Issuu on Google+

26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:47 PM

Page 1

PERKINS

PERSPECTIVE Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years. Available Online at www.marybird.org

Volume 2 2009

The Infinity Option…Page 4 NCCCP Year Two…Page 8 Fighting Cancer Through Community Events…Page 14 Maurice King, M.D., Medical Director, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, with new Infinity machine at the Baton Rouge location.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:47 PM

Page 2

IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Internal Giving Campaign Sets New Record Employees Donate over $37,000 to Fight Cancer and Help Patients

PARTNERS OF HOPE

Rays of Healing

W

ith almost 100% participation, employees and volunteers at all Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBP) locations generously donated over $37,000 during the Center's 2009 Rays of Healing Campaign, setting a new record for employee and volunteer giving. The campaign took place during May and was conducted by a committee of MBP employees. Leading the committee were cochairs Brent Parker, Ph.D., one of MBP's academic medical physicists, and Crissy Michel, CT technologist.

“What the Center does is Members of the 2009 Employee Giving Campaign. important and giving back to Just as donors are able to designate what their donations Mary Bird Perkins is a way support, Rays of Healing participants were given this same to show that to others. This campaign gives option. Gifts could be made to either the Center’s Fight Cancer Campaign or the Patient Services Fund, or both. MBP employees a chance to demonstrate that we truly care about our patients The campaign raised $18,500 to support the Center’s fight against cancer. These gifts will help fund MBP’s medical physics and, hopefully, the chance to make the academic research program, and the CARE Network’s awareness and education efforts, as well as its outreach programs which treatment experience a little easier on them include free cancer screenings throughout communities in and their families.” southeast Louisiana. Brent Parker, Ph.D. The Rays of Healing Campaign gives us an opportunity to help our patients even more during their fight against cancer.” Crissy Michel, CT technologist

2 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Another $18,500 was raised to support the Patient Services Fund, which helps patients in need receive treatment and removes barriers that might prevent these patients from keeping their appointments.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 3

My Perspective A message from

Todd D. Stevens, president and CEO

I

n looking back, 2009 has been a year of milestones for Mary Bird Perkins. Through innovative and collaborative partnerships with community hospitals, physicians, and many others, we have made great strides toward fulfilling the Center’s mission – to improve survivorship and lessen the burden of cancer through expert treatment, compassionate care, early detection, research, and education. And, in 2009, we are privileged to carry our mission across five locations in southeast Louisiana.

Together with our partners in the first part of the year, we opened the doors to the new facility in Gonzales, LA, launched a Total Cancer CareTM program, and screened nearly 400 participants in one day at this year’s Minority Cancer Awareness Event. In this issue, you’ll read about more recent achievements including: Mary Bird Perkins’ expansion of technology options with the Elekta Infinity; ACoS accreditation of the Covington facility; MBP employees and volunteers setting a new record of funds raised internally during this year’s 2009 Rays of Healing Campaign; and the many third party events that benefit MBP. However, I cannot speak of 2009 without acknowledging the Mary Bird Perkins employees. With leadership and support from the Center’s Board of Directors, a team of dedicated employees took on the challenge of updating the Center’s vision and mission statements and developing core values and accompanying service standards. The team’s amazing work captures the essence of why Mary Bird Perkins is such a great community-based organization. Their work exceeded expectations and resulted in a mission renewal that employees appropriately titled "Our Promise."

Mission

Through a constant focus on the Center’s vision and mission and adherence to the core values – innovation, respect, compassion, integrity and collaboration – Mary Bird Perkins employees, including myself, will work hard every day to provide the best cancer care possible. That is “Our Promise.” Thank you to all of our community partners, volunteers and donors, without whose support the stories contained within these pages would not be possible. As 2009 comes to a close, plans are already underway for the upcoming year. With a strong strategic vision and support system, the Mary Bird Perkins team will continue to live the mission with a special dedication to the patients we are so humbled to serve. Sincerely,

Our promise

To improve survivorship and lessen the burden of cancer through expert treatment, compassionate care, early detection, research, and education.

Core Values

Innovation • Compassion • Respect • Integrity • Collaboration www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 4

Introducing the Newest Cancer Treatment Option: The State-of-the-Art Infinity

R

esidents of the Greater Baton Rouge area now have access to the latest generation of cancer-fighting technology – the Infinity. This advanced radiotherapy accelerator has been installed at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center in Baton Rouge, located on the campus of Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center. The Infinity is made by Elekta, a world leader in radiation therapy, pioneering significant innovations and clinical solutions for treating cancer. Mary Bird Perkins offers a variety of best-of-class radiation therapy options allowing its patient care team to aggressively treat cancer without accepting the limitations of a one-size-fitsall approach. The acquisition of Infinity further demonstrates Mary Bird Perkins’ long-standing dedication to offer patients the skills of an expert team and access to the most advanced technology options available.

“The combination of radiation therapy treatment resources made available by Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center is unparalleled in Louisiana. Together our team of radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists and medical physicists has the most advanced resources available in the field to ensure that each patient’s treatment is customized to their individual fight against cancer.” Maurice King, M.D., Medical Director, Mary Bird Perkins Infinity is a state-of-the-art image guided linear accelerator that incorporates best in class computerized medical imaging technology to treat people with radiation therapy. Because of its superior image guidance capabilities, Infinity can be very useful in treating, as an example, prostate cancer, as well as cancers of the head and neck. The Infinity also brings the promise of a technology called VMAT, a new and developing tool in the field of radiation therapy. VMAT (Volumetric Intensity Modulated Arc

4 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Medical physicists discuss the new Infinity. Therapy) is intended to shorten treatment time without compromising quality of care. Elekta believes VMAT’s shorter treatment times will translate into increased patient comfort and improved accuracy by reducing time spent during treatment. When Mary Bird Perkins opened its fifth location in Gonzales, LA in partnership with St. Elizabeth Hospital earlier this year, the first of Mary Bird Perkins’ $20 million investment in Elekta Systems was installed at the new facility. VMAT was under development at the time and now that it is available, it will be a part of the Elekta machines in both locations: Baton Rouge and Gonzales. “We look forward to working with Elekta to deploy VMAT technology in Baton Rouge and Gonzales for the benefit of cancer patients,” John Gibbons, Ph.D. chief of clinical physics, Mary Bird Perkins, said. “In many cases, we believe Infinity’s VMAT will allow us to deliver superior treatments.” “Every cancer case is unique and personal, and Mary Bird Perkins is committed to providing the latest options to our treatment team,” Todd D. Stevens, president and CEO, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, said. “The options offered by Mary Bird Perkins are potential solutions from very common to very rare and complex cancers.” Mary Bird Perkins continues to expand its technology arsenal with additions like the Elekta Infinity in its efforts to provide its highly experienced radiation oncologists the best possible options for custom radiation treatments, affording patients their best opportunity to beat cancer.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 5

Elekta Infinity machine shown in Baton Rouge location.

In addition to the Elekta Infinity, Mary Bird Perkins’ comprehensive radiation therapy services available across its five locations throughout southeast Louisiana include Conformal Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), TomoTherapy, Imaged Guided Radiation Thearpy (IGRT), BrainLAB Novalis® stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy, extra-cranial stereotactic radiotherapy, adaptive radiotherapy, electron conformal therapy and advanced tumor localization techniques including 4-Dimensional CT and CT/PET, and MRI. Mary Bird Perkins also offers a wide range of low and high-dose brachytherapy treatment techniques for prostate, breast, choroidal melanoma, and gynecological cancers. For more information about Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center’s treatment team and treatment technology, visit www.marybird.org. www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 6

Houma Welcomes New Radiation Oncologist

J

effrey P. Long, M.D., a Board Certified radiation oncologist, is the newest physician to join the Southeast Louisiana Radiation Oncology Group (SLROG). Dr. Long is practicing exclusively at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center at TGMC in Houma, LA. “My partners and I are pleased to welcome Dr. Long and his wife Jody into the Mary Bird Perkins family,” said the Center’s Medical Director, Maurice King, M.D. “Dr. Long is an extremely knowledgeable physician who is passionate and dedicated to the fight against cancer. He will truly be an asset to Mary Bird Perkins at TGMC and the Bayou Region.” Jeffrey P. Long, M.D.

