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MLK

DREAM CONCERT Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin Headline Spectacular Event

Fall/Winter 2007 • Volume 92 • Numbers 3–4

ALPHA BROTHERS RECEIVE HIGHEST BBBS AWARDS DISTINGUISHED COLLEGIANS HIGHLIGHTED


STEVIE WONDER… ARETHA FRANKLIN… JOHN LEGEND… LUDACRIS… JOSS STONE… WYCLEF JEAN… CARLOS SANTANA… BABY FACE… GARTH BROOKS… And a host of other stars performed at the MLK Dream Concert in New York City to raise money for a National Memorial in Washington, D.C., honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy of Democracy, Justice, Hope and Love. To read more about the concert, see page 24. To make a donation to The Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project, call 1-888-4-THE-DREAM or visit WWW.BUILDTHEDREAM.ORG.

Stevie Wonder performs at MLK Dream Concert Photo by Donald Baker


®

MISSION STATEMENT Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. develops leaders, promotes brotherhood and academic excellence, while providing service and advocacy for our communities.

CONTENTS DEPARTMENTS President’s 5 General Letter Director’s 7 Executive Letter 11 Publisher’s Letter 30 Distinguished ON THE COVER:

Collegians

42 Chapter News 50 Book Reviews 53 Omega Chapter 62 Corporate Directory 64 Leadership Directory

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr. (l) and legendary singer/songwriter Stevie Wonder. Photo by Donald Baker. Cover story begins on page 24.

On This Page:

Radio City Music Hall served as the venue for the MLK Dream Concert. Photo by Donald Baker.

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O F F I C I A L O R G A N O F A L P H A P H I A L P H A F R A T E R N I T Y, I N C .


On This Page: Singer John Legend joined an all-star

cast of performers at the MLK Dream Concert. Photo by Donald Baker

FEATURES

12 CBC Reception 15 Jena 6 16 Tied to Greatness 17 BBBS Honors 18 VSU Big Brothers 21 Wells Fargo 24 MLK Dream Concert 35 Alpha Sigma Lambda 38 Alpha Night in Annapolis 40 Alpha Eta Lambda The Sphinx: www.APA1906.net

Spring 2008

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ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. 102ND ANNIVERSARY CONVENTION

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FOR INFORMATION ABOUT EXCITING SPEAKERS AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING.


PRESIDENT’S

GENERAL PRESIDENT’S LETTER

A MOMENT OF REMEMBRANCE: THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ASSASSINATION OF BROTHER DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

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f Brother Martin Luther King, Jr. were here—alive not just in spirit—I wonder…What would Martin think? What would he think about what we have become since the days of the Civil Rights Movement that he headed? What would Martin think about what we have done with the baton (the legacy) he passed on to us? Can we truly say that we have answered the call to uplift the down trodden with our time, talent and treasure when there still is clearly an urgent need? What would he think of the high profile, publicity-seeking pretenders who have no plan and no clear objectives other than to extort money from corporate America, delivering no results of real consequence? What would Martin think about the reluctance, or refusal, of our youth to take full advantage of the educational opportunities from which their forbearers were “legally” excluded? We have young people who are looking for, and in desperate need of, role models… but instead, they are given the pressures of striving to have more and doing less. In the days before his death, Brother King was wrestling with so many issues. He was concerned that the movement was losing ground. He was concerned because a myriad of voices were raising questions about the method of non-violence that he practiced. People were upset because it appeared that little progress was being made. And, at the same time, lives were being lost for the sake of an unrealized freedom and equality. It has often been said that God speaks through His people…. and; one has to believe that on many occasions God sent messages to and through Martin Luther King, Jr. In our lifetime, we will likely never fully know the legacy and the true value of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. However, as the nation pauses to recognize Brother King this month, at the 40th anniversary of his assassination, we must believe as Martin King believed—that we people of faith, have been called by a mighty God to continue to do His work. Brother King would want us to expand our focus from Civil Rights to Silver Rights; to become more financially literate and economically empowered. He would not want us to trade old masters for pagans. Possessions can be taken in the blink of an eye…. just ask the folks in New Orleans. Many great men and women have gone on before us and not one of them sought greatness. But through their tireless works, greatness was earned because they put self last and others first. Henry Ward Beecher said, “Greatness lies not in being strong, but in the right use of strength.” Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity is calling on the nation to show its strength…. to use its strength… to show its greatness. Help your fellow man to rise up and to raise up those who shall follow. We cannot hope for another Martin. We must all become like Martin. We hold the keys to the forward progress of the race and harmony we seek. And, in doing this, we truly will honor the ultimate sacrifice that this great man made. Fraternally,

DARRYL R. MATTHEWS, SR. General President

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Official Organ of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc®

R E A D E R’S

GUIDE

How to receive The Sphinx® Subscriptions: Price U.S. is $40.00 per year. To subscribe, please send a check or money order to: Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and mail to Sphinx Subscriptions, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-5211. To purchase selected back issues or to obtain reprint permission, contact Alpha Phi Alpha’s Office of Communications at 410-554-0040. Selected back issues of The Sphinx® are also available on-line at www.APA1906.net. Note: Active members currently receive The Sphinx as part of their membership. Additional copies of The Sphinx® Individuals interested in receiving additional copies (of current editions) of The Sphinx® may submit a written request accompanied with a check in the amount of $10.00 per copy payable to: Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 -5211. How to change an address Alumni & College Members: E-mail your new address to your regional coordinator/specialist. You may also call 410.554.0040 or send mail to Address Changes, 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-5211. Corporate, Non-Profit & Educational Institutions: E-mail your updated address to sphinx@APA1906.net or you can call 410.554.0040, Ext.114. How to contact Post: The Sphinx Magazine, 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-5211 E-mail: sphinx@apa1906.net (Not for submissions) Phone: 410.554.0040; for Magazine questions, select Ext. 114 Fax: 410.554.0054 Attn: The Sphinx How to get published Each Chapter’s Editor is a correspondent for The Sphinx® Magazine. Chapters are encouraged to submit news and stories to The Sphinx®. Tell us about your events and please include photographs. Article submission does not guarantee publication. We reserve the right to refuse or reject articles submitted (without notification). Inactive members and/or Chapters will automatically be denied publication. All articles received via email will be rejected. How to send a letter to the Editor We always welcome your comments – both positive and negative. Email to sphinx@apa1906.net or mail to Editor, 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-5211. General deadlines for submissions* Spring issue-November 1 Summer issue-February 1 Fall issue-May 1 Winter issue-August 1 *These deadlines are estimates; visit www.APA1906.net for up-to-date info. Note: Due to pre-press and production schedules, 1-3 issues may appear before a submission is published. The SPHINX® (USPS 510-440) is published quarterly by Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.®, 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-5211 and SJW Publishers, Inc., P.O. Box 1203, Randallstown, MD 21133. Periodical postage paid at Baltimore, MD with additional entries. Postmaster: send address changes to The SPHINX ®, 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-5211. The magazine subscription price is $40 a year. The SPHINX® is the official magazine of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.® Send all editorial mail and changes of address to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.® Manuscripts of art, opinions expressed in columns and articles do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.® Use of any person’s name in fiction, semi-fiction, articles or humorous features is to be regarded as a coincidence and not as the responsibility of The SPHINX® and is never done knowingly. The publisher does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers. Copyright 2006 Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.® ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction, or use without permission, of the editorial, art or pictorial content of the magazine in any manner is prohibited. The SPHINX® has been published continuously since 1914. Organizing Editor: Brother Raymond W. Cannon. Organizing General President: Brother Henry Lake Dickason. The Sphinx® is printed in the United States of America

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EXECUTIVE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S LETTER

MAKING PLANS TO JOURNEY TO THE 102ND ANNIVERSARY CONVENTION My Dear Brothers, Greetings from the General Office!

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s we continue to move forward with the execution of the daily operations of the Fraternity, it is a pleasure to present to you this Fall/Winter 2007 Edition of The Sphinx magazine. Our 101st Anniversary Convention—87th General Convention—was historic in the quantity and quality of work accomplished. During the Convention, the Fraternity’s 2008 and 2009 budgets were approved; C2C Seminars were held; Constitution Realignment performed; General Presidential Election Primary conducted; policy creation and approval performed; Ritual update made; Training & Development done; and much more. Since the conclusion of the General Convention in August 2007, the Corporate Headquarters pace has been hectic indeed. In September, we celebrated and presented the Fraternity’s 15th Anniversary Congressional Black Caucus Reception; General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr., along with myself, traveled to Jena, Louisiana to participate in civil rights efforts to “Free the Jena Six”; and we participated in the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Foundation Dream Concert in New York City. Each of the events presented a different opportunity for us to show the world the Brothers of Alpha—“Living our Mission”. As I stood in the woods of Jena during the pre-dawn hours of September 20th, the “awesomeness” of being an Alpha Man in that moment of time loomed tremendous for me. In this Sphinx edition, you will see articles on these topics and more. The other fall and winter months were equally as busy and productive—with a new Strategic Alliance formed with Wells Fargo; and our attendance and participation in Tavis Smiley’s annual State of the Black Union Symposium. During the symposium, we met with national leaders and discussed new partnership options to enhance your membership benefits. Now, we are just three short months away from the start of the Fraternity’s 102nd Anniversary Convention, which will be held in Kansas City, Missouri in July 2008. You have received your Official Convention Call and hopefully you are making plans now to journey to the Heartland of the Midwestern Region—to the home of Beta Lambda Chapter our second oldest Alumni Chapter. This also will prove to be an outstanding convention where we announce the 33rd General President; hold a national discussion on Membership Intake; and do much more as we continue to move forward the Alpha Agenda. Fraternally Always,

WILLARD C. HALL, JR. Executive Director

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®

Submission Guidelines Official Organ of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc® ORGANIZING EDITOR Raymond W. Cannon ORGANIZING GENERAL PRESIDENT Henry Lake Dickason

PUBLISHER AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Seaton J. White, III

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS William Douglass Lyle

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS David Campbell Thomas A. Brown Joseph T. Durham Robert L. Harris, Jr. Lover High, Jr. Wilbur Jackson Ralph E. Johnson Leonard Le’Doux, Jr. Ryan Mack PHOTOGRAPHY Donald Baker Rickey Brown Larry Crider Jeff Lewis Anthony Roberson

GENERAL OFFICERS GENERAL PRESIDENT Darryl R. Matthews, Sr. IMMEDIATE PAST GENERAL PRESIDENT Harry E. Johnson, Sr. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Willard C. Hall, Jr. GENERAL TREASURER George N. Reaves GENERAL COMPTROLLER Frank A. Jenkins, III GENERAL COUNSEL Michael D. Pegues DIRECTOR OF CONVENTIONS Michael Thompson HISTORIAN Robert L. Harris, Jr.

FOUNDERS Henry Arthur Callis Charles Henry Chapman Nathaniel Allison Murray

Eugene Kinckle Jones Vertner Woodson Tandy George Biddle Kelley Robert Harold Ogle

Since the founding of The Sphinx Magazine in 1914, the African American community has looked to the publication for its profound insight on issues of the day. The Sphinx is the second-oldest continuously-published African American magazine in existence and is preserved in libraries and archives across the country as an historical record of community occurrences. The publication covers a wide range of topics that are relevant to different sectors and geographic locations. The major focuses are leadership, strategy, entrepreneurship, career management, economic development and community service. Many articles are written by experts and authorities whose insight comes from research and experience. It is little wonder that for more than 90 years, The Sphinx® has maintained its place as an indispensable medium for reaching the leadership and progressive segment of the African American community. Those interested in writing feature articles for The Sphinx should: (1) submit a short abstract of their work. Completed articles are also accepted. (2) Suggested feature article length is 800 to 1,500 words; however, we accept stories that are shorter or longer in length. Print quality photographs or graphics may accompany the feature. (3) All articles submitted are required to be editable and proofread-able. (4) All articles must be accompanied by a brief biography of the author. (5) Submission of an abstract, synopsis or full article contribution is no guarantee of publication. (6) The Sphinx reserves the right to edit all submissions for length and suitability to a given issue, without final and formal review of the contributor. (7) Statements of opinion expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of The Sphinx. (8) Submission proposals can be emailed to: Sphinx@apa1906.net. (9) Final materials should be mailed to: The Sphinx; Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.; 2313 St. Paul Street; Baltimore, MD 21218-5211.

ALPHA PHI ALPHA WEBSITE ADDRESS: http://www.APA1906.net

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www.bbbs.org

BETA GAMMA CHAPTER RECEIVES BBBS COMMUNITY PARTNER OF YEAR AWARD On Saturday, December 1, 2007, the Beta Gamma Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. was awarded the Community Partner of the Year honor by Big Brothers Big Sisters Services, Inc. (Richmond, VA). The Chapter was presented the award at the BBBS Annual Meeting and Holiday Breakfast. The Beta Gamma Chapter earned the honor for several reasons: (1) for being the only Alpha Phi Alpha Chapter in the United States to have 100 percent of their membership volunteering as Big Brothers; (2) several of the Alpha Phi Alpha BBBS matches have been highlighted in the Essence Cares Campaign and on the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America website due to the strength and quality of their mentoring relationships; (3) the Chapter donates money to support the BBBS activities and events in Petersburg; and (4) the most invaluable effort the Chapter has put forth is recruiting for BBBS on the Virginia State University campus—ensuring that over 50 children in Petersburg reap the benefits of a oneto-one mentoring relationship. The Beta Gamma Chapter has achieved all of this in only one calendar year! What truly separates the Beta Gamma Chapter from their peers is the personal investment each member has made to their “Little”. Kirk Williams articulates his responsibility to BBBS, saying “youth hold the future of our society in their hands, and as Big Brothers we must show them the right way to uphold manly deeds, scholarship, and love for all mankind.” Tim James reflects, “I have to say that having a little brother gives me motivation to want to continue on my career path. Sometimes I become discouraged, but then I think—‘what would I tell Treyshawn (Little Brother) if he was feeling like giving up’—and that gives me motivation to stay the course no matter what is going on in my life.” In a short time the Beta Gamma Chapter has carved a legacy in the BBBS and Petersburg community that will live on in each of the children they mentored and in the organizations who attempt to replicate their dedication and service. For this, BBBS, the children and their families commend the Chapter members as we hope you will do also. Best regards, Sarah K. Gould, M.Ed. Tri-Cities Coordinator Big Brothers Big Sisters Services, Inc. Hopewell, VA

The above letter, which was first received by Virginia State University President Dr. Eddie N. Moore, Jr., was edited for publication

Little Moments, Big Magic.

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Remembering Brother EDDIE ROBINSON (1919-2007)

ALPHAS

Spring/Summer 2007 · Volume 92· Numbers 1–2

IN THE 110TH CONGRESS Heirs of a Leadership Legacy

ED FOUNDATION

Supports Ghana’s Du Bois Center

FLORIDA HOTELIER

Fulfills Dreams of At-Risk Children

PROJECT ALPHA Sponsored Internationally

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Publisher of The Sphinx® Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. c/o SJW Publishers, Inc. P.O. Box 1203 Randallstown, MD 21133 Phone: 410-902-8387 • Email: SphinxMagazine@sjwpublishers.com

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PUBLISHER’S

PUBLISHER AND EDITOR’S LETTER

THUNDEROUS APPLAUSE AT THE MLK DREAM CONCERT

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alk with any journalist and you will most certainly hear stories about the exciting moments their profession has led them to. The MLK Dream Concert held last September in New York City—with its world-class cast of performers—presented one of those exciting moments. And this is one of those journalists’ stories. In today’s world, one sign that serves as an indicator that something of major societal importance is occurring might be the gathering of a large group of journalists. When numbers of print and electronic media reporters are spotted gathering with groups of photographers, cameramen and camera crews, the logical question that comes to mind is, “What’s going on?” I left Baltimore on an afternoon commuter train headed for New York the day of the Dream Concert with the intention of finding an answer to that question. My planned arrival at Radio City Music Hall where the concert was being held would be a few short hours before the event started— allowing me time to capture the red carpet entrance of the evening’s performers. I was traveling with camera in hand, although my primary purpose would be to capture details of the event. This would be a high security event requiring all the proper credentials—and I was leaving home without mine. While on the train, I coordinated with the lead photographer to synchronize our arrival times; and confirmed with the Executive Director that credentials would be waiting for me onsite. It was confirmed that the items would be waiting for me. The task now at hand was for me to get through security and make it all the way to the red carpet. I had faced such challenges before. Upon arriving at Grand Central Station, I exited the train and began my climb up those stairs that I had often climbed before with my grandfather who lived in the Bronx. The already dense NYC crowd grew thicker as I neared street level. Once on the street where I could see the tall buildings, I took my place in line waiting for a taxi to carry me on the next leg of my journey. It was an uneventful cab ride—without the driver doing anything such as crossing six lanes of traffic while making a turn from the far lane—as I have experienced before. Thank God for small favors! We got close enough to the Music Hall. I realized that I would have to jump from the cab and make my way on foot because of the barriers ahead. Another passenger immediate took my place in the taxi’s back seat, brushing by me as I exited the vehicle. Security at the Music Hall was tight with police posts set up around the building’s perimeters and gates in place to divert traffic and keep the crowds at a distance. “The other side of the building,” “Not this door,” “No one is allowed pass this point,” “Can I see your credentials?” were some of security’s comments to me. With convincing words, I was able to get the officers to escort me to the red carpet area. But they were not leaving me— not until my credentials were in hand. Just as promised, the credentials had been set aside and were given to me. It now was time to go to work. I took my place on the red carpet in the space reserved for The Sphinx Magazine, beside other major media, including Entertainment Tonight, Inside Edition, Access Hollywood, BET, The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, Ebony and Jet, TV network and cable news crews and other national media. One by one the celebrity limousines pulled up to Radio City Music Hall. The arriving star’s popularity could be gauged by the loudness of the crowd. Tom Joyner, John Legend and Stevie Wonder were among the first to arrive. Garth Brooks, Baby Face, Gayle King, Kirk Franklin, Tommy Hilfiger, Joss Stone and many others soon followed. In the midst of it all, there suddenly came a thunderous cheer. The media scurried to their positions to see who was coming next. Stepping from his limousine was NBC’s Today Show weatherman Al Roker—an enormously popular figure with the crowd. While standing together there, media members told each other stories about the last time they had worked the red carpet; and the pictures they had gotten; and who the most friendly stars were. The parade of stars continued until I realized it was show time and I needed to be inside so I could present readers with an answer to the question presented earlier, “What’s going on?” The MLK Dream Concert performers well understood the importance of the evening, which was purposed to raise awareness and money for the Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. To learn more about what went on that evening, see our coverage beginning on page 24. Fraternally, Seaton: This is about 4-6 lines long SEATON J. WHITE, III Publisher and Editor-in-Chief

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1. Congressman Bobby Scott 2. (l-r) General Presidents James Williams and Darryl Matthews; Senior V.P. of Turner Construction Company Hilton Smith, and former G.P. Harry Johnson. 3. (l-r) Brothers Al Bailey, Darryl Matthews and Dr. Ed Jackson, Jr. 4. (l-r) Fraternity Chief of Staff Al Rutherford and Executive Director Willard Hall.

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5. (l-r) Southern Region V.P. Everett Ward and CNN Commentator Brother Roland Martin. 6. Brother Darryl Matthews pictured with March of Dimes’ Gwen Carmen (l) and LaVonia Anderson (r). 7. (l-r) Midwestern Region V.P. Mark Tillman and Eastern Region V.P. Dennis Kemp.

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FRATERNITY’S MEMBERS IN CONGRESS HONORED AT ALPHA PHI ALPHA’S 15TH ANNUAL CBC RECEPTION A Voteless People Is A Hopeless People Campaign Credited with Helping Change Politics in Washington Photos by Donald Baker

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lpha Phi Alpha Fraternity honored the organization’s eight members currently serving in the United States Congress during its 15th Annual Congressional Black Caucus Reception held last fall at the Renaissance Washington, D.C. Hotel. The Fraternity’s tribute to its members in Congress was designed to connect with the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s 37th Annual Legislative Conference theme, “Unleashing Our Power”, which challenged legislators and citizens to use their collective power to level the playing field for African Americans, while also recognizing the historic number of CBC members leading congressional committees. Brother Congressman Bobby Scott (D-Virginia) spoke at the reception on behalf of the Fraternity’s other seven congressional members—Brother Congressmen Emanuel Cleaver (D-Missouri), Danny Davis (D-Illinois), Chaka Fattah (D-Pennsylvania), Al Green (D-Texas), Gregory Meeks (D-New York), Charles Rangel (D-New York) and David Scott (D-Georgia)—during the reception, held September 27, 2007. “We’ve done a lot of work and Alphas are always in the forefront,” Brother Scott stated. “It’s been decades since the Fraternity’s Go-to-High School, Go-to-College program was implemented. Now today, it’s going to be a little easier because last year we passed legislation stripping the student loan industry of about $20 billion.” Brother Congressman Scott stated that the $20 billion that had previously been spent on tax cuts for the wealthy would now be used to cut the interest rate in half for student loans; add $1,000 to the Pell Grant for each student; help historically black colleges and universities with hundreds of millions of dollars; and fund the Upward Bound program with tens of millions of dollars.

