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What’s Ripe Now? Summer Bounties from Local Farms JULY 2009

HEALING FOODS

Exploring the Raw Life

10

tips to green your vacation

Wayne County Edition | HealthyLivingDetroit.com


AREA FARMERS MARKETS Belleville Farmers Market

At the end of Main Street, in Victory Park Contact: Bob Kennedy, 734-699-2034 May-September, Saturday 9-2pm

Canton Farmers’ Market

Canton, 420 Cleveland Ave Contact: Kristina Natoli, 734-394-5460 June 20 – October 17, Sunday 8-1pm CantonFarmersMarket.com

Detroit Eastern Market

2934 Russell Street, between Mark and Gratiot, Detroit Contact: Randall Fogelman, 313-833-9300 Year-Round public market: Saturday 5 am - 5pm Detroiteasternmarket.com Project FRESH and Food Stamps accepted

Detroit – East Warren Avenue Farmers Market Center of East English Village, East Warren Avenue, Detroit Contact: Richard Hertz, 313-571-2800 ext. 1136 July 12 – October, Saturday 10-3pm

The Farmers & Artisans Market of Dearborn

22100 Michigan, The market’s new location surrounds Bryant Library and extends behind the city parking lot between Tenny and Howard streets. Contact: Joan Reed, 313-278-8759 June 5 – October 30, Fridays from 8-1pm

Garden City Farmers Market

Garden City Town Center Plaza, Lot south of Kroger, northeast corner of Ford and Middlebelt, Garden City Contact: Amelia Oliverio, 734-422-4448 May 6 – October 26, Wednesday 9-2pm

Grosse Pointe – West Park Farmers Market

On Kercheval between Lakepointe and Beaconsfield, Grosse Pointe Park Contact: Jennifer Meldrum, 313-822-2812 ext. 200 May 16 – September 26, Saturday 9 – 1pm Grossepointepark.org

Highland Park Farmers Market

Woodward Avenue, across from Auedes Market, Highland Park Contact: Teresa Cummings, 313-422-8730 July – September Saturday 10-3pm Project FRESH accepted

Lincoln Park – Fort Visger Collaborative Farmers Market

1355 Southfield Road, municipal parking lot across from City Hall, Lincoln Park Contact: Leslie Lynch-Wilson, 313-598-3137 May 3 – October 25, Sunday 11 – 4pm Holiday Market: November 22, 10-3pm

Livonia – Wilson Barn Farmers Market

29350 W. Chicago at Middlebelt, Livonia Contact: Karen DePerro, 734-261-3602 June 21 – October 11, Saturday 8-3pm

Northville Farmers Market

Northville Downs Race Track, corner of W. Seven Mile and Sheldon Road, Northville Contact: Sher Watkins, 248-349-7640 May 1 – October 30, Thursday 8-3pm Project FRESH accepted

Northwest Detroit Farmers Market

15000 Southfield, Bushnell Congregational Church Parking Lot, Detroit Contact: Pam Weinstein, 3 13-387-4732 ext. 103 July – October, Thursday 4-8pm October only, 3-7pm Project FRESH accepted

Plymouth Farmers Market

In “The Gathering”, on Penniman Ave., just east of Main Street, Plymouth Contact: Mary Heim, 734-475-2585 May – October, Saturday 7:30-12:30pm

Wayne Farmers Market

35310 Michigan Avenue W., next to theatre Contact: Sandy McClure, 734-516-0202 May 20 – October 28, Wednesday 3-7pm ci.wayne.mi.us/farmers_market.shtml

Wayne State (SEED) Farmers Market

5201 Cass Avenue, in front of Prentiss Hall, across the street from the Detroit Public Library Contact: Kami Pothukuchi, 313-577-4296 June 3 – October 30, Wednesday 11-4pm Michigan Bridge Card and WSU One Card accepted Clas.wayne.edu/seedwayne

Wyandotte Farmers Market

Corner of Maple and Biddle Contact: 734-324-4500 May 29– September 18, every 2 weeks on Friday 5/29, 6/5, 6/19, 7/8-11 (Street Art Fair), 7/17, 7/31, 8/7, 8/21, 9/4, 9/18

Please contact us via email mdemo@naturalawakeningsmag.com with changes or updates to these free listings for the local farmers markets. We’re doing our best to pass along accurate information and to help support the farmers markets.

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HealthyLivingDetroit.com

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle. inside this issue

departments

newsbriefs 6 globalbriefs 8 healthbriefs 9 consciouseating 18 inspiration 19 healthykids 20 fitbody 22 naturalpet 24 calendars 26-29 resourceguide 29-30 classifieds 30

pg. 8

pg. 10

Healing Foods

10

Is It Really Organic?

15

Dirty Girl Farm

16

What’s Ripe Now?

18

Exploring the Raw Life by Lisa Turner by Dr. Carol Ann Fischer by Erin Eagen pg. 22

Summer Bounties from Local Farms by Susie Ruth

Kid’s Gym

20

Beat the Heat

22

Whole Food Supplements

24

Play as Exercise by Jen Lemen pg. 24

Five Water Workouts to Keep You Fit and Cool by Jodi Helmer Benefits for Pets by Dr.. Matthew J. Heller

How to Advertise To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 586-983-8305 or email mdemo@HealthyLivingDetroit.com Deadline for ads: the 15th of the month. Editorial submissions Email articles, news items and ideas to: mdemo@HealthyLivingDetroit.com Deadline for editorial: the 10th of the month. calendar submissions Email Calendar Events to: mdemo@HealthyLivingDetroit.com Deadline for calendar: the 10th of the month. regional markets Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets, call 239-449-8309. For franchising opportunities, call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com.

July 2009 July 2009

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letterfrompublisher On so many levels our lives are all about food, which is so closely interwoven into everything that we are and do. What we put into our bodies reminds me of the saying about computer technology, “garbage in/garbage out”. The quality of input directly corresponds with the quality of the output and if we are filling up on low quality food, we can expect low quality physical performance. The freshest organic produce we can eat is what we grow in our own gardens. The next best thing is buying fresh produce at the local farmers market directly from the farmers and their families that work so hard to raise the healthy fruits and vegetables they bring to market each week. This one simple act helps to keep our dollars within the local economy where we need it the most.

newsbriefs News about local happenings in and around our community

Local Shoe Store Offers Oprah Sensation contact us Wayne County, Michigan Edition Published by: Healthy Living Detroit, Inc. P.O. Box 341081 Detroit, MI 48234-1081 Phone: 586-983-8305 Fax: 586-933-2557

For produce items that aren’t available locally, Dr. Carol Ann Fischer shares facts about how to learn if store bought produce have been grown organically and whether or not it was grown from seeds that were genetically modified (GMO). [pg 15] We can’t get away from reading labels, even on fresh produce.

Publisher Mary Anne Demo mdemo@HealthyLivingDetroit.com

The once unimaginable changes, that our globally connected world brings to our doorstep, are accompanied by views of how people are suffering in other countries far more than we are. As we approach our nation’s birthday this year, I am renewed by a sense of thankfulness for the freedoms and blessings that we all enjoy.

Editorial & Layout Team Linda Sechrist Kim Cerne Maryann Lawrence

As a long-time member of the Rotary Club of Detroit, my family has hosted high school students through the Rotary Youth Exchange program. This gave us opportunities to get to know young people and welcome them into our home and culture. Rotary strives for world peace through understanding, and taking time to understand other cultures helped us discover how much we’re all the same.

Client Services Consultants Lauren Brayton Daksha Patel John Chetcuti Cyndy Vernier

My daughter Jessica, who just completed her freshman year at the University of Detroit Mercy, took two summer courses that included spending two weeks in Brazil. A Spanish student, all through high school, she plans to major in International Business. I suspect that some of her decision was the result of growing up with many international brothers and sisters.

National Franchise Sales John Voell II NaturalAwkeningsMag.com 239-530-1377

Rotary encourages young college students to spend a year studying abroad and offers scholarships for up to $23,000. [pg 5] If you’re past college age, Rotary also offers vocational exchanges where a group of professionals from different occupations are selected as a team to participate in a ‘Group Study Exchange’ (Rotary6400.org). It’s a wonderful program. Kudos to the Detroit Tigers for stepping up to the plate and taking on new green initiatives. When an organization of this size makes good choices the results are impressive. [pg 7] It’s a reminder that everyone’s greener choices protect our planet. Live well,

© 2009 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.

SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions are available by sending $28 (for 12 issues) to the above address.

Mary Anne Demo, Publisher

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Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soybased ink.

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uperior comfort and arch support are now available in a stylish new sandal called FitFlops, available locally at ZCoil Comfort Shoes, 1314 N. Telegraph Road, in Dearborn. FitFlops became an overnight success last summer after they were featured on Oprah’s Summer Favorites show. With a unique microwobbleboard cushioning system in the foot bed, the shoe reduces hotspots and pressure points, and reduces ground force impact. Contact ZCoil at 313-407-4976. Zcoil.com or FitFlop.com.

Rotary Sends Students to Study Abroad

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ore than 750 university students from 60 countries have been selected to study abroad as Rotary Ambassadorial Scholars during the 2009-10 academic year. Designed to bridge cultures and encourage goodwill, the program is one of Rotary’s leading efforts to promote world peace and understanding. Ambassadorial Scholarships provide undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to study at participating universities in the 200 countries and geographical areas where Rotary clubs are active. While abroad, scholars participate in community service projects and speak at local Rotary club meetings and conferences, schools, civic organizations, and other forums where they serve as goodwill ambassadors for their home countries. For scholarship guidelines and application forms visit Rotary.org. E-mail RotaryScholarships@gmail.com or call 866-9ROTARY.

Go Green at Garden Family Hootenanny

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here’s wonder to be found through the garden gates this summer during the Garden Family Hootenanny, July 12 from 3 to 5 p.m. at The Whitney in Detroit. As parents dig into food and drink in the outdoor cafe, kids will discover bubbles, games and crafts along the garden path. The Whitney will provide garden fare, cocktails and mocktails for purchase. Live performances include Mydols, Cello-Bella! and a Music Together demonstration. The Garden Family Hootenanny is sponsored by Ecostore USA. It is the latest in a series of Hootenanny concerts and CDs organized by Mydols lead singer April Boyle to celebrate music both children and parents can enjoy. Since 2001, Detroit Family Hootenannies have brought together talented musicians to jam with full audience participation. The concerts gave rise to two criticallyacclaimed compilation CDs, “Detroit Family Hootenanny: Detroit Folks Playing Old and New Music for Kids” in 2006, and “Holiday Hootenanny” in 2007.