Dr. Long received his medical training at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. He completed residency training in Diagnostic Radiology at University of Arkansas for Health Sciences in Little Rock and Humana Hospital-University in Louisville, Kentucky. He completed his residency in radiation oncology at University of Iowa Hospital in Iowa City. Dr. Long is the Founder and Webmaster of the Radiation Oncology Online Journal, www.rooj.com. "I am excited to be a part of Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center at TGMC because of their clinical expertise and commitment to fighting cancer,” explained Long. “I am personally very committed to fighting cancer and will stay involved with the latest developments in treatment and research so that my patients can get the most progressive care possible.” Immediately prior to his arrival in Houma, Long served as a radiation oncologist at the New Mexico Cancer Center in Gallup, New Mexico.

New Director of Houma Cancer Program

M

Clarke Currie, MHA, NHA, CRCFA, CPC has been named director of the Cancer Program for Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center at TGMC. He will be responsible for the further development and coordination of the comprehensive cancer program. “We are very pleased to welcome Mr. Currie to our cancer program,” said Phyllis Peoples, president and CEO of TGMC. “His experience and expertise will be an asset to our team as we work to provide caring and quality cancer care to the people in our community right here, close to home.”

“The word ‘cancer’ raises fear in the minds of most people; I think that is universal,” Currie said. “So how we, as health care professionals, respond to patients needing cancer treatment is very important. Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center at TGMC is focused on doing the right things for cancer patients – from providing a caring environment to ensuring access to expert physicians, leading edge technology and vital support programs. That is what interests me most about this cancer program and the opportunities it brings.” Currie received his Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration in Marketing, his Master of Health Administration and his Certificate of Graduate Study in 6 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Gerontology from the University of South Carolina in Columbia. He is a member of American College of Cancer Executives, Who’s Who Among Young Business People, and is a Certified Coder with the American Academy of Professional Coders. Currie was most recently the Director of Oncology, Dialysis and Hospice Services at Tift Regional Medical Center in Tifton, Georgia.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 7

Gibbons Receives Prestigious Recognition

J

ohn Gibbons, Ph.D., chief of clinical physics at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, was recently honored as a Fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Dr. Gibbons was one of 18 members of the 6,500 plus member organization selected as AAPM Fellow in 2009.

“Gibbons is an active, stellar teacher in the LSU-Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBP) medical physics program, who has trained many graduate students in medical physics clinical practice and research,” said Kenneth Hogstrom, Ph.D., chief of physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. “His research contributions have focused on the role of physics quality assurance in the radiation therapy process, particularly through the MBP research grant with TomoTherapy. He has a long record of service and leadership though appointments to multiple committees within the AAPM and other professional medical physics organizations. Currently, he is serving a three-year term as Secretary of the AAPM. AAPM Fellows are members elected by the Board of Directors who have made significant contributions through: service to the AAPM; the advancement of medical physics knowledge based upon independent original research or development; medical physics educational activities, especially in regard to the education and training of medical physicists, medical students, medical residents and allied health personnel; or leadership in the practice of medical physics. John Gibbons, Ph.D.

Dr. Gibbons joins Dr. Hogstrom as Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center’s second medical physicist elected as Fellow of the AAPM. Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center has unparalleled medical physics support for patient care with thirteen medical physicists on its team.

New Medical Director of Baton Rouge Cancer Program Announced

M

itchell Z. Berger, M.D. is the new medical director for the Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins. He will provide clinical and administrative leadership for the comprehensive program.

“This is an exciting time to be joining the Cancer Program team,” said Berger. Mitchell Z. Berger, M.D. “As one of 14 sites in the country participating in the National Cancer Institute’s pilot to discover better ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, our Cancer Program is on the front lines of setting the

standards for care benefiting thousands of cancer patients across the country and right here at home. This prestigious selection also validates the excellence of the physicians and the high quality of care associated with the Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins.” Board certified in Medical Oncology and Internal Medicine, Dr. Berger earned his medical degree at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School of the University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey. He conducted his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Alabama Hospital in Birmingham, and a Hematology and Medical Oncology Fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He received his Masters Degree in Medical Management at Tulane University in New Orleans and is also a Certified Physician Executive.

www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 8

CANCER PROGRAM OF OUR LADY OF T

NCCCP Pilot The Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins

Local Care. National Recognition. Year Two in Summary The pilot phase of the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) ended its second year by implementing a variety of initiatives to advance clinical research and improve the quality of cancer care at community hospitals – with an emphasis on minority and underserved patients. The NCCCP pilot is exploring what it takes to conduct complex cancer clinical trials and offer state-of-the-art treatment options in a hometown setting so patients do not have to commute to large, university-based medical centers to receive high-quality cancer care. The pilot hospitals – located in 14 states across the country – serve patients from a wide range of geographic and demographic localities in rural, small-town, and underserved urban areas. This diversity offers a potential framework for a national program of community cancer centers that would be integrated with NCI’s extensive network of cancer research and quality care initiatives. A fourth year was recently added to the three-year pilot.

Looking Forward In the third year of the pilot, the participating hospitals will continue to collaborate with and learn from one another to further strengthen this public-private partnership and share what they learn with community hospitals outside the network. They also will develop a final report for NCI documenting the lessons learned on the best ways to advance stateof-the-art cancer care and research to benefit patients in their home communities.

The goals of the NCCCP pilot program are to: • • • •

Reduce cancer healthcare disparities Draw more patients into clinical trials in community-based settings Link to national computer networks for conducting research and sharing results Explore standards for collecting and storing cancer research specimens

Key Accomplishments by Focus Area Reduce Cancer Healthcare Disparities

by Expanding Patient Navigator Services to All Pilot Sites

Since the inception of the pilot in 2007, the Cancer Program has screened 12,378 participants at 406 events and diagnosed 104 cancers. In line with the aims of the pilot’s outreach initiatives, in 2008 the Cancer Program began offering patient navigators to assist patients who had an abnormal screening result for breast, colorectal, skin and prostate cancer. From January to September 2009, these navigators guided 652 patients through a complex web of clinical care, social services and financial counseling.

Increase Patient Involvement in Clinical Trials

by Increasing Accessibility

The Cancer Program is providing cancer patients and their physicians access to clinically relevant research trials that will lead to advances in evidence-based disease management, specifically NCI-sponsored clinical trials made available to pilot sites through NCCCP. In doing so, the Cancer Program has increased the number of patients choosing to participate in a clinical trial, brought leading-edge trials to disparate populations and developed mechanisms to increase minority accruals. Since the inception of the pilot, over one thousand participants were accrued to clinical and pharmaceutical trials.

8 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 9

F THE LAKE AND MARY BIRD PERKINS the Second Year Enhance Information Technology Capabilities by Converting Paper-Based Patient Records to Electronic Health Records The Information Technology (IT) Team of the Cancer Program is designing and implementing replicable strategies to connect the information systems of Our Lady of the Lake, Mary Bird Perkins, and private practice physician groups into one unique system containing all oncology related electronic health records (EHR). Integration of patient level data will provide an opportunity for the Cancer Program to assess the needs of its patients, while demonstrating ways in which this data can be effectively utilized for cancer prevention, treatment and care on a national level.

Standardize Biospecimen Collection

by Implementing NCI Recommendation for Snap-frozen

and Formalin-fixed Tissues The Cancer Program and H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute in Florida have partnered to perform state-of-theart cancer research called Total Cancer Care™. The Cancer Program is one of only 18 sites in the country participating in this first-of-its-kind study to individualize cancer treatment based on genes that provide a “molecular fingerprint” unique to each tumor. Nationally, the study has the consent of over 30,000 patients and the Cancer Program has accrued over 200 patients to participate in the exciting initiative.

