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MARYLAND TRADITIONS FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL

2014

SATURDAY, JUNE 14 BALTIMORE THE FOLKLIFE PROGRAM OF THE MARYLAND STATE ARTS COUNCIL


WHAT IS FOLKLIFE? WHAT IS MARYLAND TRADITIONS?

A MESSAGE FROM GOVERNOR MARTIN O’MALLEY Dear Friends: Welcome to the 4th annual Maryland Traditions Folklife Festival. Maryland Traditions, the folklife program of the Maryland State Arts Council, has been working for 13 years with communities across our state to support and celebrate living traditions through fieldwork, partnerships, grants, research and public programs. Today, we come together to highlight the rich cultural traditions that are practiced and expressed from the Chesapeake to Appalachia. Folklife is the embodiment of community wisdom, which relies on the dedication of key individuals to maintain its vibrancy and relevance. Our musicians, dancers and culinary and material artists are invigorating folk and traditional arts by handing them down to the next generation through word of mouth or example. We are fortunate to experience their arts firsthand through their performances and demonstrations.

YO U M AY B E A S K I N G YO U R S E LF “ W H AT A R E M A RY L A N D T R A D I T I O N S? ” TO DAY W E PR E S E N T YO U W I T H A G LI M P S E O F T H AT A N S W E R . You may also be asking “what is Maryland Traditions?” To which we’ll tell you that Maryland Traditions is the folklife program of the Maryland State Arts Council. We’re a team of folklorists, spread across the state, working together to document, celebrate, and sustain traditional arts and culture through regionally-based partnerships at Coastal Heritage Alliance (C H E S A P E A K E T I D E WAT E R ) , Frostburg State University (M O U N TA I N M A RY L A N D) , the National Council for the Traditional Arts (M E T R O D C A N D S TAT E W I D E) , University of Maryland Baltimore County (M E T R O B A LT I M O R E A N D S TAT E W I D E) ,Sandy Spring Museum, and the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art (LO W E R S H O R E) . We are also a network of individuals and communities, practitioners and professionals, artists and presenters with a common goal: passing on traditional knowledge from one generation to the next.

Please join me in celebrating outstanding individuals who are passing on the living traditions that make Maryland’s communities distinct and bridge our pasts to a promising future. Sincerely,

About the Maryland State Arts Council The Maryland State Arts Council, an agency of the Maryland Department of Business & Economic Development, Division of Tourism, Film and the Arts, is dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive. The mission of the council is to encourage and invest in the advancement of the arts for the people of Maryland. Maryland Traditions is a collaborative statewide folklife partnership program of the Maryland State Arts Council with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, designed to create a lasting infrastructure for the documentation, promotion and celebration of traditional culture in Maryland. Creative Alliance at the Patterson provides support to artists and advocates for cultural expression rooted in a sense of place. Wide ranging programs are found within the walls of this former movie theater, including local film, modern dance, neo-burlesque, puppetry, hip hop, improv comedy, experimental and traditional music. Today’s festival is produced in partnership with the National Council for the Traditional Arts (NCTA). Based in Silver Spring, Maryland, the NCTA is a private, not-for-profit corporation, dedicated to the presentation and documentation of traditional arts in the United States. Founded in 1933, it is the nation’s oldest producing and presenting organization with such a focus. O N COV E R : M A S T E R O F C H I N E S E C A L L I G R A P H Y, J O H N S H U N - C H I E H WA N G , AT H I S S T U D I O I N G A I T H E R S B U R G .

P E T E R B R I C E O F A N N A P O L I S P L AYS T H E I R I S H ACCO R D I O N .

Governor

I N D E E D, FO L K A N D T R A D I T I O N A L A R T S A R E H A N D E D D OW N FR O M G E N E R AT I O N TO G E N E R AT I O N T H R O U G H WO R D O F M O U T H O R E X A M PLE .