“We’re going to do this all because something happened last November when Alphas decided that A Voteless People was a Hopeless People and gave us a different Congress. We’ve had a different result with that $20 billion. So, thank you, Alphas from around the country for participating and voting.” Brother Scott also thanked the Fraternity for its Project Alpha program that is getting young men headed in the right direction as opposed to their heading toward the country’s jails. It was announced at the CBC Reception that General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr. had been elected a few hours earlier as Chairman of the Council of Presidents for the nine traditionally Black Greek-Lettered Organizations. In his remarks, Brother Matthews reported that he had recently returned from the protest rally in Jena, Louisiana; and news just had arrived that Mychal Bell—one of the Jena 6 high school students who was being incarcerated—had been ordered released from jail. Brother Matthews also encouraged Brothers to continue donating to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Project Foundation and again welcomed guests to the House of Alpha. In addition to saluting Alpha Phi Alpha’s eight members in Congress, Fraternity Executive Director Willard C. Hall, Jr. recognized the presence of Past General Presidents James R. Williams and Harry Johnson, noting that Brother Johnson also serves as President of the MLK Memorial Project Foundation. Also recognized were Eastern Regional Vice President Dennis Kemp; Midwestern Regional Vice President Mark Tillman, Southern Regional Vice President Everett Ward; Maryland, Delaware and Washington, D.C. District Director David Raphael; Racial Justice and Public Policy Commission Chairman Cleveland Beckett; Elections Committee Chairman Russell Campbell; Organizational

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1. G.P. Darryl Matthews and MLK Memorial Board Director Roderick D. Gillum. 2. Brother Darryl Matthews and Delta Sigma Theta International President Dr. Louise A. Rice. 3. Brother Matthews is pictured with Immediate Past Council of Presidents Chairman and Immediate Past Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Grand Polemarch Samuel C. Hamilton. 4. Brother Darryl Matthews and Ms. Deryl McKissack, head of the MLK BuildDesign Team. 5. Brother Darryl Matthews is joined by Sigma Gamma Rho Grand Basileus Dr. Mynora J. Bryant (r) and other Sorority leaders. 5

Effectiveness Committee Chairman Zollie Stevenson; Public Action Committee Chairman Kobi Little; MLK Memorial Foundation Executive Architect Ed Jackson, Jr.; and Education Foundation Chairman Ralph Johnson. Maryland State Delegate Brother Keith Haynes also was recognized along with the heads of the eight other Pan-Hellenic Council member organizations. Each year, more than 20,000 people focusing on issues impacting African Americans and the African Diaspora attend the Annual Legislative Conference. Through its programs, forums and dialogue, the conference has helped fashion public policy.

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Some of the challenges dealt with during the 2007 Conference, included: creating jobs, growing wages and promoting economic opportunity and inclusionary practices; protecting homeowners from the threat of foreclosure brought about by the meltdown in the sub prime mortgage market; assisting those displaced by Hurricane Katrina and rebuilding the Gulf Coast region and neighborhoods; expanding access to mainstream financial services and products while ensuring that consumers are safeguarded against fraudulent and abusive practices; stimulating investment in America’s underserved communities; and increasing diversity in the financial services industry.

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Jena 6 Plight Seen as “Wake-up Call” by Fraternity General President in Address to Historic Protest Rally

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Photo: Robert S. Gordon

housands gathered for a historic protest in Jena, Louisiana last fall to support six African American youths—the “Jena 6”—who faced decades of jail time for their alleged assault in a schoolyard fight with a white teenager. The march—which was called by civil rights organizations and promoted on African American websites, radio and other media outlets—attracted protesters from across the country. Students from historically black colleges and universities such as Morehouse College, Spelman College, Clark Atlanta University, Thousands converge on Jena, Louisiana for historic Howard University, Hampton University and Southern University protest rally. were especially represented. know that in 2007 Martin Luther King’s dream of equal treatThe protest rally was scheduled to coincide with the senment, respect, fairness and opportunity is still not realized.” tencing of Mychal Bell, a 17-year-old high school football star Brother Matthews stated that the plight of the Jena 6 should and one of the teens whose conviction on aggravated assault was serve as a wake-up call to black, white and brown America that overturned the week prior to the September 20, 2007 march we can no longer continue to live in denial with the belief that because an appeals court found he should not have been tried as racism and hatred no longer exist. “I ask people of good will an adult. everywhere to let your voices be heard. We are not satisfied and Organizers continued with the march anyway because Bell will not be satisfied until justice is served,” he said. was still in jail, being unable to afford the $90,000 bail set by Reverends Jesse Jackson and Al the courts; and because the other Sharpton, along with numerous other Jena 6 defendants faced possible prominent leaders in the African harsh sentences. American community addressed the rally, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity which was organized by the Louisiana General President Darryl R. NAACP, in conjunction with a coalition of Matthews, Sr. addressed the thoucivil rights groups. Those groups includsands of demonstrators assembled ed Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow/PUSH, Al during the protest rally, which was Sharpton’s National Action Network and touted as the start of the “new civil the Southern Christian Leadership rights struggle of the 21st century.” In Conference. A second rally was held outhis address, entitled We Demand (L-r) General President Darryl Matthews side of the Justice Department building in Justice for the Jena 6! Brother and Executive Director Willard Hall in Jena, Washington, D.C. on November 16, 2007. Matthews stated: “It is sobering to Louisiana.

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Above: Adult role models teach teen males to tie neckties. Above Right: (l-r) General President Darryl Matthews and Tied to Greatness™ head Alex O. Ellis. At Right: General President Matthews helps youth with necktie.

BROTHERS SERVE AS ROLE MODELS IN NATIONAL NATIONAL INITIATIVE TO TEACH TEEN BOYS HOW TO TIE A NECKTIE

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lpha Phi Alpha Brothers came out in large numbers to the historic Abyssinian Baptist Church in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood to help launch the national initiative Tied to Greatness™ that teaches male teens how tie a necktie, a rite of passage that many have never experienced. General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr. was a featured speaker at the national launch in February 2008 where more than 250 male volunteers—many of whom were Alpha Brothers—instructed about 500 teens from surrounding schools the art of tying a necktie. The Tied to Greatness™ initiative, headed by Alex O. Ellis, custom clothier and award-winning author of the book Restoring the Male Image, endeavors to teach young men the value of presenting a good appearance and image to the world. According to Ellis, that image is tied directly to a rich cultural heritage and an inner greatness. Also appearing at the Harlem launch were The James Gang, contemporary vaudevillian performers signed to John

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Legend’s Homeschool Records; political commentator Jeff Johnson; veteran newsman and CNN commentator Brother Roland Martin; Black Enterprise magazine’s Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice-President Alfred Edmond, Sr.; along with other notables and celebrities. Men’s Wearhouse donated neckties for the Harlem event; and Season One finalist from The Apprentice television show, Kwame Jackson, pledged the support of his men’s neckwear line, Krimson, to the Tied to Greatness™ initiative. The two-hour event included the tie tying element as well as words of wisdom about image and greatness from the male panel, entertainment and the reciting of a pledge where the teens commit to their educations, futures and images. The initiative is being presented in major cities across the country through May 2008. The Fraternity encouraged Alpha Brothers to attend each of the events to help mentor the young teens.

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〈⌽〈 BROTHERS RECEIVE TWO OF BBBS’ HIGHEST HONORS AT ORGANIZATION’S NATIONAL CONFERENCE Brothers Dale Long and Lowell Perry, Jr. Recognized as “Deserving Recipients” by Youth-Mentoring Organization

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Currently, Big Brothers Big Sisters is emphasizing the need ig Brothers Big Sisters has awarded two of its highest honfor more male mentors, particularly African American male menors to two prominent Alpha Brothers. Brother Dale Long tors, to serve the country’s youth. Alpha Phi Alpha is working side was presented with the Clifford P. Norman Award, which by side with big BBBS to reach more children and to make a poshonors the local Big Brothers Big Sisters board member who itive impact in the lives of children across the country. shows exemplary commitment and contribution to the Big Also in attendance at the BBBS National Conference were Brothers Big Sisters organization and its mission to serve children Fraternity Executive Director Willard Hall and Brothers Pettis in need across the country; and Brother Lowell Perry, Jr. was given Perry and Daryl Love. Brother Love is Community Relations the National Large Agency CEO of the Year award for his outstandManager for Ashland, Inc., a committed supporter of Big ing leadership at BBBS of Middle Tennessee. Both Brothers Brothers Big Sisters and its one-to-one mentoring programs; and received their awards at the BBBS National Conference held in Brother Pettis Perry is the new Vice President of Programs at one Scottsdale, Arizona last summer. of the organization’s largest agencies, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Brother Long has been serving children as a mentor through Massachusetts Bay. BBBS for more than three decades. In 1989, he was selected as Through collaboration in leadership, funding, volunteerism National Big Brother of the Year and he currently sits on the board at and recruitment, Alpha Phi Alpha and Big Brothers Big Sisters are BBBS of North Texas. Brother Long works each day to make an impact committed to bringing mentors to children in need. on the lives of young people. He is dedicated to recruiting more mentors and to serving more children, leading BBBS to recognize him as “a deserving recipient of the Clifford P. Norman Award,” which is one of Big Brothers Big Sisters’ highest honors. Brother Perry has been the CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee since May 2005. He has made great strides to help his agency reach more and more children in central Tennessee. In 2006, the Middle Tennessee agency set a record by serving 1,523 children in one-to-one mentoring relationships (matches) and the agency led the country in new match growth. His agency board also won Large Agency Board of the Year honors at the 2007 conference. General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr. was at the BBBS National Conference to witness the awards presentations. Brother Matthews, who is committed to giving children ALPHA BROTHERS RECEIVE HIGH HONORS FROM BBBS. Pictured (l-r) are: Brothers positive role models to learn from, has set a Pettis Perry, Darryl Matthews, Dale Long (Clifford P. Norman Award recipient), goal a Fraternity goal to recruit 10,000 volun- BBBS President and CEO Judy Vredenburgh, Brothers Lowell Perry, Jr. (CEO teers as new mentors by the end of 2008. of the Year Award recipient), Willard Hall and Daryl Love.

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Beta Gamma Chapter Brothers Answer Call to be Big Brothers 100 Percent of VSU Brothers Serve as BBBS Mentors at Petersburg Elementary School

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them join her school family. “They are great ome students have even emerged as African American young men, impressing the leaders as a result of the mentoring children in a positive way,” she said. program, and the Beta Gamma Each Beta Gamma Brother was Brothers have really enjoyed getting to be a matched with a young boy from the J.E.B. part of that transformation. “Watching Elementary School for the 2006-07 school Isaac (Little Brother) mature and learn to year. The matches would meet each week, become a leader in his class instead of a sometimes twice a week, at the school and follower,” said Brother Michael James, would work on homework, arts and crafts, or “That was really the icing on the cake.” would just talk about things that were going Motivated by General President Darryl on in their lives. Relationships and brotherMatthews’ call for 10,000 mentors, Beta hoods developed from there. Gamma Brothers joined the Big Brothers Big “At first you don’t feel like you’re makSisters (BBBS) program through BBBS, Inc. ing a difference,” said Big Brother Steven in Richmond, Virginia. Sarah Gould, the TriWard. “He (Little Brother) was kind of shy and Cities Coordinator for BBBS, Inc., facilitated a quiet—but he definitely found his voice by the partnership between the Chapter and the end of the year.” School-based Mentoring program at J.E.B. Ward said he really noticed a change in Stuart Elementary School. Ja’Kayle, his Little Brother, after winter break. J.E.B. Stuart Elementary School in “I think that is due to the fact that my Little Petersburg, Virginia could be described as a Michael James and his Little, Isaac, knew I could be trusted to be around because school and community in crisis. In 2006, became true brothers through the BBBS the school was denied accreditation due to program. James encouraged Isaac every I came back after break,” said Ward. “It deficiencies in English and mathematics day, telling him that he was intelligent became regular.” And that regularity boosted the relabased on state mandated Standards of and could be successful in life. tionship between the Big Brothers and the Learning assessments. According to the Little Brothers. Beta Gamma Brothers found common links with their National Institute for Literacy, 43 percent of the town’s population Littles and were able to set an example of what can be achieved. Big is at the lowest possible literacy rate. Additionally, much of the Brother Brandon Oberlander is studying to be a dentist, and his community is economically disadvantaged. Little, George, says he wants to be a doctor when he grows up, too. The motto for J.E.B. Stuart, however, is not that of a disadvantaged Big Brother Michael James is president of the Beta Gamma Chapter, community in crisis. By commonly using the phrase, “If it is to be, it’s so his Little, Isaac, has set a goal for himself to become a leader in up to me,” Principal Brenda Shelton works hard to instill self-worth the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, too. James even gave him a tie to take and value in her students. home and taught him how to tie it to prepare for his successes. “People can achieve,” expressed Shelton. “All you have to do is For Sarah Gould, the impact the Fraternity had at the school set your mind and aim high.” She routinely tells her students that if they was most evident at the BBBS end of the year party to celebrate the are to make something of their lives, it is their decision. program’s success. The Littles of the Beta Gamma Brothers had The Alpha Brothers were an in-person example of just what secretly prepared a step routine to perform for their Big Brothers. Shelton is trying to teach her students and she was happy to have

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A Brotherhood of Bigs and Littles.

They choreographed the whole thing, made costumes and got their music together. They even got permission to use the stage. “Most of these kids have difficulty even sitting through a class,” said Gould. “But they planned ahead and were able to put this together.” It was clearly a shining moment for her in her work with BBBS and a testament to just how much the Alphas were influencing the young people at J.E.B. Stuart Elementary. According to Gould, the teachers at the school say that things have improved 100 percent in areas like class behavior, academic achievement and relationships with peers and adults. It is clear that much of that came from the example set by the Fraternity. “Brandon (Oberlander) would say ‘to be an Alpha you never accept second best’ and they brought that to the Littles,” said Gould. She believes that having the Big Brothers in the school gave the Littles an opportunity to behave a certain way. “The Bigs would do it,” she said. “So the Littles would rise to the occasion.” The principal also noticed a change in the behavior of the children in her school due to the presence of the BBBS program and the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. “It helps with discipline and has made a difference in the student’s attitudes,” said Shelton. “A large majority of the Littles don’t want to disappoint the Bigs, so the attitudes have changed and there is more accountability.” Some students have even emerged as leaders as a result of the mentoring program, and the Beta Gamma Brothers have really enjoyed getting to be a part of that transformation. “Watching Isaac (Little Brother) mature and learn to become a leader in his class instead of a follower,” said Brother Michael James, “That was really the icing on the cake.” Big Brother Chris Binn’s noticed a positive change in the students’ behavior as well. “When we were there all the kids knew who we were, not just the Littles,” said Binns. “The kids were excited to be in school and there was a much more positive atmosphere.”

According to Shelton, all the students look forward to the Bigs coming to the school. “You can just see the stars in their eyes when the Bigs come in,” said Shelton. “And when the Bigs came through the door it was if they said ‘look at where I am and what I’m doing. This is something you can do, too. This is what you need in order to be successful’.” Beta Gamma Brothers set a great example and are terrific role models, even to students not enrolled in the BBBS program. Some Bigs would meet with their Littles during the lunch hour, so many of the students without Bigs would get to see what the program was like—and Shelton says that it’s clear that those children without mentors are excited about the BBBS program and are going home and talking about it. “Parents of the other children have been hearing about the program from their kids,” said Shelton. “They come in to see how their child can get an Alpha Big, too.” In the 2006-07 school year, the School-Based Mentoring program at J.E.B. Stuart was serving 33 young people, as opposed to the 10 that were served in the previous pilot year. The jump was due in large part to the Beta Gamma Chapter. For next year, the program already has 22 VSU volunteers returning with 20 children ready to be matched and the Brothers at VSU have committed to having 80 percent of their membership join the mentoring program. Shelton is hoping for an even larger group next year, especially since her school has merged with two others, increasing her student body from 320-550. “I’d like one for all of them,” said Shelton. Big Brother Steven Ward recognizes the need for mentoring in the community and thinks that the exposure the program has been getting due to the Fraternity involvement is fantastic. He’s even hearing people talking about BBBS and their programs at work and is hoping more people, and more organizations, sign up. “This was a spring-board…a pilot school,” said Ward. “All boys in Petersburg need a Big Brother.” With the help of Alpha Phi Alpha, BBBS is working to bring as many mentors as possible to students around the country. Principal Shelton is pleased that the Alphas have challenged other fraternities to follow their lead and join the BBBS program, especially at J.E.B. Stuart, and she is ready. “I am looking forward to next year—each year gets better,” said Shelton. “That’s what makes the difference.” Jill Godsey works at the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Headquarters in Philadelphia, PA.

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Fraternity’s Newest U.S. Diplomats among Handful of Individuals Selected as Foreign Service Officers

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to enter the Foreign Service and are among a handful of individuhe nation’s diplomatic “front line infantry”—its Foreign als selected to serve as diplomats for the United States each year. Service Officers—have served as a staple of U.S. diplomacy Brothers Husbands and Lewis began on their path toward diplofor many decades. macy early in their young lives. Brother Husbands is a recipient of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity is no stranger to foreign affairs the Pickering Fellowship and Brother Lewis is a recipient of the service. The first African American to become a United States Rangel Fellowship, both of which prepare college students for the Ambassador, Brother Edward R. Dudley, served as head of the U.S. rigors of the Foreign Service through a combination of mentoring Mission in Liberia in 1949. Brother Andrew Young worked to end and internships. segregation in Zimbabwe as the U.S. Ambassador to the United As Foreign Service Officers, the Brothers each will serve two Nations. The chairman of the Fraternity’s World Policy Council, years in their initial posts before transferring to new assignments. Brother Horace G. Dawson, entered the Foreign Service in 1962, Before embarking on their assignments, the Fraternity’s serving in Nigeria, Uganda, Liberia and a number of other positions newest diplomats paused to acknowledge that where they now before being named Ambassador to Botswana. stand is due to the sacrifice and efforts of Ambassadorial progeniThere are scores of other Alpha men who have held the title of tors such as Brothers Horace Dawson, Andrew Young, Edward R. United States Ambassador, including Terence Todman, Leonard Dudley and the many other Brothers who have served in foreign Spearman, John E. Reinhardt, Kenton Keith, William Gray, John affairs. Brothers Husbands and Lewis expressed that it is because Howard Morrow, George Haley, Walter Carrington and W.E.B. of these Alpha predecessors that they will invariably progress DuBois who was conferred the “personal rank” of Ambassador onwards and upwards! while representing the U.S. at a Presidential Inauguration in Liberia. On November 2, 2007, there were 59 new Foreign Service Officers sworn into the elite cadre of diplomats. Among the new officers are two of Alpha’s brethren— Ajani Husbands, a Fall 2003 initiate at Nu Sigma Chapter, Stanford University; and David A. Lewis, a Spring 2002 initiate at Theta Zeta Chapter, Dartmouth College. Brother Husbands will serve as a Political/Economic Officer in Asmara, Eritrea; while Brother Lewis serves as a Consular Officer in Hermosillo, Mexico. As Foreign Service Officers, they will deal directly with issues of drug trafficking, human rights, religious freedom, immigration and numerous other topics pertinent to international affairs. The young Brothers passed ALPHA’S NEWEST DIPLOMATS: Brothers Ajani Husbands (l) and David A. Lewis (r) are pictured rigorous written and oral exams with Ambassador Horace Dawson during swearing-in ceremony for new diplomats.

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Photo: Melvin Adams

Wells Fargo Financial President Mark Merkel (r) presents $25,000 initial funding check to C2C National Chairman Desmund Adams (l) and General President Darryl Matthews.