Improve the Quality of Cancer Care

by Offering Genetic Counseling to Determine Risk for

Certain Cancers The Cancer Program developed a Multidisciplinary Colorectal Cancer Team whose purpose is to identify and address the entire continuum of care for colorectal cancer from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, treatment, recovery and survivorship. A unique component of this team is genetics counseling. A geneticist is trained to identify high-risk individuals and works with the medical team to address concerns about their personal risk of developing colorectal cancer; conducts a detailed risk assessment of personal or family risk; ensures the individual's understanding of screening options for early detection and ways to reduce personal cancer risk through lifestyle modification; and provides information to help individuals make informed decisions about medical management options, including the need for genetic testing if indicated.

Enhance Survivorship and Palliative Care Services

by Offering Educational Programs to

Support Survivors An educational series titled “Thriving in Survivorship - focusing on nutrition for cancer patients, survivors and caregivers” was offered to Cancer Program patients through a series of workshops. These free workshops were presented to address the needs of new Cancer Program patients, patients completing treatment and long-term survivors. This series was structured in a manner that allowed patients and their family members to progressively build upon information learned. Currently, there are more than 11 million cancer survivors in the U.S. The needs of survivors are unique and important and the Cancer Program is working to make sure they are appropriately addressed.

www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:48 PM

Page 10

IN YOUR COMMUNITY Cancer Program in Covington Earns National Accreditation

T

he Cancer Program of Mary Bird Perkins and St. Tammany Parish Hospital received renewal of its accreditation by the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS). Only 25 percent of all cancer programs across the United States and Puerto Rico earn this approval. The Cancer Program of Mary Bird Perkins and St. Tammany Parish Hospital is the only CoC-approved Cancer Program in West St. Tammany Parish.

“Cancer patients and their loved ones can have peace of mind knowing that an independent organization certifies that they can receive comprehensive, world-class quality cancer care here.” Patti Ellish, FACHE President and CEO, St. Tammany Parish Hospital Receiving care at a CoC-accredited cancer program ensures that a patient will have access to: • Comprehensive care, including a range of state-of-the-art services and equipment • A multi-specialty, team approach to coordinate the best treatment options • Information about ongoing clinical trials and new treatment options • Access to cancer-related information, education and support • A cancer registry that collects data on type and stage of cancers and treatment results and offers lifelong patient follow-up • Ongoing monitoring and improvement of care • Quality care close to home

New Physician to Join Covington Staff

R

adiation oncologist R. Scott Bermudez, M.D., is the latest physician to join the Southeast Louisiana Radiation Oncology Group practicing exclusively at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center locations. He will begin seeing patients at the Covington location in early January. A cum laude graduate of Duke University, Bermudez received his Doctor of Medicine from Harvard Medical School following a year as a Fulbright Scholar in Berlin, Germany. He

10 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

comes to Mary Bird Perkins from the residency program at the University of California, Department of Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA where he was Chief Resident in Radiation Oncology, UCSF, 2007-2008. He is fluent in Spanish and German. Dr. Bermudez enjoys international travel, hiking, bicycling, college basketball, movies and reading novels.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:49 PM

Page 11

Making a Difference in YOUR Community

M

ary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBP) believes that screenings are the single most proactive way to lower the inordinately high cancer mortality rate in Louisiana. Today, Louisiana ranks number two in the United States in cancer deaths. In many cases, the diagnosis comes too late. Mary Bird Perkins works year round to change that through its Early Detection Program. With the help of community partnerships, MBP is continuing to fight this disease by offering free community cancer screenings and education programs throughout our 18-parish service area. In recognition of National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, Mary Bird Perkins partnered with St. Elizabeth Hospital, St. Tammany Parish Hospital, Physician examines patient at mobile screening. TGMC and Our Lady of the Lake to offer free screenings throughout the month of September. Throughout October, in recognition of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, MBP offered six breast cancer screenings across its 18-parish service area in partnership with Woman’s Hospital. Year-to-date, MBP has held 160 events and screened over 4,500 participants for breast, prostate, colorectal and skin cancer. The chart below represents the number of participants screened thus far and indicates that 35 percent of them had never been screened for cancer.

1

2009 Cancer Screenings to Date Breast Total Participants

1,831

Participants who have never been screened

239

Diagnosis of Cancer

15

1January 2Women

2

Prostate Colorectal

Skin

Total

1,102

877

765

4,575

299

490

565

1,593

5

2

6

28

1-September 30, 2009 over the age of 40 who have never been screened for breast cancer.

www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:49 PM

Page 12

What Our Patients Say: Below are some of the quotes patients at Mary Bird Perkins locations wrote after completion of their treatment. Patients completing treatment at the Baton Rouge, Covington, Gonzales, Hammond and Houma facilities are given the anonymous quality of care questionnaire.

Bradie James Donates $100K to Early Breast Cancer Detection

B

radie James, Dallas Cowboys linebacker and former LSU All-American, visited Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBP) to help fund a collaborative breast cancer program aimed at early detection, screening and treatment. James lost his mother, the late Etta James, to breast cancer in 2001 during his sophomore year at Louisiana State University. A $40K grant was given to MBP, Woman’s Hospital and YWCA ENCOREplus. This brings the generous support by James’ Foundation56 through the Soul Survivor’s donor-advised fund of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation to $100,000 over the past two years.

“The funds we have gratefully received through Bradie James’ foundation have allowed Mary Bird Perkins to save lives through early detection. This gift demonstrates James’ and Mary Bird Perkins’ steadfast dedication to offer free screenings, mammograms, follow up care, community outreach and education services for underserved and uninsured women,” said Carolyn A. Chassee, CFRE, vice president and chief development officer, MBP.

“The Baton Rouge community helped me make the transition from being a teenager to becoming an upstanding man. The joys and pains I experienced here taught me invaluable lessons. That is what led me back here to help, because people here helped me.” Bradie James 12 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Everyone has a smile on their faces. You don’t know how much that simple smile means to your patients. It is like saying “everything will be OK!” Baton Rouge I am so pleased with my treatment at MBP in Covington. I was relieved to be able to receive radiation in my community; it saved me a huge block of time everyday. Covington My experience was very positive. The staff at the facility is awesome and it was so nice to have volunteers to chat with in the waiting area. Gonzales I compliment the radiation therapists who were very friendly, supporting, kind, gentle and professional. The staff helped make an intolerable experience tolerable. Hammond Keep doing what you’re doing and I know all patients will be happy. Houma


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:49 PM

Page 13

Become a Krewe Supporter

New Therapies Are Lifting Spirits

Save the Date

Pet Therapy

T

he 23rd Annual Karnival Krewe de Louisiane Mardi Gras Ball will be held in the Baton Rouge River Center on January 29, 2010. The Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins will be charitable beneficiaries of this spectacular fund-raising event. “What our two organizations are doing together —and what the Krewe is supporting—is expanding cancer research, furthering delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to patients in the region, increasing healthcare outreach and reducing cancer healthcare disparities. Mary Bird Perkins is thrilled to once again be partnering with the Krewe,” said Todd Stevens, president and CEO, Mary Bird Perkins. The night will be filled with two dance bands playing and an indoor parade featuring marching bands, dance teams and floats. Over the last six years, this event has raised over one million dollars. A corporate ball membership or an individual membership will help improve survivorship and lessen the burden of cancer through expert treatment, compassionate care, early detection, research and education. To learn more about Karnival Krewe de Louisiane and how you can become a member, contact the Krewe office at (225) 765-5002.

Karnival Krewe de Louisiane Mardi Gras Ball

January 29, 2010

The Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins recently launched an integrative therapies initiative including pet therapy. Pet therapy is believed by many professionals in the field of healthcare to play an important role for patients with various Mercedes and David Dunbar enjoy medical conditions. visiting with (l to r) Rocky and Rolex. “Animal-assisted therapy is a favorite with both patients and staff,” said Renea Duffin, vice president of Cancer Programs at Mary Bird Perkins. As one patient said, “The dogs distract you from thinking about cancer, even if only for a few minutes.” Man’s best friend will be visiting patients in the waiting room of the Center on the first Thursday and third Tuesday of every month.

