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THERE SHE GOES It’s always about the journey.

THE GUTSY TRAVELER MARYBETH BOND

SPAIN THE COUNTRY OF DREAMS

GLOBAL DESIGNERS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT MARCH|APRIL 2014 MARCH|APRIL 2014

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“TOURISTS do they’ve been,TRA know where th

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on’t know where RAVELERS don’t they’re going.” Paul Theroux

View of Barcelona’s coast from the top of Parc Güel.

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March|April 2014

CONTENTS

9|12

15|16

EDITOR’S NOTE

CONTRIBUTORS

EDITOR’S TRAVEL PICKS

The inspirational, talented, and travel bug bitten writers who have given the magazine its voice.

Find out what There She Goes magazine’s editor chooses when she travels.

17|19 GLOBAL EXPATS

21|28 GLOBAL

We catch up with a U.S. expat living in Japan, who shares her experiences, challenges, and how it’s like to live in the worlds most expensive city.

EXPERIENCES Our editor shares her personal journey and experiences in the amazing country of Spain.

29|35 GLOBAL DESIGNERS Designers around the globe create beautiful things, and make their unique mark on the global fashion market.

33|35 39|46 GLOBAL PEOPLE Interview with the gutsy traveler Marybeth Bond, and Gunnar Garfors, the youngest man to travel all countries.

37|38 GLOBAL HIGHLIGHTS A quick look at the city of Boulder, Colorado, by one of its local rock climbing lovers.

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47|52 59|64 GLOBAL CITY TOURS Tour the city of Budapest. Tour the city of Oslo. MARCH|APRIL 2014


53|56

65|70

GLOBAL

GLOBAL

EXPERIENCES

ARTWORK

Follow us to Ireland, with a personal and authentic journey from Cork to Dublin, by two of its natives.

Photography under water with the talented young photographer, Kwangbok Jack Lee.

71|74 GLOBAL HISTORY Find out the truth behind the Brazilian icon ‘ La Chica de Ipanema’, from a true Ipanema girl.

ON THE COVER

75|80

The streets of Cuzco, Peru. Edison Guerreros Chaccha. (See page 75)

GLOBAL FACES A look at the picturesque and timeless people, places, and things of Cuzco, Peru. By native Peruvian photographer, Edison Guerreros Chaccha.

75|80 ANNOUNCEMENTS The who, what, when, where and why of There She Goes magazine. Find out the fine details, and travel information. MARCH|APRIL 2014

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Contributor Sent Image

“Masai Women in Kenya, near the Tanzania border. I took this picture while on safari in Africa. It was such an amazing experience, I was glad to be able to take this image.� -Janet Deleuse

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THERE SHE GOES magazine. EDITORIAL EDITOR IN CHIEF Massiel Mancebo DESIGN DIRECTOR Massiel Mancebo CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Annette Ronaszegui Ashley Robinson Daniella Cadavez Laura Hastings Lisa McCann Nicolas Minton Sarah Elisabeth PROOFREADING Katherine Ramirez Massey Catherine Lamb GRAPHIC DESIGN Massiel Mancebo Lola Hernandez PHOTOGRAPHY Edison Guerreros Chaccha Kwangbok Jack Lee Arpad Ronaszegui Salvadorita Mancebo Massiel Mancebo MARCH|APRIL 2014 There She Goes Magazine is published bimonthly. For more information visit: ThereSheGoesMagazine.Tumblr.com

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Editor’s Letter

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here comes a time in every person’s life when things either meet at a definitive crossroads or everything just comes to a screeching halt. This is what traveling has done in my life. Every time I have boarded a plane, I have found myself asking many questions about where I should be headed in life. The funny thing is, I never really find one place, I’ve always find many. One incredibly sunny day in the timeless Spanish city of Cordoba, I found myself walking through the famous Mezquita Mosque-Cathedral. La Mezquita is an interesting place: quiet, solemn, and mysterious; you can find a blend of medieval Islamic art and Christian art, living in harmony among the pristine marble columns and floors. I’ve never seen ceilings so imposing and so perfectly crafted. Although there were many tourists going a bit camera crazy, there was silence, peace, and even a bit of mystery. Sitting in there long enough, you begin to wonder about yourself, about your own inexplicable mix of likes and dislikes, and the things that make you who you are; maybe in a place like this it’s easy to accept those differences you struggle with. I believe this is what traveling does: it turns you into a place just like this cathedral, where new truths and findings are blended with the characteristics that make us who we are. Perhaps at first it may be a struggle, but little by little, possibly without noticing, you’ll become this universally adaptable being. It won’t matter where you are, what you’re eating, or whom you’re with. You are now a global local, A nomad. Most importantly, you’ll have a story to tell.

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Editor’s Traveling Picks 1.

2.

I call this my “ninja wrap”! I own several in black, brown, whatever color I can find them.

This tote is actually reversible; it sort of reminds me of a Bottega Venetta minus the luxury price, Also it’s purely vegan. it’s a great bag!

3. 4.

1. CARDIGAN WRAP BCBG

2. URBAN EXPRESSIONS WEEKEND TOTE

Traveling with fuss is a big negative. That’s why, for me, it’s essential to have a cozy wrap around cardigan. It doubles up as a hoodie, jacket, and a sweater, which is also convenient when you don’t know how the weather will be when you land. $99-$150Bluefly.com

It’s very important to be comfortable when I travel, so my bag of choice is always a light and spacious tote where I can stick all of my snacks - I carry plenty of snacks. I also like to stick to totes that are original and eco-friendly. This one is vegan and works p e r f e c t l y. $ 5 9 . 9 5 D sw. c o m

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3. ITEM ANALOG WATCH

Knowing what time it is without relying on your phone is sort of important when you travel. I enjoy wearing bigger watches with an edge. I’m Scandinavian design’s biggest fan; watches by the Scandinavian brand ‘Item’ are my favorite. They are simple, colorful and very fun to wear. €46 Itemstore.se

4. MAD LOVE LYNN CANVAS FLATS

Shoes: They are either your best friend or your worst enemy. These days, I go for good quality, yet inexpensive flats that I can walk around for miles in, while surviving dirt roads, grass, sandstorms, and whatever else may come. $19.99 Target.com

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GLOBAL TIPS

5.

6.

This suitcase has totally saved my life; it almost feels like I don’t over pack, although, let’s face it, I sure have!

I have very sensitive skin, so it’s highly important to find a product that is gentle enough to take on the go. These are a great option. Plus, and they smell great, which is crucial.

7. 8.

5. KENSINGTON

6. KATADYN POCKET

PORTAFOLIO WALLET

WATER FILTER

If I’ve learned anything from traveling, it’s that you definitely shouldn’t have your valuables in plain sight or within easy access. The best way to carry my phone was in one of these versatile cases. They are easy and convenient. $ 39.99blog.laptopmag.com

The one thing I worry about the most when traveling to a remote country, is water quality. You definitely don’t want to catch a stomach virus. This portable water filter can clean just about any water. Katadyn Pocket Water Filter. $369.95 BePrepared.com

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7. YES TO CUCUMBER FACIAL

8. IT LIGHT LUGGAGE

TOWLETTES

Have you ever walked around with a suitcase that’s heavier than you? I have, and since then I was on a constant search for ‘light luggage’. This wonderful collection by IT luggage offers just that.$69.99 handbags.com

Keeping your skin alive and well while you travel can be very challenging, especially for people who like me, have sensitve skin. These facial wipes are not only refreshing, but great for sensitive skin, and very travelfriendly.$5.99 dermstore.com

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THERE Contributors SHE GOES ANNETTE RONASZEGUI

magazine.

An interior design graduate from Savannah College of Art and Design, Annette Ronaszegui is an avid European traveler, and enjoys learning about other cultures, making new friends and visiting with family and friends. She also enjoys music, and baking her favorite Hungarian foods. She currently works as an interior designer in the state of South Carolina.

ASHLEY ROBINSON

DANIELLA CADAVEZ

Born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina, and from a loving southern family, Ashley Robinson attended the International Academy of Design & Technology in Orlando, Florida, to study Fashion Design and Merchandising, but later moved back to South Carolina to rejoin her family and pursue her career. While in South Carolina she met and married her best friend Matt, and together they moved to Japan for his work. Japan has been an awesome cultural experience for them. Ashley had always wanted to travel, so moving to Japan was the perfect opportunity. In her spare time she enjoys going to concerts, art shows, fashion shows and museums, as well as exercising, hiking, cooking and pretty much anything that seems fun.

Few of us are lucky enough to say that we’ve been born in the famous Rio de Janeiro, but for Daniella Cadavez, Rio de Janeiro has been her native home. An experienced journalist, she has worked for Rio’s Daily Journal, and for the Approach press agency. Not satisfied with her BA in Journalism from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, she moved to the great city of London for a Fashion Journalism MA at the London College of Fashion. She has experienced the best of Rio’s fashion weeks and is an avid trend watcher. As an expert on Brazilian fashion, Daniella wants to make sure everyone knows that Rio really is as wonderful as it seems. She is also passionate about travel, and dreams of one day visiting China. LAURA HASTINGS

An English major from the renowned University College Cork, Laura Hastings is currently an MA Fashion Journalism student at the London College of Fashion. She also works as a freelance journalist. She loves horror movies, food, and travelling. A native of Ireland, she is at home with either city or country life. Laura’s favorite trip so far was her backpacking trip around Thailand when she finished her BA. She considered it to be a journey full of culture, laughs, and one or two buckets of rum.

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SARAH ELISABETH OVERBY

NICOLAS MINTON

A Norway native, Sarah Overby is highly involved in the cultural aspects of her city. Currently finishing her Bachelor’s Degree in Cultural Management at the Norwegian Business School, she had obtained her Associate’s Degree in Business from the Axia College at the University of Phoenix while living in the United States. She has been a business owner and young entrepreneur for many years, working in the cultural department of her country. By taking commissions from the public and private sector, Sarah was able to start her own dance school and arrange many events and competitions in Norway. She has traveled the world with her dance team, and has hosted competitions and workshops in countries such as Malaysia, Kenya, India, the Benelux countries and the United States. Sarah is passionate about dance, travel, and making the world a more culturally conscious place.

Nicolas Minton is an avid rock climber and writer. An Ohio native, he moved to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, for college and realized that he had a passion for travel. Despite his Bachelor’s degree in accounting, he realized that the cubicle life was not for him and decided to travel around the United States to find the right career. After two years of traveling to over twenty states, he decided to work for a natural disasters insurance claim company. This profession allowed him to travel, and to help people along the way. Nicolas considers that in his experience you will be outside of your comfort zone while traveling; but as long as you can stay positive while making others happy, you will be left with incredible self-confidence.You’ll have wisdom, as well as great friends and great stories to share for a lifetime.

LISA McCANN Lisa McCann is an Irish journalist and stylist residing in London. She is studying Fashion Journalism at the London College of Fashion and has worked for Image magazine and The Gloss Magazine in Dublin. She enjoys traveling around the world, checking out the vintage shops in her local Dublin and writing down the best of her experiences. One of her most memorable holidays was her trip to Indonesia, where she attempted to ride a donkey all the way up a volcano and ended up falling all the way down.

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THE EXPAT CORNER: FROM USA TO JAPAN Ashley and Matt Robinson share their adventurous journey as expats in Japan.