FRATERNITY’S C2C INITIATIVE PARTNERS WITH WELLS FARGO IN NATIONAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

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lpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and Wells Fargo Financial have launched a national internship program in an effort to provide career opportunities in financial services for minority college men and women. The partnership between the Fraternity’s own national initiative, College Life to Corporate Life (C2C)—“Champions of Change” internship program—and Wells Fargo Financial was announced at Zeta Kappa Lambda Chapter’s annual Black & Gold Ball on February 16, 2008 in Des Moines, Iowa. In endorsing the program, General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr. stated: “When I assumed this office my vision was to provide our collegiate members with the tools and resources needed to maximize their potential and rapidly ascend as leaders in their chosen fields.” Brother Desmund Adams, National Chairman of the C2C Program and chief architect of the internship initiative, said: “We are pleased to have Wells Fargo on board as the inaugural nation-

al corporate partner. We believe their presence will inspire other corporations to join in—providing a direct and substantial impact on the success of diverse professionals. Many professional careers will be launched from this solid foundation.” As part of the partnership, Wells Fargo Financial will provide up to 25 summer internships each year to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity collegiate members, as well as diverse women and men within the participating markets. Initially, the program will launch in 14 Midwestern states, including states where Wells Fargo Financial has a presence. Wells Fargo agreed to provide a one-time initial contribution of $25,000 to the program and donate $1,000 per internship on an annual basis to the Fraternity. Mark Merkel, president of Wells Fargo Financial Leasing, Inc., stated: “All of us at Wells Fargo Financial are proud of our continued work in helping our great partners at Alpha Phi Alpha with their vision of creating unlimited professional opportunity for minority women and men. It is our hope that this program will help

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individuals bridge the gap from career opportunities to career success in corporate America.” The program is designed to be replicated in the Fraternity’s other Chapters across the country. It will begin with an initial five-year commitment from Wells Fargo, running through the end of 2012. The internship program on which the national launch is modeled was created by the Zeta Kappa Lambda Alumni Chapter in Des Moines. It began as a local initiative between Zeta Kappa Lambda and Wells Fargo Leasing in Des Moines in the summer of 2006— with Iowa Health Systems and Equitrust also participating. As a result of the program’s success, a decision was made to launch a national effort. In 2008, the Fraternity’s corporate office and local sponsor Wells Fargo Financial committed the necessary resources to launch the program nationally. The program’s goal continues to be to help bridge the gap in corporate development and career opportunities in America. Wells Fargo Financial, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, is a unit of Wells Fargo & Company and provides real estate-secured lending, automobile financing, consumer and private-label credit cards and commercial services to consumers and businesses. The company has $73 billion in assets, approximately 21,000 team members and operates in 48 states across the United States, the 10 provinces of Canada, Puerto Rico and the Pacific Rim.

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM KICKOFF: (l-r) C2C National Chairman Desmund Adams; Wells Fargo Financial President Mark Merkel; General President Darryl Mathews; Wells Fargo’s Greg Janasko; and another Wells Fargo Team Member help kick off the national internship partnership.

General President Darryl Matthews (c) is pictured with Zeta Kappa Lambda Brothers during Chapter’s annual Black & Gold Ball where the Fraternity and Wells Fargo internship program partnership was announced.

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HIGH SCHOOL ALPHA ACHIEVERS PROGRAM INITIATED BY COLUMBIA, MARYLAND CHAPTER CELEBRATES 10 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE By Brother David Campbell

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lpha Achievers from the Oakland Mills High School in Columbia, Maryland held a reunion celebration that recognized ten years of encouraging academic excellence among African American male students at the school. The program at Oakland Mills was started by Columbia’s Kappa Phi Lambda Chapter in 1997. There were fewer than 20 boys involved when the program began. Since then, more than 100 members of Alpha Achievers at the Columbia school have graduated. Originally founded for African American males, Alpha Achievers is now open to high school males of every ethnic group. All students must have at least a 3.0 grade point aver- Current and past Alpha Achievers at the 10th Anniversary age to be accepted into the program and they must submit Celebration. two letters of recommendation and sign an honor code. when I was in elementary school,” Cole said. “It’s nice that the kids A second Howard County chapter of Alpha Achievers was starthave someone to talk to who is not a teacher.” ed at Long Reach High School three years ago and additional chapKye Pinder, 9, a fourth-grader at Jeffers Hill, said he enjoys ters opened at two other high schools in 2006. Last year, another spending time with his Alpha Achiever mentor, Richard Duarte, 18, high school expressed interest about starting a chapter. a senior from Columbia. The two discuss everything from girls to The program has greatly changed the academic climate at video games. “He’s funny,” Pinder said of Duarte. “I have someone Oakland Mills, according to Mr. Vincent James, a guidance counto talk to about the same thing.” selor at the school who volunteered to be advisor for the group. In addition to their community service, the Alpha Achievers hold “Now students are taking honors, AP (Advanced Placement) and a mix of social events and fundraisers. The annual video game tourgifted-and-talented courses,” James said. “Now, students are not nament regularly attracts numerous participants, and the group’s isolated. There are more students challenging themselves.” annual calendar—in which members pose in tuxedos—has set a Oakland Mills Principal Frank Eastham also has noticed a tradition at Oakland Mills. Proceeds from the calendar pay for the change. “It took some time to change the mindset that it wasn’t students’ college scholarships, field trips and operating costs. cool to do well in school,” said Eastham, who was an assistant After finishing high school, many of the Alpha Achievers have principal at Oakland Mills when the program began. “Now we have continued on to college and received graduate degrees. They can men of color striving to get into the Alpha Achievers. It has created be found in career fields ranging from law to public relations, a culture that has celebrated academic achievement in school.” according to James, who volunteered as an advisor after hearing Students in the Alpha Achievers program at Oakland Mills members of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity speak to a group of stuHigh provide hour-long tutoring twice a week to younger students dents about morals and sexual responsibility. at nearby Jeffers Hill Elementary School. Other Alpha Achievers can “We weren’t sure how much of an impact we would be able to be found tutoring pupils throughout the week at Oakland Mills make,” said Eastham. “(But) it has had a tremendous impact on Middle and Stevens Forest Elementary schools. the school.” After spending an hour helping Jefffers Hill Elementary School pupils with their homework assignments, Eric Cole, a 17-year-old senior at Oakland Mills High School, came away with a feeling of Brother David Campbell was initiated through Beta Alpha accomplishment. He later watched as his mentees played an Chapter at Morgan State University and is former president of intense game of Connect Four. “I really wish someone came to me Kappa Phi Lambda Chapter in Columbia, Maryland.

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John Legend performs.

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Dream Concert Highlights 1. BET CEO Debra Lee 2. Quincy Jones and Cuba Gooding, Jr. 3. Darryl Matthews, Stevie Wonder, Willard Hall 4. Ludacris and Talib Kwieli Photos by Donald Baker and Seaton White

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DREAM CONCERT ALL-STAR LINEUP PERFORMS TO RAISE AWARENESS AND FUNDS FOR ALL-STAR LINEUP PERFORMS D URING MLK MEMORIAL DREAM CONCERT TO RAISE AWARENESS AND FUNDS FOR MLK MEMORIAL Aretha Franklin shows why she is the Queen of Soul.

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tevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, John Legend, Jessye Norman, Ludacris, Joss Stone, Carlos Santana, Garth Brooks, Kenny “Baby Face” Edmonds and an all-star lineup of nearly a dozen other artists performed at Radio City Music Hall in New York City for The Dream Concert to benefit the Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial to honor Brother King. The once-in-a-lifetime concert, held September 18, 2007, was intended to raise public awareness and funds to build and maintain the national memorial, which is expected to cost about $100 million. The Memorial Foundation has already raised about $82 million of the total cost for the memorial, which is scheduled to be completed in 2008. Tommy Hilfiger, Russell Simmons, Joel Horowitz, Quincy Jones, David Stern and Edgar Bronfman, Jr. served as co-chairs for

the historic gathering of top musicians in the country, as well as prominent figures from politics, sports and entertainment. Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis served as artistic directors for the event and Ben Affleck, Muhammad Ali, Angela Bassett, Jamie Foxx, Cuba Gooding, Jr., Magic Johnson, Michael Jordan, Shaquille O’Neal, LaDainian Tomlinson, Kerry Washington and former New York Mayor David Dinkins served as Host Committee members. General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr., who is Vice President of the MLK National Memorial Foundation Board, also was among the dignitary at the concert. Soul artists Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin who have long been associated with Dr. King’s causes anchored the three-hour concert, stirring the audience in their closing performances. The $1,000-per-seat Dream Concert also presented the country sounds

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Cedric the Entertainer and Darryl Matthews

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Bebe and Cece Winans

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12. Dream Concert organizers and MLK Board Members, including: Russell Simmons (3rd left), Darryl Matthews (4th left), and Tommy Hilfiger and companion (5th and 6th from left).

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Sean “P. Diddy” Combs

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Kirk and Tammy Franklin

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Darryl and Allison Matthews

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Joss Stone

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Aretha Franklin

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of Garth Brook; gospel tunes from Bebe and Cece Winans; rhythm and blues from Baby Face; the Latino flavor of Carlos Santana; the hip-hop sound of Wyclef Jean; rap music from Ludacris and Talib Kweli; and the operatic enunciations of Jessye Norman. British soul singer Joss Stone performed a duet with newcomer Ryan Shaw; singer and keyboardist John Legend lent his gospel flavor to a political selection; and new artist Robin Thicke performed some of his current hits. The night featured several short speeches—presented between the music acts—from noted individuals such as Dr. King’s daughter, Bernice King, Usher, Quincy Jones, Cuba Gooding, Jr., Ben Vereen, Al Roker, L.L. Cool J., Kerry Washington, Stevie Wonder, Kirk Franklin, Sean “Diddy” Combs, Cedric the Entertainer, Tom Joyner, BET CEO Debra Lee, NBA Commissioner,

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David J. Stern, Brother Harry Johnson, Russell Simmons, Tommy Hilfiger and other members of The Dream Concert host committee. On the giant screen at the back of the stage, the show presented a mid-concert virtual tour of the King Memorial, which will soon break ground on the Mall in Washington. The official presenter and concert sponsor was Viacom. The national memorial honoring Brother King will be situated adjacent to the FDR Memorial and in a direct line between the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials. Congress passed Joint Resolutions in 1996 authorizing Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity to establish a memorial honoring Dr. King to be built in Washington, D.C. The Ceremonial Groundbreaking for the memorial took place on November 13, 2006.

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2007 Distinguished Collegians Big Sister’s Program. He also performs volunteer work with Habitat for Humanity.

Brother Ruben Gerard Alexander Alpha Rho Chapter Morehouse University Atlanta, GA

Majoring in biology and serving as a tutor in the Biology Department, Brother Alexander is president of the University’s Health Careers Society and member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. He is an Economic Empowerment Initiatives intern and received an Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Scholarship, as well as a W.E.B. Dubois Scholarship. He was named as the Southern Region’s College Brother with the highest GPA in 2007; served as Alpha Rho Chapter Director of Educational Activities; and was a Scholar’s Bowl Team member for the 2007 General Convention. He served as a Chapter delegate to the 2006 and 2007 Georgia District Conventions; 2007 Southern Regional Convention; and 2006 and 2007 Fraternity General Conventions.

Zeta Xi Chapter University of Louisiana at Lafayette Lafayette, LA

A Dean’s List student and recipient of a school scholarship for having the highest GPA, Brother Duhon also received local and state scholarships from Sacred Heart Men and Teens Against Violence, as well as the Knights of the Year Award. The honor’s program student served as Vice President of the school’s Pre-Professional Society, and is a member of the Biology Society and National Pan Hellenic Council. Initiated into the Fraternity in Spring 2007, he has served as Zeta Xi Chapter Chaplain, Education Committee member, on the Fundraising Committee and as part of the Survivor Mentoring Program. Brother Duhon also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar.

Brother Brandon D. Brown

Brother Stuart Parnell Lott

Xi Delta Chapter James Madison University Harrison, VA

Delta Phi Chapter Jackson State University Jackson, MS

A marketing major, Brother Brown has served his Chapter as Secretary, Director of Membership Intake and Chairman of the 2008 Miss Black & Gold Scholarship Pageant. He is a James Madison University Honors Scholar and James Madison University Centennial Scholar. He also serves as a member of Students of Minority Outreach; the Black Student Alliance; Neo-Underground Railroad Conductor; and Contemporary Gospel Singers. He is a tutor with the BLAST Program at Thomas Harrison Middle School in Harrison, Virginia and is a recipient of the Alexander Gabbin Scholarship. Brother Brown also is a Dean’s List student. Brother Brown also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar.

Delta Phi Chapter Jackson State University Jackson, MS

A two-time National Deans List honoree, Brother Harris is a member of the campus’ American Society of Civil Engineers. He also is a member of Greater Pearlie Grove Baptist Church and performs volunteer work in the Jackson, Mississippi Public Elementary School, serving as an after school tutor/mentor. Brother Harris was recently appointed as Delta Phi Chapter Chaplain and is chairman of their Big Brothers

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Majoring in finance with a pre-law minor, Brother Lott maintains a 4.0 GPA. He is Assistant Southern Regional Vice President; and serves as President of Delta Phi Chapter. He is a Metro Jackson Assistant Area Director; Mississippi District Area 4 Pharaoh’s Council member; National Pan-Hellenic Council representative for Delta Phi Chapter; and the District of Mississippi Brother with the Highest GPA Average. Brother Lott also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 20062007 Collegiate Scholar.

Brother Jonathan McCoy Beta Epsilon Chapter North Carolina A&T State University Greensboro, NC

Brother DeMarco Harris

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Brother Karlnelius Duhon

Majoring in mechanical engineering, Brother McCoy serves as Alpha Lambda Delta President; and is a member of the National Society of Black Engineers where he was Freshman Development Committee Chairman. He also is a member of the Council of Presidents; Deans Leadership Ambassador; Honors Program Student Council; Alpha Chi; Alpha Kappa Mu; Ronald E. McNair Scholar; NSBE BCA Scholar; Ben Carson Scholar; Black Professional Men Scholar; Comcast Leader/Achiever Scholar; recipient of the INROADS Trendsetter Award; Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholar; NC Space Grant Scholar; National

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Achievement Scholar; Lochkeed Martin Scholar; Toyota Community Scholar; 100 Black Men Scholar; Armed Forces John Skinner Scholar; recipient of the Honors Program Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement; as well as recipient of the College of Engineering Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement. Brother McCoy also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar.

Beta Nu Chapter Florida A&M University Tallahassee, FL

Majoring in Business Administration with a minor in African American Studies, Brother Miller served as FAMU Student National Alumni Association President 2006-07. He served as a FAMU SGA Student Senator from 2005-2007 and was named Senator of the Year. He also served as the school’s Chicago Club Vivre President; was a Dean’s List and Honor Roll student throughout his college tenure; was a University Volunteer Campus Tour Guide; member of the campus NAACP; FAMU Presidential Scholar Association; and Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society, Kappa Iota Chapter.

Brother Micah Dean Moon Alpha Rho Chapter Morehouse University Atlanta, GA

Majoring in English with a history minor, Brother Moon is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society; an Omicron Delta Kappa member and Sigma Tau Delta member. He is his Chapter’s Assistant Editor-to-theSphinx; Director of Educational Activities; Maroon Tiger Man of the Year; National Dean’s List member; Alpha Rho Step Team member; campus NAACP member; Project Identity mentoring group volunteer; and member of the Morehouse-Spelman Pre-Law Society. Brother Moon also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar.

Leadership Academy Packet materials are available on the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity website. To download the information, visit: www.apa1906.net.

Delta Rho Chapter University of Missouri-Kansas City Kansas City, MO Named Beta Lambda’s College Brother of the Year 2005-2006, Brother Okagbue served as his Chapter’s Treasurer in 2005-06 and as Vice President in 2006-07. He served as Budget Committee Chair for the Midwest College Brothers Retreat in Fall 2005 and received the Omicron Xi Lambda Collegiate Jewel Award for 2006-2007.

Brother William J. Miller III

LEADERSHIP ACADEMY PACKET

Brother Oseloka Albert Okagbue

Brother Joshua Jerelle Oliver Theta Chi Chapter Northwestern State University Natchitoches, LA

Recipient of the College Brother with the Highest GPA Award for both the Louisiana District and Southwestern Region, Brother Oliver also was given the Theta Chi Chapter Leadership Award. He served as President of the Omega Greek Honor Society; Vice President of the Helping Hands Community Service Club; Treasurer of the National Pan-Hellenic Council; and Historian of Beta Beta Beta Biological Honor Society. He was a member of Mu Epsilon Delta pre-med club; was active with Intramural Athletics; and was on the President’s List. Brother Oliver received the Academic Achievement Award from the Order of Omega; and the Most Energetic Helping Hands Member Award. Brother Oliver also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar.

Brother Brettney D_Sean Smith Clemson University Graduate School Clemson, SC

A native of Charlotte, NC, Brother Smith is currently pursing a Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Clemson. The former president of Xi Zeta Chapter (a joint Chapter at Hampden-Sydney College in South Carolina and Longwood University in Virginia) graduated summa cum laude Phi Beta Kappa from Hampden-Sydney with a 3.8 GPA. He currently holds a 4.0 GPA at Clemson. After obtaining his Ph.D., he plans to become a consultant, helping to optimize worker productivity and organizational efficiency for various firms and companies. Continued on following page

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2007 Distinguished Collegians Brother Tramell Tillman Delta Phi Chapter Jackson State University Jackson, MS

Student coordinator for the Jackson State University Kids Kollege Freedom School, Brother Tillman is a member of the school’s Chapter of the National Association for Black Journalists. He is Treasurer for JSU’s Chapter of the American Advertising Federation; JSU Student Government Association; and serves as Mr. Senior 2007-2008. Brother Tillman is a member of the Alpha Delta Sigma Advertising Honorary Society; Alpha Chi Honor Society; Who’s Who Among Colleges and Universities; 2007 American Advertising Federation’s Most Promising Minority Student in the Country; the University’s National Pan-Hellenic Council; and was named Most Valuable Fraternity Member 2006-2007. Brother Tillman also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar.

Brother Joel L. Todd, Jr. Epsilon Alpha Chapter University of Toledo Toledo, OH

Vice President of the University of Toledo’s Black Student Union, Brother Todd also serves as Chair of the Personal Development Committee. He is a member of the Student African American Brotherhood; Educational Affairs Committee; and the school’s NAACP Chapter. Brother Todd also is a member of the Dean’s List; and President’s List, having a degree with higher distinction—Magna Cum Laude. He received the Excel Award for minority students who balance community activities and academics; and

Vice President’s Exemplary Leadership Award. He was a student member of the University of Toledo Board of Trustees; Who’s Who Among American College Students; Golden Key International Honor Society; Blue Key National Honor Society Member of the Year; University of Toledo Chapter NAACP; Special Assistant to the President of the Black Student Union; Student General Fee Committee; and the University of Toledo Strategic Planning Committee. Brother Todd also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar.

Brother Etienne Clement Toussaint Rho Nu Chapter Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA

A mechanical engineering major, Brother Toussaint serves as a Big Brother in the BBBS Program and is a MLK Memorial Foundation donor. He is Chapter coordinator of Games & Karaoke Night to benefit the MLK Foundation; voter registration coordinator; Step Team member for Hyannis Telerama for March of Dimes; WalkAmerica team member with Rho Nu Chapter; Vice President of Rho Nu Chapter; MIT PR Chairperson for the National Society of Black Engineers; MIT Diversity Initiative; and Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Program (STEM) Tutor. Brother Toussaint also is an Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation 2006-2007 Collegiate Scholar. Note: Brothers Ivan Cason of the University of Central Missouri and Daniel Hibbert of Tennessee State University were also named as 2007 Distinguished Collegians. Their photos and information were not available.

In Honor of

THE SEVEN JEWELS: Distinguished Collegians

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s black students in a large American University, they were cut off from the many opportunities for mutual helpfulness, which come to groups of students through personal acquaintance and close association. As individuals, there were personal contacts of value with other members of the student body, but as a group they were proscribed in their associations. The cleavage, characteristic of this period, had laid the basis for the division even in college life. Many of these students were self-supporting and their resources were limited, and if membership in the university fraternal associations had been permissible, it is probable that advantage could not have been taken of the opportunity. Confronted by the social proscriptions of color common to American institutions of this era, hampered by limited means with the attendant circumstances of the average “poor” student, these students faced the future and boldly endeavored to find a way out of their difficulties, scarcely realizing, however, the import of their action on subsequent generations of college students.”