Music Therapy Patients in the waiting room at the Baton Rouge Center closed their eyes and imagined they were far away from receiving treatment for cancer. Don Groh & Friends played light jazz that had others in the waiting room tapping their toes and moving Trumpet player Leroy Pero and Don Groh their heads to the on keyboard. rhythm of old favorites. “This kind of keeps your mind off everything,” said Larry Stokes, one of those enjoying the entertainment by Don Groh & Friends. A free integrative therapies initiative of the Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins, relaxing music is offered twice a month as an opportunity to rejuvenate and recharge the mind, body and spirit. “This is such a treat,” said one patient. “It’s so uplifting.”

www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:49 PM

Page 14

IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Fighting Cancer Through Community Events The Lemonade Brigade The Lemonade Brigade is part of an organization called “Kids Wanna Help” started by teenager Mary-Brent Brown. As a 501(c)(3) organization, the purpose of “Kids Wanna Help” is to teach children about entrepreneurship and philanthropy. “Kids Wanna Help” has raised thousands of dollars for charities in St. Tammany Parish, including Mary Bird Perkins.

Bumble Lane Spa for the Cure 2009 Bumble Lane Spa Retreat hosted its third annual Spa for the Cure event in October. Bumble Lane’s staff generously donated their time for the evening and proceeds benefited MBP. Chef Don Bergeron generously provided hors d’oeuvres, wine and decadent desserts. Guests enjoyed a variety of mini spa treatments and the opportunity to shop early for the holidays by receiving 20% off merchandise and gift certificates.

Greater Mandeville Seafood Festival Held every year over the 4th of July weekend, MBP has been a charitable beneficiary of the Greater Mandeville Seafood Festival for the past seven years. The Festival gift is made in memory of Russell Nash, a founder of the festival and a former Mary Bird Perkins patient.

14 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

DISCOver a Cure A charity dance hosted by Stevie and LeLe Keller for 350 of their seventh and eighth grade peers was held Friday, August 7, 2009. The youngsters attended the back-toschool dance with a purpose. More than $8,000 was netted from the event and donated to Mary Bird Perkins to benefit early detection, research and education.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:49 PM

Page 15

IN YOUR COMMUNITY Jeff Boss Memorial Golf Classic The Jeff Boss Memorial Classic is held each year in honor of the former LSU Athletic Equipment Manager who was treated at MBP. Pictured (l to r): Rich Abadie, David DeGeneres, and James Frazier; front row: Jay Lyles, MBP director of corporate and foundation giving; Greg and Ashley Stringfellow.

Stirling Properties Stirling Properties held its 9th annual golf tournament to benefit Mary Bird Perkins at the University Club on October 19. Stirling Properties President and CEO Marty Mayer presented Todd Stevens with a check for $10,000.

Rubicon The twelfth annual Rubicon Golf Tournament raised $45,000 for the fight against cancer. Pictured (l to r): Eric Phillips; Phil Lister; Todd Stevens; Sue Sheets; Ron Gerard; Carolyn A. Chassee, CFRE; and Paul Nowacki.

Strike Out Cancer The Pansouthern Drillers were the championship boys team of the Strikeout Cancer Tournament in Mandeville and Hammond, organized by Becca Vaughn and Pelican Park recreation director Ann Keyes. The tournament raised over $10,000 for MBP’s fight against cancer. As a former MBP patient and member of the Greater Northshore Business and Community Council, Ann said, “I can personally attest that MBP is a first class operation that sincerely cares for every patient.” www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:49 PM

Page 16

IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Rathbone Society Donors Honored Cancer Survivor Tells of Total Recovery from Stage III Tonsil Cancer

M

ary Bird Perkins Cancer Center’s first Rathbone Society Dinner took place September 16 at the Louisiana State Museum. The Rathbone Dinner is dedicated to the memory of Dr. and Mrs. M.J. Rathbone, Jr. Dr. Rathbone was one of Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center’s founders and was the chairman of the board from the Center’s inception until his death in 1998. The dinner honors individuals, organizations, corporations and foundations that support the Center at its highest levels of giving.

Jerry Jolly, chairman, board of directors, Mary Bird Perkins, delivered the welcoming remarks. During the dinner, Todd D. Stevens, president and CEO, Mary Bird Perkins, shared his thoughts about Growing the Vision, the title for the evening’s program. Dr. Kenneth Hogstrom, chief of physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center and professor and director, LSU Medical Physics Program, discussed the future of cancer care. The guest speaker for the evening was Greg Peace, a cancer survivor treated at Mary Bird Pictured (l to r): Keri and Greg Peace with Perkins’ Covington campus two years ago by Dr. Charles Wood. Peace’s experience with Dr. Charles Wood. cancer began when he broke a chewable vitamin in half and swallowed it instead. A few days later, he started spitting up blood. “I assumed a jagged edge of the pill was to blame,” he said, but the problem persisted. Ultimately, this young husband and father of two was diagnosed with stage III tonsil cancer. The inoperable tumor was the size of a golf ball. His physician recommended that Peace receive his radiation treatments at Mary Bird Perkins in Covington, with a caution that his chances for a full recovery were only fifty-fifty. Standing before the audience Peace said, “Today I am 100% cancer-free. My salivary glands are intact, there is no scar tissue and everything went so well there is no need to even remove my tonsils!” He thanked the Rathbone Society donors for supporting Mary Bird Perkins and said, “Dr. Wood and the Mary Bird staff desired the best for me. I wasn’t just a patient. I felt as though I was a part of their family. It was obvious that it wasn’t just their job but their passion.” The evening was made possible through the generosity of the Southeast Louisiana Radiation Oncology Group: Robert S. Fields, MD; Gregory C. Henkelmann, MD; Sheldon A. Johnson, MD; Maurice L. King, Jr., MD; Renee A. Levine, MD; Kenneth K. Lo, Ph.D., MD; Mary Ella Sanders, MD; Charles G. Wood, MD.

Golf Provides $168K to Support Mission

T Pictured (l to r): 2009 Taste of the Tournament PAR-TEE and Auction committee members Courtney Newbill, Kristen Stafford, Sara Abercrombie, Yvette Owens, Rebecca Nelson, Ginger Kurlas and Danna Hodges. 16 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

hanks to sponsors and community support, this year’s Mary Bird Perkins Merrill Lynch Open netted $168,000 – proceeds that will go directly back to thousands of people throughout the Center’s 18-parish service area to further the treatment of cancer and its prevention. Merrill Lynch has already committed to the 2010 title sponsorship of this event. Chairing the 2010 Taste of the Tournament PAR-TEE and Auction is Sara Abercrombie. Watch for an announcement about a date and new location for next year’s tournament.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:49 PM

Page 17

IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Fight Cancer Campaign Finds Creative Way to Reach New Donors

M

ary Bird Perkins’ 2009 Fight Cancer Campaign (FCC) has added an interesting twist to appeal to new donors. Under the leadership of FCC member Elizabeth McKnight and a committee of volunteers, at least 120 potential donors will be encouraged to make an average gift of $120 to qualify as members of the Samaritan’s Circle Society ($30-$1199) of annual philanthropic giving to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Volunteers involved with this effort along with McKnight are Adele Abboud, Autumn Caldwell, Garrett Callaway, Lindsay Chustz, Eric Guerin, Ashley Johnson, Ellis McKnight, William McKnight, Chad Ortte, Deanna Saab, Stephanie Sander, Melissa Shultz and Jessica Weimer. The Samaritan’s Circle committee hopes to tell more people about the difference they can make in the fight against cancer in a way they may not have thought possible. The committee wants people to see the various services that their donation to MBP actually helps support. For instance, the cost of a single prostate screening is $10. A mammogram is $90; and $150 will fuel the Early Bird mobile medical clinic to provide free cancer screening services to rural and underserved areas. No gift is too small and every dollar makes a difference.