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i, I’m Ashley, and this is my e’ve learned to bow all husband, Matt. Matt and I ended the time, when meeting someone up in Japan because of his job. He or when saying goodbye. I even find called me the night of my birthday myself bowing in the States when I (strangely enough) and said, ‘Looks like visit home, just out of habit. Aside from we’re moving!’ You can only imagine the learning some basic Japanese words, confused look on my face when he elabowe’ve learned the proper way to use our rated: he had just been transferred chopsticks: for instance, when using to Japan and we’d be moving there chopsticks, the top of the sticks can’t in a few months. I can honestly say y first thoughts when get- cross because that’s seen as a sign of Japan wasn’t on my list of places ting off the plane had to do with disrespect. Also, before eating, you’re to live so I was very surprised. Of the hot climate I experienced. always given moist napkins to wipe course, I had always thought about Coming from South Carolina, and your hands, arms, and mouth. You have how cool it would be to visit Japan having lived in Florida for a bit, to cleanse yourself before eating, in a and experience the culture, but othyou would think I would be much sense. I guess it is similar to washing er than that, it never really crossed more accustomed to the heat but your hands before you eat in the States. my mind. In the end, Matt and I it was shocking; I didn’t imagine were super-excited about moving it would be that hot in Japan. My to Japan -I was just excited about next thought was about how it moving in general. I always like godidn’t look anything like the moving somewhere different, and it just ies I had seen filmed there. At so happened to be perfect timing. first glance it seemed quite boring and plain: beige and gray buildings everywhere, no bright vibrant colors, and none of the huge buildings that I had expected. But as nighttime approached all of that changed. Initially, I sort of thought Japan wasn’t that great. I wasn’t getting used to it: everything was just so expensive and the yen rate was horrible, so shopping or eating out was really a splurge. A lot of stores and restaurants closed early, and I just wasn’t used to that. Of course, the language barrier could sometimes One of my favorite dishes be difficult. Neither of us was a big from Screaming Sushi. drinker, nor did we like to go clubbing, so there really weren’t any nighttime Matt and I enjoying activities for us to indulge in. Soon, our morning hike. however, Japan began to grow on us.

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here really is a lot to do here. Matt and I enjoy the outdoors, so we usually like to go hiking in the mountains. There are plenty of trails to go hiking. There’s also kayaking, camping, canoeing, and snowboarding. We’re usually up for anything. There are also many parks, museums and zoos -and plenty of aquariums. There are so many restaurants that I love in Japan: there’s a delicious bagel and sandwich ‘Screaming Sushi’ shop called ‘HOOPS’ has the best sushi a short walk from our I’ve had in Japan: tons house. Also, there is of ramen soups, and this authentic Indian traditional Japanese restaurant called Taj dishes. Mahal that has the best cheese naan and chicken curry I’ve ever had. There’s a place that us Americans call ‘Chicken Shack’ -we go there a lot to get these tasty fried dumplings called ‘gyoza’; they are a type of ‘posticker’ with pork and vegetables. Screaming Sushi has the best sushi I’ve had in Japan, tons of ramen soups, and traditional Japanese dishes. However, some of Japan’s coolest places are their themed restaurants. In Harijuku, which is a short train ride closer to downtown Tokyo, there are various popular themed restaurants. There’s an Alice-in-Wonderland-themed restaurant, a Resident Evil restaurant, and even a robotthemed restaurant, just to name a few. The city is busy, busy, busy; there are tons of people around at all times, and it’s always crowded. If you’ve ever watched videos on YouTube about how packed the trains are here, well I can tell you it’s 110 percent like that. We personally try to go to the city only when it’s super early in the morning. Otherwise we spend most of our time in the mountains. It’s really peaceful and a great escape from the hustle and bustle of Tokyo. There’s no comparison between Japan and America. They’re so very different. I think the overall vibe of being in a foreign country is different to me. Everyone acts so differently, it’s very interesting. I enjoy the atmosphere of both countries, despite their differences. I can’t say that life here is ‘exciting’ -it just seems like regular stuff that everyday people do. Granted, I’m now living life in a drastically different country, but, in the end, I’m just living my life. MARCH|APRIL 2014

View of mount Fuji, from our house. Tokyo, Japan.

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here’s really quite a lot about Japan that I wish we would implement in America. For instance, everywhere you go in Japan you find wonderful customer service. It’s really nice to walk into a store or restaurant and have people actually be polite and enjoy being respectful to others and to their jobs. People here are genuinely happy in their work environments. Also, the Japanese vehicles, they are some of the most amazing in the world, not because they’re fast or anything like in the movies, but just because they are very good quality and function well in everyday life. Parking is interesting here too. Mostly all of the parking for any building is on top of the building. There are parking garages on top of the malls, instead of next to them. I feel like it’s a great usage of space. I also love that people are very active here. A lot of people drive around the city, but the there are tons of people who ride their bicycles everywhere or use the trains. Last, but not least -I know this may be sort of weird, but their toilets are really amazing. They’re not your average toilet: they have a system that sprays water when needed, they play music and the toilet seats are heated, aside from a bunch of other stuff.

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ome of the greatest memories I have are of my many cultural experiences with Japanese people. It always makes my day when Matt and I are just standing somewhere outside talking, or waiting for something, and the little Japanese kids that were just released from school wearing their bright yellow safari hats and backpacks are so happy to see us, that they start waving at us like crazy and wanting to give us hugs and say would definitely suggest the expat life to everyhello. One day, Matt and I were at a zoo not too far from one. I think other people should experience living in our apartment. There is a section in the zoo where you another country at least once in their lives. It’s imcan buy food to feed the coy fish in this large pond, portant to get bitten by the travel bug. Since living so I went to feed them. I then noticed this little girl here, and because I’ve been able to travel, I feel as if playing around and talking to the fish and stuff, so I we’re just more culturally rounded and acceptable offered her mother the rest of my fish food to give to of other people and their lifestyles -not that we were her daughter so she could feed ever closed-minded or anything, them. She was just so grateful but you become more appreciaand happy. It’s something that tive of life in general. You learn came so naturally for me to do, he most familiar thing I’ve found in Ja- to take things slowly so you can yet the amount of apprecia- pan has been a Costco! We were super sur- appreciate all the beautiful peotion she was giving me for this prised to see one here. There is also a store ple, animals and things around small act was unbelievable. called ‘Seiyu’ which is owned by Wal-mart, you. We feel like you can never There was an elderly couple strangely enough. It is just like the Ameri- truly understand or appreciate nearby as well, and they were can Wal-mart or Target stores except for the world and its living things also very happy to see me of- the fact that they don’t have the super-low until you see the world through fer the fish food; it was quite prices. Another store that I would consider a different set of eyes. I’ve enunexpected. There have been to be the ‘Wal-Mart’ of Japan is called ‘Joy- joyed this expat lifestyle and I some shocking cultural differ- ful Honda’; they have everything there. Just think my husband and I would ences as well. One of the most imagine a Wal-Mart super centre, three sto- like to continue with it. What is shocking would have to be the ries high, with a super-cool pet department, my next moving choice? Alaska. vending machines. They sell and food court. Still, there are some things Matt and I have visited several pretty much everything and I do miss from my American home. For in- times since moving overseas to anything out of vending ma- stance, my family of course, and the con- Japan and we just love Alaska. chines here, and by everything, venience of everything: being able to find We like to be outdoors so it I really do mean absolutely ev- clothes in my size on a regular basis, being would be perfect for us. Also erything. All of the rumors you able to shop at any time during the day, fur- maybe Germany as well, since might have heard about wom- niture that is actually ‘American size’, wide we’ve heard such great things en’s used undergarments be- roads, and, oh yeah -space. I would defi- about the country from our ing sold in vending machines nitely say I still feel quite American, which friends. I am sure I will really are totally true, thought it’s not is fine because I like being an American. miss Japan once I move again. out in the open -they do usuI’d have to say one of the things ally have black curtains over I’ll definitely miss the most is them. It’s quite Weird to me. It the food; I really can’t place has also been a very big adjustment to see relatively litenough emphasis on how amazing and fresh the tle cultural diversity. I know this sounds odd, but 98% food is here. I always miss it when I go back home of the people you see are Asian. Occasionally, you’ll to the U.S. But, apart from the food, Japan is just a see an American, or an Australian, perhaps even somewonderful place to live. I have learned a lot from livone from India, but it’s incredibly rare. It took some ing here. I can say that if Japan were a person, he or getting used to -sometimes people will stare at you, she would be calm, quiet, respectful, and accepting like: ‘Hey, that person’s not Asian!’ -I’m cool with that. of others - and would also be very thankful and kind.

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Spain

THE COUNTRY OF DREAMS.

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Cathedral La Mezquita, Cordoba, Spain.

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he auditorium went black, suddenly there was the sound of three strong taps, then six, and soon it was a rising rhythm that echoed in the darkness. The tapping began to collide with a passionate clapping and slowly dim lights revealed a beautiful dancer on stage. She wore a bright magenta gown embroidered with roses; over her shoulders was a lace mantle that she twirled boldly and fearlessly; around her came other sounds: Spanish catañuelas began to rattle on stage like snakes. From behind her came a young woman dressed in a similar gown but in an indigo shade, she began to sing a hauntingly beautiful song about a lost love. She was angry about it, she was forceful, and her voice was so loud that aside from the sound that invaded your ears you could feel her voice ringing in your chest. You saw pain and angst in her eyes, and with her arms and hands she explained her frustration. A group of men dressed all in black supported her complaints by clapping along and tapping their feet in agreement, ‘Vamos guapa!’ they yelled, encouraging the expressions of her feelings: she enchants us with the sounds of flamenco, the very soul of Spain. Spain has been known as a country of choleric, hot-blooded passion for many years, their spirit of adventure is shown throughout the history and even today its powerful influence is seen and felt in many countries. Many Latin Americans have considered Spain to be disconnected from who they are, almost ignoring its existence and their own heritage, which takes them back to this very place, to the vivacious and dancing streets of Spain. However, spending just a few hours in Spain you are not sure where you are anymore, it is so very different from its surrounding European neighbors, and so similar to the countries it nurtured and influenced oceans away. Spain becomes a Matisse of sorts.

MASSIEL MANCEBO

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Catalanes enjoy a traditional Catalan dance in front of La Sagrada Familia. Barcelona, Spain.

Breathtaking view from the very top of Parc G端ell. Barcelona, Spain.

A Beautiful day on the beach of Barcelonetta. Barcelona, Spain. 23 THERE SHE GOES

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eginning the adventure in Barcelona, is possibly best. With its otherworldly coastlines surrounding the rugged mountain terrain, you wouldn’t expect to find any breath of metropolitan air, yet it stands as one of the most renowned fashion capitals and home to some of the most extravagant restaurants. In many cities you are advised to avoid the tourist crowds at the center and head for the outskirts, the places no one knows about. In Barcelona you must do both. Risking being marked out as a tourist is a worthwhile venture in this city, and once you step out of one of the world’s best-run metro systems and onto the sidewalk of ‘La Sagrada Familia’, you understand why. Constructed in 1882 by Barcelona’s finest architect, Antonio Gaudi, La Sagrada Familia is still a work in progress. Locals are quick to tell you the story of their famous city landmark; their stories all have Gaudi’s tenacity and adoration for completing what he believed was the greatest work of his life: he wanted to pay tribute to the life and death of Jesus Christ. A mainly Catholic society, Barcelona’s traditions are full of religious history and tributes. When in Barcelona you will be surrounded by two cultures marvelously blended into one, the Catalans and the Spanish. Every once in a while someone will speak to you in Catalan, and everywhere you go you’ll have the option of a Catalan menu or a Spanish one, but it’s easy to see that Catalan has priority in this region of Spain. MARCH|APRIL 2014

The most rewarding experience in Barcelona is the journey to El Parc Güell, an invigorating hike that takes you through some of the city’s most scenic hills and mountains. Taking the green line and getting of at ‘Lesseps’ may be the easiest way to the get there, but the truth is that the walk to this park is still one to remember and learn from. A short cut often becomes a long cut in Barcelona. Nevertheless, it is well worth it since friendly locals are happy to stand around with you for a few minutes and work out which is the best way to get to your destination. Nevertheless, it is well worth it since friendly locals are happy to stand around with you for a few minutes and work out which is the best way to get to your destination. Often times they will suggest great restaurants you may find along the way or maybe they will tell you a good story: the Spanish know their food and they are not shy about it. Once at Parc Güell you may realize that you have entered a vortex of sorts, a place seemingly familiar to planet Naboo in Star Wars, you don’t feel as if you’re on earth anymore, but rather in a dream, one that goes by slowly, blending into the sunlight that refreshes your skin. At that moment you realize that there is no doubt that Gaudi was indeed a genius. It makes you wonder what else he saw in his dreams.

