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50 WAYS TO A WONDERFUL BATHROOM

70

years of AUSTRALIAN HOMES

SHELF CONFIDENCE The art of display

Bathing

BEAUTY FAB FITTINGS AND CLEVER DESIGNS New plants ^ ideas from MELBOURNE’S GARDEN SHOW

LISTEN UP! FEEL THE WARMTH F

Sound advice for your home

JUNE $8.50 *NZ$9.50 (*incl. GST)

Comfortable spaces & smart shopping

HARMONY Home FIND THE KEYS TO ROOMS THAT SING


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Make an understated impression. Introducing COLORBOND steel Matt. Available in five natural colours and tested in some of Australia’s harshest conditions, this roofing and walling material features new paint technology that diffuses light to give the surface an elegantly soft, textured appearance. It’s the versatile designer finish that enhances your home, however you choose to use it. Visit COLORBOND.COM/MATT or call 1800 702 764

COLORBOND and the BlueScope brand mark are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. 2018 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved.


Home harmony

JUNE

Immerse yourself in our bathroom special, page 147.

On the cover 29

Find the keys to rooms that sing 46 Comfortable spaces and smart shopping (page 177) 115

144 147

Sound advice for your home Fab fittings and clever designs 177 The art of display

Decorating & design 17 Inspired By Nestle into the comforting textures and tones of our June palette. 18 t The couple behind design studio Koskela turn a tired little shop into a beachside haven. 29 St Interiors hit new high notes in finely tuned spaces with witty musical themes. Encore! 41 Laidback luxuries. 42 St Eat up these greens. 46 Designer tips and techniques to create an inviting impression in every room.

A silvery palette drew accolades for Wonder Wall, a garden by horticulture student Sarah Jardine, at the Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show. For more on this garden and other MIFGS highlights, go to page 115.


Insider 53 N A peep into landscape designer Nicola Cameron’s Sydney abode. 54 Design news and reviews. 59 Australian designer Gordon Andrews’ notable legacy ranges from cool chairs to hard cash. 63 How technology is changing the way we hear and enjoy sound and music at home. 68 O Novelist Alex Miller writes about emigrating from the UK and the pain of leaving family behind.

Houses 72 80 88 96 104

Gardens 115 B Inspirational designs and plants from the country’s premier garden show. 125 N The growing interest in Australian plants. 127 S How natural and ambient sounds can contribute to our enjoyment of outdoor spaces.

Living 131 H Lunch recipes from fashionable food blogger Stephanie Conley. 138 L Refreshing tea options. 140 G Travel destinations that leave a lasting impression. 143 A Low-cost, highperformance beauty products. 144 L Hearing loss is on the rise; here’s how to save yours.

A couple build their own rainforest retreat in the Gold Coast hinterland. St This Perth home’s Australian aesthetic is a delight for the owners and international guests. P A boldly modern addition brings a 1920s bungalow in Bathroom special Melbourne’s south-east up to date. 147 Brilliant ideas for bathing spaces. Easy elegance is the theme of this exquisitely renovated home on Sydney Harbour. C Though its footprint hasn’t changed, the interior of this Sydney home is now a step above.

Advice 165 S Home audio. 172 S A new recycling program for soft plastics. 174 N Miniature goats make really great pets.

My Ideal House 168 E With gorgeous bathroom fixtures scheduled for installation, our My Ideal House build is in its exciting final stages. 171 M Why it pays to paint a property before you sell.

Shopping 177 183 184 187 188

Great storage pieces and lovely things to display on them, including 50 fab buys under $150. Bright and beautiful. A Speakers and players to amplify the look of your home. Sunrooms that shine. Stockists’ details.

Community 12 Readers’ letters. 189 190 Info and insights. 194 B Sydney florist Myra Perez creates a bouquet fit for a star.

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Photograph by Claire Takacs.

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EDITOR’S LETTER H G

HOME HARMONY

S

Love that look…

Senior stylist Kayla Gex’s fave finds. Photograph by Maree Homer (Lisa).

Put some soul into your home with musical elements and timber notes. FROM TOP Natural Curiosities ‘Jazz 2’ wall art, $1125 (unframed), Coco Republic; cocorepublic.com.au. Engraved Darbuka drum, $110, Threeworlds; (07) 5520 3318; threeworlds.com.au. ‘Almond’ wooden vase, $135, Woodfolk; woodfolk.com.au.

Follow the H&G team on Instagram @houseandgarden

o many big moments in life revolve around music. The soundtrack to our lives, a catalogue of musical memories forms us, comforts and accompanies us. From childhood music lessons to teen band crushes to wedding songs to funeral services, the emotion attached to a piece of music is deep. Music “M i accts like a magic key, to which the most tightly closed heart opens,” said Maria Augusta von Trappp. Is there anyone alive who doesn’t know any lyrics from The Sound of Music? My fathher is a self-taught guitarist with a beautifuul voice. My grandmother and aunt both played piano, which I took up at six but regretttably dropped in my teens. Early childhoodd memories peg Dad at the centre of singalongs, Nan sitting at her piano or my aunt’s hannds dancing across the keys. As toddlers we w twirled in tights to Strauss waltzes or vigorouusly conducted Peer Gynt’s In The Hall of thee Mountain King. Hours were spent fossicking through Dad’s vinyl collection before ld my own. Today our home is still filled with music. There’s no space for a piano but my son is angling to play sax and nothing makes me happier than him asking if he can choose a playlist, often a prelude to a Friday night disco in the living room. Our teenage daughters, meanwhile, are building their own music worlds, earbuds in and Spotify playlists engaged. The CDs went a while ago but our vinyl collection is still in the house and a place for the record player is earmarked when we reconfigure a bedroom this year. Following on from last month’s sight theme, this issue we are exploring the sense of sound and the influence it has in the home. In doing so, we’ve placed musical instruments at the

heart of our decorating feature, and look at the technology that has transformed the way we listen to music. How quickly we’ve moved from vinyl records to cassettes to CDs and portable music devices to homes that are wireless for sound. Travel experiences chosen for their aural impact are also in the line-up. While planning H&G’s 70th birthday event, music was on the agenda early. What better way to unite a crowd or start a conversation than with a quick music quiz? ABC personality Myf Warhurst not only warmed up the guests but also created a charts-led playlist for the event. You can now download Myf’s playlist – Australian Number Ones And Then Some Party Mix – from H&G’s Spotify account, using this link: https://spoti.fi/2HjDtZC. Hope you enjoy the musical journey through the decades, and the issue.

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H G LETTERS

H&G social

The posts that made your month.

YOUR H&G Who doesn’t love a walk down memory lane? The 70th anniversary edition did that for me, a child of the 1960s and ’70s who can fondly remember a burnt-orange Laminex kitchen, multi-coloured Tupperware and shagpile rugs. Myf Warhurst’s music list included songs my parents played on the stereo – on vinyl – and Mardi Doherty wore the same shoes I bought with money from my first job in the ’80s! Thanks for a wonderful read.

Facebook

Christine Garven, Yamba, NSW

Instagram

Pinterest

Facebook fans loved our story on natural pools and native gardens, a beautiful bouquet met a rapturous response on Instagram, and Pinners adored this riverside garden in Sydney. Facebook facebook.com/ australianhouseandgarden Highlights from each issue + links to our favourite home tours. Instagram @houseandgarden View the most inspirational images from the month at H&G’s HQ and out and about. Pinterest pinterest.com/ housengarden Picture-perfect images from our pages and sensational products to covet. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our e-newsletter at newsletter. houseandgardenmag.com.au.

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H&G has always helped me to stay up to date and understand all things new in the world of interiors and life in general. But I’m not sure about devouring the magazine digitally. I miss the tactile sensation of the printed page. And what would I donate to the local hospital? (After my second reading six months later, of course.) Ann Babington, Shortland, NSW

Special delivery What a great way to start my H&G subscription – with the delivery of the 70th Anniversary Collector’s Edition. It was a joy to stir up memories of the lime green and orange of the 1970s and journey through the progression of design to reach today’s mix of classic style and sophistication. Jackie Galloway, Frankston, Victoria

Cover girl I eagerly scanned the pages of your anniversary issue and yes, there it was in ‘70 Years Well Lived’: a photo of my younger self on the cover of the June 1960 issue. Earlier that year a pal and I had gone with my mother to visit a friend of hers who’d just moved into a new home in Avalon, NSW. That day, H&G arrived to photograph the small but very modern house – “a tiny home for two”, as the magazine called it. My friend and I, both 14, were very happy to be part of the shoot, posing on the verandah and in the garden (me, on the rock), and extremely excited to find ourselves on the cover. I still have my precious and rather dog-eared copy of the magazine. Thanks for including me in your birthday celebration. Jacqueline France, West Pennant Hills, NSW

WRITE IN TO WIN The author of every letter published receives $50. Our favourite also wins a fabulous prize. This month, Christine Garven of NSW wins two pairs of Grado SR80E Prestige Series headphones from BusiSoft, valued at $149 each. For more information, go to busisoft.com.au. Email your letter to H&G@bauer-media.com.au with your full name and address or post to Your H&G, PO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028.

Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

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VICTORIA

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AN EMPTY ROOM IS A STORY WAITING TO HAPPEN.

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CREATE A BEST-SELLER AND SAVE UP TO 25% OFF TODAY! At Victory, our free in-home measure and quote style consultation with a décor consultant, is where we learn exactly what you want from your LQGRRUDQGRXWGRRUZLQGRZIXUQLVKLQJV:LWKDVLJQLŪFDQWLQGRRUDQG RXWGRRUUDQJHLQZLQGRZIXUQLVKLQJVZHFDQŪQGWKHSHUIHFWVROXWLRQ WRVXLW\RXUKRPHDQGG¦FRU:HKHOSEULQJG¦FRUYLVLRQVWROLIH

QUEENSLAND


EDITORIAL Editor in chief Lisa Green Creative director Melissa Heath Deputy editor & travel John McDonald Interiors & houses Kate Nixon

ART

STYLE

Art director Katrina Breen Deputy art director Shayne Burton Junior designer Sophie Wilson

Senior stylist Kayla Gex Market editor Sarah Maloney Assistant stylist Sara Åkesson

FEATURES

SUB-EDITORS & WRITERS

Senior features editor Elizabeth Wilson Features Sarah Pickette Gardening Helen Young Western Australia editor Anna Flanders 0410 551 048

Chief sub-editor/writer Deborah Grant Deputy chief sub-editor/production Tamarah Pienaar Sub-editor/writer Rosa Senese Junior writer/editorial assistant Laura Barry

CONTRIBUTORS Domenic Bahmann, Stephen Crafti , Roger Crosthwaite, Jody D’Arcy, Zoe Deleuil, Nicole England, Tom Evangelidis, Anna Flanders, Paula Goodyer, Nic Gossage, Harvey Grennan, Rose-Marie Hillier, Maree Homer, Ross Honeysett, Will Horner, Elisabeth King, Rodney Macuja, Georgia Madden, Bridget Maher, Alex Miller, Anne-Marie Molloy, Toni Paterson, Chris Pearson, Dion Robeson, Christine Sams, Beck Simon, Jessica Slater, Kristina Soljo, Derek Swalwell, Claire Takacs, John Paul Urizar, Natalie Walton, Chris Warnes

ADVERTISING & PRODUCTION Group brand manager Analise Gattellaro (02) 9282 8935 Advertising production manager Kate Orsborn (02) 9282 8364 Brand manager Kimberly Anderson (02) 9338 6103 Brand executive Jennifer Burke (02) 9288 9145 Victoria, SA & WA sales director Jaclyn Clements NSW head of agency sales Karen Holmes +61 2 9282 8733 Victoria head of direct sales Will Jamison (03) 9823 6301 Queensland head of sales Judy Taylor (07) 3101 6636 New Zealand enquiries +61 2 9282 8505 General manager – production services Ian McHutchison Production controller Sally Jefferys Advertising production controller Dominic Roy (02) 9282 8691 Senior Event Manager Cate Gazal (02) 8226 9342

MARKETING & CIRCULATION Marketing director Zenna Katsikaris Circulation manager Nicole Pearson Subscriptions campaign manager Lauren Flinn

SUBSCRIPTION SALES & ENQUIRIES Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia Phone 136 116 (Mon-Fri, 8am-6pm AEST) Web magshop.com.au Marketing enquiries: homes@bauer-media.com.au All other Australian House & Garden enquiries: (02) 9282 8456

BAUER MEDIA CORPORATE Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul Chief Financial Officer Andrew Stedwell General manager – publishing Fiorella Di Santo Commercial director Paul Gardiner National sales manager – retail sales Julie Green Senior category circulation manager Andrew Cohn General manager - subscriptions & e-commerce Sean McLintock Commercial analyst Marisa Spasich Syndications syndication@bauer-media.com.au Published by Bauer Media Group (ABN 053 273 546), 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. The trademark AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN is the property of Bauer Media Pty Ltd and is used under licence. © 2018. All rights reserved. Printed by PMP Moorebank, 31-37 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, NSW 2170. National distribution by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd. 1300 650 666. ISSN 0004-931X. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Bauer Media Pty Ltd does not accept responsibility for damage to or loss of freelance material submitted for publication. Allow several weeks for acceptance or return. For enquiries regarding subscriptions, call 136 116 Monday-Friday 8am-6pm AEST, email magshop@magshop.com.au or mail letters to: Australian House & Garden, Reply Paid 3508, Sydney, NSW 2001 or subscribe online at magshop.com.au/hg. Subscription rate*: Australia $79.99 (one year, 12 issues); NZ A$120 (one year, 12 issues); other countries A$180 (one year, 12 issues). All overseas subscriptions sent air speed. *Recommended price, Australian House & Garden.


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GALAXY SOFA TEMPO COFFEE TABLE MARTINI FLOOR LAMP RIFLESSO RUG PLISSÉ BOOKCASE


INSPIRED BY H G

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Nick Gossage.

June ‘Home becomes a place of comfort and warmth as we hunker down for the winter months. Layers of texture, soft lighting and inviting sofas become especially appealing, as do hearty meals and a good book.’ Meryl Hare, interior designer, Hare + Klein

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Belgian Amalfi Silver’ sisal flooring, $160/m², The Natural Floorcovering Centres. For similar bowl, try Robert Gordon Australia. ‘Victory’ polyester-blend fabric in Ink, $44/m, Warwick Fabrics. Walter G ‘Yoko’ linen fabric in Indian Teal, $140/m, Ascraft. ‘Flowerbomb’ polyester fabric in Scarlet, $73/m, Warwick Fabrics. ‘Nixon’ polyester/acrylic fabric in Terracotta, $51/m, Warwick Fabrics. ‘Oak Laverton’ rustic-grade engineered European oak flooring, $83m², Havwoods International. Casamance ‘Reverence’ viscose-blend fabric in 3790 01 94 (blue pattern), $363/m, Zepel Fabrics. Austral Bricks ‘San Selmo Reclaimed’ clay bricks, $1995/1000, Brickworks. For Where to Buy, see page 188.

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H G AT HOME WITH

SHOP SHAPE The couple behind ethical design business Koskela took a dilapidated shop and residence in Sydney’s eastern suburbs and turned it into a stunning near-the-beach pad. STORY Deborah Grant | ST Y L IN G Kayla Gex | PH OTOG R A P HY Maree Homer


KITCHEN/DINING Russel Koskela (shown) and wife Sasha Titchkosky renovated their two-level home over a number of years. The living spaces are at the top, furnished with a mix of pieces designed or refurbished by the pair. Grey stone benchtops, Sharwood Stone. For similar terracotta splashback tile, try Teranova. Custom cabinetry and whitewashed timber desk. ‘Patonga’ table, Greg Hatton stool, rug and wicker pendant light, all Koskela. Fritz Hansen ‘Series 7’ chairs, Cult. Framed at right is a photograph Russel took of an ice hotel in Finnish Lapland. >

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H G AT HOME WITH

ussel Koskela and Sasha Titchkosky bought their home for a very good reason: no one else wanted it. “It was the ugly duckling and almost uninhabitable,” says Sasha of the three-bedroom residence/ shop in Sydney’s east. The couple were well qualified to transform it. Russel is a furniture designer and Sasha is a lawyer/accountant. Together they run Koskela, a retail business they founded in 2000, known for its amazing sustainable Australian-designed and -made furniture and products, as well as collaborations with artists from remote communities. Sasha says the main attraction when they bought in 2008 was the suburb, with its diverse mix of houses and apartments flowing down a hill to the beach. “The area was originally working class and there are a few of the original dwellers left, but mostly it’s a lot of families and young couples.” And, of course, a large influx of visitors on sunny days, when families treat the beach and adjacent park like their own backyards. Describing the 155m2 home as “pretty compact”, Sasha says making it feel more spacious was crucial. But there were many other challenges for the two-level abode, which has all the living spaces and two bedrooms on the ground floor, and the bathroom, laundry and a spare room below, level with the garden. “It’s part of an early 19th-century building,” she says. “At some point it had been dodgily renovated and stripped of its original period features.” She and Russel and their sons – Anders, 12, and Mika, 10 – lived elsewhere during the structural part of the renovation, enabling the builders to work quickly restoring some of its charm. To start with, the kitchen, bathroom and stairs were replaced, along with many of the windows, mainly at the north-facing rear of the property. “We installed new louvre windows everywhere and bifolds at the back of the house to capture the cooling sea breezes,” says Sasha. “The kitchen window now looks directly

R

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out onto a large bottlebrush tree that attracts every type of bird you can imagine. It’s amazing to sit at the table and watch them.” Much of the original Baltic pine flooring was retained, while areas that needed replacing were matched with reclaimed Baltic timber of a similar vintage. The exposed ceiling beams upstairs were restored and painted Dulux Chalk USA, a warm white. New skylights have contributed to this level’s loft-like ambience. “The one we put in the boys’ room has brought in the natural light and makes the room feel so much bigger,” says Russel. As is often the case with designers’ homes, Russel and Sasha decorated over time. They’ve used natural, tactile materials, and a lot of indigenous art, in the form of wall-hung canvases and printed cushions. One of Sasha’s favourite features is the stair wall in the living room, which was perfect for hanging some of their much-loved Aboriginal art collection. Having a garden in this part of Sydney is a precious thing, and enabled the boys to have their own outdoor play space and pet: a mini lop-eared bunny named Mr Softy. Russel added another outdoor space upstairs off the living room and main bedroom. “It has lovely french doors and is a great addition in terms of light and airflow,” he says. “We wanted to look out onto a green wall so we trained ivy there and installed deck lights to illuminate the surface at night. It’s great for entertaining.” So, what started as “a horror story”, according to Sasha, turned into a beautiful home the family was happy in for 10 years. She refers to it fondly as their “stepping-stone home”, and says its recent sale has enabled them to move to a cottage on a large block near the water on the lower north shore, where they are > busy planning the next stage of their lives… Koskela, 1/85 Dunning Avenue, Rosebery, NSW; (02) 9280 0999 or koskela.com.au.


LIVING This seating area is two steps below the kitchen/dining room and has new french doors out to the deck. Antique clock. ‘Quadrant Soft’ sofa, Better World Arts cushions, vintage kilim beanbag, rug, pendant light and Pop & Scott ‘Mali’ pot, Koskela. Artwork above entertainment unit by Mabel Juli. STAIR WALL To one side of the kitchen is this auction piece, filled with crockery and glass. Russel and Sasha sanded the doors and painted the rest matt black. Mr Kitly pot, Koskela. Artworks by Freddie Timms, Lena Nyadbi, Dorothy Napangardi and Gunybi Ganambarr.


To create harmony across a range of styles, opt for natural, tones.

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AT HOME WITH H G

ANDERS’ AND MIKA’S BEDROOM The boys’ bunk bed was inspired by a trip to Switzerland, where the family visited many old barns. A third bed is hidden in the bottom drawer. Linen, Koskela. LIVING A play space with ‘Helmi’ stool and bean bags in mid denim and light denim, all from Koskela. BATHROOM A large, roughly sanded window from Chippendale Restorations replaced a much smaller one. Brass tapware adds to the old-world charm. “We wanted all the pipes exposed and on show,” says Russel. Tile-topped custom vanity. MAIN BEDROOM “The wall is painted Dulux Deep Onyx, close to black but warmer,” says Russel. “It’s an old colour, but you can still get it if you ask.” Wicker pendant light, side table and throw, Koskela. Print by Anson Smart. STAIRCASE Hidden behind plasterboard was this original sandstone wall, now restored. Artworks by Warmun Art Centre children (canvas) and Mavis Ganambarr (baskets). >


BEDROOM/STUDY A great ‘garden room’ where the boys also practise their music (guitar and saxophone). Shaker-style wall panelling and custom joinery. Bedlinen, various cushions, wicker pendant light and vintage kilim rug, Koskela. GARDEN Yellow furniture always brings sunshine to an outdoor setting. Table, vintage find. Chairs, Ikea. Oversized pot, Urban Growers. Frangipani trees, ferns, palms, succulents and many other plants surround the generous patch of grass/parking area. For Where to Buy, see page 188. #


AT HOME WITH H G

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Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Maree Homer.

Listen to your heart to create a home that is pitch perfect.

Elm and leather drum, $520, Orient House. Molteni&C ‘D.154.2’ chair with velvet upholstery, from $7890, Hub Furniture. Moroccan kelim wool cushion, $85, Afghan Interiors. ‘Linear’ timber stool, $160, Madras Link. Vintage gramophone, stylist’s own. ON WALLS from left Epiphone ‘Stagebird’ electric banjo, $1099, Allans Billy Hyde. The Yellow Wind artwork by Ann Thomson, Defiance Gallery. Endure Interior paint in Silent Night, $100/4L, Taubmans. ON FLOOR ‘Beoplay H9i’ leather and aluminium headphones, $749, Bang & Olufsen. ‘Lexicon’ wool-artsilk-linen rug (2.4x3m), $5490, Designer Rugs. >


Style

NOTES

“Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything,” mused Plato. Here, some decorating ideas to create harmony at home. ‘Ovalis’ elm dining table, $949, La Maison. ‘Torso’ metal and leather dining chairs, $699 each, Vincent Design Supply. Yamaha ‘U1’ upright piano, $5495, Hutchings Pianos. ‘Knight’ iron bench seat with upholstered seat, $2935, Coco Republic. ‘Atticus’ lambswool throw in Poppy, $340, Jardan. ON TABLE Green glass jug (used as vase), $30, House of Orange. ON PIANO from left ‘Chulucanas’ clay vase, $80, House of Orange. Brass knot ornament, $55, Domo. ‘Beosound 1’ portable speaker, $1950, Bang & Olufsen. ‘Tomales Double Arc’ iron and mangowood candleholder, $230, Dunlin. Sheet music, $20, Brocante de Provence. ON WALL from top left Artwork by Lucy Anderson, $1100, MCM House. ‘Santiso 1’ brushed-brass wall light, $249, Beacon Lighting. Violin artwork by Peter Godwin, Defiance Gallery. Artwork by Lucy Anderson, $900, MCM House. Set In Stone painting by Katie Wyatt, Greenhouse Interiors. Pencil sketch by Kayla Gex. ‘Ribba’ fibreboard frame, $20, Ikea. ‘Sterling Feather 1’ wall art, $1895 (framed), Coco Republic. Endure Interior paint in Forever More, $81/4L, Taubmans. ON FLOOR Bernabeifreeman ‘Lace Like’ wool rug (2x3m), $4950, Designer Rugs. >

Stylist’s assistants Anne-Marie Molloy, Bridget Maher & Jessica Slater.

ST Y L IN G Kayla Gex | P HOTOG R A P HY Maree Homer


DECORATING H G

CLASSICAL COMPOSITION Make a feature of the piano or other large furniture with accompanying art and objects.

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H G DECORATING

Vintage Indian teak cabinet, $1900, Few and Far. ‘Toulouse’ timber and rattan armchair with cotton cushions, $1299, La Maison. ‘San Andreas’ lambswool throw, $249, Las Niñas Textiles. Chinese white-lacquer drum, $980, Orient House. Fog & Morup ‘Semi’ aluminium pendant light, $895, Vampt Vintage Design. ‘Ethel’ three-seater sofa with velvet upholstery, from $3400, Project 82. Vintage Chinese pine drum, $1300, Few and Far. Moroccan leather pouf, $165, Afghan Interiors. Elm and leather drum, $580, Orient House. Kentia palm, $155, and terracotta planter (60x70cm), $745, both Garden Life. ON CABINET from left Indian clay cow ornament, $410, Few and Far. Wooden dice, $85, and porcelain vase, $65, both Orient House. ON SOFA from left Moroccan handira wool-cotton cushion, $85, Afghan Interiors. ‘Kooshen’ velvet cushion in Diamond Orange, $250, Fenton&Fenton. ‘Duke’ linen cushion


FEEL THE RHYTHM Percussion instruments add colour to music and expression to an interior. In this Cubanleaning room scheme, drums set the beat.

in Rust, $265, Jardan. ON DRUMS from left ‘Bolga’ basket shakers, $15 each, and ‘Striped’ wooden maracas, $10 each, all Threeworlds. Crassula, $8, and ‘Elementary’ terracotta pot, $19, Bunnings. ‘Mira’ glass vase, $75, Madras Link. Chinese elm tray, $120, Orient House. ON WALL clockwise from left Handpainted folk-art cross, $239, Las Niñas Textiles. Palm-leaf basket, $20, Afghan Interiors. Gold-leaf heart, $79, Las Niñas Textiles. Wooden ring tambourine, $9, and Remo double-row tambourine with head, $45, both Threeworlds. ‘Emery’ linen-cotton curtains, from $184 each (including blackout liner), and ‘PB Standard’ 20mm metal curtain rods with ball finials in Antique Bronze, $89 each, Pottery Barn. Endure Interior paint in Forever More, $81/4L, Taubmans. ON FLOOR Cadrys ‘Moroccan Tuareg’ leather and reed rug (440x310cm), $11,950, MCM House. >


H G DECORATING


ELECTRIC DREAMS With accent colours tuned in to the lead guitar and a retro vibe in play, this teen haven rocks.

ABOVE 1960s ebonised-teak sideboard, $3450, Vampt Vintage Design. ON SIDEBOARD from left Succulent, $8, Bunnings. For similar plant pot, try Kmart. ‘Vadu’ felt bowl, $18, Greenhouse Interiors. Teak and ceramic lamp with fabric shade, $575, Collectika. Crosley ‘Cruiser’ portable turntable, $170, iWorld. ON WALL ‘Island Lighthouse’ art print, $89, and timber art-print frame, $99, both Hunting for George. Wash & Wear 101 paint in Lexicon Quarter, $59/4L, Dulux. OPPOSITE Ficus longifolia, $125, Garden Life. Paul Kafka loveseat with vinyl upholstery, $2450, Collectika. Sideboard (as before). Original BTC ‘Fin’ bone china pendant light, $1278, Dunlin. ON SOFA from left ‘Rae’ cotton cushion in Sierra, $65, Madras Link. ‘Beats Studio3’ wireless over-ear headphones, $450, Apple. Kantha cushion, $75, Greenhouse Interiors. ‘Cordoba Tile’ linen cushion, $145, Bonnie and Neil. ON WALLS Alvarez concert ukulele (above sideboard), $249, Big Music. Handy Shelf 900mm MDF photo shelves, $30 each, Bunnings. Endure Interior paint in Forever More (on left), $81/4L, Taubmans. ON FLOOR Fender ‘Monterey’ bluetooth speaker, $800, iWorld. For similar electric guitar, try Allans Billy Hyde. ‘Xtreme’ universal guitar stand, $30, Big Music. ‘Atlas Beni Ourain’ wool rug (120x220cm), $699, Olli Ella. All other items (as before). >

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H G DECORATING

Vintage Saarinen ‘Tulip’ fibreglass armchair, $850, Vampt Vintage Design. ‘Rex’ metal side table with marble top, $590, MCM House. ‘Lincoln’ queen-size bedhead with velvet upholstery, $1430, Heatherly Design Bedheads. ON SIDE TABLE ‘Question’ metal table lamp, $290, Fenton&Fenton. ‘HomePod’ wireless speaker for Apple Music, $499, Apple. ON BED from rear ‘Palais Lux’ cotton European pillowcase in White, $110, Sheridan. ‘Leopard’ linen cushion in Multicolour, $200, Bonnie and Neil. ‘Benson’ cotton cushion in Plaid, $70, and ‘Rae’ cotton cushion in Sierra, $65, both Madras Link. ‘Tiger’ linen cushion, $165, Bonnie and Neil. ‘Palais’ queen-size cotton quilt cover, $630, Sheridan. ‘Mulberi Danaja Check’ wool throw, $298, David Jones. Saami embroidered-cotton coverlet, $1650, Afghan Interiors. ON WALL Curtain made from ‘Corfu’ polyester fabric in Quartz, $40/m, Warwick Fabrics. Eastman ‘VC100’ half-size cello, $1799, Allans Billy Hyde. Endure Interior paint in Summer Storm, $100/4L, Taubmans (top). Wash & Wear 101 paint in Lexicon Quarter, $59/4L, Dulux. ON FLOOR For similar maidenhair fern and plant pot, try Garden Life. ‘Woman’ framed print, $150, House of Orange. Violin, $200, Ici et Là. ‘Turca-N-0516-03’ patchwork rug (353x259cm), $2750, Few and Far. >

SWEET SERENADE Create visual harmony with curvaceous elements and interesting textiles.