They may be verbal, musical, or visual, occupational or religious. They may be indigenous or have found a welcoming home in Maryland. You will find some of each of these at today’s festival. Taken together, these forms of expressive traditional culture — or what we call folklife — endow Maryland with a distinctive sense of place. True, folklife provides identity to communities, but it also serves as the vehicle by which communities gather to link past and future. These are living traditions — not living history. They are dynamic and everchanging, however slowly that may seem, and always growing to encompass newcomers or reacting to new circumstances. The practitioners you meet today are masters in their own right, but they are also celebrated representatives of their communities. All of us gather today to learn from one another, to share questions, beliefs and memories to pass on to another generation. Enjoy the festival! Clifford R. Murphy, PhD D I R E C TO R , M A RY L A N D T R A D I T I O N S


MARYLAND TRADITIONS APPRENTICESHIP AWARDS

LILIANA ROBESON AND ANABELLA VICTORIANO

Nearly all of the participants in today’s festival have been recognized through the M A RY L A N D T R A D I T I O N S A PPR E N T I C E S H I P AWA R D , given annually since 2004 to master

traditional artists to pass their skills on to the next generation. This year’s recipients are:

M A S T E R

A PPR E N T I C E T R A D I T I O N

Bernie Garlitz Linda Goss Rock Howland Raymond Loomis Billy McComiskey Rico Newman Mel Price Liliana Robeson Richard Semper John Shun-Chieh Wang

Ryan Garlitz Engle’s “Frostburg” Bologna Diane Macklin African-American Storytelling Slim Harrison American clog dancing (“Flatfooting”) Steve Cole Linotype typesetting and printing Peter Brice Traditional Irish button accordion Lisa Thomas Piscataway finger-weaving Arty Hill Traditional country music Anabella Victoriano Colombian cumbia dance Jordan Banidele Trinidadian steel drum Mei Yu Green Chinese seal engraving and calligraphy

Festival Participants • East Avenue Stage

Native of Trinidad and Tobago, Richard Semper organized the Trinidad and Tobago Baltimore Steel Orchestra with Paul Gervais in 1971. Richard is accompanied by his apprentice, Jordan Banidele, as well as a parade band from the Baltimore/Washington One Caribbean Carnival. The Moko Jumbie tradition, or stilt walking, is a spiritual element of the carnival. The band’s colorful costumes were made by maskers and wirebenders Kenley Shortmus John and Jackie Cumberbatch. Do not forget to attend the Baltimore/ Washington One Caribbean Carnival on July 12 -13 at Lake Clifton Park! CO U N T Y )

T R I N I DA D & T O B AG O B A LT I M O R E STEEL ORCHESTRA

The Variety Tones – Polka Band

Photograph by Elaine Eff

Trinidad & Tobago Baltimore Steel Orchestra – Trinidadian Steel Pan/Caribbean Carnival (B A LT I M O R E C I T Y/M O N TG O M E RY

Sensational Royal Lights – Quartet-style Gospel (E A S T E R N A N D W E S T E R N S H O R E S)

S E N S AT I O N A L R OYA L L I G H T S

Arty Hill & the Long Gone Daddys

Courtesy of the Artists

CO U N T Y )

T H E VA R I E T Y T O N E S

(B A LT I M O R E

Raised in Cambridge, Maryland, Arty Hill lives in Baltimore and has spent the past year apprenticing to Mel Price, Maryland’s senior veteran of country music. Born in 1921, Mel was raised in Easton, and released several honky-tonk singles on Starday records. Mel performed the first live country show Arty had ever seen. Arty Hill and the Long Gone Daddys have released five albums, including Heart on My Dirty Sleeve in 2014. CITY)

(B A LT I M O R E

From Essex, Maryland, The Variety Tones have roots in the Eastern European neighborhoods of East Baltimore. Band leader, Leon Umberger, learned accordion from his uncle, Daniel Adamski, of the Lenny Adams Polka Stars. The Variety Tones play a mixture of Eastern European polka and American popular music. Band mates Leon and John were members of the Rhinelanders, the house band at the now-defunct Blob’s Park (2009 ALTA Awardee, Place).