Back on the train and on the way to Barcelonetta -the station by the sea, Here you can witness incredible street shows, acrobats doing amazing things and people surrounding them open-mouthed, and to enhance it all the smell of the ocean and the seafood that will undoubtedly change your life. A classic Barcelona mariscada represents culinary hedonism at its best. You are presented with all sorts of fresh seafood, seasoned with nothing more than the natural salts of the ocean and bit of fresh lemon, all served up on a plate only a few inches from being the size of the table. It’s easy to start wondering

The amazing cathedral of La Sagrada Familia, still under construction. Barcelona, Spain.

how you could eventually move to this city, build a life there, and eat at ‘El Rey de La Gamba’ every single day of your glorious new life. Barcelona has that effect: it is a city of dreams, surrealism, and oceans, beautiful bright blue beaches that make you want to grow roots in the warm rocky sands and forget you were ever anywhere else. THERE SHE GOES

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One of the many decorated streets during the festival of ‘Los Patios’. Cordoba, Spain.

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rom Barcelona we take a journey into our first scene, the region of authentic flamenco, of hearty dishes and old Spaniard tradition -A region where time has literally come to a halt and the heat is abundant and unforgiving: welcome to the region of Andalusia. The journey is unforgettable, clouds hanging so low on eternal emerald plains, perfectly rounded trees in a shade of green you’ve never seen before and ruins of Spanish chateaus, abandoned by people but the new home of vines and beautiful wild flowers. Cordoba is one of Andalusia’s most beautiful cities and although it is not as popular as other Spanish cities it is well worth visiting for an authentic Spaniard experience you many not have anywhere else. Driving through Cordoba you can’t help but notice how many flowers surround the city, the festival of ‘Los Patios’ celebrates the month of May and the flowers of Cordoba. As part of the city’s tradition: you are welcomed to take a private tour of many of the homes and view the incredible flower displays. Time has been stopped in this city, taking a carriage ride through the center is a common thing to do, and after spending enough time there, you get used to the families wearing their traditional riding clothing with the Cordoban black hats which are sold all over the city. Temperatures can reach desert-like altitudes, making it easy to get out your Spanish fan and stop by a café for some churros with chocolate, the traditional Cordoban afternoon meal. During the month of May it is common to see future brides and grooms dressed in comical costumes, running around the city asking you to take a picture with them, or looking for mischief, They are followed by energetic friends who cheer them on, and laugh at the antics taking place. This is something very particular to this city, which gives it a joyful atmosphere. In Cordoba you slow down, the bright hot sun leaves you in a daze, and often the sounds of flamenco guitarists aid you in entering a trance. You kick your feet up on a park bench, a warm breeze running through your hair, you’re drinking an icy cold drink and it feels like there’s no tomorrow. There’s no rush, there’s only that moment. You’ve become a part of Cordoba, it becomes your city for as long as you’re there.

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“The hike through the dense forests of Villaviciosa Cordoba was invigorating and challenging, but rewarded with this amazingly beautiful waterfall.” MARCH|APRIL 2014

The mysteriously captivating Popea’s Waterfall. Cordoba, Spain.26 THERE SHE GOES


“Madrid is not like other cities in Spain, it has all the chic metropolitan qualities of a New York City, and the fashionableness of Paris, all wrapped up in a style all its own.�

A pleasant afternoon at the royal palace of Madrid. Madrid, Span. 27 THERE SHE GOES

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he journey ends in Madrid. Now, there are different ways to get to Madrid from Cordoba; there are affordable flights that take you to the main airport in Spain’s capital, and while you may get there quicker, the breathtaking roads full of Spanish homes, old gas stations that make you think of something straight out of an 1800s film, will be very much missed. Madrid is the capital of Spain in every sense of the word, much of the westernized shops and restaurants reside here; it is a first-class city, and it feels like it. You know you are no longer in the slow cooked Andalusian tradition of a life: you have moved on to a metro system, buses, cars racing through the city and lots of tourists. At first it’s hard to get your head together -are we even still in Spain? Where is that Spanish charm we had become so accustomed to? Madrid is not like other cities in Spain, it has all the chic metropolitan qualities of a New York City, and the fashionableness of Paris, all wrapped up in a style all its own. Madrid’s people make it charming and friendly, unlike other big cities, Madrid still holds many traditional family values. It isn’t uncommon to see older couples holding hands and taking a slow stroll through the city. El Museo Del Prado holds some of the most recognized pieces by Velazquez, and a walk through ‘El Jardin Botanico’ (Botanical Gardens) next door, will have you feeling as if you’ve entered your own secret garden. Outside of the typical tourist spots you find great little restaurants, with waiters who know Spanish food well, your best bet is to ask for a recommendation, In Madrid it’s easy to take a risk and order blindly, everything is delicious. The city’s metro system can be a bit overwhelming for a first time visitor, sometimes the best option is taking a bus tour of the city, and Madrid’s City Tours bus is one of the best tours you’ll encounter in your touristic life. Stopping at Madrid’s most astounding landmarks, you can hop on towards the ‘Palacio Real’ and then stop at ‘Templo de Debod’, an Egyptian temple given to Spain as a sign of gratitude for having saved the Egyptian temples of Abu Simel in 1968. Saying goodbye to Spain isn’t easy, You leave a bit time warped and yet you feel as if you’ve spent your entire life there. Whether you are fluent in Spanish or don’t know the first word of it, you are loved and welcomed with open arms. The cuisine is comforting beyond description, and it matches this warm vivid culture incredibly well. The taste of the pungent Spanish olive oil lingers in your memory long after you’ve left the beautiful country behind, and you’ll find that you compare everything to this place, without success. There’s nothing like it, you’ve been enchanted once you’ve been there, you learn that this is Spain, and that’s how it lives.

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Global Designers

You should know about.

CHIE DUNCAN Japan

NATIVE CITY: Tokyo, Japan. TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF: My name is Chie Duncan. I am a Japanese national, now living in Tokyo with my husband and two-year-old daughter. I am self-taught in sewing, pattern-making and design. I started selling clothes under the name ‘Vivat Veritas’ in 2008, borrowing a sewing machine from my friend and making too many dresses for myself to wear. It slowly developed over time and I am happy to say that after six years I am still in business. YOUR FASHION PHILOSOPHY: I think fashion should be something to be enjoyed. It should be fun and always evolving as you age and mature. WHAT MADE YOU BECOME A FASHION DESIGNER?: I never intended to be a fashion designer. It all happened organically. Initially, I became enamored with sewing and crafting, not so much sketching designs. The object of my craft happened to be clothes. I still feel a bit awkward when someone calls me a ‘fashion designer’, since I feel like it is such a high title. IF YOU WERE A FASHION ITEM, WHAT WOULD YOU BE AND WHY: I would be a briefcase since I am a very practical and pragmatic person.

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FAVORITE PLACE TO TRAVEL TO FOR INSPIRATION: I love going to anywhere with beaches. Bright blue sky, white sand and the sound of the waves inspire me. A TRAVELING EXPERIENCE THAT CHANGED YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE: I studied abroad in the U.S. for one year when I was in high school. It completely changed my life and the way I think and now I think of myself as a jumbled mix of Japanese and American. A FASHION TIP: Know your body type and figure out the shape of the clothes that are most flattering to your body. Even if a dress is nice, if it does not fit your figure, it means nothing.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE WORLD OF CHIE DUNCAN www.vivatveritas.com www.etsy.com/shop/vivatveritas7

FAVORITE QUOTE: ‘Vivat Veritas’ – ‘Let the truth prevail’ in Latin. It is tattooed on my husband’s arm.

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GLOBAL FASHION

NATIVE CITY: Hamilton, New Zealand. TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF: I have been the driving force behind my successful fashion label ‘Annah Stretton’ for the last 21 years, with origins in a small rural New Zealand town. I have always been about creating frocks that women love to buy and wear, ensuring my profitability going forward. FASHION PHILOSOPHY: Fashion should always attach to the individual. It should be about creating a look that defines who you are, sits comfortably with your life and adds to the fabric of your character. You should never be a slave to global fashion trends. Trust that you will always know what looks good on your body shape, but don’t forget to follow fashion at some level as it’s always about adding to your repertoire of looks. WHAT MAKES YOUR COLLECTION ORIGINAL?: The wonderful back story that is created for each season is always mindful of the feminine flavour, the color, the wearable styling and the drama that our customers have come to love.

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ANNAH STRETTON New Zealand FAVOURITE PLACE TO TRAVEL TO FOR INSPIRATION: London. I will always love this city and travel at least once a year to the UK… the diversity of culture, the early adoption and creation of trends, the designers, the markets and the food. It would be difficult not to take inspiration from this environment. A TRAVELING EXPERIENCE THAT CHANGED YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE: Traveling to India last year as part of an eight-strong New Zealand female delegation led by our British High Commissioner. From Mumbai to New Delhi, we were taken to the most contrasting of places from the rock star companies such as Tata Group to the Mumbai Port Trust Slum housing one million dwellers. I loved every minute of the absolute assault on my senses from the people, the food, the landscape and the fashion. I will return to bask in the diversity of this wonderful country very soon.

IF YOU WERE A FASHION ITEM WHAT WOULD YOU BE AND WHY?: Our Chameleon wrap frock that has the ability to adapt to any situation that it finds itself in …as well as, make you look slimmer on those fat days. A FASHION TIP: The sexiest thing a woman can wear is her confidence. FAVORITE QUOTE: Most doors are closed but if you find one that is open you better have an interesting knock.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE WORLD OF ANNAH STRETTON www.AnnahStretton.blogspot. co.nz www.Facebook.com/AnnahStrettonFashion Twitter.com/AnnahStretton Pinterest.com/Annahstretton

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GLOBAL FASHION

SHEILA FRANK United States NATIVE CITY: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF: When I am designing, I like to lay everything out on the floor, I feel like I have to ‘be in’ the process. My dream is to be a global brand. My goal is to be sold in a major fashion retail chain within the next couple of years. I find joy in the little things like marshmallows in hot WHAT MAKES YOUR COLLECTION chocolate and I like dreary days. UNIQUE?: I like to keep some traditional YOUR FASHION PHILOSOPHY?: Fashion methods and couture techniques in my is art, it is my medium. When someone is garments. I admire the quality of handcraftwearing a look I designed, it’s like going to ing. a museum and seeing a sculpture to me. I love creating. Fashion should be about you, IF YOU WERE A FASHION ITEM, WHAT WOULD YOU BE AND WHY?: I would be the creation. a black dress, because I’m quiet and pack WHAT MADE YOU BECOME A FASHa punch. ION DESIGNER?: I learned to sew at FAVORITE PLACE TO TRAVEL TO FOR a young age, around 6 years old. I was INSPIRATION: The country. I currently always designing, however I first studied reside in Camp Hill, PA (two hours north Fine arts, and all of my projects were centered around fashion, I then transferred of Philadelphia)… I often travel North of to Moore College of Art & Design where I Camp Hill about an hour to Millersburg and Dalmatia, PA. The area is full of farmgraduated with a BFA in Fashion Design. land and open fields; it is beautiful with every season.

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A TRAVELING EXPERIENCE THAT CHANGED YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE: A summer vacation with my sister on the Island of Cape Hattaras in North Carolina. This was the first time ever that I took a week to just reflect and relax. The beach was beautiful and not crowded. The sun was warm and smiling. It was nice to just be. A FASHION TIP: Accessories. I’m really into statement necklaces at the moment, it really makes an outfit pop. FAVORITE QUOTE: ‘There is no expiration date on a dream’. WWW.SHEILAFRANK.COM

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GLOBAL FASHION NATIVE CITY: Suva, Fiji, South Pacific Islands. TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF: I am 57 years young and very gregarious. When I put my mind to something I am like a dog with a bone. I’m a complete extrovert. I love life and live it to the fullest. My mother made me who I am and I owe so much to her. My husband Mark has been the love of my life for the last 25 years. I love my family: I have 7 brothers and my 2 daughters Melisha and Tahndra. I like to think that I have good taste and my grandmother taught me that if you buy cheap in the end it will become expensive. So buy well the first time around. YOUR ‘FASHION PHILOSOPHY: Fashion is what you think it is. I don’t always follow the trends. I certainly tailor things to suit my own taste, which is simple and elegant. I am not into frills and spills. I Love the classic silhouettes of the 60s, yet flowing chiffon garments are so romantic and feminine. WHAT MADE YOU BECOME A FASHION DESIGNER?: My mother used to sew her own clothes and all of ours. She was known to be one of the best-dressed women in Suva. She had natural style and class for a woman who came from a village. She was my Audrey Hepburn. I started to sew because I didn’t want to wear the dresses she sewed that matched my 7 brothers’ shirts.