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Subtle. Sophisticated. Concrete domesticated by Caesarstone® New Cloudburst Concrete™ www.caesarstone.com.au


H G DECORATING MOODY BLUES Jazz up a quiet corner with deep colour, a plush chair and brassy elements that trumpet good times.

‘Grayson’ metal floor lamp, $399, Oz Design Furniture. Molteni&C ‘D.154.2’ chair with velvet upholstery, from $7890, Hub Furniture. Moroccan kelim wool cushion, $85, Afghan Interiors. ‘Linear’ timber stool, $160, Madras Link. Vintage gramophone, stylist’s own. ‘Beoplay A9’ wireless speaker, $3499, Bang & Olufsen. Conn ‘52H’ trombone, $2799, Better Music. ON LEDGE from left Toss B ‘Opus For Michael’ artwork, $595 (framed), Hub Furniture. Bond ‘The Classic’ alto saxophone, $999, Musos Corner. Brass bottle, $55, Domo. ‘Wire Circle’ wall art, $449, House of Orange. Brass house ornament, $30, Domo. ON WALL Vintage sheet music, $25, Vintage Black Catz. For similar frame, try Ikea. Endure Interior paint in Silent Night, $100/4L, Taubmans. ON FLOOR ‘Duke’ linen cushion in Rust, $265, Jardan. ‘Beoplay H9i’ leather and aluminium headphones, $749, Bang & Olufsen. ‘Lexicon’ wool-artsilk-linen rug (2.4x3m), $5490, Designer Rugs. For Where to Buy, see page 188. #

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S O M E T I M E S O N LY A CAPPUCCINO WIL L DO The new Latissima One. For the love of quality cofee moments.


DECORATING H G 1

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Trend

Produced by Kayla Gex. Styling by Hans Blomquist (wall hanging). Photograph by Debi Treloar (wall hanging). Currency conversion correct at time of printing.

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BEST OF BOHEMIAN Free-spirited designs w with exotic influences are the secret s to laidback luxury.

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1 ‘Cog’ mirror in teak frame, $495, Weylandts. 2 Knitted wool rug (160x220cm), $699, Olli Ella. 3 ‘Adeline’ metal and cut-glass chandelier, $959, Urban Lighting. 4 Timber cupboard with embossed-brass front, $3200, Nomadique. 5 ‘Shraavan’ vintage cotton quilt, $175, Bowerhouse. 6 ‘Berber Diamond’ sofa with cotton dhurrie upholstery in Red/White, $4400, Ruby Star Traders. 7 Canvas+Sasson ‘Bohemia Island’ beaded cotton clutch bag, $120, Eco Chic. 8 ‘Tayah’ bamboo-silk and linen wall hanging on sheesham-wood dowel, about $384, Anthropologie. 9 Scalloped brass stool/table, $795, Weylandts. 10 Ridged glass table lamp with shade in White, $390, Orson & Blake. 11 ‘Lotus’ embroidered cotton cushion, $80, Few & Far. 12 ‘Artisan’ painted metal knob (left), $9, and ‘Bhawan’ painted metal knob, $8, Indigo Love Collectors. For Where to Buy, see page 188. # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G DECORATING 1 12

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STARS OF THE SAGE

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Natural shades of green take on a sophisticated grey edge, offering fresh design potential.

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1 In The Sac double-size lin on school chart (85x59cm), $90, House of Orange. 3 Tasselled cott a. 5 Mercer+Reid ‘Kensington’ armchair with chenille upholstery in trolley, $699, House of Orange. 8 FK05 ‘Charlotte’ plywood coffee in bowl in Pistachio, $68, Mud Australia. 11 ‘Alys’ 20x20cm concrete tiles in Sage, $8 each, Schots Home Emporium. 12 Jade facial roller, $36, Lux Aestiva. For Where to Buy, see page 188. #

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Produced by Kay

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naturally ageless

for the first signs of ageing Ageless is rich in deeply nourishing Rosehip Oil, a natural source of Vitamin A and C, antioxidants and natural nutrients to moisturise, revitalise and protect skin of all ages and types. Use the ‘try me’ free testers on all Natio display stands to experience Natio’s exceptional quality and value. www.natio.com.au Available at Myer, David Jones and selected Pharmacies.


BRAND PROMOTION

Luxe comfort

Add a touch of affordable luxury to your bathroom this winter with Australian House & Garden’s beautiful range of towels and bathroom accessories, only at Myer.

Made from 100% natural Australian cotton, these towels offer premium absorbency.

ABOVE Glass hurricane with hand-carved natural-wood base (15cm), $39.95. ‘Bailey’ stoneware tumbler, $19.95. Lotion dispenser, $24.95. Soap dish, $19.95. Hand towel, two for $30 or $17 each. OPPOSITE Natural Australian-cotton bath towel in White, Natural, Charcoal, Navy, Celestial Blue and Dusty Pink, two for $50 or $35 each. ‘Exmouth’ plush oversized bathmat in Charcoal, $50. ‘Apollo’ bamboo bath rack, $59.95. Oak tumbler, $29.95. Oak soap dish, $24.95. ‘Eyre’ ventricular vase in Ombre Glaze (21cm), $39.95. All from the Australian House & Garden range at Myer; 1800 811 611 or myer.com.au

See more of the Australian House & Garden collection instore and online at myer.com.au


H G DECORATING

Ask an expert

WARM WELCOME Interiors editor Kate Nixon on how to create an inviting impression in every room.

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his classic Victorian terrace in Sydney’s eastern suburbs is a study in conviviality and warmth. In the living room, the timeless decorating principles of symmetry, scale and proportion were applied – complemented with cosy layers of upholstery, window treatments and soft furnishings to deliver a look everyone feels comfortable with.

MEDIA ATTENTION The homeowners’ existing media console was stained black, creating tonal consistency with the newly purchased ‘Frejac’ bookshelves in Ebony from La Maison. The shelves are an elegant way to frame the TV, with books and decorative objects drawing attention away from the screen. This sort of arrangement can be very useful in open-plan spaces.

Floor story AN AREA RUG DISTINGUISHES A ROOM, DEFINING ITS STYLE AND PALETTE. IT UNIFIES EVERY ELEMENT WHILE ALSO ADDING WARMTH AND COMFORT. THIS WOOL RUG FROM WEST ELM SETS A CONTEMPORARY TONE AND REINFORCES THE CALMING COLOUR SCHEME.

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WINDOW DRESSINGS Soften and frame a view with bespoke window treatments. These gauzy sheer curtains in Busatti ‘Lazio’ linen-cotton fabric were designed to filter natural light and frame the courtyard view. They can be gathered at either side of the bifold doors for maximum flexibility. The contrasting hem and upholstered pelmet bring extra layers of detailing and finish.

Green screen A SIMPLE LATTICE SCREEN PLANTED WITH A FAST-GROWING GREEN CLIMBER WILL HIDE NEIGHBOURS, ENHANCE THE VIEW AND MAXIMISE THE INDOOR/ OUTDOOR CONNECTION.

The joy of symmetry LOOK FOR OPPORTUNITIES TO CREATE SYMMETRY AND BE REWARDED WITH A SUBTLE SENSE OF ORDER AND STRUCTURE THAT’S COMFORTING TO THE EYE AND SOUL. HERE, PAIRED STATEMENT OBJECTS – INCLUDING VITTORIA CHAIRS FROM GLOBEWEST AND HORGAN STUDDED STOOLS – DO THE TRICK.

PERFECT PLACEMENT

Photograph by Maree Homer.

The adage ‘a place for everything and everything in its place’ encourages a balance of storage and display. A generous centrepiece – in this case, an Orson & Blake ‘Berlin’ coffee table – makes for a stylish focal point, topped with curated books, fresh foliage and treasured objects. A mirrored tray reflects the foliage arrangement.

Feather your nest UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE EXUDES CLASSIC COMFORT. CHOOSE FEATHERWRAPPED FOAM FOR SEAT CUSHIONS AND A CUSHY FEATHER/DOWN MIX FOR SCATTER CUSHIONS. KEEP A TEXTURED THROW AT THE READY FOR COOLER NIGHTS. >


H G DECORATING FIRST IMPRESSIONS Carve out an entry (left) in even the narrowest of corridors with a slimline console, mirror, runner and wall light. A basket for shoes, a catch-all for keys and a simple vase of cheery blooms will encourage order, ease and smiles from everyone who comes and goes.

An open book Lattice-backed dining chairs, such as these designs from Naturally Cane (below left), help to maintain airy sight lines through open-plan spaces.

INNER CIRCLE To visually soften hard lines, introduce curves and circles in the form of mirrors (left), light fittings (opposite), occasional tables and accessories. Remember, curves equal comfort.

Bathing beauties Black and white is a classic bathroom scheme. Make this utilitarian space more inviting with fragrant soap, candles, foliage and crisp, clean towels folded on open shelves for easy access. Baskets for toiletries and hairdryers control clutter.

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Photography by Maree Homer. For Where to Buy, see page 188.

Bedtime stories Layer pattern and texture in an earthy palette to create a dreamy bedroom haven. Here, the bedspread, scatter cushions and bespoke bedhead, all in Busatti ‘Monviso’ fabric, draw colour cues from the Designer Boys Collections art print on the wall. Custom fabric pelmets with contrasting black piping serve to frame and soften the white plantation shutters. In a thoughtful touch, upholstered stools offer the perfect perch for taking off your shoes at the end of the day. #

Interiors by Studio Kate; studiokate.com.au.


lightbulb

MOMENTS Create a sense of mood inside and out with the right lighting for your home 1.

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t’s important to think about the smaller details in your home, particularly lighting. With just the flick of a switch you can transform spaces, creating mood and ambience as well as functionality. Your lighting needs to be flexible to allow you to perform a number of tasks, from preparing and cooking food in the kitchen to applying make-up in the bathroom or reading in the bedroom or living room, as well as just looking good. Before you choose your lighting, consider your requirements and the right style for you. Not sure where to start? Read on.

Home Design Marmo Pendant, $149 each

All angles Home Design Struzzo Pendant $89

LIGHTS OUT

Consider using timers for your indoor and outdoor lighting. It’s convenient, avoids lights being left on and can help protect your home when you’re not in or away. There are weatherproof outdoor options that can control all your outdoor lighting. Power-saving globes are more environmentally friendly than traditional globes, plus they’re a great way to help reduce your electricity cost.

Home Design Crudo Pendant, $69

In frequently visited rooms, such as the kitchen and living room, you need adequate lighting to carry out multiple tasks. Overhead downlights and spotlights to illuminate work areas are a winner in the kitchen, and a combination of ceiling lights, wall lights and lamps are a popular choice in bedrooms and living rooms. Floor and table lamps can be positioned at multiple angles, plus they can be used in place of furniture or to fill an empty corner. 1. Home Design 150cm Campden Floor Lamp $149 2. Home Design 150cm Copper Rame Floor Lamp, $169 3. Home Design Black Conico Table Lamp, $39


BRAND PROMOTION

Home Design Gesso Pendant, $179

MAKE A STATEMENT When you want your lighting to make a dramatic impact in a room, think about scale, shape and modern design touches. Oversized, sculptural pendants hung low look beautiful as the focal point of a room. Metallic elements will add an industrial or luxe touch and earthy textures and finishes will bring a down-to-earth vibe.

Home Design Ritmo Pendant, $119

Just like the rooms in your home, think about layering your outdoor lighting as well. You will need both task and ambient lighting options.

Outdoor moods The exterior of your home is just as important as inside, so make sure you get the lighting right here too. Light up pathways and bring entertaining zones and garden beds to life with uplights, bollards, spotlights, wall lights and sensor security lights – this will not only create a welcoming atmosphere, but will also provide an element of safety and security. There’s a wide range of both electric and solar-powered lighting options to choose from, but if you choose to install hard wired lights, make sure they have weatherproof fixtures, and remember to always call in a certified electrician to install them.

Home Design Dondo Single Pendant, $159

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Pendants can set the mood in any room. Whether they’re above the kitchen bench or hanging either side of a bed, you can rely on pendants to make a style statement and deliver a warm glow.

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PAT H WAY S

GARDEN BEDS

SECURITY FIRST

Lead guests up the garden path with exterior bollard lights. There are LED options that provide soft lighting or you can opt for solar-powered bollards. These lights are great if you’re big entertainers, but they’re also a good nighttime safety feature.

Enjoy your garden at all hours with spotlights to light up your plants, trees and water features, creating a dramatic effect. Most solar spotlights come in easy-to-install kits with an outdoor weather resistant transformer included.

Gain peace of mind with security lighting, designed to detect and deter intruders. They can also help to light the way in dark areas outside your home and increase feelings of security. It’s important to get the positioning of security lighting right, so talk to an electrician before installation.

1. Brilliant 50cm Bayview Bollard, $94.90 each. 2. Arlec Stainless Steel Spotlight - pack of 4, $114; 3. Brilliant Coastal LED Sensor Light, $140

Some products are not available in some stores, but may be ordered. Indoor Lighting only available at Armadale & Bunbury in WA.


TIMELESS Collection parisi.com.au


Text by Laura Barry. Styling by Sarah Maloney. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

NICOLA CAMERON Founder and director, Pepo Botanic Design

Large vase on table Thrown by a friend, Sophie Curlewis, when she was doing a master’s degree in ceramics in South Korea. Outdoor Nicola and husband James share sofa and coffee table ‘Watego’ their home in Sydney’s eastern designs from Eco Outdoor. Plants beaches with children Mimi, 13, The top layer is a mix of succulents, and Archie, 11, and dog Tigga. with Rhipsalis spilling over the wall. At the bottom is a range of herbs. MY FAVOURITE THINGS MY FAVOURITE HAUNTS Spotted-gum bench Made by my brother-in-law’s company, Zylem. Botannix Studio Cafe in Botany has been my go-to for years. The Stool By Francesco Petrolo, a Pool Cafe at Maroubra Beach is blacksmith and artist whose work is scattered throughout our house. great for breakfast or lunch, and the Grumpy Baker in Marouba for Fruit bowl When I started in the freshly baked bread in winter. industry, I worked with William Dangar; this was a gift he gave me WHAT ‘HOME’ MEANS TO ME when I left to start out on my own. “It’s where our family celebrates Blue and red cup Mimi made this in the highs and lows of life. It’s a a class with artist Gabbi Lancaster. sanctuary in this crazy city, and Pulley Found in a farm shed. I liked we’re really grateful to have it.” > Pepo Botanic Design; pepo.com.au the craftsmanship and patina.


HOME SOLUTIONS

S TA R TURN

Ikea has co-created 10 living-room spaces with 10 Australian families from across Australia as part of a new initiative to solve everyday living-room frustrations, and help make dream spaces a reality. These living rooms are now replicated and on show in the 10 stores across the country to share the solutions and ideas Ikea discovered while consulting with the families. ikea.com.au

RECENTLY LAUNCHED AT THIS YEAR’S MILAN FURNITURE FAIR, THE OBSERVATORY V COLLECTION OF LIGHTING BY UK DESIGNER LEE BROOM (PICTURED) PLAYS WITH PROPORTIONS OF VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL PLANES. AVAILABLE FROM SPACE, THESE STRUCTURAL AND SPHERICAL FORMS WILL MAKE ANY INTERIOR FEEL HEAVENLY. SPACE FURNITURE.COM.AU

RETAIL NEWS Five Fables is a new online destination for sourcing luxurious homewares. Check out the sophisticated range of seating, ottomans, credenzas, storage pieces, desks and occasional tables in its launch collection. fivefables.com.au

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The National Gallery of Victoriaa delves into times past in A Modernn Life: Tablewares 1930-1980s (right). The exhibition charts the transformaation of lifestyles and homeware trends oveer six decades. Until January. ngv.vic.gov.auu

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To mark the 50th anniversary off the h ic Panton chair, h r manufacturer Vitra has released two limited-edition n versions. ‘Chrome’ (above) has a reflective finish, while ‘Glow’ radiates a soft ft bl blue light li ht in i the th dark. d k Both B th emphasise the seat’s sculptural qualities. From $2953; livingedge.com.au.

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Text by Laura Barry. Photograph by Armelle Habib.

HATCHES, MATCHES…


INSIDER H G

Made from sustainably harvested coconut wax, hand-poured fragrant candles from designer Greg Natale are the final layer of luxury for a home. The onyx-capped brass vessel will be treasured long after the candle has melted away. y From $100. gregnatale.com g g

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VISIT REMODERN’S MELBOURNE SHOWROOM TO VIEW A NEW COLLECTION OF FURNITURE BY ACCLAIMED DESIGNER AND ARCHITECT SEAN DIX. THE RANGE, WHICH INCLUDES THE ‘FORTE’ COFFEE TABLE (ABOVE), $1010, IS REFINED AND SUPERBLY CRAFTED. REMODERN.COM.AU

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You may know him as a TV garden guru, but Jamie Durie has now clocked up 20 years as a designer. “Outdoors is where it all started for me, but I’ve turned my hand to everything from furniture to decor and lighting,” he says. His latest project is a limited-edition bedlinen line for Ardor, inspired by a love of nature. “I’ve tried to capture that through natural fabrics, and in colours and patterns inspired by plants.” ardor.com.au

Age-old Italian glassmaking techniques were adapted to create Poesia, a market first from Austral Bricks. The standardformat glass bricks, in five colours and five finishes, open up bold new possibilities in building design. From $39 each. australbricks.com

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AUSTRALIAN STORY

Apaiser

Making a worldwide splash in sustainable luxury bathroomware. hen Belinda Try (pictured above) set out to renovate her own home nearly two decades ago, her plan to build a beautiful bathroom with natural products was thwarted by a gap in the market. Undeterred and inspired, she began to develop sustainable luxury bathware and founded Apaiser. “I wanted to nurture the concept of bathing as an uncomplicated joy,” she says. Launched in Melbourne in 2000, Apaiser is now an international triumph and has patented its own naturally derived and sustainable apaiserMARBLE material, a reclaimed marble composite. “It delivers superior strength, a luxurious feel and higher performance at a much lower weight than other materials,” Belinda explains. By 2014, Apaiser had established an office in Singapore, followed by the UK and US in 2015. Today, its products feature in more than 500 luxury hotels and resorts, and countless homes. For 2018, Apaiser will unveil two new in-house ranges and two collaborations, following successful projects with Singapore studio WOHA and London-based designer Kelly Hoppen. Hoppen’s ‘Bijoux’ range has become one of the brand’s most iconic, along with its ‘Zen’ line. “We’ll continue the search for exciting collaborators to ensure Apaiser remains innovative and inspiring.” With plans in place for new Melbourne and Singapore showrooms and flagship stores in both New York and London, Belinda’s business is booming. “We’re blessed with a passionate team, customisation capabilities and true craftsmanship,” she says. apaiser.com >

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H G INSIDER A blend of laidback and lavish elements created by Martyn Lawrence Bullard (pictured). “A layered home is a beautiful one,” says the designer.

Text by Laura Barry.

WE’VE FOUND YOUR FUTURE COLOUR

The Dulux® Wash & Wear® Pretint Range is expertly curated from our most contemporary and popular colours, like Dulux Natural White. The colours are on-trend, on the shelf and ready to go on your walls. Easy.

Dulux Natural White

DESIGNER PROFILE Martyn Lawrence Bullard EXPLORE THE RANGE, AND LEARN ABOUT THE SUPERIOR WASHABILITY OF DULUX WASH & WEAR AT dulux.com.au

Please note due to limitations of printing process, photographic and printed images and swatches may not represent the true colour. Dulux, Wash & Wear and the Sheepdog device are registered trademarks of DuluxGroup (Australia) Pty Ltd

ctor turned designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard, recently named one of the world’s best interior designers by Architectural Digest, is an English expat with a knack for creating wildly sumptuous interiors for Hollywood’s elite. Speaking to H&G from LA, Martyn explains the overlap between his professions. “You have to be a showman. You need to know how to present yourself and your designs, and the show must always go on. If the sofa won’t fit through the door, you find a way around the door.” Martyn always had a love of design but didn’t consider it as a job until he moved to LA. “I was working on a film and became friends with the producer,” he says. “When we wrapped, I had the producer and his fiancé over to my tiny rented house for dinner. They loved what I’d done with the place, using things I found at a flea market. I was asked to decorate the film-studio offices.” The producer then recommended him to the president of Capitol Records, to redesign that company’s offices. One job led to another, and by

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the age of 24, Martyn had established his own practice, with a reputation for his eclectic, layered style. The key to good design, Martyn says, is being true to yourself instead of following trends. “I don’t like to pinhole myself into one particular style. I like to evolve with every client I work with.” Well-known for his collaborations, Martyn has just launched a range of wallpapers inspired by his travels. Later this year he plans to release a line of fine jewellery, a lighting collection and a new range of outdoor furniture created in partnership with Australian brand Harbour. Martyn is scheduled to give the keynote talk at Melbourne’s Decor+Design show in July and is keen to check out the local design scene. “There’s a real fan base for design in Australia, and a breaking down of barriers between indoors and outdoors. It will be interesting to see homegrown designers and the work they’re presenting.” # martynlawrencebullard.com; decordesignshow.com.au


BRAND PROMOTION

3 different ways to

frame your view Window treatments can work wonders for your home, on both a practical and decorative level. They can add the perfect finishing touch to a room - and installing them is an easy DIY task. From blinds to curtains even outdoor awnings, there are many different options that will change the look of both your indoor and outdoor spaces.

OFFICE STUDY

OUTDOOR ZONE

BEDROOM

Your home office is an area of your home where you need great window treatments. A neat-fitting blind will allow you to control the glare and light levels in your study, which is vital when you’re working on a computer. There’s a selection of styles you can consider, from venetian and roller blinds to cellular blinds, as seen here, that will reduce the transfer of heat and cold into your home office, helping regulate the temperature of your working space.

Outdoor roller blinds provide a fantastic first line of defence in stopping the sun from hitting your home’s outdoor areas and its windows and doors. They’re constructed from durable, weatherresistant materials and are a great tool for defining and styling your outdoor areas. Exterior blinds come in roll-up and retractable styles and there’s a wide range of colours and sizes you can choose from.

The combination of blockout roller blinds and curtains is a winning one for bedrooms – you can have your light levels just right while introducing a soft, decorative element . Roller blinds are affordable, adaptable and easy to operate. They come in a range of fabrics, blockout levels and colours, allowing you the ultimate control when it comes to light reduction and privacy. Whether you opt for sheers or a heavier fabric, curtains can complete a room and add the perfect amount of textural interest.

STYLE TIP: For a sleek, contemporary

STYLE TIP: Now you see it, now you

STYLE TIP: Did you know you can buy roller blinds

look opt for a cordless blind. They also have the important benefit of being child-safe.

don’t. Look for outdoor roller blinds with a quick-mount bracket system that allows for easy removal during the cooler months.

that have been expertly colour-matched to some of Dulux’s most popular interior paint colours (Tranquil Retreat, Hog Bristle Quarter & Natural White)?

Window treatments are most successful when they’re factored in with other design decisions for your home. LEFT TO RIGHT: Zone Interior Boston Cellular Blind from $64; Coolaroo Outdoor Roller Blind from $118; Windoware Eyelet Curtain in Maine $45; Markisol Uno Indoor Roller Blind in Ivory Sheer from $39.90

Some products are not available in some stores, but may be ordered. Curtains only available in Armadale and Bunbury in Western Australia.


Architect: Scale Architecture

If you desire style, build it with Austral Bricks.

www.australbricks.com.au


INSIDER H G

Design moment

RONDO CHAIR Local furniture designer Gordon Andrews left a surprisingly noteworthy legacy, writes Chris Pearson.

1956 The original ‘Rondo’ chair had a plywood frame and splayed aluminium legs.

Gordon Andrews photograph courtesy of National Archives of Australia.

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hen Olivetti set up a showroom in Sydney in 1956, it wanted a slick setting for its cutting-edge office products. So the Italian firm tapped into the talents of local designer Gordon Andrews (pictured at top). Not content with designing just the space, he created bold new seats to go in it. The shop and its typewriters may have faded into history, but his ‘Rondo’ chairs became classics. Born in Sydney in 1914, Gordon had already established himself internationally, having worked extensively in Italy and the UK. He had masterminded the new-look Olivetti showrooms around the UK and the Festival of Britain science pavilion in 1951. In 1955, he was the first Australian designer to become a fellow of the UK Society of Industrial Artists & Designers. Ever self-effacing, Gordon didn’t big-note himself, which could be why he was less feted in his home country. Sadly, few people outside the design world have heard of him. Perhaps his legacy was diluted by his sheer versatility: he designed everything from furniture, fabric and jewellery to civic projects, corporate logos and Australian pavilions at trade fairs across the world, even saucepans for David Jones. Most Australians unknowingly carried his work in their pockets: Gordon designed the nation’s original decimal-currency banknotes, in circulation from 1966. It was “most unusual to find a government department in any country going forward

1957 ‘Gazelle’, described as a typist’s chair, was based on a seat for Olivetti’s London showroom.

1960 Gordon’s bevellededge coffee table, now a desirable collectable.

1961 The ‘Perch’ stool’s curved seat gave it a saddle-like shape.

1966-73 Gordon created the first six denominations of Australia’s decimalcurrency banknotes.

with such advanced designs”, architect Robin Boyd told The Age in 1966, alluding to the rich colours and striking graphics of the notes, which remained in circulation for decades. The banknotes, the ‘Rondo’ chair and the 1957 ‘Gazelle’ are what Gordon remains best known for. The original design for the scooped ‘Rondo’ had splayed legs, but was later changed to a star-shaped base. And while the original frame comprised two sheets of plywood, later versions sported a fibreglass frame. But all shared the trademark join in the fabric, which forms a seam down the seat. The ‘Rondo’ chair received its biggest leg-up from iconic interior designer Marion Hall Best. She championed it in her interior fitouts, most notably for Sydney’s chic Kingsgate Hotel, which opened in 1971. According to Andrew Shapiro of Shapiro Auctioneers, Gordon belongs in the canon of the country’s top designers. Nearly every design collection in Australian institutions features his work, and almost every Shapiro vintage auction will include something by Gordon Andrews, be it a sculpture, one of his 1960 hexagonal ‘Coffee Tables’, a 1961 ‘Perch’ saddle stool, or a ‘Rondo’ or ‘Gazelle’ chair. “He was one of Australia’s most inventive furniture designers,” says Shapiro.

WHAT IT MEANS TO US Gordon, who died in 2001, richly deserves a place on the Australian honour roll, along with the luminaries on his banknotes. He was awarded a gold medal in 1985 by the Design Institute of Australia. And in 1987, he joined a select list of world-class practitioners (fellow Australian Marc Newson is another) when he was named a Royal Designer for Industry, a British honour conferred for “eminence, efficiency and visual excellence” in creative design. His small output is reflected in the high prices his pieces now fetch at auctions. The ‘Rondo’ chair, especially, remains “very desirable”, notes Shapiro. # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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SOUNDS AMAZING Enjoy rich, room-filling sound every time

here’s no mistaking that music makes life better at home. From classics in the kitchen to soul at sunset, it’s an instant way to set the mood, break down barriers and boost the energy in a home. A wireless speaker is the ideal way to bring more music and more life into your world, with minimum fuss. The new voice-enabled Sonos One is designed with one intention – to make your music more accessible and sound more amazing than ever before. Unlike other smart speakers, Sonos One is truly platformagnostic, which allows you to connect with more than 80 global streaming services –

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including Amazon Music, Spotify and Apple Music. The new Sonos One combines great sound with Alexa for easy voice control of your home sound system – just ask. Sonos One can be used on its own or as part of a bigger sound system. It will connect wirelessly with other Sonos Home Sound System speakers, allowing you to play music in any – or every – room of your home. Being beautifully designed in a matte black or white finish with rounded corners makes it a seamless fit in any home. Enjoy it on its own, or for even more powerful sound, pair two Sonos Ones together in the same room for instant stereo sound.


BRAND PROMOTION

Let your music

SET THE MOOD Bring more music and more joy into your home with the new voice-enabled Sonos One – designed especially for music lovers.

CO NTROL S VOICE Choose your mood, your song and your radio station from anywhere in the room with Amazon Alexa built right in. TOUCH Tap to turn up the volume. Swipe to skip a track. Mute the microphone for privacy. Sonos One’s touch controls are always a tap away. APP Tap into your favourite music streaming services with the Sonos app and stream to different rooms.

Fits anywhere Mount the Sonos One to the wall, ceiling or a speaker stand. The compact size also makes it perfect for shelves, benches and snug spaces.


Italian for style. The new STILE tapware collection from Gareth Ashton encapsulates the definition of style across five high-end metallic finishes for the bathroom. Made in Italy, STILE is now available in Australia. Visit an Abey Australia Selection Gallery to immerse yourself in the collection.