Dr. Charles H. Wesley The History of Alpha Phi Alpha

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Alpha Sigma Lambda Brothers

NATIONAL ALUMNI CHAPTER OF YEAR CELEBRATES 75TH ANNIVERSARY

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lpha Phi Alpha Fraternity’s 2006-07 National Alumni Chapter of the Year celebrated its 75th Anniversary by hosting a Black and Gold Gala last November. In addition to honoring the rich history of the progressive Chapter, the gala recognized Alpha Sigma Lambda’s National Chapter of the Year Award—presented to them at the Fraternity’s 2007 Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Chapter also paid tribute to its members Reginald Bibb and Rod Tyler who received National co-Brother of the Year honors at the 101st Anniversary Convention. Also during the gala, the Chapter recognized leaders from the local city government, as well as the business, education, criminal justice and religious communities. In addition, Alpha Sigma Lambda’s living legends—those who have served Alpha Phi Alpha for 50 years or more—were also honored. They are: Brothers Frank L. Breedlove; Wright L. Lassiter, Jr.; John H. Nelson; Robert Prince, M.D.; C.C. Russeau; Charlie B. Sheperd; Ernest L. Wallace; Myron H. Watkins, M.D., P.A.; and H.B. Sorrellis. Alpha Sigma Lambda Chapter in Dallas, Texas received its charter on November 5, 1932 when it inducted eight young men

into its ranks. The charter members were: Herman I. Holland, president; Robert L. Prince, vice president; James White, secretary; James R. Edmonds, assistant secretary; Roy A. Lay, treasurer; and Brothers Hugh A. Key, Clifford P. Johnson and Roy E. Dixon. The charter members and those that followed soon after them played a vital role in developing the Negro Voters League in Dallas, the Dallas Urban League and the Dallas NAACP Chapter. Numerous members of the Chapter have held key positions in the state, regional and national levels of the Fraternity since Alpha Sigma Lambda’s chartering. Brother Maceo Smith was elected as the Fraternity’s 17th General President; Brother Earnest L. Wallace served as Southwestern Regional Vice President; and Brother Victor Elmore currently serves as auditor for the Southwestern Region. Alpha Sigma Lambda Chapter has more than 75 active Brothers who oversee their national programs and initiatives. The Chapter has local partnerships with the African American Museum, the Martin Luther King Community Center of Dallas, the Greater Dallas March of Dimes, and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Dallas.

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Since its Alpha Merit Program was implemented 27 years ago, Alpha Sigma Lambda has mentored more than 500 young men and given more than $100,000 in scholarships. Its annual Beautillion features the graduating seniors and those who have been awarded one of their four annual scholarships. Also the Chapter is celebrating 10 years of property ownership, resulting from its Alpha VII Corporation. Its Alpha VII Group consists of Alpha Sigma Lambda Brothers who own and operate commercial properties that include their Fraternity House, a restaurant known as the South Dallas Café, and a jazz and R&B club. Alpha Sigma Lambda Brothers are involved throughout Dallas, including having leadership roles in the NAACP, the Dallas Urban League, Dallas City Council, Dallas School Board and many nonprofit boards and organizations.

The Chapter recently opened their House of Alpha to young men in the Alpha Merit Program and the ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. They met with the youth for introductions and a game of basketball, and also assisted with the Angel Food Ministries/Gathering of the Eagles Worship Center in the same morning; and later that afternoon, they participated in the AKA Sorority Bowl-A-Thon. They also hosted an 80th birthday celebration for Chapter Brother Ernest Wallace, former Southwestern Region Vice President and 50-year living legend Brother, who founded the Chapter’s Alpha Merit Group Committee, Inc. in 1964.

SEE THE NEXT SPHINX EDITION FOR FULL COVERAGE OF THE 2007 ORLANDO CONVENTION

Fraternity General President and Executive Director among Noted Leaders at 2008 State of Black Union Symposium

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eaders in education, public policy, religion and black communities discussed the role of the African American vote in 2008 at this year’s State of the Black Union (SOBU) weekend, held February 22 and 23 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana. The theme for this year’s symposium was “Reclaiming Our Democracy, Deciding Our Future.” In addition to focusing on the role African Americans will play in this year’s election, a goal of SOBU 2008 was to mobilize 1,000 volunteers to rebuild some of the poorest areas of New Orleans, which remain devastated more than two years after over 80 percent of the city was inundated with floodwaters. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr. and Executive Director Willard C. Hall, Jr. were among the noted leaders at the symposium, which was sponsored and moderated by author/journalist Tavis Smiley. During the forum, morning-radio program host Tom Joyner

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led a question-and-answer session with the panelists and audience members. Topics included the possible election of African American Democratic candidate Barack Obama as United States President; the effects of the Presidential election on the social, political and economic future of African American communities; and the mortgage crisis and the U.S. economy. Portions of the forum discussed the rebuilding of parts of New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina; and Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton spoke to the audience about health care and education. Other participants in the symposium included New Orleans Mayor Clarence Ray Nagin, Xavier University President Brother Dr. Norman Francis, Michael Eric Dyson, Brother Cornel West, Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, Rev. Al Sharpton, Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu, CNN commentator Donna Brazile, Bishop T.D. Jakes, National Urban League President Brother Marc H. Morial and Rev. Jesse Jackson.

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First Caucasian Brother to Address General Convention Visits Missouri Alumni Brothers Brother Dr. Roger Youmans also was one of First Caucasians Inducted into the Fraternity

By Leonard Le’Doux, Jr.

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eta Lambda Chapter in Kansas City, Missouri hosted a reception honoring one of the first Caucasian, non-honorary members of the Fraternity, Dr. Roger L. Youmans, who was initiated in 1953 through Upsilon Chapter while a junior at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas “I would always ask many of my African American friends to join me at church,” said Brother Youmans. “Many of them would reply: “Why don’t you join our church or our organizations.” he said. Brother Youmans pondered the subject for several months and when the invitation was extended to him to join the Fraternity, he accepted. “My reasons for joining the Fraternity were to show the world that segregation was wrong and I really believe that joining was right in my heart,” he explained. “I was not joining to make any type of name or publicity for myself. I just thought that if I wanted to end the separation, it must start with me making the first step.” Although many Caucasians and African Americans did not agree with him pledging an African American Fraternity, that did not stop him. Brother Youmans continued through the process and became a member of the organization. “I owe my life to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,” Brother Youmans said as he stood before Beta Lambda Chapter members during his visit. “Alpha showed me how to treat black men and it helped me in my missionary work in Africa. Had I not had my Alpha experience, I would have been very lost in my mission in the boundless African Congo.” The surgeon, who spent many years in Congo working in the mission field, also spoke to the Beta Lambda Brothers about his experiences during the pledge process of those days. He also stated that he was selected as a delegate to represent Upsilon Chapter at the General Convention in Miami in 1954 where he gave the Undergraduate Address. The occasion is recorded in Fraternity’s history book, The History of Alpha Phi Alpha: A Development in College Life. His address was a call for the reevaluation of the Fraternity in terms of being a more effective leadership. Brother Youmans, the youngest of six children, grew up in Kansas City, Kansas with the dream of becoming a medical doctor. He graduated from the University of Kansas Medical School in 1958; and before completing his surgical residency there, he took

a leave of absence to direct a mission bush hospital in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1961-62. Those were turbulent, desperate years for Congo. He and his family returned to Kansas where he finished his residency and passed his surgical boards. He went on to study French and tropical medicine in Belgium, and then returned with his wife and children to Congo. Dr. Roger L. Youmans He worked 18 months as the only doctor (and the only foreign family) in the Wembo Nyama Hospital in the heart of Congo. In 1967, he returned to the University of Kansas Medical Center as an assistant professor of surgery and director of the emergency service. In 1970, he was asked to come back to Congo as Chief of Staff of the 2,000-bed Kinshasa General Hospital, later renamed the Mama Yemo Hospital in honor of President Mobutu’s mother. He returned to Congo in the offered position and led the transformation of the sick-infested facility into the best hospital in central Africa. He spent the next 18 years in the practice of surgery in California and as an associate professor of surgery in medical schools in Oklahoma. He again went to Africa and worked four years in rural hospitals and health centers in Ghana; and was a visiting professor of surgery in the medical schools of Ghana and Nigeria. He is now retired and living in Princeton, New Jersey with his wife. Brother Youmans has written a book explaining his experiences in Congo entitled When Elephants Fight: An American Surgeon’s Chronicle of Congo. Brother Leonard Le’Doux, Jr. is Missouri District Financial Comptroller and Associate Editor to the Sphinx for Beta Lambda Chapter. He holds baccalaureate degrees from Excelsior College (USNY) in Albany, New York and the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He is currently pursing a Master’s degree in Education at the University of Saint Mary in Overland Park, Kansas.

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(L-r) General President Darryl Matthews presents Centennial Book of Essays and Letters to Gov. Martin O'Malley as Brother Delegate Keith Haynes looks on.

ALPHA LEGISLATIVE NIGHT IN MARYLAND PURPOSED TO INFLUENCE STATE POLICY

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raternity Brothers representing Chapters from throughout Maryland traveled to the state Capital in Annapolis on January 28, 2008 to participate in the Seventh Annual Alpha Phi Alpha Legislative Night. The event was hosted by Delegate Keith E. Haynes, Esq., 44th Legislative District, Baltimore, MD, in association with Baltimore’s Delta Lambda Chapter. Alpha Night’s purpose is to familiarize Brothers with the Maryland government and officials elected to the state’s legislative and executive branches. Additionally, the Legislative Night hopes to establish a visible presence and relationship between the Fraternity and the legislative and executive decision makers, as well as to positively influence state policy that impacts the African American community. The event opened with Brother Delegate Haynes welcoming the Brothers and legislators from across the state. Numerous legislators complimented Delegate Haynes for his skilled leadership in the Assembly. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr., Executive Director Willard Hall, and Eastern Regional Vice President Dennis G. Kemp, Sr. brought greetings.

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Brothers Matthews, Haynes and Delta Lambda Chapter’s Political Education co-Chairs Brothers Dr. Russell Kelley and Charles E. Sydnor, III presented Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley, Lt. Governor Anthony Brown, Speaker of the House Michael Busch and Speaker Pro Tem Delegate Adrienne A. Jones with bound collections of the scholarly and historical writings presented in the special edition book, Centennial Book of Essays and Letters. In addition to the Delta Lambda host Chapter, leaders and members from six other Chapters from around the state attended the Seventh Annual Alpha Legislative Night. The large gathering of Brothers received simultaneous recognition from legislators in the House and Senate Chambers. Public greetings also were given on the House floor to General President Matthews and the Delta Lambda Chapter leadership. Delta Lambda’s 2008 Beautillion Class of distinguished high school seniors also attended Alpha Night and they were greeted by Governor O’Malley. Their presence and interest in the state government was recognized and encouraged by the Chapter leadership and Executive and Legislative representatives attending the event.

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(Front row, l-r) Brothers Timothy McFadden; Charles Sydnor; Executive Director Willard Hall; General President Darryl Matthews; Gov. Martin O’Malley; Brother Delegate Keith Haynes; Eastern Regional Vice President Dennis Kemp; and Dr. Russell Kelley are pictured following book presentation.

Above: A delegation of Brothers is pictured in the legislative chambers of the Maryland State Capitol Building. Above Right: Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley (center) is pictured with 15 members of Delta Lambda’s 2008 Beautillion class, who represent senior high school students from the Baltimore area. Right: (L-r) Delta Lambda Political Education co-Chairs Brothers Dr. Russell Kelley and Charles E. Sydnor, III, appear with General President Darryl Matthews.

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Houston Chapter Hosts Historic Celebration By Brother Thomas A. Brown

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ounded November 27, 1927 in Prairie View, Texas by Alumni Brothers teaching at the now Prairie View A&M University, Alpha Eta Lambda Chapter moved 40 miles south to Houston in 1952 following the founding of Epsilon Tau Lambda in the Chapter birthplace. Alpha Eta Lambda served as host of the Fraternity’s 1969 and 2005 National Conventions in Houston; and in December 2007, the Chapter held their 80th Anniversary Celebration in their city of relocation—combining the occasion with the Fraternity’s Founders’ Day Celebration. In observance of the dual 80th Anniversary and Founders’ Day celebration, Chapter President Daryl Irby, Texas Southern University Dean Brother James Ward and former Southwestern Region Vice President Tophas Anderson prepared a full slate of weekend activities that began on November 30 with Brothers gathering at the Ruth Street Fraternity House for a night of goodwill and fellowship.

80th Anniversary and Founders’ Day Luncheon The following day, December 1, about 500 Alpha Brothers and friends joined an impressive group of dignitaries for the Chapter’s official luncheon celebration. Among the dignitary present were: General President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr.; 31st General President Harry E. Johnson, Sr.; 30th General President Adrian Wallace; 27th General President Charles Teamer; 26th General President Ozell Sutton; Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 27th Supreme Basileus Barbara McKinzie and 18th Supreme Basileus Mattelia Grays; Congressman Brother Al Green; Alpha Kappa Alpha member and Congresswoman Sheila Jackson-Lee; and numerous local politicians; as well as current and past college presidents, including Langston University’s Brother Earnest Holloway and Texas Southern University’s Brother James Douglas. Former General President Harry Johnson served as the Master of Ceremonies for the occasion. The Fraternity’s Seven Jewels were honored in a traditional lighting of seven candles. Also, Brothers

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with 25 years and 50 years of service were recognized. Of special note, Bro. A. C. Hastings, one of the trailblazers of the southwest region was given a standing ovation in recognition of his 73 years of service to Alpha Phi Alpha. Alpha Eta Lambda Brother Isaac Bryant presented his signature reciting of The House of Alpha, making Brothers sit a little taller in their seats and guests awe at the intense delivery. The program included presentations by the following individuals who congratulated Alpha Eta Lambda on 80 years of leadership and service to the community: Brothers Ozell Sutton; Adrian Wallace; Texas District Director Willie Edwards; Southwestern AVP Maurice Gipson; Brother Daryl Irby; Texas State Speaker of the House Brother Sylvester Turner; Texas State Representative Brother Morris Miles; and Houston City Councilman Brother Ronald Green. Congressman Brother Al Green and Congresswoman Sheila Jackson-Lee presented the Chapter with Congressional Certificates of Recognition. In response to being recognized for his work with the MLK Project Foundation, Brother Harry Johnson detailed the contributions of all the General Presidents to the project, stating that the concept of the memorial was first adopted under the administration of Brother Sutton; as Executive Director, Brother Matthews was the driving force that got the congressional bill passed; as General President, Brother Wallace secured the site and the design for the memorial; and then General President Brother Charles Teamer initiated the fundraising strategy for the memorial.

Keynote Address Twenty-seventh General President Charles Teamer offered commentary on a variety of subjects in his keynote address. He said Alpha Eta Lambda has been a leading Chapter in Alpha and has participated in many of the changes made in the country. Eighty years after the formation of the Chapter some of the same problems remain, including violence in our communities, police brutality and scenes like the Jena 6 trials, he said.

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Congresswoman Sheila Jackson-Lee greets Brothers.

Dais members singing Alpha Phi Alpha Hymn.

Brother Teamer proposed an alliance between Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to lead other members of the Pan-Hellenic Council and the nation to address many of the ills of our society. In 1919, Alpha created the Go-toHigh School, Go-to-College program; however, we now need to begin mentoring at the elementary school level, he said. If Alpha does not mentor our children early on, we may not have viable candidates for membership in the future.

Special Remarks In his special remarks, General President Matthews said Alpha Eta Lambda’s history reflects the Fraternity model of developing leaders, promoting brotherhood and encouraging academic excellence, while providing service to the community. He thanked the past General Presidents for their leadership, saying he hoped his service would live up to their example. Brother Matthews accepted the challenge presented by Brother Teamer to lead in addressing the issues of the nation and reminded Alpha Brothers that Big Brothers Big Sisters is the national program that the Fraternity should use to assist in mentoring our youth. In summary, he stated: “This event is typical of Alpha and has been a wonderful afternoon of recognition and fellowship”.

Post Celebration Events

Brother Teamer also discussed the crisis of the sub-prime market and its impact on wealth development, saying that as a result, it has increased the slippage of the economic middle class as fewer African Americans are able to purchase and retain homes. The former General President stated that the five key things taught to him as an initiate into Alpha Phi Chapter at Clark College can assist our young people today: (1) academic supremacy; (2) discipline; (3) adhering to a dress code; (4) command of parliamentary procedures; and (5) developing the ability to think on your feet. He concluded by saying that Alpha must continue to lead and to challenge our community in order for us to remain “First of All, Servants of All, We are Alpha Phi Alpha”.

Later that evening, many of the special guests and Chapter members attended a post celebration affair to enjoy a spread of ribs, catfish and other trimmings at the home of Brother James Ward. Also joining the festivities that night was the 21st Supreme Basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Sister Faye Bryant. On Sunday morning, 200 Brothers attended services led by Senior Pastor Brother Christopher Hartwell at the Cross Roads Community Church in Pearland, Texas. During the service, Brothers made a generous donation to the church; and following service, they enjoyed refreshments with members of the congregation. On Founders’ Day, December 04, 2007, Brothers Thomas A. Brown and Willie Cooper hosted an informal celebration at the Belvedere Lounge. Similar to the event held at the fraternity house, 100 Brothers and friends of Alpha came together to enjoy a cigar, network and to toast the Founding Jewels. Brother Thomas A. Brown is Associate Editor to the Sphinx for Alpha Eta Lambda Chapter, Houston, TX.

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CHAPTER

CHAPTER NEWS

EASTERN REGION Alpha Brotherhood, having been named the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity’s 2005 National College Chapter of the Year; Alpha Phi Alpha National Scholar’s Bowl co-winner and winner of the District Miss Black & Gold.

Gamma Sigma Chapter Alumni and Undergraduate Brothers.

GAMMA SIGMA Delaware State University Dover, DE

Gamma Sigma Brothers Assemble for 60th Anniversary Celebration Gamma Sigma College and Alumni Brothers recognized the Chapter’s noble history during their 60th Anniversary Reunion Celebration held in February in the Venetian Ballroom at the Sheraton Hotel in Dover, Delaware. Brothers and Sweethearts—dating from the second group of initiates inducted into the Fraternity through Gamma Sigma Chapter to the most recently initiated members—were represented at the Banquet Celebration. The Immediate Past President of Delaware State University, Brother Dr. William B. DeLauder, served as guest speaker; and Eastern Pennsylvania Area Director Brother Tyrone Highsmith presented the keynote address. Sphinx Magazine Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Seaton White presented Gamma Sigma Brothers with a Fraternity proclamation and Brother Dr. Willis Lonzer made a special presentation to the Chapter. Reunion Anniversary Chairman Brother Chris Jackson served as Master of Ceremonies for the event and Brother Emilio Stewart presented the opening welcome; current Chapter President Jason Pilar, gave the President’s Address; former Chapter President Harold G. Burnett II gave the Invocation; and Lincoln University Miss Black & Gold 2008 Amber Newton gave a special presentation. Current Gamma Sigma members presented some of the Chapter’s award-winning steps during the banquet. Gamma Sigma Chapter was chartered on February 7, 1948. The Chapter was founded by former Delaware State University President Brother Dr. Luna I. Mishoe, who served then as professor of the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. The first initiates of the Chapter were Brothers Charles Wade, Moses M. Gossett, James E. Grant, Oscar Harris, Paul Robinson, Frank Henderson, William White, William Lambe, Reginald S. Tynes, William Bowie, James Price and Alphonsa Coles. Gamma Sigma Chapter is recognized for its outstanding achievement within the Alpha Phi

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Iota Sigma Lambda Brothers.

IOTA SIGMA LAMBDA St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

Virgin Island Brothers Organize Royak Regatta Iota Sigma Lambda Chapter took their community service efforts to the shorelines of St. Croix by coordinating, organizing and promoting the 2007 Boy Scouts Royak Regatta. The event marked the sixth straight year that the Chapter has been involved in the activity. The Royak Regatta is a major fundraiser for the Boy Scouts Virgin Islands Council in which five-member teams compete in a relay race around a water-based course using a one-person royak. The Regatta had over 100 participants, including about 70 young males and females, ages 11 to 17. The Regatta was held at the Divi Carina Bay Resort in Christiansted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. Those who participated in the event included Brothers Frank Abednego, Joseph Bramble, O’Neil Canton, Rameek Croskey, Dino Fontaine, Kendall Griffith, Omar Henry, Semaj Johnson, Reuben Molloy, Robert Molloy, Gary Moore and Belgrave Stedman. ISL Chapter Brothers organized the entire event and also served as referees, scorekeepers, judges and provided music and entertainment. The Chapter also raised money for the Boy Scouts by securing sponsorships and donations.

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CHAPTER NEWS

ZETA OMICRON LAMBDA Philadelphia, PA

Zeta Omicron Lambda Brothers of Philadelphia

Zeta Upsilon Lambda Photo Caption: ZUL Brothers and spouses during WalkAmerica event.