Pictured with their Mary Bird Perkins “Fight Cancer” boxing gloves are members of this year’s campaign committee (l to r): Todd Stevens, president and CEO, MBP; Brett and Renee Furr, Campaign chairs; Mindy Tyler, Annual Giving program manager, MBP; Stacey Chiasson, Corporate division co-chair; Elizabeth McKnight, Samaritan Circle division chair; and Carolyn A. Chassee, CFRE, vice president, chief development officer, MBP. Not pictured are Bill and Gail O’Quin, Rathbone division chairs; and Mike Pitts, Corporate division co-chair. “I want to be a part of this,” said McKnight, an ardent volunteer for Mary Bird Perkins. “I think it has so much potential. You have to get people started; plant a seed in someones mind. Then when they can afford to be a major donor, they are already emotionally connected,” she explained. Gifts given each year through the Fight Cancer Campaign provide the critical base of support necessary for Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center’s outreach and early detection programs that meet the current and recurring needs of the community.

MONTHLY E-NEWS Mary Bird Perkins is interested in sharing timely and interesting cancer news with you. Sign up to receive the latest cancer news at www.marybird.org

www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 18

Pictured are members of the newly-formed Joint Development Committee in front of the new Elekta Infinity machine.

Joint Development Committee Formed The Mary Bird Perkins Development Committee and the Foundation Development Committee recently merged to streamline operations and increase effectiveness. Consolidated goals include building awareness of the endowment, increasing total investment toward the fight against cancer, enhancing the overall volunteer experience, and greatly expanding Mary Bird Perkins’ volunteer corps of ambassadors and advocates.

Guests Learn about Mary Bird Perkins MBP Board Chairman Jerry Jolly and his wife Donna opened their home to MBP and invited friends and guests to attend a reception to learn more about the Center’s efforts in the fight against cancer. Guests pictured (l to r): Terri and Jim McIlwain; Shelley Mockler, MBP board of directors; Louis and Lauren Barfield.

18 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 19

Dow Commitment Stronger Than Ever

A

t a time when no business is immune to the fallout of a troubled economy, The Dow Chemical Company in Plaquemine was forced to close three of its production units this year. But, they did not decrease the amount of their $25,000 annual gift to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center for 2009. Their corporate commitment to fight cancer remains stronger than ever. “Community success is part of the Dow culture,” said Stacey Chiasson, Louisiana public affairs leader, The Dow Chemical Company. “Ultimately, our goal is to play a positive role in making our community a better place to live." Chiasson explained that Dow surveys its near neighbors about what they think quality of life issues are and healthcare always ranks in the top three. “What is important to our neighbors is important to us as well,” she said. “We are unable to support every organization and in times like these, we have to become even more strategic with our giving. We look at organizations that are far reaching, and the reach of Mary Bird Perkins is amazing. We look at who is a good steward of contributions and who makes the biggest impact. Mary Bird Perkins does it over and over and over again.”

“It was because of Mary Bird Perkins’ success – its track record – that we made the decision not to decrease our contribution. An unfortunate recession does not negate the need for a community cancer center.” Stacey Chiasson Louisiana public affairs leader The Dow Chemical Company “Needless to say, we are thrilled,” stated Carolyn A. Chassee, CFRE, vice president, chief development officer, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. “Dow’s commitment to the community – their participation as a partner in addressing local quality of life concerns – where cancer is concerned, will help us save lives. We could not be more grateful.”

Providing Leading-Edge Clinical Trials to Our Patients

T

he mission of Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center’s clinical research program is to provide cancer patients and their physicians access to clinically relevant research trials that will lead to advances in evidenced-based disease management.

Most clinical trials are treatment related studies. Trials currently available at Mary Bird Perkins test new types of treatments, such as new drugs, new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy, or new combinations of treatments. One trial is called Total Cancer Care, which is a study open for patients who currently have cancer and who will have a biopsy or cancer-related surgery performed at Our Lady of The Lake Regional Medical Center. This study involves thousands of patients, which will lead to gene-based technology to try to find the best drug specific to the “molecular fingerprint” of the tumor. For more information regarding clinical trials available please visit ww.marybird.org or call (225) 215-1353. www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 20

MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center gratefully acknowledges the following gifts made in memory of or to honor a special person or loved one during the period of March 1, 2009 to August 28, 2009. Memorial and honor gifts may be made at any time and mailed to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Office of Development, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Gifts may also be made online at www.marybird.org under “Make a Gift.”

In Memory of Sue Abernethy Ms. B. J. Abernethy Florence Accardo Mr. and Mrs. Elwyn Bocz Charlie Albert Mr. and Mrs. Joe Kelly Sidney Alleman Ms. Pearl Alleman George Lawrence “Larry” Allen Ms. Susan M. Allen A. J. Amoroso III Anonymous Wallace Armstrong Todd and Kelli Stevens Julanne V. Arthur Mr. Theodore R. Arthur, Jr. Marie Ruby Bailey Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Seaton Chester McClure Baker, Sr. Ms. Carolyn A. Chassee Renea Austin-Duffin Charity Gay Mr. and Mrs. David Landry Debbie and Wayne Landry Mr. and Mrs. Ricky Thomas Jean Barnwell Mr. and Mrs. Jerry M. Baldwin Richard Barry Anonymous Ms. Eleanore Barry Mrs. Elizabeth B. Barry Angelina Barthel Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Brumfield Joey, Joanna and Adam Crifasi Mrs. Peggy L. Guidroz Angeline Gulino and Mario Ms. Lori A. Meyerer Miss Myrtis E. Rogers Mrs. Vicki M. Sinagra Ernest Dell Bateman Ann and Frank McMains Sharon Beard Evelyn and C.P. LeJeune

Marc Becker Karen and Harry Kleinman Horace Benjamin Ms. Rosa Benjamin Cecil Halbert Benton, Jr. Mrs. Peggy Edwards Anselmo James “Buck” Bergeron Mrs. Louise Guidroz Lynn P. Bertaut, Jr. Verify, Inc. Janet S. Bertone Mr. Joseph Bertone David and Sandy Leader William Blount Anonymous Thomas Bordelon Joe and Judith Kelly Edwin Brabetz Mr. and Mrs. Michael Perrault David Branton Ms. Blossom Branton Doris Buerger Joe and Judith Kelly Carol Mae Turner Buhler Dr. Sharon Fox Mrs. Joyce Goudeau Joe and Judith Kelly Ineos Lab Group Mrs. Winnie P. McLaughlin Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Turner Mr. and Mrs. Lester W. Turner Gloria Butler Joe and Judith Kelly James Butler Mr. and Mrs. John Lapenas Joan J. Butt Mr. Herbert H. Butt Leo and Gladys Cambre Mr. and Mrs. Rayborn Fontenot Sandra Cambre Mr. Gaston Gerald Mr. and Mrs. Donald Modicut Oak Forest Civic Association Robert Cason Picou Brothers Construction Co., Inc. Elton Cazes John and Gretchen Williams Gilda Cerinich Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Baronich George Joseph Charlet, Jr. Joe and Judith Kelly Mr. and Mrs. John Lapenas, Jr. Robin Remmelts Childs Mr. and Mrs. G.F. Allen, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John C. Blackwelder Joe and Sharon Mehrtens Nolan Power Group LLC Ms. Jeanne Parrish Vital Link, A Home Care Company Mr. and Mrs. Ben Wolfe