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* N E W LY O P E N E D * WESTERN AUSTR ALIA Selection Gallery 12 Sundercombe St Osborne Park Ph: 08 9208 4500


INSIDER H G

LOUD & CLEAR Technology has radically changed what Australians are listening to and how we’re listening to it. But we’re also embracing sound in a multitude of new and useful ways. Christine Sams tunes in to our rapidly evolving soundscape.

hechildreninGaryBrown’shomeoftenlistentomusic by the ABC last year showed that 89 per cent of Australians are via Spotify or watch video clips on YouTube. What’s awareofpodcasts,whilemorethanhalfofthosesurveyedbetween unusual about this fairly typical scenario is that their the ages of 18 to 75 have tried listening to them. (There was a entertainment is delivered via the fridge, an internet- higher level of engagement among 25 to 34 year olds, but 40 per connected Samsung ‘Family Hub’, which has a cent of 50 to 75 year olds had given podcasts a go.) touchscreen, speakers and a raft of apps built in. It should be Music downloads, audiobooks and streaming sites are noted that dad Gary is the brand manager of home appliances cementingtheirpopularity,too,makingitallthemoreremarkable for Harvey Norman – it’s his job to be an early thatdigitalmusicdownloadswerenotfactored adopter of new technologies – but his home into the ARIA charts until late 2006. ‘There are a lot of life reflects the way many Australian Educational apps that combine auditory devoted vinyl and households will consume entertainment in CD fans but sourcing andvisuallearningcues,suchasABCReading the not-too-distant future. His music-playing Eggs and Babbel, are exceedingly helpful music online is most for picking up and finetuning new language fridge is just the latest in a conga line of common.’ Len Wallis gadgets that tap into our love and innate need skills. Digital audio technology has benefits for sound in our lives. in the health space, too. The Sound Scouts Australians’ love affair with music – and all things sound- app, for example, allows parents to easily assess a child’s hearing related – is unwavering. And it’s no accident that entertainers at home, and offers guidance if a problem is detected. such as comedians Hamish Blake and Andy Lee are shifting For all our love of technology, there has been a noticeable from traditional radio formats to podcasting. Research released resurgence of interest in vinyl records. Perhaps it serves as >

Photograph from Getty Images.

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Safe and sound As technology changes the way Australians consume sound at home, there is a movement towards further conserving of important sounds, especially those relating to indigenous cultures. Recording and preserving the Wiradjuri language has been a defining achievement for Stan Grant AM (father of TV presenter Stan Grant), and prompted a new generation of students, at high school and tertiary level, to learn the language afresh. Some of the oldest recordings in Australia, made in the 1890s on wax cylinder and now kept in the NFSA, were of indigenous speakers. “We have recordings of people who have gone into Aboriginal communities and captured their voices,” says sound curator Thorsten Kaeding. “One of the most important is the recording of Fanny Cochrane Smith, the last fluent speaker of a Tasmanian indigenous language.” The environment is now also being recorded for research and conservation purposes. A joint project between The Australian Research Council and five Australian universities will ‘acoustically map’ 100 areas of the nation, with recordings of various ecosystems.

an antidote to the amount of new technology on offer. In truth, the gramophone isn’t that far removed from the latest iPhone, says sound curator Thorsten Kaeding from the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA). “The same concept applied then as it does now: people want to have the latest technology. It’s a status thing.” “There are still a lot of devoted vinyl listeners, and many CD fans, but sourcing music online is most common these days,” says Len Wallis, owner of Sydney’s Len Wallis Audio. He says the quality of digital audio files, which was shaky in the early days due to the limitations of file-compression technology, has improved to near-CD standard. According to Thorsten, the biggest difference in the way sound is consumed at home now, compared to a century ago, is that listening to music is generally an individual activity, rather than a shared one. Where families once gathered around the piano

for singalongs or near the wireless to listen to radio programs together, now everyone listens to their own podcasts or music on individual devices, segmented within certain areas of the home. It wouldn’t be unheard of for one parent to be immersed in the calming sounds of a mindfulness app downloaded to a tablet while the other streams live sports commentary. At the same time, their school-aged child might have headphones on, listening to the latest hits on their iPod. The shift towards individual consumption of music within families is also changing the way our homes are shaped and built. Architects are consulting with audio experts to plan acoustically zoned homes. Technicians from audio brands such as Bang & Olufsen can spend months working closely with designers and builders on major projects, fitting homes and apartments with multi-zone audio systems. In the more competitive Sydney and Melbourne real-estate markets, this is often used as a selling point. “Technology should be seamlessly integrated and easy to use, regardlessoftheknowledgeandabilityofthehome’soccupants,” saysBrianMan,managingdirectoroftechnologyandinnovation at Kennedy Luxury Group, the Australian distributor of Bang & Olufsen products. “Customers might want to play music in one place, say an outdoor dining area, that’s different to what’s being played in a teen retreat, so we have to factor that into our multi-room systems,” he says. “The music has to be accessed – and changed – at the touch of a button, too.” Speakers are no longer big black boxes in the corners of a room; tech teams have worked hard to develop sound-delivery solutions that look sleek and can be integrated into the smallest spaces yet produce impressively big, bold sound. Although individual choice rules the modern music market, the rising popularity of voice-activated devices such as HomePod (Apple), Google Home and Alexa (Amazon) hints at a yearning for the days of more social sound consumption. Their placement in the centre of rooms (like the wirelesses of old) and ease of use – even a four-year-old can request ‘karaoke party’ or ‘Disney favourites’ – increases opportunities for engagement. No matter how we choose to consume our music, podcasts, audiobooksandapps,ThorstensaystheNFSAwillkeepacquiring audio technology, including iPhones, to document the changing ways in which Australians are consuming sound in their homes. “I suspect the main way people in the western world access music these days is through their smartphones. We do continue to collect other equipment, although we probably won’t start collecting fridges,” he says, laughing. # Christine Sams is an entertainment writer and music lover.

Photograph by John Paul Urizar/bauersyndication.com.au.

H G INSIDER


NOW PLAYING The popularity of podcasts continues to soar, and among the voices we’re most enjoying is the ABC’s Richard Fidler, arguably the nation’s warmest and most skilled interviewer, whose ‘Conversations’ podcasts now attract around 3.9 million downloads a month. Meanwhile, comedians Hamish & Andy claim their iTunes chart-topping podcast has been downloaded more than half a billion times. The beauty of podcasts is the ability to tailor your listening material to your own interests. Brooke McAlary’s ‘Slow Your Home’ podcast started small but has passed the four-milliondownloads mark, while Gourmet Traveller’s ‘Set Menu’, Lucy Feagins’ ‘The Design Files Talks’ and Magdalena Roze’s ‘The Pass’ (a guide to food and eating) are all gaining traction in the charts.

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Something old

SOMETHING NEW Sleek and striking, Axon’s vertically grooved cladding panels breathe fresh new life into any home.

“As you walk down its polished timber hall, the old home opens out to into a slick new open-plan living area.”


BRAND PROMOTION

Bec and David opted for smooth Axon cladding with grooves at 400mm for their extension.

hen a note written in 1902 by the tradesmen who built their house was discovered behind an architrave, David and Bec Smith felt a renewed dedication to preserving the front of their Sydney home. But they were also just as passionate about how the modern architectural extension to the rear of their house should look. Bec wanted a cantilevered design and David loved the look of James Hardie’s Axon vertical groove cladding. And so their vision for a “contemporary floating box” was realised. Contrasting beautifully with the house’s original brickwork, the extension is finished in Axon cladding, painted Dulux Stepney Grey and notable for its handsome 400mmspaced grooves that are reminiscent of broad, vertical timber panels. But unlike timber, Axon cladding is extremely durable and resistant to moisture, rot, termites and fire. The humble heritage facade of David and Bec’s cottage now opens out into an amazing, contemporary home that’s simply perfect for this young family.

W

EX TERIOR CHOICES Axon cladding is constructed from 9mmthick premium fibre cement. It’s extremely durable and weathers well, so maintenance is minimal. Axon cladding is available in three styles:

AXON CLADDING SMOOTH 400MM Ideal for large walls; the sheets have a smooth texture and the vertical grooves are spaced 400mm apart.

AXON CLADDING SMOOTH 133MM For sharp clean lines. Try a smooth textured sheet with grooves spaced 133mm apart, for a tongue-and-groove look.

AXON CLADDING GRAINED 133MM A wood-grain texture with grooves spaced 133mm apart to give the appearance of coarsely milled tongue-andgroove timber.

For more information visit scyonwalls.com.au


H G INSIDER

ON HOME By Alex Miller

The distant memories of home and loved ones can tantalise and haunt you for a lifetime, as this award-winning novelist discovered.

M

ore than 50 years after I left England to go alone “Was our dad crying?” I asked him. I was surprised. to Australia, my younger brother Ross came My memory of my father was of a tough, kind-hearted out to visit me for the first time. On the last Glaswegian who never cried. “No,” my brother said. evening, he and I were sitting in my back garden under “No, Dad wasn’t crying.” How could I have thought our the apple tree, enjoying the last of a very large bottle of father might have been in tears? It surely showed how duty-free Glenfiddich he’d brought with him. Ross is nine little I’d known him. years younger than I am and was not yet eight years of We sipped our whisky in silence. After a minute or two age when I left home as a boy of 16. I said, “And you? Were you crying?” I wanted to know. I Since my departure from England, I had retained an loved my brother. I was the one who had made up stories image of my family standing there for him when he was little, to get on the platform at London’s Liverpool ‘Fifty years after leaving him off to sleep at night. And I Street station. In the steam and remembered his birth; my father my family, I wanted to smoke of that dark November day in coming out of our parents’ know that Ross had shed bedroom, his collar off and his 1953, it was a tight little group watching my train pull out for the a few tears at the moment sleeves rolled up, his face shining port of Tilbury and the other side of in the light of the coal fire, the of my departure.’ the world. In this last remembered three of us children sitting close image, Ross is standing between my father and mother, together on the hearth rug in silence after all the wailing holding my father’s hand. My older sister Kathy and my and screaming from the bedroom. “Come in a meet your younger sister Ruth are holding each other’s hands, wee brother,” my father said. standing close up against the skirt of my mother’s coat. He had a lovely, happy smile on his face such as none Sitting under the apple tree that autumn evening with of us had seen since he’d come home from the war. Our my brother, who was now a man close to 60, I turned to little brother’s arrival healed my father’s wounded soul him and said, “Do you remember seeing me off for the and we loved Ross in a special way for it. His presence boat?” His wicker chair creaked. “Of course I do,” he said, restored harmony to our family, and there was always a deep gratitude in the way we loved him. and laughed. “We were all crying.”

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GET PAID TO DO WHAT YOU LOVE .

Fifty years after leaving my family, I wanted to know that Ross had shed a few tears at the moment of my departure. When he didn’t respond to my question, I let the silence go on for a bit, then said again, “So, tell me, were you crying or not?” My brother’s laugh was light and untroubled, as it always was. “Of course I wasn’t crying. Whenever we had a bit of a crisis in the family, Dad’s way of dealing with it was to promise we’d all go to the pictures when it was over and done with.” He twisted around in his chair and looked at me, a smile in his eyes. “I couldn’t wait to see the back of you.” He picked up the whisky bottle, then carefully poured equal shares of the last of it into our glasses. “Whenever anyone in the family has ever mentioned the day you left home, I’ve always thought of Deborah Kerr and Burt Lancaster kissing in the surf.” By now the sun had gone down and the air in the garden was getting a bit of a chill in it. I suggested we go in and see how dinner was coming on. “At the end, when our mum was dying,” Ross said, “I was sitting with her, holding her hand. The last thing she said to me was, ‘It will be all right when Alex comes home.’” He turned on his creaky chair and looked up at me. “Mum spent her life believing # you’d be coming home one day.”

Two-time winner of the Miles Franklin Literary Award, Alex Miller is a London-born, Australia-based writer whose novel, The Ancestor Game, won the Commonwealth Writers’ prize in 1993. His latest critically acclaimed novel, The Passage of Love ($32.99, Allen & Unwin), is described by the author as “fictional autobiography”, a review of his life and loved ones in the form of a fictionalised story.

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Styling by Kate Nixon. Photograph by Maree Homer.

Comfort comes to the fore in cosy spaces that celebrate hearth and home.

Ten-year-old Karna Hansen cuddles Bala the guinea pig on the deck of his family’s idyllic rural home in Queensland. Textural cushions from Village. Turn the page for more‌


This is the life

“My children have the best of both worlds,” says owner Vrinda. “They can play on our land or ride their bikes up on the street.” Working from home as a travel consultant lets her balance career and family; husband Gavin commutes to Sydney for work, making his time at home even more precious. Despite its seclusion, their house is a social hub. “With seating on the deck for 16, we’re the go-to place for gatherings,” Vrinda says.


HOUSES H G HOUSE/PADDOCK Owner/builder Gavin Hansen surveys the results of his hard work as son Karna swings from a mature pecan tree and daughter Gopi plays with miniature pony Sati. The home’s stained western red-cedar exterior blends into the surrounding rainforest. Galvanised steel braces the lower level. >

Free range &

FABULOUS Returning to the scene of a happy childhood in the Gold Coast hinterland, this couple built their own house in the rainforest. STO RY Rosa Senese | ST Y LI N G Kate Nixon | P HOTOG R A P HY Maree Homer

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H G HOUSES rowing up in Queensland on her parents’ 4000m² property, Vrinda Hansen and her siblings experienced the simple joys of a free-range Australian childhood. “We would spend days playing in the seasonal creek, riding our bikes on the quiet dead-end streets or exploring the surrounding reserve,” she reminisces. “I wanted that for my own children.” Vrinda’shusbandGavinwasinagreement, so, in 2010, having renovated and sold a home just across the border in Tweed Heads, the couple cleared the front half of her parents’ block in preparation for building. There, in the subtropical rainforest setting of the Currumbin Valley, they built a warm, personal home much enjoyed by daughter Gopi, now 13, son Karna, 10, and a menagerie of animals. “We designed every inch ourselves,” says Vrinda. Her layout was the result of many hours spent drawing plans, dreaming and imagining the experience of living in the completed house – including the cook’s view from the kitchen and exactly where the family would curl up in front of the fireplace. Vrinda’s knowledge of the site was invaluable. “I designed the deck to follow the dry creek bed, so that when it rained we could lean over the balcony and watch the water flow past,” she explains. As owner-builders, the couple also constructed the house themselves, with help from local carpenter David Robbie. Thewesternredcedarcladdingandcorrugated steel elements of the exterior sit well with the lush, tree-filled block. “Even when it was just completed, the house looked like it had always been there,” says Vrinda. Entry to the split-level home reveals a vaulted ceiling that immediately captures attention. At 5.5m, it arcs over the open kitchen, dining and living area. A spiral staircase winds gracefully up to the parents’ loft-like bedroom

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‘Even when it was just completed, the house looked like it had always been there.’ Vrinda Hansen

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and down to the children’s rooms with shared bathroom. Covered decking, with a mature pecan tree growing through it, wraps around the main living level. At the bottom of the house is a separate office, a more recent addition that overlooks Vrinda’s horse paddock. Inside, natural timber finishes and VJ boards create a timeless, classically Australian backdrop, while the furnishings pay testament to the owners’ talents. Gavin excels at woodwork; he whipped up the breakfast bar from old wharf timbers and created various items of furniture from burnt-out eucalyptus trees. Vrinda has a knack for finding quirky collectables and combining them with new items and family pieces. “My decorating style would be rustic and industrial, with a hint of antique,” she says. “I didn’t stick to any particular style – I followed my heart and picked pieces that I loved, which had some character to them.” Vrinda also has a gift for creating beautiful, earthy ceramic wares, which she makes in her spare time. Examples of her work can be seen around the house, in her small studio on the property and online at her Etsy shop, Stoka Clay Collection. The brand takes its name from her beloved Haflinger gelding, Stoka, who has his own stable made from locally milled timber. Other family pets include a miniature pony named Sati, as well as a guinea pig and tabby cat, Bala and Mallika respectively. A family of koalas peacefully inhabit nearby gum trees, and the silence of the rainforest is usually only broken by the calls of kookaburras and cockatoos, or Stoka whinnying for food. It’s an idyllic lifestyle and one that’s all set to continue, now that the family has purchased the entire site from Vrinda’s parents. “We’ve put so much love and time into this property,” > says Vrinda. “It really is our pride and joy.”


DINING “The table was a $60 eBay score – my favourite furniture buy,” says Vrinda. On it are some of her own ceramic creations. Tray, Village. Rattan pendant light, St Barts. Rug, Freedom. Smart buy: For similar chairs, try ‘Laurent’ chairs, $169 each, Freedom. PADDOCK Vrinda with Stoka, her ‘golden’ Haflinger horse. Stoka has the run of the property – with the exception of Gavin’s lovingly tended lawn.

THE PALETTE

Porter’s Paints Dusty Mule (kitchen, living)

Western red cedar with Cutek Black Ash stain (exterior)

Colorbond galvanised cladding (exterior)


KITCHEN Vrinda and Gopi in the bright and welcoming space Vrinda designed. “My only disappointment is that I didn’t go with a double sink,” she says. Gavin made the breakfast bar from salvaged wharf timbers, and the stools from an old gum tree. Mixer tap, Reece. Stove, Smeg. Natucer ‘Cotswold’ splashback tiles, Groove Tiles & Stone. Pendant lights, Beacon Lighting. Rocket Espresso coffee machine. Ceramic pieces, Stoka Clay Collection. LIVING The staircase connects this main level with the main loft bedroom above and children’s rooms below. Sofa and rug, Freedom. Coffee table and cushions, The Beach Furniture. Throw, Village. Local hero: Spiral staircase in galvanised steel, about $6400 per level, UpRite Steel Fabricators. >

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HOUSES H G THE LAYOUT UPPER LEVEL LOWER LEVEL Bed

Outdoor dining

Living Dining

Bath

LOFT Entry

Office Bed Deck

Plush, soft textiles make a comfy counterpoint to durable timber and steel.

Kitchen

Bed Bath


H G HOUSES


FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) Poet’s jasmine (Jasminum grandiflorum) Pecan Liquidambar Jacaranda Sir Walter buffalo turf

Comfort level

Winter is when the Hansen house really hums. “We have a wood-burning fireplace and a lifetime supply of firewood cut from old wattle trees on the property,” says Vrinda. In winter, the fireplace becomes the focal point. “It’s so cosy and warm, we spend hours in front of it. We also love having a bonfire in the front yard. When we have enough to burn, the invite goes out and our friends come over for ‘potluck’ around it.”

MAIN BEDROOM “It’s like our own treehouse,” Vrinda says of the cosy eyrie at the top of the house. Bedcover, Bed, Bath N’ Table. Woven bedside chest, The Beach Furniture. Table lamp, Beacon Lighting. Rug, Freedom. KARNA’S ROOM A loft bed leaves more floor area free for homework and play. The desk was restored by Vrinda. Chair, Freedom. Lamp and rug, Target. Smart buy: ‘Tee Pee’ play tent, $25, Kmart. OFFICE Vrinda’s workspace features joinery by Currumbin Cabinets and a recycled timber desktop made by Gavin, plus an antique Indian rug. Cushion, The Beach Furniture. DECK Crafted from recycled fencing, the outdoor table is another example of Gavin’s handiwork. Stools and rug, Temple & Webster. Pendant lights, Beacon Lighting. BATHROOM A travertine basin sits atop marine-ply joinery. Travertine tiles, Groove Tiles & Stone. Tap, Reece. Ceramic dish, Stoka Clay Collection. #

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H G HOUSES

STAYCATION Built to accommodate family from all over the world, this Perth Hills home has a holiday vibe few can resist. STORY Zoe Deleuil ST Y LI N G Anna Flanders P HOTOG R A P HY Dion Robeson

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FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Eucalyptus accedens Orange wattle (Acacia saligna) Acacia aphylla Calothamnus sanguineus Ficinia nodosa Eremophila glabra ‘Amber Carpet’ Kennedia prostrata

DECK Owner Judith Tibbitt relaxing outside the guest bedrooms. Her home has many environmentally friendly features, such as shade structures and newly installed solar panels. “And all the water from the roof goes to the vegie gardens, water tanks or dam,” Judith explains. ENTRY Bernese mountain dog Ollie at the front door with marine-ply screen. Beyond is the main deck, connecting the guest wing (at left) with the living spaces. Local hero: Austral Bricks ‘Metallix’ bricks in Graphite, $2153/1000, Brickworks. >


H G HOUSES

he is Dutch and has lived all over the world, yet Judith Tibbitt, the owner of this eclectic Perth Hills home, wanted it to have an unmistakeably Australian aesthetic. Her plan was simple: to ensure the new build on a semi-rural block was effortlessly in tune with its surroundings, with huge windows overlooking gum trees, resting kangaroos and the horizon. Judith originally bought the 1.25-hectare block as an investment with her former husband. When she decided to build on it four years later in 2012, she asked her son, Peter Tibbitt, then a third-year architecture student, to design it. “I was excited, but soon realised I needed someone with more experience to help,” says Peter. “So I talked to my uni design studio master, Paul Wakelam, who runs an architecture studio in Toodyay called A Workshop. Paul has similar views about how we should work with the landscape and live in Western Australia, and I learnt a lot from him.” Completed in 2014, the home is designed to accommodate frequent visitors, including Judith’s three adult sons and family from the Netherlands. Fittingly, >

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KITCHEN/DINING “The roof and ceilings are pitched at five degrees, creating a wonderful play of light and shapes,” says Judith. It’s an elegant backdrop for her treasures, a mix of family pieces and items collected while living in Holland, Vietnam and the UAE. Behind the sliding door is the combined pantry/laundry. High-grade marine-ply cabinetry and Caesarstone Organic White benchtop. Brick walls limewashed in Bauwerk Colour Chalk. Tasmanian oak flooring throughout. Antique Dutch dining table. Smart buy: ‘Ari’ solid ash dining chairs, $199 each, Life Interiors.

Large windows with deep eaves allow plenty of light without direct sun.


This is the life

Judith’s home was designed to accommodate immediate and extended family from overseas. The guest wing is separate so that everyone has ample space and privacy. When it’s just Judith and her partner Vaughan in residence, the wing can be closed up, which reduces running costs. With or without visitors, the couple spend a lot of their time around the pool, deck and fire pit.

it has a communal gathering space with bedroom pavilions or wings on either side. The windows are specially designed to capture the views, without compromising on light or comfort. “If you have too many in certain areas, you end up with a hot glass box,” Peter explains. Sustainable features include louvres for cooling cross ventilation, and two ‘towers’ on either side of the living area to collect and release hot air. The vast timber deck has block-out blinds that drop down on hot days, turning it into an extension of the living area. In winter, north-facing windows warm the interior and Judith heats all the main living areas with her Jetmaster fire, burning wood collected on the property.

At the centre of the home is the kitchen, with a large pantry/laundry at one end and access to the carport (with outdoor storage) and kitchen garden at the other. Judith’s wing contains her study and is lined with custom-designed marine-ply bookshelves. She works as a special needs educator and is studying psychology, so this room is well-utilised. Her walk-through robe leads to a bathroom with a built-in tub, then to the main bedroom, where there’s a west-facing window with comfy reading nook. “Everyone here wants western views of the horizon, but the light can be harsh,” says Peter. “This nook has deep reveals and external fins, so some of the sun is blocked, and there’s space for storage.” >

LIVING this page and opposite The living room has a built-in day bed that looks toward John Forrest National Park. ‘Metallix’ Graphite brickwork surrounds the Jetmaster fireplace. Custom sofa, Lifestyle Furniture. Cushions, Pure Linen. Throw, Remedy. Chinese rug and baskets from Vietnam. In the music corner are a piano played by Judith, and a guitar and didgeridoo enjoyed by her sons (artwork on wall from a local school auction). Deer antlers, bought in the UK. Mounted silver tribal necklace from the UAE. The Delft Blue miniature Dutch houses above are souvenirs collected from KLM flights that family members have taken over the years.


HOUSES H G THE LAYOUT Entry

Bath

Living

Carport

Bed

Store

Bed

Bed

Deck

Kitchen

Deck

Dining

Pantry/ laundry

Deck

Study

Pool

WIR Bath

Main bed Deck

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THE PALETTE

H G HOUSES The guest wing (three bedrooms and a bathroom) is accessed by an external walkway, creating a sense of separation from the main house. “When people travel here from far away they tend to stay for a while – which is lovely – so it’s good for everyone to have their own space,” Judith explains. Visitors particularly love the raised swimming pool jutting out from the deck, with brick sides that double as safety fencing. “The design means you swim out to the horizon and back to the house,” says Peter. Materials throughout have been kept as simple as possible, with Peter’s choices of corrugated iron, limewashed bricks and silvered timber more than reminiscent of early Australian homes, a look Judith loves. “Mum said she wanted the first Peter Tibbitt house,” he says, “but because I had her so much in my mind while I was working on the design, it’s very much her house.” # Peter Tibbitt Design, Dunsborough, WA; 0430 088 204 or petertibbitt.com.au. A Workshop; paulwakelam.com.

British Paints White Gable (interior)

High-grade l marine ply

‘Metallix’ Graphite bricks (exterior, fireplace)

Comfort level

Harnessing natural processes to control the temperature makes this home a very pleasant place to be. The best example is the cooling towers on either side of the living area. When the louvre windows at the top are open, drafts are created, which removes the rising hot air from the room. In winter, the woodburning fire heats the space, keeping everyone toasty.


MAIN BATHROOM A luxurious space that feels open to the elements yet totally private. All the bathrooms’ taps, basins and other fixtures are from Reece. Lighting by Specific Lighting. Smart buy: ‘B-140’ matt white honeycomb tiles, $66/m2, Original Ceramics. POOL AREA Architect Peter and girlfriend Marion on the Ekodeck composite decking from Bunnings. The concrete pool is faced in brick with a quartz plaster lining. In the garden, C&W Resources did the heavy lifting, moving massive amounts of earth and large boulders from the property into pockets near the house. Surrounding the natural rockeries are low shrubs, ground covers and a mini orchard of nine citrus fruits. The plantings thin out towards the boundary. MAIN BEDROOM Neutral tones and natural textures reference the rural setting. As you head into the bathroom, the flooring becomes a ‘slatted path’, allowing water to drain. For Where to Buy, see page 188. #

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FAMILY ROOM The deep window seat is a favourite spot for Fiona and Cooper, the family’s cavoodle. Moroso ‘Gentry’ sofa, Hub Furniture. Prostoria ‘Frame’ coffee table, Luke Furniture. The feature-wall cladding and flooring are stained Tasmanian oak. Credenza by FMD Architects. Artwork by Deborah Halpern. Marc Pascal vase. Designer buy: Moooi Carpets ‘Seduction’ rug (225x300cm), $3905, Space.

Point of view A Melbourne architect took her bungalow’s 1920s features and melded them with a contemporary addition, creating a knockout family home that suits her fine. STORY Stephen Crafti ST Y L IN G Beck Simon PH OTO G R APH Y Derek Swalwell

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This is the life

Smartening up the garden was as much a priority as renovating the house, says owner/architect Fiona Dunin, who engaged Eckersley Garden Architecture to help. The paved front area is now lush and green, the narrow driveway a pretty side courtyard, and the backyard a haven from the hustle and bustle. Feature windows frame garden aspects while mirrored and glossy surfaces reflect interesting aspects and scatter light. >


H G HOUSES THE PALETTE

Dulux Vivid White (extension)

Resene Half Truffle (original walls)

he term ‘original condition’ can be a double-edged sword in the property game. That was certainly the case for this late-1920s California bungalow in Melbourne’s south-east. “It had been completely neglected – there was extensive water damage and it needed reroofing, restumping, rewiring and repainting throughout,” recalls architect Fiona Dunin, who purchased the three-bedroom home in 2012. “On the upside, I had never seen a place of this vintage with so much intact period detailing.” Happily,Fiona’shusbandTerryGoutzioulis,whoisthepractice manager of the firm she heads up (as well as project manager on some of their fitouts), needed little convincing that it could become a fabulous home for them and their daughter Tiggy, 13. The renovation was conducted in three stages. Phase one involved a complete structural restoration; in phase two, Fiona

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and Terry extended into the attic space to create a retreat for Tiggy; phase three saw a 63m2 rear extension added to accommodate a new open-plan kitchen/family room, plus a new deck and garden makeover by Eckersley Garden Architecture. Formerly a sea of cement, the front garden is now a verdant oasis with pretty spring-flowering Chinese redbud trees for impact at the entrance. Inside, the entry hall gives access to the formallivingroomontherightandthemainbedroomandfamily bathroom on the left. A central corridor leads past the dining room on the right and two more bedrooms and the laundry on the left before arriving in the kitchen/family area. Fiona and colleague Andrew Carija collaborated on the project, which sensitively combines the best elements of 1920s design with 21st-century style and comfort. Terry, a keen DIYer, did a > lot of the work, including the plastering and painting.

DINING Fiona used a light hand here, restoring and making a feature of the original fireplace, decorative ceiling and timber trims. The dining table is a custom piece. ‘A9’ sound system, Bang & Olufsen. Moooi ‘Non Random’ pendant light, Space. Artwork by Robert Owen. Designer buy: ‘Chair 170’ American oak dining chairs, $420 each, Feelgood Designs. STAIRS Thoughtfully designed wine storage makes use of otherwise wasted space. Artwork by Bill Henson. KITCHEN opposite, top right and bottom left A mirrored panel on the island bench reflects light around the room, softening the visual weight of the dark joinery. Mirror, GM Glass. Polytec MDF joinery in Black Wenge Ravine. Benchtop and fascia in Dekton Sirius. Tiles, Artedomus. Fridge, Fisher & Paykel.