Wayne State Students Planting SEEDS of Sustainability

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he SEED Wayne program is looking for volunteers on multiple fronts to help cover their campus and Detroit neighborhoods with edible plants. The group sprang from Wayne State University’s agriculture program. In addition to planting sustainable urban gardens, the SEED program works in partnership with community-based organizations promoting food security, urban agriculture, farm-to-institution, and food and fitness planning and policy development. SEED needs help in their campus garden every Thursday from 5 to 6 p.m. and Sundays from 10 to 11 a.m. at the Warrior Demonstration Garden. Tasks include bed prep, planting, trellising, watering and, of course, weeding. Volunteers are needed every Wednesday at the farmers market between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Tasks include surveying, set up, take down and special event assistance. Volunteers are also needed for the Healthy Corner Stores Evaluation and Marketing program. As part of trying to increase fresh produce access and consumption at corner stores on Detroit’s near-east side, volunteers would help with surveying, marketing and record keeping. To volunteer, e-mail W.Ahee@wayne.edu, or call 313- 701-7027. For more about SEED, visit Clas.Wayne.Edu/SeedWayne.

Doors open at 2:30 p.m. Admission is $10 and free to kids 12 and under. Reservations at (313) 832-5700. Visit TheFamilyHoot.com, EcostoreUSA.com and TheWhitney.com. The Whitney is located at 4421 Woodward Ave., Detroit.

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newsbriefs News about local happenings in and around our community

Rise and Shine with Yoga

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uesdays from 5:45 - 6:30am evolve yoga studio is offering a new earlymorning yoga class Tuesdays from 5:30 to 6:45 a.m. The class was designed for individuals who may only have time to fit in yoga class early in the morning because the rest of their day is packed with work, kids, errands and appointments say evolve owners. Students start the day with sun salutations and practice a variety of yoga postures and breath work to develop strength, balance and flexibility to enhance the mind-body connection. evolve Yoga Studio is located at 7986 Lilley Road, in Canton. Contact mail info@evolve-yoga.net and 734-454-YOGA. evolve-Yoga.net.

Splash Park Open for Summer Fun

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ith more than 10,000 square feet of fun, how can summer get better? Splash Park is now open at the Downriver YMCA, 16777 Northline Road, in Southgate. Park perks include a giant water slide, pool for lap swimming and a pool side cafe. Lessons are available as well. Daily, group and season passes are available. Lifeguards are always on duty.

For more information, call 734-282-9622. Or visit us at YMCADetroit.org

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Green Committee Invites Public Discussion

newsbriefs

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Detroit Tigers Going, Going, GREEN! Weekend

reening Downriver is a standing committee under the economic development division of the Southern Wayne County Regional Chamber (SWCRC.) The committee welcomes anyone interested in participating in reversing the adverse affect of unsustainable practices in these communities to join its monthly meetings at the Chamber offices, 20600 Eureka Road, Ste. 315, in Taylor. “We realize that changes do not come overnight,” says committee chair Mary Bohling. But we are committed to working patiently but persistently to make the improvements that will help to build a green Downriver.” Greening Downriver was created as a result of the Downriver Summit to bring together leaders from the public, private and nonprofit sectors to map the future of the community. Spearheaded by U.S. Congressman John. D. Dingell several years ago, the Summit remains at the helm of moving Downriver into a more sustainable economic, social and ecological region of southeastern Michigan. Contact Mary Bohling at Bohling@msu.edu.

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For More Information or to Signup for a Free Demo Contact Pro-Literacy Detroit www.proliteracydetroit.org The Palms Building • 2111 Woodward, Suite 410 • Detroit, Michigan 48201 • Phone: (313) 872-7720 • Fax: (313) 965-8441

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Wayne County

News about local happenings in and around our community

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n Saturday, July 25th from Noon to 8:00 p.m. and again Sunday July 26, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. the Detroit Tigers will be launching their inaugural “Going, Going, Green!” event at Tiger Stadium. The mission of the “Going, Going, GREEN!” Weekend Trade Show is designed to educate fans of the Detroit Tigers and other residents of the Metro Detroit area about the products and services that can help make their lives more GREEN. The exhibitor area will be located on the West side of Comerica Park. Each exhibitor will be offering their products or services to attendees of the event, which is open to the public - not just ticket holding Detroit Tigers game attendees. For more information on exhibiting, visit Tigers.com/green.

Restaurants Serve Healthy Food With an Ethnic Flair

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ith two locations in metro Detroit, Al-Ameer continues to expand its offerings. Its new Al-Ameer pastry shop in Livonia offers French and Middle Eastern pastries with fresh and healthy ingredients. The restaurants offer another venue for raw dishes and dishes made with locally purchased ingredients. Both Al-Ameer restaurants offer fresh smoothies and salads. All ingredients are purchased locally when possible, and the olive oil comes from groves in Lebanon owned by the restaurant. “Everything is made in-house from scratch, using no additives or preservatives,” says manager Abbas Ammar. “Supporting local farmers and knowing that our ingredients are fresh and made from scratch is important to us.”

Scholarships for Naturopathic Teachers

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aturopathic College of Ann Arbor, in association with Gaia School of Herbal Studies, offers prize drawings for school scholarships through July 25 for talented experienced teachers. Sample Gaia products and order herbal medicines at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market most Saturdays. To enter the drawing, visit area natural food stores between Lansing and Toledo, Ohio. The Grand prize is an $18,000 full scholarship to the program; each store will also have a prize winner for individual classes and programs. Visit GaiaHerbalStudies.net and NaturopathicCollegeofAnnArbor.net. To sponsor a drawing, call 734-769-7794.

clean your whole house green.

The new pastry shop is located at 29112 Five Mile Road, in Livonia. Al-Ameer east is located at 12710 W. Warren Ave., in Dearborn and Al-Ameer west at 27346 Ford Road, in Dearborn Heights. AlAmeerRestaurant.com. Our cleaning products are safe, effective and non-toxic.

New Location For The Holistic Healer

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he Holistic Healer and Wellness Center in Dearborn Heights has changed locations and added a variety of new services to their retinue. The center has added a new nurse to the staff, and also now offers colon hydrotherapy and food allergy testing. The new location is 21194 Van Born Road, in Dearborn Heights. The clinic offers a variety of natural and holistic healing therapies and therapeutic products including massage therapy, natural and organic body and skincare products, nutrition counseling, healing light therapy treatments, organic herbal supplements, custom blended natural makeup, home detoxification services and natural skincare services including facials, manicures and pedicures. Call 313-299-9800 or visit HolisticHealerOnline.com

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globalbriefs

healthbriefs

News and resources to inspire concerned citizens to work together in building a healthier, stronger society that works for all.

Natural Remedies for Motion Sickness

Batters Up Major League Baseball Stadiums Go Green Ballparks are greening more than the outfield grass, reports E/The Environmental Magazine. Leading examples are cutting energy use, upping recycling efforts and taking the first steps into renewable energy. Even the nation’s oldest, Fenway Park, in Boston, is now one of the city’s 12 greenest buildings. New construction brings opportunities for energy-efficient field lighting and waterless and low-flow plumbing fixtures, as well as heat-reflective and vegetative roofs. Citi Field, in New York, and Nationals Park, in Washington, DC, are good examples. Renovations, which recur about every decade in a stadium’s existence, also are up for eco-improvements. Remarks John McHale, Major League Baseball’s executive vice president for administration, “I expect the renovation work is going to be done with a much higher consciousness to LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification than has ever been the case.” For more information on the Detroit Tigers’ Going, Going, Green! event this month, see ad on the back cover, the NewsBrief on page 7 or visit Tigers.com/Green. Visit Emagazine.com and search “ballparks” for feature article.

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10 Tips to Green Any Vacation G

reen travel doesn’t mean sleeping in a treehouse or backpacking into a jungle to rescue orangutans, but simply keeping a few Earthfriendly ideas in mind when planning a summer vacation. Of course, when traveling to a foreign country, making an effort to get to know the people, their culture and a few words of their language, respecting local customs and showing appreciation also go a long way toward avoiding the label of “Ugly American.” The easiest ecotravel tips are these: 1. Pack lightly. 2. Find a “green” hotel or eco-lodge. 3. Book a downtown hotel that is walking distance from sights. 4. Take short showers, reuse towels and switch off lights, heat and air conditioning when leaving the room. 5. Ask if the hotel recycles, and participate. 6. Take a non-plastic water bottle that can be refilled. 7. Use public transportation. 8. Eat vegetarian, or at least meals comprised of local meats and produce. 9. Always stay on marked trails and be respectful of nature and wildlife. 10. Buy locally produced gifts and souvenirs to support the local economy. Sources: MSNBC.com/Green Travel, Geekabout.com, IndependentTraveler.com

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otion Sickness refers to the uneasiness, cold sweats, dizziness and/ or vomiting brought on by travel by car, train, boat, train, airplane or amusement park rides. Caused by a disturbance in the inner ear, motion sickness can make any journey unpleasant, and once the symptoms have started, they’re difficult to stop. It’s far better to keep the symptoms from starting in the first place by taking precautions, including natural remedies such as ginger or acupressure. Drinking ginger tea, eating crystallized ginger or taking a ginger supplement have all been shown to alleviate a tendency toward motion sickness. Ingesting peppermint and black horehound in tincture form or as tea are also worth a try. Some studies suggest that acupuncture and relaxation training may help. Before traveling, avoid spicy, greasy or fatty meals; don’t drink alcohol or smoke. Do drink plenty of water to avoid becoming dehydrated and pack dry crackers in a handy carry-on as a light snack. As always, ask health care providers about the best ways to incorporate these herbs, supplements or other therapies into any existing overall treatment plan. Source: University of Maryland Medical Center

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the body and may actually require more energy to digest. Thus, people who naturally tend to feel cold or dry should avoid them. “For certain body types at certain times of year, a raw food diet could be the best medicine,” says John Douillard, Ph.D., doctor of chiropractic and author of The 3-Season Diet. “But, during cold winter months, for certain body types, it can cause trouble.”