ELLEN WHIPPY-KNIGHT Fiji

A FASHION TIP?: Simplicity is elegant. WHAT MAKES YOUR COLLECTION UNIQUE: it comes from the heart, it’s feminine and soft, it’s wearable for anyone, and it’s pretty. FASHION CELEBRITY YOU WISH YOU COULD BE: I would be Anna Wintour, I love her cool demeanor, her cutting-edge style and the way she rules the fashion industry. She’s Tough but successful, and ever so elegant. FAVORITE PLACE TO TRAVEL TO FOR INSPIRATION: New York, New York, New York! A TRAVELING EXPERIENCE THAT CHANGED YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE: Visiting Pyongyang in 1981 as part of a 2-man delegation from Fiji. We were invited to a youth conference over 5 days. As a journalist in those days I was absolutely shocked at the robotic nature of the people completely subjected to a dictatorship and brainwashed. It broke my heart when one of our attendants asked us to help them get out; they even wanted to know how we lived. They could not believe that we enjoyed such freedom. www.FijiFashionWeek.com.fj

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Sign up for different fashion blogs from around the globe, you’ll learn the latest fashion scoops straight from the locals: including some of the best online boutiques.

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THE GUTSY TRAVELER MARY BETH BOND

Writer, world traveler, expert and mother, she shows us what women’s travel is all about.

MARY BETH BOND

photo courtesy of: GutsyTraveler.com

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Vol-

Marybeth and her daughter biking in France. Photo courtesy of: Gutsytraveler.com

Have you ever wanted to venture into the Arctic Ocean, ride a bicycle across America, or maybe live with nomads in the Thar deserts of India? This woman has not only done all of these things, but she’s created a lifestyle guide for those of us who have been wanting to live life on the edge. She has visited over one hundred countries, is a National Geographic author, and contributor to such notable publications as the LA Times, and USA Today, but she has also been featured on CNN. But she hasn’t stopped there, she went on to create the Gutsy Traveler brand, wrote twelve books including Gutsy Women, which notoriously landed her on the popular Oprah Winfrey show. She’s blogged for National Geographic and GutsyTraveler.com, has been on radio and TV as a travel expert, and of course is a worldwide corporate travel spokesperson. If that isn’t enough, consider her 3,115 mile bicycle trip from California to Virginia with her 22-year-old daughter. Welcome to the world of Marybeth Bond; The Gutsy Traveler. MASSIEL MANCEBO

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GLOBAL PEOPLE

MM:Did you always know you wanted to travel? MB: Yes. I began traveling with my family as a very young girl. We would camp for a month each summer and we always went far from my home in Ohio. I was the youngest of four children and the travel bug bit me hard.

THE GUTSY TRAVELER MARY BETH BOND

MM: How did the Gusty Traveler blog come about? MB: I wrote a book Gutsy Women, which has sold over 100,000 copies. I sold the website name to a travel company and thus took the URL, Gutsy Traveler. I also wanted the blog to appeal to men. MM: So, I read that you biked 3,115 miles across the USA with your 22year-old daughter. What was that like? MB: It was amazing. We contacted the National Osteoporosis Foundation and offered to dedicate our ride to their cause. I am afflicted with osteoporosis, as are my sisters and mother. So we launched a website and blog for donations of a dollar for each mile we biked. MM: You may just be the most qualified woman to give advice to young females around the world who are interested in seeing the world. What would be some words of wisdom that you’d share with them? MB: It’s easier than you think. Put your fear or anxious feelings behind you. Just do it. Book a flight. Trust that it will all work put. It will. What’s the worst that could happen? You come home. You only have one life and it goes by really fast. Go dance while you are young. Trek while you have strong legs and knees. Don’t wait for someone else to make your dreams come true. Travel will change you in wonderful, powerful, uplifting ways. And you may even meet new friends or a future husband like I did.

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MM: What was in your opinion the most challenging thing about traveling around the world alone and as a woman. Was there anything you sincerely feared? MB: Fear of being lonely, which is not justifiable. You will not be lonelier than you would be if you stayed home alone. There are already plenty of other solo travelers out there. MM: Name five important things you’ve learned about life during your travels. MB: People are good and want to help you. All over the world we have more in common with each other than we suspect. We all want similar things: love, security, a home, good health. I learned patience. I learned to trust my instincts. I learned to give back. Whether its a smile to a stranger, a compliment to someone, or making a meal for a cancer patient I’ve never met, giving to others brings more joy than receiving. MM: Name a life changing destination? MB: Somewhere that pushes your envelope. and makes yo move put of your comfort zone. Recently I swam in the Arctic Ocean with Beluga whales. It was 34 degrees Fahrenheit; I wore a dry suit and was pulled by my legs behind the boat, I was face down in the murky water. The huge whales were surrounding me. This was an intense experience. An experience like this, or mountain climbing, makes me feel alive and ever so grateful for life.

MM: Was there ever a place that you considered moving to because you loved it so much? MB: Paris. I live in San Francisco, but if I didn’t, I would want to live there. MM: Where have you always felt most at home? MB: San Francisco. MM: How has it been continuing this nomadic legacy with your family? Has it been challenging? MB: Yes. I’ve taken my two daughters with me. We’ve stayed in hostels, and camped as a family all across the USA and Canada. I still travel alone occasionally, but I travel more with my husband and girlfriends. When my children were young I stayed home more. MM: What is one of the most memorable anecdotes that you may have from your travels? MB: Meeting an old timer in Kansas when I was riding across the USA. It was just a quiet conversation about life on a bench at a small town gas station. Also, crossing the Thar Desert in India on a camel. MM: Why do you think it is important for women of all ages to travel and see the world? MB: Go out into the world to discover yourself, learn what a great person you are and what a great companion you are to yourself.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MARYBETH AND HER GUTSY TRAVELS AT: WWW.GUTSYTRAVELER.COM twitter: @GutsyTraveler facebook: www.facebook.com/ Gutsytraveler

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GLOBAL HIGHLIGHTS

HIGHLIGHTS AD R LO O , C R DE L U BO

O

Ever wanted to climb mountains, breathe mountain air, and explore hip neighborhoods? Boulder, Colorado is just the place.

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An autumnal road in Boulder, Colorado.

WHAT’S THERE TO DO: What isn’t there to do? During the summer, you can go tubing in Boulder Creek, but wait until the end of summer after the creek settles a bit. The farmers’ market on Wednesdays and Saturdays is a great place to see local business and produce. Pearl Street is the downtown area, which is a brick road that is four blocks long, that is pedestrian only to shop, eat, or watch the dozens of street performers engaging in a variety of talents. If you’re looking for more of a challenge physically, you could take a hike at Chautauqua Park on the Royal Arch Trail at the base of the Flatirons. Another option is to check out the University Campus and ‘The Hill’, which is the college town area. About forty-five minutes south of Boulder down route 93 is one of the greatest outdoor concert venues ever, Red Rocks Amphitheater. This aesthetically pleasing venue is tucked into a naturally formed Amphitheater surrounded by beautiful red sandstone rock which overlooks the city of Denver, creating a breathtaking backdrop of lights at night, which shows how alive the city really is. During the snowy winter months, you may want to go snow tubing at Chautauqua Park. If the cold weather is not your idea of a good time but you want to have a good workout, check out one of the three climbing gyms in the area: The Spot is the one I would suggest.

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he Boulder area is such a diverse and unique place, tucked literally right up against the east edge of the foothills of the Rockies. With just over 100,000 residents in 27 square miles, there are endless possibilities for innovative and creative lifestyles amongst these motivated ‘Boulderites’, potentially opening new doors in your own life. I moved to Boulder, Colorado to pursue my hobby and passion in life – Rock Climbing. After living in Boulder for fourteen months before moving to the Sunshine State, I have acquired many new hobbies and outdoor interests, ranging from snowboarding, tubing in Boulder Creek, and even slacklining (similar to a tightrope). I’ve also met a lot of great friends. The people here are very conscious of their bodies and environment, and show compassion even to strangers. With the combination of the outdoor activities, the caring and active people, the large selection of organic and local foods at farmers’ markets, the creativity in the air, and the dry climate paired with incredible scenery, you are left with a very magical place to visit. NICOLAS MINTON

“My friends and I love to hike through trails in the summer time.”

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GLOBAL HIGHLIGHTS The members there are all very helpful and encouraging, and there is a slackline there to test out, which is similar to a tightope. For a lighthearted and fun performance, one can attend a show at the Boulder Circus Center. And for more of an evening event, there are two theatres which always have something going on: The Fox Theatre or The Boulder Theatre, located on The Hill and downtown on 14th St., respectively. WHAT’S THERE TO EAT: If you enjoy Mexican, Santiago’s has some of the most incredible breakfast burritos: mild, medium or hot. Another great breakfast or brunch sit-down restaurant is the Walnut Café (2 locations -Table Mesa and Broadway in South Boulder and 30th and Walnut in Mid-Boulder); they have great homemade-style food at the middle price range, but it’s worth it. For lunch or dinner with a fun pub atmosphere with an outdoorsy crowd in a restaurant setting, The Mountain Sun or Southern Sun Breweries are cool places to check out.

WHERE CAN YOU STAY: Boulder is known for its hippie community, so if you really wanted, you could go as far as couch surfing here if you have the right personality for it. I once met a student who was going to set up a hammock somewhere because he was too intoxicated to drive, I don’t recommend that, but it’s definitely possible in Boulder. You can camp in the mountains if you can find locals to help navigate you to the right spot, or even stay at a hostel if your budget is low. If your budget is a little more forgiving, you may want to stay at the Boulderado at 13th and Spruce, or the St. Julian on Walnut between 9th and 10th, both located downtown and probably the nicest options in Boulder.

WHAT’S THERE TO BUY: Boulder is a place that is booming with creativity and unique entrepreneurial businesses. If you can think of a hobby, it probably exists here. There are plenty of outdoor stores such as R.E.I. and Boulder Ski Deals, for outdoor gear and equipment. There are many craft stores and boutiques scattered throughout downtown Boulder, concentrated near Pearl St., like Kidrobot and Earthwood Gallery. There are a couple of stores on The Hill that may be worth checking out as well, such as Meow Meow.

BEST ADVICE: As far as the suggested times to visit, I would say anytime really. It’s more a matter of what you are looking to do while in town. If you want to play outdoors, April-September is a good time to visit. October is usually the first month for snowfall each year. Nights can be chilly even during the summer months, so be prepared for that. Safety People enjoying the street shows on wise, I would be careful Pearl St. Boulder, Colorado. with the homeless crowd around downtown, and on The Hill, especially late at night (after the bars close). They usually aren’t much to worry about, but there can be occasional drama you may want to avoid. You have to keep in mind that, Boulder does attracts many strange people. It can be both a positive and a negative, but what place is perfect? If you can learn to take certain things with a grain of salt, you’ll be quite fine.

TRANSPORTATION: If you are worried about not having a car when you visit, never fear. The RTD transportation system is said to be the best in the country. Biking is also a very popular and supported form of transportation here. You can even donate fifteen hours to earn a bicycle at a place called Community Cylces, which is a bicycle garage where you can pay $40 a month to be a member and use all of their equipment to upkeep your bike for a year. They also provide you with access to assistance as well. I learned how to disassemble and reassemble bikes, how to clean the parts, how they work together, and repairs/maintenance, all in the fifteen hours of volunteer time. Then I got to use that knowledge to build my own bicycle. The best advice I can give about Boulder is to explore the place as much as possible and talk to the locals: ask questions.

WHAT’S LIFE-CHANGING ABOUT IT: Boulder’s culture and surrounding scenery leaves a lasting impression on everyone who visits. The community is very respectful to one another, showing care and compassion. This seems to be a result of everyone being happy because they are pursuing their passions and hobbies in life and doing what they truly enjoy and connecting with the outdoor world much more. It’s pretty much impossible not to when you have to adjust to the high altitude, dry and sometimes cold climate, with steep hills and incredible terrain. Plus, when you gaze west at the foothills of the Rockies and admire the Flatirons jutting out of the mountainside, you can’t help but feel motivated to do something great in life.