20 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Ronnie Chustz Myles and Dana Kirkland Wayne Chustz Myles and Dana Kirkland Walter H. Corkern Mrs. Linda Corkern Evelyn Dash Creel Mr. Louis Bartet Mr. David Lee Humbert Mr. and Mrs. Norman E. Masters Mr. Kenneth B. Merry Mr. and Mrs. Joe W. Moore Mr. and Mrs. R. Dennis Rodgers Mrs. Pat Ann Sulyma Mrs. Peggy Humbert Mary Lou Crifasi Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Miller, Jr. Alvin Joseph Curole Shaw Industries Group, Inc. Luke Cusimano Mr. Marion L. Mascarella Lynn Marshall Cutrer Janet and Jerry Baldwin Patsy Daigle Mr. Marion L. Mascarella Victor E. Debetaz Mr. and Mrs. Ted E. Denstel Helen Demers Mr. Larry L. Rolling, Jr. Margie Faye Hodgeson Diez Little Prairie Baptist Church Mr. Samuel L. Stewart Janie Distefano Mrs. Grace M. Mire L. J. Ducote, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Ternahan Carl Russell Dunn Mrs. Cynthia A. Dunn Dorothy Hazel Dunn Chad and Brittany Dunn Michael Patrick Dunne Mr. and Mrs. Mark Galliand Sherilyn Nugent Dupuy Mrs. Miriam Hearn Crump Bobby Durham Ms. Nellyn Aguilar Darian and Lisa Chustz Nancy Eberts Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mehrtens Tammy Edmonston Phillip “Soup” Clark The Coleman Family E.A. Class of 1977 Mr. and Mrs. Dempsey H. Edmonston Mr. Murphy H. Edmonston, Jr. Mark and Mitzi Ficklin Floyd and Lucille Melancon Kaigler Family Ms. Carol Kaplita Ms. Diane Kling Ms. Trudy G. Thibodeaux


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 21

MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Marnie Evans Joe and Judith Kelly Eloise R. Falgoust Mr. Jess J. Waguespack Patricia Fisher Mr. Herbert H. Butt Elaine Keating Fletcher Ms. Marion Corkern Mrs. Lynn Dalier Mr. and Mrs. Bob Doucet Sherri and Richard Hayden Mr. and Mrs. H. Mack Ingle Bob and Louise Lewis Mrs. Kenneth D. Phelps Mrs. Agnes Titkemeyer Minnie May Bennett and Joanne Troth Ron and Brenda Truxillo Angela Fluker Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Accardo Mr. Dane C. Andreeff Ms. Yvonne S. Conrad Mrs. Amy H. Darbonne Mr. Isaac DeLee First Baptist Church Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey S. Ghann Mr. and Mrs. Fred J. Gossen, Sr. Ms. Tracie B. Greely Mr. and Mrs. John A. Kirkwood Melanie Langlois and Mickey Gremillion Ms. Danette McGee John and Gretchen Williams Derby Fruge’ Mrs. Elaine Simms Thomas Fusco Mike Cammarosano Mary “Maggie” Magdaline Gautreau Mr. and Mrs. Greg Haydel Sidney B. Gauteaux Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Mayeaux Mitch Giroir Joe and Judith Kelly Patricia Glass Mr. Henry V. Stanga, Jr. Bruce and Connie Gomez Mrs. Mary Landry Ms. Nancy T. Landry David Goodyear Ms. Shirley H. Wild Lawrence Granier Joe and Judith Kelly Wayne A. Greenwood Dr. and Mrs. Edward Dunigan Colan Griffin Dianne Griffin Jill Randel George G. Griffon, Jr. Mr. Ray W. Burgess Alice Faye Gros David and June Fitzgerald

Kay Guglielmo Ms. Mary Lou Beck Ms. Sherry Cason Mr. and Mrs. Eugene L. Croxton Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Evans Mrs. Gloria J. Owens Ms. Lucille Guglielmo Roy Mr. Charles Thibaut Mr. John Yarbrough Lynda Susan Duke Habig Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Onstead Danny Harris Mrs. Tammy Ward-Babin Albert J. Henry Ms. Diana Mann Jack Herron, Jr. Egg and Juanda Lyle Gary Heyl Ms. Kathleen F. Cangelosi Hogan, Kerry Ms. Iva Nell Hogan William H. Hopper Mrs. Patricia Stubbs Judy Ann Roussel Hotard Mr. Daniel G. Hotard Col. John Steven “Jack” Hubert, USAF (Ret.) Mr. and Mrs. Andrew S. Nadler Judy Humphreys Gil and Sue Hineman Margie Boyles Hutchinson Lynne Graner Landry James Hymel Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Onstead Richard Dean Ivey Sam and Krista Lowery Raymond Jarreau Myles and Dana Kirkland Jerry and Geneva Jones Mr. and Mrs. Brian A. Maiocchi Karleen P. Jones Mr. Frank E. Jones Wilma S. Jorda Mrs. Marie V. Achee Betty Keith Anonymous Crystal Lynn Kessler Debbie and Wayne Landry Mr. and Mrs. Bernard S. Kilbride Mr. Michael Kilbride Charles E. King Ms. Sue K. Longoria Myrtis Anne King Ms. Sue K. Longoria Dr. Erol Kozdereli Dr. and Mrs. Lamar L. Lambert Col. Theron Gaston Ladner Safety Council of LA Capital Area Mrs. Billie Wire Henry and Marine Lambert Mr. and Mrs. Harley C. Cody, Jr.

Joanne LaMotte Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Walsh Margaret Taylor Lane Mrs. Barbara Parker Patsy Langlois Mr. James Langlois Rosemary Lawrence Dr. and Mrs. James D. McElveen Andre LeBeuf John and Genevieve Barry Mrs. Marilyn K. Manchester Joe and Betty Salter Kathi M. Lebeuf Mrs. Marilyn K. Manchester Ann LeBlanc Joe and Judith Kelly Mr. and Mrs. Thomas LeBreton Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Hohman Judith Anne Lee E.C. and Mary Jo Forbes Bill and Zelma Lofton Russell and Ruth Singleton Rose Mary Lee Debbie and Wayne Landry Raymond C. Lemkul Dr. and Mrs. Kelly Joseph McKinell Leslie Livingston Brenda Truxillo Glenna Lynn Mr. and Mrs. Donald N. Piatt Dwight Maddox Ms. Peggy Eagan Sylvia Manis Michael Manis Ms. Robin C. Silverman Charles S. Marchand Anonymous Irma Martin Claire Loup Darlene Morgan Mary Lena Debate Matherne Board of Directors, Management and Employees of Associated Grocers, Inc. Dr. A. K. McInnis, Jr. Ms. Mary Laidlaw Smith Mrs. Jane S. Van Reenen Pearl McLeod Ms. Janet J. Stogner Katie Allen McNabb Mrs. Mary M. Allen Edward Mix Mr. Douglas Langlois Valorie H. Montgomery Charlene, Wayne, and Angie Hamilton Bernadette Moore Mr. and Mrs. Hildrith Wegener Kenneth Moore Mrs. Veronica Moore Edward Clements Mulligan Jack and Maxine Accurso

www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 22

MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Gloria Margaret Webb Mulligan Young at Heart First Baptist Church Phil Muscarello Mr. Michael Cammaronsano Davis Vision Ms. Lyndra Lea Mr. Sam J. Marino, Sr. Ms. Lena M. Polite Hettie Austin Myer Joe and Judith Kelly Russell Nash Anonymous Tom and Mary Breaux Mr. and Mrs. Harley C. Cody, Jr. Mrs. Ann Daugherty Mr. Brian Gray Mr. and Mrs. Bill Soniat Sedonia Navarre Mr. and Mrs. James N. Prine Mary Ann Schulin Patin Kenneth and Peggy LeBeau Sally Saizan Edna Ross Patton Mr. Curtis Patton Ranny G. Pearce Mr. and Mrs. Charles Angelloz, Jr. and Family Alex Chauffe, Jr. Mrs. Vicki Guidroz Harry L. Laws and Company, Inc. Mrs. Judy B. Pearce Progressive Tractor and Implement Co., Inc. Antoinette Reed Brent Rivet Ms. Julie Taylor Elizabeth Tate Peters Ms. Annie Mae Ferguson Aubin Hazel Ferguson Peters Ms. Annie Mae Ferguson Aubin Roger Dwight Piatt Mr. and Mrs. Donald N. Piatt Shawntell Plache Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth D. Maher, Sr. Peggy Politz Mr. and Mrs. James C. Gammel Della L. Prine Mr. and Mrs. James N. Prine Gordon A. Pugh, Sr. Judge and Mrs. Lewis Doherty III Zoe Keefe Pursell Mr. Wallace G. Pursell Camille Raggio Ms. Mary Laidlaw Smith Mrs. Jane S. Van Reenen Donnie Reynolds Debbie and Wayne Landry W. R. “Bud” Rice Joe and Judith Kelly Shirlene C. Richard Ken and Lexie Van Tassel