Getting Started

healing foods exploring the raw life by Lisa Turner

I went raw once, and did so with a great deal of enthusiasm for the health benefits I would accrue. Certainly, eating only uncooked food seemed easy enough. Make a bunch of salads, gorge on apples and oranges, eat raw nuts, sprout some beans—piece of cake, I thought. After three weeks, all I wanted was a piece of cake. And bread. And hot, hot soups. Slowly but surely, after two months I returned to my old eating habits and to my beloved stove. I didn’t know what I know now: With a few simple tricks, we can conquer cooked-food cravings, as well as other common obstacles to a raw foods diet. Multiple Benefits The payoff for eating raw foods makes it worthwhile. When you cook food above 114 degrees, it destroys the enzymes that help you digest and assimilate the food. High temperatures also alter the chemical structure of vital nutrients. Overall, “You lose 50 percent of the protein, 80 percent of the vitamins and minerals and about 95 percent of the phytonutrients,” says Gabriel Cousens, a medical doctor and author of Rainbow Green Live-Food Cuisine. By enhancing nutrient absorption and making digestion easier, raw foods allow the body to spend its energy on

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other important functions. “If the body’s working on trying to digest heavy, difficult-to-process food, it can’t focus on healing,” says Natalia Rose, author of The Raw Food Detox Diet. The potential benefit of going raw is more radiant health. Says Cousens, “A live foods diet decreases inflammation, slows the aging process, increases immunity and energy and results in increased mental, physical and spiritual well-being.” Keep in mind though that cooking your food does carry some advantages—besides the yummy taste. Heat

actually makes some nutrients, like lycopene, in tomatoes, more bioavailable by breaking down the plant’s cell walls. Cooking also destroys so-called “anti-nutrients;” for example, phytates in grains and legumes, which block mineral absorption, as well as trypsin inhibitors in nuts and legumes, which hamper protein digestion. However, soaking and sprouting raw food helps break down these compounds, too. More importantly, raw foods don’t work for everyone. Both traditional Chinese medicine and ayurvedic traditions teach that uncooked foods cool

In general, most people can eat raw foods with glowing results. Plus, the regimen doesn’t have to be an all-ornothing proposition. Depending on our constitution, we can choose how raw we want to go. “Most people won’t do a 100 percent raw diet, because it’s too painful,” says Susan Schenck, a licensed acupuncturist and author of The Live Food Factor. “Most people do better on an 85 percent raw diet.” Whether going all the way or taking the middle path, these seven surefire tricks make going raw easier: Constant cravings – Overcoming an appetite for bread, cookies, pasta, chips and most candy doesn’t come easily. The raw solution: “If you’re missing carbs, you can make satisfying substitutions from raw foods,” says Brigitte Mars, author of Rawsome! “Dates stuffed with almond butter or cookies made from raw, ground nuts and dried fruit can satisfy a sweet tooth. You can have flax crackers instead of chips or bread. And, you can make ‘rice’ out of cauliflower or rutabaga, and ‘pasta’ from zucchini strips.” Social support – Food provides more than physical nourishment. “It’s tied up in all kinds of social cues, holidays, mother’s love and childhood memories of being loved and nurtured,” observes Schenck. Foregoing those comfort foods can make us feel alone and isolated.

kitchen essentials by Lisa Turner Just because we’re not heating up a stove to prepare raw food doesn’t mean we don’t need the proper kitchen equipment. A blender and standard knives would probably suffice, but a variety of tools facilitates preparation of a wider variety of foods. Good starters include: • A great knife. Raw foods cooks slice and dice a lot, so invest in a chef’s knife, small paring knife and serrated knife, all of which should comfortably fit the hand. Wusthof, Henckels and Shun are good, long-lasting choices. • Food processors. These work better than a blender for grinding nuts and seeds and making soups, sauces and spreads. Opt for a high-quality one (Cuisinart is always a safe bet) that has attachments for shredding and slicing vegetables. A mini-food processor also helps in chopping garlic or grinding nuts and seeds. • A dehydrator. Although a dehydrator isn’t a must, it’s a help. Use it to make raw cookies, crackers, breads, fruit leathers and even ersatz burgers. The Excalibur dehydrator has a fan to distribute heat evenly and a temperature gauge to help judge how hot the food gets—important with a raw foods diet (ExcaliburDehydrator.com). • Spiral slicers. Great for cutting long, thin strips of butternut squash, zucchini or other vegetables to decorate salads or make raw ‘pasta.’ Joyce Chen makes a good, simple version (JoyceChen.com). • A juicer. A good basic juicer is available for $100 to $150. Or, go for the gold with a Green Star juicer (GreenStar.com), a high-end model that actually presses, rather than grinds, the produce. This creates less heat, which increases the juice’s quality.

The raw solution: Get support. Tap into the area’s raw community. Check local newspapers for notices of raw foods potluck groups, or start one.

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Dining out dilemmas – Nibbling on crudités at a restaurant, while fellow diners cozy up to burgers and fries, tempts even the most devoted rawfoodist.

enzymes. Also, eat high-fat raw foods, like avocados and nut butters, and add warming spices, like cinnamon, ginger and garlic, to dishes. Try grating apples, tossing them with cinnamon and ginger and warming them slightly in a dehydrator; no need to wait for winter. Yum.

The raw solution: Schenck suggests printing small cards that say, “I’m a raw High temperatures foodist; please prepare a large salad alter the chemical for me, with fresh, structure of Time crunch – Raw raw vegetables, foods do take lonvital nutrients. nuts, seeds and ger to prepare, at avocado.” Ask the least initially—and waiter to deliver this special request to that alone sends many people back to the chef. At cocktail or dinner parties, the microwave. call the host and ask to bring a dish to share. Then, whip up a favorite raw The raw solution: Spend a couple foods dish that will help keep temptahours on weekends making enough tion at bay and may introduce somefood to last several days. Focus on one new to raw foods. easy raw dishes, like blended soups or nut pates, and take advantage of timeThe salad rut – If our daily raw foods saving equipment (see sidebar). Also, diet consists mainly of lettuce and find a raw buddy for a meal-exchange grated veggies, we’ll get bored fast. program: Each cooking partner makes One can only do so much with a bowl double or triple quantities of raw of Romaine. dishes to share. The raw solution: Get creative. Invest Commitment phobia – Following a in a few great raw foods recipe books. raw foods diet requires discipline in Seek out raw foods classes to learn terms of time, energy and attitude, all techniques for preparing a variety of of which challenge most of us. dishes—and meet new friends in the process. The raw solution: Lighten up. “Remember that the raw foods lifestyle is Needing the heat – Eating raw seems a choice, not a religion,” says Renee easier in warm-weather months, espeLoux, author of The Balanced Plate. cially when farmers’ markets call. But, “There isn’t one thing that works for when colder months return, we tend to crave everyone, and part of the journey is learning to listen to your own body.” warming meals, like soup and creamy foods. A plate of sliced apples just doesn’t have the same comforting appeal as a slice of warm, organic apple pie. The raw solution: Eating foods raw doesn’t mean eating them icy cold. Most foods can be warmed to 110 degrees without damaging their

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P.S.: If you can’t live without one or two goodies, like Aunt Marge’s chocolate truffle cake, have a tiny bit, mindfully and moderately. We won’t tell. Lisa Turner is a nutrition writer, personal chef and food coach in Boulder, CO.

raw foods film documents diabetes turnaround The recent independent film, Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days, documents how holistic physicians Gabriel Cousens and Helen Ross are helping Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics to reverse their disease naturally, without prescription drugs. Ages of the five patients participating in the filmed 2008 study ranged from their early 20s to late 60s. According to a company spokeswoman, they are representative of several dozen cases that have been treated at Cousens’ Tree of Life Rejuvenation Center, in Patagonia, Arizona. During the study, the subjects ate only organic, vegan, uncooked raw foods for 30 days. Researchers report that by the fourth day, three people with Type 2 and one with Type 1 diabetes were off their insulin completely. By the end of the 30-day retreat, these four had stabilized blood sugar, and the remaining Type 1 patient was down to one-fifth of his usual dosage of insulin. “It’s not just diabetes,” says Cousens. “Everything went back to normal.” According to the American Diabetes Association, 23.6 million Americans, or 7.8 percent of the population, are living with diabetes. The International Diabetes Federation estimates the worldwide number at 246 million. Cousens states, “We need to wake up to the possibility that simply changing our diet can significantly reverse, and even cure, this disease.” Sources: RawFor30Days.com and TreeofLife.nu. Also see There is a Cure for Diabetes, by Gabriel Cousens, M.D.

10 tips for eating raw by Chef Matthew Kenney

1 | start with shopping. The best way to start eating raw is to visit local farmers’ markets in season. The abundance of produce—sweetsmelling fruits, glowing heirloom tomatoes and vibrant greens, none of which have seen the inside of a refrigerator—is better than the best gourmet shop. Let taste be your guide.

2 | stock up on condiments. Keep a variety of condiments in your kitchen, including raw cashews and macadamia nuts, almond and hazelnut butters, dried sweet dates and seaweeds and nut and olive oils. They make it easy to dress up simple raw dishes and enhance the appeal of salads and raw nori (seaweed paper) rolls.

enhanced with green powders. You can mix fruit with fresh collard greens, kale or Swiss chard in the blender. Sometimes, I also add soy or nut milks to smoothies, rather than fruit juice.

6 | practice some of the world’s simplest recipes. Take gazpacho, for example: Simply blend vegetables, including tomato, cucumber, a bit of fresh red chili, sea salt, citrus or vinegar and perhaps a garnish of diced avocado, and you’re done. It makes a meal in five minutes. Use gazpacho as a jumping-off point for other raw soups.

7 | indulge in fat.

Start with a powerful blender, a food processor and sharp knives. Advanced cooks also use a dehydrator, which costs about the same as a high-quality sauté pan.

Raw fats from high-fat plants are actually great for you on many levels. For a delicious and nutritious meal, try a small salad dressed with cold-pressed nut or olive oil, and a bowl of homemade guacamole with raw chips, which are now appearing in major organic markets everywhere.

4 | perfect your own smoothie.

8 | have an all-raw day.

Simple variations can be made from unpasteurized fruit juices (perhaps made at home). Mix with other fruits and natural sweeteners, such as agave nectar or honey. My favorite is a rich blend made from banana, cacao powder, agave nectar, raw almond butter and either water or coconut water. Use common sense when measuring. It’s decadent, delicious and nourishing, and easy on the digestive system. This shake will power you for hours.

The results of a single raw day will amaze you. Try a green smoothie for breakfast, a big salad or a homemade nori roll for lunch and maybe raw lasagna for dinner, with fruit and nut snacks during the day.

3 | get the right equipment.

5 | build up to greens. Green juices can be challenging to prepare at home, so it may be easier to prepare smoothies that are fruit- and berry-based, and then

9 | the proof of the pudding is in the eating. For the more adventurous cook, a raw food “pudding” takes no more than 15 minutes to make. Blend young Thai coconut meat, agave nectar, sea salt, vanilla and raw organic cacao powder. This rich, delicious and healthy dessert has no refined sugars. All it requires is a good knife or cleaver to extract the meat from the coconut.

10 | not yet convinced? Eat one whole piece of fruit before every lunch or dinner for one week. It might be an organic apple or peach, a papaya or mango, or whatever is in season, but it will make for a life-altering experience. Matthew Kenney is an award-winning chef, restaurant entrepreneur and international consultant. His cookbooks include Raw Food/Real World and Everyday Raw. For more, see MatthewKenneyCuisine.com.

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Food is, delightfully, an area of licensed sensuality, of physical delight which will, with luck and enduring tastebuds, last our life long. - Antonia Till

ake sure you know where your food comes from when shopping. According to Wikipedia, organic foods are made according to certain production standards that allow certain non-organic fertilizers to be used. Ideally, it is best to get your organic produce from your own organic garden. When home gardening is not possible get your organic produce from local farmers who still control their own seed and grow organically. As an alternative, there is a way to safely shop in a grocery store when buying organic produce. The key is the bar code label. The tiny annoying stickers, which appear on almost all fresh fruits and vegetables, actually contain the secret code to whether the fruit is organic, conventional or genetically modified. Only conventional, non-organic fruits and vegetables have bar code stickers that have only four numbers. 
Both the organic and genetically modified bar code stickers have five numbers each. Organically grown fruits and vegetables have a five number bar code that begins with the number 9. Organic fruits and vegetables are required to be in separate areas in supermarket. The bar code sticker helps to confirm which type of produce is actually being purchased in case the food item has been put in the wrong location. There is no requirement that supermarkets inform customers which fruits and vegetables being sold are genetically modified (GMO). Genetically modified foods were first marketed in the early 1990’s, and have Monsanto’s Roundup® pesticide added to the genes of the plant. Genetically modified foods have a five number bar code that begins with the number 8. Reading the bar codes will tell the truth about the source of the fruits and vegetables. This means that a regular banana bar code would be 4011, an organic banana would be 94011 and a GMO banana would be 84011.

