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PERKINS

PERSPECTIVE Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years. Available Online at www.marybird.org

Volume 1 2008

Over 20,000 Screened…Page 2 Rays of Hope…Page 4 Building In Gonzales…Page 7 Pictured above (l to r): John Gibbons, PhD and Jeff Fuller, MD hold the shields used in a highly specialized procedure for the treatment of an eye cancer. It is offered in Louisiana only by the Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins.


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E A R LY D E T E C T I O N S AV E S L I V E S

Mary Bird Perkins and Its Early Detection Partners Screen Over 20,000 People

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Making a difference in the fight against cancer is a community effort – and Mary Bird Perkins’ CARE Network and its partners are delivering real results. In only six years, the CARE Network’s early detection outreach initiative has grown from a pilot program to having screened its 20,000th person in 2007. Since 2002, over 464 free screening events have been held in southeast Louisiana for breast, colorectal, prostate and skin cancer. “We couldn’t do this without so many dedicated partners committed to this cause and the generosity of donor support from a caring community,” said Renea A. Duffin, executive director of Mary Bird Perkins’ CARE Network. MBP clinically collaborates with other health care agencies to provide screenings. In 2004, Mary Bird Perkins, Woman’s Hospital and YWCA ENCOREplus established regular breast cancer screenings to help fight cancer. For colorectal, skin and prostate cancer screenings, the CARE Network partners with Our Lady of the Lake, St. Elizabeth Hospital in Gonzales and St. Tammany Parish Hospital in Covington. The breast screening partnership served Mel Eskridge well when she found herself desperately in need of help.

Through partnerships with Woman’s Hospital, LSU HCSD and YWCA ENCOREplus, Mel Eskridge was able to participate in a free breast cancer screening leading to her diagnosis of breast cancer. Pictured (l to r) are Eskridge and her children Rishard, Jasmine and Jada. Surgeon Dr. Michael Hailey was consulted and ultimately performed a biopsy that proved positive for breast cancer. In addition to chemotherapy and a lumpectomy, Eskridge underwent removal of several lymph nodes under her arm. She then had six weeks of radiation treatment at Mary Bird Perkins under the care of Dr. Renee Levine. “I see it all as heaven-sent,” Eskridge said. “I went to Woman’s thinking ‘who would know better?’ and they told me about the screening. Then Dr. Hailey took me as his patient. And now I’m here at Mary Bird Perkins. Without all those people helping me, I wouldn’t be here. I am blessed.

It was the morning of her 34th birthday that Eskridge felt a lump in her right breast. She wasn’t even old enough for her first screening mammogram (age 40, according to American Cancer Society national screening guidelines). Nor did she have a doctor. Her family, originally from New Orleans, had relocated to Dallas for a year after Hurricane Katrina. Now living in Baton Rouge, her fiancé and three children – Jasmine, 13; Jada, 9; and Rishard, Jr., 2 – were still getting used to life in their newly adopted city.

“It’s not easy but there’s a reason I’m still here. I’m a survivor. I keep fighting for my kids. They’re my strength.”

Eskridge did the only thing she could think of. She went to Woman’s Hospital to find help.

• One out of every 107 women we screened for breast cancer in the last two years had a confirmed diagnosis.

“I thought a hospital for women would know what I should do,” she said. A nurse practitioner did a clinical breast exam and recommended that she come back for a free breast cancer screening being offered just a few days later by MBP and Woman’s Hospital.

• Over 50% of the 33 confirmed diagnoses of breast cancer were found at screening locations that hold events monthly.

Eskridge returned for a second clinical breast exam, followed by a workup that included a diagnostic mammogram and ultrasound. 2 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

• In the past two years on the Early Bird, MBP’s mobile medical clinic, screenings have resulted in compelling results with breast cancer representing 79% of the cancers diagnosed.

• 2007 data reflects that 25% of the women seen had never been screened and another 39% had not been screened in two or more years. • In addition, the average age of diagnosis in 2007 was 44 years, with the youngest woman being only 34 years old.


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My Perspective A message from

Todd Stevens, president and CEO

In the pages ahead, you will read about the many ways resources are being leveraged to fight cancer through innovative partnerships. It is through these effective partnerships that Mary Bird Perkins is privileged to be a part of the great strides being made in the transformation of cancer care in the United States.

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Our partnership with Our Lady of the Lake (OLOL) is now the only cancer program in Louisiana able to treat a rare cancer of the eye. Heretofore, patients had to travel to Tennessee or Georgia for treatment. Be sure and check out the reprint from the Baton Rouge Business Report in this edition of the Perkins Perspective for more details on this innovative procedure that can help save a person’s eyesight and life. Another reprint in this edition highlights the MBPLSU partnership via an interview with Dr. Hogstrom, chief of physics at MBP and professor and director of the Medical Physics and Health Physics Program at LSU.

Other partnerships you will read about in this issue involve the 4th Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, a location we are building together with St. Elizabeth Hospital in Gonzales. We helped to reach some important NCCCP goals through the event held for National Minority Cancer Awareness Week – a week recognized by our NCCCP partner pilot sites across the country. And, this summer we will be partnering with individuals, organizations and corporations that support our annual pro-am golf tournament, the Mary Bird Perkins-Merrill Lynch Open. We couldn’t do what we do without our community partners who so generously give of their valuable time and talents to make a difference…especially people like the Mary Bird Perkins fundraising volunteers who, in 2007, helped raise over two million dollars for cancer care. Thank you for your tremendous teamwork and vision as we all work to eradicate cancer and improve the health of our communities. Sincerely,

Todd D. Stevens Mary Bird Perkins and its many early detection partners reached an incredible landmark at the end of last year by screening the 20,000th person for cancer. And, by the first quarter of 2008, we have already screened 1,000 more people. This partnership-based effort is delivering significant results.

www.marybird.org • Volume 1 2008


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Rays of Hope

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A collaboration and protocol were established in 2007 for treatment of ocular melanoma – cancer of the eye. A rare condition, accounting for only one in every 500 cancers in the U.S., it not only can cause blindness but can also lead to death. Years ago the only treatment was removal of the eye. Today, there is an option that can save both eyesight and a person’s life. The first patient was treated in November 2007. The Greater Baton Rouge Business Report ran a story on this procedure in its recent Health Issue. The original article written by Steve Clark follows: Chances are you’ll never need it, but if you do, you can get it right here in Baton Rouge. “It” is a treatment for rare eye cancer called choroidal melanoma, in which low-dose radiation is applied to the affected area in an ingenious way: Radioactive “seeds” about 3 millimeters long are placed inside a solid gold cap—or plaque—that is attached to the eyeball. The gold backing keeps the radiation from penetrating where it’s not supposed to go, such as the brain.

GOLDENEYE: Dr. John Gibbons, chief of clinical physics with Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, shows a solid gold plaque that is attached to the eyeball to help treat choroidal melanoma. The gold backing keeps the radiation from penetrating where it’s not supposed to go, such as the brain.

The treatment can be a lifesaver for people afflicted with choroidal melanoma, of which roughly 2,000 new cases are diagnosed in the United States every year. The disease primarily strikes older, fair-skinned Caucasians with blue eyes, though level of sun exposure doesn’t seem to be a factor.

Dr. Kenneth Lo, a radiation oncologist with Mary Bird Perkins, completes the team. He consults with patients about the procedure, fine tunes the dosage and makes sure the tumor hasn’t metastasized. Unfortunately, when that happens, there’s only a 10% chance the patient will live for five more years.

That’s according to Dr. John Gibbons, chief of clinical physics with Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, which partnered with Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center to offer the treatment as part of a joint cancer program.

Before the procedure was invented, about two decades ago, anyone with choroidal melanoma was guaranteed to lose the eye. The treatment was available in New Orleans before Katrina, though now the Mary Bird Perkins program is the only place to get it done in Louisiana—a fact they like to tout because it’s yet another weapon in their cancer-fighting arsenal, albeit a rarely used one.

“The ratio of white to non-white victims is 9-to-1, so it’s pretty high,” he says. Dr. Jeff Fuller, an ocular oncologist with OLOL and another member of the eye plaque team, says that, although rare, choroidal melanoma is one of the most common among a wide variety of ocular tumors. “This is one of the only life-threatening tumors,” he says. “We do the treatment not just to try and help preserve their eye and their vision as much as possible, but to save their lives as well.” Fuller’s job is to insert and remove the plaque containing the radioactive seeds, which are the same seeds used in much greater quantities to treat things like prostate cancer. Gibbons determines the dosage and prepares the tiny radioactive package, which stays attached to the eye—the back of the eye usually—

4 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

from five to nine days.

Fuller says the procedure usually costs between $22,000 and $30,000. Fuller receives about $1,500 of that to perform the surgery, dictated by Medicare’s physician reimbursement schedule. The rest of the cost comes from the cost of anesthesia and radiation oncology services. The radioactive seeds themselves are also very expensive—from $100 to perhaps a few hundred dollars per seed. “You figure you pay that much you’d get to keep them, but we take them back,” Gibbons says. OLOL and Mary Bird Perkins began offering the procedure not long after Fuller relocated to Baton Rouge from Iowa last year, joined a medical practice and through OLOL teamed up with


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Gibbons and Lo. Gibbons had already set up an eye plaque program in South Carolina, so he knew how to make it happen on Mary Bird Perkins’ end. “It’s a good thing to offer the service for the patients,” Fuller says. “I think there’s probably a benefit from a marketing or bragging rights standpoint. That was one of the reasons my partner [Dr. John Couvillion] really wanted to get me here. He knew no one did this in the state, and this was something we could add to the practice.” Gibbons says the best thing is that patients don’t have to travel. “The big plus is that people don’t have to go outside,” he says. “They can stay in Louisiana.” That was a big deal for Linda Holmes, the team’s first—and only—patient so far. She doesn’t fit the typical victim’s profile in that she has brown eyes—not blue—and isn’t particularly fairskinned. But Holmes, who lives in Baton Rouge, learned she had choroidal melanoma after seeing an ophthalmologist for vision problems. The news came as a shock. She’d had family members who had died of skin melanoma, but nothing involving the eye. The doctor referred her to Fuller, who had just arrived and didn’t have all his medical equipment. He told Holmes she’d have to go to Tennessee or Georgia for treatment, though she was having none of it.

“I feel like God sent him here for me,” she says. “He could have gone anywhere in the United States he wanted to go. I just felt like he was sent here for me.”

Partnering on EYE CANCER Medical physicists collaborate on highly specialized eye cancer procedure. Offered only by the Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins A new collaboration and protocol was developed in 2007 for treatment of ocular melanoma – cancer of the eye. A rare condition, accounting for only one in every 500 cancers in the U.S. or approximately 1,800 cases per year, it not only can cause blindness but also can lead to death. Years ago the only treatment was removal of the eye. Today, there is an option that can save both eyesight and a person’s life. In November 2007, the first patient was treated. “This is one of the only life-threatening ocular tumors,” said Jeff Fuller, MD, OLOL ocular oncologist. “We do the treatment not just to try to help preserve their eye and their vision as much as possible, but to save their lives as well.”

“I said, ‘I’ll wait on you if you just promise to treat me like your own mother,’” Holmes says.

A gold shield, or plaque, is inserted behind the eye. The smooth side of the plaque provides a barrier to protect the brain while the radioactive ‘seeds’ inserted on the other side radiate the tumor.

Part of it was her confidence in Fuller. Part of it was her dislike of traveling. The idea of five nights in a motel room was extremely unappealing, especially because it’s difficult to leave her dog, which has medical problems.