ZETA UPSILON LAMBDA Reston, VA

Zeta Upsilon Lambda Brothers Uplift Alpha through Service Zeta Upsilon Lambda Brothers participated in last year’s March of Dimes’ WalkAmerica at Lake Fairfax Park in Reston, Virginia. Several Brothers raised $2,706 to help in the research and prevention of premature birth. Some Alpha spouses also joined Brothers in the walk and supported the Chapter through their participation. The six-mile walk was shared with several other community groups and organizations. Also, ZUL Chapter held its Annual Alpha Awards and Scholarship Program last year. For over 20 years, the men of ZUL have hosted the event, which recognizes African American student achievement for youth in the Northern Virginia area in grades 7 through 12. This year more than 150 students were recognized as having achieved a grade point average of 3.0 and above. The ceremony, held at Herndon Middle School, also featured a keynote address by former Redskin Linebacker Ken Harvey as well as a performance by the AlphaNova Step Team. The awards ceremony included the presentation of the Jewel Scholarship—an award given to seven graduating seniors who were selected based on criteria of academic excellence, community involvement, leadership, and sense of purpose. The scholarship was funded by the Joyce, Gillespie, Harrington Foundation, a 501 (c)3 organization created by ZUL, and featured three components: (1) a scholarship of $1,500 per student to be paid directly to his or her university for tuition; (2) a mentoring program wherein each student was assigned a ZUL Brother who will stay involved with the student throughout their college career; and (3) a Dell Latitude laptop that was specially designed to meet each student’s computing needs while in college. The program was well received by parents, students and school administrators and ZUL looks forward to hosting the event again next year. Also, ZUL’s Leadership Development Institute (LDI) – South was held last year at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Approximately 50 high school males, from as far south as Alabama, participated in a weekend full of leadership and interaction with men of various chapters of Alpha. ZUL Brothers participated in LDI South as workshop facilitators.

Zeta Omicron Lambda Brothers conducted mentoring at the Waring School— with Brothers Carl Bailey and Claude Mickle addressing 7th and 8th grade boys about being good citizens and making their best effort to excel in academic studies. They emphasized the importance of a good education in the achievement of future career goals. During the session, each student was given an opportunity to make a presentation about his personal interests and future goals. Also, ZOL Brothers continued their support of the March of Dimes of Philadelphia by raising $882 to benefit the cause of preventing birth defects to newborn babies. Chapter Brothers completed the six mile Walkathon course as they walked with Brothers from other Philadelphia area Chapters. In addition, the Chapter demonstrated leadership in voter registration drives, combining the effort with its affordable housing concerns. Brothers Herman Walker and Claude Mickle led the voter registration/mobilization drive as volunteers for Project Home, a non-partisan coalition concerned with affordable housing, jobs and human services in Philadelphia. Brothers completed a Voter Education Seminar conducted by Project Home before going out into the field to lead voter education sessions at shelters, recovery centers, community meetings and soup kitchens. During the visits they registered numbers of voters and invited voters to attend Mayoral Candidate Forums around the city. Brothers also drove and escorted voters to the polls, made phone reminders to registered voters and were present at the polls urging voters to cast their ballots.

BETA SIGMA LAMBDA Hartford, CT

Beta Sigma Lambda in Hartford, CT More than 2,800 people packed into the sold-out Bushnell Performing Arts Center in Hartford, Connecticut to witness the 2nd Annual Step into Wellness Hartford Step-Off Classic and Health Expo sponsored by Beta Sigma Lambda Chapter and the Beta Sigma Lambda Education Foundation, Inc. The event was made possible by BSL’s leading contributor, The Connecticut Health Foundation, which also was the lead sponsor for the 2006 event that drew 1,500 patrons to the University of Hartford Sports Complex. The sponsorships defray the cost of the event while ticket sales generated more than $22,000 to create an endowment for the BSL Educational Foundation. The Foundation annually provides scholarships to graduating seniors; sponsors high school students for the Fraternity’s Eastern Region Leadership Development Institute; awards scholarships to participants of the Brother Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Oratorical Contest; and targets middle and high school students with its Project Alpha event. The revenue also helps the Foundation to begin the Alpha Academy. The Step-Off Classic is an attempt to inspire everyone to eat properly and to exercise. Throughout the day and during the performance, the audience was reminded of the health disparities that exist in the Greater Hartford community—most specifically obesity. Also, throughout the day, patrons received eye exams, blood pressure readings

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CHAPTER NEWS and health and wellness information. Members of the Divine Nine college fraternity and sorority teams from Pennsylvania to Massachusetts came to compete for prize money and first-place trophies. The audience also was treated to performances by middle school, high school and collegiate step teams from Connecticut.

New York’s teams stepped away with the grand prizes. The sorority team winner was Delta Sigma Theta from Long Island. The Alpha Phi Alpha team from Hofstra bested the Philadelphia All-Stars of Kappa Alpha Psi in the fraternity team category. Each team received a trophy and $1,500.

MIDWESTERN REGION

ALPHA RHO LAMBDA Columbus, OH

ARL Closes Out Fraternal Year with Successful Programs and Initiatives

ZKL Brothers respond after receiving “One Iowa Award” from Lt. Governor Patty Judge (front row, 3rd from left).

ZETA KAPPA LAMBDA Des Moines, IA

Zeta Kappa Lambda Recognized for Advancing Diversity through Mentoring and Internship Programs Iowa Lt. Governor Patty Judge awarded the first ever “One Iowa Award” to the Fraternity’s Zeta Kappa Lambda Chapter. Lt. Governor Judge created the One Iowa Award to recognize communities, groups, businesses and organizations making progress in advancing diversity in Iowa. “Their mentoring program at East High School is changing the lives of dozens of young men in our community,” Lt. Governor Judge said in presenting the award. “And they’ve engaged local businesses with their ‘Champions of Change’ internship program. It teaches young men and women how to succeed in corporate America and gives them the tools to be successful.” The One Iowa Award is sponsored by two Iowa-based businesses—Bankers Trust in Des Moines and Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids. Brother Matt Jeter, president of Zeta Kappa Lambda Chapter said he and the ZKL Brothers were humbled to have been chosen to receive the inaugural award. “Our Chapter has worked hard to make Des Moines a city that embraces diversity. We are honored that the Lt. Governor has found our organization worthy of the One Iowa Award and we thank her for acknowledging the importance of diversity in Iowa,” Brother Jeter said.

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Alpha Rho Lambda Brothers closed out their fraternal year with a salute to outgoing Chapter President Brother Robert “Bo” Chilton. The Chapter’s other events, national initiatives, and celebrations of community services that helped ARL close out the year included their Annual March of Dimes Walkathon; Chapter step team taking second place at a local festival; Brother Mataryun “Mo” Wright’s election as Ohio District Director; Brother Shaun Carter’s election as District Executive Director; Chapter elections for the 2007-008 year; Brother Dale Gresson’s election as ARL’s new president; cosponsorship of the City of Columbus’ 2007 Youth Summit; sponsorship of Project Alpha Program with Omicron Rho Chapter; and participation in the Ohio Governor’s Conference. In addition, Alpha Rho Lambda saw the leadership of its Alpha Esquires program move from the hands of Brother Deacon Hooper to those of Brother Donald Ross; and the Chapter’s Go-to-High School, Go-to-College program added 22 new inductees to the roster of high school boys to be mentored for the coming year. The Education Foundation monitors the programs’ funding and scholarship monies.

MU MU LAMBDA Glen Ellyn, IL

Congressman Danny Davis Keynotes Mu Mu Lambda Awards Banquet Brother Congressman Danny Davis (D-IL, 7th District) gave the keynote address for Mu Mu Lambda Chapter’s 31st Annual Officer Installation and Awards Banquet, held last September at Elmhurst College. Brother Davis, who was initiated into the Fraternity through Mu Mu Lambda Chapter in Fall 1984, spoke about the decreased number of African American males in college due to incarcerations in the American prison system. He stated that only about 100,000 African American males are enrolled in college whereas over one million black males live behind America’s prison bars. The Congressman challenged Brothers to continue uplifting the lives of wholesome youth. During the banquet, plaques were awarded to the following Brothers: David A. Lewis, Man of the Year; Lonnie J. Valentine, Charles H. Wesley Fraternal Service Award; Keith C. Johnson and Seth Wilson, Outstanding Service Award; Kewon K. Bell, Neophyte of the Year;

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CHAPTER NEWS Anthony Vinson, Pro-phyte of the Year; Mickey Brown, Mu Mu Lambda Lifetime Achievement Award; Judge Lewis Nixon, Professional Achievement Award; Undray Wilks, Gavel Award for the Retiring Chapter President; Oscar Douglas, Special Service Award. Brother Congressman Davis was presented with a special medallion from the Chapter. Mu Mu Lambda Chapter also held its annual Chapter retreat at Elmhurst College last summer. The retreat, hosted by Brother Elgie Sims, District Director of Illinois, focused on reflections of brotherhood, fraternal love. During this presentation, Brother Sims presented an overview of each elected chapter officer position and included the purpose and duty behind

each office. He stressed that positive development in the Fraternity begins on the chapter level—simply stated this means that each chapter must “Hold Alpha High” and each chapter officer must be accountable to both fellow chapter members and the Fraternity as a whole. In addition, a seminar discussing “Alpha Image and Retention” was conducted. Brothers Sims, David Lewis and Quincy Banks focused on how the Fraternity can improve its public and community image in the Fraternity’s Second Century; and how to do more through the job of recruiting, recommending and selecting qualified potential Brothers for life-long, financial and active Fraternity membership.

SOUTHERN REGION proceeds from the Walk-A-Thon will directly benefit individuals living with Sickle Cell Disease and the Education Programs for the Alpha Memphis Education Foundation, which is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation dedicated to empowering the underserved and under-represented citizens of Greater Memphis.

ADL Brothers at Sickle Cell Walk-A-thon

ALPHA DELTA LAMBDA

Pictured at reception for NCCU Chancellor are: (standing, l-r) Brothers Roger Gregory; Landon Adams; Richard A.S. LaBennett; Everett Ward, Southern Vice President; Orrin Hatch; Reginald Wilkerson; (seated, l-r) William McDonald; Dr. Charles Nelms, NCCU Chancellor; Howard Clements, Durham City Councilman; and Raymond Pierce, Dean, NCCU Law School.

Memphis, TN

Chapter Holds First Annual Sickle Cell Walk-A-Thon Alpha Delta Lambda Chapter Brothers hosted their First Annual Sickle Cell Walk-A-Thon at Overton Park in Memphis. Over 700 people participated in the Walk, which was developed to create a greater awareness in the Memphis community of Sickle Cell Disease and to raise money for patient care. Ultimately, the hope is to find a cure. The Junior ROTC Color Guard from Manassas High school marched to open the pre-Walk ceremonies and Brother Damien White (Lemoyne-Owen College) sang the national anthem. Rochelle Stevens, U.S. Olympic gold and silver medalist, got the crowd motivated and gave the call to start the walk. Students from the Memphis Academy of Health & Science represented the largest team. Walkers made two laps around Overton Park on a very beautiful day. Brother Trevor K. Thompson, Chairman of the Diggs-Kraus Sickle Cell Advisory Council for the Regional Medical Center, was spokesperson and Brother Kenneth Carpenter was the walk organizer. The event was sponsored by Diggs-Krause Sickle Cell Center, the MED Foundation, Alpha Memphis Education Foundation, United Way & Lifeblood of Memphis. More than $9,500 was raised during the event. All

BETA THETA LAMBDA Durham, NC

Chapter Makes Family’s Wishes Come True; also Welcomes New NCCU Chancellor Beta Theta Lambda Chapter held its annual Adopt-A-Family service project in December. Brothers gathered at the Walker Education Complex on the campus of North Carolina Central University for photos and to greet the media before delivering gifts to their adopted family. Guided by the family’s “Wish List”, the Chapter supplied toys and clothes for 15-year-old Neal, 10-year-old Tyrek, 8-year-old Tiquan and their 58-year-old great aunt Shirley. The Beta Theta Lambda Chapter was chartered on May 7, 1938. Also, Beta Theta Lambda and Gamma Beta Chapter Brothers, along with Southern Regional

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CHAPTER NEWS Vice President, Everett Ward, hosted an event where the Area 3 Brothers of the Association of North Carolina Alpha men came together to welcome Brother Dr. Charles Nelms to Durham as the new chancellor of North Carolina Central University. Brother Dr. Nelms is a 1969 initiate of the Fraternity through Gamma Delta Chapter at the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff. He came to NCCU from Bloomington, IN where he served as Vice President of Institutional Development & Student Affairs. In addition, Beta Theta Lambda Brother William E. McDonald—a 1943 initiate through Epsilon Chapter at the University of Michigan and an original Tuskegee Airman—was honored with a Life Member Award during the reception.

Brothers and beaux are pictured following their 2007 Beautillion and Scholarship Program.

RHO XI LAMBDA Canton, MS

Rho Xi Lambda Presents Second Biennial Beautillion and Scholarship Program GSL Project Alpha participants and Brothers.

GAMMA SIGMA LAMBDA Fort Valley, GA

Gamma Sigma Lambda Discusses Consequences of Teenage Pregnancy Gamma Sigma Lambda Brothers sponsored a Project Alpha Retreat for middle school and high school males at Camp John Hope in Marshallville, Georgia. Numerous speakers came to talk with the young men during the weekend event. The youth received information on drug prevention and teenage pregnancy prevention. The major emphasis during the retreat was to increase the knowledge of the young men concerning the consequences of teenage pregnancy from the male perspective. The participants received Tshirts displaying Project Alpha. The coordinators of the retreat were Brother Isaac Smith, Jr. and Brother Elliott S. Mizell. Funds used to support the event were from the Gannett Foundation, the March of Dimes and the Maulvin Engram Education Foundation, Inc.

Rho Xi Lambda Brothers conducted their Second Biennial Beautillion and Scholarship Program last year. The program exposed six beaux and six belles from Canton area high schools to workshops concerning dressing for success, effective communication, proper etiquette, waltz dancing, and resume writing. The group also participated in a “Project Alpha” session. In addition to the seminars, Rho Xi Lambda Brothers tasked each beaux with selling ads for the banquet’s program. Proceeds from their efforts were added to the Chapter’s scholarship fund. As a result of the students’ hard work, more than $3,000 in scholarship money was awarded to the beaux during the beautillion festivities. “We’re very happy to have had the opportunity to help these kids further their education,” said Brother Dr. Percy Anderson, Jr., an area podiatrist/certified wound specialist and Rho Xi Lambda’s president. “Our Chapter is very proud of their efforts and we are positive that these young people will go on to do great things in the future for Madison and Holmes counties.” More than 150 family and friends attended the event. The banquet also featured a step show which was performed by six junior beaux selected by the Chapter. Rho Xi Lambda was voted as the Mississippi District Chapter of the Year for 2007 and will conduct its third Biennial Beautillion and Scholarship Program in 2009.

— LOVE FOR ALL MANKIND — 46

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CHAPTER NEWS

OTL Mentees and Brothers.

Participants in Gamma Zeta Lambda Chapter mentoring program.

OMICRON TAU LAMBDA

GAMMA ZETA LAMBDA

“Small Chapter in Small Town” Holds Inaugural Beautillion

Gamma Zeta Lambda Chapter

Aiken, SC

Tampa, FL

Omicron Tau Lambda Brothers from Aiken, South Carolina—“A Small Chapter in a Small Town!”—completed their inaugural Beautillion Program last summer. The Mufasa Mentoring Program led senior high school African American males through several different workshops, which included public speaking, college and career planning, financial aid, etiquette, personal grooming, time management and other topics designed to promote spiritual, cultural and intellectual growth. The eight-month program has permitted the youth to participate in events sponsored by the Chapter, the South Carolina District and the General Organization. At the formal culminating ceremony, the Beaux were presented with scholarships, useful tools and college supplies. In addition to the Mufasa Mentoring Program, OTL Brothers sponsored their Centennial Public Program and the Chapter’s 20th Anniversary Celebration. The Centennial Public Program was held at the University of South CarolinaAiken. It served as the Brothers’ invitation to the community to know Alpha better. Brothers from across the District came to commemorate the historic occasion. The 20th Anniversary Celebration capped off a weekend of Alpha events, including a Brothers’ Reclamation Dinner; participation in the March of Dimes WalkAmerica; and a conferring of local community leaders, which honored the Chapter’s Charter members and recognized their 20 years of service to the Aiken community.

As part of its Go-to-High School, Go-to-College initiative, Gamma Zeta Lambda Chapter Brothers teamed with the BBF Development Corporation in partnering with area colleges and universities, local churches, social service organizations, community service organizations and alumni chapters of local fraternities and sororities to sponsor the “SUCCESS IS A CHOICE” African-American and Latino Male Summit (AALMS) last fall. The program included workshops for students in grades 6 through 12, as well as for parents and educators, and was held on the main campus of Hillsborough Community College. Some 474 students, parents and educators registered and attended. The summit also served as a major recruiting tool for GZL’s Men of Tomorrow Program, with 22 students signing up. Open to high school freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors, and conducted annually, the program is geared toward helping students succeed in high school and college. It includes workshops on topics for success such as goal setting, time management, career choices, financial aid, study skills, interviewing skills, college life, test taking skills, financial responsibility and managing money, and social outings. Former MOT participants have visited the Kennedy Space Center, toured state universities, taken tours of WMNF Radio Station and the St. Petersburg Times Forum (Ice Palace). This year’s MOT participants toured Florida A&M and Florida State universities. The workshops began in October and will culminate in May with the Chapter’s annual scholarship program where outstanding graduating seniors that have exhibited noble character, high scholastic aptitude and improvement, and leadership ability will be recognized—with the top students winning scholarships. Also, GZL’s 9th Annual Alpha Open Golf Tournament, which the proceeds from go to the Men of Tomorrow Program, was held in November; GZL provided Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets to needy families; and Chapter members volunteered to work with the Marine Corps “Toys for Tot” program. Answering the General President’s call, three GZL members have become Big Brothers. The Chapter also is entering its 15th year of partnership with Head Start’s Accepting the Leadership Challenge—Male Involvement Program. GZL was one of the first chapters to be involved with the program. The Chapter also was well represented at the General Convention in Orlando and at the recent District Conference in the Bahamas.

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CHAPTER NEWS SOUTHWESTERN REGION

Brothers pictured in “A” position are: (l-r) Beta Tau Chapter Advisor Joseph Byrd and Chapter members Joshua Hill, Michael Winn, Chester Brown, Farrell Fort, Devante Williford, Jeffrey Bullock, Olufemi Fadahunsi and Lauchland Roberts.

Delta Upsilon Lambda Photo Caption: (L-r) DUL Brothers Raymond Love, Brothers Billy Blanks, Carter Bedford, Jerry Paige and Gerald Joshua

BETA TAU

DELTA UPSILON LAMBDA

Beta Tau Heads Effort at News Orleans Mission

Shreveport Brothers Raise Monies for Sickle Cell Can Shake

Among the many community projects that Beta Tau Brothers participated in during the past year, the Chapter is most proud of the effort they headed at the New Orleans Mission. The New Orleans Mission houses and feeds many homeless people daily—giving them necessities and also giving them hope for the future. Beta Tau’s program there involved reorganization of the mission’s pantry, which included sorting through many of the non-perishable items and making sure that the food was safe to eat and easy to retrieve from the facility. The Brothers also landscaped the grounds—ridding the area of all waste and refuse, as well as cutting down weeds that had grown there, and giving the grounds back their fine appearance. They also created places for the homeless to sleep by transporting mattresses to the specified sleeping quarters. Also, Brothers helped by insulating one of the living quarters the mission’s upstairs. Although many may not understand the plight of the homeless and those less fortunate, Beta Tau Brothers learned an appreciation for their situation and said they were very blessed to have aided in serving those who are in need.

Delta Upsilon Lambda Chapter Brothers participated in the annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America Can Shake with about 15 members raising money to help the organization. For the past few years, the Chapter has helped with the organization’s mission: “to promote finding a universal cure for sickle cell disease while improving the quality of life for individuals and families where sickle cell related conditions exist.” Brothers Jerry Paige and Hugh Bradford coordinated the Chapter’s participation. Also, DUL held its first Alpha Family Fun Day with more than 35 Brothers and their families at the Shreveport Fleming Park. Activities included dominoes, cards, volleyball, fishing, music, flag football and an “Old School” vs. “New School” tug-of-war contest. At the conclusion of the family fun day, the Chapter hosted an adults-only social at their Fraternity house. In addition, Brothers participated in the annual “Paint Your Heart Out” community service project where the Chapter painted the home of Rev. James Jackmon. About 13 Brothers worked from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. repainting the home.