Albert J. Richardson, Jr. Mrs. Albert J. Richardson Jr. Dr. Guy Riche’, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Leo M. Abraham Janet and Jerry Baldwin Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M. Blitzer, Jr. Lorraine Roach David and June Fitzgerald Karen Cascio Robert Mr. and Mrs. Sid Garrison Noah Robert Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Babin Butch Rolling Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Kemp, III Fred Ross Sam and Krista Lowery Dr. John S. Roussel, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Roussel Regina Sanchez Mrs. Dorothy Webre Elaine Caffarel Schlatre Mr. Charles N. Schlatre, Sr. Geraldine Fleniken “Jerry” Schwing Claudia and Ernie Delahaye Marie Carroll Seals Dr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Graves Nelson Senegal, Sr. Pam and Mike Pourciau and the Staff of Drapes Unlimited Roger Wayne Sigler Ms. Molly S. Morgan Mrs. Mary Morgan Joseph S. Simmons Mr. Martin B. Haymon Amanda Haydel Sinanan Mr. and Mrs. Greg Haydel Ruthell Skiles Frank and Linda Moore Edith “Dotsy” Smith Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Rabalais Lelan R. Smith Sam and Krista Lowery Sharon C. Smith Mr. Jack B. Garrison Charlotte G. Spring Clements Insurance Services Doris St. Romain George and Betty Reynolds Leonard H. Stander Dr. and Mrs. Joe A. Morgan Glenda B. Stevens Mr. and Mrs. Bruce J. Hernandez Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert L. Lawton V. O. Story Mrs. Gladys C. Siebert Amy West Strain Anonymous Ms. Deanna Ashworth Baton Rouge Country Club Dr. and Mrs. Art Bedeian

22 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

BSI Entergy Partners, LLC Mrs. Debbie Buckingham Patsy and Neal Chastain Cox Operating, L.L.C. Mr. and Mrs. Michael G. Cullen, Jr. David M. Ellison, Jr. French Quarter Citizens, Inc. Galatoire’s Restaurant Ann, Carol and Buel Humphreys David Humphreys and Family Dave Garber and Susan Irby The Janke Family Bobby and Maxine Jones Mr. J. P. Keeter Rosie and Ed Langhetee Mayhall & Blaize, LLC Gloria McMurry and Susan McMurry Lang Mrs. Betty M. Phillips Mary Alice and Hoky Phillips Mrs. Harry W. Platter Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Plumb Bob and Raydene Prichard Mr. Robert L. Redfearn Kathleen and Dale Redman Mr. and Mrs. Edgar E. Spielman, Jr. Clint and Mary Lou St. Clair Mrs. Samuel J. St. Romain Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Stephens Mrs. Ann Trost Mr. Chris A. Verret Mr. Mac Versaw The West Family Tom and Jane Wicker Ms. Gertrude W. Williamson Doris Sweatt Dr. Basil O. Sweatt Charles Taylor Mr. and Mrs. Wiley F. Duke, Jr. John Ray Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Richard Leggette Nicole E. Trabeaux Mr. and Mrs. James J. Alleman, Jr. Aretha F. Holmes Van Buren ExxonMobil Emergency Response Margaret Dorothy Vance Ms. Carol Page Freddie and Carol Vincent Brenda Truxillo Janet Webb Mr. and Mrs. Hildrith Wegener William Preston Welch Janet and Jerry Baldwin Ms. Babs Gilmore Jack Wells Mrs. Virginia Lou “Jenny” Wells Richard West Wayne and Jeanette Grip Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Legleu Robert Wicker, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry M. Baldwin


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 23

MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Henry Edward Wilson Gay Hoover Mr. Thomas W. Walker Margaret E. Wilson Anonymous Barbara Womack Mr. and Mrs. Nelson A. Bourgeois Charles Woodard Mr. and Mrs. George White and Family William Wright Myles and Dana Kirkland Jean Zimma Thomas and Maurine Parker

In Honor of Randy Alleman Ms. Pearl Alleman Dr. Bryan Bienvenu Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Harlow, Sr. Carol Buhler Joe and Judith Kelly Cancer Patients Ms. Sarah F. Mitchell Harry Joseph Chatelain, Jr. Gregory and Bonnie Boothe Joseph M. Daigle Craig and Bridget Soileau

Preston Dogua Mrs. Judy Dogua Dr. Robert Fields Dr. Oscar Hidalgo-Salvatierra Diana Gesser Cassie Arceneaux and B.C. Thibeaux III Roy L. Grob Ms. Laura B. Oubre Dr. David Hanson Deborah B. Normand Dr. Greg Henkelmann,Valerie, and Treatment Staff Anonymous Dr. Sheldon Johnson Mr. Michael P. Sotile, Sr. Maureen Jones Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Normand Dr. Maurice King and Staff Anonymous Carolyn D. LeBlanc Anonymous Dr. Kenneth Lo Mr. Kirk Varnado Joe McCarter Mr. W. Donald McCarter Waver Moreau Ms. Mona Gaspard

Dot Ourso Mrs. Evelyn D. Lafitte Boyd Perry Mrs. Beth Perry Lolette Robert Marie Robert Harris Teresa M. Rupp Mrs. Kerrie L. Kulbeth Mr. and Mrs. Don W. Schittone Mr. and Mrs. John Schittone, Jr. Roy Stafford Mary Williams Brenda Truxillo Dr. Oscar Hidalgo-Salvatierra Debbie Landry Bill Whitehead Joe and Judith Kelly Mrs. Nedra W. Williams Mr. Russell Bankston

2009 – 2010 Board of Directors and Officers J. GERARD JOLLY Chairman KPMG LLP

RICHARD A. LIPSEY Immediate Past Chairman Lipsey’s, Inc.

DONNA M. SAURAGE Vice Chairman Community Volunteer

LEE MICHAEL BERG Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry

TOM J. MEEK JR., M.D. Secretary Dermatology Clinic RANDY WAESCHE Treasurer Resource Management, Inc. MAURICE L. KING, M.D. Medical Director Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center TODD D. STEVENS President and CEO Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center

KEVIN R. CARMAN, PH.D. Dean, College of Basic Sciences Louisiana State University DUDLEY W. COATES Smith Barney (Retired) WILLIAM T. FIRESHEETS Buquet & LeBlanc BRETT P. FURR Taylor Porter Attorneys at Law

ROSE J. HUDSON Louisiana Lottery Corporation SANCY H. MCCOOL Community Volunteer SHELLEY MOCKLER Mockler Beverage-Budweiser BILL O’QUIN Financial Services Online BILL PETERS Peters Wealth Advisors, L.L.C. GARY A. SLIGAR Baton Rouge Coca-Cola (Retired) PAUL R. THOMPSON Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

G. LEE GRIFFIN Chase (Retired)

www.marybird.org • Volume 2 2009


M a r y B i rd Pe rk i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r Fo u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e rs

26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 24

“You Couldn’t Be in Better Hands”

T

he town of Pocahontas, Virginia gave Herbert Butt roots, but he has been all over the world ever since he left. First stop – Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia where he met his wife Joan, a New Jersey native. “I graduated on June 3rd and on June 5th I left for the service. I signed up for the Air Force before the Army could get me,” he laughed. That decision took him to Valdosta, Georgia for more than three years where he was worked as an air traffic controller. Upon returning to civilian life, Butt and his wife lived and worked in multiple places from Ohio to Uncle Sam, Louisiana and New Guinea to Baton Rouge. It was in Baton Rouge that Joan became a first grade teacher at St. Thomas More Catholic School, a position she held for 35 years. Ten years after Butt retired in 1990, Joan was diagnosed with breast cancer. Her treatment required surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. “Joan’s surgeon recommended she go to Mary Bird Perkins for the remainder of her treatment. Once we got to Mary Bird Perkins, we never really considered going anywhere else,” said Butt. “Once you have a doctor you trust, there is no sense looking elsewhere, especially if you can stay close to home.”