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Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

Stained Tasmanian oak (living-room feature)


a ering n t, mid d rk k s enhancees interest in a neeutral al scheeme.


H G HOUSES

Star of the new family room is the five-sided feature window with deep window seat, which Fiona designed to better connect the interior with its newly landscaped surroundings. “I love the window seat; it’s one of my favourite elements,” she says. The surrounding wall is clad in Tasmanian oak that’s been stained a rich dark-chocolate colour in an effort to draw the eye toward the soothing green view. The moody palette extends into the kitchen, which features black woodgrain-textured laminate joinery and charcoal-toned benches made from Dekton, a composite quartz, porcelain and glass surface that is super strong and scratch-resistant. The kitchen is linked to the dining room via a servery window, an original feature Fiona was keen to retain. “Retaining the servery was a practical way to connect the two rooms and provide a bridge between past and present,” she says.

The dining area is mostly original, apart from one striking feature: a wall of wine storage built into the stairs leading to Tiggy’satticbedroom.Madefromblack-paintedMDF,thestorage unit ties in beautifully with the joinery in the adjacent kitchen. The wine storage works in tandem with a mirrored panel above, which also conforms to the shape of the stairs. “As well as bouncinglightaround,themirrorreflectswhat’sgoingonaround the room – all the dynamic movement – and borrows views from the garden,” says Fiona. All three family members are incredibly happy with their new-old home. “We bought it because we loved all the original features,” says Fiona. “And I think we’ve created something that > honours them in a contemporary way.” FMD Architects, Melbourne, Victoria; (03) 9670 9671 or fmdarchitects.com.au.

MAIN BEDROOM Simple decor allows the architectural features to shine. ‘Tolomeo’ lamp, Artemide. Artecnica ‘Grand Trianon’ pendant light, Dedece. Artwork by Callum Morton. STUDY NOOK The Hans Wegner ‘Wishbone’ chair from Cult is signed by Wegner himself. Hem ‘Drifted’ stools by Lars Beller Fjetland, District. Sashless slider window, Saxon Windows. Joinery, Laminex. Smart buy: Objekto ‘Eclipse’ table lamp, $240, Hub Furniture. MAIN BATHROOM This space was extended by almost a third to accommodate the luxurious freestanding bath. Stone wall and floor tiles, Signorino. Mosaic tiles, Artedomus. Bath sourced from eBay. Basin, Caroma. ‘Posh’ showerhead on rail, and Mizu ‘Drift’ tapware and ceiling rose, all Reece.

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Comfort level

“We weren’t in a rush to renovate,” says Terry. “Fiona and I wanted time to think about each stage.” The 1920s decor was dark and subdued, so making the home feel lighter and brighter was always top of mind. While fresh white walls in the extension and liberal use of mirror address the light factor, Fiona kept it cosy by painting the walls of the bungalow a soft grey: Resene Half Truffle. Timber detailing is the unifying thread.

A wa k in sh werr sav avess p ecciouss e in a c mp t ba at oom.

‘I wanted a modern home that allowed the spirit of the bungalow to shine through.’ Fiona Dunin, owner/architect


‘When you’re sitting in the window seat, you feel like you’re in the middle of the garden.’ Fiona

THE LAYOUT

Deck

Bath Bed

Bed

L’dry

Main bed Entry Family Porch

Living

Dining

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Kitchen


HOUSES H G BACKYARD this page and opposite, top right Fiona and Terry’s brief to Eckersley Garden Architecture included the creation of a new deck off the family room, ideal for alfresco dining. Chairs, Feelgood Designs. Custom table by FMD Architects. SIDE COURTYARD opposite, top left Fast-growing evergreen plants such as Dichondra repens and Fatsia japonica help a garden look established quickly. FRONT GARDEN opposite, bottom left The now-verdant entrance has greatly enhanced the home’s kerb appeal. For Where to Buy, see page 188. #

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Lagerstroemia ‘Tuscarora’ Chinese redbud (Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’) Fatsia japonica Dichondra repens Pittosporum tobira ‘Miss Muffet’


H G HOUSES

Barefoot

LUXURY Inspired by its proximity to the sea, this Sydney home has come to life with a considered palette of dreamy aquatic tones and natural textures. STORY Elizabeth Wilson | ST Y LI N G Kate Nixon | P HOTOG R A P HY Maree Homer

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SITTING ROOM Comfort and ease radiate from every room of this three-storey home, exemplified by furniture you can sink into. ‘Strada’ sofa in Lexington fabric #4186-31 and ‘Westcott’ armchairs in #4179-31, both Cromwell. Antique rug from the owners’ collection. Designer buy: Cypress Point ‘Seawatch’ woven cocktail table in rattan and tempered glass, $3993, Cromwell. >


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Hotel in Santa Monica, Southern California. “We love that coastal, comfortable, Ralph Lauren style,” says the owner. Kate and her team set to work immediately, designing joinery, soft furnishings, attractive but not attention-grabbing window t re at m e nts , b e dd i ng an d decorative elements with a focus on classic style and understated luxury. They came up with a sophisticated palette of textured neutrals and nautically inspired stripes with natural timbers and wicker, all complementing the owners’ collection of vintage carpets. The existing carpet was removed throughout and walnutstained blackbutt floorboards were laid all on levels. A large part of Kate’s brief was to address the spatial planning on each level. On the open-plan first floor, she created clearly delineated spaces for the entry, formal sitting area, dining room and kitchen using area rugs and well-considered placement of furniture. The ground level is home to the main bedroom, along with two bathrooms, a study, laundry and garage. Here, Kate has designed elegant and tailored interiors with a focus on beautiful, custom upholstery and bespoke finishes. Prior to the renovation, the owners had decided they needed moreguestaccommodationfortheirexpandingextendedfamily, so the lower level was reconfigured with an additional bedroom, bathroomandrumpusarea.Functionalitywasincreasedwithout compromising flow or natural light, thanks to generous connecting corridors and opaque glass pocket doors. Every space of the home is now light, warm and basking in barefoot comfort. “This is a really relaxed, comfortable home, notashowroom,”saystheowner.“Essentially,it’s a beach house.” With some of the best views in the world. > Studio Kate, Double Bay, NSW; (02) 9363 4318 or studiokate. com.au. Bruce Stafford Architects, Double Bay, NSW; (02) 9327 7889 or brucestafford.com. ibuild, ibuild-nsw.com.au.

SITTING-ROOM SHELF Some of the owners’ objects and books are beautifully framed in this white-painted box shelving atop a slab of walnut-stained blackbutt. While they love the timber floor and furniture inside, there are no wood finishes outside because of the salt-water spray. DINING A few steps from the kitchen, the dining table is located next to a daydream-inducing picture window, giving diners the option of banquette seating. Cypress Point ‘Atwell’ dining table and ‘Point Devereaux’ chairs in Lexington fabric #5880-31, all Cromwell. Banquette cushion in matching fabric. All joinery by APR Joinery.

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Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

ocationiseverythingwhen it comes to real estate. And an amazing location can be a powerful catalyst for transforming a tired houseintoaneverything-you-everdreamed-of sanctuary. When the owners of this home purchased it eight years ago, the 1930s building was poky and damp. In fact, they “didn’t like it at all”. But the old property’s shortcomings were eclipsed by its waterfront location on glittering Sydney Harbour. The couple moved in with grand plans for a redesign, but before they could embark on the renovation, both relocated to London for work. Knowing they’d return to Sydney in future, they decided to hire Bruce Stafford Architects and proceed with their plans while overseeing the works remotely. The house underwent a complete re-build, except for the elegant facade. It was a two-year project that involved painstaking excavation by hand through layers of rock to create a new floor, resulting in a four-bedroom,four-bathroomhomeoverthreelevels.Remarkably, given the challenges of the waterfront site and the clients’ remoteness, the job was completed on time and within budget. The owners’ brief to the architects had been clear: they wanted to maximise views and natural light. The location was to be the hero; the home, classic and understated. What’s been achieved is exactly that, with every room paying homage to the setting, with vast windows framing picture-perfect harbour views. “My favourite thing is the house’s relationship to the water,” says the owner. “We love listening to the sound of the water at night.” OncetheyreturnedtoSydney,theownersturnedtheirattention to finishing and furnishing the interiors. Armed with a few favourite references, they turned to Kate Nixon of Studio Kate to create bespoke joinery and upholstery that would translate Hamptons style to an Australian setting. Among the references presented to Kate were photographs of Shutters On The Beach


THE PALETTE

Resene Half Villa White (shelving/ cabinetry)

‘Serengeti’ fabric from Westbury Textiles (guestroom)

Dulux Goanna Grey (sitting-room feature wall)

HOUSES H G

This is the life

After living in London for several years, the lure of Sydney’s diamond skies and sparkling harbour was strong, and the homeowners were grateful to return to this prize. “I often find myself wandering around the house looking at the view and pinching myself that I live here,” says the owner. “It’s also a great home for casual entertaining and we love that the main floor is one big open space – it’s a good party house.”


THE LAYOUT LOWER LEVEL Bath

GROUND FLOOR Bed

FIRST FLOOR

Bath Study

Garage Rumpus

Balcony

Cellar

WIR

Bed

Bed

Sitting Living

Main bed Dining

Store Bath

Study

Entry Bath

L’dry

Bath

Kitchen

Balcony


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KITCHEN The U-shaped kitchen is located in one corner of the first floor, separated from the dining space by a long breakfast bench. Cypress Point ‘Turner’ stools, Cromwell. LIVING A faux shagreen ‘Marina’ tray from Busatti is just the thing for this side table. STUDY Sit at the desk and work, or relax on the chaise longue? Hard choice in this study, which opens to a balcony on the ground floor. CHILL-OUT AREA Kate has created sitting areas throughout the house so the owners can soak up their beloved views. ‘Westcott’ armchairs and ‘Moxby’ side table, all Cromwell. Cushions, Seneca Textiles. RUMPUS opposite Reconfigured to accommodate family when they visit, the lower floor comprises two bedrooms, two bathrooms and this lovely space. The home’s gas fireplaces supply all the heat required in winter. ‘Varinia’ day bed with trundle, Luxo Living. Designer buy: ‘Henwick’ sideboard in Chalk, $1439, La Maison. >

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MAIN BEDROOM “I need a comfortable bed and beautiful sheets,” says the owner. “I’m a sheet nut.” Designed with tailored touches in a palette of navy, white and oatmeal, the bedroom features a bedhead upholstered in Lexington fabric #4995-11 from Cromwell. Cypress Point ‘Ellisworth’ nightstand, also Cromwell. Designer buy: ‘Ermes’ cashmere throw, $899, Busatti. LOWER LANDING Designed as a mini mud room, this nook has storage for shoes and jackets. MAIN ENSUITE A calming white-on-white palette bounces light around the room. For similar bath, try Bathe. GUESTROOM The bedhead is upholstered in ‘Serengeti’ fabric from Westbury Textiles. Side table, La Maison. Quilt and dress pillows, Busatti. RUMPUS opposite There’s plenty of storage in the curved banquette seat. Cushions in Les Creations ‘Fez’ fabric #42; roman blinds are Christopher Farr Cloth ‘Mare’ fabric in Azzuro, both Ascraft. #

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For Where to Buy, see page 188.

H G HOUSES


Comfort level

Blessed with a dreamy location awash with light and sea breezes, the owners wanted their home to be casual and relaxed. They’ve personalised their interiors with custom joinery and soft furnishings to create rooms that are inviting and warm, not stiff or formal. Every aspect of the home embraces its aspect. “We hardly ever use the airconditioning because of the beautiful sea breezes,” says the owner. “We love the louvres.”


Cloud

NINE

A Sydney couple are in heaven after an interior designer took them on a life-changing journey with bold colour and lively prints. STO RY & ST Y L IN G Natalie Walton | P HOTOG R A P HY Chris Warnes


HOUSES H G

This is the life

“Our house has plenty of room for our family to be together, but also places we can retreat to separately,” says owner Angela. Husband Victor has an office he uses for work and photographic pursuits, while daughter Sofia enjoys the media room upstairs. Angela loves her larger dining room and revamped kitchen with new features, especially the double oven. “It’s great being able to entertain lots of people now,” she says.

DINING Formerly a living room, this larger space accommodates an extension table that seats 14. “It’s a triumph!” says Angela of the design. At night, the pendant light from ECC Lighting+Furniture casts beautiful shadows on the ceiling. Table, Sapphire Wood Furniture. Chairs, Coco Republic (white) and Boyd Blue. Harlequin ‘Nuvola’ wallpaper, Domestic Textile Corporation. Artwork by Catherine Cassidy. HALL Entry to the house is via an extra-wide front door by MRY Constructions. Stool, H+J Furniture. Runner, The Rug Company. Local hero: ‘Barc’ wall light, from $134, Axiom. >

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fter 10 years of living in the same home in Sydney’s inner west, Angela Balafas and Victor Carey decided to make some changes. The couple’s offspring had all moved beyond the demanding years of childhood, and the way the family used the house had changed. What they really wanted at that point was a home more suitable for entertaining friends and hosting great feasts. “Everyone thought I was crazy, but I knew our house could be transformed without knocking out walls,” says Angela, who felt that good design might be the key. The couple originally purchased the property in the late 1980s and rented out the tired fibro residence until 2003, after which they knocked down the old house and replaced it with a twostorey project home. The new build included both casual and formal living and dining spaces on the ground level, along with a kitchen, laundry, powder room and study; upstairs offered four bedrooms (the main with ensuite), a media/living room and bathroom. Daughter Sofia, now aged 13, has one of the rooms and Alexander and Mia, Victor’s twenty-something children fromapreviousrelationship,havetheirownspaceswhenvisiting. While Angela knew what she wanted to achieve with the renovation, she felt that pulling it all together required some help. “I had never used an interior designer before and, to be honest, I was nervous,” she says. “This was not an architectural masterpiece; it was just a nice house in a nice suburb.” In the end, Angela hired Karen Akers, based on her portfolio of successful home transformations. “What I loved was Karen’s use of colour in ways that were unexpected, and how all her homes were different, unique to their owners,” says Angela. They first met in 2012, Angela armed with a short wish list: paint over feature walls, refinish floorboards and update furniture. The work was quickly put on hold, however, when the couple decided to put in a swimming pool first. By the time Karen’s company was contacted again in 2015, Angela had bigger plans. She was now keen to update the kitchen and adjoining laundry and powder room, allocate more space to entertaining, and make changes to the main ensuite. “The spa bathtub in the > corner had to go!” she says with a laugh.

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KITCHEN Mother and daughter hang out in the transformed cooking space. “I adore all the drawers and bench space,” says Angela. A new double oven, deeper benches and improved storage make it easy to entertain a crowd when required. Caesarstone benchtop in Organic White. Smeg double oven. Westinghouse fridge. Hansgrohe ‘Talis S2 Variarc’ mixer and Billi chilled/boiling water tap. Tiles, Surface Gallery. Hay ‘About a Stool’ stools, Cult. Northern Lighting ‘Bell’ pendant light, LightCo. Artwork by Helen McCullagh. Local hero: ‘Pebble’ bowl in Wasabi, $147, Mud Australia.

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‘I’ve always loved the colour green, but never thought it could be used so beautifully in a house.’ Angela Balafas, owner

For colour details, see page 112.


“Angela had an idea of what she wanted her home to convey,” says Karen. “We wanted the house to represent her and the family in personality and feel.” In April 2016, Karen began work on the project, right at the threshold. She widened the opening and installed a new front door “to create the illusion of more space and open living”. Then, to accommodate the owners’ love of entertaining, she swapped the formal dining and living areas to fit in an extension table capable of seating 14 people. The kitchen and ensuite were renovated and every corner of the house transformed with well-considered furnishings, textiles, wallpaper and paint. Karen is known for her creative use of colour, so the family was excited about the green palette she proposed to run through the home, starting with the kitchen’s

emerald-coloured cabinetry. Green pops up in accents throughout the living room, and as substantial highlights in the main bedroom (large rug) and Sofia’s room (entire ceiling) . Despite a few stops and starts – most notably when the floorboards weren’t up to scratch and had to be refinished a second time – the work went smoothly and the result has revitalised the house. It’s made everyday living and socialising much more enjoyable, and changed Angela’s view of designers. “I think most people would benefit from using an interior designer,” she says. “They really work magic and push you to do things you would never imagine. And your house doesn’t have > to be a mansion to justify it.” Designed by Karen Akers, McMahons Point, NSW; (02) 8920 9018 or karenakers.com.au.

CASUAL LIVING/DINING Angela, Victor and youngest daughter Sofia in weekend mode. Re-covering their existing ottoman in a dazzling shade of green has made it a centrepiece. King Living ‘Bongo’ ottoman in Chivasso ‘Tango’ fabric from Unique Fabrics. ‘Kivik’ corner sofa, Ikea. Rug, Cadrys. ‘Dizzie’ dining table, Stylecraft. ‘Rombus’ dining chairs, Thonet. Lightyears ‘Lullaby’ pendant light, Cult. FORMAL LIVING A conversation corner by the stairs. Sancal ‘Talo’ armchairs, Ke-zu. Cushions, Jim & Jane (left) and Flower Power. Gilt-coated black bowls found in Vietnam. ‘Diamond Velour’ rug, Designer Rugs. Smart buy: ‘Flore’ coffee table, $805, Exhibit Interiors.

Joinery keeps this open-plan area orderly and provides display space.

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HOUSES H G

Comfort level

Texture, form and pattern combine to soothe the senses in this home, balancing the invigorating effect of its colour palette. Dreamy, cloudcovered Harlequin wallpaper starts at the front door and wends its way through the formal living areas and up the stairs. “The patterned walls are welcoming and cocooning,” says interior designer Karen Akers, who’s accentuated the soft, floaty feel with plush rugs and curtains.


H G HOUSES

THE LAYOUT GROUND FLOOR Outdoor dining Bath Garage

L’dry Kitchen

Dining Entry

Formal living

Study

Dining Living

Storage FIRST FLOOR Ensuite Terrace

Bed Bed

Bed

WIR

Bed Living

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Bath


THE PALETTE Caesarstone Organic White (kitchen, ensuite)

Harlequin ‘Nuvola’ wallpaper (living)

Sydney blue gum (floorboards)

SOFIA’S ROOM Green makes a surprising appearance on the ceiling. Linen, Orla Kiely. Throw, Sheridan. Printed cushion, Me & Amber. Audio-Technica Bluetooth turntable. Designer buy: ‘Cameroon’ Fairtrade headdress (on wall), $330, Temple & Webster. LIVING-ROOM CABINET Keen photographer Victor captured the black and white images. Striped and spotted vases, Jim & Jane. Printed bowl, Marimekko. Footed vessels, Chrissie Cotter Gallery. MAIN BEDROOM A major style update has worked wonders here. Bedhead in Christopher Farr Cloth ‘Peonies’ fabric. Throw, Cultiver. Lamp, MRD Home. Rug, Kulchi. Artwork by Gina Law. ENSUITE The corner spa was replaced with a L’Isola bath from Harvey Norman. Wall tiles, Bisanna Tiles. Basin, Cass Brothers. Pendant light, Mud Australia. Stool, Orient House. For Where to Buy, see page 188. #


In partnership with Australian House & Garden

Green light Homeowner Angela loves green and was keen to see it incorporated into her colour scheme. Paint to the rescue!


COLOUR TRICK

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ngela hadn’t realised she liked green so much until the penny dropped: she was continually drawn to rooms in magazines that had the colour in them. So when she and interior designer Karen Akers were planning the colour palette for the home, green was at the forefront of Angela’s mind. And of course, paint was the easiest and most cost-effective way to get the look. Her colourful kitchen, with its cabinets finished in Dulux Deep Brunswick Green, was a bold and beautiful choice. “I think all colours can look great, but not all would make a great kitchen colour,” says Angela. “At the time, I thought green was a brave option for a kitchen, but dark colours are becoming more popular. The more people see them in magazines and on social media, the more confident they will become using them. I think people love colour, but can be scared to use it.”

Angela’s daughter Sofia loves her bedroom and its Dulux Wash & Wear Government Green ceiling. “It’s cosy, and because the bedroom is north-facing it reduces glare and actually makes the room seem bigger and the ceiling higher, which is the opposite of what you would think,” says Angela.

‘Green is uplifting and makes me feel instantly happy. It’s natural and peaceful.’ H OMEOW NER A NGEL A ( PIC T U RED B ELOW)

CONSTANT CONNECTION

COOKING UP A (COLOUR) STORM The emerald greens in the kitchen cabinetry and tiled splashback are timeless, bold and striking, “definitely like a jewel”, says Angela. They contrast with the more subtle, peaceful green paint tints found on the the island cabinets, laundry cupboards and walls, along with the sandblasted blond oak timber veneer and white stone counter on the island. “I guess the house is both extroverted and introverted, rather like me!” says Angela. “The various greens and neutrals sit side by side in perfect harmony.”

“I regularly bought glass and ceramics in different colours, but knowing that the house was going to use a lot of green gave me a real excuse to buy green homewares,” says Angela. “Whenever I went out during the renovation – there they were in front of me! Green vases, bowls, sculptures… I had to buy them. Then friends and family started giving me green things. I think I have enough now, though.” The subtle green wall colour in the living area (right) – Dulux Gentle Calm Half – is a great backdrop for Angela’s favourite pieces. “It allows them to ‘pop’,” she says. Green is a favourite in other ways, too. “I love our garden – the trees, plants, lawn – all green, and I feel very serene sitting out amongst it,” says Angela. “When we go on holidays we like to stay in places where you can see rolling hills, or the hinterland. My husband loves taking photos (see right) and has a particular love of landscapes.”

V I S I T D U LU X .C O M . AU

Dulux Professional Polyurethane Satin tinted Dulux Deep Brunswick Green (kitchen cabinets) Dulux Professional Polyurethane Satin tinted Dulux Beech Fern (pantry)

Dulux Gentle Calm Half (living-area walls)

Dulux Antarctica Lake Half (island cabinets)


GIVE THE GIFT OF BEAUTY THIS MOTHER’S DAY AU.LOCCITANE.COM @LOCCITANEAUS #LOCCITANEAUS


Photograph by Claire Takacs.

See beauty and talent on display at Australia’s premier garden show.

A layered setting of swaying grasses, gum trees and pops of colour lies beyond the front fence of this garden, a creative re-imagining of the Aussie backyard and triple winner at the Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show (MIFGS). Turn the page for all the show highlights‌


MIFGS 2018 Australian Case Study Garden Designed by Eckersley Garden Architecture in collaboration with Australian House & Garden Presented by Brickworks

Best in show

In a ďŹ eld of talented entries from Australia and abroad, H&G joined forces with a trio of young landscape designers to take top honours at the Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show. WORDS Elizabeth Wilson | PH OTO G R APH Y Claire Takacs

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TREES & PLANTS Inland scribbly gum Eucalyptus rossii Water gum (Tristaniopsis laurina ‘Luscious’ ) White cedar (Melia azedarach) Japanese aralia (Fatsia japonica) Yellow canna lilies Renga renga lily (Arthropodium cirratum ‘Matapouri Bay’) Miscanthus transmorrisonensis Miscanthus sinensis ‘Adagio’ Lomandra ‘Lime Wave’

‘This garden contains many touchpoints from decades past, yet it is undeniably modern, the garden for right now.’ Lisa Green, H&G editor in chief, on the winning garden, brainchild of H&G and Eckersley Garden Architecture

GOLD

BEST IN SHOW

BEST USE OF PLANT LIFE


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ustralians love their backyards. From weekend barbecues and Christmas Day cricket matches to lovingly tended vegies and nostalgic plants grown from Grandma’s cuttings, the backyard provides the backdrop for many of life’s good things. With this in mind, and to mark the occasion of H&G’s 70th birthday, editor in chief Lisa Green invited Melbourne-based landscape design practice Eckersley Garden Architecture to collaborate in creating a special show garden honouring the humble backyard at this year’s Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show (MIFGS). The brief to Eckersley landscape designers Clare Mackarness, Rupert Baynes-Williams and Joshua Cocks was for a contemporary garden paying homage to the backyard and its incarnations over time. “At first we thought, ‘That’ll be easy,’” says Clare. “But it’s hard to sum up the history of the backyard in one garden.” Not only did the trio pull it off, they also scooped the pool, winning a gong for Best Use of Plant Life, scoring a gold medal for overall execution and taking out the ultimate prize: the City of Melbourne Award of Excellence for Best in Show. What were the key features of this big-time winner? Gum trees (Eucalyptus maculata), lawn, swathes of native grasses, ornamental shrubs, a vegie patch, an entertainment zone with crazy paving, and even a Hills Hoist all featured in the 15x15m site. “We wanted to acknowledge our native vegetation, our European heritage and the influence of migrant culture on our backyards,” says Clare. From the outset, the designers wanted to include a pool, a barbecue and a cricket pitch. They subtly modified each of these elements, however, so that the pool became a pond filtered by water plants, the

barbecue morphed into a stylish brick fireplace in an open-air living room and the cricket pitch ran unobtrusively through the middle of the space. Brick played a major role in the design: a low brick wall at the entrance was a reference to the suburban front fence, while the monolithic fireplace wall was a nod to Australia’s sculptural landscape, with the pink hues of ‘San Selmo’ reclaimed bricks from Brickworks helping to reference the colours of the Red Centre. Plant-wise, the focus was on luscious and layered foliage, an “eclectic mix of native and exotic species that complement and offset each other in form and texture,” says Clare. For example, a border of Fatsia japonica with star-shaped leaves was underplanted with Rhaphiolepsis ‘Oriental Pink’, both offset by ribbons of strappy renga renga lilies (Arthropodium ‘Matapouri Bay’), clusters of ‘Encore’ azaleas, drifts of Salvia ‘Indigo Spires’ and wavy grasses (Miscanthus transmorrisonensis and M. sinensis ‘Adagio’). Under the Hills Hoist was an array of capsicums, eggplants, chillies, verbena and thyme. “Inspired by Greekinfluenced edible gardens,” explains Rupert. There were retro plants, too, including canna lilies (a crowd favourite), Cordyline stricta and kidney weed (Dichondra repens), which was popular as a substitute for lawn in the 1980s and is again right now. Native plants played a major role in the design, a standout being Hymenosporum ‘Butterfly Scentz’, a native frangipani in shrub form. “It’s a beautiful native alternative to gardenia, but much hardier,” says Clare. Along with the official awards, this garden won the hearts of MIFGS visitors. “Lots of people said they felt nostalgic and recognised plants from childhood,” says Clare. “That’s exactly what we hoped for.” > Eckersley Garden Architecture; e-ga.com.au.

‘We used a variety of plants and materials to represent the patchwork of cultures in Australia today.’ Clare Mackarness

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT A row of Fatsia japonica underplanted with Rhaphiolepsis ‘Oriental Pink’ forms the backdrop to the cricket pitch. Pretty pink Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and native violet (Viola hederacea). The design team from Eckersley Garden Architecture: (from left) Rupert Baynes-Williams, Clare Mackarness and Joshua Cocks. A pair of Featherston chairs from Grazia & Co, set against white correa (Correa alba), purple-flowering aster daisies and evergreen Miscanthus transmorrisonensis. The garden was designed as a journey through swaying grasses and textured garden beds to the entertainment zone beyond, bordered by a row of water gums (Tristaniopsis laurina ‘Luscious’).

For Where to Buy, see page 188.

MATERIALS Austral Bricks ‘San Selmo Reclaimed’ clay bricks, Brickworks ‘Luca’ gneiss natural stone, Eco Outdoors 20mm granite gravel in Grey, Hillview Quarries Pergola in powdercoated steel and stainless steel Furniture, Grazia & Co


Unity Garden Designed by Ross Uebergang and Yousuke Yamaguchi

The Australian bush and Japanese aesthetics came together in this striking project. A collaboration between Melbourne landscape designer Ross Uebergang and his friend, Japan-based Yousuke Yamaguchi, this east-meetswest garden combined hardy native trees and plants with Japanese elegance and simplicity. The planting palette was restrained, consisting of ethereal she-oaks (Allocasuarina) underplanted with prickly spear grass (Austrostipa stipoides) and Geraldton waxflower (Chamelaucium). A scattering of paintbrush lilies (Haemanthus coccineus) provided surprising pops of red against the bed of white sand. At one end of the garden was a circular tea-ceremony room and, at the other, a dining table laid with strict symmetry. Completely unlike anything we’ve seen before at MIFGS. Ross U Design & Landscape; rossu.com.au.

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SILVER

Square 1 Designed by Candeo Design

Melbourne landscape designer Brent Reid specialises in courtyards and entertaining spaces, so for his MIFGS display he opted to “focus on what I know”. Hence the name Square 1. His design was a study in sophistication, featuring bluestone, marble and a sleek pergola in white powdercoated steel, with an open roof to keep the tree canopy in view. Hugging the pergola was a lush garden of textured foliage plants (Aloe ‘Erik the Red’, Rhaphiolepsis umbellata, Elaeagnus, Ligularia and Philodendron ‘Little Hope’) with drifts of white-flowering star jasmine, Rhaphiolepsis, Bergenia and hostas (left). Brent’s favourite species here? The three Norfolk Island pine trees along the back boundary (top). > Candeo Design; candeodesign.com.au.