For over sixty years, the Sensational Royal Lights have traveled throughout the Delmarva singing quartetstyle gospel music. The group originated in Cambridge and performed at the 1977 Maryland Folklife Festival (pictured). Founding brothers Tyrome and Frederick Elliot still lead the family-filled group today. The Sensational Royal Lights deliver their music ministry at benefit concerts to help churches, individuals, government agencies, and other civic and community groups.

A R T Y H I L L & T H E LO N G G O N E DA D DYS

MEL PRICE OF EASTON H O L D S H I S 45R PM S I N G L E , “O N E M A N ’S LOV E ” O N S TA R DAY, C I R C A 1955.


T E L L I N G A S T O RY. O L D S A TA M B O U R I N E W H I L E L I N DA G O SS O F B A LT I M O R E H

LILIANA ROBESON & CO LO M B I A T R O P I C A L

Liliana Robeson & Colombia Tropical – Cumbia Dance/Colombian Vallenato

RockCandy Cloggers – Appalachian Flatfoot Clogging (C A R R O L L CO U N T Y ) Traditional flatfoot

( WA S H I N G T O N/M O N TG O M E RY CO U N T Y ) Cumbia originated along Colombia’s Caribbean coast as courtship music and dance practiced by enslaved Africans; this later mixed with native and European musical influences. Master dancer Liliana Robeson was born in Colombia and now lives in Hagerstown, Maryland, where she is teaching her apprentice, Anabella Victoriano. Colombia Tropical, a vallenato group from Montgomery County, provide accompaniment. Vallenato features virtuosic accordion playing and is named for a valley in northern Colombia where it originated among cattle herders.

clogging is an Appalachian Mountain style of percussive dance. Rock Howland, of Mt. Airy, began his clogging career at the age of 50 when he fell in love with the oldtime dance style with his first lesson in 1986. Rock and his partner, Candy Ranlet, form the RockCandy Cloggers. In 2005, they joined the Barnstormers band with Rock’s current apprentice, Slim Harrison, and have performed at festivals, barn dances, and at educational programs for children.

R O C KC A N DY C LO G G E R S

Everybody Gather ‘Round – The Storytellers are in Town! – African American Storytelling

Samba Mapangala & Orchestra Virunga – Congolese Rumba (H O WA R D CO U N T Y )

Courtesy of the Artist

Samba Mapangala and his group, Orchestra Virunga, are considered one of the classic bands from Central and East Africa of the past 25 years. Formed in 1981, the band is named after a volcanic mountain range in central Africa and performs an innovative mix of Congolese rumba and soukous with an earthier Kenyan style. Settling among Maryland’s robust African immigrant community in the metro DC region, Samba came to live in the United States in 1997 and continues to perform at festivals internationally. S A M B A M A PA N G A L A & ORCHESTRA VIRUNGA

E V E RY B O DY G AT H E R ‘ R O U N D – T H E S T O RY T E L L E R S A R E I N T O W N !

Indoor Theater Stage

Accordion Masters Join Billy McComiskey (Irish

Photograph by Ashley Minner

South Broadway Baptist Church Choir – Native American-style Southern Gospel

S O U T H B R OA DWAY BAPTIST CHURCH CHOIR

(B A LT I M O R E C I T Y ) The South Broadway Baptist Church Choir performs Native American-style Southern Gospel music at their home church in Baltimore’s Fells Point neighborhood. Thousands of Native American people — many from the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina — migrated and settled in Baltimore after the Depression. Linda Cox, Lumbee Tribe member and singer in the Choir, says “Gospel music is a joy to me... We’re carrying the tradition of what we were raised on.”

