p. m .

Astronaut Remembrance Week New Mexico Museum of Space History

This special exhibit on the Museum’s first floor is dedicated to the men and women from around the world who gave their lives in the pursuit of space exploration. For more information call 575–437–2840 or www. nmspacemuseum.org.

FEBRUARY SUNDAY, FEB. 2, 2 P.M; FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 7:30 p. m ., SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2 p. m .

Opera Southwest presents Il Postino National Hispanic Cultural Center

Based on the novel Ardiente Paciencia by Antonio Skármeta, as well as the film by Michael Radford, Daniel Catán’s Il Postino (The Postman) is a fully staged opera with orchestra, sung in Spanish with both Spanish and English-translation supertitles. When exiled Chilean poet Pablo Neruda arrives on a tiny Italian island, he receives so much fan mail that Mario is hired as his personal postman. Mario soon becomes Neruda’s student, learning the art of poetry, first to woo a local barmaid and later to express the struggles of his fellow working-class villagers. A firm friendship develops, and the postman is forever a changed man. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21–SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 7:30 p. m .

Carnaval 2020

National Hispanic Cultural Center Carnaval, the festive season occurring before Lent in many countries, including Latin American and Caribbean nations as well as parts of the United States, is one of the world’s most widespread celebrations and one of its biggest parties. First celebrated at the NHCC in 2002, Carnaval has become part of the National Hispanic Cultural Center’s annual seasonal programming, with regular performances by presenting partners Frank Leto & PANdemonium and Pilar Leto & the Odara Dance Ensemble. This year’s Carnaval 2020 marks the 15th annual Carnaval celebration at the NHCC. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22–SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 9 a . m .–5 p. m . (SAT.), 10 a . m .–4 p. m . (SUN.)

4100 Dripping Springs Road, Las Cruces. For more information call 575–522–4100 or visit www.LCMuseumRocks.com. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21–SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 10 a . m .–6 p. m .

History Festival: “Mundos de Mestizaje” National Hispanic Cultural Center

This two-day festival includes a reception, workshops, lectures, arts activities, and other events for all ages. All sessions will be inspired by the theme of “Mundos de Mestizaje” and the famous NHCC buon fresco by artist Frederico Vigil. An evening reception in the Torreon, middle and high school art and poetry contests, murals by local artists, and scholarly talks will explore themes in the fresco and allow all to explore Hispanic/Latinx history through the cross-cultural, transnational, and multidisciplinary influences that have created the Hispanic world. Daytime events are free and open to the public. Tickets for the Friday evening wine reception in the Torreon/fresco with a talk by Frederico Vigil are $100 with $15 discount for NHCC members. For more information visit www.nhccnm.org.

MARCH SATURDAY, MARCH 7–SUNDAY, MARCH 7, 9 a . m .–5 p. m . (SAT.) 10 a . m .–4 p. m . (SUN.)

Cowboy Days

New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum The museum’s largest event of the year pays tribute to the state’s ranching traditions. Enjoy two days of cowboy demonstrations, chuck wagon cooking, cowboy music, children’s activities, stagecoach and pony rides, living history, vendors, and much more. The museum is located at 4100 Dripping Springs Road, Las Cruces. Admission is $5 for everyone three years and older. For more information call 575-522-4100 or visit www.nmfarmandranchmuseum.org.

APRIL FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 6 p. m .–7 p. m .

Trinity Site Tour Reception

New Mexico Museum of Space History Trinity Site Motor Coach Tour after-hours museum reception featuring a special presentation by Museum Executive Director Chris Orwoll. For more information call 575-437-2840 or visit www.nmspacemuseum.org. SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 6:30 a . m .–3 p. m .

The Museum Rocks! Gem & Mineral Show

Trinity Site Motor Coach Tour

New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum

New Mexico Museum of Space History

This fifth-annual event is sponsored by the Friends of the Museum and features more than sixty vendors from throughout the Southwest. There will be geology discussions and films, as well as children’s activities, and food and beverages for sale. The museum is located at

Limited advance tickets are on sale now through the museum’s marketing department and include the round trip to Trinity Site, guided tour, brownbag lunch, guided tour of the museum, and more. For more information call 575–437– 2840 or visit www.nmspacemuseum.org.

42 New Mexico Museums & Historic Sites  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020

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Calendar SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 6 p. m .–9 p. m .