MIFGS 2018 Inspired By Time Designed by Orisis

GOLD

PEOPLE’S CHOICE

Edward Eulloran Chief landscape designer, Orisis

he Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) was a time of prosperity in China that saw advancements in horticulture and the elevation of the ‘scholar’s garden’, a refined setting for reflection on nature and the arts. The aptly named Inspired by Time garden, designed by Shanghai-based landscaping company Orisis, was influenced by this classical concept and deftly reimagined for a modern audience. Every element of the design has a deeper meaning based on traditional beliefs, says Edward Eulloran, chief landscape designer at Orisis. Water is viewed as the life force of the garden and stepping stones represent the Eight Immortals of Chinese legend. Recurring mountain motifs are symbols of stability and

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endurance, and the red lanterns (traditionally lit during festivals) promote family happiness. While rich in traditional symbolism, the garden also integrates modern elements, such as a vibrant colour palette. “Old China was monochromatic,” says Edward. “Modern China is colourful, and this garden represents the new.” There’s also a mix of non-traditional plantings, such as Chilean myrtle (Luma apiculata) clipped into cloud shapes, lime-green Abelia, Celosia and Carex, along with traditional species maple, bamboo, camellia and Nandina. “This is what a modern Chinese garden looks like,” says Edward. “It could easily be replicated in an urban Australian landscape.” > Orisis; orisisinternational.com.


MATERIALS

TREES & PLANTS

Pavers and steps in white granite and bluestone Moongate made from laser-cut corten steel, produced in China Steel-framed pavilion with cypress-pine posts White river pebbles Marble mountain sculpture

Coral bark maple (Acer palmatum) Golden bamboo (Phyllostachys aurea) Chilean myrtle (Luma apiculata) Abelia ‘Kaleidoscope’ Azalea indica Camellia ‘Yuletide’ Celosia ‘Dragon’s Breath’ Sedum ‘Lime Zinger’ Carex oshimensis ‘Evergreen’

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT The main garden bed contains ribbons of colour including (from front) Sedum ‘Lime Zinger’, lime-green Abelia ‘Kaleidoscope’ and red Celosia ‘Dragon’s Breath’, with burgundyhued Loropetalum ‘Plum Gorgeous’. The circular moongate is a traditional inclusion in a scholar’s garden, believed to bring success and happiness; through the gate are hand-sculpted marble mountains (symbols of stability and endurance) backed by bamboo, a mainstay of Chinese gardens. An offering of tea in the pavilion. Water signifies life in this design; bordering the water feature is a mix of Azalea indica, Camellia ‘Yuletide’, Gardenia augusta ‘Florida’ and Carex oshimensis ‘Evergreen’. Red lanterns are traditionally lit during festivals to foster happiness and good fortune.


MATERIALS Patio wall in ‘Ekologix’ bamboo/reclaimed timber/ recycled plastic composite screening in Greystone, Bunnings Brighton Masonry ‘My Pave’ concrete pavers, Bunnings Granitic sand

Wonder Wall Designed by Sarah Jardine, Melbourne Polytechnic

STAR STUDENT The Avenue of Achievable Gardens showcases the work of graduating horticulture students. Entrants were briefed to design a 5x3m outdoor concept, achievable for the average home gardener, with a budget of $8000. Sarah’s design won the coveted Award of Excellence in this category.

For Where to Buy, see page 188.

A soothing palette of silvers and grey-greens made this petite plot by horticulture student Sarah Jardine a unique entry in the Avenue of Achievable Gardens. Hero of the space was a stunning red box gum (Eucalyptus polyanthemos) in a circle of blue fescue (left), surrounded by a mix of succulents and natives, including kangaroo paw (right), pig’s ear, cotton lavender and dusty miller. “I also wanted to create a green wall that was super low-maintenance,” says Sarah. Her solution: star jasmine growing up a mesh grid (top). To keep costs down, she used humble steel reinforcing mesh, inserted into a niche space to give it a 3D appearance. “It was the colour of the steel that prompted the use of silver plants,” she explains. To achieve the wall’s soft-grey cloud effect, Sarah mixed paint (Dulux Grey Encounter) and sand. > Garden Design By Sarah; gardendesignbysarah.com.au.


GARDENS H G

NATIVE SPEAKERS Young landscape designers are talking up the exciting resurgence of Australian native plants, writes gardening expert Helen Young. he trend towards using native plants was very apparent at this year’s MIFGS, highlighting the growing appreciation for the beauty and benefits of keeping it local. In fact, this was proudly on display from the first step inside the gates. Visitors were immediately greeted by a new feature of the show, the Welcome Garden, designed by talented young landscape designer Phillip Withers of Phillip Withers Landscape Design (phillipwithers. com) as a place where visitors could sit and meet friends. The Welcome Garden consisted of massive slices of bluestone set within a dynamic selection of mostly native plants, including iconic grass trees and palms,

Photograph by Claire Takacs.

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flowering shrubs and bush-tucker plants. “It’s a place that celebrates nature, the rock, the soil and the rich history connecting people and place,” Phillip explains. Half of the major show gardens featured Australian plants, either on their own or blended with non-native species. H&G’s Australian Case Study Garden, presented in collaboration with Eckersley Garden Architecture (e-ga.com.au), acknowledged our botanical heritage while transitioning into a mixed style of planting. Landscape architect Emmaline Bowman, founder of STEM Landscape Architecture & Design (stemlandscape.com), won silver for her Living Garden design, which made use of plants indigenous to Melbourne’s

Western Plains in order to highlight the area’s natural beauty. “I think Australian plants are trending at the moment because people are becoming more aware that they grow better and require less maintenance [than non-native species],” she says. “The range that’s available is getting bigger and better all the time. And the flowers are so unique.” Emmaline’s garden concept demonstrates how diverse Australian habitats can be integrated within a family garden. “We are thinking more about our environment, thinking about wildlife and celebrating these beautiful Australian plants,” she says. The Grow Together garden was designed and built by Melbourne-based landscape >

Visitors were greeted by the inviting sight of Phillip Withers’ Welcome Garden. The dark trunks and sculptural forms of grass trees (Xanthorrhoea australis) and Chinese windmill palm (Trachycarpus fortunei) contrast with the lush green foliage of bird’s nest fern (Asplenium australasicum), cardboard cycad (Zamia furfuracea), tractor seat (Ligularia reniformis) and giant taro (Alocasia macrorrhiza), with a softly spreading groundcover of kidney weed (Dichondra repens).

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designer Ben Hutchinson of Ben Hutchinson Landscapes (benhutchinsonlandscapes. com.au), who specialises in sustainable, native planting schemes. “I’ve seen a big shift towards natives,” he says. “We have a massive range of stunning plants that are totally underutilised.” Of the five Boutique Gardens, where competition finalists built their winning designs for a 5x5m space, two focused on Australian plants. Olga Blacha’s AusZen entry was a Japanese garden designed with native plants. It’s a novel idea that Olga believes has great potential. “I researched the taxonomy of plants traditionally used in Japanese gardens and found a native alternative for each,” the PhD student explains. Instead of bamboo fencing, she used spent gymea lily (Doryanthes) stems, while the plants were selected to offer year-round flowering. Jake Baturynsky of Loco Landscape Design Studio (locolandscapedesign.com. au) called his Boutique Garden design Raw, referencing the appeal of rustic materials such as stone and timber. “Native plants can beautify a space’s character and vibe while being great for the environment,” he says of his Australian plant palette. Along the inspirational Avenue of Achievable Gardens, where 12 horticulture students each created a tiny 5x3m space, a third chose to showcase native plants. Each plot represented a courtyard or balcony space that could be replicated by home gardeners on a tight budget. Elinor Beard, Bessie Richards, Sarah Jardine and Nicole Taylor are names to watch. Their work showed a commitment to sustainability, biodiversity and habitat for wildlife – and demonstrated how simply beautiful Australian plants can be. # In Ben Hutchinson’s design, eucalypts and bottlebrush (Callistemon ‘Kings Park Special’) create a backdrop for the cottage-style mix of perennials, including everlasting daisy (Xerochrysum bracteatum ‘Dargan Hill Lemon’) and kangaroo paw (Anigozanthos ‘Everlasting Amber’).

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‘ ‘ I U S E N AT I V E A N D I N D I G E N O U S P L A N T S W I T H S U S TA I N A B LY S O U R C E D A N D R E C L A I M E D M AT E R I A L S , A N D F O S T E R H A B I TAT S F O R L O C A L FAU N A .’ Ben Hutchinson

Photograph by Claire Takacs.

H G GARDENS


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SOUND GARDEN Outdoor spaces are living, breathing environments where sound can play a major role, writes Helen Young.

Photographs of water (Leigh Clapp), grass (Brent Wilson) and birdfeeder, all bauersyndication.com.au.

Each of our senses contributes to the ways we experience and enjoy gardens. Hearing is probably the least explored of these, but there are plenty of ways to create a pleasing ‘surround sound’ effect. WHEN THE WIND BLOWS Wind creates many different sounds in the garden, depending on the plants involved and strength of air currents. Think about whispering sighs of breezes moving through a grove of she-oaks or casuarinas, or the audible ‘shush’ of ornamental grasses (1). Bamboo leaves rustle in light gusts and the plant’s tall canes creak as they sway. In stronger winds, the movement of high tree canopies signals a change in the weather. For greater effect, add wind chimes. Those with metal tubes make melodious tones (the best are musically tuned), but you may prefer the tinkle of glass or bells, or the soft clacking of bamboo. WATER MUSIC Moving water (main image) can add a splash or gurgle that’s not only soothing but masks other, intrusive sounds. Ponds in larger gardens can be fitted with a waterfall, but small spaces can also have watery sound effects, courtesy of a fountain in a large pot or a wall-mounted water feature. Today’s choice of plug-andplay features is better than ever, including low-voltage and solar-powered options. If young children are about, choose a

child-safe design. Ponds usually attract frogs, which will add to the soundscape, but beware placing close to a bedroom window as frogs can be very loud at night.

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SWEET TWEETS Birds are an obvious source of sound in the garden, and learning to distinguish the warbling, chirruping or singing of various species is fun for children and adults. To attract birdlife, provide a clean source of water and food such as nectar-rich flowers, seed heads and fruits. Different food sources will attract different species. You can add bird feeders and houses, too (2). And those with chooks will know just how comforting their clucking can be. MUSIC TO YOUR EARS Outdoor speakers have come a long way, so we can experience our favourite music outside without loss of quality. Some speakers are disguised as flowerpots or rocks (3), others mounted under eaves. Ensure the equipment is weatherproof and suitable for outdoor use. You could use wireless speakers outside temporarily, but don’t forget to bring them in. CRUNCH TIME Other sounds to consider include the crunch of gravel or pebbles underfoot on driveways and paths (4), the buzz of bees, the summer drone of cicadas and the rustle of fallen autumn leaves. And one of the best? Children’s laughter. #

4

Subtle ambient sounds help attune your senses to the outdoor environment and its seasonal variations.


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Photograph by Amanda Prior.

Impressive and achievable recipes for weekend entertaining.


H G ENTERTAINING

Haute

HOSTESS With tasty share plates and elegant serving ideas, lunch with friends is a snack. Fashion designer turned food blogger Stephanie Conley shares her winter go-tos. ST Y L IN G Stephanie Conley | PH OTO G R APH Y Amanda Prior

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Gazpacho with grilled prawns


H G ENTERTAINING

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Sweet potato gratin

Coq au vin

Slow-roasted lamb with minted yoghurt

Chilli-roasted pumpkin


Panna cotta with coffee granita


GAZPACHO WITH GRILLED PRAWNS Prep: 45 mins. Cooking: 5 mins. Serves 6.

18 green prawns, peeled and deveined Olive oil Gazpacho 6 vine-ripened tomatoes, cored and chopped 1 continental cucumber, deseeded and chopped 1 red onion, peeled and chopped 1 red capsicum, chopped 1 yellow capsicum, chopped 2 cloves garlic, crushed ½ loaf stale bread, crusts removed, torn ¼ cup (60ml) olive oil 2 tbsp red-wine vinegar 200ml water Basil oil ⅓ bunch basil leaves ⅓ cup (80ml) olive oil 1 To make gazpacho, Place tomatoes, cucumber, onion, red and yellow capsicum, garlic and bread in a large bowl. Add oil and vinegar and season well with salt and pepper. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate 30 mins. Remove from fridge, add water, then blend with a stick blender until desired consistency is reached (add more cold water if needed). Refrigerate until ready to serve. 2 To make basil oil, place basil leaves in a food processor and blend to break down. With machine running, slowly add oil. Season with salt to taste. Set aside. 3 Heat olive oil in a frypan to high heat. Add prawns and pan-fry until opaque. 4 To serve, ladle gazpacho into serving bowls. Top with three prawns each and drizzle basil oil over.

SWEET POTATO GRATIN

COQ AU VIN

Prep: 25 mins. Cooking: 1 hr. Serves 4 as a side.

Prep: 30 mins. Cooking: 1 hr. Serves 4.

2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled 300ml full-cream milk 200ml cream ¾ cup grated parmesan cheese 5 sprigs thyme, leaves stripped Olive oil 1 Preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan). 2 Using a mandolin, slice sweet potatoes finely; set aside. 3 Place milk, cream, ½ cup parmesan,¾ of the thyme and a little salt and pepper in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to the boil gently, then remove from heat. 4 Layer sweet potatoes in the bottom of a medium ovenproof dish. After each layer, ladle some cream mixture over potatoes. Repeat process until dish is full. Drizzle with olive oil, then scatter remaining grated parmesan over. Bake for 1 hr or until golden. Scatter remaining thyme leaves over the top just before serving.

This is an edited extract from At Home With The Hostess by Stephanie Conley ($49.95, Smudge Publishing). Available from bookstores nationally and thehostess.com.au.

8 french shallots, peeled 150g pancetta 2 cloves garlic 10 brussels sprouts 4 chicken marylands or 8 thigh cutlets 2 tbsp plain flour 500ml white wine 4 sprigs thyme 2 tbsp greek yoghurt Mashed potatoes, or small pasta such as risoni, to serve 1 Preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan). 2 Place a medium casserole dish on the stove top over a medium heat and add oil. When hot, add french shallots, pancetta, garlic and brussels sprouts and sauté for 2-3 mins. Remove from pan and set aside. 3 Lightly dust chicken in flour. In same pan, cook chicken on all sides until golden (do this in batches to avoid crowding pan). Remove to a plate lined with paper towel. 4 Deglaze casserole with a dash of white wine, scraping the base to dislodge any cooked-on bits. Return chicken to pan along with shallots, pancetta, garlic and brussels sprouts. Add remaining white wine and thyme, cover with a tight-fitting lid and cook in oven for 1 hr. 5 Remove casserole from oven and transfer chicken to a plate. Stir yoghurt through cooking liquid, then return chicken to pot. Serve with mashed potatoes or risoni.


ENTERTAINING H G

SLOW-ROASTED LAMB WITH MINTED YOGHURT Prep: 20 mins. Cooking: 7 hrs + resting. Serves 4.

1 medium (about 1.5-2kg) lamb shoulder, bone in 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced Olive oil 1 cup (250ml) chicken stock 1 cup (250ml) dry white wine Minted yoghurt 2 cups (500g) thick greek yoghurt Juice of ½ lemon 1½ tsp dried mint 1 tbsp mint jelly 1 Preheat oven to 140˚C (120˚C fan). 2 With the tip of a sharp knife, make small incisions all over the lamb and place a sliver of garlic in each incision. Season well with salt and pepper. Heat a large frypan with a little olive oil and brown lamb on all sides. Transfer lamb to an ovenproof dish, add stock and wine, then cover with a tightfitting lid or piece of foil. Place in oven and cook 7 hrs. Remove from oven and rest in liquid for 30 mins. 2 Meanwhile, make minted yoghurt. Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix well to combine; set aside until needed. 3 Using two forks, shred meat from bone and place on a platter (discarding bone and juices). Serve with yoghurt on the side.

Wine matches by Toni Paterson.

WINE MATCHES Gazpacho with grilled prawns 2017 Alternatus Vermentino, $23. Snappy and vibrant with gooseberry, starfruit and lemon flavours. Deliciously dry and racy. Sweet potato gratin 2014 Blue Pyrenees Estate Chardonnay, $22. Bright and fruity with subtle stone-fruit flavours, plus notes of honeydew and pear. Coq au vin 2016 Quealy Tussie Mussie Pinot Noir, $40. Mesmerising and ethereal red-berry characters with fine tannins and impressive length.

CHILLI-ROASTED PUMPKIN Prep: 10 mins. Cooking: 50 mins. Serves 4-6.

Whole butternut pumpkin, halved, skin on 1 tsp chilli flakes 1 tsp sea salt 1 tbsp maple syrup 1 tbsp olive oil 1 Preheat oven to 200˚C (180˚C fan). 2 Use a spoon to remove seeds and pulp from pumpkin, then discard. Thoroughly wash pumpkin and pat dry with paper towel. Place pumpkin halves on an oiled or baking-paper lined baking tray, flesh-side up. Sprinkle with chilli flakes and sea salt, then drizzle with maple syrup and olive oil. Roast for 40-50 mins or until cooked through and golden brown on top.

Slow-roasted lamb with minted yoghurt 2016 Shingleback Haycutters Shiraz, $18. Soft and bright fruit in a medium-bodied package. Fleshy, rounded, juicy and delicious. Chilli-roasted pumpkin 2016 All Saints Estate Marsanne, $25. Sweet lemon-curd flavours plus a little attractive beeswax. Great energy and intensity. Panna cotta with coffee granita Danes Mocha Gold Coffee Blend, $13/250g. Depth and roundness with chocolatey flavours. Make a strong brew and serve with frothy milk.

PANNA COTTA WITH COFFEE GRANITA Prep: 20 mins. Cooking: 10 mins + refrigeration/freezing. Serves 6.

Panna cotta 400ml double cream 100ml milk 2 vanilla pods, split 2 sheets gold-strength gelatine ¼ cup icing sugar Coffee granita 3 espresso coffee capsules, extracted 400ml hot water 3 tbsp sugar OR 3 tbsp instant coffee 2 cups (500ml) hot water 3 tbsp sugar 1 To make panna cotta, place cream, milk and vanilla in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a gentle simmer for 5 mins, then remove from heat. Meanwhile, place gelatine in a bowl of cold water and allow to soften to a silky consistency. Squeeze out any excess water, then add to cream mixture along with the icing sugar; stir to combine. Once combined, pour mixture through a sieve into a jug, discarding vanilla pods. Pour into dariole moulds and cool to room temperature, then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until set, at least 6 hrs. 2 To make coffee granita, combine all the ingredients in a jug and stir until sugar dissolves. Cool to room temperature, then pour into a plastic container and freeze at least 4 hrs. Scrape mixture with a fork to break up crystals to desired consistency. Store in freezer until needed. 3 To serve, turn panna cotta onto serving plates and top with coffee granita. #

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H G LIVING

Bag an exotic new blend.

Drinks

LEAF OF FAITH Tea drinkers are particular about their brews and brands, but there are always more options to explore, writes Toni Paterson.

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water is high in minerals or heavily chlorinated. The temperature for steeping depends on the type of tea; 95°C is recommended for black and pu’er, 85° to 90°C for oolong and 70° to 80°C for green and yellow. For white tea, which can come as buds alone or buds with leaves, it depends on the specific type. All teas are different, so check the producer’s recommended brew times. A classic ceramic vessel is best for brewing. A good example is the handfinished metal-lidded, glazed pot by Zero Japan, which retains heat better than a glass diffuser. Be sure to use a cute cosy when it’s cold, and always take a moment to warm the pot and cup. If this all sounds too hard, there are excellent premium tea bags on the market. Some use cotton pouches or silk pyramids, but in the end the quality of a tea bag is determined by what’s inside. Buy those containing whole-leaf tea and allow ample brewing time. #

Tasting notes OVVIO NO.22 WHITE JASMINE ORGANIC TEA ($26/130g loose-leaf box) A beautifully fragrant green tea with fresh, grassy notes and scented jasmine flowers. TWG TEA FRENCH EARL GREY ($27/15 tea bags) A subtle, rounded and harmonious black tea scented with bergamot and French blue cornflowers. Well-proportioned and utterly refined. TWININGS PURE PEPPERMINT TEA ($7/40 tea bags) Has an aromatic minty flavour that’s never bitter. Revives with every sip. FORTNUM & MASON THREE FAMOUS TEAS ($30/75g) This mini caddy set makes a luxurious gift for any tea lover. Contains Earl Grey plus the popular Royal and Afternoon blends.

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Teas to try Green This is the most popular tea in China and Japan. The leaves are steamed, baked or roasted, followed by rolling and drying processes. The heat destroys natural enzymes that would lead to oxidisation, allowing the leaves to retain their fresh flavours and green hue. Black India, Sri Lanka and Kenya are the largest producers. The leaves are withered to reduce moisture, then rolled to break the leaf, followed by an oxidative process that darkens the leaves and deepens the flavours. Oolong Produced in China and Taiwan, this tea is made when the withering and rolling is followed by a partial oxidative stage. The leaves are then twisted or rolled, then dried. Its character falls between green and black tea. White A delicate, light-bodied tea, produced from new leaves and young buds in small quantities. Yellow A rare, specialty Chinese tea that has had a very brief oxidative phase and can fall into the whiteor green-tea categories, depending on the colour. Pu’er An aged tea from China’s Yunnan province that has undergone both oxidative reactions and fermentation. Rich and distinctive.

Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Rodney Macuja. TWG and Fortnum & Mason tea from David Jones. For Where to Buy teas online, see page 188.

ea is one of life’s small but enchanting pleasures. It’s good for the body, mind and soul, allowing us a moment’s escape from the bustle of life. Plus, the high polyphenol levels give it healthy antioxidant properties. However, even die-hard tea lovers can be somewhat guilty of not truly understanding their regular ‘cha’, let alone the diversity that exists within the category. I suspect the ubiquitous tea bag is to blame. Its use removes one from the brewing process, detaching us from the congenial art of tea-making. Tea leaves are harvested from the young shoots of the Camellia sinensis shrub. Anything water-soluble in the leaves will end up in your cup, so the purity and integrity of the tea are paramount. For maximum freshness, it’s best to buy tea in small quantities and use within a few months. Filtered water is an essential element of the perfect cup, especially if your tap


Delight in the Majestic Scenery of New Zealand

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Scene & heard Sound travels and when you do, too, your experience of a new place is very much shaped – and sometimes inspired – by what you hear, writes Sarah Pickette. Hear the call of the wild Australians are spoilt for choice when it comes to the sounds of nature. From the rainforest’s insect hum and the coastline’s crashing waves to birdsong in the bush or the near-silence of the desert, it’s all here. Further afield, keen audiophiles might like to explore Mongolia’s Khongor singing dunes, where constant winds create a symphony as they shift the sand; or Echo Point, near India’s Kerala, one of the world’s best spots for hearing your own voice echo back at you. However, the ultimate aural adventure might be on an African safari at night, when the animals are most active and vociferous.

GOOD VIBRATIONS Aural attractions and adventures you’re sure to love the sound of: Audioversum, in Austria’s Innsbruck, is a science-based interactive museum that’s all about encouraging kids and adults to explore the magic of sound. audioversum.at Move over storm-chasers, there’s a far more thrilling natural phenomenon to track down. ‘Skyquakes’ are unexplained noises that come from above, often in remote areas, with no obvious explanation as to the source. They’ve been reported in Italy and Japan, among other locations. strangesounds.org Kukulkan is an ancient Mayan pyramid at Mexico’s Chichen Itza where visitors can experience a bizarre scenario: when you clap your hands, the reverberations create a chirping sound. chichenitza.com The stone walls of the Whispering Gallery in New York’s Grand Central Terminal reflect sound in such a way that if you and another person stand at opposite ends of the underpass, you can hear each other speaking at a normal volume. grandcentralterminal.com

Photography from Getty Images.

A

rriving at your destination after dark is special. Then dawn breaks and birds sing, their calls as fascinatingly unfamiliar as the stirring of exotic trees in the breeze. The traffic begins; there are horns and shouts and music to take in. Our perception of a place is very much formed by what we hear – and sometimes by what we don’t, as anyone who’s ever craved the silence of a bush track can attest. There’s a wealth of wonderful destinations around the world where what you hear is sure to be the highlight of, or even the reason for, your trip. We’ve put our ears to the ground to bring you six of the best auditory experiences.


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Sounds – whether they’re musical, natural or ambient in source – lay down some of the deepest memories we take home from our travels. Attend a concert at Sydney Opera House You don’t need to leave the country to enjoy one of the world’s finest concert halls. Seating more than 2000 people, the high-ceilinged, timber-panelled Concert Hall in the Sydney Opera House delivers outstanding acoustics and is home to the largest pipe organ of its kind (it’s so unique, there’s only one person in the world who knows how to tune it). You can catch all manner of wonderful performances here, from the Sydney Symphony Orchestra to rappers and rock acts. Any event you have tickets to here will sound the best it possibly can. sydneyoperahouse.com Tap your toes in an Irish pub Few performances are as joyfully infectious as when a bunch of locals spontaneously whip out a harmonica, fiddle or accordion and start playing their favourite jig-inspiring tunes in the corner of an Irish pub. Set your

sights on Cork – this Irish county offers a wonderful heritage pub trail where you’re almost guaranteed to enjoy good tunes over your Guinness. corkheritagepubs.com

Get jazzy in New Orleans Nine-million tourists a year can’t be wrong: when it comes to jazz, New Orleans is the undisputed global capital. You’ll hear it in clubs, restaurants, festivals, parades and simply drifting along the city’s streets. This colourful US city turns 300 years old this year, so what better time to visit the Big Easy? neworleansonline.com All the fun of the festivals The most enjoyable way to hear music is undoubtedly in the company of others who love it, too. From Glastonbury in the UK to Coachella in the US, today’s biggest music festivals are major tourist drawcards in their own right. But music lovers can get their fix without digging out the passport, as

Australia hosts some of the world’s best festivals. Byron Bay’s Splendour in the Grass is where you can kick back and hear music from all manner of genres in July, and Falls Festival celebrates every New Year’s Eve with three days of camping and music. January’s Rainbow Serpent in Lexton, Victoria, is another great musical offering, with side serves of art and spirituality. 1ivemusic.com

Experience the art of sound If you prefer to experience art with your ears rather than your eyes, check out what’s on offer at the Biennale of Sydney (running until June 11), where you can take in the work of Hong Kong sound artist Samson Young among the many fantastic exhibits. Elsewhere, check out Melbourne-based Experimenta’s Make Sense exhibition about life in a digital age, which features unique sound installations. It’s on at the University of Tasmania’s Hobart Plimsoll Gallery until May 27. experimenta.org #

There’s music on every corner in New Orleans, where street performers are part of the city’s lively culture. But the tempo really picks up for the annual Jazz & Heritage Festival, which usually begins on the last weekend in April. OPPOSITE An African night safari is an unforgettable experience. Apart from the calls of elephants and other large animals, sounds from lesser- known creature such as reed frogs and nightjars fill the air.

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THE MAGIC O F MAT TE Matte surfaces add another layer of texture to your home. They absorb light and graciously provide a gorgeous backdrop for the fixtures that surround them. Understated elegance: a matte surface such as Laminex AbsoluteMatte speaks quietly of luxury - but doesn’t come with the hefty price tag.

Beyond THE SURFACE

The clever anti-fingerprint technology built into the AbsoluteMatte range means your surfaces will always look as beautiful as the day you installed them.

Matte finishes are more popular than ever – and it’s easy to see why. The innovative new Laminex AbsoluteMatte is flawless to the eye and velvet soft to the touch, as well as being incredibly durable. It is, in fact, a game changer.

I

f it’s visual impact you’re after for your home, look no further: New AbsoluteMatte by Laminex will make you re-think laminate, with its ability to deliver a leading-edge surface that is smooth, lightabsorbing and unbeatably elegant. Its advanced new patent-pending technology delivers superior fingerprint resistance, to ensure your surface remains in impeccable condition. This high-pressure laminate is also stain and scratch-resistant and extremely easy to maintain. Available in 10 on-trend colours - from a clean, architectural white to the most current greys and the ultimate matte black - the AbsoluteMatte palette offers you the opportunity to create a premium look for your benchtops, splashbacks and cabinetry at a very practical price. AbsoluteMatte is as functional as it is beautiful.

White

Neo Cloud

Oyster Grey

Neo Tornado

Stormcloud

Surf

Raw Cotton

Earth

Denim

Black

To find out more about Laminex AbsoluteMatte, or to order your free sample, visit laminex.com.au


LIVING H G

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Beauty Styling by Sarah Maloney and Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Will Horner. Brushes from Designer Brands. For Where to Buy, see page 188.

APPLY NOW Good-quality make-up has never been so affordable, writes Elisabeth King. oundations, lipsticks and mascaras from popular mass-market brands have long been priced over the $20 mark. But now a new generation of players is offering wallet-friendly beauty buys that allow you to play with colour and texture across a full range of categories – from eyes to nails – without retail regret. Many follow trends as closely as their high-end competitors for a fraction of the cost, while maintaining the quality we’ve come to expect. Check out our favourite picks:

F 1

Bourjois Palette Les Nudes ($28)

Portability, value and convenience have kept make-up palettes on trend for decades. But gone are the days when eyeshadow sets featured a couple of wearable colours partnered with shades best suited to a Halloween party. This eight-hue line-up boasts a buildable cream/powder formula that allows you to opt for a natural or bold look.