 If you cannot find organic produce, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has put together a list of the best and the worst non-organic fruits and vegetables. They list the foods that contain the most and least pesticide residues found on conventional foods. The top five with the highest pesticide load are peaches, apples, sweet bell peppers, celery and nectarines. The five least pesticide residue foods are mangos, pineapples, frozen sweet corn, avocados and onions. To see the full list of 45 foods visit: http://www.foodnews.org/ fulllist.php.In the world of organic food there is organic produce, and manufactured items with organic ingredi-

ents. Why is it that some of the ingredients of your favorite organic health foods have changed over the years, where more sugar has been added or canola oil has replaced the other oils? The reason for these changes is the shift in ownership of many of the organic health food manufacturers. According to Wikipedia, since the early 1990’s organic food production has had growth rates of around 20% a year, far ahead of the rest of the food industry. Organic food accounted for 1-2% of food sales worldwide as of April 2008. The increased sales have made organic food more profitable, making it more attractive to commercial food giants. Since 1999 large commercial food conglomerates have quietly been buying up the organic food companies. CocaCola now owns Odwalla, the maker of organic juices and smoothies, while Pepsi recently acquired Naked Juice. General Mills owns both Cascadian Farm, the maker of fruit jams and other products, and Muir Glen, the maker of tomato soups and sauces. In 1999 Heinz invested in the formation of a strategic alliance called the Hain Celestial Group. Many of the organic manufacturers like Garden of Eden, Health Valley, Celestial Seasonings and 18 other companies are in this group. In 2003 the Hain Celestial group formed an alliance with Cargill, a commercial food manufacturing company. The ongoing collaboration with Cargill Health & Food Technologies has allowed the companies in the Hain Celestial Group to manufacture new alternative products, like Rice Dream milk. To see a chart of who owns each of the organic food manufacturers visit: www.cornucopia.org/who-owns-organic/ According to a study published in the Journal of American Nutrition, organically grown fruits and vegetables have twice the amount of beneficial minerals compared to those grown by conventional methods. Enjoy eating organic food now that you know what is really organic and what is not. Dr Carol Ann Fischer is a chiropractic holistic wellness consultant with TLC Holistic Family Health Care, in Livonia, MI. Call her at 734-664-0339 or email TLC4Health@sbcglobal.net

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Dirty Girl Farm By Erin Eagen

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n the past several years being eco-friendly has become trendy. In fact, according to Graydon Carter, editor of Vanity Fair Magazine, “green is the new black.” As consumer demand increases it becomes easier and easier to find products that claim to be safer for both the earth and the user. However, consumers must be diligent in investigating just how natural many of these products really are. In order to profit from the eco-trend many companies have changed their labeling, but not much else. Products claim to be CFC-free, which is quite irrelevant considering that the chlorofluorocarbons (man-made chemical compounds used as refrigerants, cleaning solvents, aerosol propellants and blowing agents for foam packaging) were banned in the early 90’s. Claims of being “all natural” are also deceptive and vague since many dangerous substances, for example arsenic, occur naturally. Considering that our

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skin is our largest organ it is important to pursue skin-care products that really are safe. Luckily, there are real companies that care more about producing truly safe products than just capitalizing on an eco-chic image. Long before it was cool to be green Heather Rosencrantz was living a healthy and natural lifestyle. Growing up with severe asthma on a farm in Davison, Michigan, her parents saw the value of keeping their environment free of chemicals and pesticides. For Heather this natural way of life would become even more important when her own daughter was born with the genetic autoimmune condition called Celiac’s Disease. What began out of the necessity to protect her baby’s extremely delicate skin has grown into a thriving business known today as the Dirty Girl Farm. Her first product, which is still a best seller after nearly 15 years, was her boo-boo balm. Heather says, “I had personal needs and due to diet and lifestyle restrictions I couldn’t find what I wanted.” Rather than settle for inferior and potentially dangerous products Heather bought a few books and drew on her knowledge of herbs and plants. She did a lot of experimenting and eventually developed the boo-boo balm. She used that as a jumping off place and soon she had five or six products. Over the past fifteen years Heather has been on a mission to offer a complete line of “head-to-toe natural, chemical-free, and plant-based body care products. All the Dirty Girl Farm products are environmentally friendly and free of common allergens. Heather offers this reassurance to her customers. “We are really REAL. We are what we say we are. We live that way. It’s organic; it’s natural. We specialize in this. If I say its allergen free it is because that’s how careful I am with stuff at home, so I pass that on to my customers.” Many of her products have actually been developed based on the specific needs of her customers. For example, one of the newest products simply called Magnesium Crème contains lavender and ginger essential oils to relax the muscles and the mind and to soothe aches and pains. It has an organic cream base with geo-thermal magnesium salts from Iceland, which are beneficial for the muscles. Heather developed this cream at the request of Beverly Willey, who was searching for a safe and truly natural way to help relax her 5-year-old autistic daughter Olivia’s tight muscles. Their pediatrician recommended soaking in

Epsom salts, but sitting still in the bathtub wasn’t a practical solution for this active little girl. The Magnesium Crème helped Olivia so much that Beverly spread the word to other families with similar needs and the cream became popular enough that it is now a regularly stocked product. For Heather and the staff at Dirty Girl Farm this is what it’s all about. “We’re about family, and moms, and I put everything I love into what I do,” says Heather. Even her customers who initially are attracted to the products simply because of the fun and hip name, or the beautiful scents seem to be realizing the very real value of natural body care. “Once they take the product home and use it they realize how much better their skin really feels,” Heather explains. But Dirty Girl provides more than just great skin-care. In addition to offering baby-care and household cleaning supplies she hopes to help encourage people to live a healthier lifestyle in general. “Maybe they’ll start thinking about the foods they eat, maybe they start recycling, or hit a yoga class, it’s all part of a progression.” Learn more about Dirty Girl Farm by visiting their website and online store at DirtyGirlFarm.com or by visiting the Royal Oak Farmers Market Friday and Saturday from 7am-1pm and Sunday from 8am-3pm. To investigate the safety of your current body care products visit the Environmental Working Group’s searchable database of toxic ingredients at CosmeticsDatabase.com or pick up Not Just A Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry by Stacy Malkan.

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wo contrasting visions of the future countries to find lasting solutions to poverpresent themselves today. One ty and injustice, summarizes the emerging acts upon and reacts to outdated concept of global citizenship. The global values of self-interest: cultural superiority, citizen: exclusive rights, social injustice, environ • Takes responsibility for their mental degradation and war. The other own actions. responds with values grounded in mutual respect more suited to the new world • Respects and values diversity. reality: equity, inclusive rights, social justice, sustainability and peaceful conflict • Is outraged by social injustice. resolution. The first point-of-view fosters danger, darkness and discord. The second • Stays aware of the wider world yields greater abundance and fullness of life for all. and their role as a global citizen. Today, Americans have the opportunity to embrace a more expansive, updat • Understands how the world works, ed and urgently needed ethic, known as economically, socially, politically, global citizenship. With rapid travel and A global citizen is culturally, technologically and instant communications, we have become environmentally. motivated by local global citizens. We need to discern what interests, such as love we have in common as we celebrate the • Participates in and contributes to differences that enrich human life. of family, communal the community from the local to As Americans, we rely upon freefairness and self the global level. doms that are essential to any progressive interest, as well as society: freedom from want and fear and • Acts to make the world a more freedom of speech and expression, as global interests, based sustainable place. well as belief. But, we are too often inon a sense of universal sular rather than engaged. Fewer than 20 The call for change demands that equality and care for percent of U.S. citizens have passports. A we embrace a life of learning, engage National Geographic Society test showed fellow humans, human creatively with other cultures and practhat 11 percent of U.S. high school rights and dignity. tices, embrace the new complexity of students could not find even their own an interdependent world and continually country on a world map. Fifteen famous adapt to new realities. A broader vision, embracing and writers commissioned by the State Department to write integrating different perspectives, is vital to every member about what it means to be an American for an internationof the planetary community. al digest had no sense of how to write for people who are not Americans. Jim Kenney is former global director of the Council for a In such an environment, how can we prepare ourParliament of the World’s Religions, executive director of selves to rise responsibly to the occasion to protect other the Interreligious Engagement Project and co-founder and peoples’ freedoms, as well as our own, especially when director of Common Ground, an adult education program we are challenged daily by perceived threats and resultant based in Deerfield, IL (cg.org). restrictions of our liberties? Solutions are rarely simple in a complex era, but finding answers has never been more Primary Sources: WorldBank.org; Oxfam.org; PEN World essential to the survival of our species. Voices statement by Eliot Weinberger. Oxfam International, a confederation working in 100

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ummer is here and kids are running wild with boundless energy. Why not join them? Playing with your kids and their friends is a good way to bond with them. It’s also a quicker and easier route to keeping in shape than going to the gym. Twenty minutes of sustained play—running, jumping or dancing—three to four times a week, builds energy, improves cardiovascular health, helps overall mood, decreases tension, tones muscles and aids sleep. The following family games all offer a minimum 20 minutes of activity that will get your heart pumping and provide fun for all.

Tag–You’re It! You’ll be amazed at the endless variations of tag that have emerged since you were in grade school. Ask your kids to educate you about the latest recess tag incarnation and then, declare yourself to be “It.” Take the long way to get to your slowest little one, putting all your effort into exaggerated steps, while you swing out those arms. Let your oldest give you a run for your money and enjoy being tagged over and over again. The delight on your children’s faces does a body good in more ways

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Wayne County

than one. A 20- to 30-minute workout will pass in no time.

Jump for Joy Forget everything you’ve ever said about jumping on the bed. Treat your kids to seven minutes of insanity by playing every jumping game you all can imagine. Start with a bedroom tour to find the bounciest beds, followed by a hop down the hall and through the living room. Keep your heart rate up after your seven minutes inside by taking it outside. Learn the jump rope rhymes de jour and hop ’til you drop. It’s great for calves, arms, delts and abs. Cool down with a little hopscotch, followed by a skip to the freezer, where homemade popsicles await.

Marathon Mania Invite neighborhood kids to a special race against the clock as you find out how many laps you can run around your house, apartment, car, yard or dining room table in five minutes. Fall down on the ground in a dizzy display of exhaustion. Then, get up and do it again and again. Push yourself to see how long you can hang with your most active

preschooler. Award medals of distinction, made out of crepe paper and recycled aluminum foil, to everyone who ran the race. Little kids will love reporting to their parents and friends how they conquered 20 or 200 laps with you by their side.

Shake What Your Mama Gave You Turn up the radio in the kitchen and work up a sweat showing youngsters how to dance the night away. Just 20 minutes, rocking to five to six songs, will get your heart pumping and show everybody who’s still got it going on. Don’t be surprised if you want to keep going. Kids love to show off their own moves and appreciate your willingness to get down in the name of playful fun. Impromptu dance parties are the perfect intervention for couch potato kids’ longing for something fun to do this summer. Jen Lemen is a freelance writer, illustrator and doula in Silver Spring, Maryland. Connect at JenLemen.com.