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GLOBAL PEOPLE

THE MAN WHO SAW THE WORLD

GUNNAR GARFORS In a world where, on average, people will travel three or four times in their lifetime, Gunnar Garfors breaks the mold as the youngest hobby traveller to have visited all countries. Let’s not forget to mention the astonishing act of visiting 5 continents in one day. Once you see every country in the world, do you stop traveling? Not this guy. There She Goes magazine catches up with Gunnar at Café 640, in the hip neighborhood of Little Five Points, Atlanta. MASSIEL MANCEBO 39 THERE SHE GOES

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“I would never change this for a lifestyle where material things matter. I love to travel, it teaches me so much about myself, it teaches me so much about other places, I don’t really see why I would ever change.”

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SHE GOES 40 Photo by:THERE Jannecke Sanne.


A collage of Gunnar’s travels around the Courtesy of : Gunnargarfors.com 41 THERE globe. SHE GOES

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MM: So, 198 countries, that is one amazing thing to say you’ve done in life. How did you get started? GG: I had done a bit of traveling around Europe when I was younger, but it was nothing major. I think it all really began around 2003 or 2004, going to Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, that’s when it really started. I loved the experienced so much that I decided I would go to all the ‘stan’ countries with my brother. There were no tourists there and we were really welcomed and the people were genuinely interested. MM: Yes, I read a bit about your experience in your ‘The 25 least visited countries’ article. I love that article, I’ve passed it on to so many people. GG: Really? That’s been read by millions of people, it’s amazing. MM: Yeah, that’s actually how I found out about your travels, I was researching the least visited countries and that’s how I found it. Then I read that you had visited all countries, and thought, ‘Wow, all countries?’ Yeah, that’s major bragging rights there. GG: (laughs) Wow, that’s great, well thank you.

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MM: So how was your most recent trip to Colombia? GG: The reason I went to Colombia this time was to meet my brother and his wife, and their new adoptive son, so this time it was really on their terms, I was there to meet my new nephew. I went to Bogota, spent one night on my own, then went to Santa Marta which is a nice seaside resort. So then I just went there and we spent our time together in a flat, a big flat, so it was really nice getting to know my nephew, getting to know him, and hanging out with my brother and his wife. I have three brothers and three sisters so we are pretty big family. MM: Oh, wow, are you the...? GG: I’m the oldest. And this guy is a year and a half younger than me, so we are kind of the best buds. So when he said he was adopting from Colombia, I said: ‘Yeah I’ll be there!’ MM: You are the oldest of seven then? You guys must have had the best holidays of all time. That’s what I always think when I see a big family. GG: Yeah, that’s the thing, now that we are older… one brother just had his first child, one of my

one of my sisters has one kid, there are so many now with boyfriends and girlfriends that now we have established what we call our ‘sibling weekends’: we either go to my mother’s -we’ve got a big house- and everything, and we stay there… but even that house is too small now, so last time we went to an island off the west coast of Norway and rented four houses, and we had like a big party there with everyone. MM: That is so great! GG: So we do this once or twice a year and call it ‘sibling weekends’ (laughs). So with this Colombia trip it was fantastic, I hadn’t really planned anything; I was just going to meet with them so we stayed in this sort of um… seaside little village, called Taganga; there are maybe three or four thousand people? It’s tiny. It’s nice, has a beach, a few pubs, a few restaurants and everything. Then we had our last night in Bogota yesterday, we just went out for a meal and that was pretty much it. MM: So where can you say you have been in the last five months? GG: Oh, okay, the last five months? Well actually it’s not too hard to THERE SHE GOES

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GLOBAL PEOPLE answer, cause it’s been summer and I spent all my... well, okay where are we now? September? Then there’s August, July, June, May, April… ah, okay, well, April. So I’ve been to Norway obviously, I’ve been to Germany, I’ve been to the Marshall Islands in the Pacific, I’ve been to the U.S. not just now but also before, I was in Hawaii. I was in Tonga, I was in Samoa, I was in Fiji, Kiribati… MM: Is it pronounced ‘Keeree-bahtee’ or ‘Keeree-bas’? GG: It’s spelled as Kiribati but it’s pronounced as ‘Keere-bas’, cause they don’t have the letter ‘s’ in their language. They have the sound of ‘s’ but not the letter s, so to write down an ‘s’ they write ‘ti’. MM: Wow, you learn something new everyday, I would have kept calling that place Kiribati all my life. GG: Oh, yeah, I know, I had done that forever. There are only about 50, 000 people there. I was at a bar and ended up meeting the president’s son-in-law! (laughs) then afterwards I was in Tuvalu, Cape Verde, Britain, and France. Then I went to Colombia obviously, but I haven’t really traveled this summer because I had almost no holiday, because I traveled so much in the spring. That’s the thing, I’m doing this next to a fulltime job. MM: Right, this brings me on to my next question. What were some of your greatest challenges in completing this goal of visiting all countries? GG: I don’t know I never really had any great challenges in that respect, I just struggled getting to some countries visa-wise. I guess that’s the biggest challenge I had. Of course also money wise, I’m not wealthy, I just have a normal job, you know? I never inherited or anything… (laughs). So of course then I had to prioritize, I bought a cheap flat, purchased the flat in 2000, before the market went crazy, so you know… I live cheap in Oslo, I don’t have any kids, no wives, no girlfriends, no dogs, and I don’t have a car, and a car costs a lot of money in Norway.

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A car here is free compared to Norway, it’s awful. So I just spend money on traveling. I spend all my money on traveling, I have my flat, I don’t have loads of luxury, I don’t have any Picasso paintings on the walls, let’s put it that way. So I prioritize using money on experiences and memories. MM: I think that’s the best way to spend it actually. GG: I think so. MM: What are some of the most life changing places you’ve visited, I’m sure there are so many, but if you could maybe narrow it down to like, five… GG: (laughs) Well, the thing is that there are so many amazing places out there, that it’s a very unfair question. If you ask me for the top place I couldn’t answer but I can give you some amazing places, but I still can’t rate them. Turkmenistan is one of the ‘stan’ countries, it’s usually referred to being the second most ‘crazy’ country in the world after North Korea. MM: I did read about that, so it’s pretty interesting that you say that. GG: So just to narrow it down to one tourist attraction in each country… there you have this place, it’s called ‘Gates to hell’; it’s a big hole in the desert, it’s a 3-4 hour drive from Ashgabat the capital, and it’s just 120 metres across to Yemen. It’s 130 metres deep, and the flames are just coming up from the ground because there’s a gas leak. It’s been burning since the 70s I think. It’s in the middle of the desert, nothing happens, no other lights, and it’s just amazing, almost no people go there. So we went there, stayed in a tent, there were several tents next to us. Also the fire is so intense and so huge that it makes a sound as well, so even though our tents were 500 metres away, you could still hear the fire. MM: It doesn’t spread or anything? GG: No, no, because it’s down in a crater, it’s in the Karakum desert in Turkmenistan, That’s probably the most crazy and amazing thing I’ve seen. Nature-wise, I would have to say Northern and Western Norway.

And, yes, I am biased of course, but that’s the only place in the world you have the combination: you have the fjords, you have the the glaciers on top, you have the waterfalls. MM: Mmm... like the seven sisters waterfall? GG: Yes of course, so you know what I’m talking about (laughs) MM: I think Norway and New Zealand are the most naturally beautiful countries in the world. GG: A lot of people say that New Zealand is similar to Norway, but on a much smaller scale. Norway is much wilder and much bigger as well, and there’s more of it. But I do agree New Zealand is fantastic as well. I’m quite biased. I also love Iceland, again it’s the scenery, the hot springs, the geysers. Also, it’s an island in the middle of the Atlantic and it has a lot of volcanoes. MM: Did you see any Icelandic horses by any chance? GG: Oh wow yes, they are so nice. It’s so wild there, and the Icelandic people really know how to party (laughs). I would also add Madagascar to that list of countries. We have seven continents obviously, but a lot of people refer to Madagascar as continent number 8, because you have so much wildlife, so many plants, you have everything: high mountains, the beaches obviously, it’s a big island. But you have so many plants and so many animals you don’t have anywhere else in the world, that’s why they call it the 8th continent. It’s a huge island, almost twice as big as Norway, and four times as big as Great Britain. You have everything there except good roads. The roads are awful, it’s funny because you’ve got four-wheel drives of course, and there are really bad potholes, and then you have the kids living in the villages and they have shovels, and they put sand into the potholes to even them out, so it’s a little bit better, and then they want money. Of course this will last until the next rain and then it’s bad again. I could also say the least visited country in the world, Nauru. But it’s just weird because no one lives there, only 200

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GLOBAL PEOPLE I could probably say Bhutan, Bhutan is also amazing, it’s got to be the most Buddhist country in the world. Buddhist figures, statues, Buddhist paintings, and of course the monasteries, and then there’s the ‘Tiger’s Nest’ which is mental! It’s like a monastery up in the very steep mountains; you have to walk this tiny space in the cliffs to get there. It’s incredible. MM: So which place has been the most challenging and difficult to visit in general? GG: Well any country with a war of course -that goes without saying- is hard to visit, and can be dangerous. But almost in any country even when there’s a war, you can find parts of the country that are reasonably beautiful, or very beautiful. But of course if you say to someone ‘I’m going to Afghanistan’, they think you’re an Idiot! And it’s like, well yeah, but I’m not going to Kabul, so you know, whatever. When I was in Afghanistan I went to Heart, a small town where there was not a lot of issues. Of course for women, you can’t go to Saudi Arabia unless you have a work permit, or you are travelling with your husband, or your father, or your son. You need to travel with a man. MM: Are you serious? So no woman can go to Saudi Arabia alone? GG: Not unless you are there for work and have your work permit. For example there, as a woman, you can’t drive a car, it’s really so strict. So of course you would have trouble getting into Saudi Arabia as a woman. Saudi Arabia is one of the worst countries to get to visit even as a man, unless you’re a Muslim, of course, then you go there to Mecca. At the moment you wouldn’t really want to go to Syria, you always have war zones, and areas where there are a lot of kidnappings, but it’s never an entire country. You have to do a little research. You can’t really blame people for not going to these places. The only thing that’s ever heard about Afghanistan in the media is wars and grenades and stuff.

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MM: Was there ever a moment in your travels when you felt genuinely unsafe and possibly even afraid? GG: Somalia, that was a little bit sketchy. Somalia’s another place that you might not want to go to unless you have to, and I had to, so I went there. I went to the consulate in London and I was going to get my visa, and when I told them I was going to Somalia they asked, ‘Why do you want to go to Somalia?’ I tried to tell them I was going to be okay, and they go on: ‘Have you heard about the pirates?’ I mean, it was these two guys at the consulate, there were no windows, a dodgy area in London, and I say, ‘Well I’m going there to visit as a tourist, and they say, ‘Are you crazy? Do you want to die?’ (laughs) they were making the visa, and they were trying to scare me away, they kept asking me if I was sure about this, and when I walked out the door they said: ‘Good luck!’ So then I went there, and I had to walk across the border, I walk in and of course I’m in the border. I walk in and and I’m in the border village and I want to go to Selah, which is 30 kilometers away or something. Of course there’s no bus, no roads, there’s no nothing. So I’m trying to hitchhike, I’m asking this one guy-MM: You were trying to hitchhike? GG: (laughs) Well you know, I had to get there somehow. I asked this guy if he could take me to Selah, and he said: ‘100 dollars’, and I thought ‘for 30km?’ Forget that! And then I walked around and there was another guy and I asked him, he had this four-wheel drive, he charged me 10 dollars. You normally don’t pay for hitchhiking but I was in Somalia so I thought 10 dollars was fine. His car was full though, so he tells his wife to jump in the back seat with the kids, of course I’m the ‘guest’, I’m paying, and of course there are no roads, just desert and he drives like a maniac, going 100 to 120 km through the desert, no roads, you can’t see much because of the sun, you’ve got camels running around and everything. Then, Suddenly,

there’s another guy in another car driving alone and he’s coming up from behind and passing us, and you know. They’re racing, and the other guy wins, and passes us, and then we see absolutely nothing because of the sun, but of course he doesn’t slow down. MM: He’s still going 120 miles an hour? GG: He’s still going 120-130, and then we get into Selah. I had done my research, I looked it up and saw that it was a small village, a couple of guest houses, you can go diving there, it’s a nice place… when I actually got there, there’s not a house in the village, only sheds, it’s a slum. It’s getting dark, and I asked the driver: ‘Are there any hotels here?’ He replies, ‘There are no hotels in Selah!’ and he shuts the door and drives off. So I’m walking around this slum, and I thought maybe I could find a guest house, when this guy stops me and asks me what I’m doing and says I’m not allowed to walk around the area alone. ‘Come with me!’, he said, there was not much I could do so I followed him into this sort of shed. He opens the door and there are these old men sitting on the floor, there are no chairs or sofas or anything, then one of the old guys asks me, ‘what are you doing in Somalia, have you broken the rules?’ and I’m just like, ‘I don’t think so, I have a visa.’ So they took me to the only thing that resembled a house there. At this point I thought I was going to go sleep on the beach or something, there are no lights so it was pitch black. One of the guys sitting on the floor of that house ended up being the mayor of the town and said I could stay in his room. So I get into this room, there are no windows, no blankets, no nothing. There’s loads of rubbish in the room as well. I wake up the next morning and this guy who was a journalism student, about 19 years old, says he’s going to show me around town. He takes me to a school, a hospital and a pharmacy with a doctor who spoke very good English, they THERE SHE GOES