John Gibbons, PhD, MBP medical physicist, stated, “The best thing is that patients don’t have to travel. They can stay in Louisiana.”

Not only would Holmes have had to travel out of state for the initial treatment, but also for the frequent, required follow-up visits. As it is, Holmes’ treatment was a success; the tumor is shrinking, and she doesn’t have to leave town. The vision in that eye improves a little each day, though the remnants of the tumor will always block her “dead center” vision in the eye to some extent. Mainly, Holmes is just glad the tumor is dead and she gets to keep her eye. As for Fuller’s arrival in Baton Rouge around the same time she learned about the melanoma, Holmes is convinced it was more than just a coincidence.

This procedure was performed in collaboration with Retina & Vitreous of Louisiana. Dr. Jeff Fuller, ophthalmologist and retinal specialist, OLOL, performed the surgery; MBP radiation oncologist Dr. Kenneth Lo handled radiation treatment planning to ensure the placement and combined dose of the seeds would not harm any nearby critical structures; and Dr. John Gibbons, MBP chief of clinical physics, oversaw the handling and insertion of the radioactive seeds.

www.marybird.org • Volume 1 2008


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I N YO U R C O M M U N I T Y What Our Patients Say: Patients at Mary Bird Perkins locations in Baton Rouge, Covington and Hammond are given an anonymous quality of care questionnaire upon completion of their treatment. Results are sent to an independent research consultant who compares the results to those of other similar community cancer centers across the country. Examples of some of the quotes patients felt compelled to write are below:

MBP Names New Medical Director Dr. Maurice King Selected

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Dr. Maurice King has recently been named medical director of Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. “Since joining Southeast Louisiana Radiation Oncology Group (SLROG), the radiation oncology group of physicians practicing exclusively at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center locations, in 2003, Dr. King has demonstrated outstanding leadership and has remained dedicated to providing cancer patients in our area with the most effective radiation treatment programs available,” said Todd Stevens, Mary Bird Perkins’ president and CEO.

“Thank you for the opportunity to meet and be treated by your very dedicated staff. This has been an honor and blessing for the help I have received from such a great group of specialists who treat and minister to so many people in distress.” Covington patient “Your doctors and staff take pride in their work. They show that they have really good feelings toward their patients.” Hammond patient “All the services provided were excellent and exceeded my expectations. I had several choices for treatment, but MBP was chosen because of many positive recommendations. The techs always made me feel at ease and comfortable for my treatments. My doctor was always encouraging me that all would go well.” Baton Rouge patient

A native of New Orleans, King received two BS degrees from Tulane University — one in Chemical Engineering and one in Applied Physics. After receiving his Medical Doctorate from LSU School of Medicine, King completed a general surgery residency at Ochsner in New Orleans before becoming the director of the emergency department at Seventh Ward General Hospital in Hammond. He then completed a Fellowship in Radiation Oncology at Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology in St. Louis, MO.

Lin Joins Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Medical Physics Team

King currently serves as an assistant clinical professor in Radiology and Medicine at Louisiana State University at Earl K. Long Hospital and an adjunct professor with the LSU Department of Physics and Astronomy’s medical physics program.

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Lan Lin, PhD, has joined Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center as a clinical Medical Physicist. She earned her doctorate in Medical Physics from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio where she served as a Graduate Teaching Assistant with the Department of Radiological Sciences. Lin received formal clinical training at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center in San Antonio, TX and worked as a Medical Physicist at International Medical Physics Services before coming to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center.

6 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.


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I N YO U R C O M M U N I T Y

Gonzales To Be Site of Fourth Mary Bird Perkins Location Groundbreaking Kicks Off Partnership with St. Elizabeth Hospital

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Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center and St. Elizabeth Hospital held a groundbreaking ceremony for their new outpatient cancer treatment center. The facility will be located on West Highway 30, across from St. Elizabeth Hospital. The two organizations are partnering to increase local and regional access to state-of-the-art cancer care, affording more people the opportunity to receive quality cancer care at home, in their own community.

Pictured (l to r): Hickley Waguespack, chairman, Board of Directors, St. Elizabeth Hospital; Dee LeJeune, president and CEO, St. Elizabeth Hospital; Todd Stevens, president and CEO, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center; Richard Lipsey, chairman, Board of Directors, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center.

“It is an honor to have the opportunity to work with St. Elizabeth and community physicians in the greater Ascension area to support cancer care,” said Todd Stevens, president and CEO of Mary Bird Perkins, to those present at the well-attended event. “It is important that people have access to high quality health care services in their community where they live and work.” President and CEO of St. Elizabeth Hospital Dee LeJeune said the partnership would provide a broader range of critical services for cancer patients. “Together, we are addressing an important need – local access to high-quality cancer care,” she said, explaining that this would make it possible for St. Elizabeth and the physician community to provide a broader range of services for cancer patients in the Ascension area. “We will be expanding our services to expand our mission.” As part of this joint venture, Mary Bird Perkins and St. Elizabeth Hospital will continue to jointly enhance outreach services with a grassroots approach to saving lives through education and early detection. The organizations have a history of partnering to provide free educational and cancer screening initiatives. With the support of local health care professionals, it is expected that these efforts will only grow in the future, ultimately improving the health of the community-at-large for generations to come.

The new center in Gonzales will feature advanced technology, including a high-energy linear accelerator utilizing image guided radiation therapy (IGRT); intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT); and leading-edge imaging using positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT). It will be supported by the medical physics team on staff at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, a program part of a partnership between Mary Bird Perkins and LSU. The radiation oncologists who will provide patient care at the new center are members of the Southeast Louisiana Radiation Oncology Group practicing exclusively at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center locations. Other speakers on the agenda included Richard Lipsey, chairman, Board of Directors, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, and Hickley Waguespack, chairman, Board of Directors, St. Elizabeth Hospital. The Blessing of the Ground was offered by Deacon William B. Blair, Jr., St. Theresa of Avila Catholic Church. Ascension Parish President Tommy Martinez; state Rep. Elton Aubert, D-Vacherie; and several Parish Council members including President Pat Bell, District 4; Dempsey Lambert, District 5; and Chris Loar, District 7 also attended the ceremonies.

“St. Elizabeth excels within our health system,” said John Finan, president and CEO of Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady Health System. “This is a wonderful opportunity to partner with another excellent organization.” Gonzales Mayor Johnny Berthelot praised the joint venture calling it “a convenience that truly enhances our community.” www.marybird.org • Volume 1 2008


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Q&A On the beam Cancer radiation therapy honcho discusses LSU-Mary Bird Perkins’ promise and the growing sophistication of medical physics. The Greater Baton Rouge Business Report conducted a Q & A session with Dr. Kenneth Hogstrom — director of LSU’s medical physics program, holder of the Dr. Charles M. Smith Chair of Medical Physics at LSU and chief of physics at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center — to talk about training students in the increasingly complex field of medical physics and to find out what’s new with the LSU-Mary Bird Perkins program itself. The article written by Steve Clark follows: Ken Hogstrom is a big gun who wields a big gun—a radiation gun that kills cancer. That’s an overly simplified description of the science behind medical physics, which is about using radiation against tumors, and which has gotten considerably more sophisticated in the past decade or so. Hogstrom, director of LSU’s medical physics program, holder of the Dr. Charles Smith Chair of Medical Physics at LSU and chief of physics at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, is an expert in the field. Hogstrom, who came to Baton Rouge from University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, sat down with Business Report to talk about training students in the increasingly complex field of medical physics as well as what’s new with the LSU-Mary Bird Perkins program itself. Question: How would you characterize changes in medical physics over the last couple of decades or so? What I’ve seen in the last decade is things that were research have now made it into the clinic. A lot of that is because of the tremendous jump in computer technology. That has allowed the complexity of treatment to increase, which is to the benefit of the patient. What we do now is not a whole lot different than what was ever done in radiation therapy. But it’s like going from a handsaw to a power saw. You can make a lot better cut. This has allowed significant improvements in getting doses to the tumor while protecting normal tissues. That’s been the big breakthrough. Q: Does this make the job of medical physicist more involved than it used to be? The increase in technology has a put a lot more burden and responsibility on the medical physicist to make sure everything is working correctly. The scope of knowledge for the medical physicist has gotten much broader. Q: You came on board in 2004. What’s been going on with the LSU-Mary Bird Perkins program since then? The program has been accredited. That means we’ve reached an equilibrium point where we’re getting good students, we’ve revised a lot of the curriculum to conform to what’s required to be accredited, 8 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

THE DOCTOR IS IN: Kenneth Hogstrom, chief of physics at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center and professor and director of the Medical Physics and Health Physics program at LSU, as seen through a TomoTherapy treatment system, which integrates optimized planning, image guidance and helical delivery to provide precise, continuous radiation therapy from all angles around the patient. and that we have the infrastructure to have a very solid program—in faculty, equipment, classrooms and so forth. Based on my experience, none of this would have been possible without the joint venture. It would have been very difficult for LSU to do it alone and, of course, Mary Bird’s not an academic institution. The two together have made this program one of the better programs in the United States. We’re still evolving. We’re not as big as some of the entrenched programs, but we’re moving in the right direction. Q: Becoming accredited isn’t easy? No. It’s a lot of work. Accreditation was a big step for us. We’re proud of that. Q: Most of your research grants to date have been from the medical industry, with the biggest grant from the company that makes TomoTherapy cancer-fighting technology. What does that entail? Currently, we have a grant with TomoTherapy for $240,000, that’s over three years. We expect that to be renewed at probably $100,000 a year starting next year. The main focus of that grant was in quality assurance and superficial therapy. Quality assurance is ensuring that when we treat the patients they’re treated in a safe way and the best way possible. We’ve been studying methods, for example, of how to ensure that the doses coming out of the TomoTherapy are correct.


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Q: So it’s about maximizing the effectiveness of the technology? What I’m talking about is how to make sure it’s used as accurately as possible to minimize any case where the patient might receive suboptimal treatment. Q: And this is complicated? It is. These calculations take 10 hours on a computer, so how can you trust them? That’s what we’re answering. Q: What are some other potential funding sources? As we get our publications out and build our reputation at the center, it positions us more favorably for being competitive for government grants, which are very difficult to get. That’s the goal, and we’re starting to do behind the scenes planning to gear up the infrastructure in that direction a year or two down the road. These won’t replace our current agreements. They will be supplemental. Q: How big do you see the program becoming? I envision it continuing to grow. My philosophy has always been quality over quantity, so the growth should come naturally. At the start of each year now we have maybe 16 to 18 students. In another five years we might have 20 to 25 students. The biggest mistake an academic program can make is to concentrate too much on numbers. It’s kind of an egotistical thing. It makes it very difficult. You still can get students out but they’re not trained. Q: People are living a lot longer these days and thus cancer cases are on the rise. Is there a shortage of medical physicists to meet the demand? I would say there’s a shortage of good medical physicists. Some people get into the field—because there’s such demand—without the same quality of training as people going through the program here. People coming here not only have the training, but usually they specialize in one area for their research. Because it’s very clinically oriented research, that’s very attractive to [employers] out there. Q: What kind of students is the program attracting? We’re competing with the top players for students. We get usually about 40 to 50 applicants for five to six positions each year. We usually narrow it down to about 10, and we interview everyone before we make an offer of admission. Since I’ve been here, we’ve had about a 75% acceptance rate. The 25% we lose are typically to places like M.D. Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Wisconsin, who are really the top two programs around. We have been successful in recruiting some of the best graduates from LSU out of the physics department. And we’ve also been successful in recruiting all over the United States. Q: Some people think Baton Rouge should follow the lead of cities like Birmingham in nurturing a medical “core” that would generate all kinds of opportunities. How is the LSU-Mary Bird Perkins program a step toward that?