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Five Water Workouts to Keep You Fit and Cool In hot summer weather, when the scorching sun and out-of-control humidity threaten to take a toll on your fitness routine, one good solution is to hit the pool.

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by Jodi Helmer

“Y

ou can tailor a water workout to all fitness levels,” explains Jane Katz, a doctor of education, longtime professor of physical education and athletics with City University of New York and author of Your Water Workout. “It’s perfect for someone who doesn’t exercise and wants to get started, as well as elite athletes who need a new challenge.” Water provides up to 15 times more resistance than air, so the body has to work a little harder to complete each movement. The result is a workout that improves cardiovascular fitness, builds strength and develops flexibility—while you feel like you’re barely breaking a sweat. Here are five water workouts that will inspire you to stay fit and cool for the summer:

Swim Like Fish Swimming is one of the best water workouts around, working all the major muscle groups as the repetitive motion of gliding through the water puts you in a state of zen. “Focus on being long and relaxed in the water,” advises Desirée Ficker, professional triathlete and co-author of The Waterproof Triathlete. “Form is more important than speed.” Swim 100-meter laps, alternating between a front stroke, like the crawl, and a backstroke. Aim to swim at

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Belly flops off the diving board aside, falling into the water is painless, so it’s a great place to work on balance; all you need is a kickboard. Warm up by holding the kickboard out in front of you and use flutter kicks to swim five laps. Then, sit on the kickboard with your legs dangling over the side. Kick your legs and flutter your arms to propel yourself around the pool. Continue for one minute, then rest for 15 seconds. Do three reps. This exercise works arms, chest, back, abs and legs. Next, hold the kickboard under the water and place your feet on opposite ends, as if you were surfing. Slowly stand up, extending your arms to your sides to tread water. Bring your legs toward your chest, and then lower them again. Do 10 reps. Benefits include improved balance and stronger abs.

least 20 laps, with a 15-second rest between each lap. Two lengths of the pool, from one side to the other and back again, counts as a lap. As you become more proficient, add more laps and fewer rests. Swimming works shoulders, triceps, biceps and abdominals. Reward: Burn up to 563 calories in a one-hour workout.

Take a Class Aqua aerobics isn’t just for senior citizens in rubber bathing caps. These low-impact fitness classes offer a variety of effective, all over workouts. Most fitness centers that have pools offer water aerobics and fitness classes, in addition to their lap lanes. One of the biggest benefits of aqua aerobics is having someone else design the workout; all you have to do is play followthe-leader. “Water aerobics is a great starting point for someone who’s new to working out in the pool,” says Katz. “The instructor can offer suggestions to make the movements easier or more challenging, so you can tailor the workout to your fitness level.” Reward: Burn about 285 calories per hour.

Race for the Finish Line When the pavement is hot enough to cook an egg, an afternoon run is out of the question. Hop in the pool, instead. “Use the same running motion you would if you were running on the road,” advises Ficker. “Emphasize high knees and drive your arms forward to keep you above water.” A half-hour jog might not seem like much, especially if you’re used to putting in more time on the treadmill, but it’s long enough to give your back, abs, glutes, hip flexors and quads a solid workout. Start with a five-minute warmup, walking in place in shallow water. Move to deep water and, with or without a buoyancy belt, begin jogging. Set a goal to run for 30 minutes, followed by a five-minute, shallow water cool down. Reward: Deepwater jogging burns about 340 calories per hour, 100 calories more than jogging on land.

Feel the Burn To look even better in your bathing suit, go with a cross-training workout

that both burns calories and builds muscle. Katz recommends this 60-minute cross-training workout, which is challenging enough for experienced athletes. In shallow water, start by walking in place for five minutes. Next, move to the deep end and alternate five minutes of treading water with five minutes of jogging, for a total of 20 minutes. At the edge of the pool, place palms flat on the pool deck and push yourself upwards as high as you can go. Now, lower yourself until your arms are at a 90-degree angle. Do 20 reps. Back in shallow water, stand with

feet shoulder-width apart. Squat low enough to submerge your shoulders. From there, jump straight up, bringing your legs together at the top of the jump, to land in the starting position. Do 20 reps to firm thighs and butt. Reward: Burn an average of 520 calories per session. Note: Calorie counts are based on a 155-pound woman. Freelance writer Jodi Helmer is the author of The Green Year: 365 Small Things You Can Do to Make a Big Difference. Connect at Green-Year.com.

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naturalpet

Whole Food Supplements Benefits for Pets by Dr. Matthew J. Heller

Pets and people today share a common bond: We rarely consume a completely balanced diet that meets our nutritional needs and promotes optimal health. Everyone knows that vitamins are fundamental to health and wellness, and concerned pet owners are beginning to realize that even the best food sources may not be enough. Pets’ diets may need additional fortification with nutritional supplementation.

Why Supplements May Be Necessary First, it’s vital to understand that the majority of the U.S. pet population consumes highly processed diets. In order to form those attractive kibble bites, most pet food is cooked at extreme temperatures, which also destroy most naturally occurring vitamins and minerals in the raw materials. Recognizing this, many commercial pet food manufacturers fortify their products with synthetic vitamins in an attempt to compensate. We must ask: Does the addition of these synthetic vitamins benefit an animal’s health, as marketing materials suggest? Could synthetic vitamins potentially be harmful? Is there a better way to provide our furry companions the valuable nutrition they may not receive from their primary diet? I encourage responsible pet owners to take a closer look at available options for supplementation, and to recognize the differences between the benefits of whole food vitamins and their synthetic counterparts.

Benefits of a Whole Foods Approach In a food source, a vitamin complex consists of the main vitamin nutrient and an underlying matrix of supporting enzymes, coenzymes, minerals and antioxidants. For ex-

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ample, a natural food source of vitamin E, such as wheat germ oil, sunflower seeds or leafy vegetables, has at least five other key nutrients present, as well as hundreds of related nutrients. In manufacturing whole food vitamin supplements, the raw materials (plants, vegetables, fruits and/or animal products) are gently processed to preserve the intrinsic vitamin and mineral complexes. In consuming whole food vitamins made from these natural concentrated food sources, an animal receives the same benefit as though he or she had consumed the food itself. Synthetic vitamins, by contrast, typically contain only a single, isolated component of the main vitamin nutrient (or, in some cases, a network of related chemicals), but do not duplicate the underlying matrix in its intact organic form. For example, dl-alpha tocopherol acetate, listed as an ingredient in a given synthetic supplement, is supposedly standing in for the entire natural vitamin E complex. This is not what nature intended. Unfortunately, the majority of vitamins found in nutritional supplements today are synthetic. These synthetic vitamins are less expensive to manufacture, but are inherently inferior to nutrition found in a natural organic complex. Over the past half century, scientific studies from the University of California and many other academic

institutions have demonstrated both the potential risks of consuming synthetic vitamins and the known benefits of supplementing both animal and human diets with whole food vitamin complexes derived from concentrated food sources. Proponents of whole food vitamin supplements identify various concerns with synthetic vitamins: Potential toxicity of synthetic vitamins. For example, researchers at Boston University documented that consumption of synthetic vitamin A may increase birth defects, while overconsumption of whole food sources of vitamin A did not have any toxic effect. Creation of vitamin deficiencies of the very synthetic vitamin being supplemented. If the body is accustomed to absorbing a vitamin complex in its natural state, the concern is that the body must supply portions of the vitamin complex not present in the synthetic vitamin in order to attempt to absorb it. According to research results noted in the Veterinary Clinical Reference Guide, forced supplementation of the missing portions of the vitamin complex can result in a deficiency. Synthetic vitamins absorb much more slowly. For example, the National Research Council of Canada reports that vitamin E in a natural form is absorbed five times more quickly than its synthetic counterpart.

Increased histamine levels may indicate an apparent allergic reaction. Synthetic vitamins may contain additional ingredients used to bind together the components; certain people may be sensitive to or intolerant of such ingredients, including MSG, food colorings and chemical preservatives. Profound differences exist between synthetic vitamins and whole food vitamins. The bottom line is that whole food vitamin supplements are able to supply an animal’s body with nutrients lacking in their diet. Synthetic vitamins, on the other hand, offer only isolated components of vitamins, and many researchers argue that they pose potential risks. Providing proper nutrition for our pets in the form of whole food vitamins is a powerful tool in combating and preventing illness and promoting overall wellness. Dr. Matthew J. Heller is a holistic veterinarian in Middletown, OH. Contact him at 513-424-1626 or visit AllAboutPetCare.com.

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July 2009

25


ongoingcalendar All Calendar events must be received by the 15th of the month prior to publication, and adhere to our guidelines. Email mdemo@ HealthyLivingDetroit.com for guidelines and to submit entries.

Rise and Shine Yoga-7:30-8:30am. All levels. Start your day by saluting the sun in this early morning yoga practice. Practice a variety of yoga postures and breath work to develop strength, balance and flexibility. $13. evolve yoga studio, 7986 Lilley Rd, Canton. 734-454-9642. evolve-yoga.net. Xflowsion Class – 10-11:15am. One of kind blend of yoga, martial arts, and dance moves all infused by music from every genre. This flow is designed to move way beyond a traditional vinyasa so that all fitness junkies feel at home. Everyone is welcome, especially those of us that never thought yoga could be fun! Yoga Shelter, 17000 Kercheval St, Grosse Pointe. 313-884-9642. YogaShelter.com. All Levels Hip Openers Yoga Class – 12-1:15pm. This class is an all levels class to not only open the hips but also the heart. Using the breath as a solid foundation to assist in finding the edge and safely balancing between effort and surrender. Class moves from lighting and building your internal

flame slowly, to utilizing this warmth in longer holding yin-style asanas. Free to new students, or $12, packages available. Rising Sun Yoga. 13550 Dix-Toledo, Southgate. 734-282-9642. RisingSunYoga.com. Vinyasa Yoga-4-5pm. Perfect for beginners or well-seasoned yogi alike. $15/class. See full schedule at Practice-Yoga.net.

Gentle Yoga – 6-7pm. A series of soft and nurturing poses allowing the opportunity to surrender to the breath, and bring stillness to the mind. Rice bags are often used to provide pressure relief at strategic areas of the body. First class free to local residents, $14 walk in. Livonia Yoga Center, 19219 Merriman Rd, Livonia. 248-449-9642. LivoniaYogaCenter.com. Yoga Ed Class – 6-7:15pm. Requests each student to develop a non-competitive practice to serve as a health maintenance regime to integrate on and off the mat. Incorporates self-awareness. All levels. $10 suggested donation. Free parking after 5pm. Yoga in Detroit, 535 Griswold St at Congress Floor 27 – Buhl Bldg, Detroit. 248-496-0392. info@yogaindetroit.com. YogaInDetroit.com.

Yin Yoga-4-5pm. Great way to compliment a strenuous Vinyassa Yoga. Increase flexibility and energy flow. Practice-yoga.net for fees and full schedule.