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GLOBAL PEOPLE had the old tablet medicines, of course everything was dirty, and later on we went to have breakfast. We were eating goat meat and vegetables and suddenly there’s a police car coming up with a pretty big guy, and he says to me: ‘I want you to have breakfast with me’ and it turns out he’s the governor. So they took me to this place with plastic chairs; they had some sort of barbecue with goat meat and vegetables, plastic plates and as I was talking to the governor I asked him if I could pay for the meal. He insisted he would pay for it and I kept explaining that I would like to pay for the meal but he was like, ‘No no! I pay for this!’ and I just accepted. So then I thought maybe I should get out of this country, and maybe go out into Djibouti, I knew there were no buses, so the men said they would arrange something for me. Half an hour later there’s the four-wheel drive again, a very rubbish four-wheel drive, and they let me know this is my ride. Now this is Africa, you can’t drive anywhere without them filling up the car or the bus. So, anyway, I sat in the front and, the other guy he’s outside talking, and suddenly this young guy with this big knife in his belt comes along, he opens the door, takes me by the shirt and rips me out of the car! And then my friend the guy I’d been talking to, he explains to this guy that I’m a friend. Then they start fighting. But see my friend was older, and age is somewhat respected in Somalia. So in the end, the guy with knife,

he ends up sitting just behind me. So I end up sitting in the front and this guy with the knife is behind me. That’s really the only time I’ve ever felt... (laughs) I really thought what the hell am I doing in Somalia? MM: Yeah that’s definitely a story, I was going to ask if you had any

own kids. They break their knees, take out one of the eyes, you know… they’re beggars, and they get sympathy. China and India are the worst places for this, because if they just beg with the normal kid, they get no money, but if the kid looks really awful they get more sympathy and more money. That is just one of the saddest things I see, they’re so shortsighted that they just want money for rice for that day, and you damage the kid forever. That is so sad, it’s awful.

“I’ve been very lucky, I’ve never really felt that in danger. But, see, I’ve traveled so much, and that’s one thing about when you travel, even if you have no idea where you are, and you’re scared as hell, you do not show it.”

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traveling horror stories but that pretty much answers it. GG: Yeah, that’s really the only time I’ve ever felt danger. I’ve been very lucky, I’ve never really felt that in danger. But, see, I’ve traveled so much, and that’s one thing about when you travel, even if you have no idea where you are, and you’re scared as hell, you do not show it. MM: Well, here’s another one: what about a very life-changing moment? Something that you feel made you a different person? GG: That’s a deep question, I don’t know if I have a good answer for that. I mean I’ve seen so much of the bad stuff as well, but what I really hate and have no respect for is the parents who damage their

MM: Is there a place you consider your home 100 percent? GG: It’s Naustdal, my village. And it means boat shed valley. There are 15,000 people and that’s proper home. My mom lives there, my dad, my brother from Colombia lives there, and I have two sisters living there as well. That’s where I grew up, but I mean I’m easy to ask… home is where my backpack is. Home can be Oslo, yesterday it was Bogota. MM: Did you always know you wanted to do this? GG: It came gradually, I of course visited all the ‘Stan’ countries in 2008, but already in 1992 when I went on Interail, actually even before that, when I went on a family holiday to England with all my brothers and sisters in a huge caravan, we made lots of friends and I realized, traveling is the best thing. MM: Is there a particular country’s cuisine that you feel you could eat forever? GG: No… I don’t know, I think seafood I could eat forever, and in the Marshall Islands it was great.

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GLOBAL PEOPLE MM: What do you think is the most MM: Have you ever considered livchallenging country for female ing another lifestyle? travellers? GG: It’s easy of me to say money GG: Well, again I’d say Saudi doesn’t matter. I’ve been able Arabia, to get into. But it would to do all of this travelling, which be some of the Middle Eastern means I’ve sacrificed loads of other countries, and of course now on things. So when you said you were the news I’m sure you’ve heard doing this magazine on travel and about India and their recent rise a little bit of fashion, I thought… in violence against females, a lot well I can’t contribute anything to of gang rapes. But I just don’t like fashion! I dress awful! But I would that in the Middle East women are never change this for a lifestyle often looked down upon, I don’t where material things matter. I love like their views. They have a hierarchy: it’s the men on top, then females, and then the workers or whatnot. Women have to wear those burkas in very hot weather, I had one of those burkas on for 2 or 3 minutes and I freaked out, I thought, seriously, how can they force women “The Burning Crater” or “The Door to Hell” in Darvaza, into wearKarakum in Turkmenistan. Photo by Marius Arnesen. ing this? So I’d say the Middle East. To travel alone there as a woman to travel, maybe if I have kids at is not good. one point that would change, but MM: What would your best advice I love traveling. It teaches me so be for females who want to see much about myself, teaches me so the world? much about other places, I don’t GG: Just do it! Travel. People travel really see why I would ever change. too little and it’s about widening MM: So I’m going to mention a few your horizons. Don’t go where evwords, and you’re going to give me eryone else goes, go somewhere the first country that comes to mind. else, if you want to go to places GG: Okay. you’re a bit fearful about going MM: Party. to… well, travel together, 2 or 3 GG: I’d have to say Seoul, Korea. of you, a few girls, or even with a MM: Relaxing. male friend. The thing is to widen GG: Mmm… I’m horrible with the your horizons, go somewhere your relaxing but if you go to Kiribati, you best friend doesn’t go, don’t go have no choice! to I don’t know… the Bahamas, or MM: Romantic. Mexico; go and be a little more it GG: Ah… that’s a good one. I adventurous. would say Madagascar actually,

of course you have the resorts if you’re into that sort of thing, but I’m not. I would never say the Maldives or the Seychelles, because they have the resorts and not much else. But in Madagascar they have that and you can do something together. I really don’t understand those people who go on honeymoon together to the Maldives and the only thing they have is a bungalow and beach, and that’s all they see for two weeks, I don’t consider that romantic. MM: Adventure. GG: New Zealand. MM: Mystery. GG: I was going to say London really… cause you have uh (laughs) MM: Oh, why? Because of Jack the Ripper? GG: (laughs) I was thinking more about Sherlock Holmes and haunted houses, but I’d actually say Romania, Dracula country… you have those old castles in Transylvania. MM: Spiritual. GG: I’m not very into that, but It’s got to be Bhutan; some of those shrines were truly amazing. MM: Last but not least, the most important lesson learned on your travels? GG: Don’t only listen to media reports for one thing… the most important thing is that people everywhere, deep down they are friendly, they are open, they want to welcome you. People are people wherever they are. There are kids in Somalia as well and they grow up to be perfectly normal adults, and people don’t think about that, they just say it’s dangerous.

“The fire is so intense and so huge that it makes a sound as well, so even though our tents were 500 metres away, you could still hear the fire.”

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Annette’s

BUDAPEST Annette gives us a local tour of her Hungarian home. A paradise of warm pastry treats and sweet delights.

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GLOBAL CITY TOURS

Opposite page: The Halaszbasta (Fisherman’s bastion) A popular location where people go to get the best view of the ‘Pest’ side and the Parliament. Afternoon view of the Parliament house from the ‘Buda’ side of Budapest, Hungary.

I

f Budapest were a person they would be very hospitable, they would feed you a lot and often! The scents of Budapest are an eclectic mix: when I think about Budapest I’m reminded of diesel busses running through the city, and of course the shopping streets and restaurants in the center, they always smell amazing. The city is quite neutral in color, amazing architecture in sleek designs with old charm, but at the same time it’s very green, a lot trees and parks to enjoy. MARCH|APRIL 2014

HOW IT FEELS: The climate in Budapest is typical of many European cities, it changes all the time. You can experience harsh winters and very hot, dry summers. There’s a lot of snow in the wintertime, last time I was there it even snowed a little in October. In Budapest you see all kinds of people, lots of tourists, especially Germans, Swiss, French and English. I have so many favorite memories of Budapest, but the main ones are with my grandparents.

One thing I love most, which I am able to experience there every time I go, is walking along the Danube at night with all the buildings and bridges lit. It is very romantic and beautiful. I am Hungarian. My family grew up there; my grandparents and cousins still live there. I have so many memories with my family and friends. It’s important because it’s very personal, it is home and this is why I wanted to share my Budapest with the world.

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GLOBAL CITY TOURS

Annette enjoying an ice coffee drink from Anna Café on Vaci street. Budapest, Hungary.

HOW IT TASTES: Hungarian food is the best, it is very comforting and very sweet. The scent of their delicious baked breads along the streets is one of the best things about Budapest. A musthave in Budapest is kültös kalács, It’s a sweet dough that is spiral and baked over an open fire. It’s spun on a stick so it gets a crispy exterior with soft dough inside. You can buy it plain, with hazelnut, vanilla sugar, or cinnamon. My favorite is vanilla sugar. Hungarians have a love of peppers, we are famous for our paprika.

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There is also a variation of the red pepper used for paprika which is longer and yellow, it doesn’t grow anywhere else but here. It can be sweet, mild, or you can get it hot. Be careful, though: the Hungarian pepper is very spicy. Along with our peppers we have ‘turo’. It’s like a farmer’s cheese that is only sold in Hungary. It is used sweet or salty. Any pastry with turo is very delicious. The best meal in Budapest for me is always at my grandparents’ house, there’s nothing like a good home-cooked Hungarian meal.

Most Hungarian meals include none other than paprika, of course- it’s very particular to Hungarian cuisine. As are as poppy seeds and Hungarian peppers, which are incredibly spicy. Some of the best cafés and restaurants in Budapest include Gerbeaud Café and the Hungarian creperie ‘Palacsinta Ház’, while in Budapest it’s always best to stick to traditional Hungarian restaurants and local favorites, that’s the best way to experience Budapest in all its culinary glory.

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GLOBAL CITY TOURS

B

udapest is divided by the famous Danube River, the ‘Buda’ side is full of hills, lush forests, and it’s often home to some of Hungary’s wealthiest residents. While the ‘Pest’ side has a plain territory, and is famous for its city vibe and edginess. Váci Street is the main street in Budapest where you can find most shops, restaurants and hotels.

The great ‘piac’ or market, you can find just about anything there. Budapest, Hungary.

The ‘Csarnok Piac’ has some of the freshest produce found in Budapest; it is located on the ‘Pest’ side of the Szécsény bridge, one of the most famous bridges that separate the two sides. A fine thing to see is the Hősök Tere, which means Heroes’ Square, and in the same vicinity is the Museum of Fine Arts and the Hall of Arts. Budapest is a great city for museums and the arts. The ‘Halaszbastya’, also called the ‘Fisherman’s bastion’, located on the ‘Buda’ side, is another great landmark where you can go to get the best view of the ‘Pest’ side and the Parliament house. Driving through this city you can experience the many beautiful bridges, my favorite is the ‘Lánchíd’ (Chain Bridge) It is a huge attraction, especially at night when it lights up, and you can see this from the top of the Buda side and it’s excellent for pictures. Some of the best pictures I have were taken at 2am. My Dad stopped and took these while we are all in the car, half sleeping. It’s worth it to get awesome shots.