back 50 years from now, they’ll see medical physics as the seed that helped start what maybe 50 years from now will be quite an extensive program. Q: What else should we be doing? From where I sit, the cancer center has been very proactive in supporting medical physics. LSU is also a very solid source of academic resources. What would be quite beneficial to growth in terms of our research and development is the ability to interact with things like the LSU Medical Center and Health Sciences Center. Those entities having a larger presence in Baton Rouge—those are the things that can be synergistic and can help when you talk about the Birminghams and Austins and even Houstons. That’s what’s allowed them to grow. Q: So you’ll be glad when Baton Rouge gets a new LSU hospital to replace Earl K. Long? When that happens that will be a major opportunity, not only on the medical physics side but all people that are interested in applying their research to medicine. It would be good for Louisiana. Q: How did you get into the field of medical physics? I was introduced to medical physics at Rice University in 1973 while working on my Ph.D. at Bonner Nuclear Lab; we collaborated occasionally with faculty at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. In spring 1973, I left Rice to go on active duty in the Army, which was for a short training period in artillery as the Vietnam War had ended. Upon completion of my active duty, I took a job from September 1973 to August 1974 at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center working on the neutron therapy project in collaboration with Texas A&M. In 1974, I returned to Rice to finish my Ph.D. in Experimental Nuclear Physics. Upon completion of my Ph.D. in 1976, I took a job as a medical physicist at Los Alamos working with experimental pion therapy, a job that took advantage of both my knowledge of nuclear and medical physics. In 1979, I accepted a tenure-track faculty position at M.D. Anderson in Houston. From then on, I was committed to medical physics as my career. Q: What do you find interesting about the field? What I have found most interesting in this field is the challenge of determining how to cleverly apply physics and mathematical principles to research and provide a practical solution to a clinical problem in radiation therapy. I have been fortunate to have been challenged with many technical problems in electron, photon, pion and neutron therapy in my career. Secondly, I have found teaching students about medical physics interesting and have enjoyed challenging them to bring out their best in preparing them for a successful career. Thirdly, I have found the rewards from working with cancer patients and radiation oncologists both interesting and rewarding.

If the cancer center wants to evolve, which it does, into having a research program, it has to start somewhere. Because its focus is mainly on radiation therapy, the medical physics program is a natural place for it to focus initially. Hopefully, when people look www.marybird.org • Volume 1 2008


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I N YO U R C O M M U N I T Y

MBP Collaborates with Area Partners To Sponsor Colorectal Cancer Screenings Throughout the month of March, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center partnered with other organizations to offer eight colorectal screenings in recognition of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colorectal cancer, or cancer of the colon or rectum, is the third most common cancer killer in men and women. It causes no symptoms in its early stages, making screening vitally important.

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The Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins offered these screenings at multiple locations throughout the Greater Baton Rouge area. Screenings were also made available in Covington as part of the comprehensive cancer program of Mary Bird Perkins and St. Tammany Parish Hospital. Through these innovative partnerships, Mary Bird Perkins offers free, year-round cancer screenings and educational programs to the underserved and uninsured. Together, Mary Bird Perkins and St. Elizabeth Hospital partnered to offer a colorectal screening in Ascension Parish. The recent groundbreaking of the new Mary Bird Perkins center in Gonzales, in partnership with St. Elizabeth Hospital, will ensure that Ascension Parish residents will be provided with frequent cancer screenings and educational programs along with access to highquality cancer facilities. Mary Bird Perkins will also offer free skin cancer screenings throughout the month of May in recognition of National Skin Care Awareness Month. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of cancers, and it is estimated that more than one million Americans develop skin cancer every year, according to national statistics from the American Cancer Society. For information regarding dates, times and locations of these and other free screenings, please visit www.marybird.org.

Free Health Fair for the Whole Family in Recognition of National Minority Cancer Awareness Week

www.ncccp.cancer.gov

Over 450 Cancer Screenings Provided

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The Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins sponsored a free health fair for the whole family in April at the Bon Carre' Business Center. There were free cancer screenings—breast, prostate, skin and colorectal—and free blood pressure and glucose screenings in recognition of National Minority Cancer Awareness Week. Honorary Chairman East Baton Rouge Parish Mayor Kip Holden made an appearance to present a city proclamation. The event also included food, fun and activities for kids. All community members were welcome. Both Woman’s Hospital and Southern University had their mobile clinics onsite to help provide cancer screenings. “Although cancer affects men and women of every age, race, ethnic background and economic class, the disease has a disproportionately severe impact on minorities and the economically disadvantaged,” said Mayor Holden. “Raising awareness about this disturbing fact is a step toward saving lives.” Early detection, through yearly screenings, can find cancer early before it has a chance to spread, increasing the odds of treating it successfully. Look for more information on the compelling statistics from the one-day event in the next issue of Perkins Perspective. For additional information about future screenings, please visit www.marybird.org.

10 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.


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A N N U A L G I V I N G C A M PA I G N

Annual Giving Campaign Helps Bring Advanced Treatment to All Volunteers Help Expand Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment

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Philanthropic annual support is the cornerstone of a nonprofit organization’s development efforts. For the past decade Mary Bird Perkins, along with dedicated community volunteers, has built a successful annual support program that has raised over $5 million to help the Center continue to fight cancer in southeast Louisiana. In 2007, 72 volunteers gave their time and talent to raise over $917,000 to benefit Mary Bird Perkins. Last year’s Annual Giving Campaign Chairman, Jim McIlwain, explained that the 2007 campaign kicked off in August and enjoyed a generous response from the community in gifts and pledges. “I was extremely encouraged by gifts from members of our Rathbone Society as well as the number of new gifts.” However, McIlwain considers the volunteers and their dedicated efforts as the foundation of the campaign’s success: “The campaign couldn’t exist without the solicitors.” Many volunteers are donors and there are several whose lives have been touched by cancer in some way. As a volunteer since 2004, McIlwain speaks from personal experience. “My commitment to the Center comes from two very heart-felt places. One is that my wife Terri and I both lost our parents to this disease at very young ages. The other is that we see the important need to greatly expand the reach of cancer prevention, early detection and treatment to those least likely to have access to help make our community a better place to live." Leading this year’s Annual Giving Campaign is Bill O’Quin. “I am grateful to have this opportunity to give back to an institution that has given to me and to my family.” O’Quin explained that he initially started out as a campaign solicitor. “As the stepfather of a cancer survivor treated at Mary Bird Perkins, I wanted to become involved. Little did I know that six months later I would be diagnosed with prostate cancer.” He, too, was treated at Mary Bird Perkins and today is cancer-free. Regarding his role as Annual Giving Campaign Chair, O’Quin said, “It’s very important to me that more individuals know that people are treated at Mary Bird Perkins whether they can pay

Pictured (l to r) are 2007 Annual Giving Campaign Chairman Jim McIlwain and 2008 Annual Giving Campaign Chairman Bill O’Quin. for it or not. I think that’s important to a lot of people, but we need the resources to continue to make that possible.” The funds raised through the Annual Giving Campaign help Mary Bird Perkins provide the highest quality radiation therapy and support services for anyone in our community, regardless of their ability to pay. The Center also provides awareness and education programs, research and early detection programs through free community cancer screenings. Vice President for Development and Chief Development Officer Carolyn A. Chassee, CFRE explains, “The impact of each donation allows the donor to become a part of a much larger and more meaningful accomplishment. Everyone is coming together to actually save a life.” For more information about the Annual Giving Campaign and how you can help, please call Mindy Tyler at (225) 215-1233. Please see the enclosed giving envelope if you wish to make a donation.

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MBP Volunteers Gave 550 Hours, Thank You! Employees of Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center volunteered to work extra hours without pay at cancer screenings and fundraising activities in 2007. Please join us in thanking the following employees who together gave over 550 hours of their time to support the Center’s programs:

MBP/STPH Co-Sponsor Covington ACS Relay for Life Survivor Tent Co-sponsors of the Survivor Tent at the 2008 Covington ACS Relay for Life at Covington High School were Mary Bird Perkins and St. Tammany Parish Hospital. Volunteers came out to serve 51 survivors and their family members a hot meal and to give out some great door prizes. Shown with a beautiful cake donated by Zoe’s Bakery are front row (l to r): Chryl Corizzo, STPH and Sherri Blackwell, MBP. Middle row: Natalie Hock, MBP; Teena Strand Parker, STPH; Katherine Scallon and John Chelette. Back row: Michelle Allen, HOS; Staci Scallon, STPH and Jennifer Chelette, HOS. Not shown: Cindy Williamson, MBP development director, Northshore/Florida Parishes.

MBP Receives Largest Team Award from Komen Supriya Jindal, wife of Louisiana’s Governor Bobby Jindal, is seen here presenting to Amy Benton, MBP’s vice president of communications, the award for the second largest overall team at the 2008 Komen Baton Rouge Race for the Cure. Mary Bird Perkins also won the award for the largest corporate team. More than 8,400 people registered for the Komen Baton Rouge Race for the Cure this year. The event raised over $250,000 for breast cancer education, screening, treatment and research, 75% of which will stay locally. Mary Bird Perkins is proud to be a presenting sponsor of this. We are also proud of our own Chief Radiation Therapist Tammy Asmus and the awesome job she has done as President of the Komen Baton Rouge affiliate and as Race Co-Chair for 2008. 12 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Sheila Alexander Amy Armand Tammy Asmus Yolanda Augustus Donna Baham Amy Benton Brian Berceguay Sherri Blackwell Donna Bryant Matt Bryant Rhonda Chandler Mindy Chelette Teresa Daigle Lynn Dalier Renea Austin-Duffin Susan Duncan Chad Dunn Lasheca Earls Brenda Eppinett Kara Ferachi Sabrina Franklin Charity Gay John Gibbons, PhD Denise Gipson Dianne Griffin Janet Guercio Vickie Hall Sherri Hayden Stephen Hebert Greg Henkelmann, MD Tiffany Hill Katherine Hilliard Natalie Hock Kenneth Hogstrom, PhD Erin Johnson LaRue Jolly Carolyn Jones Felicia Kersey Debbie Landry Sheneka Lewis Mary Livingston

Nicole Magee Rebecca Maher Tiffany Martin Sally McConnell Kate Messina Jennifer Miller Sharon Myshrall Doug Naden Dan Neck Judy Nickens James Nosacka Paul Nowacki Christine Palmer Brent Parker, PhD Noel Parnell Vadel Shivers Kristi Siemann Danette Simon Eddie Singleton Adrienne Smith Stuart Sonnier Angela Stam Todd Stevens Michael Stewart Brenda Truxillo Deirdre Ventress Debby Vollmer Vickie Walker Marian Walsworth Mary Catherine Warner Arnette Warren Tracie Way Tracie Whittington Lisa Williams Jamie Wilson Beverly Wood Trisha Wright Patrill Young Lisa Zeringue


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Former LSU Tiger and Cowboys Linebacker Helps Score Against Breast Cancer Bradie James Donates $60K to Local Leaders in Early Breast Cancer Detection Bradie James, Dallas Cowboys linebacker and former LSU AllAmerican, was at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center on Essen Lane Saturday afternoon, April 19 to donate $60,000 to help fund a breast cancer program and services aimed at early detection, screening and treatment.