Xavier University New Orleans, LA

Shreveport, LA

— A VOTELESS PEOPLE IS A HOPELESS PEOPLE — Voter Registration Campaign Since 1937

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CHAPTER NEWS WESTERN REGION

Alpha Academy youth and ZBL Brothers at Consumnes River Community College.

Zeta Sigma Lambda and Eta Sigma Brothers MOD Walk-a-thon.

ZETA BETA LAMBDA

ZETA SIGMA LAMBDA

Local African American Males Take Right Path to Success

March of Dimes WalkAmerica Recognition Given to Zeta Sigma Lambda

Zeta Beta Lambda Brothers decided two years ago that they had to do more in addressing the factors which undermine young African American male’s ability to successfully transition into successful, productive, educated, well-adjusted and contributing men in our society. ZBL’s current president, John Taylor, and the long-time guru of the Chapter’s highly successful Annual Scholarship Program, Travis Parker, stepped up to the task—bringing a history of great vision and commitment to African American youth. The two Brothers asked: (1) What do we have now, and how can we expand it to better serve scholarship grantees? and (2) How can we use the scholarship program as a “launching vehicle” to reach out and serve young African American males? The Chapter’s Alpha Academy came as the answer to those questions. The Chapter instituted Saturday workshop/study sessions for all (male and female) scholarship candidates and grantees, which covering a wide-range of subjects. Chapter members—who include practicing and retired lawyers, teachers, and businessmen—serve as presenters; and the youth enthusiastically responded to the program. In 2004, ZBL inaugurated its first four-hour Alpha Academy program with four young men in attendance. The Chapter undertook a vigorous (mostly word of mouth) recruitment program for the monthly four-hour Saturday Academy. Now the average attendance at the Academy is 46 students. Young men, age 11 to 19, are fully engaged in a lively, interactive program of instruction, introspection, and fellowship with successful, adult, African American male role models. In addition to the Chapter Brothers who serve as the core team of instructors, outside African American males with special expertise are brought before the group. Through the work of the Alpha Academy, the Fraternity now is able to assist, guide and support young men who might otherwise travel a path that is far less desirable for them to take. With its successful scholarship program for all qualified young people (in the last ten years more than $200,000 in grants were distributed), the Academy provides a strong two-pronged approach to serving the youth and their families.

Zeta Sigma Lambda Chapter was honored as the Second Place Alumni Chapter of the Year in connection with March of Dimes’ 2007 WalkAmerica. The award was presented to the Chapter by March of Dimes Liaison Brother Wilbur Jackson at the Fraternity’s 2007 Convention. ZSL Brothers raised $7,120 for WalkAmerica in 2007. The amount is about one-third of the total monies raised by the Western Region. Zeta Sigma Lambda is involved in all of the Fraternity’s national programs. Also, ten male students participated in the Chapter’s Project Alpha session held at the San Diego Diamond Charter School located in the Kearny Mesa community. The project was organized in collaboration with the “Connections Program” in cooperation with the administration of San Diego Charter Schools.

Sacramento, CA

San Diego, CA

THETA PI LAMBDA Las Vegas, NV

Chapter Prepares Young Men and Women for Future Thirty young men and women attended Theta Pi Lambda Chapter’s all-day Project Alpha conference in November, which included a financial planning seminar, teenage pregnancy discussion, and a disease prevention session. Brothers came from around Las Vegas Valley to provide their insight, knowledge and real-life experience to the teens. The Chapter also worked with the youth group in building a float for the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade in January. Brothers dusted off their tool sets and cleaned their paint brushes in preparation for building a float with an ‘80s theme, which was done at the youth’s request. The statement emblazoned on the float’s side read: “Positioned for the Future” and featured an artist’s rendering of Brother Dr. King. Several members of the Chapter march with the youth group during the parade.

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BOOK REVIEW

He Talk Like a White Boy By Joseph C. Phillips Philadelphia: Running Press, 2006 (232 pages) Reviewed by Dr. Joseph T. Durham Brother Joseph T. Durham

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rother Joseph C. Phillips is an actor, an activist, a writer, a husband, and a father. In his book, He Talk Like a White Boy, he writes about his upbringing in Denver, Colorado— when once in an eighth grade English class, a black girl announced to the class and the teacher that Phillips talked like a white boy. Of that announcement, he said, “It was the beginning of my life” (p. l9). It changed his life because from then on he became aware that he was different Brother Phillips is a conservative—a black conservative—and his book is composed of 42 essays, which extol the values of faith, character, idealism and family. In these essays, Phillips gets away from the pessimism and nihilism of many black writers. He writes about growing up in an integrated neighborhood where there was hope and where people believed that all things were possible. In one essay, “What Are We Teaching,” Phillips takes on parents who do not expect their children to dress appropriately and who permit children to address adults by their first names. He writes, “When chil-

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dren are taught that values are without purpose, that morality is subject to opinion and honor is a commodity to be bought and sold on a whim, it is no wonder that they smirk and disrespect their elders” (p. 33). Phillips weighs in on inner city education. He cites a visit to a school in the inner city where students were using a 20-year-old textbook. He says parents must see that education dollars are given to schools so that every student will graduate with a quality education. This message is not new to Phillips, but it is a message that bears constant repeating. Being the conservative that he is, Brother Phillips does not see much in hip-hop music. The majority of hip-hop music is a celebration of nihilism, gangster life, pimping, smoking dope, and promiscuity. Hip-hoppers sing about keeping it real, but in reality, they sing about profiling and bling-bling. He prefers singers like The Supremes, who have integrity, talent and charisma. As a conservative Republican, Phillips admires Bush and is not enthusiastic about Bill Clinton. Bush, according to Phillips, is “a man of vision, conviction and faith”

(p. 65). Clinton, on the other hand, believes “in nothing but himself” (p. 65). In this same way, Phillips extols Colin Powell, Paul Robeson and his own father. He makes a point that history will be written not only by people like George Bush but by men and women who engage in the difficult work of disciplining children and being devoted to family and community. In the essays on Family, Phillips talks about his mother who died when he was young and his father whose death he witnessed. He talks about his wedding and the rewards of marriage. According to Tavis Smiley, who wrote the foreword to the essays, Phillips is most passionate when he writes about fatherhood. Phillips recalls one occasion when his wife had to go out of town and left the three boys with him. He writes of the good time he had with them: “During these all too brief moments, I felt young again. I felt new in the world” (p. 96). In the essays on Faith, Phillips writes in one instance about the “Power of Faith and Religion.” He quotes Alexis de Tocqueville who said: “Not until I went to the churches of America and heard her

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pulpits aflame with righteousness did I understand the secret of her genius and power” (p. l20). De Tocqueville understood the importance of religious faith in America. So does Phillips. The author attests to his faith. He decided to join a church and get baptized (getting dunked, as he put it). But this epiphany has changed his life and his relationship with his wife. Faith for Phillips is an every day matter, not just for Easter and Christmas. “True faith is more than just belief; it is the willingness to turn our lives over to something greater than ourselves,” he says (p. l44). In discussing Idealism, he has a long essay, “Black Conservatism, Black Pride.” It is the longest in the collection and the most difficult one to understand. He cites a meeting with Glen Loury who asked him what a conservative was. He admits that the question unsettled him and he never gave Loury a good answer. This essay is hard to follow. It rambles on about California State University at Long Beach; about Donna Brazile; Cornell West; and Bill Crosby. However, at the end of


BOOK REVIEW

Lynched by Corporate America By Herman Malone and Robert Schwab Denver, Colorado: HM-RS Publishing, 2007 (l0l pages) Reviewed by Dr. Joseph T. Durham

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this long essay, Phillips does say: “To be a conservative is to accept that human nature is flawed and that the role of government is not to facilitate equanimity among an imperfect people but through the rule of law to protect its citizens” (p. l58). In the last section, Phillips talks about Identity. He is concerned about his sons knowing their identity. He believes that they should know about Africa—but they should know about cowboys and Southeast Denver, as well. He believes parents should teach their children about African roots—but also prepare them to live in an inte-

grated society. He says: “I truly hope that I live to see the day we defeat this obsession (with race); when we look beyond skin color and begin to view one another as the sum total of our hearts, minds and characters” (p. 231). Brother Phillips has written short essays and long essays. It would have been helpful if he had written a summary essay that ties all of the essays together. He expresses his own view point and others may disagree with him—but as the proverb says: “Let there be no disputing about tastes.” He has expressed his views. Let others express their views.

he term “lynched” evokes stories of hundreds—perhaps thousands—of black men who were mutilated and hung from trees in the South. The term is said to have originated with Willie Lynch, a planter from the Caribbean who came to America and told southern slave-holders how to handle their Negroes. Herman Malone and Robert Schwab have used the term to tell the story of how an African American company doing business with a Fortune 500 company was the victim of racial discrimination and was lynched by corporate America. Herman Malone was the owner of a telephone communications company in Denver, Colorado. A larger company there, US West Communications, did business with several black communications firms in and around Denver, including Malone’s company, RMES Communications. Eventually US West Communications became Quest Communications. Malone’s story begins with US West Communications, which had a $10 million conduit supply contract with him. But suddenly, US West Communications wanted to renege

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on Malone’s contract. However, before this happened, Malone’s company was doing business with US West by supplying communications equipment across the territory controlled by US West. Malone was a former chairman and founding member of the Colorado Black chamber of Commerce and the current chair of the National Black chamber of Commerce. He and other plaintiffs filed suit against US West alleging that the company was discriminating against African American companies. They began with Eric Vickers as their attorney—but personal and professional matters with him caused the plaintiffs to engage another lawyer, Daniel Robert Webster, a white Harvard Law School attorney. Up until this time, no business vendor had filed a suit in federal court against a major U.S. firm, and Webster saw the chance to get US West to settle a law suit, rather than to go to court, in the way Texaco was going. Denver ministers announced their support for Malone, but Malone was left out of the private settlement for his case. US West

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BOOK REVIEW

held conferences with the other six of the seven plaintiffs in the race discrimination case, but Malone was left out of consideration. Malone then went to court on his own behalf—but in the trial presided over by Judge Wiley Daniel, the case of racial discrimination was going to be difficult to prove, especially to a western jury. Malone’s company was RMES. In Denver, during the trial, a statement was made that this company deserved nothing more than janitorial work—but that US West had given RMES a plastic pipe contract to house underground phone lines; and that RMES did not perform well in dealing with the pipe contract. Larry Theis, the US West attorney, told the jury that Malone and RMES were incapable of doing business. Theis said “RMES could not do the job” (p. 70). On Malone’s 53rd birthday the case against US West went to trial (the first trial). Judge Wiley Daniel, a black man, presided. When the jury’s verdict was called for, each juror stated they agreed with the verdict that there were no grounds for the discrimination charge against US West. When the judge then decided to poll the jurors, separately, regarding the verdict, several said they had reservations. In the light of these reservations, Judge Daniel declared a partial mistrial. The persons at the trial had recognized that Malone was discriminated against. He was free to file for a second trial. Judge Daniel tried to persuade Malone not to file for a second trial,

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but Malone insisted on having “his day in court” (p. 83). At the second trial, nothing had changed. The judge was the same; the lawyer, Larry Theis, was the same. The jury was composed of 11 white and Hispanic jurors and one African American man. The jury was no different from the jury in the first trial. They found it difficult to detect and rule favorable on the charge of racial discrimination. Randy Wade was the white foreman of the jury. He placed the blame for all he had heard right where he thought it truly belonged—on Herman Malone, who made $40 million from US West—but his performance was stated to be unsatisfactory. So, Malone lost a second time. In the Epilogue of the book entitled, And Still I Rise, Malone discusses how his company RMES finally got a contract with Quest, a successor to US West, to provide pay telephone service at the Denver International Airport. By so doing, RMES, a small company is providing phone service at a major venue in the United States.

Herman Malone and Robert Schwab wrote Lynched by Corporate America to highlight the fact that major corporations in America still practice racial discrimination. The book calls attention to the failure of the nation’s justice system to correct the “economic lynchings” African American firms have suffered at the hands of corporate America. Although it is hard to detect,

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racial injustice by major white Fortune 500 companies is present, but juries have difficulty charging the companies with discrimination. Students of business and all who are interested in racial justice will profit from reading this account. It is an account of how one African American stood up to a major corporation and ultimately prevailed.


OMEGA CHAPTER

LAST SURVIVING AMERICAN GOLD MEDALIST FROM 1936 OLYMPICS ENTERS OMEGA CHAPTER

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Final Olympic Trials for the 800-meter race. Brother Woodruff rother John Youie Woodruff, the last survivor of the 12 won the AAU 800-meter championship in 1937 and the NCAA American athletes who won track and field gold medals 880-yard titles from 1937 through 1939. in the 1936 Olympic Games in In 1940, he won the Compton Invitational Berlin, Germany, has entered Omega in California in his last organized compeChapter. He passed away at age 92 in tition, setting an American record that Fountain Hills, Arizona where he and his lasted for 12 years. wife of 37 years, Rose, had moved to an Following college, Brother Woodruff assisted-living facility in 2003. became an Army career officer, serving in Brother Woodruff was a 21-year-old World War II and Korea and retiring as a freshman from the University of Pittsburgh lieutenant colonel. He later lived in with no international racing experience Westchester County and central New Jersey when he won Olympic gold in the 800where he coached young athletes and offimeter race—out-distancing a three-time ciated at local and Madison Square Garden Olympic champion from Canada and the track meets. reigning European champion. Brother Woodruff was a member of Brother Woodruff was born July 5, the National Track and Field Hall of Fame 1915 in Connellsville, Pennsylvania. He and a charter member of the Penn Relays drew national attention in high school by Wall of Fame. In 1936, he received a footrunning the 880 yard race, which is tall oak sapling from the German governslightly longer than the 800 meters race, Brother John Y. Woodruff ment for his Olympic victory. The Woodruff in 1:55.1 seconds—performing the feat Oak is planted beside the track at his old high school in twice in one week. In the Summer 1936, he won the U.S. Connellsville and is now nearly 80-feet tall. Eastern Olympic Trials; and two weeks later, he won the U.S.

We hold ever aloft, noble ideals and aims, Carrying out earth’s and heaven’s grand command.

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OMEGA CHAPTER

OMEGA

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rother Dr. Elias A. Blake, Jr., who served as president of Clark College in Atlanta from 1977 to 1987, was a leading advocate for the nation’s historically black colleges and universities—bringing attention to the role of historically black colleges as an authority on desegregation and the black educational experience. Before and after his tenure as Clark College President, Brother Blake was a professor, scholar and policy analyst in Washington, D.C., and spent more than 15 years at Howard University. In 1970, Brother Blake published a study showing that 70 percent of all African Americans with Bachelor’s and graduate degrees were educated at HBCUs. The study led to a meeting between President Richard Nixon and several college presidents and laid the groundwork for amendments to the federal Higher Education Act that expanded support for predominantly black colleges. From 1969 to 1977, Brother Blake was president of the Institute for Services to Education, Inc., a Washington organization that helped distribute more than $500 million in federal grants and other aid to the nation’s black colleges. Previously, he had been instrumental in the development of Upward Bound, a federal program designed to help lowincome high school students pursue higher education. Brother Blake was born in Brunswick, Georgia and grew up under the laws of the segregated South. He lost both of his parents by the time he was age 12 and went to live with his grandmother. He began working at a hotel in his teens and credited his education with saving him from a life of menial labor. Brother Blake received a scholarship to the historically black Paine College in Augusta, Georgia where he excelled in football and basketball and graduated as valedictorian of his college class. Following two years of Army service in Germany, he tutored African American and white soldiers; and later traveled to Washington, D.C. where he received a Master’s degree in education from Howard University in 1954. He received a doctorate in education from the University of Illinois in 1960 and then taught education at Howard until 1966. After working in policy research and curriculum development at the Institute for Services to Education, Brother Blake put his ideas into practice at Clark where he strengthened the faculty, created business and music programs and secured millions in grants for other improvements. One year after Brother Blake resigned as president in 1987, Clark merged with another HBCU in Atlanta and became Clark-Atlanta University. From 1987 to 1992, Brother Blake was Director of Howard’s Division of Higher Education Policy Research. Since 1992, he had been president of Benjamin E. Mays National Educational Resource Center in Washington, where he analyzed racial differences in educational opportunity and often consulted or served as an expert witness on desegregation cases.

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rother Jimmie Lawrence Buford was a former Midwestern Regional Vice President and was a Life Member of the Fraternity. He was initiated into the organization through Gamma Alpha Chapter at Texas College and was last a member of Beta Lambda Chapter in Kansas City, Missouri. He received his elementary and secondary education in Texarkana, Texas and graduated from Paul Lawrence Dunbar High School in 1954. After graduation, he continued his education at Central State College in Wilberforce, Ohio where he received

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his Bachelor of Arts degree in history at Texas College in Tyler, Texas. After completing college, he enlisted in the U.S. Army where he was assigned to the 19th MP Company in Fort Carson, Colorado as a Military Policeman. After completing his tour of duty, he received an honorable discharge and later obtained a Master of Education degree at Central Missouri State University in Warrensburg, Missouri. Following a short stay in St. Louis, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri where he began his teaching career. Brother Buford joined the Kansas City, Missouri School District as a teacher with assignments at Richardson Elementary and MLK Junior High during 19631969. In 1968, he was promoted to senior instructor and in 1972, accepted a position as assistant principal of MLK Junior High. He remained as assistant principal at various high schools and middle schools until 1980 when he accepted the position of Administrative Intern to the Superintendent of Schools. Following the internship, he was reassigned to an assistant principal position at Leeds/Dunbar until 1981. He then served at Ashland Junior High as assistant principal before accepting another position at Southeast High School as assistant principal in 1982. He then moved to Van Horn High School and Central High School to serve as an assistant principal. He retired from the Kansas City Missouri School District in 1994. Brother Buford was a leader in many civic and community endeavors and was a dedicated member and leader within the Fraternity. He served as Midwestern Vice President (1979-1983), Regional Director (1965-1983), National Conventions Registration Coordinator (1977-1979); Beta Lambda Chapter President (1975-1977), Corresponding Secretary (1974-1975), and Director of Educational Activities (1965-1972).

B

rother Floyd E. Carroll, Sr. was a Life Member and 50-year member of the Fraternity. He was a member of the Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago and had formerly served as president of Theta Chapter. He retired from a management position with the U.S. Postal Service in 1999. Brother Carroll’s interest in music was cultivated by his mother, a music teacher and school principal, who taught him to play the violin at a very early age. He enjoyed classical music, jazz and anthems and was a lifetime subscriber to the Lyric Opera and never tired of listening to and watching numerous opera performances. He also was an ardent student of history and was well versed in African and African American history. He served as the chairman of the Civil Rights Committee at Progressive Baptist Church during the Martin Luther King, Jr. era. After graduation from high school, Brother Carroll enlisted in the U.S. Navy. He received an honorable discharge and attended the University of Illinois at Navy Pier and he earned a degree from Chicago Teachers College. In 1956, he married Frances Graves. Brother Carroll was initiated into the Fraternity in 1957 and was elected president of Theta Chapter in 1959. Brother Carroll worked for the U.S. Postal Service as a time-keeper in the Personnel Department until his retirement in 1999. He also was an insurance broker for Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.

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OMEGA CHAPTER

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rother Dr. John M.T. Chavis, Sr., a distinguished educator, was a Life Member of the Fraternity who was initiated into the organization in 1970 through Theta Zeta Lambda Chapter in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He last was a member of Beta Zeta Lambda Chapter in Jefferson City, Missouri. Brother Chavis was born August 7, 1923 in Toledo, Ohio and educated in the public schools there. Following high school graduation, he attended Hampton Institute and the University of Toledo where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors in philosophy. He served his country for five years in the U.S. Army where he graduated from the Engineer School in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He also served as Administrative Officer of the Engineer Dump Truck Company in Furth, Germany. He married Edna LaVenia DeBro on December 22, 1950 in Detroit, Michigan. Brother Chavis’ educational journey continued on to the University of Chicago where he earned a Master’s degree in philosophy; and to the University of Detroit where he received a M.A. in history; then to Michigan State University where he earned his Ph.D. in history. Brother Chavis’ record of accomplishments in education, include serving for ten years as Curator of Urban History and the Director of Education at the Detroit Historical Museum in Detroit, Michigan. He later served as the Assistant to the Vice President of Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. During his tenure at the University of Michigan, Brother Chavis also worked as lecturer of U.S. History, Associate in Research in the Michigan Historical Collections, and Assistant to the Dean at the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Brother Chavis also found time to contribute his professional insights to groups such as the Governor’s Task Force on Equal Opportunity in Higher Education. In 1971, he was appointed by Governor William G. Milliken to serve as Commissioner on the Michigan Historical Commission for the State of Michigan. He also served as a visiting professor at Tuskegee Institute from 1971 to 1974. From 1974 to 1988, he served Lincoln University as Vice President, Interim President (twice), Professor of History, Dean, and Coordinator of Institutional Affairs. In addition to his membership in the Fraternity, Brother Chavis was a member of the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, Theta Boule, Kansas City, Missouri.