Yoga Flow Class – 7:15pm. Increases awareness of breath & body while building a strong, flexible back & core. Walk-ins $15. Body Fit, 133 W Main St. Ste 240, Northville. 248-305-8414. Bodyfitmi.com

Candlelight Yoga – 7-8pm. A Basic/Gentle yoga class, but with lots of candles. A great way to end the weekend! First class free to local residents, $14 walk in. Livonia Yoga Center, 19219 Merriman Rd, Livonia. 248-449-9642. LivoniaYogaCenter.com.

Ashtanga Yoga-7:30-8:30pm. Led by Shelly Smith, ashtanga yoga is a great way to feel more energetic, be more flexible and loosen up. Full class schedule available at Practice-Yoga.net. Vipasana Meditation-7:30-9pm. Insight meditation is a simple and direct practice: moment to moment investigation of the mind/body process through calm, focused awareness. Donation. evolve yoga studio, 7986 Lilley Rd, Canton. 734-454-9642. evolve-yoga.net.

Slow Flow Yoga – 9-11am. Wonderful for beginners, designed to help you overcome the pressures of modern day life. Course will be gentle, slow and calm. Taylor Recreation Center, 22805 Goddard Rd, Taylor. 734-374-3901. TaylorYoga.com Work Break Yoga – 11:45am-12:30pm. This class runs for 45 minutes to allow for a practice during a lunch-break from work. Easy to follow along, focus on stretching, tension relief and breathing. Postures will be paced slowly - but a dedication to challenging yourself is required. May return to work refreshed, and perhaps with a new, and more positive perspective. All levels. $10 suggested donation. Yoga in Detroit, 535 Griswold St at Congress Floor 27 – Buhl Bldg, Detroit. 248-496-0392. info@yogaindetroit.com. YogaInDetroit.com. Meditation Night-6-8pm. Guided meditation night. Free admission. 670 S Main St, Plymouth. 734-476-9555. Belovedspirit.com. Yoga and Qi Gong for Real Bodies – 6-7:15pm. You can do this class. Feel happier, healthier and less stressed. Improve digestion and sleep better. Have better balance and coordination. This class will incorporate yoga, qi gong, breathing techniques, mudras and relaxation methods. Free to new students, or $12, packages available. Ris-

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ing Sun Yoga. - 13550 Dix-Toledo, Southgate. 734-282-9642. RisingSunYoga.com. Restorative Flow Yoga-7:15-8:15pm. Deeply relax and relieve stress. $13/class. 734-454-4692. evolve-yoga.net. Cardio Kickboxing – 7:45-8:45pm. High energy cardiovascular workout plus the benefits of practicing self defense moves, ages 13 and up $5. Michigan Karate Academy, 23753 Van Born Rd, Taylor. 313-292-9214

IMat Pilates-7:15-8:15pm. Fun and for all levels. Intense core-workout. evolve the shape and posture of your body. $15/class. Schedule on Practice-yoga.net. Slow Flow Yoga Class – 7:15-8:45pm. Playful flow of 3 or 4 gentle postures united in a short sequence repeated to warm up and connect breath and movement. Learn foundation postures, great workout too. Cool down with passive stretches. Classes are on a donation basis and open to everyone. Rising Sun Yoga, 13550 Dix-Toldedo, Southgate. 734-282-9642. RisingSunYoga.com. Vipasana Yoga-7:30-9pm. Moment to moment investigation of the mind body process through calm focused awareness. Donation. evolve Yoga Studio, 7986 Lilley Rd., Canton. 734-454-9642. evolve-yoga.net.

Slow Flow Yoga – 9-11am. Wonderful for beginners, designed to help you overcome the pressures of modern day life. Course will be gentle, slow and calm. Taylor Recreation Center, 22805 Goddard Rd, Taylor. 734-374-3901. TaylorYoga.com Gentle Yoga – 9:15-10:15am. A series of soft and nurturing poses allowing the opportunity to surrender to the breath, and bring stillness to the mind. Rice bags are often used to provide pressure relief at strategic areas of the body. First class free to local residents, $14 walk in. Livonia Yoga Center, 19219 Merriman Rd, Livonia. 248-4499642. LivoniaYogaCenter.com.

Yoga for Every Body 6-7:15pm. All levels, but geared towards helping those who feel they “can’t do yoga” to find comfort, while seeking a routine of exercise and health. No judgment, no pressure. Just an opportunity to be good to yourself for an hour each week, and to encourage positive change in your life. $10 suggested donation. Free parking after 5pm. Yoga in Detroit, 535 Griswold St at Congress Floor 27 – Buhl Bldg, Detroit. 248-496-0392. info@yogaindetroit.com. YogaInDetroit.com. Posture Pro Yoga Class – 7:15-8:15pm. Practice yoga correctly. Learn to do yoga safely and reveal a deeper understanding of the body. Learn to keep the back positioned to prevent injury while stationary and moving is reinforced through yoga postures. Free to new students. $12. Packages available. Rising Sun Yoga, 13550 Dix-Toledo Rd, Southgate. 734-282-9642. RisingSunYoga.com. Yoga Class -7-8pm. All ages. No experience necessary. Drop in class. $8. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com. Cardio Kickboxing – 7:45-8:45pm. High energy cardiovascular workout plus the benefits of practicing self defense moves, ages 13 and up $5. Ultimate Karate Institute, 23753 Van Born Rd, Taylor. 313-292-9214 Prenatal Yoga – 7:45-8:45pm. A nurturing class designed to meet the changing needs of pregnancy. This class is a wonderful opportunity for pregnant women to share their experiences, connect with their developing baby, and prepare for childbirth through movement, relaxation and breath techniques. All levels welcome, but if you are new to yoga, it is best to check with your doctor before beginning. Walk in $14, Northville Yoga Center, 200 S Main Street Unit B, Northville. 248449-9642. NorthvilleYogaCenter.com.

All Levels Yoga Class – 5-6pm. Let go of the

stresses of the week and unwind going into the weekend. A half hour meditation after class is optional. Classes are on a donation basis and open to everyone. Rising Sun Yoga, 13550 Dix-Toldedo, Southgate. 734-282-9642. RisingSunYoga.com.

Prenatal Yoga Class – 11:00am-12pm. Help strengthen the uterus and pelvic muscles, improve circulation, aid in digestion, exercise the spine and increase overall comfort. Yoga can also alleviate many of the discomforts of pregnancy such as nausea, constipation, varicose veins, swelling, back pain and sciatica. Dad’s or friends are welcome to join in. Classes are on a donation basis and open to everyone. Rising Sun Yoga, 13550 Dix-Toldedo, Southgate. 734-282-9642. RisingSunYoga.com. Drop In Kids Yoga Class – 12:30-1:30pm. This creative and less traditional approach to yoga will improve flexibility, coordination, concentration and focus, stimulate children’s imagination and help to release energy in a fun, safe environment. Using stories, interactive games and animated postures, kids learn about animals, art, nature and basic anatomy through yoga. Ages 6-11. Free to new students, or $12, packages available. Rising Sun Yoga. - 13550 Dix-Toledo, Southgate. 734282-9642. RisingSunYoga.com. Prenatal Yoga-12:30 - 1:45pm. Meets 1st and 3rd Saturdays each month. No yoga experience necessary. Help soothe aches and pains, reduce stress, maintain good posture, learn to relax on command, keep a positive outlook, clear the mind of stress and anxiety. $13. evolve yoga studio, 7986 Lilley Rd, Canton. 734-454-9642. evolve-yoga.net. Little Lotus – Kids Yoga – 1-2pm. A creative and fun way for your child to learn to move their bodies, focus and calm their minds as well as create community with others. Promotes self esteem, caring for others and builds a sense of awareness for nurturing the planet Earth. Ages 5-11. Yoga Shelter, 17000 Kercheval St, Grosse Pointe. 313-884-9642. YogaShelter.com.

Work Break Yoga – 11:45am-12:30pm. This class runs for 45 minutes to allow for a practice during a lunch-break from work. Easy to follow along. Focus is on stretching, tension relief and breathing. Postures will be paced slowly - but a dedication to challenging yourself is required. May return to work refreshed, and perhaps with a new, and more positive perspective. All levels. $10 suggested donation. Yoga in Detroit, 535 Griswold St at Congress Floor 27 – Buhl Bldg, Detroit. 248-496-0392. info@yogaindetroit. com. YogaInDetroit.com.

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calendarofevents

SATURDAY, JULY 25

All Calendar events must be received by the 15th of the month prior to publication, and adhere to our guidelines. Email mdemo@HealthyLivingDetroit.com for guidelines and to submit entries. WEDNESDAY, JULY 1

MONDAY, JULY 13

MONDAY, JULY 20

Used Book Sale- 9:30am- 6:00pm. Sponsored by Friends of Dearborn Libraries. Henry Ford Centennial Library, 16301 Michigan Ave, First Floor, South West Corridor, Dearborn. 313-943-2330.

Summer Young Naturalists Program - 9:30 – 12pm. Thru Fri 7/16. Ages 7-9. Children explore pond life, soil creatures, insects and spiders, birds, and more. Free. Registration Required. Environmental Interpretive Center, University of Michigan Dearborn. 4901 Evergreen Rd, Dearborn. 313-593-5338.

A Living Foods Lecture- 6:30-7:30pm. Joyce Olivetto, President of Midwest Living Foods association, will be utilizing kirlian photography to show how all living things including raw foods have a life force. Register by phone. Free. Zerbo’s Health Foods, 34164 Plymouth Rd, Livonia. 866-493-7297.

THURSDAY, JULY 2 Nutrition Class -10- 11am. Our clinical dietician guides you to better health with instructions on how to prepare meals to decreasing your sugar intake. Free. Registration required. DMC Wellness Center(inside Ford Community and Performing Arts Center, 15801 Michigan Ave, Dearborn. 313-943-5479.

Raw Vegan Potluck- 7 - 9pm. Admission: Bring a raw vegan dish, no meat, fish, dairy, eggs, or honey, sized for eight servings. First-time visitors may pay $7.50 in lieu of bringing a dish however, they are encouraged to bring a dish to ensure there is enough for everyone. Unity of Livonia, 28660 Five Mile Road, Livonia. 877- 778-3464. VegMichigan.org.

MONDAY, JULY 6 Summer Young Naturalists Program- 9:30- 12pm. Thru Fri 7/9. Ages 10 – 11. Children explore pond life, soil creatures, insects and spiders, birds, and more. Registration required. Free. Environmental Interpretive Center, University of Michigan Dearborn, 4901 Evergreen Rd, Dearborn. 313-593-5338.

Meditation Class- 7- 8:30pm. Mixture of guided visualization, breathwork, therapeutic imagery and body awareness. Presenter, Sue Burton-Hidalgo is listed in Bantam Book’s “The Top 100 Psychics in America” and in Llewellyn Book’s “The Complete Book of Psychic Arts.” $15. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com.

THURSDAY, JULY 9 Alice Huang’s Country Style Food Party- 6-8:30pm. 18 & older. Learn how to cook different country-style recipes, including how to cook tofu. Alice will talk about digestion and the health benefits of exercise and diet. Buffet dinner will be served. $25. Must pre-register. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com.