Bradie James presented a check to organization representatives of Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Woman’s Hospital and YWCA ENCOREplus, in front of the Center’s Early Bird mobile screening clinic. Pictured (l to r) are Wendi Chapman, Renea A. Duffin, Bradie James, Roberta Madden, Wilfret Lorraine and Jamie Haeuser.

James’ personal Foundation56, a donor advised fund of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation, awarded a grant to fund a collaborative initiative of Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Woman’s Hospital and YWCA ENCOREplus designed to reach women most in need of these services. “The goal of the Foundation is not to duplicate existing services but to provide assistance by partnering with established organizations to fill in any gaps,” explained James. “Teaming up is the best recipe for success.”

James said losing his mother to breast cancer in February 2002 changed his awareness of breast cancer. “Breast cancer doesn’t just impact the woman – it impacts the entire family. Through Foundation56 we can devote resources to changing and saving communities and lives,” he said. “I want to do something to pass the torch both on and off the football field. I want to truly feel like I’m living my purpose.”

Williamson New MBP Northshore/Florida Parishes Development Director Cindy Williamson has joined the Development Office at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center as the development director for the Northshore/Florida Parishes. She earned her bachelor’s degree in economics and political science at the American University in Washington, D.C. and a master’s in business administration from Tulane University. Williamson has been active in the Northshore community with many organizations for the past 20 years, including having worked at St. Scholastica Academy in Covington, LA as public relations/marketing director.

Lyles Joins Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Development Office Jay Lyles, MPA, has joined the Development Office at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center as director of corporate and foundation giving. He earned his master’s degree in public administration at LSU. Lyles formerly served as vice president of development for Health Care Centers in Schools prior to coming to Mary Bird Perkins. He also formerly served as research manager at the Baton Rouge Area Chamber of Commerce.

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Volunteers Recognized for Raising Over $2 Million

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Over 60 Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center community volunteers attended a volunteer appreciation reception hosted by Mockler Beverage-Budweiser. The reception was held to honor the 2007 fundraising volunteers for helping to raise over $2.2 million for Mary Bird Perkins. Guests enjoyed delicious food from Louisiana Bayou Bistro, sampled specialty beer, Pictured (l to r) are Todd Stevens, president and CEO, MBP; Bill O’Quin, chairman, had the opportunity to tour the Mockler Beverage- 2008 Annual Giving Campaign; Shelley Mockler, chairman, MBP Development Budweiser facility and shared in fun and Committee; Richard Lipsey, chairman, MBP Board of Directors. fellowship.

Bumble Lane Holds Breast Cancer Fund-Raiser ‘Spa for a Cure’ Raises $4,000 for MBP

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Casey Little is the owner of Bumble Lane, a spa in the upscale Towne Center shopping area on Jefferson Highway in Baton Rouge. But his intentions to hold a ‘Spa for the Cure’ last fall to raise money for Mary Bird Perkins couldn’t be more humble. Little’s mother is a breast cancer survivor, and he wanted to do something to make a difference. At the same time, spa co-founder and massage therapist Tricia Thibaut wanted to do something in memory of a client, a five-year breast cancer survivor who had recently passed away. “We wanted to do something meaningful, something with a purpose — focus on something that would make a difference. We hope it did,” said Thibaut. “So many people who attended had been touched by cancer either through a family member or friend,” explained Thibaut, “that in 2008 the event will accept donations on behalf of anyone the donor wishes to remember.” During the spa party Bumble Lane’s manicurists, massage therapists and estheticians were on hand to provide a variety of mini spa treatments. Gourmet food, libations, goodie bags and door prizes topped off the evening of pampering. Tickets to the event were $100 each. All proceeds were donated to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Ticket sales totaled $4,000.

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Golf Committee Organizers Share Reasons for Commitment to the Cause “My father was treated for cancer at Mary Bird Perkins. Unfortunately, he didn’t survive, but I feel a lot of money can be raised by this golf tournament and maybe it will help to ultimately find a cure for cancer. Helping with the golf tournament is also a good way to be involved in the community.” Randy Haddad, Premier Office Products, Inc. Chairman “I’ve been involved with the MBP golf tournament for four years now. I chose to support Mary Bird Perkins because it is a good steward of monies raised by an event like the golf tournament. The funds go right back into the community in the form of free cancer screenings for those who can’t afford them, for example. My family has never been touched by cancer, but if that day ever comes, I know exactly where we’ll go for care.” John Schiller, Mockler Beverage Budweiser Sponsorship Chair, Immediate Past Chair “I truly enjoy the people who are associated with the organization and cherish all of the new friends I have made through MBP. I’m in my fourth year of volunteering for the golf fundraiser and I look forward to many more. It’s fun! And, supporting MBP has allowed me to educate my peers about the importance of early detection and cancer screenings.” Kurt LaCroix, Cox Communications Pro Tournament Chair; Vice Chairman “I support the golf tournament and Mary Bird Perkins with a sense of pride in what we accomplish and what it means to the Baton Rouge area and surrounding communities. I have a better appreciation for the many services Mary Bird provides. I have also learned directly from several friends and volunteers what Mary Bird has meant to them personally and to their families. At the end of the day, this is what really matters most. These are real examples of Mary Bird’s impact on the quality of life in our community.” Michael Patterson, Lee, Dougherty & Ferrara Pro-Am Chair

June 2 - June 8 www.marybird.org

“Cancer has touched my family just like it has most likely touched almost everyone’s at some point. We have a resource to treat people right here – Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. I am committed to donating my resources and volunteering my time to such a worthy cause.” Rebecca Nelson, community volunteer Taste of Louisiana Co-Chair “In a time when people don’t have a lot of spare time, I want to give back to something meaningful. Cancer has touched everyone’s lives in some way. It’s important to me that Mary Bird Perkins treats people regardless of their economic status. It’s nice to volunteer for an intelligently run event that makes a difference.” Ginger Kurlas, community volunteer Taste of Louisiana Co-Chair “Mary Bird Perkins is such a vital part of our community. It provides hope, cures and quality of life to so many of our citizens. I know someone who was treated at Mary Bird whom I think the world of and he often spoke of the wonderful and competent care and treatment he received there. It is my pleasure and honor to serve on behalf of such a great organization.” Kim Ginn, Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. Food & Beverage Co-Chair “The staff, doctors and technology at Mary Bird Perkins played a pivotal part in saving my life. When at 30 I was diagnosed with stage IV cancer, I had no idea what Mary Bird could do to help me beat it. Now that I do, I can’t volunteer enough hours to make sure everyone knows about the world class cancer care available to everyone in our community, regardless of ability to pay, we can receive right here at home. The volunteer hours I give to Mary Bird Perkins are given in gratitude. I feel blessed to have the time to give back.” Marielle Land-Howard, Baton Rouge Business Report Marketing Chair

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Thank you to our tournament sponsors! Raffle Sponsor

Title Sponsor

Presenting Sponsors

Junior Clinic Sponsor Cart Signage Sponsor

Taste of Louisiana Underwriting Sponsor

Tee Marker Sponsor

Awards Reception Sponsor

Scoring Sponsor Sponsor Zone Sponsors th Anniversary

C e l e br at i n g 2 0 Y e a r s of Q u a l i t y

Prize Package Sponsor

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Pro-Am Sponsor

Volunteer Tent Sponsor

Taste of Louisiana Presenting Sponsor

Drs. Bienvenu, Billings, Hanson, Patten, Schmeeckle, Spell

Golf Hole Sponsors Andreeff Equity Advisors, LLC

Putting Contest Sponsor

Putting Green Sponsor

Driving Range Sponsor

Hole-In-One Sponsor

Presenting Radio Sponsor

www.marybird.org • Volume 1 2008


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MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center gratefully acknowledges the following gifts made in memory of or to honor a special person or loved one during the period of September 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007. Memorial and honor gifts may be made at any time and mailed to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Office of Development, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Gifts may also be made online at www.marybird.org under “Make a Gift.”

In Memory of… James Francis Abadie Anonymous (2) Brandon and Carol Abadie Creighton Abadie The William J. Bell Family Robert H. Carpenter, Jr. Durward D. and Christina K. Casteel Mittie P. Chaney-Veillon Mark and Scott Emonet Gate House Property Owners Association, Inc. Bettie Hastings Mary and Cheney Joseph Campbell Kaufman Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lastrapes Elizabeth Leake and Family Anne and Paul Marks, Jr. Mary and Charles McCowan Lisa Murray Henry and Michelle Pylant Margaret Quinn Melanie and Joel Safer Katherine S. Spaht Janet and Bobby Theriot Sean and Leslie Van Kerkhone Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Zuber Mary Accardo J. F. and Adrienne Accardo Phyllis Addison Mrs. Manship Williams Haller Alexius Lee and Kathy Alexius Marsha Newton Alford Tim and Cindy Moore George Lawrence “Larry” Allen Sue Allen Evelyn Altazin Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bologna Caroline Amberg Margaret Lovelace A. J. Amoroso III Anonymous Laurie Anderson Dr. and Mrs. David E. Johnson The Lavilles Virginia Perkins Anderson Ms. Catherine R. Perkins Joey Arceneaux Mr. and Mrs. Larry Poche

Estelle Atkins Joe and Judith Kelly Donald Charles Aucoin, Sr. Betty Aucoin Marianne Ward Averette Glenda Sullivan Donna Babin Bobbie and Mike McDonald Juanita Metz Mary Babin Mr. and Mrs. Lional Ezell Eleanor W. Baer Jeanne, Andy, Shelley, Matthew, Lauren and Tiffany Butch Bailess Suzan Bosarge Troy Ball Copolymer Retirees Trust Cathy Romaire Ballay Margaret A. Romaire Lilly Bankston Dannie and Nan Kennedy Kathleen McCarthy Barrilleaux Ms. Nanarea McCarthy Paul F. Bates, Sr. Elizabeth Bates Mable Jolibois Beaugh Sabrina and Julio Peck, Jerick and Sedrick F. J. Bello Sr. F. J. Bello, Jr. Emile Lieux Bello F. J. Bello, Jr. Irene N. Bello Mr. and Mrs. Freddie J. Fossier Norma Lieux Bello F. J. Bello, Jr. Henry Albert Benefield Mary Benefield Landry Anne H. Bennett J.W. Bennett and Family Clara Ruth Saint Sharon Judge Bennett Billy and Jessie Judge Brenda Bercegeay Mr. and Mrs. James Hawkins Joseph Clovis Bergeron, Sr. Dyer and Joyce LaFleur Steven Berthelot Ms. Melissa Dubois Ms. Terry Freeman Ms. Denise Gipson Dianne Griffin Jill Randel Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Tumor Registry Ms. Adrienne Smith Charles Beskin Anonymous Howard L. Reitz Robert and Ann Betz Steve and Mary Magee Bonnie Bickham Alberta Dillon Judy Johnson Bigler Joy M. Johnson Dr. Frederic T. Billings Carol Anne and Sidney Blitzer Mrs. Paul Marks, Jr. Maria “Cookie” Palermo Bologna Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bologna