A man selling produce at the grand market. Budapest, Hungary.

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GLOBAL CITY TOURS

A view of the famous ‘Hosök Tere’ or Heroes Square. It is home to many of Budapests’ museums.

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GLOBAL CITY TOURS

A must-have in Budapest

is kültös kalács, It’s a sweet dough that is spiral and baked over an open fire.”

Annette, her brother Martin, and sister Karla, enjoy Hungarian pastries from street vendors.

ONLY IN BUDAPEST: Authentic Hungarian gifts are not hard to find. For a unique find you can choose Hungarian custom-made lace tablecloths, their traditional Eastern European flower patterns are beautiful, embroidered or painted on their lace tablecloths, and on their china. Hungarian porcelain is among the best in the world, so it makes for a great buy. Of course you can’t leave Hungary without a bit of Hungarian paprika. A great place to visit for an original shopping experience is Ecseri Market, one of Budapest’s most famous flea markets. It has everything: plenty of antiques and interesting finds. Many young fashion lovers often head to the popular Andrássy avenue for shops like Retrock, where you can purchase trendy pieces by young up-and-coming designers. For the ultimate shopping experience I recommend heading to the Westend City Center- you can find just about anything there.There’s also Mammut and Árkád, two high-quality shopping centers which offer up great design and luxury.

ANNETTE RONASZEGUI photography: ARPAD RONASZEGUI

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MAY THE ROAD RISE UP TO MEET YOU

A look at the places and sights that make up the road from Cork to Dublin.

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ork is better known within Ireland as ‘The Rebel County’. Corkonians have a proud tradition of rebellion that dates back over 200 years to when they led the rebellion against the occupying British. Nothing much has changed today in terms of a fighting spirit, and a visit to Cork is a must when taking in what Ireland has to offer. The native accent can be somewhat impenetrable for those unused to it, but a smile and a good sense of humour will get you where you need to go. The county of Cork is the biggest in Ireland and has plenty to offer. The town of Kinsale is a destination for water sports, especially sailing. Blarney is home to its namesake stone, attracting thousands of visitors every year willing to kiss it in exchange for ‘the gift of the gab’. I spent three of the happiest years of my life in the small but perfectly formed Cork City, studying for my BA at the renowned University College Cork. During this time I tasted, experienced, and most certainly drank everything that Cork had to offer. The University is somewhat unusual in that it is right at the centre of the city. One minute you are walking along the riverbank, window-shopping, and the next you find yourself entering the impressive quadrangle, built in Gothic style in the 1840s when the University was first founded.

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Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin Ireland. Photo courtesy of: Etrusia UK

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he Glucksman Gallery is on campus and always has an interesting exhibit on offer. While it is a vibrant and constantly evolving city as a whole, I always had my favourite places.My favourite times of the year in Cork were always in October during the Jazz Festival, and in December when the Christmas street markets would start up. The Jazz Fest is a testament to Cork’s amazing live music scene. For a weekend in October, the whole city goes jazz crazy, with gigs in every bar, street performances, and travellers flocking from all over the world. Christmas time sees Cork’s somewhat narrow streets lined with market stalls, selling everything from O’ Conaill’s hot chocolate (I still haven’t tasted better), to handmade decorations made by skilled artisans. No matter what time of year you choose to visit Cork, you will be bowled over by this wonderful city established by Vikings, and by the people who proudly call themselves rebels. MARCH|APRIL 2014

LAURA HASTINGS

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Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.

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or me, home has always been a red-brick house, a familiar voice, a cup of tea and toast. The beautiful city I live in, Dublin, has been my home for 24 years and since moving to London I have finally begun to appreciate it. It has a personality of its own, with its cobbled streets, buttery toast and brightly coloured doors. The City Centre is a mesh of aspiring musicians, over-eager tourists and students parading their recently acquired sense of style. Georgian architecture dominates the city along with green parks, vibrant and eclectic vintage stores, and, of course, famous pubs. This is where old friends meet for a gossipy lunch, a mother and daughter bond while shopping, and college students meet for drinks before a night out. The sense of community is extremely strong for a city. We all know each other in some way or another. This is what makes Dublin

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special. I live in the suburbs of Dublin, in an area called Ballsbridge. We live alongside various embassies, which hold glamorous parties and never invite us. My friends and I still meet for walks along Sandymount Strand on sunny evenings. Donnybrook, also near me, is a walk away and an assortment of boutiques, cafes, small supermarkets and galleries. I love to window shop at Havana, a luxurious boutique that stocks Simone Rocha, then walk to Donnybrook Fair where I purchase a whole box of Mars Bar squares. There are tennis courts nearby where I spent my childhood and a disco called Wezz where my friends and I spent many evenings dressed in Buffalo trainers and denim mini-skirts, trying to blend in. There are beautiful houses and huge trees and a strong sense of calm. On a summer’s day, Irish people can be sighted a mile away, their pale skin glowing in the

glaring sun. Dublin has an extremely temperamental climate: one minute torrential rain, the next, a beautiful sky. This summer, however, Dublin was enveloped in a heat-wave that lasted over two weeks. According to my dad, ‘There is no place more beautiful when the sun shines’. Dun Laoghaire is another favourite of mine. This is along the sea front and is almost another world. First you buy a ‘99’ from Teddy’s Ice Cream, the main reason to ever go for a walk here. Since coming home for the summer, I remember why I love my city. Its people, its cobbled streets, its quirky shops, its excellent Full Irish breakfast, and its colours. It has character, conversation and, most importantly for me anyway, Barry’s Tea. LISA McCANN

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GLOBAL EXPERIENCES

WHEN IN DUBLIN FOOD BREAKFAST: FARMER BROWNS LUNCH: FALLON & BYRNE DINNER: BANG LODGING LUXURY: FOUR SEASONS BALLSBRIDGE MIDDLE: ROYAL MARINE HOTEL BUDGET: AVALON HOUSE HOSTEL SHOPPING BOW POWESCOURT CENTRE OM DIVA| THE LOFT MARKET HARLEQUIN VINTAGE SHOP DUNDRUM SHOPPING CENTRE LUCY’S LOUNGE VINTAGE SHOP SIGHTS: TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN

WHEN IN CORK FOOD BREAKFAST: LIBERTY GRILL

THE HA’ PENNY BRIDGE GEORGES STREET ARCADE TEMPLE BAR

LUNCH: SCOOZIE’S| CAFE PARADISO DINNER: MARKET LANE DRINKS: CRANE LANE| FRANCISCAN WELLS LODGING LUXURY: HAYFIELD MANOR HOTEL MIDDLE: JURY’S INN CORK BUDGET: BRU BAR & HOSTEL SHOPPING AMITY BOUTIQUE PLUGD RECORDS STORE

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GLOBAL CUISINE

AVOCADO

AVOCADOS AROUND THE WORLD Discover popular avocado dishes from around the world.

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GLOBAL CUISINE

INDONESIA

BRAZIL

ETHIOPIA

In Indonesia one of the most popular ways to use avocado is in a delicious milkshake by the name of ‘Jus Alpukat’. By combining the creamy flesh of 3 ripe avocados, condensed milk and regular milk, you get a creamy, rich and tasty concoction. For an even more indulgent milkshake, don’t forget to add a thick and creamy chocolate syrup at the end for a nice punch.

There’s nothing like a light chocolate mousse in Paris, right? How about a creamy avocado mousse dessert in Brazil? The Brazilian ‘Mousse de Abacate’, is a light summery dessert. It works well by mixing two firm ripe avocados, fresh lemon juice, whole milk, sugar and heavy cream. Puree the avocado and other ingredients and then fold them into the fluffy whipped cream for an exotic dessert.

In Ethopia there is a popular method of layering different fruits into smoothies by the name of ‘Spris’. Avocado is often used as the base for these popular smoothies. It all begins by pureeing two small avocados; then add a bit of water, the juice of a lime, and sugar. Serve the avodo puree, wash your blender and proceed to do the same with mangos, papayas or any other fleshy fruit of your choice. Then layer them gently over your avocado puree.

This creamy and delicious fruit, often mistaken for a veggie and recognized as nothing more than the main ingredient in ‘guacamole’, is redefined as a gourmet protagonist around the world. SRI LANKA

HAITI

KENYA

In Sri Lanka they have an avocado pudding by the unofficial name of ‘Avocado Crazy’. We’re not quite sure how that name came about, but with a mix of three large fully ripe avocados, a cup of cream, caster sugar for taste and, of course, a dash of rum, you may find out. Mash these all together into a smooth consistency. Some say that leaving the avocado seed around prevents discoloration.

In Haiti they love avocado exactly as it is, sliced fresh and with a bit of salt. It is commonly used as a partner to ‘cassava’, a root often boiled and mashed, or air dried into a crunchy gritty consistency which they call ‘cassava bread’. In Haiti they typically eat avocados on their cassava bread, with nothing more than salt to taste -it’s simple, fresh, and delicious.

Salads are always a great way to include avocados, in Kenya there is a fresh avocado salad by the name of ‘Kachumbari’, the ingredients around the avocado can vary depending on the season. Start with thinly sliced tomatoes and onions, some chopped cilantro, lemon juice and salt. Mix it all together with cubed avocado and enjoy a refreshingly flavorful salad.

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SARAH’S OSLO NATIVE SARAH OVERBY, GIVES US A PERSONAL TOUR OF HER ARTISTIC AND LIVELY CITY.

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GLOBAL CITY TOURS

A

t first glance, it may seem like a city situated far north, with cold weather and with inhabitants who can be perceived as being somewhat introverted and have a hard time saying hello to strangers. However, underneath there is a city full of people interested in facilitating and investing in the cultural scene and especially the arts. The governments policy is ‘arts for everyone’, not only for the wealthy elite but also for ordinary people. This makes the city warm despite its appearance being often seen as cold and distant. The city is interested in incorporating other cultures as well as the typical ‘Norwegian culture’ like setting up ‘Mela’ (a big Norwegian festival for non-Norwegian music) and arranging the biggest football tournament in the world known as the ‘Norway cup’, which have representatives from all of the world coming to our city every summer. This makes the city inclusive and inviting. It’s a city that wants all citizens to express themselves and have a good time, which is viewed by the Norwegians as an important of a good quality life, and it is often seen as the ‘governments job’ to entertain and maintain a culture that can enjoy good quality arts at the government’s expense. Although Norwegians can come across as a bit rude ‘at first handshake’, this may be because they are shy until you get to know their hospitality and corporate spirit. SARAH ELISABETH OVERBY

Statues in Vigelandsparken, Oslo, Norway.