(B A LT I M O R E C I T Y ) Born in the 1940s in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains in Alcoa, Tennessee, Linda Goss has gathered a repertoire of stories — from her East Tennessee home, to Washington, DC, where she became a social activist in the 1960s at Howard University, and later as a longtime resident of Philadelphia. A founder of the National Association of Black Storytellers, she teaches life lessons through family stories, folktales, call and response techniques, clapping, songs and poetry. “Mama Linda” is joined today by her apprentice, Diane Macklin, an accomplished storyteller from Baltimore, and multiinstrumentalist Papa Ed Stokes of Philadelphia.

ACCO R D I O N M A S T E R S

button accordion), Juan Mojica (Colombian button accordion) and Leon Umberger (Polish/German piano accordion) as they explore the common ground of the accordion. The instrument is believed to have originated in early 19th century Eastern Europe, but its roots stretch back to 18th century encounters by Jesuit missionaries with the Chinese sheng. The accordion plays a prominent role in European, Latino, and African musical traditions and is considered by ethnomusicologists to be a symbol of working-class culture in North America.


ival 2014 st Fe e lif lk Fo s n io it ad Tr d an yl ar M AMALIE SCHEDULE ROTHSCHILD TIME

EAST AVENUE STAGE Outside

THEATER STAGE Inside

FRONT PORCH STAGE Marquee Lounge

CLASSROOM

Upstairs Workshops

11:00 11:30

11:30 - 12:30

11:45 12:00 - 12:30 ON STREET

12:15

Trinidad & Tobago Baltimore Steel Orchestra Steel pan

12:30

12:30 - 1:15

12:45

The Variety Tones Polka

1:00 1:15 1:30 1:45 2:00 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 3:15 3:30 3:45

4:30 4:45 5:00

Sensational Royal Lights Gospel 2:15 - 3:15 ON STREET

Trinidad & Tobago Baltimore Steel Orchestra Steel pan 3:15 - 4:00

6:15 6:30

STUDIO 4

Upstairs Inside Workshops

STUDIO 7

Upstairs Inside Workshops

4:15 - 5:15

Liliana Robeson and Colombia Tropical Cumbia, vallenato dance/ instruction

RockCandy Cloggers Old-time and flatfoot (plus instruction)

1:00 - 1:45

One Caribbean

1:45 - 2:45

Everybody Gather ‘Round, 2:00 - 2:45 The Storytellers are in Little Ethiopia Town! African-American Storytelling

3:00 - 3:45

Accordion Masters

Kuri/Tseday Ethiopian

Samba Mapangala & Orchestra Virunga East African rumba

12:00 - 1:00

Piñata Masters Piñata making all ages

3:00 - 3:45

Foodways!

1:00 - 2:00

Halyna Mudryj Ukrainian pysanky (egg painting) ages 8 & up

GALLERY

Upstairs Inside Workshops

NORTHEAST CRAFTS TENT Outside SIDEWALK East Ave

Workshops

4:00 - 4:30

Devociones y Fe (Latino Arts in Bmore)

11:15 -12:00 11:30-12:30

Old Time Music Workshop Ages 10-up

12:00-1:30

Edna & Martha Ruff Griots’ Circle of Maryland Storytelling/ Qulting all ages

Blessed Coffee Traditional Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony

All Day 12:45-1:30

Blessed Coffee Traditional Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony

1:00 - 5:00

Francisco Loza Arte en Estambre ages 8 & up

1:30 - 2:30

Piñata Masters Piñata making all ages

Rich Smoker Decoy painting ages 8 & up, ages 3-7 with adult

Globe Poster Make your own all ages, all day

1:45-3:15

Old Time Jam Session All ages All Day

2:30 - 3:30

Kathi Beauchesne Eel Basket Weaving all ages, all day

2:45 - 3:30 3:00 - 4:00

Piñata Masters Piñata making all ages

3:00 - 5:30

Griots’ Circle of Maryland Storytelling/ Qulting all ages

Cumbia Latin Dance Workshop all ages

4:00 - 5:00

Mei Yu Green Chinese brush painting ages 8 & up

5:00 - 6:00

New Century w/Billy McComiskey Irish traditional dance band 5:45 - 6:45

Edwin Remsberg Master/Apprentice Photo Exhibit

12:45 - 1:30

4:00 - 4:45

5:30 6:00

So.Broadway Baptist Church Choir

Arty Hill & Long Gone Daddys Honky-tonk

5:15 5:45

12:00 - 12:30 ON STREET

Halyna Mudryj Ukrainian pysanky (egg painting) 12:00 - 12:45 Irish Music in Maryland/DC ages 8 & up