18 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

John Bonnecarrere Copolymer Retirees Trust Lillian Byrd Bossier George Cornell Frances Bourgeois Mr. Garvin Bourgeois Adolphe Bourque Board of Directors, Management and Employees of Associated Grocers, Inc. Betty Sue Boyd Patsy Gray Joseph A. (Buck) Brashear Jim and Kaaren Gammel Gerald Braud Copolymer Retirees Trust Ronnie and Ella Breaux Dwight and Wanda Babin Arnette Brent The Staff of the CARE Network at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center William Brent, Sr. Ellen Belgard Gordon Brignac Mr. and Mrs. Adrian Newby Don and Mary Lou Brown Dr. and Mrs. David E. Johnson Imogene Newsom Brown Mr. and Mrs. G. Lee Griffin James H. Brown, M. D. Amelia B. Brown Mary Lou Brown Sandra Brown Sally Brown Ms. Albertina Diaz W.T. & Betty Doughty Elizabeth L. Kendrick Oscar and Rosemary Martinez Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Murray and Family Donald R. Smith Steve Bueche Brad and Ceily Burkett Lloyd Buisson Melva Burgess Clyde M. Buzzard II Anonymous Calvin Stewart Cage Geraldine Inman Philip Caire Alisha Stutzman Edwarda Thomure “Eddi” Calvin Anonymous Dr. and Mrs. P.M. Breaud Joyce and Michael Carpenter Carol Demsky Tom and Sally Graves Bob and Bev Jones Joe and Paula Melancon Ken and Alyce Quillman Bobbie Roberts Martha Terry Nancy Todtenhausen Jose Calvo Xinia Troxler Jacob Cambre Herman and Merlie Hunt Leo and Gladys Cambre Diana Fontenot

Richard W. Campbell Mrs. Elouise D. Campbell Charles Campo Jimmy and Edna Prince Frank Carias Nellyn Carias Aguilar Louis Michael Carona Carona’s Bakery, Inc. Joyce Carter Mr. Wellington W. Carter, Jr. Othello O. Celestine Anonymous Tammie Charrier James and Denise Alleman John Arthur Chauvin, Sr. Tommy and Vikki Chauvin Lois Cheaney Charles Earnest Bernard Chesler Copolymer Retirees Trust Nadine W. Chopin Laura Ross Joseph “Ronnie” Chustz Myles and Dana Kirkland Preston Chustz Mary Chustz Ronnie Chustz Myles and Dana Kirkland Joyce and Kelly Clark Mitzi and Family Bill Clement Board of Directors, Management and Employees of Associated Grocers, Inc. Roger J. Clouatre Frank and Carol Frederic Doris LeJune Cole Glenda Dobson Virginia L. Comeaux Rosemary Dunaway Marion H. Conner Lou Conner Gene Copeland Diane Skelton Libby Corkern Copolymer Retirees Trust Ron Cotten Janet and Jerry Baldwin Sylvester Cotten Frances Cotten Lester Couvillion Frank and Linda Moore Elizabeth Crabtree Mr. William Crabtree Grace Richard Crain Anonymous Jim and Wanda Brinkley Betsy Chambers Mr. Norman Crain Joan Kennedy Numa and Gail Marquette Elma Neal Dakota Pace Kaye Schiefelbein Cynthia Sullivan, Ruth Sullivan, and Deborah Ansley Samuel J. Terito, Jr. Miriam Trivet Elfie P. Warner Betty Crochett John and Genevieve Barry


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MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Mr. and Mrs. Lester J. Mayer Jean Harvey Curet Louis D. Curet Dorothy Currier Heidi Guillot Vincent F. D’Agostino Mr. and Mrs. Shelby R. Gilley Barbara Repp Daigle Ethel Blanchard Dr. and Mrs. L.R. Daniel, Jr. Colleen Williams Mary Danos “Snookie” Daniel Kenneth McCoy Art Dardeau Jeanie Dardeau Joseph David Copolymer Retirees Trust Edward A. DeLaune, Sr. Billie and Ed DeLaune Rose Anne Deleo Dr. and Mrs. N. Joseph Deumite Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Members Baton Rouge Sigma Alumnae Chapter Helen Demers Larry Rolling, Jr. Thomas Anthony DeRose Victor and Jill Hilderbrand Camille Diaz Anonymous Alycia C. Diez Amy Millet Dominick DiReda Mr. and Mrs. Shelby R. Gilley Mary Ann Dorsa Bruce and Rosalie Myrick Shirley Dronet Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Clark Joe and Pearl Daigle Wayne and Debbie Landry Thelma Margaret Rushing Dunaway Helen Harbourt Hilda Duncan Joe and Judith Kelly Carl Russell Dunn Geraldine Dunn Co-Workers at the Tangipahoa Health Units Karla Suzanne Dunn Kathy Lewis Michael Patrick Dunne Mark Galliand Raelyn Galliand Lonnie Dupont Mrs. Claire Dupont John Engels Copolymer Retirees Trust Mike Estep Pat and James Hoth Stewart Falcon Copolymer Retirees Trust Wesley Farmer Grace Simipson Sammye K. Felps Mr. James H Felps Jeffery Dallas Fiandt Margaret Fiandt Oswald Sterling Fisher Copolymer Retirees Trust

Dr. Raymond B. Floyd George and Sheila Floyd James D. Fogleman Mrs. Nancy S. Fogleman Kay Foil Jack Foil Violet N. Fontenot Ed and Linda McClure Ginger and Leon Ford III Ford Family Charitable Foundation Hildene Fozzard Arthur and Patricia Stubbs Janes Ganes Francis Jessie M. A. Joseph Varrie Francois Will Ford and Family Hosea Franklin Copolymer Retirees Trust Robert M. Franklin Anonymous Gretchen Becnel & Family Thom and Beth Franklin Jerry and Edmee Reel Jimmie French Herman and Merlie Hunt Donald David Fullmer Helen Harbourt Arva Talley Fussell Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Lambremont III Clyde Fussell Copolymer Retirees Trust Ricky Fussell Mrs. Sharon Lambremont Nan Galloway Mr. and Mrs. Mevlin Branch Victoria H. Galtier Betty Lou Hebert Kathryn Thompson “Kathy” Garner Anonymous (3) John W. Barton, Sr. Kristen Bell Debi Benoit Clifton O. Bingham Travis Carter Ben Rose Jr, Anne Nancy Rose Vosler, and Peggy Rose Day Mr. and Mrs. Morise Duffin Chris and Mary Garner, Ann Zimmerman and Jeff Garner Dianne and Colan Griffin Leo M. Hataway Jerry and Donna Jolly Junior League Provisional Group Wayne and Debbie Landry Jennifer L. Looney Jeanne, Elizabeth, Rolfe and Teeta McCollister John and JoAnna McConnell Leoda McConnell Dottie McCormack Mr. and Mrs. Dan McDonald The CARE Network Edward and Jennie Miller Mr. and Mrs. Steven Parnell Ms. Salli Phillips Scott Singletary Mark and Jane Skerkoske Wysie Stuckey Jane S. Thomas Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Thompson, III

Tumor Registry Felix and Lynn Weill The Woodchucks Arlene Garrison Mrs. John Meier Jean K. Garrison Jack B. Garrison Ronald Gauthler Boy Scout Troop 429 Glen Talmage Gentry, Sr. Bruce, Jeri and Christopher Liles Antimony L. Gerhardt Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Sanders James Gomez Copolymer Retirees Trust Dr. F. Z. Goss George T. Goss Persy Graves Elsie Wren Reginald Bryan Griffith Penny Bouquet Stanford Groves Baton Rouge Coca-Cola Duplessis Cadillac Bob and Sara Easterly Millie Edwards Mr. and Mrs. Doug MacPherson John C. Miller Kenneth and Clara Westmoreland Audrey C. Gueho Charles Gueho Linda A. Guidroz Mary Lois and Howard Alexander, Jr. Anthony J. Gulla Carol Ann Cohan Dr. Michael T. Hackler Dean and Suzanne Mayers Eleanor Halifield Herman and Merlie Hunt Mark Hammett Bob and Jenny Scott Julia B. Harrington Elsie Wren Barbara B. Hart William Hart Jay Ann Hartzog The Noto Family Althea A. Hebert Anonymous Linda Jones Heflin John and Carla McClelland Carrie Frances Heirtzler Sharon Heirtzler Terrie Lynn Barber Helmke Skin Care Specialists, APMC Josie Helouin Mr. and Mrs. John Schittone, Sr. Randy Helton Gwen and Bill Vick Janice Hemelt Leo Hemelt Jim and Lucy Hemphill Jim and Ruth Hemphill Emily Hermann The Reid Family Mary Amelia Mixon Hess George M. Hess John Hicks Rodney Wilson Russell Hicks Anthony J. and Lena Mae Lombardo

Carlo W. Hintzen Ms. Barbara Hintzen Billy M. Hodge Donna Hodge Jack Raymond Hodges Theda Hodges Cahill Jensen Holliday Chris and Julie Crifasi Franklin Press, Inc. Estelle Holliday Dorothy “Dottie” Desselle Hopkins Joyce Butler Richard Hopkins Elizabeth Hopkins Bonnie Lynne Hornung Murphy and Tammy Edmonston Ralph F. Howe, Sr. J. H. Benton Eilleen M. Kean Barbara Ann White Hunt Herman and Merlie Hunt H. Cooper Hutchinson, Sr. Lynne Graner Kay Spaht Hutchinson Mrs. Sue L. Spaht Margie Boyles Hutchinson Lynne Graner Sandra Immble Dr. and Mrs. F. J. Impastato Hermine Jacobs Joe and Judith Kelly Herbert G. Jahncke, Jr. 115 Club James Favrot Vivienne Jahncke Eugene Young Raymond Jarreau Myles and Dana Kirkland T.J. Jenkins Aline Jenkins Charles Jensen Copolymer Retirees Trust Jim Johnson Pat, Jill and Jeff Leroy J. Johnson Cariola Johnson Margaret Estes Johnson Mrs. Harry A. Johnson, Jr. Ray and Dianne Lamonica Michael and Kate Pedrotty Linda C. Rigell Roy Rogers Johnson, Jr. Evangelist Dyon Brown Dr. William A. Johnson Joy M. Johnson Michael D. “Mike” Johnston Charles and Alice Brewer Audrey C. Crochet Fred and Betty Dowling Alexis and Berwick Duval Annie Embry Marcile C. England John and Sue Ellen Graham Mr. and Mrs. Dan McDonald John and Jeanne McManus Dan and Teanna Neskora Nancy Panaro Gerald and Marlene Wilcox Dave Jones, Jr. Copolymer Retirees Trust

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MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS David Jones Tim and Charlotte Dietrich Franklinton High School Class of 1964 John Charles and Jean Stafford Jerry and Geneva Jones Kathryn Landry Shannon Maiocchi Louise Jordan Preselia Richardson Virginia Upton Kean Mr. and Mrs. Owen Ashworth, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. H. Norman Saurage, III Julian Kent Charles and Pat Smith Chef Chris Kerageorgiou Karen Kerageorgiou Joseph King Copolymer Retirees Trust Joan Kirkpatrick Suzanne Lavergne Jean M. Kleinpeter Kleinpeter Farms Dairy, L.L.C. Roberta Kleinschmidt Jane and Charles Lugenbuhl Mrs. George Knowles Jeree Barnes David Krail Ashley Ballard HR XCEL, LLC Louisiana Society of Human Resources Council Terry Zlatnicky Mary E. Kraus Ms. Irene A. Yesick Bradford LaBauve Copolymer Retirees Trust Isadore Labbe Ms. Lucille Labbe Lance Lamothe Nanette Lamothe and Family Dennis Earl Landry Kathryn Landry Wayne and Debbie Landry Eileen McCurnin Landry Mackie and Alyce Landry Lourine Landry Anonymous Penny Landry Barbara and Jim Scallan Sabin and Laura Landry Kathryn Landry Stanley Landry Beryl Bland and Edith Dugas John B. Lane Ruby Lane William Joseph Laughlin Dr. and Mrs. W. Joseph Laughlin, Jr. Karen Wax Sebastian Laurent Pauline Laurent Emile Lavigne, Jr. Ronnie and Bobbie Hughes Marianne Spetz Lea Julia Pearce Mary Lea Lake Pontchartrain Sail & Power Squadron Kathi M. Lebeuf Mrs. Marilyn K. Manchester