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Natio Smooth & Rich Lip Colour Palette ($13) Use one of

the three complementary brushes (or just your finger) to dab on a creamy dollop of long-lasting colour. The two innovative palettes – Berry (pictured) and Primrose – showcase Natio’s most popular lipstick shades, from pale nude to deep plum. Each can be used alone or blended to create a customised colour; all contain the formula’s nourishing Argan, jojoba, grapeseed and olive oils.

Essence The False Lashes Mascara Dramatic Volume Unlimited ($6) These days, few

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mascaras are priced under $10, let alone one that promises a false-eyelash effect. This high-performing wonder-worker delivers thicker lashes for less than the cost of two lattes. If you’re looking to

tighten the belt further, this German brand offers just-off-the-runway trends across all the make-up categories for similarly modest sums.

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SMART BUY $15

Designer Brands Brilliant Skin Blush & Illuminator Duo ($15) This Australian brand has

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become a success story by offering high-quality, fashion-forward make-up at affordable prices. Its products, all vegan-friendly and cruelty-free, are blissfully free of nasties. This doubleduty blush and illuminator lights up the face with a healthy glow. It contains hyaluronic acid, chamomile and aloe vera to boost hydration and smooth the complexion. Choose from Rosy Glow (pictured) or After Glow.

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Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure Powerful Pinks ($15 each) A limited-edition collection of six

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new shades billed as contemporary neutrals. The vibrant coral and raspberry colours look chic, while the pale and vintage pinks are ultra-feminine. In a single application, this all-in-one polish delivers the benefits of a base coat, colour, strengthener, growth treatment and top coat, with high chip-resistance and gel-level shine.

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Ulta3 Perfect Balance Foundation ($10) Another Aussie

brand with tiny price tags, Ulta3 ticks all the boxes for budget beauty. While some like to splurge on foundation, there’s no need to if you want a lightweight, oil-free base packed with antioxidants such as vitamins C, B3 and E. For a light glow, go sheer with a single application; to mask fine lines or imperfections, apply several layers and achieve full coverage. Available in Ivory, Beige, Natural (pictured) and Golden. #

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Health

LISTEN UP Be on the lookout for loud situations and proceed with caution to protect your ears, writes Paula Goodyer.

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“Our research in live music venues shows that 15 per cent of 18 to 35 year olds are at risk of hearing loss, and people listening to music through earphones on public transport can be exposed to sound as high as 90 decibels or more,” says Professor Cowan. “The solution is to be as serious about sound protection as we are about sun protection,” he adds. “Avoid sound when it’s too intense and don’t expose yourself to it for too long or too often.” Just as we use sunscreen to protect our skin from too much UV light, we can defend our hearing from damage with a range of barriers: earmuffs when mowing the lawn or using power tools; filtered earplugs at concerts; and noise-cancelling earbuds or earphones. “If you can shield your hearing from excessively loud sound when younger,” says Professor Cowan, “the better your hearing is likely to be when you’re older.”

‘If you can shield your hearing from excessively loud sound when younger, the better your hearing is likely to be when you’re older.’ P R OFE S S OR R OBE RT COWA N

This may also help our ageing brains; some studies have shown an association between hearing loss and the rate of cognitive decline. The reason isn’t clear, but may have something to do with the social isolation that can come with hearing loss. # For more information on protecting your hearing, go to hearsmart.org.

Loud and clear: Safe sound exposure times NOISE

DECIBEL LEVEL

HOW LONG CAN YOU LISTEN WITHOUT PROTECTION?

Jet take-off Personal music player at maximum volume

130

0 minutes

106

3.75 minutes

Pop/rock concert

103

7.5 minutes

Riding a motorcycle

97

30 minutes

Using an electric drill

94

60 minutes

Source: HEARsmart

Illustration by Domenic Bahmann.

hen you injure yourself it usually hurts, but when your hearing is damaged you may not feel a thing. It can happen when loud noise damages the delicate hair cells in the inner ear that send sound signals to the brain. Over time, loud sounds can batter these cells so badly that they no longer transmit sound. That’s how preventable hearing loss can start, and not just in older people. “Increasing numbers of 20 to 60 year olds are acquiring preventable hearing loss and/or tinnitus – the buzzing, roaring, ringing or hissing sound that can occur in one or both ears after listening to loud sound, and which may mean a hearing injury,” says Professor Robert Cowan, CEO of Melbourne’s Hearing Cooperative Research Centre. How loud is too loud? If you need to shout at someone who’s only a metre away in order to be heard, that means the sound level around you is potentially damaging. And if you’re listening to a personal music player through headphones and can’t hear traffic noise or people around you, the volume is probably too high. Sound is measured in decibels; anything below 85 decibels is unlikely to cause problems. Normal speech is around 64. The trouble starts with long or repeated exposure to noise of 85 decibels or more (for example, a drill or loud music at the gym). Clubs and rock concerts can also deliver loud sound, along with personal music players.


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Clean & FRESH Let a De’Longhi Dehumidifier remove excess moisture from the air to create a healthy and comfortable home.

SHARON HUNT, THEAUSTRALIANWOMEN'S WEEKLY BEAUTY AND HEALTH EDITOR

There’s nothing wrong with being houseproud. But while many of us are fixated on our house’s image, what we overlook is the health of our homes. Things like moisture in the air and dampness – and the mould, mildew and dust mites it spawns. Fungal bacteria appear in damp areas, while dust mites flourish in high humidity. It’s enough to make your skin crawl – and far more worryingly, could be detrimental to your family’s health. Mould, mildew and dust mites can trigger allergic reactions for those prone to allergy and asthma symptoms. The good news is dehumidifiers, like the De’Longhi Dehumidfier, are a simple solution for household dampness. Dehumidifiers make your home a more comfortable environment by reducing overall humidity levels and removing excess moisture from the air. With its sleek design, this model will fit effortlessly with your interior décor. Now WALL MOULD that’s something to breathe easy about. CONDENSATION

Delonghli Ariadry Compact Dehumidifier DDS30COMBI, RRP $499

De’Longhi Dehumidifiers are designed to bring perfect harmony to any nvironment, eliminating excessive moisture in the air.

For more information visit delonghi delonghi.com.au


The future of toilets is here. And it’s smart. Washing

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reece.com.au/roca


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wonderful bathroom

For more details, see overleaf. Photograph by Nicole England.

P R ODU C E D BY Sarah Pickette

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FOCAL POINT A luxurious, freestanding Antoniolupi ‘Dafne’ bath is the centrepiece of this Sydney bathroom. “It’s positioned so the homeowners can soak, chat and take in the water views,” says the designer, Darren Genner of Minosa. >


SERENE SCENE Thoughtful, carefully executed details make for an exquisite ensuite in this new build. THE BRIEF Work on their beachside new build was already underway when the owners of this Sydney home asked Darren Genner and Simona Castagna of Minosa to come up with a concept for their ensuite. “The palette had to work in with the home’s contemporary design and exposed concrete walls,” says Darren. “The owners also asked that this bathroom be impeccable in its detailing.” THE PROCESS As concrete was being poured for the slab, Darren and Simona made a quick decision on the internal wall placement between the main bedroom, walk-in wardrobe and ensuite. “We specified a glass wall between the bedroom and ensuite, so the view would be the focus and natural light would flood into the walk-in robe,” says Simona. An additional wall clad in Brazilian granite conceals the generous shower enclosure and toilet, and provides space for the custom vanity with his-and-hers basins and plenty of storage. Most of the fittings are Italian and luxuriously high-spec. The tiles have been specially selected to complement the home’s off-form concrete. THE RESULT “The owners are over the moon with the harmonious feel of this space,” says Darren. MINOSA; MINOSA.COM.AU

FIXTURES Antoniolupi ‘Dafne’ 1700mm white Cristalplant bath, $9300; Gessi ‘Tremillimetri’ rain shower, $1722; Astra Walker A69.48 shower mixer, $327; Gessi ‘Goccia’ basin mixers, from $1380 each; Gessi ‘Goccia’ floor-mounted bath filler, from $1490; 3000mm Corian four-drawer vanity and mirrored lift-up cabinets, POA, all from Minosa; minosadesign.com.

‘Tondo’ rail shower, $325, and ‘Seed’ 550mm above-counter basins, $1510 each, Parisi; parisi.com.au. Flos IC Lights ‘S1’ opal glass pendants, from $562 each, Euroluce; euroluce.com.au. ‘Concrete’ 1200x600mm porcelain tiles in Smoke, $110/m², Rocks On; rockson.com.au. 20mm honed Superwhite dolomite slab, from $700/m2, CDK Stone; cdkstone.com.au.


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03 SHOWERHEADS x 3 Nostalgia ‘Vintage’ 204mm chrome shower rose and arm, $233, Phoenix Tapware; phoenixtapware.com.au.

Round 200mm matt black showerhead and arm, $299, meir.com.au. $299 Meir; meir com au

Photograph by Nicole England. Prices are for supply only unless indicated.

Linfa 250mm round shower rose and arm, $1080, Parisi; parisi.com.au.

04 Lexi ‘Deluxe’ matt black rail shower, $374, Phoenix Tapware; phoenix tapware.com.au. > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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VIEWS ON TAP This award-winning Sydney bathroom makes the most of its beautiful river outlook.

Styling by Sara Äkesson. Photography by John Paul Urizar. Prices are for supply only unless indicated.

THE BRIEF When homeowners Gina and Bruce renovated their haciendastyle 1970s house, they wanted their main bathroom to capture the vistas of nearby Georges River. “Previously, this was a bedroom with purple shag carpet and floral wallpaper,” says Gina. She liaised with Toni Ford of Karanda Interiors to remodel the space as an elegant, timeless bathroom.


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SIDE TABLES x 3 FROM LEFT ‘Stella’ metal and glass side table, $299, Oz Design Furniture; ozdesignfurniture.com.au. ‘Mushroom’ suar-wood stool/side table, $290, Temple & Webster; templeandwebster.com.au. ‘Eggcup’ pine stool/side table in Olive, $750, Mark Tuckey; marktuckey.com.au.

‘ W E S O U G H T T H E P E R F E C T T I L E S F O R O U R B AT H R O O M A N D F O U N D T H E M I N T H E F O R M O F B L AC K M A R B L E - L O O K AC C E N T T I L E S A N D LU X U R I O U S , S O F T-TO N E D I TA L I A N T I L E S F O R T H E F L O O R A N D WA L L S .’ Gina, homeowner

THE PROCESS After installing a new wall to divide the room and lowering the ceiling to accommodate some of the plumbing, Gina and Bruce had the beginnings of a serene bathroom that maximised its river outlook. The star feature is a Victoria+Albert freestanding ‘Terrassa’ bath from Domayne Bathrooms. “This is a west-facing room, so we wanted a UV-stable bath that wouldn’t yellow,” Gina explains. “It also had to be lightweight so it could be manoeuvred down the stairs.” The custom-made vanity is topped with a Caesarstone surface, Marblo oval basin and slimline Parisi ‘Ellisse’ mixer. An LED-backlit mirror echoes the soft, oval shapes at play in this space. THE RESULT “Our bathroom is serene and luxurious,” Gina says. “I look forward to Friday evenings, which is my time to relax in the bath.” The finished room not only met all Gina and Bruce’s expectations but also won the 2017 Victoria+Albert@Domayne Bathroom Design Competition. KARANDA INTERIORS; KARANDA.COM.AU

FIXTURES Victoria+Albert ‘Terrassa’ 1702mm freestanding Quarrycast bath, $5650; Marblo oval above-counter basin, $849; and Parisi ‘Ellisse’ wall-mounted mixer tap, $600, and ‘Loop’ LED-backlit mirror, $899, all Domayne Bathrooms; domayneonline.com.au. Comblanchien 600x600mm porcelain wall and floor tiles, $110/m2, TileArte; tilearte.com.au. For similar black wall tiles, try I Classici 600x1200mm porcelain tiles in Nero Marquinia, $120/m2, Di Lorenzo Tiles; dilorenzo.com.au. Custom vanity with Caesarstone surface in Fresh Concrete, about $3500, Designline Kitchens & Bathrooms; designlinekitchensbathrooms.com. >

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H G BATHROOM SPECIAL 07 HOTEL HEAVEN There’s nothing like a stay in beautiful accommodation – such as London’s Henrietta Hotel, shown here – to get you daydreaming about creating a five-star sanctuary at home. It’s very achievable, says Daniela Santilli, bathroom marketing lead for Reece. Here are her tips for getting the look: “Choose a luxe statement piece and build the rest of your bathroom around it. For me, that piece is almost always a large freestanding bath or a statement vanity with plenty of storage.” “Treat your bathroom to all the trimmings and indulgences, from a heated towel rail to a multisetting showerhead. Focus on little luxuries that will create the feeling of a holiday escape.” “Create a moody hotel atmosphere with dramatic lighting. Consider a decorative light or two above the vanity or bath.” reece.com.au

08

Purple craze Pantone colour of the year Ultra Violet is a tricky shade to work into a bathroom, but Australian tapware manufacturer Sussex has introduced the funky deep-purple hue (left) to its range of special finishes. For a thoroughly modern pairing, mix it up with Rose Quartz, another Pantone favourite that’s also now available across the Sussex range. sussextaps.com.au

0 9 TO P TO W E L S FROM LEFT Jordan Spot cotton bath towel in Stone, $35, Linen House; linenhouse.com. ‘Wave’ cotton bath towel in Grey/White, $189, Loom Towels; loomtowels. com. Morgan & Finch ‘Merida’ cotton bath towel in Midnight, $30, Bed Bath N’ Table; bedbathn table.com.au. Apollo cotton bath towel in Navy/White, $61, L&M Home; lmhome.com.au.

10 TRENDS BLEND Two directional tile trends – playful pastels and bold geometrics – meet in the Futura range of 150x150mm ceramic tiles, $112/m2, at Di Lorenzo Tiles; dilorenzo. com.au.


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TIME ON YOUR SIDE It can be difficult to predict how long a bathroom renovation might take, says Marc Reed, managing director of Candana Bathroomware. Here’s his professional view of how long to allow for the following scenarios: TO RE-TILE AND UPDATE FIXTURES, LEAVING PLUMBING AS IS “Set aside a minimum of two weeks, assuming it all runs to plan. Demolition will take two to three days, waterproofing four (including drying time), tiling one to two, and fit-off another one to two days.”

TO RE-TILE AND UPDATE FIXTURES, RELOCATING PLUMBING “Moving plumbing can be tricky, so allow four weeks. Demolition will take up to four days, rough-in two to four, waterproofing about four (with drying time), tiling and fit-off one to two days each. These can’t happen at the same time nor over weekends, so overcompensate on time. If it’s less than that, amazing!” TO HAVE A CUSTOM VANITY MADE “Depending on the materials, you should be able to have a joiner complete your vanity in three to four weeks. But do ask about a lead time before you start planning.”

range is a new release from the design team at Phoenix Tapware. There are five showers in each of the three collections, NX Quil, NX Vive and NX Cape, designed to suit all sensibilities. Quality and functionality feature throughout. “Nothing has been compromised on,” says Ban Liu, senior designer for Phoenix Tapware. NX Cape twin shower, $990; phoenixtapware.com.au.

M I L L E N N I A L P I N K M AY W E L L C O M E TO D E F I N E A G E N E RAT I O N . I F YO U ’ R E P E AC H Y K E E N O N T H E C O L O U R , C O N S I D E R U S I N G I T I N T H E B AT H R O O M . T H I S ‘ R O D N E Y ’ 1 6 8 0 M M F R E E S TA N D I N G CONCRETE BATH BY BOYD ALTERNATIVES OFFERS CUSHY ERGONOMICS AND G R E AT H E AT R E T E N T I O N . I T L O O K S A M A Z I N G T E A M E D W I T H C O P P E R , B RA S S O R B R O N Z E TA P WA R E . P R I C E D AT $ 78 0 0 F R O M C A N DA N A B AT H R O O M WA R E ; C A N DA N A .C O M . AU. >

Prices are for supply only unless indicated.

FOR SPECIAL ORDERS AND CUSTOMFINISHED TAPWARE “Some European products are not kept in stock in Australia. Check their availability before starting a reno. It may take 12 to 16 weeks to receive an item and avoid expensive air freight.”

13 SHOWERS AHEAD The NX Showers

12 FINISHING TOU TOUCH Sometimes it’s the small details that pull a bathroom together. From Queenslandbased Architectural Bathrooms & Interiors comes the fab Aliah cast-brass shower hose in Rose Gold, $50; abiinteriors.com.au.

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15 MIRROR, MIRROR Featuring integrated LED lighting, this mirrored light from Beacon Lighting offers even illumination and low energy consumption. The ‘LEDlux Reflextion’, available in three shapes, is dimmable and IP44-rated, which means it’s suitable for bathroom use. From $495; beaconlighting.com.au.

16 Vanity flair High-pressure laminate delivers the look of timber with excellent water resistance and durability. Unlike timber, it won’t warp or swell. Domayne is showcasing this material in its Kokoon vanities; the ‘Elements’ 1400mm model (above) is $5475; domayneonline.com.au.

1 7 E L E G A N T O R C H I D S A R E B AT H R O O M - L OV I N G P L A N T S . P L AC E T H E M O N A W I N D O W S I L L O R I N A N Y S P OT W H E R E T H E Y ’ L L R E C E I V E I N D I R E C T S U N L I G H T. TO K E E P YO U R O R C H I D H E A LT H Y, G I V E I T J U S T A S M A L L A M O U N T O F WAT E R E V E RY C O U P L E O F W E E K S .

HIGH HOPES In a tight bathroom a floor-to-ceiling towel ladder is a smart space-saving solution.

18 What a gem Superstar designer Kelly Hoppen is the brains behind the covetable ‘Bijoux’ bath in marble composite, $10,995, for Melbourne-based Apaiser. Joyful and jewel-inspired, it presents a stunning contrast of faceted exterior and smooth interior. apaiser.com

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The Kado Lussi heated towel rail is hard-wired and costs $2315 at Reece; reece.com.au. >


Raising the -S\ZOPUN Standard Maximum Flushing Performance, Minimum Water Usage The design of the bowl propels the water MVY^HYKHUKJYLH[LZHZ[YVUNÃ…\ZOPUNTVTLU[\T


H G BATHROOM SPECIAL

Wellbeing sits at the very heart of this bathroom in Sydney’s Loftus Lane apartment development, designed by architecture and interior-design studio Silvester Fuller. “We wanted the bathroom to be both bright and hygienic, so this guided our material choices,” says partner Jad Silvester. Corian was the primary material specified. “This is because it allowed us to minimise joints in the wet zone, where dirt can hide,” Jad says. “We also love its ability to soften the lines of the vanity.” Corian has been used right through the shower and bath areas, as well as on the floor, the walls and the vanity. silvesterfuller.com

21 Is comfort the ultimate luxury in the bathroom? The design team at L&M Home thinks so, and dreamt up the ‘Lagom’ cotton bath rug (left), $86. At 80x120cm, it’s far too generous to be called a bathmat. Also shown is the ‘Waffle’ guest towel in Stone, $13. lmhome.com.au

23 22 FLOOR SHOW There’s a new player in bathroom flooring: multilayer hybrid floors have the look of timber but are completely water- and warp-proof, and robust enough for heavy traffic areas. Shown here is Godfrey Hirst Floors ‘Veles’ multilayer hybrid flooring, from $55/m², Carpet Court; carpetcourt.com.au.

POWDER PLAY “I was looking for a delicate vanity with long lines and beautiful curves,” says Ru Lenta, interior designer and owner of this Sydney home (left). After much deliberation, she outfitted her powder room with the Zuster Issy ‘Ballerina’ vanity, from $2675, available from Reece. “The tapered legs lend it a lightness that works beautifully with the room’s star feature – the unusual and delicate pendant lights purchased in New York.” Marble also makes a star appearance, in the honed Carrara wall tiles as well as in the Calacatta and Nero Marquita floor tiles. lenta.net

Photography by Ross Honeysett (Loftus Lane) & Tom Evangelidis (Zuster vanity). Prices are for supply only unless indicated.

Soft sell


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What do you need to know before you buy a new bath? Jonathan Carter, marketing director for luxury manufacturer Victoria+Albert baths, outlines the essentials: “Before you start planning your space, consider how your bathroom will be used and the style you’re aiming to create. Understand your bathroom’s purpose.” “Consider matching your bath and basin. Fixtures that naturally complement each other create a clean and balanced space.” “While aesthetics are important, you need to consider practicality and opt for purchases that maximise the room’s space. Contrary to popular belief, a freestanding bath opens up the wall and floor, creating a sense of light and space.” “Online browsing undeniably plays a huge role in the interiors world, but nothing can beat viewing a product in the showroom. It’s really important to speak to an expert about different materials and finishes.” vandabaths.com/aus

25 S T I L L S E E K I N G T H AT P E R F E C T C O L O U R F O R YO U R B AT H R O O M T I L E S ? T H E R E ’ S A G O O D C H A N C E T H AT P E R I N I H A S J U S T T H E T H I N G I N I T S N E W ‘ U - C O L O R ’ R A N G E O F I TA L I A N P O R C E L A I N S U B WAY T I L E S ( L E F T ) , $ 2 7 7/ M ² . T H E Y C O M E I N N O L E S S T H A N 6 4 S H A D E S . P E R I N I . C O M . AU

26 FINE LINES Gessi ‘Cono’ high basin mixer in Chrome, from $1254, Abey; abey.com.au.

27 CHUNKY CHIC IB Rubinetterie ‘Bold’ basin mixer in Rose Gold, from $600, Paco Jaanson; pacojaanson.com.au.

28 LEVER LOVE ‘Industrica’ basin mixer in Durobrite Chrome, $799, Brodware; brodware.com.

FIMA ‘Quad’ single-lever basin mixer in Matte White, $449, Bathe; bathe.net.au. >

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30 31 SHAPE SHIFTER Once again,

Total eclipse Introduce a splash of subtle colour in the bathroom with Aura Home’s new-season ‘Eclipse’ towels in graduated shades. The range starts at $20 for a handtowel. Find them online or at the new Aura concept store in Malvern, Victoria. aurahome.com.au

32 FILLER THRILL Floor-mounted bath fillers give you the freedom to plan your bathroom without compromise. “Keep height in mind as you make your choice,” advises Ben Shirtliff, director of Brodware. “Your filler should be 200-300mm taller than the bath.” At left is Brodware’s Manhattan bath filler with hand shower, $2299; brodware.com.

B

ti L A yo les a C 2 ur re K m² 00x bath a go A N , B 20 ro rg D ea 0m om eo um m f us R on gla loor and I G t T ze . ‘M t H ile d p a ime T s; o jo le M be rce rca ss on au la S so oc mo in tri lut hr nt- tile pe’ ion om for e tile s, f s.c rom om $ .au 64/ .

S C R U B S U P N I C E LY W H O W O U L D N ’ T L OV E A S H O W E R S C R E E N T H AT P R O M I S E S TO C U T C L E A N I N G T I M E BY U P TO 9 0 P E R C E N T ? S T E G B A R H A S U N V E I L E D A S P E C I A L N A N OT E C H C OAT I N G T H AT P R OV I D E S A P R OT E C T I V E B A R R I E R A N D P R E V E N T S B U I L D - U P O F G R I M E A N D L I M E D E P O S I T S . S I N C E T H E C OAT I N G I S U V- S TA B L E , I T W O N ’ T D I S C O L O U R OV E R T I M E . S T E G B A R .C O M . AU

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Prices are for supply only unless indicated.

Methven has reimagined the showerhead, this time with its geometrically inspired ‘Rua’ range. Despite its light look and water-efficient spray, it delivers a full-bodied showering sensation. The ‘Rua’ rail shower (above) is priced at $499. methven.com


Not content with perfecting the look and feel of its showerheads, German-based Hansgrohe also counts acoustic experts in its product-development team. Acoustic performance is one of the key indicators of a shower’s quality, says Hansgrohe process engineer Melanie Chaloupka. She uses a purpose-built sound-testing chamber to test how loud a shower will be in operation and how it will sound from adjoining rooms. “I contribute to making sure our products provide an experience with water that people can enjoy with all their senses, including the sense of hearing.” hansgrohe.com.au

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R E E C E ’ S C U S TO M G L A S S S E RV I C E G I V E S YO U T H E O P T I O N O F C U S TO M I S I N G YO U R SHOWER ENCLOSURE, FROM COLOURED SHOWER SCREENS TO A S L E E K , F U L LY FRAMELESS LOOK . THE POSSIBILITIES A R E L I M I T E D O N LY BY YO U R I M AG I N AT I O N . R E E C E .C O M . AU

37 PURE VANITY Melbourne’s Omvivo has updated its line of ‘Urban MKII’ vanities. These sleek wall-mounted designs feature integrated basins plus beautifully understated bevelled finger pulls for a no-handle look. They’re available from Reece in four sizes and two finishes: powdercoated matt or oak laminate. From $2327 each; omvivo.com.au or reece.com.au. >

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Character reference

3 9 A LWAY S C O N S I D E R T H E I P R AT I N G O F A B AT H R O O M L I G H T ; T H E H I G H E R T H E N U M B E R , T H E B E T T E R I T S P R OT E C T I O N F R O M WAT E R A N D D U S T. ‘ C O R A’ I P 4 4 - R AT E D WA L L L I G H T ( L E F T ) , $ 3 6 7, L I G H TC O ; L I G H TC O .C O M . AU.

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LEADING EDGE With lovely rounded contours and elegant lip edging, the new ‘Cameo’ basins are both modern and refined. Designed by Prospero Rasulo for Valdama and available exclusively through Parisi, there are seven sizes in the collection, each available in gloss or matt white and black or stunning ‘Nuvola’ (cloud). They can be either wall or bench mounted. From $695; parisi.com.au.

42 40 NORDIC VANITY Embrace Scandi-style clean lines with Beaumont Tiles’ new ‘Nordic’ vanity, from $2150. It features push-to-open drawers and comes in four sizes from 900-1800mm. beaumont-tiles.com.au

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PORCELAIN PROPORTIONS While subway tiles have shown no sign of diminishing in popularity, manufacturers are playing with dimensions (while sticking to classic subway proportions) and finishes. These ‘Poitiers’ 300x75mm porcelain tiles, $70/m², feature a glossy glaze and gentle dimpling that bounces light around the bathroom. From Signorino Tile Gallery; signorino.com.au. >

Photograph by Jody D’Arcy (Texture Studio). Prices are for supply only unless indicated.

Renovating an older bathroom presents challenges but also opportunities, says interior designer Jenny Burgess of Perth’s Texture Studio. Her client, the owner of a 1920s house, wanted to retain the charm of its ensuite (left) while upgrading the facilities. “A frameless shower keeps the space visually open,” says Jenny. “Glossy subway tiles and oversized hexagons on the floor bring the tiling into the 21st century. The owner was keen to incorporate the existing vanity into the new design; all other fixtures were from Reece.” texturestudio.com.au


Every drop, personalised. The perfect shower experience is an integral part of creating a bathroom sanctuary just for you, and with the GROHE Smart Control, every aspect of the daily ritual is entirely in your hands. Relax and refresh in a new world of personalisation.

Select Bokoma Spray function for a unique sensation as relaxing as a fingertip massage.

Shower your way and use the hand shower for flexibility of function.

Set and forget your optimum temperature with temperature control that remembers your preference.

Overhead, hand-held or both; create a fully personalised showering experience.

GROHE Rainshower SmartControl Shower System

reece.com.au/grohe


H G BATHROOM SPECIAL 4 3 D R AW E R C A R D I TA L I A N F I R M AG A P E M A K E S I T S ‘ F L AT X L’ CABINETS IN SEVERAL SIZES A N D F I N I S H E S , U N I F I E D BY T H E I R E XQ U I S I T E L E V E L O F D E TA I L . AVA I L A B L E O N S P E C I A L O R D E R F R O M A RT E D O M U S ; A RT E D O M U S .C O M . AU.

44 FLASH FLLUSH No-touch flushplates are big neews in loos. From German maker Viega, which offers plates in more than 100 variations of colour and style, com mes the ‘Visign Style Sensitive’ design, $12279. It flushes with just a wave of the haand. Available from Bathe; bathe.neet.au.

45 TOUCH OF TIMBER Devvised by Wood Melbourne’s

EASY GLIDER Beautifully refined, the Issy ‘Glide’ wall-hung 1750mm vanity with integrated double basins (below) is just the ticket if you’re looking for understated glamour. Priced at $3889 from Reece; reece.com.au.

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CROSS PURPOSED Inspired by marble but made from hard-wearing porcelain, these ‘Open’ laser-cut cross tiles from Perini, priced at $710/m², are highly polished and feature dramatic veining. perini.com.au

Prices are for supply only unless indicated.

Oliver Maclatchy, Maclatchy the ‘Otis’ Otis timber timber-edged edged showerhead (above) is handmade from reclaimed 80-year-old blackbutt. Each piece of timber is put through a 12-step process – including de-nailing, sanding and waxing – to produce an individual, timber-encased chrome showerhead. $440 from Handkrafted; handkrafted.com.