FRIDAY, JULY 10 Trenton Mid-Summer Festival-10am–11pm July 1011. 10am–5pm July 12. Includes “Green Street” featuring environmentally friendly vendors, activities and information. Over 150 arts and crafts, food, entertainment, “kids’ korner” and much more family fun. Free. Downtown Trenton. 734-675-7302. TrentonMid-Summer.com.

SATURDAY, JULY 11 Circuit Training Class-11-12:20pm. Training done in 2-3 minute intervals. All equipment provided. Gloves recommended. $12. Body N Balance, 2315 Monroe St, Dearborn. 313-792-8181. MyBodyNBalance.com.

SUNDAY, JULY 12 Garden Family Hootenanny-3-5pm. Concert of folk singing and dancing. Garden Family Hootenanny features the latest of this music. $10/Adult. Free/12 and under. Whitney Restaurant, 4421 Woodward Ave., Detroit. 313-832-5700.

Eclipse! Writing into the Light-6-9pm. Women Only. Heather Good, a devout student of natal and north node astrology for over 10 years, presents the three eclipses and how you can harness their energy. RSVP required. $25. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com.

TUESDAY, JULY 14 Raw Foods Seminar- 6:30-8:30pm. Learn about the raw food lifestyle. Matt Monarch, author of the best-selling book “Raw Spirit” and Angela Stokes, raw foods speaker, will share their experiences with changing to a raw food diet and will answer questions. Register by phone. Free. Quality Inn Livonia, 30375 Plymouth Rd, Livonia. 866-493-7267.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 Eat Your Way Thin-6pm. Dr. Carol Anne Fischer will discuss diet, nutrition and exercise. Also discuss what and how to eat. Free. Noble Library, 32901 Plymouth Road, Livonia. 734-756-6904. TLCHolisticwelness.com.

THURSDAY, JULY 16 The Salt Conspiracy-7-8:30pm. Learn what salt cravings mean. Find out what happens to your adrenal glands when you are under stress, and what you need to do to help repair them. Free. Civic Center Library, 32777 Five Mile Rd, Livonia. Requested Registration. 734-425-8588.

SATURDAY, JULY 18 Computer Recycling Event– 8am-12pm. Items accepted for recycling are computer monitors, peripherals, keyboards, mouse devices, printers, copiers, scanners, cell phones and fax machines. Free. Henry Ford Centennial Library, 16301 Michigan Ave, Dearborn.734-326-3936. Yoga in Kellogg Park-9-10am. All levels welcome for basic yoga class outside in downtown Plymouth at Kellogg Park. Weather permitting. Free. Evolve yoga studio & boutique, 7986 Lilley Rd, Canton. 734-4549642. evolve-yoga.net.

Vegan Potluck-12pm. Bring a vegan dish and enjoy a day of fun filled with vegan food. Free. Starr Jaycee Park, 1101 West 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak. 877-778-3464. Concert of Colors– July 18 – 19. 4 – 10pm July 18; 3 – 9pm July 19. Designed to celebrate the many ethnic and cultural groups that comprise metro Detroit with indoor and outdoor performances including music, dance, drum circles and more. Free. In and around the Max M. Fisher Music Center, 3711 Woodward Ave., Detroit. ConcertofColors.com.

The Herbal Hour on Anger Management7-8:30pm. All ages welcome. Presented by Nature’s Sunshine. Come learn how to keep cool when getting hot under the collar.$10. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com.

Exercise and Pressure Point Therapy-7-8:30pm. How pressure points can help you relieve stress and tension. Followed by chat with the doctor and enjoy organic snacks. Karl Chiropractic Clinic & Wellness Center, 30935 Ann Arbor Trail, Westland. Register at 734-425-8220.

TUESDAY, JULY 21 Back Off Pain!-5-6pm.Learn why stability in the front of your body will help keep your back strong and healthy to prevent back pain and back injury. Free. DMC Wellness Center, (located in the Ford Community Performaning Arts Center) 13801 Michigan Ave, Dearborn. 313-943-5479.

Peace Camp-5:30-8:30pm. Thru Thursday Ages 6 – 12. Children learn respectful, peaceful ways of resolving conflict and working together in a fun, multicultural environment celebrating diversity.Free. Register by July 20. Littlefield Presbyterian Church, 7560 Littlefield blvd, Dearborn. 313-933-3740. LittlefieldChurch.org. Weight loss, Diet & Energy Seminar-6:30-7:30pm. New Chapter’s Kelly Cassise will talk about taking control of your body to feel good and see results.Free. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22 Drumming Class- 7- 8:30pm. Bring your drums and come for some fun. Extra drums available upon request.Free. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com.

Tummy Trouble-7pm. Learn the hidden secrets behind stomach trouble such as acid reflux, ulcers and indigestion and ways to stop stomach pain. Free. Limit 15 guests. Civic Center Library, 32777 Five Mile Rd, Livonia. 734-756-6904. TLCHolisticWelness.com.

FRIDAY, JULY 24 The Grassroots Autism Awareness Tour- 7-9pm. Raun Kaufman, CEO of the Autism Treatment Center of America and Kristin Selby Gonzalez, mother of an autistic child, talk about importance of regular diet and therapies. Register by phone. Free. Quality Inn Livonia, 30375 Plymouth Rd, Livonia. 866-493-7267.

Yoga in Kellogg Park – 9-10am. All levels welcome for basic yoga class outside in downtown Plymouth at Kellogg Park -weather permitting. Free. Offered by evolve yoga studio & boutique, 7986 Lilley Rd, Canton. 734-454-YOGA (9642). evolve-yoga.net.

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Circuit Training Class-11-12:20pm. See July 11, 11am listing for details. $12. Body N Balance, 2315 Monroe St, Dearborn.313-792-8181.MyBodyNBalance.com.

MONDAY, JULY 27 Raw Food to the Rescue-7-8pm. Revitalize your health by eating raw food. What is raw food? Free. First Cup Organic Coffee, 15130 Inkster Rd., Redford. Register at 734-425-8588.

TUESDAY, JULY 28 Back Off Pain! – 5 – 6pm. See July 21 5pm listing for description. Free. DMC Wellness Center, located within the Ford Community and Performing Arts Center, 13801 Michigan Ave, Dearborn. 313-943-5479.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29 Inner Engineering Program - Introductory Talk – 7 – 8pm. The Inner Engineering Program (July 29 – Aug 4) includes Shambhavi Maha Mudra, an ancient kriya (an internal energy process) never before offered publicly. Together the program and practices establish health and vitality, enhance mental calm and clarity, and instill a deep sense of joy. This introductory talk is the first hour of the Inner Engineering Program. Free. The Finnish Cultural Center, 35200 West Eight Mile Rd, Farmington Hills. 248-229-5245 IshaFoundation.org.

THURSDAY, JULY 30 Get Energy Back-7pm. Come learn how to put a spring back into your step the natural way. Limited to the first 20 guests. Free. RSVP required. Whole Foods, 7350 Orchard Lake Road, West Bloomfield. 734-756-6904. TLCHolisticwelness.com.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 MacroVal’s Annual Pot Luck Picnic in the Park – 12 – 6pm. Annual Picnic in Hines Park, Livonia. A day of delicious food and fun activities, including volleyball and a water balloon toss. Whole foods chef, teacher, author and counselor Valerie Wilson, a.k.a. MacroVal, will have a vegetarian BBQ and be serving sweet potato burgers, grilled vegetables, and mouth watering desserts. Please bring a main course dish to share (vegan, sugar-free and wheat-free) large enough to serve at least 10 people. No desserts please as Val will provide those. For more info and ideas on what to bring visit the Picnic Page at www.macroval.com. $6 (with dish to share). $13 (without dish to share). RSVP Val at 734-722-4553 or email macroval@cs.com.

HEALTH FOOD STORES

Dr Carol Ann Fischer, D.C. N.D. NUTRITION UNLIMITED 14185 Eureka Rd., Southgate 734-284-2357 A Weston A. Price Shopping Guide Store. Organic and natural foods, sports nutrition, health care professional lines: Standard Process, Biotics Research, Medi-herbs, and certified nutritional counseling. Will ship anywhere in the U.S. or Canada.

17940 Farmington Road, Livonia, MI 48152 734-664-0339 – You deserve the best TLC TLC4health@sbcglobal.net Weight loss and detoxification, Nutrition, Homeopathy, Gentle non-force Chiropractic, Hormone Rejuvenation Therapy, Pressure Point Therapy, and Muscle Response Testing

Holistic Healer & Wellness Center TOTAL HEALTH FOODS, LLC 13645 Northline, Southgate 734-246-1208 THFDownriver.com We offer organic foods, vitamins, supplements, colonics, allergy testing and a variety of classes and informational lectures. Our new look includes free Wi-Fi and Internet access and an area to sit and enjoy our community atmosphere.

ZERBO’S

34164 Plymouth Rd., Livonia 734-427-3144 Zerbos.com Wall to Wall supplements Organic products & produce Frozen & Refrigerated foods Groceries, Teas, Bulk Foods Natural Chemical Free Pet Products Mineral Based Cosmetics Chemical Free Personal Care products Raw Living & Sprouted Food Section Fitness Section and more ...

21194 Van Born Rd. Dearborn Heights, 48125 (313) 299-9800 | HolisticHealerOnline.com AskTheHealer@HolisticHealerOnline.com Alternative healing modalities offered including bodywork, nutritional counseling, essential oils and home detoxification. Products available include organic herbal supplements and natural and organic body and skincare products.

Karl Chiropractic Clinic & Wellness Center, P.C. 30935 Ann Arbor Trail, Westland 48185 734.425.8220 | KarlWellnessCenter.com A unique wellness center devoted to helping people regain and support their health in the most natural ways, utilizing nutrition, whole food supplements, herbs, energy balancing techniques and, homeopathic and herbal remedies multiple detoxification techniques, allergy elimination, rebuilding and energizing exercises, as well as providing traditional and advanced chiropractic care.

SUPPLEMENTs NEWCHAPTER Organics®

An Herbal Complex for Your Complex Metabolic Challenges Supercritical Diet & Energy™ delivers New Chapter’s herbal strategy for optimal energy and weight management.* How you feel and how your body stores fat are functions of complex metabolic processes. Your genetic profile, what and when you eat, your exercise routine, metabolism of sugars and insulin, even your stress and toxin levels – all these combine to create the energy and form of your body.

MONDAY, AUGUST 3

New Chapter

Meditation Class – 7 – 8:30pm. See July 6 7pm listing for details. $15. Total Health Foods, 13645 Northline Rd, Southgate. 734-246-1208. THFDownriver.com.