Alice B. LeBlanc Mike and Gwen LeBlanc Danny LeBlanc Billy and Marlene LeBlanc Rene LeBlanc Rita LeBlanc Sharon Ledet Michael Ledet William J. and Flora Lee Billie Lee Wilfred C. Leininger Anonymous Gerald J. LeJeune Garry L. Zieman Clifton S. LeSage Alice and Tonya LeSage Richard Lesser Mrs. Dean Geheber Damon Letherman, Jr. Copolymer Retirees Trust Genevieve B. Lewis Jim Culpepper, Sr. Evelyn Inez Hughes Lipscomb Mr. and Mrs. H. Norman Saurage, III Charles L. Little, Jr. Willie, Marcia, Ben, Wendi, Charity, Donna, John, Mellisa, Joe, Lindsey, Sarah, Adale, Calab, Micha, Rachel and Anders Brenda Lively Brad Lively Lacy Ann Livingston Ann and Phil Livingston Anthony J. Lombardo Mrs. Lena Mae Lombardo Katherine Hattic Long Pamela Long Wofford Charles Plaisance Lorio Glen and Michelle St. Martin Robert Lowe Mr. and Mrs. H. Leale Slate Turner Lux Isaac Gregorie Julie Elizabeth Mackey Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Mackey Vergie Magee David and Barbara Murray Mary Marino Sam J. Marino, Sr. Robert I. “Bobby” Marionneaux Dannie and Nanda Kennedy Zelma Marionneaux Anonymous Robert Markel, Jr. Mary Lou Evans Edith Martens Carrol Jennaro Melvin Martin, Jr. Georgia Martin Arnold “'Cop Cop'” Martinez Mr. Todd Martinez Deceased Members of the Charles Mascarella Family Mr. Marion L. Mascarella J. D. McAllister Paula Plaisance Cyril Ann McBride Mr. and Mrs. William J. Heroman

20 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Charles McClendon Alberty and Associates Patty McCrary Nancy Wolford Terry McCullough Tory Johnson Jane Garic McDaniel Mr. and Mrs. Barry D. Jenkins Jane Grary McDaniel Grary Family Richard K. McDowell Helen Harbourt James McLean Copolymer Retirees Trust Pearl McLeod Harold McLeod and JoAnn Stogner Jerry R. “Buddy” McManus Vic and Cynthia Sages Edward McNutt Brenda McNutt George McWilliams Brad Berner Dorothy Masset Mentel Ms. Helena M. Whitaker Jeanette Miletello Aquatic Pools of Louisiana Donna Plauche Elise Miller Randall Harrison Teddy Millette Dale Crawford Ralph Mollere Anthony and Audrey Rotolo Frances Montelaro Sadie Giambrone Joseph Montelaro Sadie Giambrone Peggy Montgomery Hezzie B. Sharp Horace W. Moody, Sr. Mary Tapps Bernadette Moore Honorable Louis R. Daniel Scott and Jennifer McLean Hildrith and Sara Wegener Brad Moore Joe and Judith Kelly Clay Moore Dr. Clyde H. Moore Marlene Moore Dr. Clyde H. Moore Dr. Wallace D. Moore Dr. Clyde H. Moore Dr. Joe A. Moreland Deborah B. Normand Winnie Morgan Dollie Jarreau Mr. and Mrs. Roy C. Morris Dianne Adams Hermann Moyse, Jr. J. H. Benton Dr. and Mrs. Randall Brown Pat and Margaret Culbertson Dr. and Mrs. Richard DeRosa Ellen Gilmore Sheldon and Judi Johnson Eilleen M. Kean Sancy H. McCool Dr. and Mrs. William F. Staats

Kent Mudd Ms. Valerie R. Minton Victor B. Murray David and Barbara Murray Ann Meade Nalty Theda Hodges Cahill Daniel Allen Needham Kerri Needham Sidney B. Netterville Charles and Louise Avants Don H. Neufeld Brenda S. Frederick Hybart W. Nickens Ms. Judy A. Nickens Susie Ellamae Nickens Ms. Judy A. Nickens Louis Joseph ‘Nick’ Nicolosi Nicholas Triggs Erline Normand Craig and Bridget Soileau Vera “Margie” Nugent Arnella Charters Lucy Nunnally James Purgerson, Jr. Jack O’Bannion Bobbie O’Bannion James O’Bryant Brenda, Tabatha and Lawrence O’Bryant Andy and Augusta Olah Buck and Mitzi Grantham Edward J. Oldendorf Faye Oldendorf Murphy C. Painter, Jr. Board of Directors, Management and Employees of Associated Grocers, Inc. Orine Fontenot Leader Parent Ausie Grigg Isaac Patterson Copolymer Retirees Trust Dr. Gordon W. Peek Barbara Parker Bill and Betty Wray Jill Peno Mr. and Mrs. Butch Peno Lena Amanda Penton Rick Thompson Mary Bird Perkins Deloris Brown Paul Perkins Ofney K. Ellis Peggy Perkins Paul E. Haygood Gladys Lorraine Mischler Perrien Stacio and MaJoyce Delgado Employees of Lion Copolymer Geismar Olivette Perry Will Ford and Family Elizabeth Tate Peters Jack and Adair Brabham Riley Phelps Teddy and Marguerite Peno Harry J. Philips, Sr. Todd Stevens Charles Pitcher Copolymer Retirees Trust Dr. and Mrs. David Planche Janet, Chuck and Sean Planche


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MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Bula Poche’ Emile Poche Louis Poirrier, Sr. Poirrier Family Elsie Pontiff Mr. and Mrs. Jerry M. Baldwin Dudley L. Pope, Jr. Boots Pope Leroy J. Portal Dianne Smith Smiley Louis Pourcy Herman and Merlie Hunt Della L. Prine James and Laura Prine John Pritchett Anonymous Dwight Andrus Dan and Jan Bump Larry and Louise Cole Kay and Sumpter Davis Pat Flanagan Michael Holley LSU Faculty and Staff Athletic Club Carolyn and Gerald Murray Marilyn Ramella Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Mills Wade B. Randolph, Sr. Pat and Linda Chaney Wade Bynum “Randy” Randolph, Jr. Jane Randolph Thelma Reames Naomi Austin Willie Mae Reese Lucille Spurlock Douglas Reeves Carolyn Reeves George Regira Sidney and Carole Palermo Kenneth C. Reibert Vernan and Mona Fabre Pam, Jason & Natalie Reibert Marguerite Reid The Reid Family Gabriel “Gabe” Richard Charles and Pat Smith Floyd Richardson Copolymer Retirees Trust Ralph Joseph Robert, Sr. LSU Libraries Staff Association Bobby Roberts Janet Cundiff Suzanne Lavergne Johnny Robertson Glandel Robertson Alfred A. Robinson Thomas Robinson Eula Palmer Rogers Sheldon and Judi Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Audry Rome, Sr. Carol Anne Rome Rose Mae Rome Rose Ann Brady John Frank Roshto Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bourgeois Pam Miller Cecil and Louise Sinclair John Roussel Dr. and Mrs. Edward Dunigan

Mr. and Mrs. John Roussel J.P. Roussel Sedonia Ruggia James and Laura Prine Gordon Linden Rush II Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Campbell, Jr. Wayne C. Rushing Mrs. Cheryl L. Rushing Vincent R. Russo Dwight and Debbie Brower Theresa Saia Madie Saia Karen and Phillip Foto Danvel “Ute” Sanchez Dorothy Webre Regina Sanchez Mrs. Donald Weber Loyd Sapianzia Helen Harbourt Mr. and Mrs. Everett C. Schaefer Brenda Frederick Elaine Caffarel Schlatre Charles Schlatre Carolyn R. Schmulen Buck Macmurdo Mary Beth Schnauder Anonymous Henry Schott Dr. and Mrs. Edward Dunigan Charyl Hearin Charles Scott Donald and Martha Mayeux Joe E. Sedberry, Jr., Ph.D. The Sedberry Family Wallace Sevin George Schaffer H. Duke Shackelford Sancy McCool Gene Shaffer Leah A. Shaffer Bonnie Shirks Mr. and Mrs. Larry R. Trout, Jr. James A. Sibley, Sr. Naomi Austin William Sierichs Elizabeth Sierichs Edward F. Sikes Barry and Lisa Zeringue Jeannie Sikes Barry and Lisa Zeringue Amy Simon Michael Simon Eunice Sims Marilyn Anderson Janice Davis Singletary Juliet S. Dougherty Anna Whatley Smith Lynne and Jim Prator Bobby Smith Mrs. Bobby R. Smith Clifton Jerry Smith Bob and Sara Easterly Roy and Justine Elder Reba and John Lockhart Mrs. Shirley L. Smith Family of Nita Varnado Victor Varnado Kelton & Jewell Whitehead Marvin Zeigler Family

John “Al” Smith The Luckett Family Michael Smith Beth Smith Rodney Douglas Smith Dr. David Barno Mark Borquist Scott and Joanie Ellis Sid and Carolyn Haughton Gretchen Jaeger Lake After Hours Henry and Aileen Pine and The Massie Family Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Robichaux, Sr. Rubicon LLC Kristi Sprecher Terrence ‘Smitty’ Smith Gordon Industries, Inc. Timothy Smith, Sr. Rita Smith Waymon Smith Betty Smith J.Y. and Stella Soileau Mr. and Mrs. James Mascarella Homer Dale Spaht, Sr. Mrs. Sue L. Spaht Leonard Reese Spangenberg Anonymous Keith Stanley Melissa Stanley Dorothy Stelly Neil and Becky Record Lillie L. Stewart Beatrice Matthews William Stewart, Jr. Copolymer Retirees Trust Leon C. Stilley Mrs. Athlea G. Stilley Susan Faust Straley Richard A. Magill Melville Stromeyer Mrs. Elaine Stromeyer Howard D. Strother Mrs. Howard D. Strother AJ Suarez Marion Sullivan Margaret Boudreau Connie Lea Swarner June Clayton Thomas Sweat Mr. Freddie Sweat Charles D. Sylvest, Sr. Drs. Chris and Gay Winters Evelyn Taylor James Taylor Lester R. Taylor, Sr. Jeffrey L. Taylor and Rodney Taylor Marsette Temple Copolymer Retirees Trust James Thomas “Jimmy” Terito Airtrol, Inc. Sadie Cantu Desk and Derrick Club of Baton Rouge Patti Kleinpeter Hart Lorraine Harthcock Eileen T. Hill Yvonne Jones Francis Jumonville

Bridget Ross Mary Kay Williams Calvin C. Thomas, Sr. Warren and Diane Kirsch George Bell Thompson Neil and Becky Record Mary Thompson Linda Kenyon Sarah Thornton Ronald and Linda Alford Josie Torres Dana and Myles Kirkland Nicole E. Trabeaux James and Denise Alleman Marilyn C. Trepagnier Pamela King Rowland Triplett The Board of Directors, Management and Employees of Associated Grocers, Inc. Kenneth Troutman Shelton Launey Frank Michael Tschida Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Eilts Ruth Tschida Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Eilts Cissy Tulley Ms. Margaret Z. Fiandt Robert and Sue Tullier Ms. Myrtle T. Doize Margaret Dorothy Vance Carol Page Susan VanMaastricht Mr. Dale VanMaastricht Stephen Vargo Mrs. Carita Jumonville Roy Villard Dollie Jarreau Vincent L. Vince Naomi Vince David Allen Waguespack Tee and Kate Brown David Wallace Copolymer Retirees Trust Archie John Watson Doris Watson Janet Webb Scott and Jennifer McLean Hildrith and Sara Wegener Mazie R. Weber Anonymous Linda Sue Weigand George and L. B. Griffon Karen Weilbacher Henry Weilbacher J. Treye Weilbacher Jack Wells Mrs. Virginia Lou “Jenny” Wells Frances Verdella Wall Whitson John W. Whitson Ed Wilbourn Don and Sandra McCollister Cynthia L. Williams Dr. and Mrs. H. Jay Collinsworth Lee Anner Williams Macedonia Baptist Church Catherine Williamson Dee and Billy Poe Cynthia Wilson Mrs. Robert A. Wilson

www.marybird.org • Volume 1 2008


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MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Marian Burkart Winters Chris and Gay Winters Genora Caroline Wire Billie Wire Deceased Members of the Yambilee Campers Yambilee Campers of Opelousas Barbara Perkins Young Ms. Catherine R. Perkins Christine Griffin “Tina” ZellerTanner Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Schaubhut Anna M. Zito Board of Directors, Management and Employees of Associated Grocers, Inc.