B

rother Dr. Daniel Andrew Collins, the first person of color to teach at the University of California-San Francisco School of Dentistry, was the last surviving founder of the Gamma Chi Lambda Chapter in San Francisco, California. He also was a prominent civil rights leader who founded the Bay Area Urban League. In 1936, Brother Collins graduated from Paine College in Augusta, Georgia; and in 1941, he earned his D.D.S. at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. He later earned a Master’s degree at the UCSF Dental School in 1944; and opened a successful private practice. He was an instructor and later an assistant professor at the dental school from 1942 to 1960. During his 33 years of private practice, he was an activist in the dental profession. He was a member of the house of delegates of the California Dental Association, the board of directors of the San Francisco Dental Society, and the trustees of the American Fund for Dental Education. In 1946, he founded the San Francisco Chapter of the Urban League, which was later called the Bay Area Urban League; and he served on the board of the National Urban League from 1965 to 1987, and was vice chairman of the board from 1973 to 1975. The Urban League awarded him the Whitney M. Young Medallion in 1989. He met his wife, DeReath, when she was a dental hygiene student at Meharry, and they married in 1941. She died in 2003. The couple fought tirelessly for the mentally disabled. They were among the founders of the Marin Aid to Retarded Children, now called Lifehouse, a residential and counseling center for people with developmental disabilities. The couple was instrumental in promoting the passage of the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act of 1969.

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rother Russell Ellington, a native of Jefferson County Georgia and longtime resident of Savannah, was a former coach of the Harlem Globetrotters. Brother Ellington graduated from Beach High School in 1956 and attended Morris Brown College in Atlanta where he received B.S. degrees in Biology and Chemistry in 1960. He did further studies at the University of Georgia and Georgia Southern University. He spent two years with the New York Giants. His professional football career was ended prematurely because of his injuries. Brother Ellington then began his teaching career, which spanned three decades, beginning at his high school alma

mater. During 15 years at Beach High School, Coach Ellington won 482 of 529 games (91 percent). He captured five state and one national championship. He then won the Georgia High School Association Class AAA State Championship during the sport’s first year of integration in 1967. After leaving Beach H.S., Brother Ellington went to Savannah State College (University), which had been the “doormat” in the SIAC before he took over in 1976. During his nine years at Savannah State, he won three SIAC regular season and tournament titles and achieved an impressive collegiate record of 276-52. He left Savannah State to coach the internationally renowned Harlem Globetrotters. After traveling to 122 countries with the Globetrotters, in 1993, Brother Ellington returned to Savannah to start the first basketball team at Savannah Technical School (College). The phenomenal coach led the team to the national playoffs in Kansas City. Always ready for a new challenge, Coach Ellington returned to his college alma mater, Morris Brown College, to serve as Head Basketball Coach and Athletic Director for several years. After a brief retirement, Coach Ellington was “inspired” to return to Beach High School to coach and teach one last time. His legend continued with the 2006-2007 Beach High School basketball team by leading them to the state playoffs. Brother Ellington won numerous awards during his coaching career, winning on every level, and was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in May 2007.

B

rother William Hayes Finch, Ed.D., was a Life Member of the Fraternity and an active member of Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago, Illinois and the Xi Lambda Educational Foundation, Inc. He was born in Columbus, Ohio on April 10, 1924 and initiated into the Fraternity through Kappa Chapter on May 25, 1946. He graduated from The Ohio State University in 1947 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Social Studies and Speech. He obtained a Master of Arts degree in Educational Administration from DePaul University in 1953, and a Doctorate in Education from Nova University in 1983. Brother Finch spent most of his life in Chicago, Illinois and his entire career in education. He served at the elementary and high school levels as teacher, assistant principal and principal, and as Superintendent at the District

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OMEGA CHAPTER and Administrative levels. He also taught with the Upward Bound program and at local universities. Upon his retirement in 1988, Brother Finch served on the board of the City Colleges of Chicago. He was active with St. Edmund’s Episcopal Church, The Black Star Project, and the Coalition for African-American Equity in Education.

B

rother Reynaldo P. Glover, an attorney and one-time board chairman of the City Colleges of Chicago, was president of the company that sold the final remnants of what once was Beatrice International Food Company. For years, the company was the largest African American owned business in the United States. Brother Glover became General Counsel of TLC Beatrice International Holdings in 1994 and became Executive Vice President a year later. He later was named president of TLC Beatrice and commuted each week to the company’s office in New York from his Chicago home. Brother Glover was an attorney with DLA Piper in Chicago and handled legal matters related to the final liquidation of TLC Beatrice’s assets when the firm’s holdings were sold off in1999. Brother Glover grew up in Gary and attended Fisk University in Nashville. He was a basketball star at Roosevelt High School in Gary and at Fisk. He went on to receive his law degree from Harvard. He took a job with the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council in New York after his graduation from law school. He served for a period as the group’s National Executive Director. After returning to Chicago, he became a partner with the law firms of Jenner & Block and Isham, Lincoln & Beale before his association with DLA Piper. Brother Glover was appointed chairman of City Colleges in 1988 by then Mayor Eugene Sawyer. He resigned from the post in 1991. In 2003, he was elected chairman of the Board of Trustees at Fisk.

B

rother Laurence H. “Lonnie” Holland, a chemist and civil rights leader who spent his career advocating for educational and economic opportunities for the African American community, entered Omega Chapter on December 16, 2007. Brother Holland moved to Rockland County, New York more than 60 years ago and made his mark as a leader, volunteer and philanthropist. He served in Nyack, New York as chapter president of the NAACP from 1969 to 1975.

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Through his work with the NAACP, Brother Holland promoted housing integration, development programs and scholarship opportunities. He also held leadership roles in the Fraternity, the Rockland Negro Scholarship Fund and other nonprofit organizations. Brother Holland was one of the first African American scientists at Wyeth Pharmaceuticals where he helped the company recruit and hire African American employees. He would personally distribute applications, take them back to human resources at Wyeth, and then follow up to see if interviews had been scheduled. Brother Holland donated money to many local organizations and to his church, St. Charles AME Zion in Sparkill, where he was an active member. Seven years ago, he experienced his own windfall when he won $15 million in the New York Lottery. With donations from his winnings, he helped the church pay off its mortgage.

B

rother Charles Howell James II, a Life Member of the Fraternity, was a member of Alpha Iota Lambda Chapter in Charleston, West Virginia. A native of Charleston, Brother Howell was former president and chairman of the James Corporation where he worked for more than 30 years in his family’s 124-year-old food distribution business. The company was recognized as one of the oldest and largest African American businesses in the country. Brother James graduated from West Virginia State College Elementary School and West Virginia State College Teacher’s Training High School and Institute. After completing his sophomore year at West Virginia State, he transferred to the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Finance and Commerce where he was elected to the Beta Gamma Sigma Honorary Scholastic Society and graduated in 1953 with honors, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in economics. After serving as an Air Force lieutenant in Japan, he joined the family business. In 1992, after 36 years in the family business, he undertook a second career as internal auditor at West Virginia State College. He received many awards and honors, among which included meeting with President Jimmy Carter in the White House with other Black Enterprise 100 CEOs. He was active in community affairs for several decades and served on numerous boards and committees,

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including serving as finance committee chairman for the Martin Luther King, Jr. West Virginia Holiday Commission and as a member of the Upsilon Boule of the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity.

B

rother Dr. William Percy Hytche Sr., former president of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), was initiated into the Fraternity on November 1, 1947 through Beta Kappa Chapter at Langston University in Langston, Oklahoma. He was one of the most widely respected advocates in this country of historically black colleges and universities. Brother Hytche retired in January 1997 as the President of UMES after serving there for 21 years. He was born in Porter, Oklahoma, and educated in the public schools of Fort Gibson and Tullahassee. He last resided in Princess Anne, Maryland. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from Langston University and his Master of Science and Doctor of Education degrees from Oklahoma State University. He also studied at Oklahoma University, Oberlin College (Ohio), the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and University of Heidelberg (Germany). Brother Hytche went to UMES, then known as Maryland State College, in 1960 after being one of the first African Americans to teach in the public schools of Ponca City, as well as owning and operating one of the finest restaurants in Ponca City, The Blue Moon. During his years at UMES, he served in numerous teaching and administrative positions, culminating in June 1976 with his appointed as Chancellor. The title was subsequently changed to President. Under Brother Hytche’s leadership, UMES added 32 degree programs at the Bachelor’s, Master’s and doctorate levels; saw its student enrollment more than double to 3,200; and its campus expanded and beautified by 300 acres. Dr. Hytche was appointed by President George W. Bush and served on the President’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He was the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including The Thurgood Marshall Educational Achievement Award for 1992 (sponsored by Johnson Publishing Company, Inc.). In January 1993, he was also honored by his induction, along with Garth Brooks amongst others, into the Oklahoma State University Alumni Association Hall of Fame. Additionally, honorary doctorate degrees were bestowed upon him by Fisk University, Washington College, the


OMEGA CHAPTER University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Tuskegee University and, along with Barbara Bush amongst others, Wake Forest University. Dr. Hytche traveled extensively throughout Africa, Europe and Asia. In 1998, he led a delegation of ten college presidents who observed the voting process in a national election in Nigeria. Additionally, Dr. Hytche served as a Senior Associate for the American Council for Higher Education. He was also strong in his Methodist faith and in the Democratic Party.

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rother Orlando G. Jones, a member of Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago, Illinois and a Chicago area political insider, was honored by the Cook County Board following his entrance into Omega Chapter. Brother Jones was a godson of former Board President Brother John Stroger, serving as his Chief of Staff from 1995 to 2001. He went on to a lucrative consulting career after leaving the board’s service and won state and county business. The Cook County Board approved a resolution in Brother Jones’ honor, describing him as a loyal and dedicated public servant. Brother Jones joined Brother Stroger’s 8th Ward Democratic organization at the age of 18 and rose to become one of its most important players. He was instrumental in Brother Stroger’s victory in the 2006 Democratic primary even after the former board president suffered a debilitating stroke.

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rother Dr. William M. King was initiated into the Fraternity while at the University of Michigan and was last a member of Zeta Omicron Lambda Chapter in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Brother King spent his formative years in South Philadelphia and was educated in the city’s public school system. He graduated from Central High School in 1945 and entered the U.S. Army in 1946, rising to the rank of Sergeant Major. He enrolled in the University of Michigan in 1949 where he was presented a Phi Beta Kappa key; and three years later, he received his Bachelor’s degree with distinction from the University in mathematics, chemistry and physics. He received his Doctor of Osteopathy degree in 1962 from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. In 1964, after completing his internship at Metropolitan Hospital, he established his general practice in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. Brother

King distinguished himself as a practitioner of community-based family medicine and rendered much needed primary care services to hundreds of Philadelphians as Medical Director of the Gemedco and City Avenue Medical Centers.

B

rother Charles Grant Lewis was a former member of the National Board of Directors for the Fraternity, having served as Western Regional Vice President; and he was an architect who helped shape many signature Bay Area buildings. Brother Lewis was a resident of Oakland, California and principal of an Oakland-based architectural firm that bore his name. His work included historic renovations, museum design and transportationrelated projects, which won local, state and national awards. Brother Lewis worked on projects that included the international terminal at San Francisco International Airport and the San Francisco Giants downtown ballpark. One of Brother Lewis’ proudest achievements was the restoration of homes along 34th Street in Oakland—which helped transform one of the worst blocks in West Oakland into a stable residential area. His designs transformed dilapidated hulks into proud Victorians with modern amenities. As each house received a face-lift, the spirit of the neighborhood seemed to lift as well. Before starting his own firm, Brother Lewis managed projects for Michael Willis Architects in San Francisco. He was part of the team that restored the African American Library, a project that preserved historic beaux-arts architecture while integrating new elements. Brother Lewis also was known for a lifelong commitment to advancing opportunities for young black men, especially design professionals who still fight for an equal chance at both work and recognition. A native of Los Angeles, Brother Lewis attended the University of Southern California. He was a member of the American Institute of Architects and served on the board of the National Organization of Minority Architects. He also contributed to the African American Library and Museum at Oakland, Thomas L. Berkley Square, San Francisco International Airport Pacific Bell Park and the Cecil Williams Glide Community House in San Francisco, among other buildings.

B

rother Sidney Thomas Marable, a native of Henderson, North Carolina, operated the Law Offices of Sidney T. Marable, PLC in Phoenix, Arizona. Prior to establishing his own law office, he was a partner with the law firm of Castro, Zipf & Rogers and also served as an Assistant Judge Advocate (JAG) with the U.S. Air Force. He earned a Bachelor’s degree in three years from North Carolina A&T State University, graduating summa cum laude. During his junior year in college, he was accepted into law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he earned his Juris Doctorate degree. Upon graduating from law school, Brother Marable became a JAG. While serving as a JAG, he was appointed as a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney to serve as co-counsel for the defense in a civil lawsuit filed against the United States and was nominated as the Outstanding Young Lawyer in the Air Force. Civically, he formerly served on the City of Phoenix Mayor’s Professional Sports Advisory Committee during the time Phoenix was recruiting professional baseball and football teams. He also served on the Business Partners for the Phoenix Symphony, the Board of Directors for Central Arizona Arthritis Foundation and as President of the Board of Directors of Community Legal Services. Professionally, Brother Marable has served as a member of the Executive Committee of the American Association for Justice, (formerly the Association of Trial Lawyers of America), an organization of 60,000 trial lawyers worldwide and he also served on its Board of Governors. He served on the Board of Directors of the Morris Institute of Justice and the State Bar of Arizona Board of Legal Specialization, becoming the first and only African American attorney to serve on that board. He formerly served as President of the Arizona Black Lawyers Association (now The Hayzel B. Daniels Bar Association) and as President of the Arizona Trial Lawyers Association, becoming the first and only African American attorney to serve as its President. Brother Marable served as president of the Fraternity’s Phoenix graduate chapter and was a member of Sigma Pi Phi (Boulé) Fraternity, serving as the President-elect of the Phoenix Chapter.

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rother Rhymes H. Moncure, Jr., initiated into the Fraternity in 1998 through Beta Zeta Lambda Chapter in Jefferson City, Missouri, was the Bishop and leader of 325 United Methodist congregations in North Texas. Born in Oakland, California, Brother Moncure was a 1974 graduate of Missouri Baptist College and received a Master of Divinity degree from Saint Paul School of Theology in Kansas City, Missouri in 1977. He later received a Doctor of Ministry degree from Carolina University School of Theology with academic honors. He received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Saint Paul School of Theology in 1998. Brother Moncure was ordained a deacon in 1975 and as an elder in 1977 at the Kansas East Annual Conference. He served in a number of pastoral and administrative assignments until his election on the first ballot as bishop in 2000. He was serving as the senior pastor of Missouri United Methodist Church in Columbia, Missouri—an historic and the largest Anglo congregation in American United Methodism served by an African American pastor—when elected as Bishop. In his 32 years of parish ministry, Brother Moncure’s appointments in Kansas and Missouri included urban and suburban congregations such as Mason Memorial United Methodist Church in Kansas City, Kansas and Samaritan and Union Memorial United Methodist churches in Saint Louis. He also served as superintendent of the Saint Louis South District, Director of Congregational Development for the Missouri East Conference and Executive Director for urban ministries in the Kansas East Conference. He was elected as a delegate to the United Methodist General and Jurisdictional conferences from 1984 until his election to the episcopacy. Brother Moncure also taught in regional and conference Schools for Christian Mission for the United Methodist Church Women’s Division and was part of the leadership faculty for training new district superintendents and directors of connectional ministry.

B

rother Peter Moore, Sr. was born in Columbus, Mississippi and moved at an early age to Memphis, Tennessee where he received his education in the Memphis Public Schools. He attended and graduated from Tennessee A&I State University in Nashville with a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering. Brother Moore

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began his engineering career in St. Maries, Idaho and Missoula, Montana with the USDA Forest Service. He continued his career as an employee in the Connecticut Department of Transportation where he worked until his retirement in 1992, having more than 32 years of service. In addition to his membership in the Fraternity, Brother Moore was a member of the F&AM Masons.

B

rother Simeon Moss, a member of Zeta Iota Lambda Chapter in Trenton, New Jersey, had a distinguished career as an educator and historian. Brother Moss graduated from Rutgers College in 1941 and served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Infantry-Engineer Corps during WW II—serving from 1942 to 1946 in Italy with great distinction. He won a Purple Heart, Bronze Star and a Silver Star for his valor in combat. He was called up again for service in the Korean War, from 1950 to 1952, and was an officer in the New Jersey National Guard from 1955 to 1972, retiring as a lieutenant colonel in 1980. Brother Moss had a distinguished career as an educator, serving as assistant principal at the New Jersey Manual Training School in Bordentown, NJ; history department head in Princeton’s school system; special assistant to the Commissioner-New Jersey Department of Labor; Superintendent of Essex County Schools and Vice President of Essex County College. A member of Princeton’s Witherspoon Presbyterian Church, he was one of Princeton’s “published” historians, and served on the board of a number of organizations and charities. He helped organize Princeton’s delegation to the 1963 March on Washington, and years later, he attended the Million Man March in 1995.

B

rother Eugene Sawyer, Jr., the second African American mayor of Chicago, Illinois, was a supportive member of Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago. He was initiated into the Fraternity on April 12, 1954 through Beta Upsilon Chapter on the campus of Alabama State University in Montgomery. He graduated in 1956 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Education. Following college, Brother Sawyer taught high school math and chemistry for one year in Prentiss, Mississippi. In 1957, Brother Sawyer moved to Chicago to pursue laboratory science work. After two years working for Rockford

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Sprinklers, he was hired at a South Side water filtration plant in 1959 as a lab technician. At the same time, Brother Sawyer joined the Democratic Ward Organization of the 6th Ward. He held key leadership positions in the 6th Ward organization—including president of the 6th Ward Young Democrats, financial secretary for the entire ward organization and president. In addition, he worked his way up through the city water department. Brother Sawyer was elected alderman of the 6th Ward in 1971. He served his community in this position until 1987. On December 2, 1987, Brother Sawyer was sworn in as Mayor of Chicago—after the sudden death of Harold Washington. As the second AfricanAmerican Mayor of Chicago, Brother Sawyer passed a number of major initiatives, including ordinances in the areas of ethics and human rights. Other accomplishments included expanding governmental outreach to develop cooperative partnerships with business and industry. Following his tenure, Brother Sawyer returned to a focus on business and chemistry with his friend, Charles Harrison, III. They formed CEI International, a reseller of natural gas and other fuels. He served as vice president of the company until 1997. On January 19, 2008, Brother Sawyer transitioned into Omega Chapter.

B

rother George Henry Shadie was initiated into the Fraternity through the Alpha Tau Chapter at the University of Akron on June 27, 1953 and was the Fraternity’s Life Member No. 3775. Brother Shadie received his Bachelor’s degree from the University of Akron and spent his life in education and coaching. He served as an English teacher with the Akron Public Schools and was the first African American head football coach for the school system. He was hired as South High School’s head coach in 1966. He also was an assistant at Garfield and Ellet High Schools before taking the head coaching job at East High School in 1981. Brother Shadie retired from coaching in 1983; and after working for 34 years as an English teacher, he retired from teaching in the Akron Public School System in 1992. Brother Shadie brought both his literary and coaching skills to the Fraternity. He also was a charter and dedicated member of the Eta Tau Lambda Chapter in Akron, Ohio, as well as a member


OMEGA CHAPTER of the Board of Directors of the Alpha Phi Alpha Homes, Inc. He was proud to be included in the Fraternity Centennial Documentary.

B

rother Robert J. Simms was a Life Member of the Fraternity and was last a member of Theta Delta Lambda Chapter in El Paso, Texas. Brother Simms was born and raised in Savannah, Georgia and graduated from Tuskegee Institute with a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering. He also received a B.S. degree in education from the University of Texas at El Paso. He did post-graduate work at Boston University. Brother Simms was a retired Lieutenant Colonel from the U.S. Army; and following his successful military career, he became an educator and taught science and mathematics for many years in the El Paso Independent School District. While a member of Theta Delta Lambda Chapter, he served in many capacities, including president, parliamentarian, sergeant-at-arms and committee chair/member. He was instrumental in implementing the Chapter’s Go-to-High School, Go-to-College program. He was recognized by Theta Delta Lambda Brothers with four Outstanding Service Awards and many citations for his noteworthy work with the Chapter.