“After being at Mary Bird Perkins and seeing all that went Herbert Butt on, I started making annual contributions to the Center in 2001. You do not have to have significant wealth to make charitable contributions – every gift counts. It is especially important to keep giving in a tight economy. Even in rocky financial times, you should try to keep giving and cut back on something else. Every penny counts.” Joan fought her cancer for eight years. “We had already established a charitable remainder trust for a local educational institution,” explained Butt. “Before Joan passed away, we agreed that Mary Bird Perkins should be added to it. For eight years, we went to Mary Bird Perkins every month. Toward the end, it was every week. When you are going that much, it is like home. Joan’s treatment team of Dr. David Hanson, nurse practitioner GiGi Ghebretatios and Dr. Sheldon Johnson turned out to be a very important part of our lives. We wanted to help make sure that same opportunity would be there for others. We knew from experience that if you have cancer, you could not be in better hands than Mary Bird Perkins’.” Butt remains a very active individual. He enjoys travel, golf, reading mysteries and dining out with friends. After three terms as a BREC Commissioner, he is in his tenth year of volunteering on BREC’s golf committee, giving back to the community by donating his time – another form of philanthropy. Herbert and Joan Butt’s gift to Mary Bird Perkins of a charitable remainder trust will help ensure that patients and families for generations to come will have access to all the services they need at Mary Bird Perkins and that valuable cancer research can continue.

24 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

www.marybirdfoundation.org


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:50 PM

Page 25

Few pleasures in life offer more personal satisfaction or endure longer than helping others live better lives. As you think about holiday gifts for family and friends, remember that making year-end charitable gifts can be one of your most heartwarming experiences.

Receive Tax Benefits In addition to the immense personal satisfaction you gain from knowing that your gift supports our mission, you may also receive tax benefits. Depending on the gift arrangements you choose, you can:

• Reduce your income and estate taxes. • Increase your spendable income. • Avoid capital gains tax. • Attain no-cost, worry-free asset management. Make your gifts to Mary Bird Perkins by Dec. 31 and you will see a tax break for this year (when you itemize deductions on your income tax return).

Ways to Give Cash can be used to prepay a pledge or make larger-than-usual charitable gifts. Another option is to donate securities that are worth more than you originally paid for them. Or, give to a plan that provides you with income for your lifetime. Other gift ideas include life insurance you no longer want or need, as well as real estate.

We Can Help Call the MBP Office of Development for more information about the many ways you can make a difference with a gift to Mary Bird Perkins.

Timing Is Everything All gifts must be completed on or before Dec. 31 to qualify for an income tax deduction this year. • Cash contributions sent through the mail are usually deductible if they are mailed by midnight on December 31. • Securities are generally deductible on the date they are transferred (if done electronically) to our books—not the date you ask your broker to make the transfer. • Real estate gifts, in most states, are considered complete on the date a properly executed deed is delivered.

www.marybirdfoundation.org

M a r y B i rd Pe rk i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r Fo u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e rs

Spreading Joy at Year End


M a r y B i rd Pe rk i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r Fo u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e rs

26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:51 PM

Page 26

How to Take Control of Your Legacy You’ve heard (probably more times than you can count!) about how important it is to have a last will and testament—and maybe you already have one. But think for a moment about why. Perhaps what’s most important to you is the fact that having a will ensures your property will pass to those you care about. If you don’t leave a will, state law determines how your assets will be divided. It’s highly doubtful you would agree to this arbitrary method of choosing your heirs and determining their shares. An old will can be almost as bad as none at all. Your wishes today for the division of your estate may be quite different from those you had when you made your will. Life events, tax law changes, a move to another state or changes in the nature and value of your assets can also affect your will. To make sure your wishes are followed, you need an up-to-date will. But there’s another reason that a will is important: What you put in your will is what people will remember you by. Your will gives you the opportunity to transfer the values that are important to you. And one of the best ways to leave a legacy like this is to make charitable bequests in your will.

Bill O’Quinn, Anna B. Lipsey Legacy Builder

The Form of Your Bequest Remembering Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Foundation in your will is a fitting testimony of your belief in our mission. When you name us as a beneficiary, you have many choices. One possibility is a bequest of a fixed dollar amount. Another is to give us a percentage of the estate, which allows you to keep the division of the estate residue in desired proportions, regardless of its size. Your gift can be contingent. That is, the funds would go to some individual if that person survives you. If not, they would be paid to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Foundation. A gift without restrictions is usually the most useful, because it allows us to apply the funds to our most pressing needs. But you also have the right to restrict your gift by specifying in your will how the funds are to be used. If you wish to do so, we urge you to consult us before you execute your will to make certain the conditions are ones we are able to meet. One example of a restricted gift, especially if the amount is substantial, is the requirement that we hold the principal as an endowment and use only the income, as you indicate or as our governing board decides. One of the nicest things you can do is to make your gift in memory of someone—either yourself or a person you’ve loved or admired. We’re pleased to honor this kind of request, and we have many ways of granting appropriate recognition.

Get Sound Legal Advice When the time comes for your will to be probated, you won’t be here to correct any misunderstandings. To avoid trouble for your heirs, be sure to seek the counsel of an attorney who specializes in probate and estate planning. If you’re planning to create a deferred gift to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Foundation, we would be happy to work with your attorney and financial advisors to find the method that works best for you. For more information, please contact Office of Development at (225) 215-1224, or via e-mail at foundation@marybird.com. 26 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

www.marybirdfoundation.org


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:51 PM

Page 27

Sometimes it’s difficult to be charitable when your budget is tight and the future is uncertain. After all, your family comes first. But many types of charitable gifts enable you to make a significant donation while saving taxes or receiving income in return.

The following are a few of the most popular, beneficial ways to support our mission.

1 2 3

A gift in your will or revocable living trust. Known as a bequest, this form of giving is accomplished simply by including a few sentences in your will or living trust. Contact Office of Development at (225) 215-1224 or foundation@marybird.com for our official bequest language. A gift that provides you with income for life. Through a life income gift, you provide us with assets. In return, we agree to provide you, and other individuals if you choose, with income for life. After your lifetimes, we use the remaining balance to carry out our mission. Punch the numbers on our online gift calculator to see your possible benefits. Please go to www.marybird.org.

A gift of your IRA or retirement plan assets. You can name Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Foundation as the primary or contingent beneficiary on the plan’s beneficiary designation form.

To learn more about these giving methods, please contact Office of Development at (225) 215-1224 or foundation@marybird.com, at no obligation.

www.marybirdfoundation.org

M a r y B i rd Pe rk i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r Fo u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e rs

3 Smart Ways to Support Mary Bird Perkins on a Budget


26101-15558_MBP_PP_Vol2-rev.qxd:mbp

11/10/09

5:51 PM

Page 28

PERKINS PERSPECTIVE is published by the Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Communications Department to provide information about news and programs of interest to the medical community, cancer patients and their families, donors and friends of the Center. Communications Department (225) 215-1225 Amy L. Benton, VP of communications and governmental affairs • Lisa O’Deay, communications manager Debby Vollmer, public relations manager/senior staff writer • Erin Knight, communications specialist

NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 Address Service Requested

BATON ROUGE, LA PERMIT NO. 603


2009 V2 Perkins Perspective