1:30 - 2:15

4:00 4:15

Workshops

MEDIA LAB

Upstairs Inside Workshops

All Day

11:15

12:00

DOWNSTAIRS GALLERY

5:30 - 6:30

John Wang Chinese Calligraphy ages 8 & up

All Day 4:30 - 5:30

Piñata Masters Piñata making all ages

5:00-5:45

Blessed Coffee Traditional Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony

Native American Broommaking all ages, all day

6:00-6:45

Blessed Coffee Traditional Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony

6:45 7:00

A B OV E : M E L P R I C E P L AY I N G T H E G U I TA R AT H I S H O M E I N E A S T O N .


T E D I N B A LT I M O R E . T H E L I N O T Y P E M AC H I N E , I N V E N

Courtesy of the Artist

Indoor Theater Stage

T S E DAY F E AT U R I N G K U R I

In the Marquee Lounge • Front Porch Stage

Tseday featuring Kuri – Ethiopian Music & Dance (M O N TG O M E RY CO U N T Y/ P R I N C E G E O R G E ’S

Irish Music in Maryland & DC – An Oral History:

CO U N T Y ) Born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Kuribachew Woldemariam became a dancer at age 16 and began touring internationally. A highly respected dancer, choreographer, singer, and actress, she is known as “The Queen of the Ethiopian Folklore.” Kuri is a leader in the Ethiopian cultural community of metro DC — the largest in the world outside of Ethiopia. She performs today with her Silver Spring-based dance troupe, Tseday (“beautiful day”), accompanied by a trio of kraar (lyre), massinko (bowed lute), and drum.

Join Irish musician and historian Peter Brice as he talks with key participants in the development of Maryland and DC’s robust Irish music community. While Baltimore is internationally known for its Irish music, such a “scene” was non-existent before the 1970s.

New Century with Billy McComiskey – Irish Traditional Music (B A LT I M O R E C I T Y, A N N E A virtuoso on the button accordion, Billy McComiskey began playing Irish music at age eight in his hometown of Brooklyn, New York. In the 1970s, McComiskey moved to Baltimore and has been central to the Baltimore- Washington Irish music community ever since. Billy received an Apprenticeship Award in 2006 to teach his son, Sean, and in 2013 to teach Peter Brice of Annapolis. Brice is a founder of the New Century American Irish-Arts Company. A R U N D E L , & M O N TG O M E RY CO U N T I E S)

N E W C E N T U RY W I T H B I L LY M CCO M I S K E Y

Little Ethiopia: The metro region of Maryland, Washington DC, and Virginia is home to the largest Ethiopian community outside of East Africa. The community, centered in DC, boasts a substantial entrepreneurial and cultural spirit. Join community leaders — coffee roaster Tebabu Assefa of Blessed Coffee in Takoma Park, multi-talented artist Kuribachew Woldemarian of Silver Spring, and chef Meskerem “Mimi” Worku of Meski’s Healthy 2 Go food truck in Washington, DC — for a conversation about the history and cultural life of metro DC’s “Little Ethiopia.”

One Caribbean: Carnival Traditions in Baltimore/DC:

J O R DA N B A N I D E L E P L AY I N G T H E S T E E L D R U M AT R I C H A R D S E M P E R ’S H O U S E I N B A LT I M O R E .