Five Stage Herbal System Organic Vitamins, Supplements, Herbal Products and Probiotics NewChapter.com

If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. - J.R.R. Tolkien

WELLNESS CENTERs

A responsible health program respects all these factors, and an herbal strategy must do so as well. New Chapter® thus offers a Five Stage Herbal System, combining properly extracted and concentrated herbs that are thermogenics, adaptogens, antioxidants, PhytoGlycemics™, and cell protectives.* Thermogenic herbs enhance metabolic functioning and promote fat oxidation.* Adaptogens support normal functioning of the hormonal HPA axis (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) which specifically influences normal cortisol function and fat metabolism.* Antioxidant herbs address two potential concerns: (i) the probable suboptimal concentrations of free radical scavengers commonly found in weight-challenged individuals; and (ii) providing detoxification support should lifetime stores of toxins be released from stored fat.* Cell protectives promote normal membrane integrity and deliver important formulation-balancing properties.* Lastly and most importantly, PhytoGlycemics help glucose do its primary work – creating immediate cellular energy – rather than ending up as “stored” potenty in the form of fat deposits.*

“The New Chapter Difference: nourishment from nature’s most New Chapter’s Supercritical Extracts beneficial nutrients, just as Nature intended. In everything we do and every choice we make, we are committed to protecting and sustaining the world that provides for us and for future Made with Organic Ingredients generations.” “Supercritical” means Super Purity, Super Potency, Broad Spectrum, and No Chemical Solvents. New Chapter takes the finest natural materials and then extracts and highly concentrates (as high as 250 to 1) their precious ingredients. New Chapter does not isolate single ingredients or spike their extracts with synthesized additives. They deliver the wisdom of nature with the complexity and organic nuances of the natural material preserved for you. In fact, the supercritical process is the gentlest way to extract these delicate plant compounds in a manner to optimally preserve their potency and stability. And when you take New Chapter’s supercritical extracts, neither you, nor the environment, have to contend with chemical solvents. Supercritical Diet & Energy is made with organic ingredients. Not only will you be enjoying the profound health benefits of these life-sustaining herbs, but you – and our planet – will be spared exposure to pesticides that so damage our inner and outer environments.

HEALTHY FOOTWear Z-Coil- Pain Relief Footwear 1314 N. Telegraph Rd. Dearborn, MI 48128 313-407-4976, ZCoil.com Z-Coil Comfort Shoes offers Z-Coil Pain Relief Footwear and FitFlop brand sandals, a stylish sandal which offers a high level of comfort, In addition, the Copper Sole Sox are available, the wicking socks that eliminate athletes foot/ bacteria and virtually eliminate foot odor.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Certified Organic by International Certification Services, Inc., Medina, ND, USA

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Wayne County

$5.00

OFF

July 2009 DIET & ENERGY™ 60 Vegetarian Tablets Valid through 8/15/2009

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Edible Arrangements EdibleArrangements.com

Edible Arrangements^® has a fresh fruit bouquet to make any occasion special from birthdays, anniversaries and congratulations to business events and client gifts. Make every occasion special with Edible Arrangements® . 21016 Mack Ave Grosse Pointe Woods, MI 48236 313-343-0400 2910 Van Alstyne Wyandotte, MI 48192 734-246-8700

PET SERVICES Gentle Pet Protectors Lisa Phelps 313-410-3147 Kiyoda@aol.com

community while building your own financial security working from your home. Currently for sale: Atlanta, GA; Mobile, AL; Morris County, NJ; New York City, NY. Call for details 239-530-1377.

COMPUTERS

Professional Dog Walking; Pet and House Sitting Services. In business for over nine years. Provide in-home medical services. Fully Bonded, Licensed and Insured. Member of Pet Sitters International

SCHOOL

26430 Ford Road Dearborn Heights, MI 48127 313-370-8828

Computer Repair in Your Home – Complete computer checkups only $39.99. Software/hardware upgrades, home network setups, routers, wireless, trouble shooting, computer advice and much more. Haris: 313-443-7893 or HGunic@gmail.com.

“Putting the Pieces of the Wellness Puzzle Together”

30935 Ann Arbor Trail

Michigan Green Safe Products offers Eco-Friendly biodegradable compost-able food & beverage containers made from renewable resources for restaurants, bars, schools, offices, home, and more. It’s time to go green! John: 313300-7709 or GreenAtoms@gmail.com.

Certified Wellness Doctor

GET RELIEF FROM: • Digestive Problems • Headaches & Stress • Arthritis, Muscle Aches & Pains • Structural Imbalances • Hormone Issues • Fatigue

HEALTH AND BEAUTY

Goodwells Natural Food Market NATUROPATHIC COLLEGE NATUROPATHIC COLLEGE– Vegetarian & Vegan Soups & Sandwiches, of Ann Arbor Tel: 734-769-7794 www.naturopathiccollegeofannarbor.net of Ann Arbor Organic Produce, Groceries, Natural Products. Tel: 734-769-7794 YOGA Community and Diploma COLLEGE Programs beginning October NATUROPATHIC www.naturopathiccollegeofannarbor.net 418 W Willis, Detroit. 313-831-2130. Tel: 734-769-7794 www.naturopathiccollegeofannarbor.net Open Houses July, August, September, Noon-2pm OF ANN ARBOR Tel: 734-769-7794 Community and Diploma Programs beginning October Location: 1923 Avenue, Ann Arbor Community and Diploma Programs beginning October Open Houses July,Geddes August, September, Noon – 2 p.m. 1923www.naturopathiccollegeofannarbor.net Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48103 Naturopathy Herbal Medicine dArbor Massage Location:d 1923 Geddes Avenue, Ann Practice Yoga HOME IMPROVEMENT Open Houses July, August, September, Noon-2pm Naturopathy Herbal Medicine Massage 734-769-7794 20792 Mack Ave NaturopathicCollegeOfAnnArbor.net Community and Diploma Programs beginning October 911 Handyman – Total home repair. Home Location: 1923 Avenue, Ann Arbor Grosse Pointe Woods, MI 48236 Open Houses July,Geddes August, September, Noon – 2 p.m. improvements, maintenance, repairs, exterior Integrating Western and Eastern natural mediNaturopathy dfor Herbal Medicine dArbor Massage (313) 881-2874 and interior, residential and commercial, small Location: Geddes Avenue, cine traditions1923 professional trainingAnn and perPractice-Yoga.net Naturopathy Herbalbeginning Medicinein October. Massage or large jobs. Licensed and insured. Cliff: 734sonal enrichment. Classes 771-4546. Open Houses: July 26, Aug 15, Sept 5; 12-2pm. Ashtanga, Vinyasa, Basic, YinYoga, Mat Pilates, Green Building Product – For simple Kripalu and Kid’s Yoga. We offer a very safe contracting or builders. Renews metal, rubber and supportive atmosphere and flat roofs with tremendous cost savings up to to take your practice at your own pace. Discover yourself 70%. Act now. Call 573-489-9346. at Practice Yoga! What does your space say about you? Kiana Doggan Interior Designs LLC ofTo place a listing: 3 lines minimum (103 charfers affordable and efficient design solutions for acters, spaces & punctuation): 1 month $25; 3 Rising Sun Yoga residential and commercial interiors. Free initial months $22.50 per month, prepaid. Extra words: 13550 Dix-Toledo Rd. consultation. Kiana Doggan-German, Interior $1 each. Send check w/listing by 15th of the Southgate, MI 48195 Designer, 313-396-5496 or KianaGerman@ month to Michigan Healthy Living, Inc. - Classi(734) 282-9642 gmail.com. fieds, Box 341081, Detroit, MI 48234-1081. Info Our aim is to offer yoga to 586-983-8305 or visit DetroitHealthyLiving.com. everyone. RisingSunYoga.com

Dr. William H. Karl, D.C.

(2.5 miles from Westland Mall)

GREEN

www.karlwellnesscenter.com Let Us Help YOU Renew Your Body for Summer! Call Today!

734-425-8220

Specializing in: • Nutritional Counseling • Muscle Response Testing • Hormone Test Evaluation • Allergy Elimination Techniques • Homepathic/Herbal Remedies • Hair Analysis Interpretation • Detoxification Therapy

Karl Chiropractic Clinic & Wellness Center P.C. 734-425-8220

HEALTHY GIFTS

FREE

Consultation & Chair Massage With coupon. Expires 8/1/09. Within Medicare Guidelines.

classifieds

BOOKS

evolve Yoga Studio 7986 Lilley Road, Canton 48187 734-454-YOGA (9642) evolve-yoga.net Visit our sacred space for physical, mental and spiritual evolution. Offering many yoga classes: Ashtanga, Basic, Chair/Gentle, Prenatal, Restorative Flow, Rise & Shine, and Vinyasa.

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Wayne County

Spiral Collective – A unique collective of shops. Dell Pryor Gallery, quality paintings, photography and sculptures. Source Bookseller, a unique niche of non-fiction books and unusual sidelines. Tulani Rose, a lifestyle boutique. 4201 Cass Ave, Midtown. 313-832-1155.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES CURRENTLY PUBLISHING NATURAL AWAKENINGS MAGAZINES – Be part of a dynamic franchised publishing network that is helping to transform the way we live and care for ourselves. As a Natural Awakenings publisher, your magazine will help thousands of readers to make positive changes in their lives, while promoting local practitioners and providers of natural, Earthfriendly lifestyles. You will be creating a healthier

I

f you want to eliminate hunger, everybody has to be involved. - Bono

monday

m Acupuncture m Massage Therapy m Reiki m Bulk Herbs m Salt Lamps

m Vegan Friendly m Reflexology m Nutritional Testing m Foot Detox

tuesday

wednesday

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Meditation Class 7-8:30 $15

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(734) 246-1208 www.THFDownriver.com

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Yoga 7-8pm $8

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Yoga 7-8pm $8 20 Herbal Hour Anger Management 7-8:30 $10

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Mon-Sat 9am-8pm NOW OPEN SUNDAY 11am-5pm

Yoga 7-8pm $8

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Dr.Alice’s Food Party 6:00-8:30pm $25

13645 Northline Rd. • Southgate (Near the Corner of Northline & Dix)

thursday

21 Weightloss Seminar with Kelly Cassise 6:30-7:30 Free

22 Drumming with Kristyne 7-8:30pm Free

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Yoga 7-8pm $8

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Yoga 7-8pm $8

July 2009

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Reducing Our Carbon Footprint

“Going, Going,

July 24-26, 2009

GREEN!” w e e k e n d

Detroit Tigers vs Chicago White Sox July 24-26, 2009 at Comerica Park The Detroit Tigers “Going, Going GREEN!” weekend at Comerica Park is designed to educate fans of the Detroit Tigers about how they can reduce their carbon footprint.

Friday, July 24, Game 1@1:05pm (doubleheader) Game 2@7:05pm Saturday, July 25, 4:05pm Sunday, July 26, 1:05pm

As part of the “Going, Going, GREEN!” weekend, the Detroit Tigers are hosting a trade show outside the main gates for exhibitors to display products and services related to environmental causes and practices. For information, go to tigers.com/green Going, Going, GREEN! Trade Show hours: Saturday, July 25, 12 pm - 8 pm Sunday, July 26, 10 am - 6 pm

For tickets, call (866) 66-TIGER (84437) or visit tigers.com.

FREE! FREE!

FREE “GOING, GOING, GREEN!” REUSABLE SHOPPING BAG FOR THE FIRST 10,000 FANS ON SATURDAY.



       


Natural Awakenings of Wayne County, MI 0709