48 Apaiser’s ‘Soka Grand’ bath is steeped in the ritual of bathing. Built into its form are side shelves and a shallow tray for resting a book or glass. “The tray and shelves are the epitome of form meeting function,” says Belinda Try, CEO of Apaiser. At $8295, it’s an investment that will pay you back in hours of pure relaxation. apaiser.com

49 SIMPLE GEOMETRY Sinuous shape meets subtle colouration in Newform’s ‘O’Rama’ tapware, available from Parisi. Available in six satin-style metal finishes, priced from $745 for a basin mixer. parisi.com.au

Plumb choice Keen to get the best out of your plumber next time you renovate? Matthew Stefanou, a Reece plumber and director of Stefanou Plumbing in Melbourne, says the first step is to have a realistic idea of what will fit in your bathroom. “It may be large enough to accommodate a 1200mm shower, but that might compromise the space for a toilet suite and vanity,” he says. “Your plumber or builder can help you work out the space requirements, but it’s good to have a general idea before you start.” Think, too, about the construction of the house. “For example, if you want to move a toilet to a new corner of the bathroom, will you need to rip up a concrete slab?” Educating yourself on flow rates is also useful. “People often wonder why their water pressure is so low in the shower. Sometimes it’s not so much about the pressure but about the volume of the water flowing through the outlet.” And keep your expectations on timings realistic. “During winter, waterproofing may take more time to dry, and this can hold up work for days.” #

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Smart shopper

HOME AUDIO

From speakers that deliver music on the go to set-ups that can transform your living room into a concert hall, the latest in home audio plays to every need, writes Georgia Madden.

PR R IC PO P INTS T e follow o ing arre es estitima ma co costss r a ity ty audio ysstem m, accco i g to Rall un , ma etin ma mana na r at Q li . l w reles le ess spea r: ✚ $ 00 1000. $3 o qu t so soun u d b r:: $1 0 $2200 000, 0 altlho h uggh you cann c up soound bars rs a will im ove thhe audi do di outp of just youur TV V fo r a litttlte ass $200. as u o n s tem: m: 000 3 00 r an vid o rece c , us $50 foor a 1 ea eak r ssyyst s em m. mos ( he lates et ✚ l y A mo m vie--sou t technol g ): as mu h as 0,000 0 ( r evenn mor ) f r an a Atm equip i ped VR a d s ea . >

Sound solutions for your home, the power of paint and good news in recycling.

‘Echo Plus’ voice-controlled smart home hub/speaker, $229, Amazon; amazon. com.au/echo.


H G SHOPPING

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‘ T EC H S H O U L D N ’ T S H O U T F O R YO U R AT T E N T I O N . I T S H O U L D B L E N D I N TO YO U R L I F E ST Y L E A N D H O M E E N V I RO N M E N T.’

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hether you’re an audiophile who can’t bear the thought of missing a note, or you simply want a portable solution that lets you play music outdoors, the latest audio systems have you covered. As with so many aspects of our lives, technology has transformed the home-audio landscape almost beyond recognition. Gone are the tangled wires and complicated installation. Instead, compact Bluetooth speakers allow you to stream a playlist from wherever you are – even the shower – on your mobile device while wireless systems can deliver music to every room in the house via a few taps on an app. Smart speakers will find and play favourite songs upon voice command, and sleek sound bars and surround-sound systems offer rich, immersive audio without cluttering up the living room. “Multi-room, wireless streaming systems are extremely popular,” says Len Wallis, owner of Sydney’s Len

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Tad Toulis, Sonos

Wallis Audio. “Many are incredibly easy to install: all you need is a powerpoint, a good wireless network and an app.” Ralph Grundl, marketing manager at home-entertainment distributor QualiFi, concurs. “What’s great about these systems is the ability to play music inside and out – the same songs or different ones in every room. You can stream music from your phone when you’re on the go, then plug it in at home so it becomes part of your multi-room system. And all the systems are becoming more affordable,” he adds. Music lovers can even tailor sound set-ups to suit the acoustics of particular areas, says Tad Toulis, head of design experience at Sonos. “Every room has unique acoustic qualities that affect sound,” he explains. “It’s important to maximise sound quality. In the old days you had to hire a professional to come in and tune your speakers. Now, with technology such as Sonos Trueplay, you can do it yourself using an app.”

1 Ruark ‘R1 Mk3’ Bluetooth radio in limited-edition Sea Green, $449, Len Wallis Audio; lenwallisaudio. com. 2 ‘HomePod’ wireless smart speaker/home assistant in White, $499, Apple; apple.com/au. 3 Bang & Olufsen Beoplay A9 MKII wall-mountable wireless speaker in White (comes with maple legs, not shown), $3499, Beoplay; beoplay. com. 4 Dynaudio ‘Music 3’ wireless (batteries or Bluetooth) speaker in Navy, $999, BusiSoft AV; busisoft. com.au. 5 ‘Google Home Mini’ voice-controlled smart speaker/ home assistant in Chalk, $79, Google; store.google.com/au. 6 ‘Boom 2’ waterproof wireless speaker in Cashmere, $229, Ultimate Ears; ultimateears.com/ en-au. 7 WK7 AI ‘ThinQ’ wireless smart speaker featuring Google Assistant, $299, LG; lg.com/au. 8 Denon ‘Heos 3 HS2’ wireless speaker in White, $449, Harvey Norman; harveynorman.com.au.


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SHOW TIME A surround-sound home-theatre system will give you the best movie-watching experience, says Len Wallis. Here’s how to set it up for maximum performance. ✚ Have a minimum of six speakers: three at the front (left, centre and right); two at the rear (on either side of the seating); and a subwoofer (the lowfrequency channel that delivers dramatic sound effects). ✚ For greater surround sound or to play movies with a Dolby Atmos soundtrack, consider adding ceiling speakers. ✚ Position the three front speakers on the same plane as the screen, so that voices come from the correct direction. ✚ The tweeter (high-frequency driver) should be at ear level when you’re seated. ABOVE Surround-sound wireless audio system with ‘Sub’ subwoofer, ‘Playbase’ speaker and two ‘One’ speakers, $2596, Sonos; sonos.com. BELOW ‘HW-NW700’ soundbar with built-in woofer, POA, Samsung; samsung.com.au. RIGHT Surround-sound wireless audio system with ‘Playbar’ sound bar, ‘Sub’ subwoofer and two ‘One’ speakers, $2596, Sonos.

In-ceiling and in-wall speakers are other trending audio options, says Wallis. “While most don’t have the performance capabilities of a good box speaker, they’re still impressive,” he says. “They are unobtrusive, can be painted to blend in with your decor, and are ideal for secondary listening areas such as dining rooms and bedrooms.” Ironically, many consumers are using high-tech audio equipment to play vinyl records, which have enjoyed a revival. “We’re seeing a return to traditional set-ups, with substantial speakers, quality amplification, plus some form of streaming service and, in many cases, a turntable,” says Wallis. But whether the recording format is vintage or digital, the goal is always excellent, fuss-free sound reproduction. “Many consumers have grown up with convenient, low-cost access to vast amounts of music, but the audio quality has always been pretty ordinary,” says Wallis. “They’re looking for a high-performance version that doesn’t compromise on convenience.” A well-chosen system of dedicated components delivers the best-quality sound for music and also scores top points for versatility, says Grundl.

“It’s ideal for families as you can plug in a variety of different elements, such as the TV, CD player and gaming station.” Sound bars – slender, box-like speakers that sit under a TV or on the wall – are also selling well, according to Adam Vaccaro, audio-visual product expert at Appliances Online. “They’re discreet, easy to set up and deliver excellent sound. Some can be used as a media centre, with Bluetooth for streaming music, and Chromecast to stream Netflix or YouTube.” For fully immersive acoustics and a cinema-like TV experience, consider a surround-sound home theatre system that delivers audio from multiple speakers around the room. “They create a much wider sound field than other systems and, as the units are modular, you can customise the set-up to suit your specific needs,” says Vaccaro. With so many options available, it’s important to find the one that strikes a chord with you. Test any system you’re interested in by listening to music that you’re very familiar with, advises Grundl. “This will give you a true audio picture because you’ll know exactly how it’s meant to sound.” #

E V E N A B A S I C S O U N D B A R W I L L I M P ROV E T E L E V I S I O N S O U N D Q UA L I T Y, B U T I F YO U WA N T O N E TO P L AY M U S I C TO O, LO O K F O R A M O D E L T H AT ’ S D E S I G N E D F O R B OT H T V A N D AU D I O.


EYES ON THE PRIZE The buzz is growing as the My Ideal House project reaches its final, detailed stages of construction. he flooring is in at My Ideal House, underlining the fact that the home is now thrillingly close to completion. Installers were onsite recently to put in the Quick-Step ‘Palazzo’ engineered-timber floor. These broad, blond planks will feature in the downstairs hall and multipurpose living area, as well as upstairs in all three bedrooms. Tilers, too, have been hard at work, laying the lovely concrete-look porcelain pieces from Di Lorenzo Tiles, which flow through the open-plan living area and out to the external entertaining area. Now that the floors are down, the kitchen fit-out can begin; an island bench, tailored joinery and top-of-the-line Smeg appliances are scheduled for installation. The glass-enclosed living pavilion is looking beautiful, with high-performance Viridian ‘LightBridge’ sliding doors now in place. These exceptional doors play a pivotal role in the house, enabling the beautiful connection between indoors and out that competition-winning architect

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Merging sustainability with style produces a winner.

THIS PAGE Sustainable Innowood cladding wraps around the window seat in the multi-purpose room downstairs, adding texture and a sense of warmth to the finished space. OPPOSITE clockwise from top left Landscapers have been busy preparing the grounds for the new lawn and plants. Large-format, concrete-look porcelain tiles from Di Lorenzo Tiles create an easy transition between inside and out. Installers putting in Quick-Step ‘Palazzo’ engineered-timber flooring in Pure Matt Oak; it’s so easy to lay, they completed the job in a day. A view from the back garden shows Viridian ‘LightBridge’ double-glazed doors ready to be installed. The stair handrail epitomises the level of thoughtful detail that’s gone into this project.


Text by Sarah Pickette. Photography by Nic Gossage.

A high-performance ceiling fan will be installed downstairs in the multi-purpose room – the only mechanical cooling this energy-efficient home will require. Madeleine Blanchfield devised as one of the touchstones of her design. The highly engineered double-glazed glass doors offer excellent temperature and UV control, noise reduction and security. Work continues on the house’s signature windowboxes, which are clad in Innowood, a highly sustainable timber-composite material that will bring texture and definition to the facade. Innowood also features inside, wrapping beautifully around the window seat in the multi-purpose room and bringing warmth to the space. A Haiku ‘I Series’ high-performance ceiling fan will be installed – the only mechanical cooling this energyefficient home will require. Under the direction of landscape designer Richard Unsworth from Sydney firm Garden Life, bobcats have been levelling the ground around the house in preparation for the lawn and plantings. ‘Bowral Blue’ bricks from

Austral Bricks have been used at the rear of the garden. These form a low, inviting seat that extends across the width of the block. Installed neatly and discreetly in the garage at My Ideal House is the Tesla ‘Powerwall 2’ solar-storage battery from Bradford Energy, which is now ready to swing into action and provide solar energy to the house every evening. It’s part of the Bradford 5.4kW Solar ChargePack, which includes 5.4kW solar panels affixed to the roof. All in all, it’s a busy time on the My Ideal House site at the Crest by Mirvac development in Sydney. The bathroom fixtures will soon be plumbed in, electricians are about to install energyefficient Brightgreen lights and joiners from Top Knot Carpentry & Joinery will transform the bare interiors into warm and beautifully detailed spaces. > Follow the build journey in H&G and online at myidealhouse.com.au. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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rom the inviting tub that will take pride of place in the family bathroom to the soothing showers in the ensuite, each bathroom element in My Ideal House has been designed to create a haven of relaxation. Refined, elegant and luxurious, these rooms are shaping up to be standout spaces in the house. And given this is a property overflowing with beautiful finishes and details, that’s quite an achievement. “A great bathroom always starts with the right layout,” says Madeleine Blanchfield, Sydney architect and winner of the My Ideal House design competition. “It should feel comfortable and spacious, have ample storage and be easy to move around in.” Flooded with natural light that pours in through a cedar-framed window, the family bathroom fulfils Madeleine’s intention that it should be thoughtfully zoned and fitted out. “The shower and toilet are discreetly tucked away so the freestanding bath

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and vanity can shine,” she says. And shine they will. A roomy 1700mm Kado Lussi m Reece freestanding bath (below, left) from has been specified for the space. “It’s a cast solid-surface bath that’s luxurious in feel and timeless in style,” says Daniela Santilli, bathroom marketing lead for Reece. Across from the bath will be a generous 1800mm Rifco ‘Acqua’ wall-hung vanity with a blackwood timber top. It’s from Reece, like all the bathroom’s fixtures. “This is an Australian-designed and made piece of bathroom furniture,” says Daniela. “Being wall-hung, it’s clean-lined and space-efficient, and will have a lovely, light presence in the room.” The vanity will be topped with a pair of Alape ‘Unisono’ 375mm above-counter basins. They’re formed from a single piece of steel pressed into shape and coated with three layers of a special glass/ceramic glaze. “The result is a crisp, thin edge and a contemporary look,” says Daniela. “And Mizu ‘Soothe’ wall mixers (left) marry well with the basins. They’re an elegant choice because of their gently rounded form.” For a cohesive look, all the bathroom tapware and accessories – from robe hooks to the bath spout and towel rail – are drawn from the Mizu ‘Soothe’ collection.

Hidden away behind the bathroom door is an ingenious toilet: the Roca ‘Meridian’. This in-tank model (below, right) g is water-efficient and integrates the cistern and button seamlessly into its pan. The fixtures in the main bathroom have been kept deliberately low-key, says Madeleine. “This is so the room feels less like a wet area and more like any other room of the house.” When it came to the ensuite in My Ideal House, Madeleine designed a fresh, open space. “I wanted it to feel like part of the dressing area,” she explains. To achieve this effect, the shower and toilet are zoned to the right of the centrally placed vanity, with his-and-hers walk-in wardrobes to the left. “By having the functional things tucked out of the way, the view from the main bedroom will be of a handsome vanity.” The vanity specified for the ensuite is the same design as in the main bathroom, only a little smaller at 1500mm. It will also be topped with an Alape ‘Unisono’ basin and Mizu ‘Soothe’ mixer, a very efficient tap with a 4-star WELS rating that uses just 7.5 litres of water per minute. Ceiling and rail showers work in tandem in the ensuite, offering the home’s future owners great flexibility. The overhead shower selected is the 200mm Mizu ‘Drift’ (above). “It will deliver a drenching shower that feels very luxurious, thanks to its ability to create a voluminous spray from a minimal amount of water,” says Daniela. Likewise, the Nikles ‘Pure 105’ rail shower (far left) features turbine technology within its showerhead, mixing air with water to deliver a powerful, massaging spray. Downstairs, the powder room features a compact Roca ‘Meridian’ back-to-wall toilet and AXA ‘Cento’ 450mm wall basin. “This is a great space-saving design,” says Daniela. There’s a beautiful cohesiveness to the bathrooms in My Ideal House, she adds. “Each fits perfectly with the aesthetics of the house. They’re thoughtful and understated, but also practical and efficient.” #

Photograph by xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

SHOWERED WITH COMPLIMENTS The bathrooms in My Ideal House are awash with thoughtful inclusions and beautiful, highly efficient fixtures.


Property

MAGIC COAT A well-applied lick of paint will always add a little gloss to your home’s sale price, writes Harvey Grennan. ow often do you see a fresh paint job when you inspect a house or an apartment for sale? These days, it seems almost compulsory for agents to recommend this improvement to any clients listing a property. After all, painting can be a relatively inexpensive way of giving your home a quick facelift. Sometimes, however, painting can cause more problems than it solves. A cheap coat of paint over old varnish, or an acrylic topcoat applied over enamel without an undercoat, might last about as long as the marketing campaign before the surface begins to peel or chip. It then has to be stripped off, sometimes at greater cost than the substandard painting. But how much will (good) paintwork really add to the sale value of your home, and how much does it cost? Before you begin calling contractors for quotes, you can roughly estimate the expenditure yourself. Professionals charge about $40-$45 an hour, which doesn’t include the paint and other materials. Alternatively, you can estimate the price of the job on a square-metre basis. For an undercoat and two top coats, architectural advisory service Archicentre puts the cost at $15-$40 per square metre for the exterior of a timber house if the timber is in good condition ($20-$60 if it’s in poor nick). Inside, the cost is $10-$25 per square metre, but you may have to pay extra for wall-surface repairs. Online trades-hire outfit Hipages (hipages.com.au) provided the following indicative expenses: $2500-$3500 for a two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit; $5500-$8000 for the exterior of a

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two-storey, three-bedroom brick house; or anything from $10,000-$20,000 for the outside of a weatherboard house, depending on its size and condition. The secret of a good paint job is all in the preparation. Nathan Waldron of Adelaide’s Sureline Painting advises homeowners not to be too price-driven when seeking quotes from painters. “Some people may go for a cheaper quote, but if the preparation isn’t up to scratch, you are going to see the results after a year or so,” he says. “It’s also important to match the correct type of paint with the surface.” And now for the $64,000 question: what will all this effort add to the sale price of your home? “I often tell my clients that painting is the easiest and most cost-effective renovation you can do prior to marketing,” says Sam Varrica, director of Raine & Horne in Sydney’s Five Dock. “It’s a simple way to add life and shine to what could be a stale space. “We’ve also had some excellent results from a simple sanding and painting of timber floorboards, which creates an attractive, modern feel without excessive renovation costs,” adds Varrica. “No case is the same, but a nice paint job may add five per cent or so to a sale price. What it certainly will do is make it easier to get a timely result.” #

Hire calling Domayne has introduced a property-styling service to help when you are marketing your home. Domayne Hire consultants can help with everything from coordinating your existing furnishings with a few new pieces to complete makeovers, and there’s a wide range of contemporary, industrial and vintage options available, for all parts of your home. See domayneonline.com.au /domayneservices/hire.

Follow the journey at www.myidealhouse. com.au.

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H G ADVICE

Green house

SOFT TARGET Your local supermarket has stepped up to make the recycling of plastic bags and soft-plastic packaging a whole lot easier, writes Sarah Pickette. reat news for those who deplore the amount of plastic packaging in their rubbish bin: recycling soft plastics is about to get easier, courtesy of the REDcycle collection program. It’s been in operation since 2010 and has recycled about 380 million pieces of plastic so far, but REDcycle hasn’t always been as accessible as it could be – until now. Earlier this year, Coles, a long-time REDcycle partner, announced it now has a collection bin in each of its supermarkets, and is rolling out larger bins in response to customers complaining that their local bins were always full. And by the end of June, Woolworths/Safeway is aiming to have REDcycle bins in every one of its Australian supermarkets. “We will have 1000 or so additional collection points across the country, taking us up to about 1800 in total,” says Elizabeth Kasell, founder of Melbourne’s RED Group, which operates of REDcycle. “This rollout means soft-plastics recycling will be available to more Australians than ever.” The expansion of the program dovetails neatly with the phasing out of single-use plastic shopping bags by Coles and Woolworths by the end of June in NSW, Victoria and WA. The ACT, SA, Tasmania and the Northern Territory already have state-wide bans in place; Queensland’s starts in 2019. “Our focus is on collecting the unavoidable plastic,” says Kasell. “Things like bread bags and the thin film your toilet-paper rolls are wrapped in.”

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‘ WE NOW HAVE 1000 OR SO ADDITIONAL COLLECTION P OINTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY... THIS ROLLOUT MEANS SOFT-PLASTICS RECYCLING WILL BE AVAILABLE TO MORE AUSTRALIANS THAN EVER .’ Elizabeth Kasell, RED Group

As a rule of thumb, any plastic item that can be scrunched into a ball can be returned to a REDcycle bin. You can recycle cereal-box liners, frozen vegetable packets, pasta and rice bags, chip packets, lolly bags and biscuit wrappers (though not the trays some contain; they’re considered a rigid plastic). Also recyclable are zip-lock bags, clean cling wrap, bubble wrap and even old polypropylene green bags. Items you can’t return to REDcycle include plastic drinking straws, bread-bag tags, polystyrene and cellophane. “We currently receive more than 500,000 pieces of soft plastic every day,” says Kasell. “Last year we saw a huge spike in people using REDcycle bins. I think soft plastics are one of the last few pieces of the recycling puzzle and it’s wonderful to see our biggest supermarkets taking responsibility for what happens to the packaging of the items they sell.” # For a full list of soft plastics accepted for recycling, visit redcycle.net.au.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

3 OF A KIND: GREAT REUSABLE SHOPPING BAGS

Made from sustainably grown jute, Apple Green Duck’s ‘The Grocer’ bag, $10, is biodegradable at the end of its usefulness. applegreenduck.com

Upcycled from coffee bags by a Melbourne social enterprise sewing group, the ‘Abuk’ tote, $59, is available from Global Sisters. globalsisters.org

Each ‘The Banner’ shopping bag, $15, is a one-off design made from upcycled street banners and fully lined for strength. thefreshgreenbag.com.au


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H G ADVICE

Pets

NO KIDDING Hold your horses and dogs – it seems miniature goats are the new pet du jour, writes Roger Crosthwaite.

W

hen does an animal stop being livestock and become a pet? Any animal that you have a connection with, one that returns affection, can be a pet, whether it has paws, wings or hooves. Of course, there’s always the problem of its adaptability. Not all animals, however well you get along with them, will fit into every domestic situation. While miniature goats may not be on everyone’s radar as a possible pet, their size (or lack of it), intelligence and affectionate, playful nature could win you over if you give them a chance. There are exotic varieties, such as the pygmy goat and Nigerian dwarf goat, but the Australian miniature goat was developed locally and bred specifically for its small stature. Standing just over 60cm at the shoulder as adults, they’re robust animals. While they’re used to being outdoors, they do need shelter, a well-fenced enclosure and company. Yes, company. If a kid is, as recommended, bottle-fed from the earliest possible age, it will bond very closely with its human owners. You will become the herd they never had. “They’re very sociable and can be quite attention-seeking,” says Peter Willott of Sapphire Park Miniature Goat Stud in Glen Innes, on the Northern Tablelands of NSW. “Once they’ve been bottle-fed, they become very affectionate with you,” Peter explains. “They’ll follow you around everywhere. They may also bond with your other pets – and with chooks, I’ve discovered. I often sell kids in pairs and that way they keep each other company.”

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Kids are usually sold within a couple of weeks of birth and hand-reared by their new owners. Desexed males, or wethers, are less troublesome and, let’s be honest, less malodorous than intact males. Adult females can produce milk, a litre or so a day, so that could influence your choice. Goats can be trained from an early age, much like a dogs. Some have even been known to walk on a leash. The grazing habits of goats are legendary, and just because miniature ones are smaller doesn’t mean they’ll be any less destructive in a prized garden. Hence the need for a separate enclosure and secure fence. Their grazing habits can be supplemented with hay, grain, fruit and vegetables. They also require yearly vaccinations, plus regular worming and hoof-trimming. As an adult, even a miniature goat is a robust animal (like a medium-sized dog) and pretty lively. Toddlers and grown-up goats could be a volatile mix. But if you have the space, time and lifestyle to accommodate a miniature goat, you could have a very loving animal companion, just with hooves instead of paws. #

BREED ALL ABOUT IT Australian miniature goats generally live about 15 years, but sometimes into their twenties. When sold as a pet and not a show animal, a kid will usually cost $250-$350. To find a list of breeders in your state, go to miniature goatbreedersassociation.com.au.


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Styling by Sarah Maloney. Photograph by Will Horner. Eggshell Acrylic paint in Snow Patrol (wall) and Lamb’s Wool (joinery), both $46/L, Porter’s Paints.

Shelf obsessed: exquisite things, beautifully arranged.

‘Everton’ console, $1199, Provincial Home Living. ‘Panama’ pendant light, $106, Bunnings. ON CONSOLE, TOP SHELF from left ‘Rodart’ sculpture, $110, Amalfi. ‘Pompei’ vase, $70, Ecology. ‘Cell Print B’ framed print, $150, Provincial Home Living. ‘Pompei’ jug, $30, Ecology. ‘Dragonfly’ framed print, $85, Tara Dennis Store. ‘Ike’ candleholder, $27, Amalfi. ‘Pimba’ faux succulent in pot, $50, Madras Link. ‘Tahoe’ sculpture, $60, Amalfi. MIDDLE SHELF from left ‘Avoca’ bookends, $70/pair, Madras Link. ‘Tubular’ vase, $105, Curious Grace. ‘Bay’ candle, $60, Country Road. ‘Modern’ bowl, $65, Weylandts. ‘Ceres’ urn, $50, Salt&Pepper. ‘Ashika’ clock, $39, Early Settler. BOTTOM SHELF from left ‘Tripod’ flowerpot, $38, French Bazaar. ‘La Paz’ faux cactus in pot, $15, Madras Link. Flameless candle, $55, Tara Dennis Store. ‘Mason’ footed serving stand, $70, Ecology. ‘Spots’ decorative ball, $20, Salt&Pepper. ‘Waterloo’ jug, $140, Provincial Home Living. ON FLOOR Jute runner in Concrete (76x270cm), $230, Madras Link. >


H G SHOPPING

TAKE A When thoughtfully curated, simple storage systems become works of art in their own right. ST Y LI N G Sarah Maloney P HOTOG R A P HY Will Horner

50+ FAB finds under $150

‘Thatch’ buffet and hutch, $2999, Provincial Home Living. ‘Fulham’ dining chairs, $149 each, Early Settler. ‘Cucina’ tea towel in Bone, $22, L&M Home. ‘Cantina’ dining table (150x90cm), $1199, Oz Design Furniture. Vintage bench seat. ‘Lenox’ pendant light, $69, Early Settler. ON TABLE from left ‘Earth’ mug, $20, Weylandts. ‘Malmo’ vase, $60, and ‘Kookaburra’ pitcher, $70, both Ecology. ‘Brittany’ table runner, $30, Tara Dennis Store. ON FLOOR ‘Marled Grey’ rug (60x91cm), $73, Dash & Albert. For details of cabinet contents, turn to page 189.


Australian House & Garden ‘Otoway Stripe’ table runner, $30, Myer.

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‘Spilt’ salad bowl, $55, Weylandts.

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Glass jars, $69 (small) and $90 (tall), French Bazaar.

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SSttyyl ylisst’s assistants Sara Åkesson, Anne-Marie Molloy & Nonci Nyoni. Eggshell Acrylic paint in Snow Patrol (opposite), $46/L, Porter’s Paints.

‘Nomad’ platter, $30, Salt&Pepper.

‘Ro Mangowood plates, from $14 each, Tara Dennis Store.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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‘Marla’ faux succulent in pot, $50, Madras Link.

‘Block’ alarm clock, $90, Until.

Scented play dough, from $6 each, Dough My Dear Play Dough.

Toy arrows with feathers, $49 each, The Society Inc.

‘Pio nee r’ t ca oy

Loog mini guitar, $129, Kido Store.

Eggshell Acrylic paint in Santorini, $47/L, Porter’s Paints.

U 70, r, $ ntil . ‘Ron’ toy caravan, $35, Happy Go Ducky. ‘Roxy’ tin toy VW beetle, $20, Happy Go Ducky.

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

‘Barry’ toy cement truck, $45, Happy Go Ducky.

Ceeda Cavity toy sword, $45, Happy Go Ducky.

‘Loni’ throw, $130, Linen House.

Opposite page: Eggshell Acrylic paint in Lamb’s Wool (wall with chart) and Snow Patrol (behind bed), both $46/L, Porter’s Paints. For Where to Buy, see page 188.

Vans ‘Sk8-Hi’ high-top sneakers, $80, Kido Store.


SHOPPING H G

‘Vintage’ toy box, $99, Willow & Wood. ‘Calypso’ single bed frame, $349, James Lane. ON WALL from left Ruler decal, $65, Quercus & Co. ‘Know The Human Body’ chart, $30 (unframed), Lilly & Lolly. Curtain in ‘Corfu’ fabric in Quartz, $40/m, Warwick Fabrics. ‘Felt Shelfie’ wall shelf (60cm), $80, Willow & Wood. Handy Shelf photo shelf (90cm), $30, and Flexi Storage floating shelves, $28 each, Bunnings. ‘Panhandler’ brackets, $45 each, The Society Inc. ON TOP SHELF ‘La Paz’ faux cactus in pot, $15, Madras Link. MIDDLE SHELF from left ‘Saving It For Later’ print by Natalie Martin, $49 (unframed), Lilly & Lolly. The Snail And The Whale book by Julia Donaldson & Axel Scheffler, $15, Dymocks. ‘Shamu’ whale sculpture, $45, Amalfi. BOTTOM SHELF from left ‘Apollo’ alarm clock, $30, Emporium. ‘Marla’ faux succulent in pot, $50, Madras Link. ‘Drumkit’ tins, $50/set, Until. Bookrest lamp, $90, Lilly & Lolly. The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes book by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, $13, Penguin. ‘Hobie’ toy boat, $55, Happy Go Ducky. ON BED from rear Mini Rodini ‘Odd Stripe’ cap, $52, Kido Store. ‘Meiko’ pillowcase in Navy, $100/single-size quilt cover set, Linen House. Pony Rider ‘Hieroglyphic’ cushion, $149, Kido Store. ‘Valley’ cushion in Soft Green, $60, Madras Link. ‘Noah’ cushion in Ochre, $57, L&M Home. Fictional Objects ‘Yellow Flags’ single-size fitted sheet, $80, Kido Store. ‘Alyssia’ single-size flat sheet, $100/set, Linen House. ‘Meiko’ quilt cover (as before). ‘Tee’ king-single coverlet, $150, Linen House. IN TOY BOX ‘Blanket Stitch’ cushion, $50, Madras Link. ‘Blaze’ throw, $149, Pony Rider. ON FLOOR ‘Herringbone’ rug in Indigo (76x243cm), $310, Dash & Albert. # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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SHOPPING H G

9 by design

LIGHTS 1 7

3

5

2

8 6

9

Styling by Kate Nixon. Photograph by John Paul Urizar.