Maryland and DC’s Caribbean community claims heritage from over twenty different island communities. The annual Baltimore/DC One Caribbean Carnival blends traditions of African, Indigenous, and European origin, and features live music, dance, and the handiwork of local “wirebenders,” the mask-makers and costumebuilders who make the Carnival come alive.

B & B CO U N T RY M E AT S

Foodways!: Food historian and writer, Mary Zajac, walks us through a lively conversation about foodways traditions that make our communities distinct. In conversations with local chefs and domestic cooks, we get insight to the central role food plays in our many cultural traditions.

Devociones y Fe – Spiritual Traditions of Devotion and Faith in Baltimore: Artist Michelle Gomez curated Devociones y Fe after a year of conducting fieldwork in Baltimore’s growing Latino communities in Highlandtown and Upper Fells Point. Join her today with community artists to learn how expressions of faith and devotion create a sense of belonging here in Baltimore. This project was created in partnership with Maryland Traditions and the Latino Providers Network.


Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. Setting up shop next to Krug is master blacksmith Wallace M. Yater (ALTA recipient, 2013), who lives in Boonsboro, Maryland and founded the Blacksmith Guild of Western Maryland. Ask him about his famous swage block! East Baltimore is the home of the living tradition of Painted Screens, which originated in 1913 when their inventor, William Oktavec, realized that painted window screens provide privacy to those living inside the city’s row houses. Frank Bittner learned the skills of wood graining, or faux finishing, from his grandfather, whose artistry helped to transform the windows, doors and vestibules of numerous Baltimore row houses. 2013-2014 A P P R E N T I C E S H I P T E A M

John Shun-Chieh Wang and Mei Yu Green

WA N G E N G R AV E S J O H N S H U N - C H I E HE T O M A K E A S E A L . A B LO C K O F S T O N

Occupational and Crafts Traditions M A RY L A N D B OA S T S A R I C H D I V E R S I T Y O F O CCU PAT I O N A L A N D C R A F T S - R E L AT E D C U LT U R AL PR AC T I C E S . Some are distinctive to towns, cities and regions within Maryland, while others have found a new home here more recently. Certain traditions are closely tied to the vocations of working Marylanders, while others serve as more of an avocation for those who know and practice them today.

In Baltimore, Globe Poster which closed its doors in 2010, is now the Globe Collection and Press at MICA. Bob Cicero, one of Globe’s former owners, teaches the craft of letterpress and postermaking at MICA. Globe has produced everything from carnival posters to its famous R&B show posters since 1929. 2013-2014 A P P R E N T I C E S H I P T E A M

Raymond Loomis and Steve Cole One of the last working linotype machines in Maryland is run by Raymond Loomis in the print shop of the Baltimore Museum of Industry. Linotype was invented in Baltimore in the late 19th century and revolutionized the printing industry (the machine sets full lines of type, as opposed to hand-setting each letter of every sentence of text). Apprentice Steve Cole has been learning how to work the machine, including how to fix it when it breaks down!

G. Krug and Son Ironworks is run by 5th generation blacksmiths, Peter and Stephen Krug. The Krug family aesthetic has adorned the city for more than 190 years, including the practical and ornamental ironwork that graces local landmarks like the Washington Monument and the