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61 THERE SHE GOES on the Oslo, fjords. Photo by: Mihaly A man enjoys boating

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HOW IT FEELS: The weather is for the most part cold, but because of the gulf stream we have some months in the summertime with somewhat warm weather. When the snow falls in the wintertime, everyone gets excited to ski and snowboard. Oslo is known for being ranked by Reader’s Digest in 2007 as the second in the world’s ‘greenest most livable cities’. We are so fortunate to have the great outdoors available to us only a few stops away by public transportation. At the same time, the city has the such shopping places as ‘Carl Johans gate’ (gate=street) at the center of the city not far away, and also the new Opera House by the sea, which attracts not only many tourist but also people who just like to take a Sunday trip and sit on the roof of the opera house and enjoy the view. There are also many museums, and of course a lot of dining places, which are a bit expensive for tourists. In Oslo you learn to do things differently. For starters, you will get used to the cold weather, and learn to use wool undergarments. You may learn to go ski, and also to celebrate the 17th of May, which is our independence day- a big event with a large parade of all the kids from almost all of the schools in Oslo. The king and queen and the royal family is present on their royal balcony greeting everyone. This is something special about the Norwegian Independence Day and something that immigrants learn to celebrate when they live in the city. MARCH|APRIL 2014

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“Norwegians are known to drink a lot of coffee. When I have a day off I go with a friend to a bakery in the city and order a creamy ‘Napoleon cake’. Then I can relax after a long week with a lot of schoolwork and stress. ”

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GLOBAL CITY TOURS

HOW IT TASTES: Although according to many rankings Oslo is one of the most expensive cities in the world (2007), even for fast food, that doesn’t stop us from sitting on the many bakeries in the cities on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon. We love ‘weinerbrød’or ‘skolebrød’ which is a typical food for Scandinavians to eat (it’s a wheat bread filled with a vanilla cream pudding). Norwegians are known to drink a lot of coffee. When I have a day off I go with a ONLY IN OSLO: Christmas in Oslo is wonderful, friend to a bakery in the city and order a creamy ‘Naand very family oriented. My best memories are durpoleon cake”’. Then I can relax after a long week with ing Christmas spending time at my grandfather’s a lot of schoolwork and stress. When I travel I always farm, eating good food, jokmiss the Norwegian food, ing and laughing and havwhich is known for being ing a good time all day long. quite healthy with a lot In Oslo we have a national of fish like salmon incordish called ‘forikål’, which porated in the diet. It’s relaxing when it comes If Oslo were a person it would have the general spirit is lamb and cabbage cooked to food, and to home en- of Norway, which is one that celebrates its people: in a pot. It is very comforting vironment. The food es- very inclusive and focusing on equal rights. Oslo has in a very cold winter climate. pecially is the first thing ‘No one left behind’ mentality. We Norwegians con- ‘Majorstua’, is an affluent I miss when I travel. sider ourselves very politically correct. In our culture neighborhood in the westwe don’t recommend that you express your opinion ern part of Oslo, where you too forcefully, especially something that is not a view can find lots of shops and that the majority of the Norwegians share- we try our many nice restaurants. You best to respect the views of others. Oslo is also a place can go to shopping malls that is welcoming and enjoyable. I consider it to be like the Storo shopping a place of very easy living, because of all of its health mall, especially nice when benefits. You can feel that the society is backing you the weather is not great. The up, and that it takes good care of its inhabitants. Opera House is a must-see: it has a roof that you can walk on and is quite popular just as a relaxing place to chill at weekends when the weather is nice. The scenery is beautiful with a view that shows the Oslo Fjord (a fjord is kind of a lake). When it comes to seeing a great dance performance of a up-and- coming artist, I normally go to Dansens Hus (the dancers’ house), which is located in a more urban side of the city, and is next to a big new food market with many activities.

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Dance Wa 24 YEAR OLD SOUTH KOREAN PHOTOGRAPHER, KWANGBOK JACK LEE, IS THIS ISSUES GLOBAL ARTIST. COMBINING THE ELEMENTS OF NATURE AND FUSING THEM IN A DELIGHTFULLY ABSTRACT COMBINATION OF LIGHT AND SHADOWS HE IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF THE NEW GENERATION OF ARTISTS. 65 THERE SHE GOES

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es with ater

GLOBAL ARTWORK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: KWANGBOK JACK LEE MARCH|APRIL 2014

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“It all began as a playful mystery for me; I realized that a picture was able to capture a moment. This provided me with great communication methods and this meant I could communicate with the world like other artists can do with drawings, or musicians with instruments. All of these things attracted me to the world that could be stopped by shutter.�- Kwangbok Jack Lee

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“I would love to photograph sound; I want to express sound through an image. My advice to other creative people around the world is: Enjoy capturing the moments, as well as showing their work to others. Even a genius is not better than a person who is enjoying

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what they do.�- Kwangbok Jack Lee

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WHO IS LA CHICA DE

IPANEMA? Copacabana may be one of the most recognized and sought after beaches in the world, but Ipanema is undoubtedly the most charming. Its fame dates back to the 1960s when it became immortalized in the 1962 hit by Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes: ‘The Girl From Ipanema’. Daniella Cadavez

MARCH|APRIL 2014 71 THERE SHE GOES The sun sets on the exotic beach of Ipanema. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Photo by: Chris Battaglia


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B

y the 1960s Copacabana was already a major touristic destination. Despite its growing fame, the period of the 1960s was one of great turmoil in Brazilian history. The country experienced a serious economic crisis, along with the development of projects led by the then president Juscelino Kubitschek, which resulted in a rise of foreign loans and a high rate of inflation. This scenario grew worse along with political tension, and on 31 March 1964 the military seized power of the country. These were dark years of authoritarianism and restriction of rights. However, all of this created a species of renaissance in Ipanema. It was in Ipanema that the explosion of political, cultural, artistic and behavioral movements began to take place. The main buzz of the neighbourhood occurred at Arpoador. It was there that the intellectuals, politicians, and the most ‘avant-garde’ people got together. Ipanema welcomed everything that was new: it somehow brought together people who shared new ideas and behaviors. It was there that the famous 1970s Brazilian actress Leila Diniz showed off her six-month-pregnant belly in a small bikini. This was quite a scandal at a time when the typical beach costume of pregnant women was a modest swimsuit and smock top. Noticeable fashion brands, such as Blue Man and Salinas, were created by beachgoers who sought original styles. From these designers came the ‘denim string bikini’, the famous ‘thong bikini’ and the ‘strapless bikini’, all inspired by the burning sands of Ipanema. ‘The Charming Quadrilateral’ became the fashionable area of Ipanema. Most of the first Brazilian boutiques were opened here, all characterized by the ‘hippie spirit’, the individuality, and freedom that was evident from the very beginning. Ipanema soon became the most fashionable area in the city of Rio de Janeiro; it became the ‘it place’. From this was born the great ‘Chica de Ipanema’, a relaxed, eternally summery siren, who embodies the spirit of Ipanema. The actual ‘Girl from Ipanema’ song was written in honor of Helô Pinheiro, a seventeen-year-old girl who passed in front of a bar where the future songwriters Tom and Vincius would meet for drinks. The song made not only the beach but rather an entire generation of women famous for their Ipanema charm. Ipanema beach pavement. Photo by: Charlie Phillips

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ps

BE TO DE W CA A O H HI M C E A L

N A IP

1.BE CONFIDENT. The Girl from Ipanema is, primarily, a state of mind. You don’t need to be born in Rio to be one. You just need to open your mind, learn to be confident in your own skin, love summer and enjoy yourself.

2.TAKE RISKS.Don’t be ashamed

to try something new. The Girl from Ipanema is a free spirit.

3. MIX IT UP. Mix up your bikini,

The trend on Ipanema’s sands is to mix the top of one bikini with the bottom of another. Choose a strapless top; this is the ‘must have’ on Rio’s beaches.

4.WALK gracefully towards the

beach or anywhere you’re going. Always be graceful, take your time, enjoy the view and let others be amused by your charm. MARCH|APRIL 2014

5.STAY ON THE BEACH

until sunset. Then, put on your sarong and go for a drink with some friends. Take your time.

6.LIVE THE BEACH LIFE. If

you want to have a typical summer’s day in Rio, take your beach sarong, place it on the sand and take it slow.

7. ENJOY GOOD FOOD. Buy a

‘Matte’ (Brazil’s version of Lemon Iced Tea) and a ‘Biscoito Globo’ (a typical snack of Rio’s beaches). Eat slowly and just enjoy!

8. BE SUN-KISSED. Last, but not

least, you don’t need to be young or tall, but you definitely need to be sun-kissed and lovely. After all, as Tom and Vinicius said: ‘Tall and tan and young and lovely, the girl from Ipanema goes walking…’

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75 THERE SHE GOESmen prepare for native dances. Cuzco, Peru. Indiginous Peruvian

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PERU A photographic journey through the charming country full of never-ending mysteries.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: EDISON GUERREROS CHACCHA MARCH|APRIL 2014

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The mountains of the Andes stand solemly, and quietly as they have for thousands of years. Cordillera Blanca, Allpamayu, Peru.

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The picturesque streets of Cuzco, Peru.

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GLOBAL FACES

A friendly llama comes to greet the camera. Cuzco, Peru.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS|CONTACTS THE EXPAT CORNER FROM U.S. TO JAPAN gotokyo.org/en/|visitjapan.jp/en/ expatyourself.com|yokotatravel.com joyfulhonda.com| www.seiyu.co.jp

THERE SHE GOES magazine.

Screaming Sushi 042-539-1418 HOOPS +81 42-540-2164

GLOBAL DESIGNERS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT vivatveritas.com| etsy.com/shop/vivatveritas7| annahstretton.blogspot.co.nz| sheilafrank.com| fijifashionweek.com.fj

SPAIN, THEY COUNTRY OF DREAMS

THE GUTSY TRAVELER MARY BETH BOND gutsytraveler.com twitter: @GutsyTraveler

THE MAN WHO SAW THE WORLD: GUNNAR GARFORS

tourspain.es| barcelonaturisme. com parkguell.es/en| reydelagamba. com|Genove1911.es Rambla St. Josep, 77, 08002 Barcelona, Spain| turismodecorMAY THE ROAD RISE doba.org| mezquitadecordoba.org/en/| UP TO MEET YOU: CORK patios.cordoba.es| esmadrid.com| ireland.com| visitcorkcounty.com blarrjb.csic.es| esmadrid.com/en/ neycastle.ie| libertygrill.ie 32 Washington madridcitytour Street, Cork +353 21 4271049| scoozis.ie| cafeparadiso.ie| marketlane.ie| franciscanwellbrewery.com| hayfieldmanor.ie| jurysinns.com| bruhostel.com

garfors.com twitter: @Garfors

MAY THE ROAD RISE UP TO MEET YOU: DUBLIN www.visitdublin.com| www.tcd.ie| Farmer Browns Market & Eatery 25A Bath Ave Ballbridge, Dublin 4, Co. Dublin, Ireland +353 1 660 2326| fallonandbyrne.com| bangrestaurant.com| thetemplebarpub.com| avalon-house. ie| bowpowerscourt.com| uniquetodublin.ie/shop/om-diva

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ANNETTE’S BUDAPEST visitbudapest.travel| gotohungary.com| gerbeaud.hu 1051 Budapest  Vörösmarty tér 7, Hungary +36 1 429 9000| palacsintahaz.com/EN palacsintahaz@gmail.com| palace of arts budapest/mupa.hu/en| retrock.com| mammut.hu/lang/en| arkadbudapest.hu

HIGHLIGHTS: BOULDER, COLORADO bouldercoloradousa.com| boulderdowntown.com| bouldercolorado.gov| chautauqua.com| redrocksonline.com| thespotgym.com| bouldercircuscenter. com| foxtheatre.com| lbumsonthehill. com| eatatsantiagos.com| walnutcafe. com| mountainsunpub.com| kidrobot.com| earthwoodartisans.com| Meow-Meow(303)449-7555| communitycycles.org

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WHO IS LA CHICA DE IPANEMA

AVOCADO AROUND THE WORLD

SARAH’S OSLO

Official Recipes: Indonesia ‘Jus Alpukat’ indonesiaeats. com| Brazil ‘Mousse de Abacate’ frombraziltoyou.org| Ethipia ‘Spris’ kidworldcitizen.org| Sri Lanka ‘Avocado Crazy’ www.asian-recipe.com| Kenya ‘Kachumbari’ joyunspeakableinkenya.blogspot.com

visitnorway.com| visitoslo.com/en| operaen.no| dansenshus.com| visitoslofjord. no| grand.no/en Karl Johans gate 31, 0159 Oslo, Norway+47 23 21 20 00| nordicnibbler.com

visitbrasil.com| www.rio.com| www. ipanema.com|

DANCES WITH WATER kwangbokjacklee.com boktopiaa@gmail.com London (+44)77 301 83300 Seoul (+82)10 4050 0384

PERU THE CHARMING COUNTRY FULL OF NEVER ENDING MYSTERIES EDISON GUERREROS CHACCHA +51 956 283 281 Facebook.com/Chedison dibujaluz@gmail.com

FOR MORE INFO ON THERE SHE GOES MAGAZINE AND ITS UPCOMING ISSUES VISIT: Thereshegoes.Tumblr.

Com

TO SEND IN YOUR PICTURES TRAVEL ADVICE, COMMENTS, OR JUST TO SAY HI! FOLLOW US OR EMAIL US AT: twitter:@ThereSheGoes24 mmancebo7@gmail.com

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“Do not follow where Go instead where th leave a trail” –

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re the path may lead. there is no path and ” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

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There She Goes Magazine  

A travel publication for the new generation.

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