4

1 ‘Pinch’ banana-fibre pendant light, $2650, Spence & Lyda. 2 ‘Tubular’ brass pendant light, $130, About Space. 3 ‘FlowerPot VP1’ lacquered-metal pendant light in Beige Red, $395, Great Dane. 4 ‘Bella’ large pleated-fabric pendant light in Silver, $545, Zaffero. 5 ‘Vaasa’ glass pendant light with copper finish, $129, Early Settler. 6 ‘Blown’ glass pendant light in White, $650, Great Dane. 7 ‘Hugo’ pendant light with metal base, $89, Early Settler. 8 Muuto ‘Pull’ oak floor lamp with textile-covered plastic shade, $705, Top3 by Design. 9 ‘Tokyo’ metal and wood table lamp, $695, Fanuli. ‘Vionnet’ iron and brass side table with marble top, $1255, Contents International Design. Studio Arhoj ‘Summer’ porcelain bowl, $75, Luumo. Antique 19th-century terracotta architectural corbels, $945/pair, Elements I Love. Eggshell Acrylic paint in Ochre (upper wall) and Madras (mouldings), both $102/4L, Porter’s Paint. ‘Maxi Edge Star’ plywood parquetry panels (on floor), $295/m², Maxi Plywood. Flowers and vase by Mr Cook. For Where to Buy, see page 188. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G SHOPPING

9 by design

1 Aqipa Australia ‘Audio Pro Addon T5’ wireless speaker, $380, Hardtofind; hardtofind.com.au. 2 Lexon ‘Hoop LA95’ Bluetooth ‘doughnut’ speaker in Black, $179, The Design Gift Shop; thedesigngiftshop.com. 3 Beosound Shape ‘Up Down Up’ speaker in Pink, from $6500 for a six-tile configuration, Bang & Olufsen; bang-olufsen.com. 4 Kreafunk ‘Afunk’ Bluetooth speaker in Coral, $199, Until; until.com.au. 5 ORB ‘Art’ wireless speaker in Walnut Grey, $349, Tivoli Audio; tivoliaudio.com.au. 6 SoundWear ‘Companion’ speaker, $500, Bose; bose.com.au. 7 Rega ‘Planar 6’ turntable, $2399, Addicted to Audio; addictedtoaudio.com.au. 8 ‘R7 High Fidelity’ radiogram in handcrafted furniture-grade cabinet, $4299, Synergy Audio Visual; synergyaudio.com. 9 Bluetooth portable speaker in Rose Gold look, $19, Kmart; kmart.com.au. #

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Produced by Sophie Wilson.

AUDIO


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Where inspiration lives…


SHOPPING H G

Easy update

SUNROOM Spending time in a room made for catching rays will always brighten your day. Choose from two hot looks: one bursting with colour; the other a relaxing scheme of mono tones.

wwFor Where to Buy, see page 188.

TECHNICOLOUR DREAM

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Spider plant in plastic hanging basket, $80, The Littlest Plant Shop. Wall panels in Wash & Wear 101 paint in Lexicon, $59/4L, Dulux. Jennifer Tyers ‘Dimboola3’ watercolour (56x38cm), $880 (unframed), Koskela. ‘Flottebo’ sofa bed in Lysed Green polyester with side table, $799, Ikea. Cushions, $6-$20 each, Ikea. Muuto ‘Around’ MDF coffee table, $645, Living Edge. Takeawei ceramic bowl (22cm), $170, Koskela. ‘Aegean Blue’ porcelain tiles (200x200mm), $289/m2, Bonnie and Neil. ‘Spencer’ leather shoes in Grey/Yellow, $395, Habbot.

PLANTATION PLUS

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Roman blind (90x180cm), from $320 (installed), Victory Blinds. For aluminium windows, see Trend Windows. Casamance ‘Apaches’ wallpaper in Shinok, $265/roll, Porter’s Paints. Karen Mcphee artwork (30x30cm), $170, Bluethumb. Lincoln Brooks ‘Mackay’ rattan armchair, from $1299, Naturally Cane. ‘Glitz’ viscose/polyester rug (2x2.8m), $990, Nick Scali. ‘Transparency’ merino lambswool cushions, $350 each, Fanuli. ‘Pretzel’ cane table, $399-$499, Naturally Cane. Faux snake plant in pot, $25, Kmart. Café Culture cup, $5, Maxwell & Williams. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G STOCKISTS

WHERE TO BUY Locate your nearest stockist by contacting the following suppliers. A Aalto Colour aaltocolour.com Abey 1800 809 143; abey.com.au About Space (03) 9417 4635; aboutspace.net.au Adairs 1300 783 005; adairs.com.au Addicted to Audio (02) 9550 4041; addictedtoaudio.com.au Afghan Interiors (02) 9280 0324; afghaninteriors.com.au Allans Billy Hyde (03) 8696 4650; allansbillyhyde.com.au Amalfi (03) 9474 1300; amalfihomewares.com.au Anthropologie anthropologie.com Apple 133 622; apple.com.au APR Joinery (02) 9791 0717; aprjoinery.com.au Artedomus (02) 9557 5060; artedomus.com Artemide 1300 135 709; artemide.com.au Ascraft (02) 9360 2311; ascraft.com.au Audio Technica audio-technica.com.au Austral Bricks 132 742; australbricks.com.au Axiom axiomlighting.com.au B Bang & Olufsen (02) 9356 8111; bang-olufsen.com Bathe 1300 133 320; bathe.net.au Bauwerk Colour (08) 9433 3860; bauwerk.com.au Beacon Lighting 1300 232 266; beaconlighting.com.au Becker Minty (02) 8356 9999; beckerminty.com Bed Bath n Table (03) 8888 8100; bedbathntable.com.au Better Music (02) 6282 3199; bettermusic.com.au Big Music 1300 552 420; bigmusicshop.com.au Billi 1800 812 321; billihome.com.au Bisanna Tiles (02) 9310 2500; bisanna.com.au Bluethumb bluethumb.com.au Bonnie and Neil (03) 9384 2234; bonnieandneil.com.au Bose 1800 023 367; bose.com.au Bourjois 1800 181 040; bourjois.com Bowerhouse 0422 071 119; bowerhouse.com.au Boyd Blue (07) 5527 0899; boydblue.com Brickworks brickworksbuildingproducts.com.au Bristol 131 686; bristol.com.au British Paints 132 525; britishpaints.com.au Brocante de Provence brocantedeprovence. etsy.com Bunnings (03) 8831 9777; bunnings.com.au Busatti (02) 9363 4318; busatti.com.au C C&W Resources 0438 338 026; cwresources.com.au Cabot’s 1800 011 006; cabots.com.au Cadrys (02) 9328 6144; cadrys.com.au Caesarstone 1300 119 119; caesarstone.com.au Carla Dinnage carladinnage.com.au Caroma 131 416; caroma.com.au Cass Brothers (02) 9569 5555; cassbrothers.com.au Chippendale Restorations (02) 9810 6066; chippendalerestorations.com.au

Chrissie Cotter Gallery innerwest.nsw.gov.au/ art---events/arts-and-culture/creative-spaces/ chrissie-cotter-gallery Christopher Farr Cloth christopherfarrcloth.com Coco Republic 1300 000 220; cocorepublic.com.au Collectika (02) 9557 8008; collectika.com.au Contents International Design (02) 9662 2443; contentsid.com.au Covered in Paint (02) 9519 0204; coveredinpaint.com.au Cromwell (03) 9510 5294; cromwellaustralia.com.au Cult 1300 768 626; cultdesign.com.au Cultiver cultiver.com Curious Grace (03) 9687 6878; curiousgrace.com.au Currumbin Cabinets (07) 5534 2666 D Dash & Albert (02) 4861 3389; wintonhouse.com.au David Jones 133 357; shop.davidjones.com.au Davis & Waddell (03) 9474 1300; davisandwaddell.com.au Dedece (02) 9360 2722; dedece.com.au Defiance Gallery (02) 9557 8483; defiancegallery.com Dekton (02) 8311 1518; dekton.com.au Designer Boys Collections designerboyscollections.com Designer Brands 1300 765 332; dbcosmetics.com.au Designer Rugs 1300 802 561; designerrugs.com.au District (08) 9388 1855; district.com.au Domestic Textile Corporation 1800 177 170; domestictextile.com.au Domo (03) 9277 8888; domo.com.au Dough My Dear Play Dough doughmydearplaydough.com Dulux 132 525; dulux.com.au Dunlin (02) 9907 4825; dunlinhome.com.au Dymocks 1300 305 999; dymocks.com.au E Early Settler earlysettler.com.au ECC Lighting+Furniture (02) 9380 7922; ecc.com.au Eckersley Garden Architecture (03) 9413 3223; e-ga.com.au Eco Chic 1300 897 715; ecochic.com.au Eco Outdoor 1300 131 413; ecooutdoor.com.au Ecology (03) 9765 5700; ecologyhomewares.com.au Ecolour 1300 326 568; ecolour.com.au Elements I Love (02) 9560 3067; elementsilove.com Emporium (03) 9474 1300; emporiumhome.com.au Essence essence.eu/au Exhibit Interiors (02) 8399 2866; exhibitinteriors.com.au F Fanuli (02) 9908 2660; fanuli.com.au Feast Watson 1800 252 502; feastwatson.com.au

Feelgood Designs (03) 9745 2077; feelgooddesigns.com Fenton & Fenton (03) 9533 2323; fentonandfenton.com.au Few & Far (02) 4441 8244; www.fewandfar.com.au Fisher & Paykel 1300 650 590; fisherpaykel.com.au Flower Power (02) 9727 7201; www.flowerpower.com.au FMD Architects (03) 9670 9671; fmdarchitects.com.au Fortnum & Mason fortnumandmason.com Freedom 1300 135 588; freedom.com.au French Bazaar frenchbazaar.com.au G Garden Life (02) 8399 0666; gardenlife.com.au Ghost Wares ghostwares.com.au GlobeWest 1800 722 366; globewest.com.au GM Glass (03) 9510 9075 Grazia & Co (03) 9589 4398; graziaandco.com.au Great Dane (03) 9699 7677; greatdanefurniture.com Greenhouse Interiors greenhouseinteriors.com.au Groove Tiles & Stone (07) 3257 3331; groovetiles.com.au H H+J Furniture (02) 9821 2699; hjfurniture.com.au H&M 1800 828 002; hm.com/au Habbot habbotstudios.com Hansgrohe 1800 001 901; hansgrohe.com.au Happy Go Ducky 0424 368 770; happygoducky.com.au Hardtofind hardtofind.com.au Harvey Norman 1300 464 278; harveynorman.com.au Havwoods International 1300 428 966; havwoods.com.au Hay (02) 9358 0855; hayshop.com.au Haymes Paint 1800 033 431; haymespaint.com.au Heatherly Design Bedheads (03) 5772 2089; heatherlydesign.com.au Hillview Quarries (03) 5987 2600; hvq.com.au Horgans (02) 9557 7800; horgans.com.au House of Orange (03) 9500 9991; houseoforange.com.au Hub Furniture (03) 9652 1222; hubfurniture.com.au Hunting for George (03) 9421 4849; huntingforgeorge.com Hutchings Pianos (02) 9387 1376; hutchingspianos.com.au I Ici et Là (02) 8399 1173; icietla.com.au Ikea (02) 8020 6641; ikea.com.au Indigo Love Collectors (02) 4441 8277; www.indigolove.com.au Inspirations Paint 1300 368 325; inspirationspaint.com.au iWorld (03) 9532 5052; iworldonline.com.au

J James Lane 1300 347 937; jameslane.com.au Jardan (03) 8581 4988; jardan.com.au Jetmaster 1300 538 627; jetmaster.com.au Jim & Jane jimandjane.com.au Jones & Co (02) 9310 7277; jonesandco.com.au K Ke-zu (02) 9669 1788; kezu.com.au Kido Store 1300 115 436; kidostore.com King Living 1300 546 438; kingliving.com.au Kmart 1800 634 251; kmart.com.au Koh Living 1800 811 598; kohliving.com.au Koskela (02) 9280 0999; koskela.com.au L L&M Home (03) 9419 6800; lmhome.com.au La Maison (02) 9698 8860; lamaison.net.au Laminex 132 136; laminex.com.au Las Niñas Textiles lasninastextiles.com Life Interiors (03) 9005 8303; lifeinteriors.com.au Lifestyle Furniture lifestylefurniturewa.com.au LightCo 1300 795 548; lightco.com.au Lilly & Lolly (02) 9699 7474; lillyandlolly.com.au Linen House (03) 9552 6000; linenhouse.com.au Living Edge 1300 132 154; livingedge.com.au Luumo Design luumodesign.com Lux Aestiva luxaestiva.com Luxo Living 1800 033 589; luxoliving.com.au M Madras Link madraslink.com Marc Pascal (03) 9480 3617; marcpascal.com Marimekko (02) 9281 6519; marimekko.com Maxi Plywood 1300 761 741; maxiplywood.com.au Maxwell & Williams (03) 9318 0466; maxwellandwilliams.com.au MCM House (02) 9698 4511; mcmhouse.com Me & Amber meandamber.com Mr Cook (02) 9363 5550; mrcook.com.au MRD Home (03) 9331 7533; mrdhome.com.au Mud Australia (02) 9569 8181; mudaustralia.com Murobond Paint 1800 199 299; murobond.com.au Musos Corner 1300 687 672; musoscorner.com.au Myer 1800 811 611; myer.com.au N Natio natio.com.au Naturally Cane naturallycane.com.au Nick Scali (02) 9748 4000; nickscali.com.au No Chintz (02) 9386 4800; nochintz.com Nomadique 1300 183 991; nomadique.com.au O Olli Ella (02) 6675 9725; olliella.com.au Orient House (02) 9660 3895; orienthouse.com.au Original Ceramics (08) 9444 8087; originalceramics.com.au Orla Kiely orlakiely.com Orson & Blake (02) 8399 2525; orsonandblake.com.au Ovvio (02) 9380 7863; ovvioorganics.com.au Oz Design Furniture 1300 721 942; ozdesignfurniture.com.au P Paint Place 1800 008 007; paintplace.com.au Papaya (02) 9386 9980; papaya.com.au

At Choices Flooring we know that good interior decorating...


Penguin 1800 338 836; penguin.com.au Pigott’s Store pigottsstore.com.au Pillow Talk pillowtalk.com.au Polytec 1300 300 547; polytec.com.au Pony Rider (02) 8911 3518; ponyrider.com.au Porter’s Paints 1800 656 664; porterspaints.com Pottery Barn 1800 232 914; potterybarn.com.au Project 82 (02) 9360 1471; project82.com.au Provincial Home Living 1300 732 258; provincialhomeliving.com.au Pure Linen (08) 9418 7015; purelinen.com.au Q Quercus & Co (02) 9699 4444; quercusandco.com R Reece 1800 032 566; reece.com.au Remedy (08) 9431 7080; remedyonline.net.au Resene 1800 738 383; resene.com.au Riedel (02) 9966 0033; riedelglass.com.au Robert Gordon Australia (03) 5941 3144; robertgordonaustralia.com Rocket Espresso Milano available from Espresso Company Australia: espressocompany.com.au Ruby Star Traders (02) 9518 7899; shoprubystar.com.au S Sally Hansen 1800 251 010; sallyhansen.com Salt & Pepper 1800 246 987; saltandpepper.com.au Samsung 1300 362 603; samsung.com.au Sapphire Wood (02) 9793 8016; sapphirewood.com.au Saxon Windows (03) 9546 6555; saxonwindows.com.au Schots Home Emporium 1300 463 353; schots.com.au Seneca Textiles (03) 9509 4999; senecatextiles.com Sharwood Stone (02) 9796 7930; sharwoodstone.com.au Sheridan 1800 625 516; sheridan.com.au Signorino (03) 9427 9100; signorino.com.au Sikkens 1300 745 536; tenaru.com.au Smeg (02) 8667 4888; smeg.com.au Solver Paints (08) 8368 1200; solverpaints.com.au Sonos 1800 680 234; sonos.com/en-au/ Space (02) 8339 7588; spacefurniture.com.au Specific Lighting (08) 9258 3333; specificlighting.com.au Spence & Lyda (02) 9212 6747; spenceandlyda.com.au St Barts 1300 139 619; st-barts.com.au Stoka Clay Collection etsy.com/au/shop/ StokaClayCollection Stylecraft (02) 9355 0000; stylecraft.com.au

Surface Gallery (02) 9566 2002; surfacegallery.com.au Synergy Audio Visual synergyaudio.com T Tara Dennis Store (02) 9489 2952; taradennisstore.com Target 1300 753 567; target.com.au Taubmans 131 686; taubmans.com.au Temple & Webster templeandwebster.com.au Teranova (02) 9386 0063; teranova.com.au The Beach Furniture thebeachfurniture.com.au The Design Gift Shop thedesigngiftshop.com The Natural Floorcovering Centres (02) 9516 5726; naturalfloor.com.au The Rug Company therugcompany.com The Society Inc thesocietyinc.com.au The Littlest Plant Shop littlestplantshop.com.au The Vignette Room thevignetteroom.com.au Thonet 1800 800 777; thonet.com.au Threeworlds (07) 5520 3318; threeworlds.com.au Tivoli Audio 1300 848 071; tivoliaudio.com.au Top3 by Design 1300 867 333; top3.com.au Trend Windows 137 274; trendwindows.com.au TWG Tea twgtea.com Twinings 1800 092 889; twinings.com.au U Ulta3 1800 181 040; ulta3.com.au Unique Fabrics 1800 145 855; uniquefabrics.com Until (02) 9119 8700; until.com.au UpRite Steel Fabricators (07) 3808 6588; upritesteel.com Urban Growers 0408 017 960; urbangrowers.com.au Urban Lighting (02) 9419 4007; urbanlighting.com.au V Victory Blinds 131 399; victoryblinds.com.au Village villagestores.com.au Vincent Design Supply (03) 9686 7702; vincentdesign.com.au Vintage Black Catz vintageblackcatz.etsy.com W Warwick Fabrics 1300 787 888; warwick.com.au Wattyl 132 101; wattyl.com.au West Elm 1800 239 516; westelm.com.au Westbury Textiles (02) 9380 6644; westburytextiles.com Westinghouse westinghouse.com.au Weylandts 1300 880 149; weylandts.com.au Willow & Wood (02) 9188 1572; willowandwood.com.au Z Zaffero 1300 233 071; zaffero.com.au Zara Home 1800 121 095; zarahome.com/au Zepel Fabrics zepelfabrics.com.au

From page 178 (contents of buffet and hutch) TOP SHELF from left ‘Willow’ embossed canister, $37 (large) and $20 (small), Davis & Waddell. ‘Vestige’ bottle in White, $40, Salt & Pepper. ‘Madeira’ serving bowl, $80, Salt & Pepper. ‘Vinum’ pinot noir glasses, $100/pair, Riedel. ‘Anderson’ carafe, $3, Target. SECOND SHELF from left ‘White Basics Edge’ 16-piece dinner set, $120, Maxwell Williams. Woven bowl, $25, Koh Living. ‘Austen No.2’ and ‘No.3’ bowls, $40 and $45, Tara Dennis Store. ‘Bretagne’ soup tureen in White, $28, Provincial Home Living. THIRD SHELF from left ‘Daintree’ plate in Lagoon, $13, Maxwell & Williams. ‘Acacia’ plate stand, $17, Tara Dennis Store. ‘Artisan Dipped’ canister in Mustard, $15, Maxwell & Williams. Woven basket in small, $62, Koh Living. ‘Darjeeling’ tea towel, $15, L&M Home. Chopping board, $35, Weylandts. Egg basket, $40, Weylandts. BOTTOM SHELF Staples Foundry three-piece canister set, $50, Ecology. ‘Sockerärt’ vase, from $17, Ikea. ‘Spilt’ cereal bowls, $20 each, Weylandts. ‘White Basics’ 1L jug, $15, Maxwell & Williams. ‘Trinity’ cake stand, $65, Madras Link.

PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of Australian House & Garden magazine is published by Bauer Media Pty Ltd (Bauer). Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at www.bauer-media. com.au/privacy. It also sets out on how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauermedia.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney NSW 2000.

starts from the floor up. choicesflooring.com.au


WHAT’S ON THINGS TO DO, SEE, ENJOY

1

The Kurrajong Kitchen Cheese Lovers Festival comes to Sydney’s Centennial Park this year on June 16. The program includes fine food, music and cheese workshops, plus a cheesecake contest for home bakers. cheeseloversfestival.com.au This year’s Sydney Film Festival, June 6-17, will bring some of the world’s best cinema to our shores. There’ll be more than 250 screenings over 12 days, plus an exciting program of talks and parties. sff.org.au

Show & tell I

STROKES OF GENIUS Adelaide artist Katie Wyatt specialises in creating paintings that the viewer can connect to on a sensual and emotional level. Her textural style, harmonious palette and evocative botanical and landscape themes, like the works shown above, make her oils perfect to hang in pride of place. Katie works across a wide range of sizes, so you can pick up a modest 10x10cm canvas for as little as $120 or spend $32OO on a statement 152x76cm painting. Check out her portfolio and find stockists at katiewyatt.com.

3

Satisfy your psyche during the Soul Craft Festival (above) at North Melbourne’s Meat Market, June 9 & 10. Visitors can take part in workshops, demonstrations and exhibitions covering craft, art, fashion and mindful thinking. soulcraftfestival.com

4

After a sold-out season in 2017, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander performing arts company Bangarra Dance Theatre will be gracing stages with a new work, Dark Emu. Touring Australia from June 14 to September 15, the production will visit Sydney, Canberra, Perth, Brisbane and Melbourne. bangarra.com.au

The Good Food & Wine Show begins in Melbourne on June 1 and hits Sydney on June 22. Food icons Matt Moran and Maggie Beer will be hosting the ultimate barbecue, chef Manu Feildel and his wife Clarissa will cook their favourite dishes, and gourmet food and wine stalls will keep visitors well sustained. goodfoodshow.com.au

6

Impressionist masterpieces on loan from the Musée d’Orsay collection in Paris are on show at the Art Gallery of SA until July 29. Colours of Impressionism features captivating works by Monet, Renoir, Manet, Morisot, Pissarro and Cézanne, among other great names. artgallery.sa.gov.au

Text by Laura Barry. Photography by Armelle Habib (paintings). Styling by Greenhouse Interiors (paintings).

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COMMUNITY H G

P E TA L P O W E R E D FLORAL ENTHUSIASTS, GREEN THUMBS AND DESIGN AFICIONADOS ALIKE WILL ADORE THE COLOURFUL INSTAGRAM FEED OF MELBOURNE FLORIST KATIE MARX. IMAGES OF BLOOMS DEFTLY ARRANGED INTO ARTFUL BOUQUETS SIT ALONGSIDE HER DESIGN-SAVVY SNAPS OF EVERYDAY LIFE. @KATIEMARXFLOWERS

Palate pleaser

As well as superlative food, 12-Micron – a new addition to Sydney’s Barangaroo precinct – boasts a refined interior (below) by local firm SJB. It draws from a distinctly Australian palette of textures and tones to complement the harbour views. 12micron. com.au

BOOK NOOK

1

Aspiring gardeners who live in apartments will find all they need to know about caring for and styling house plants in Leaf Supply, by Sydney authors Lauren Camilleri and Sophia Kaplan. It covers everything from pet-friendly foliage to carnivorous plants. $49.99, Simon & Schuster Australia. Filled with gorgeous images, Hayley McKee’s Sticky Fingers Green Thumb will forge a new link between your garden and kitchen. It’s filled with unusual recipes that celebrate vegetables, herbs and edible flowers in cakes and other sweet treats. Hayley also provides smart gardening tips on growing the key ingredients. $29.99, Hardie Grant Books.

3

Take a gastronomic journey through the fragrant backstreets of Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Saigon and Jakarta with chef Luke Nguyen in this revised edition of Street Food Asia. Venturing into the streets from daybreak to midnight with photographer Alan Benson, Luke reveals how to recreate the best dishes each city has to offer. $39.99, Hardie Grant Books.

Sta y in t ouc h

We love hearing from readers, so please share your news and views with us. Call (02) 9282 8456, email h&g@bauer-media. com.au or post a letter to Australian House & Garden, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028. Subscribe to the digital edition of H&G at magshop.com. au/hgn. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our e-newsletter at newsletter.houseandgardenmag.com.au. And head to homestolove.com.au/ahg for fab home tours, gardens and galleries.

Share in our home and garden finds: Facebook facebook.com/australianhouseandgarden Instagram @houseandgarden Pinterest pinterest.com/HOUSEnGARDEN AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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The Aquas X Jet shower system from Bathe is a softly shaped ergonomic shower with a unique, criss-cross spray pattern for an invigorating shower experience, $1299 . bathe.net.au

Cool in summer and warm in winter, the Windsor wool carpet from Choices Flooring provides the perfect foundation for your home all year round. choicesflooring.com.au

De’Longhi’s AriaDry Compact Dehumidifier collects excess moisture from the air, maintaining a healthy level of humidity in your home, $449.00. delonghi.com/en-au

H&G ESSENTIALS The Herman sofa by Studio Memo for Natuzzi Italia features a whale’s tail detail, inspired by Moby Dick. Style meets modularity and comfort at Natuzzi. natuzzi.com.au

Create a beautiful lifestyle and home with these must-have products.

Doing the laundry is easy thanks to OMO Dual Capsules. Just throw one in the machine and watch it lift tough stains, even in cold washes. omo.com/au

The Le Veneziane terazzo collection by Di Lorenzo showcases graphic details, styles and colours perfect for modern environments, from $77/m2. dilorenzo.com.au

The Aspen Dining Collection by King Living strikes the perfect balance between timeless style and enduring quality. Dining table from $5,800. Chairs from $678. kingliving.com.au

The Newform O’Rama collection from Parisi is a reinterpretation of simplicity as a means of expression. O’Rama basin mixer chrome with matt black handle, $815.00. parisi.com.au

Discover a world of colour and texture at Porter's Paints, where you can find luxury wallpaper and beautiful paints in one convenient location. porterspaints.com

The Roca Meridian In-Tank Back to Wall Pan for Reece, is pure minimalism and innovation with the added benefit of easy installation that will revolutionise the bathroom space. reece.com.au

Travel Associates have been creating luxury travel packages that open doors to amazing experiences for more than 20 years. To book, call 1800 017 159 or visit travel-associates.com.au/houseandgarden


ON SALE JUNE 4

Next month

Photograph by Maree Homer.

ENTERTAINING Winter recipes, edible plants and must-have dining experiences ✚ Milan Furniture Fair highlights ✚ Six yummy Australian houses ✚ Best foodie gardens

Inspiration lives here…

There’s food for thought in the Taste issue.


H G BOTANICA

Role play

A

rranging flowers is akin to assembling a cast of characters, says Sydney florist Myra Perez, owner of My Violet. “My rule of thumb is simple,” she says. “You always need to have a hero bloom, then you choose some interesting supporting blooms – the support actors – and then add the fillers, aka the extras.” In this display by Myra, created specially for H&G, the hero’s part is played by pale apricot David Austin ‘Evelyn’ roses, with peachy bougainvillea in the supporting role. The extras are intriguing in their own right: there’s a bunch of wild corn standing upright at the back, plus green hydrangea flowerheads creating pops of colour. Begonia leaves and rusty-red ‘Nina’ roses are the quiet players in the background. “You may not see the rust-coloured garden roses at

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

first, but that’s the point,” says Myra. “When you look deeper, you find little surprises.” The idea, she says, is to add diverse textures so that each flower stands out and adds to the story. The warm colour palette of the display was inspired by the notion of sunset. “I thought about all the incredible colours I see when I look at the sky at dusk,” says Myra. She set the flowers against the inky wall of her studio, which represents the perfect night sky. A squat, cylindrical copper vase anchors this lush bouquet. “When it comes to choosing a vessel, anything from your cupboard is fine,” says Myra. “Just keep in mind that the arrangement should be double the height of the vase to be in scale.” # My Violet; myviolet.com.au or @mivioleta.

Text by Elizabeth Wilson. Photograph by John Paul Urizar.

Leading florists will create celebratory bouquets for this page every month in 2018 to mark H&G’s 70th anniversary year. Don’t miss their floral tributes.


are you going home to a bathroom you love? reece.com.au/bathrooms


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