In Honor of… Jim Ahrend Donna Egan Wanda Aizpurua Pat Cabral Mr. and Mrs. Frank Alessi Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Stephanie and Steve Allison Ellen C. Sessions Dr. William A. Anderson Laura and Tommy Thompson Dominick Anzalone Donna Egan Grace Anzalone Donna Egan Jeanne Aucoin Patti Manuel Claude Babineaux Lea Ann Babineaux LeJeune Carol Backstedt Jimmie Brian John Barnes Jeree Barnes John Barton, Jr. Todd Stevens Amy Benton Todd Stevens Lee Michael Berg Todd Stevens Dr. Markham Berry Mark and Michelle Berry Jimmy Berthelot Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Berthelot Dr. Bryan Bienvenu Albert Salzer III Todd Stevens Dr. Frederic T. Billings Pete and Pat Boudreaux Todd Stevens Mr. and Mrs. Lee Blackwell Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Patricia Boudreaux Dorothy Duncan Jessie Bourgoyne Rita Culross Kathleen Bourke Laura Cotton Jane T. Boyce Bridgett Boyce Dr. Cynthia Boyer Todd Stevens

Barbara Bradberry Pat Cabral Mr. Charles Brelet Hillar C. Moore, Jr. John Lee Brewerton, Jr. Ann and Bill Monroe Mimi Brooks Dolores Reiser Dr. Charles Jay Brown Mark and Michelle Berry Donna Sue Brown Becky and Larry Brown Terrell Brown Tee and Kate Brown Donna Bryant Todd Stevens Dick Burris Ms. Elizabeth S. Haight Joan Butt Herbert Butt C.A.R.E. Network Staff Renea Austin Duffin Joseph Campbell Todd Stevens Cancer Patients Alice d’Aquin Robert and Pat Schaubhut Cancer Victims M. Abadie Kevin Champagne Todd Stevens Carolyn Chassee Todd Stevens Rose D. Chause Philip Jones Robin Childs Ms. Jeanne Parrish Robert Clothier Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Dudley Coates Todd Stevens Lillian Coleman Frances and Russ Fish Barbara M. Corkern Mr. and Mrs. Leo Mitchell Gertie D. Cornelius Wanda Waite Beth Courtney Todd Stevens Louis Curet A. Wilbert’s Sons, L.L.C. Carol Anne and Sid Blitzer Mr. and Mrs. Randy Bonnecaze Bob Casey Katherine Spaht Todd Stevens Felix and Lynn Weill Carol Lee Cusachs Anonymous Teresa Daigle Todd Stevens Chris Dantin Larry Ferachi, M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Darling Mr. and Mrs. Glenn J. DeGruy Mrs. Terri Davis Drs. Shelly and Lance Fallin Joshua Delery Charles and Sally Delery, Jr.

22 Perkins Perspective • Fighting Cancer for Over 35 Years.

Danny Delo Margaret Boudreau Preston Dogua Judy Dogua Roussella Doise General and Mrs. Ronald Richard Renea Duffin Charity Gay Kate Messina C.A.R.E. Network Employees Todd Stevens Brandon Duncan Teri Duncan Betty Dutruch Sherwood and Sherry Revere John Dutsch IV Taryn Dutsch Robert E. “Bob” Easterly Anonymous Tammy Edmonston Murphy Edmonston, Jr. Sue Edrington Mr. and Mrs. William Heroman, Jr. Robert Egan Donna Egan Liona Ezell Patricia Ezell Dr. Robert Fields Todd Stevens Emile Flanagan Doris Flanagan Angela Fluker Theresa and Seb Lawhon Terry Folse Mary Folse Fraternal Order of Police Anthony Foto Anthony R. Foto, Sr. Brett Furr Todd Stevens Sidney M. Garrison, Jr. Dorothy C. Garrison Lynda Glasper Clara B. Glapser Jerry Goss Todd Stevens Thomas J. Graner Lynne Graner Bob and Alíce Greer Michael W. McKay Ellazene Greer Linda B. Link Dr. and Mrs. John P. Greer Bob and Alíce Greer Robert S. Greer, Jr. Todd Stevens G. Lee Griffin Betty Hanks Todd Stevens Joseph Guillory Madeline Guillory Dr. David Hanson and Staff of Hematology/Oncology Associates Debbie and Dave Hurlbert Dr. David Hanson Jane Randolph Todd Stevens Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hargroder Hillar C. Moore, Jr.

Mrs. Paul Harper Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Nita Harris Laura and Tommy Thompson Dr. Greg Henkelmann Todd Stevens David Hickman Ms. Laura Rogers Dorothy Hill Lois Perrin Caroline Hodge Mr. and Mrs. Wallace L. Adams Ralph and Nancy Hood Robbie and David Rubin Dr. and Mrs. Oscar Huh Margaret and Charles Smith Margaret Ivy Craig and Cindy Nuckolls Cleola O. Jackson Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. David Jemison Mr. and Mrs. Glenn J. DeGruy Berlin Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Berlin Johnson Dr. Sheldon Johnson Tom and Rosemary Klei Dr. Don Moore Todd Stevens J. Gerard Jolly Todd Stevens Roland Jones, Sr. Rita Jones Lucy Kadair Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Dr. Maurice King Todd Stevens Dr. Maurice King and Staff Janice Drago Homer and Dotti Knost Deborah Knost Caitlin Knutsson Cammie and David Norwood Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kott Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Houston Kuhn Alice Kuhn Mignon Lasseter Kim Bevil Judy Lato Donna Egan Olivera Lazic Oliver Salihbegovic and Zlatko Salihbegovic Mabel LeBlanc Eric and Ann Langlois Robb LeJeune Shirley Martin James J. LeSaicherre Ms. Carol L. Paul Dr. Renee Levine Todd Stevens Charlotte Levy Mr. John Montgomery Mary Lou Life Dr. and Mrs. Edward Dunigan Kat Lillie Charles and Sally Delery, Jr. Richard Lipsey Todd Stevens


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MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS Dr. Kenneth Lo Norris Manuel Pam, Jason, & Natalie Reibert Todd Stevens Kirk Varnado David Lockwood Hattie Lockwood Susan and Chuck Longacre Ellen C. Sessions Mitch Marcello Evelyn Lafitte Mrs. Irma Marino Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Sam Marino Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Dan and Marcia Marsh Mr. and Mrs. Alex Chappo Allen F. Martin Mr. and Mrs. Allen F. Martin Earl Martin Nita Martin Tiffany Martin Mary and Ricky Martin Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Evelyn S. Fleming Edwina Melerine Jerry Rome Mary Bird Perkins Employees Thomas Chauvin The Masters George Rose Mary Bird Perkins Volunteer Staff Anna Williams Cyril Ann McBride Mr. and Mrs. William Heroman, Jr. Dr. John McClelland Laura and Tommy Thompson Sancy McCool Todd Stevens Jane McCraney Tee and Kate Brown Dr. David McGraw Ms. Katherine Bray McGuire Family Mike and Anne McGuire Jim McIlwain Todd Stevens Dr. and Mrs. A. K. McInnis, Jr. Frances and Russ Fish Liz McKee Ms. Marie McKee Ronnie Meadors Todd Stevens Dr. Tom Meek Todd Stevens Jeanette Mendoza Toni L. Manina Peggy Meyers Tosha Henagan Shelley Mockler Todd Stevens Dr. Clyde H. Moore Mrs. Wallace Moore Hillar Moore Todd Stevens Mr. and Mrs. John Moore Hillar C. Moore, Jr.

Gene Murphy Mark and Leah Calandro Herbert Murray Geraldine Murray, Wayne and Cody Pam Myers Pat Cabral Dr. Joel Nasca Larry Ferachi, M.D. Russell Nash Jocelyn L. Nash Paul Nowacki Todd Stevens Bill O’Quin Todd Stevens Gail O’Quin Todd Stevens Dr. James Ourso Ann and Bill Monroe Mrs. Alvin Ourso, Jr. Ann and Justin Ourso Gloria Parrino Rose and Verne Brian Dr. Judd Patten Mrs. Lolette B. Robert Todd Stevens Ranny G. Pearce Donald and Mary Cavalier Judy, Mandy and Amy Pearce Rhonda Perdue Pat Cabral Joey Perera Anonymous Ralph and Billie Perlman Mr. and Mrs. Jerald Perlman Bill Peters Todd Stevens Phil Pettus Doris Pettus Lynette Pourciau Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Milton R. Price, Sr. Hilda Molden Pruitt Radiation Oncology Physicians Paul Monsour, MD Dr. and Mrs. Harry Roberts Margaret and Charles Smith Lucy Roe Vicki and Wayne Pugh A.J. Roig, Jr. Debbi Roig Elise C. Rosenthal Angela M. “SuSu” Rosenthal Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Rutland Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Salco Construction, Inc. Ms. Lisa Murray Albert Salzer, III Kelly Salzer Dr. Mary Ella Sanders Todd Stevens Donna Saurage Todd Stevens Charles Savoia Ann and Justin Ourso Mr. and Mrs. Greg Scallon Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Dr. Kellie Schmeeckle Todd Stevens

Harold M. Schmidt Barbara Schmidt Barbara Schwartzenburg Dennis and Marilyn Strickland Mr. and Mrs. Hanson E. Scobee Frances and Russ Fish Nicki Seguin Kaye Schiefelbein Shaffer Family Mike and Anne McGuire Jess Shields Donna and Tommy Shields Barbara Shilling Joe and Judith Kelly Brittance Sibille Charles and Sally Delery, Jr. Cody Sibille Charles and Sally Delery, Jr. Lori Sigmon Pat Cabral Mr. and Mrs. Keith Simpson Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Vivian Sims Claire Gasquet Gary A. Sligar Todd Stevens Dr. and Mrs. David Smith Don and Genny Wilkinson Joy Smith Pat Cabral Mark Smith Brad Soileau and Family Gretchen Guedry Snyder Leo and Ann Guedry Dr. Derrick Spell Todd Stevens St. Luke’s Support Group D. Romero Peter B. Stewart Todd Stevens Brenda Sykes Earline Miller Ramona Talley Pat Cabral Dr. Robert Taylor Laura and Tommy Thompson Paul R. Thompson Todd Stevens Brenda Truxillo Todd Stevens Luis Hernan Valdivia Anonymous Alana Vaughn Todd Stevens D. Randolph Waesche Todd Stevens Brenda Waggenspack Angie and Brent Dornier Robert E. Warren Frances and Russ Fish Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Webb Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Hil Wegener III Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Hil Wegener, Jr. Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Lynn Weill Pat and Margaret Culbertson Leo M. Hataway Todd Stevens