John Shun-Chieh Wang is a master in Chinese calligraphy and seal carving. For thousands of years, carved seals have been used to “sign,” often with red ink, traditional Chinese paintings, poems, and other documents. Seals feature one’s own “signature” (in traditional Chinese characters) carved into stone. John Wang has been teaching Mei Yu Green, an avid Chinese brush painter, this ancient art in his Gaithersburg studio for the past year. Another distinctive Baltimore tradition is Arabbing: the selling of produce, fruit and other items from a horse-drawn wagon since the mid-19th century. Today, arabbers are diminishing in number. Make sure to stop by and get some fruit from Paul “Sonny” Diggs. In St. Michaels, Michael Vlahovich is a master builder and restorer of the Chesapeake’s vanishing skipjack fleet, the wooden boats that have dredged oysters for over a century. He is dedicated to “saving what matters” with his colleagues at Coastal Heritage Alliance. On land, Rich Smoker (ALTA recipient, 2011) is a master decoy carver who lives in Somerset County. Carving close by is Warren Saunders, master decoy carver from Dorchester County. Maryland is home to many musical instrument makers. Baile McKnight is a celebrated master drummer and drum-maker. He established Baile’s African Drum Works in Friendsville in 1975 where he uses raw materials such as cow and goatskin to transform them into djembe, dunun and ashiko drums. Kevin Enoch and Pete Ross are masters in banjo making. Using the skills he has learned as a carpenter, Kevin’s late 19th century-style banjos are distinctive in design and masterful in their construction. Pete is a leading maker of colonial-era gourd banjos and has learned intricate engraving and decorative inlay work from Kevin. In the Native American crafts area run by the Baltimore American Indian Center, regalia-making and beadwork traditions are demonstrated by Louis Campbell, who creates ceremonial regalia using feathers, eagle claws and buffalo bone for the pow-wows of the Lumbee, a Native American tribe indigenous to North Carolina that settled in Baltimore during the mid-20th century. Alongside Louis is Celest Burrell and her daughter, Celeste Swan, demonstrating Powhatan-style broom making.

Shanthi Chandrasekar is a master Indian Kolam painter from North Potomac. Traditionally, these temporary, symbolic paintings welcomed visitors outside the front doors of homes in India.


Kenley Shortmus John learned traditional Caribbean carnival mask-making and wirebending

2013-2014 A P P R E N T I C E S H I P T E A M

Bernie and Ryan Garlitz

in his native island birthplace of St. Vincent, and more recently from master wirebender and Trinidadian native Jackie Cumberbatch of Silver Spring. Both men create many of the stunning parade costumes seen at the annual Baltimore/DC ONE Caribbean Carnivals (July 12-13 in Baltimore’s Clifton Park). Carla Tomaszewski is a first-generation Polish-American, born and raised in Baltimore, who uses dyes, batik (wax resist), etching, and painting to create dazzling designs on fragile eggshells — the art of pisanki.

For over 30 years, Bernie Garlitz of B&B Country Meats has made the renowned Engle’s “Frostburg” Bologna. A loyal customer base supports this historic bologna recipe as it has been recognized across the US for more than a century. Bernie learned how to make Engle’s Bologna, pudding, and sausage from Walt Engle, Jr. who first learned from his father. Bernie’s apprentice is his son, Ryan Garlitz, who will carry on the food tradition rooted in Frostburg.

Speaking of birds, the tradition of pigeon racing, once thriving in working-class neighborhoods in Baltimore, will also be presented by master pigeon flyer, David Glorioso, a staple of the South Baltimore Social Pigeon Club in Curtis Bay.

2013-2014 A P P R E N T I C E S H I P T E A M

Workshops

Rico Newman and Lisa Thomas Rico Newman of the Choptico Band of the Piscataway is a master in finger weaving, also known as Indian braiding. For centuries, these intricate braids have been used for sashes, belts and garters, fulfilling a range of ceremonial and practical functions. For the past year, he has been teaching Lisa Thomas the tradition in their home region of Southern Maryland.

T H I S Y E A R FE S T I VA L- G O E R S C A N PA R TA K E I N S E V E R A L WO R K S H O P S , which are held inside and outside the Creative Alliance. For both children and adults is poster making with Globe Poster and Raymond Loomis, eel-pot making with Kathleen Beauchesne and the Center for Research in Basketry, Chinese calligraphy and brush painting with John Wang and Mei Yu Green, duck decoy painting with Rich Smoker, Francisco Loza’s Mexican Yarn Art, piñata making, Ukrainian egg decorating with Halyna Mudryj, storytelling and quilting with Martha Ruff and her mother “Mama” Edna Ruff along with the Griots’ Circle of Maryland, Latin dance with Liliana Robeson, and an old time music workshop and open jam session with banjo and fiddle player Brad Kolodner. For information on these workshops and many others, see the schedule page and look for signs and circulating volunteers throughout the festival grounds.