B

rother Dr. Leonard H.O. Spearman served as President of Texas Southern University and was appointed as U.S. Ambassador to the African nations of Rwanda and Lesotho. He was born July 8, 1929 in Tallahassee, Florida and completed his undergraduate training at Florida A&M University in 1947 at the age of 18, majoring in the biological sciences. His Master of Arts and Ph.D. degrees in psychology were earned in 1950 and 1960 at the University of Michigan. Brother Spearman began his 50-year career as a science teacher at Lincoln High School of Tallahassee, Florida. He taught at Florida A&M University, attaining the rank of Associate Professor of Psychology. Dr. Spearman served as a Martin Luther King Lecturer, Rutgers University, and Visiting Professor of Psychology, Queens College, New York. In 1970, he joined the federal government rising to the rank of Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for

Postsecondary Education. In 1980, he became President of Texas Southern University. He served on the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Task Force for the Desegregation of Texas Colleges and Universities. In 1984, Brother Spearman was chosen by President Ronald Reagan as a delegate to the 20th Independence Anniversary of the Republic of Kenya. He was appointed a delegate a second time in 1987 for the 30th Independence Anniversary of the Republic of Ghana. In 1988, President Reagan appointed Brother Spearman as the U.S. Ambassador to Rwanda. In 1991, President George H.W. Bush appointed him U.S. Ambassador to the Kingdom of Lesotho. He was responsible for the establishment of American Schools in Rwanda and Lesotho. In 1993, the National Association for Student Financial Assistance recognized him as one of America’s 25 most influential leaders in the crafting of higher education legislation, designed to aid disadvantaged students. He returned to the faculty of Texas Southern University as Distinguished Professor. Following his retirement from Texas Southern University in 1998, he served as Distinguished Service Professor at Coppin State College in Baltimore, Maryland and Chairperson of the Board of Renewable Energy for African Development. In 2001, Brother Spearman was appointed Executive Director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He was named as the 2002 recipient of the King Legacy Award for International Service, which was presented by the National Council of Negro Women. Brother Spearman received six honorary degrees for his contributions to higher education and diplomacy.

B

rother John H. Stroger, Jr., former Cook County Board President, was a Life Member of the Fraternity and an active member of Xi Lambda Chapter in Chicago, Illinois. Born May 19, 1929 in Helena, Arkansas, he was the first African American president of the Cook County, Illinois Board of Commissioners. Brother Stroger was initiated on December 7, 1951 through the Beta Tau Chapter on the campus of Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana. He graduated in 1953 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration. Brother Stroger attended law school at DePaul

University College of Law and graduated in 1965. He completed much of what he set out to do as Cook County Board President from 1994 to 2006, including balancing the $2.9 billion dollar budget. He also instituted a Juvenile Drug Court, appointed a Commission on Women’s Issues and opened a new AIDS treatment and research facility. Brother Stroger served on the Chicago Metropolitan Healthcare Council and the board of South Shore Hospital. The new Cook County hospital was renamed the John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County in honor of Brother Stroger while he was serving as County Board President. Brother Stroger is past president of the National Association of Counties and was appointed by former President Bill Clinton as a member of the Advisory Committee On Intergovernmental Relations. An icon in Chicago politics, Brother Stroger has credited the Fraternity and the support of his Brothers for his success in politics. Brother Stroger gave back by being supportive as an effective role model for Brothers pursuing a career in Chicago politics. On January 18, 2008, he transitioned into Omega Chapter.

B

rother Dr. Julius Thompson was a Life Member of the Fraternity and who was initiated through Delta Kappa Chapter at Alcorn A&M State University in 1966. He was last a member of Beta Zeta Lambda Chapter in Jefferson City, Missouri. A distinguished scholar, writer, poet and teacher, Brother Thompson was educated in the Northern Mississippi public schools and received his Bachelor of Science degree from Alcorn State University and his Master’s and Ph.D. from Princeton University. Beginning in 1973, he held teaching appointments at Florida Memorial College, State University of New York, University of Rochester, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale and the University of Missouri. Brother Thompson received several highly coveted and prestigious awards, including the Danforth Fellows Award, the Ford Foundation Doctoral Award, the Fulbright Program Award to Zimbabwe, and the NEH Fellowship for University Teachers. Through his authored publications of at least 11 books, Brother Thompson’s research examined topics of major significance in Mississippi history.

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OMEGA CHAPTER

B

rother Dr. Joseph Whitfield Trigg, Jr. was a Life Member of the Fraternity and member of Beta Zeta Lambda Chapter in Jefferson City, Missouri. He was born on June 19, 1929 in Jefferson City and attended Washington Elementary Grade School and Lincoln University Laboratory High School there. He graduated from Lincoln University in 1958 with a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics and chemistry; the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1971 with a Master of Science degree in mathematics; the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1978 with a Master of Science degree in computer science; and the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1984 with a Ph.D. in computer science. In 1980, he received a National Science Foundation Fellowship Grant in industrial computing at General Motors Engineering in Flint, Michigan. Brother Trigg attended the U.S. Air Force Basic Observation Navigator School at Ellington Air Force Base, Houston, Texas and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant at Harlingen Air Force Base, Texas. He served 18 months active duty at Wheelus Field, Tripoli, Libya, North Africa as a SA-16 air-sea-rescue navigator, and the Military Air Transport Service as a C-124 aircraft transport navigator with the 304th Squadron, 442nd Air Force Reserve at Richards-Gebaur Air Force Base near Belto, MO. His professional services included 40 years of teaching. He taught

at Lincoln University; the University of MissouriRolla (graduate teaching assistant); the University of Michigan-Flint, Grambling State University; and he retired as an Associate Professor of Computer Science after 16 years of teaching at Missouri State University (formerly Southwest Missouri State University) in Springfield, MO. Brother Trigg served as recording secretary with the Fraternity’s Alpha Psi Chapter and as corresponding secretary with Beta Zeta Lambda Chapter. Brother Trigg also was a member of the F&AM Masons.

B

rother Linwood Harrison Vaughters, Jr. was initiated into the Fraternity while at Cheyney State Teachers College and was last a member of Zeta Omicron Lambda Chapter. Brother Vaughters grew up in the West Philadelphia area where he attended West Philadelphia High School. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from Cheyney State Teachers College, now Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, in 1958. Brother Vaughters entered the U.S. Army in 1959 and served in the Heavy Weapons Infantry in Berlin, Germany. Private First Class Vaughters received the Army of Occupation Medal while in Berlin and was honorably discharged in 1961. He began his 41 year career with the School District of Philadelphia in 1958 as an English teacher of foreign students at the McCall

Elementary School and later transferred to Rowan Elementary School. He later became Labor Relations Assistant in the then Personnel Department of the District. He retired in 1999.

B

rother George W. “Sonny” Williams was born in Evanston, Illinois and educated in the public schools there where he excelled in the classroom and on the athletic field—playing football, track and field. After high school graduation, he attended the University of Illinois. He was drafted into the U.S. Army during World War II and was honorably discharged with the rank of Corporal. He lived with his family in Chicago before returning to Evanston in 1947. Brother Williams then became a businessman and manufactured and distributed hair preparation products and also worked at the U.S. Post Office. He continued his education and earned both his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from DePaul University. He then entered the educational field, teaching in both the public and private sector. While principal at the St. Mel School in Chicago, he wrote and published his first book and was also the owner of insurance and real estate businesses. He published his second book following his retirement. In both books, he explored the depths of the African American experience and racism as seen through the eyes of African Americans living in the Chicago metropolitan area.

OMEGA LISTINGS

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Brother Leonard Andrews Alpha Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother William I. Conley Gamma Lambda

Brother Charles Anderson Davis Alpha Phi / Alpha Eta Lambda

Allen C. Arkins Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Thomas M. Cooper Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Jacques Eherhart Alpha Tau / Gamma Lambda

Brother Kenneth Barnes, Sr. Eta Tau / Xi Lambda

Brother James L. Cox Nu Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother Mathis B. Epps Beta Sigma / Gamma Lambda

Brother Bobby Brown Gamma Lambda

Brother Leroy Daggs Alpha Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother Cyril Evans Zeta Iota Lambda

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OMEGA CHAPTER Brother William A. Ezell Gamma Rho Lambda / Gamma Lambda

Brother James W. Nelms Beta Omicron / Gamma Lambda

Brother Lewis Scaife, Jr. Alpha Psi / Gamma Lambda

Brother Lloyd Fletcher Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Eugene Oden Nu Pi Lambda / Mu Mu Lambda

Brother Waldo J. Smith Alpha Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother James Hairston Alpha Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother Jean L. Peters, Sr. Gamma Lambda

Brother Maynard Stephens Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Thomas C. Henderson Omicron ‘86

Brother Joseph Prather, Jr. Gamma Lambda

Brother Earl Tolbert Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Carl Henry Nu Psi Lambda ‘89

Brother William Reid Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Edward H. Tunstall Alpha Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother James Joyner Beta Delta / Kappa Alpha Lambda

Brother Phil Robinson Beta Sigma / Gamma Lambda

Brother Bobby G. Webber Beta Omicron Lambda / Beta Tau Lambda

Brother Chester Jordan Epsilon Iota / Theta Delta Lambda

Brother Stanley Robinson Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Ronald White Alpha Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother Francis A. Kornegay Rho / Gamma Lambda

Brother James E. Roberts Alpha Upsilon / Gamma Lambda

Brother George Q. Williams Gamma Lambda

Brother Talmadge McDow, Jr. Gamma Mu, Beta Nu Lambda

Brother Enoch Rochester Zeta Iota Lambda

Brother Donald Myles Eta Pi Lambda

Brother Herbert Roundtree Beta Sigma / Theta Rho Lambda

Brother Paul T. Williams Zeta Iota Lambda

Key:

= Life Member

CHAPTER REFERENCES: the first chapter that appears in the Omega Chapter listings represents the Brother’s Chapter of Initiation. If a second chapter is listed, it represents the last chapter with which the Brother was affiliated.

Our true hearts ever strive, success’ goal to gain, That our Fraternity’s praises may be sung.

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CORPORATE CORPORATE DIRECTORY

The Seven Jewels Henry A. Callis

Charles H. Chapman

Eugene K. Jones

GENERAL OFFICERS General President Immediate Past General President Executive Director General Treasurer Comptroller General Counsel Director of General Conventions Historian Chief Parliamentarian

Darryl R. Matthews, Sr., 5075 Red Robin Ridge, Alpharetta, Georgia, 30022 Harry E. Johnson, Sr., 7457 Harwin Drive, Houston, TX 77036 Willard C. Hall, Jr., 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 George N. Reaves, 1417 Kinross Street, Flossmoor, IL 32312 Frank A. Jenkins, III, 529 South Perry Street, Ste.16, Montgomery, AL 36104 Michael D. Pegues, 3800 Lincoln Plaza, 500 N. Akard St., Dallas, TX 75202 Michael Thompson, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22313 Robert L. Harris, Jr., 102 Burleigh Drive, Ithaca, NY 14850 John M. Williams, 7075 Colesbrooke Drive, Hudson, OH 44236

VICE PRESIDENTS Eastern Midwestern Southern Southwestern Western

Dennis G. Kemp, Sr., PO Box 3056, Laurel, MD 20709 Mark S. Tillman, 25353 Lindenwood Lane, Southfield, MI 48033 Everette Ward, 3112 Falconhurst Drive, Wake Forest, NC 27587 Arthur McDade, III, 1124 Peyton Street, Little Rock, AK 72204 Ryan Williams, 1465 65th Street, Apt. 434, Emeryville, CA 80015

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENTS Eastern Midwestern Southern Southwestern Western

Mohammed H. Jalloh, 110 Clarendon Place, Hackensack, NJ 07601 Emmanuel T. Brown, 3110 E. Livingston Ave., Apt. 2, Columbus, OH 43227 Stuart P. Lott, 1455 Timothy Drive, Memphis, TN 38116 Maurice D. Gipson, Louisiana State University, PO Box 12131, Baton Rouge, LA 70894 John A. Nelson, 930 Figueroa Terrace #723, Los Angeles, CA 90012

LIVING PAST GENERAL PRESIDENTS 25th General President 26th General President 27th General President 28th General President 29th General President 30th General President 31th General President

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James R. Williams, 1733 Brookwood Drive, Akron, OH 44313 Ozell Sutton, 1640 Loch Lomond Trail, SW, Atlanta, GA 30331 Charles C. Teamer, Sr., 32 Fairway Oaks Drive, New Orleans, LA 70131 Henry Ponder, 3 Covington Court, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 Milton C. Davis, 304 N. Main Street, Tuskegee, AL 36083 Adrian L. Wallace, 281 Debra Lane, Lake Charles, LA 70611 Harry E. Johnson, Sr., 7457 Harwin Drive, Houston, TX 77036

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DIRECTORY

CORPORATE DIRECTORY

George B. Kelley

Nathaniel A. Murray

Robert H. Ogle

Vertner W. Tandy

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS TO THE GENERAL PRESIDENT Political Affairs Development Liaison to Entertainment and Sports Industries Technology and Info Management

Leon C. Buck, Jr., 2704 Accent Court Bowie, MD 20716 John M. Williams, 7075 Colesbrooke Drive, Hudson, OH 44236 Darrell Miller, 9720 Wilsher Blvd., Suite 700, Beverly Hills, CA 90212 Lover High, Jr., 881 Creekdale Drive, Atlanta, GA 30021

DEPUTY ASSISTANTS TO THE GENERAL PRESIDENT Marketing/Branding Organizational Effectiveness College Brother Development Social Responsibility Health/Healthcare Awareness Commerce and Economic Policy Liason to the Broadcast Media

Open Kermit H. Boston, 138 Everson Street, San Francisco, CA 94131 Roderick L. Smothers, PO Box 17701, Baton Rouge, LA 70893 Dr. John H. Jackson, Esq., 4805 Mount Hope Drive, Baltimore, MD 21215 Pierre N. Vigilance, M.D., 10795 Symphony Wave, Columbia, MD 21045 Bobby McDonald, 6255 Camino Manzano, Anaheim Hills, CA 92807 Victor L. Carter, 8316 Governor Thomas Lane, Ellicott City, MD 21043

SPECIAL ASSISTANTS TO THE GENERAL PRESIDENT Logistics Protocol Aide Senior Advisor Chief of Staff Administrative Assistant

Donald Woods, 9045 S. Bennett, Chicago, IL 60617 Larry J. Henderson, 2641 Foundry Way, Apt. #302, Alexandria, VA 22314 David Brown, 4502 Pageant Way, Orlando, FL 32808 Bob A. Willis, 130 Old Fairburn Close, Atlanta, GA 30331 Al F. Rutherford, 2732 Gull Lake Drive, Plano, TX 75025 Joseph E. Heyward, Sr., PO Box 384, Florence, SC 29503

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LEADERSHIP DIRECTORY ALPHA PHI ALPHA WORLD POLICY COUNCIL

Chairman Horace G. Dawson, Jr., 1601 Kalmia Road, NW, Washington, DC 20037 Chairman Emeritus Edward W. Brooke, 6437 Blantyre Road, Warrenton, VA 20187 Members Charles Rangel, 2354 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 Huel D. Perkins, 1923–79th Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA 70807 Henry Ponder, 3 Covington Court, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 Vinton R. Anderson, AME Church Finance Office, 1134–11th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001 Chuck S. Stone, UNC-Chapel Hill, 107 Oxford Hills Place, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Bobby Austin, The Village Foundation, 211 N. Union Street #100, Alexandria, VA 22314 Cornel West, 220 Boylston Street, 1010, Boston, MA 02116 Ron Dellums, 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20004

NATIONAL COMMITTEE/COMMISSION CHAIRMEN

Alpha Collegiate Scholars Awards & Achievement Belford V. Lawson Oratorical Big Brothers & Big Sisters Black & Gold Pageant Boy Scouts Building Foundation Budget and Finance Business & Economic Development Foundation College Brothers Affairs Commission Constitution Director of General Conventions Director of Housing Activities Education Foundation Elections General Headquarters – Facility Management Grievance & Discipline Higher Education Historical Commission Human Resources Internal Auditing International Brothers: Caribbean Leadership Development Life Membership Management Information Systems March of Dimes Liaison MLK Memorial Project Mediation and Arbitration Medical Advisory Board Membership, Standards & Extensions Military Brothers Liaison National Sergeant at Arms Organization Effectiveness Political Action Publications Project Alpha Racial Justice & Public Policy Reclamation Rituals & Ceremonies Rules and Credentials Senior Alpha Affairs Training and Development (Alpha University) Walk America–March of Dimes

Steven M. Clark, 2898 Bentbrook Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45251 Clifton Johnson, 3559 Fuller Street, Columbus, GA 31907 Lynwood Randolph, 11827 Water Oak Drive, Magnolia, TX 77354 Dale Long, 1614 Dorado Street, Garland, TX 75040 Alvin J. Cavalier, 413-C Longwood Court, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 George Randall, 8705 Saranac Trail, Fortworth, TX 76118 R. (Bob) Leandras Jones, II, 1045 Audubon Circle, SW, Atlanta, GA 30311 Frank A. Humphrey, 6918 Park Edge Drive, Madison, WI 53719 Steve Sims, 2508 Dysart Road, Cleveland, OH 44118 Mike A. Blake, 405 S. Butler Blvd, Apt. 3, Lansing, MI 48915 Lloyd A. Givens, 6050 Canaan Woods Drive, Atlanta, GA 30331 Brian Parker, 9115 Lake Fischer Blvd., Gotha, FL 34734 Thomas A. Tatum, 2266 Canterbury Circle, Akron, OH 44319 Ralph E. Johnson, 9241 Sealed Message Road, Columbia, MD 21045 Russell C. Campbell, Sr., 4212 Sugar Pine Court, Burtonsville, MD 20866 Ola O. Aluko, 14951 S.W. 157th CT, Miami, FL 33196 William A. Crutchfield, 631 Spring Street, Herndon, VA 20170 Thomas Cole, 4825 Regency Trace, Atlanta, GA 30331 Herman “Skip” Mason, 4233 Ivy Run, Ellenwood, GA 30294 Chad D. Simmons, 520 East 41st Street, Chicago, IL 60653 Hyacinth Ahuruonye, 595 Market Street #2160, San Francisco, CA 94105 Ricardo P. Deveaux, P.O. Box N-4511, Nassau, Bahamas Alex Dejarnett, 1126 South Horseshoe Road, Durham, NC 27703 Roger R. Gregory, 2516 Carver Street, Durham, NC 27705 Josh O. Williams, 1006 Elmira Ave, New Orleans, LA 70114 Wilbur E. Jackson, Jr., 6716 Indian Springs Court, San Jose, CA 95120 Frank Russell, Jr., 3314 Paces Ferry Road, Atlanta, GA 30339 Keith A. Bishop, 1802 MLK Jr. Parkway, Suite 105, Durham, NC 27707 Anton C. Bizzell, 821 Braeburn Drive, Fort Washington, MD 20744 Leroy Giles, 7602 NW Wyatt Lake Drive, Lawton, OK 73505 Ralph Harris, 7371 Hunters Oak Court, Springfield, VA 22150 Ron Russell, 700 Cedar Ridge Lane, Richton Park, IL 60471 Zollie J. Stevenson, Jr., 806 Falls Lake Drive, Mitchellville, MD 20721 Kobi Little, Post Office Box 1082, Selma, AL 36701 R. Vann Graves, 206 W. 132nd Street #3F, New York, NY 10027 Craig F. Reed, 315 Forest Grove Avenue, Jacksonville, NC 28540 Cleveland E. Beckett, Jr., 1849 Sedgwick Avenue, # 10E, Bronx, NY 10453 Harry Evans, III, 7575 Weatherworn Way, Columbia, MD 21046 Russell E. Flye, 6211 Devon Court, Pasco, WA 99301 Ronald T. James, 9317 Autumn Road, Oklahoma City, OK 73151 Elliott McKinney, PO Box 942, E. St. Louis, IL 62203 A. L. Mackey, 6801 Willamette Drive, Austin, TX 78723 Wilbert L. Brown, 6216 Rime Village Drive # 102, Huntsville, AL 35806

ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. 2313 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-5211 CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS Phone: (410) 554-0040; Fax: (410) 554-0054

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The Sphinx Magazine Fall/ Winter 2007