Jamie Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Wenzel Hillar C. Moore, Jr. Birdie White Joe and Nelda Parker Barbara B. Williams John H. Williams Al and Sydney Womack Charles and Pat Smith Dr. Charles G. Wood Todd Stevens Merlin Woods Julie Woods Betty Wray Mrs. Birdie White Trisha Wright Todd Stevens Anne Zappe Anonymous Ron and Anne Zappe Mr. and Mrs. William G. Creveling Pamela Sulzer

www.marybird.org • Volume 1 2008


M a r y B i r d Pe r k i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r F o u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e r s N e w s

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Earl Nelson Makes Gift to MBP Endowment Fund Says Center Teaches People To Fish Instead of Just Feeding Them

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A native of Baton Rouge and an LSU graduate with both undergraduate and MBA degrees, Earl Nelson’s career in finance with Amoco Corporation for 38 years kept him living and working almost everywhere but his hometown. After retiring from the senior financial management of Earl Nelson Amoco in 1989, Nelson returned to his roots just five years “A lot of people need help with food and shelter, and it is later. great if someone can provide that help,” he explained. “But you have to make things better down the road or things won’t Before he was able to move here permanently in 1990, change. Mary Bird Perkins does that. They not only treat Nelson’s mother passed away of colon cancer at the age of 86. cancer but they help teach people about prevention and early The disease was late-stage and although she received detection.” He likened it to giving a hungry man a fish versus treatment at Mary Bird Perkins in Baton Rouge, it was only teaching him how to fish. to make her last days more bearable. That was Nelson’s first experience with Mary Bird Perkins. He said the compassion Nelson said he always found himself reading about Mary of the staff so impressed him that he started supporting the Bird’s involvement with research and its partnership with Center following her death. “I kept up with what was going LSU, the many free screenings and outreach programs and on by reading the Perkins Perspective they sent to me. I the provision for indigent care. He felt led to investigate Mary followed the progress being made and began to find out what Bird’s fundraising costs, which more often than not can reveal Mary Bird was all about.” the efficiency of a nonprofit organization’s fundraising. “Some Nelson said that during the many years he was gone, he pretty much lost touch with what was going on in Baton Rouge, especially in terms of philanthropy. “I definitely had to do my homework,” he said. “Ultimately I decided to open a donoradvised fund at the Baton Rouge Area Foundation and later added an unrestricted fund. This has proved helpful in getting me more in touch with what’s going on with local nonprofits.” But Nelson said he felt compelled to get more involved in the support of just one local nonprofit organization.

places beat around the bush when you ask for that number, but Mary Bird Perkins was right up front about disclosing it,” he said. It was only then that Nelson proceeded with his plans to make a gift to Mary Bird Perkins’ Endowment Fund. Sadly, Nelson recently lost another family member to cancer. His sister, who showed no symptoms until the very end, had a malignant brain tumor from which she died shortly after being diagnosed. “Her doctor told me sometimes it just happens that way. Nobody even knew she was sick.” Continued on page 25

www.marybirdfoundation.org


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Merging Family Values, Wealth and Philanthropy Planning for the 21st Century

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Approximately 40 friends and benefactors of MBPCC and Foundation joined the Foundation’s Board of Directors and Development Committee at Ruffino’s on October 23, 2007. Featured speakers included Gary J. Martin, CFP®, CAP™, Philanthropic Consultant and Kenneth R. Hogstrom, PhD, Director, LSU and MBPCC Medical Physics Program. Dr. Kenneth Hogstrom educated and entertained, with highlights on the LSU and MBP Medical Physics Program. Dr. Gary Martin shared a wealth of information regarding merging family wealth, values and philanthropy and the many financial and societal trends impacting philanthropy. These trends influence how an individual family will choose to integrate family values and their belief in philanthropy. Growing trends call for increased nonprofit accountability and the involvement of children and grandchildren in philanthropic decisions. Dr. Martin challenged the audience to be “world changers” and to chart a path of greater meaning through philanthropy – for individuals, families and the world.

Pictured (l to r) are Sanford Roy of Merrill Lynch; Mary Bird Perkins Vice President for Development Carolyn A. Chassee, CFRE; Dr. Gary Martin; Dr. Kenneth Hogstrom.

Participants in the program enjoyed the entire evening, stating the speakers were excellent and the information was concise. The charitable planning dinner was made possible through the generosity of Merrill Lynch.

Pictured (l to r) are Anna B. Lipsey Legacy Builders members Hillar Moore, Dick Luedtke, Frank McArthur and Bill Peters.

Continued from page 24

Reflecting back upon the philanthropic influences in his life, Nelson said, “My parents grew up during the Depression. Within their means, they did their part.” He explained that philanthropy can be a monetary donation, but it can also include giving of one’s time or providing a service, like helping someone build a house. “I wish this was stressed more at the high school level so when those students go out into the world, giving back at any level will come more naturally.” Nelson is the lead trainer for AARP’s Tax-Aide Program in Baton Rouge. “In addition to training volunteers with this program, one day a week I prepare personal income tax returns, free of charge, for low-to-middle income elderly people.” He says he’s enjoyed every job he’s ever had in life and thought he’d miss going into the office after retirement. “I don’t,” he laughed.

Tax-Smart Giving Ideas The new online planned giving guide provided by the Foundation offers useful estate planning tips that can help you fulfill your financial and charitable planning goals. There are ways to provide for yourself and your loved ones while ensuring extraordinary cancer care. Visit www.marybirdfoundation.org. For more information on making a gift to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Foundation, please contact the Development Office at (225) 215-1224 or visit www.marybirdfoundation.org. You may also call to obtain more information and request a confidential, no-obligation proposal. As always, we encourage you to seek professional counsel when making important financial decisions.

www.marybirdfoundation.org

M a r y B i r d Pe r k i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r F o u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e r s N e w s

Foundation Charitable Planning Dinner


M a r y B i r d Pe r k i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r F o u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e r s N e w s

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Inaugural Legacy Builders Brunch Held

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The first Anna B. Lipsey Legacy Builders Recognition Brunch was held November 1, 2007 at the home of Richard and Susan Lipsey. With picture perfect fall weather, approximately thirty-five honorees enjoyed beverages on the veranda. The program soon followed with Chairman of the Board Richard Lipsey welcoming guests to his home. Chairman of the Foundation Lee Griffin thanked those present for their generous and far-reaching support. Craig Nuckolls gave a passionate testimony regarding his commitment to MBP and the Center’s significance to him, his wife and the entire community. Bill Peters closed the program with the presentation of the newly designed Anna B. Lipsey Legacy Builders pin to invited guests.

Pictured (l to r) are Todd Stevens and Susan and Richard Lipsey.

“We plan on making this an annual event,” stated Bill Peters, chairman of the Foundation’s development committee. It is important for the Foundation to continue to honor those individuals who have given sacrificially to the fight against cancer, ensuring that patients and families have access to all the services they need - now and in the future - and that valuable cancer research continues.” Craig and Cynthia Nuckolls, Anna B. Lipsey Legacy Builders

New 2007 Anna B. Lipsey Legacy Builders Anna B. Lipsey Legacy Builders is comprised of individuals who have made or have notified Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Foundation of their intent to make planned gifts through their estate plans. Donors who have made outright gifts of $10,000 or more to the endowment or created endowed gifts for specific programs are also recognized as Legacy Builders.

A

Anonymous – (3) Carolyn A. Chassee Leonard Boyd Delaune William A. Ferguson * Jerry and Devera Goss Mr. and Mrs. Anthony S. Kurlas Family Alton W. Luedtke

www.marybirdfoundation.org

Through their generosity, the following individuals are helping MBPCCF to build a long-term sustainable endowment fund and provide for the stewardship of such funds in order to provide financial support to Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center and other nonprofit entities that are established, and have demonstrated the ability to conduct cancer-related programs or provide services that reduce cancer incidence and mortality, or improve the quality of life for those affected by cancer.

Ron and Corinne Helm Ness Craig and Cindy Nuckolls Bill and Cherie Peters Jerry and Chuck Schwing Edward and Bernice Spiess * Deceased


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Is philanthropy one of your values? How do you integrate the transfer of wealth and your values? Challenge yourself to define your values and to help yourself understand the meaning of family wealth. Is the value of the family’s wealth derived from spending, saving, passing it on to future generations or using it to make the world a better place? If philanthropy is one of your core values, it can be used as an important tool for both family financial planning and the transmission of other core values. There are four steps you can take to preserve family wealth while teaching core values: 1. Identify surplus wealth. How much income and capital do you need to maintain your lifestyle over time? Even an informal financial audit of the family’s spending and a projection of capital requirements through retirement will often reveal surplus wealth. Excess capital, once defined, can be better deployed to advance an inheritance to heirs and provide a resource for family philanthropy. You might consider transferring money to your children during your lifetime. It makes more economic sense to distribute money to your children during your lifetime than at your death. Leaving money to your children at your death is not nearly as effective or efficient. Often, the money arrives too late to have a positive impact on your children’s lives. Beyond that, direct transfers at death are the least tax-efficient way (most costly!) to transfer assets to children. 2. Define the inheritance. The hardest estate-planning question is how much money to give to the children. The question is not how much could they receive, but how much should they receive? What amount is truly best for them? 3. Communicate about wealth. It is important to communicate with your children about the extent and purpose of family wealth. Involve adult children, hold family meetings and discuss openly issues concerning family finances and wealth. Increasingly, families are writing mission statements, a stated philosophy and purpose of money and a business plan for their wealth. The decision on when to communicate with family members is a unique choice for each family. 4. Include philanthropy. Focused, strategic philanthropy allows you to express and perpetuate your values, impact society and pass on to your children and grandchildren the principle of caring for others. For many, philanthropy is essential to leading a fulfilling life and treating wealth responsibly. In fact, a family philanthropic fund (private foundation, supporting organization or donor-advised fund) can be an effective teaching tool. Establishing an endowed fund at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Foundation can serve the same purpose. Children learn to work together and gain financial competency while also serving their community. Serious discussions about giving regularly include the children, and they should be fully and intentionally involved. Thinking together about current philanthropic projects contributes to family unity, leads to better decisions and, may assist your children in making informed decisions for their future. For more information, please contact Carolyn A. Chassee, CFRE, VP for Development and Chief Development Officer, at (225) 215-1201 or cchassee@marybird.com.

www.marybirdfoundation.org

M a r y B i r d Pe r k i n s C a n c e r C e n t e r F o u n d a t i o n • A n n a B . L i p s e y L e g a c y B u i l d e r s N e w s

Should Your Estate Plan Reflect Your Values?


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Coming Soon to Gonzales, LA the fourth location of

in partnership with

PERKINS PERSPECTIVE is published by the Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Communications Department to provide information about news and programs of interest to the medical community, cancer patients and their families, donors and friends of the Center. Communications Department 225.215.1225 Amy L. Benton, VP of communications • Sally McConnell, marketing director Danette Simon, physician liaison • Debby Vollmer, public relations manager/senior staff writer

NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 Address Service Requested

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2008 V1 Perkisn Perspective