Dr. Kathleen Beauchesne of the Center for Research Basketry is joined by Rhonda Aaron and Nellie and Mark Flowers of Hoopers Island to teach festival-goers the tradition of eel-pot making—the long, handmade baskets used to catch eels in the Chesapeake tidewater region.

Foodways Traditions A G O O D E X A M PLE FO R U N D E R S TA N D I N G H OW CU LT U R A L T R A D I T I O N S A R E PA SS E D O N B E T W E E N PE O PLE I S TO T H I N K A B O U T FO O D — H OW W E G E T I T, PR E PA R E I T A N D

In the Gallery

The recipes and techniques needed for creating and enjoying the wide range of culinary dishes and specialties from around the world often come from those before us — whether it’s our grandfather’s recipe for spaghetti sauce, or our community’s love of all things crab! Food brings people together, is deeply tied to our understandings of cultural identity and sense of place, and is an integral part of many cultural traditions that range from religious to secular. CO N SU M E I T.

Design by Evins Design, Baltimore

Maryland features a variety of distinctive foodways traditions, such as stuffed ham, which has been a staple of community events in Southern Maryland for nearly four centuries, and Smith Island Cake, the official Maryland dessert. From her childhood on Tangier Island, and from her relatives on Smith Island, Yvonne Bartolomeo learned how to make the famous cakes. With the arrival of newer residents over time, Maryland’s culinary delights are ever-expanding — from spicey Caribbean fare to Nepali momos (dumplings). Blessed Coffee, run by Tebabu and Sara Assefa, will be selling its delicious Ethiopian coffee and sharing the tradition of Ethiopian coffee ceremonies (including roasting and serving) during the course of the festival.

Edwin Remsberg’s Portraits of Maryland Traditions Edwin Remsberg began documenting Maryland Traditions Master-Apprentice teams in 2008. These timeless images can be found throughout this publication and online. Descended from Frederick County farmers, and now at home in rural Harford County where he raises sheep, Edwin travels extensively to capture agricultural work and life in America. His publications include Maryland’s Vanishing Lives (Johns Hopkins Press, 1995) and Dishing Up Maryland (Storey Books, 2010).


S T O RY T E L L E R D I A N E M AC K L I N O F B A LT I M O R E P L AYS T H E M B I R A .

For more information on Maryland Traditions visit: www.marylandtraditions.org Clifford Murphy, PhD, Director, Maryland Traditions

Michelle Stefano, PhD, Program Coordinator, Maryland Traditions

Department of Business & Economic Development www.ChooseMaryland.org Maryland State Arts Council www.msac.org 175 West Ostend Street, Suite E Baltimore, Maryland 21230 T E LE PH O N E: 410-767-6555 M D R E L AY T T Y: 1-800-735-2258 OR 711 If you need assistance using this publication, please contact the MSAC office at T E LE PH O N E: 410-767-6555 or T T Y: 1-800-735-2258 or 711 for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Individuals who do not use conventional print may contact the Maryland State Arts Council office to obtain this publication in an alternate format. T E LE PH O N E: 410-767-6555 E M A I L: msac@msac.org Special thanks to our partners, the NEA, NCTA, Creative Alliance, MSAC staff, Obrecht Commercial Real Estate and Brewer’s Hill, Jennie Williams, Julia Evins, festival volunteers, Terrence Pope, John Higgins, Cody Knipfer, Mary Zajac, Michelle Gomez, Ashley Minner, Aaron Henkin, Tebabu Assefa, Elaine Simon, the Latino Providers Network, and Nicole King.

Martin O’Malley Governor Anthony G. Brown Lieutenant Governor Dominick Murray Secretary, Department of Business and Economic Development

Photography by Edwin Remsberg

NCTA

2014 Maryland Folklife Festival Program  
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