Yuri’s Night Celebration

New Mexico Museum of Space History Celebrate Yuri’s Night at the New Mexico Museum of Space History. Join thousands of people worldwide as we honor Yuri Gagarin and the dream of space exploration. For more information call 575–437–2840 or visit www. nmspacemuseum.org SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 10 a . m .–6 p. m .

Children’s Bilingual Book Festival National Hispanic Cultural Center

The second annual NHCC Children’s Bilingual Book festival celebrates children’s books written in Spanish and English, and Native languages and English. The focus on Spanish, Native, and English language books and authors makes this festival particularly meaningful and vibrant, reflecting the identities of many children in New Mexico and the Southwest. The festival features author readings, a book fair, book-related and arts activities, bilingual poetry readings by elementary students, and more. Presented in

partnership with Bookworks, Children’s Day/ Book Day, Artful Life, The Public Library ABQ-BernCo, and University of New Mexico’s Latin American and Iberian Institute. Admission to this event is free. For more information visit www.nhccnm.org.

connection through music, dance, and food. In addition to food vendors from participating countries, the festival will feature traditional dancers, a headlining salsa band or solo artist, and local musicians. Added attractions for the entire family include children’s art workshops.

FRIDAY, MAY 15–SUNDAY, MAY 17

FRIDAY, JUNE 5–SATURDAY, JUNE 20, EVENING PERFORMANCES AT 8 p. m .

Great Southwest Star Party!

New Mexico Museum of Space History Join museum staff for our biggest star party ever on the grounds of the museum. Open to amateur astronomers of all ages, this event offers RV parking and overnight camping at the museum. Special speakers and activities will highlight some of the very best viewing in the country. For more information call 575–437– 2840 or visit www.nmspacemuseum.org. SUNDAY, MAY 17, 2 p. m .–7 p. m .

South American Folk Fair

National Hispanic Cultural Center The 6th Annual South American Folk Fair seeks to unite Albuquerque’s South American community in a day of cultural experience and

National Institute of Flamenco presents Festival Flamenco Internacional National Hispanic Cultural Center

The 2020 Festival Flamenco Internacional de Alburquerque, celebrating its thirty-third anniversary this year, will include selected performances by participating companies at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, as well as two performances of Fiesta Flamenca, the festival’s culminating event, on June 19 and June 20. There will also be pre-performance lectures, and the festival’s closing celebration, Exposición Flamenca. The festival brings the finest flamenco artists in the world to Albuquerque, transforming the city into a cultural epicenter for this artistic expression.

Above: New Mexico Space History Museum exterior, Alamogordo. Courtesy: NM Museum of Space History.

newmexicoculture.org/guide  ||  Winter 2019/Spring 2020 43

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MUSEUM HILL CAFÉ Si m p le f o o d d o n e we ll

O p e n f o r L u n c h Tu e s d a y - S u n d a y, 1 1 - 3 , H ost yo u r n e x t e ve n t w i th u s !

505-984-8900

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www.MuseumHillCafe.net

710 Camino Lejo Santa Fe, NM 87505

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OPENING NOVEMBER 10, 2019 Ricardo Caté, Santo Domingo Pueblo Untitled (Santa Fe Coyote), n.d. Acrylic on canvas

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Wheelwright Museum 704 CAMINO LEJO, SANTA FE, NM 87505 (505) 982-4636 • wheelwright.org

The Laughter & Resilience exhibit was made possible by a generous grant from the Art Dealers Association of America Foundation.

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IndianPueblo.org

CULTURAL NATIVE DANCES

PUEBLO GINGERBREAD

HOUSE SHOW

STORIES BY THE FIRESIDE

NATIVE SOURCED PUEBLO INSPIRED CUISINE

Experience a Celebration of Pueblo Culture • Immersive Museum Cultural Native Dances Every Weekend • Native Arts Store

2401 12th St NW, ABQ, NM • 505.843.7270 • IndianPueblo.org • @IndianPueblo M&HS_winter2020.indd 4

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Profile for Matt Gantner

2019/20 Museums and Historic Sites Winter/Spring  

NM Museums and Historic Sites - Culture in NM.

2019/20 Museums and Historic Sites Winter/Spring  

NM Museums and Historic Sites - Culture in NM.