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The Danube Music Festival 16–23 August 2013

Angelika Kirchschlager & Robert Lehrbaumer

M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L

Austrian Baroque Company

Quintett Wien

The Wihan Quartet

Capella Savaria & Capella Cantorum

Austro-Hungarian Haydn Philharmonic

Voysey House, Barley Mow Passage, London, United Kingdom W4 4GF Telephone 020 8742 3355 Fax 020 8742 7766 info@martinrandall.co.uk Australia: Martin Randall Marketing, PO Box 537, Toowong, Queensland 4066 Telephone 1300 55 95 95 Fax 07 3377 0142 anz@martinrandall.com.au

Roderick Williams & Susie Allan

The Mozart Chamber Ensemble

Talks by Richard Wigmore & Tim Blanning

New Zealand: Telephone 0800 877 622 Canada: Telephone 647 382 1644 Fax 416 925 2670 canada@martinrandall.ca USA: Telephone 1 800 988 6168

www.martinrandall.com

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The Danube Music Festival 16–23 August 2013

©Bill Knight 2012.

Dear Traveller, Cause for celebration: the 2013 Danube Music Festival will be the twentieth. The first of the unique range of festivals which we ourselves create in their entirety has also been the one which has run most often – annually, indeed, since 1994.

Proclaiming the twentieth anniversary is to be somewhat slightly economical with the truth, as in one year the audience did not travel along the Danube on a ship but stayed in hotels in Vienna, but all the other esssentials have remained constant in all years: music of the region in historic buildings with first-rate musicians, the concerts exclusive to those who take the whole package which includes accommodation, travel, lectures and much else. It has proved a winning formula. We always ring the changes, with each edition of the festival having a different line-up of artists and a different selection of venues, though there are repeats and regulars among both. The Austro-Hungarian Haydn Philharmonic under Adam Fischer was with us in 1994 and in many subsequent years, Quintett Wien since 1995, the Wihan Quartet has performed almost as often and violinist Wolfgang Redik has appeared in all twenty. But we welcome Angelika Kirchschlager for the first time to the Danube Festival (she will be performing an hour

from her home); and unusually there are a couple of major pieces which are not Austro-Hungarian by origin but fit well with the musical programme overall. Whether traditional or innovatory, the governing principle is what we think will work, will provide participants with a really exceptional week. After two decades of honing, and having chalked up well over two thousand delighted Danube clients, we are confident that we won’t go very far wrong this time.

Martin Randall

Contents The Programme.................................................... 4–11 Fitness for the festival.................................................7 More about the concerts.............................................9 The Speakers.............................................................11 The Ship...................................................................12 The Package, Prices...................................................13 The Walking Party.............................................. 13–14 Pre-festival tour: Salzburg Summer...........................15 Pre-festival tour: Art in Munich................................16 Booking form..................................................... 17–18 Making a booking, Booking conditions....................19

M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L Voysey House, Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4GF Telephone 020 8742 3355 Fax 020 8742 7766 info@martinrandall.co.uk www.martinrandall.com

Australia: telephone 1300 55 95 95 New Zealand: telephone 0800 877 622 anz@martinrandall.com.au

Canada: telephone 647 382 1644 canada@martinrandall.ca USA: telephone 1 800 988 6168

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The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

Matching music & place

The spoken word

This festival combines music and architecture in a singularly beguiling way. The eight private concerts take place in palaces, churches, theatres and other historic buildings which are among the most beautiful along the Danube.

Talks and lecturers are another important ingredient. Richard Wigmore, music lecturer and broadcaster, and Tim Blanning, Emeritus Professor of Modern European History at the University of Cambridge, give daily talks on the music and the history of the region.

But the value of the juxtaposition goes deeper than visual attraction. The buildings are generally of the same period as the music performed in them, and in some cases there are specific historical associations between the two. Matching music and place – that is the governing principle of this festival.

Musicians of the highest calibre Now in its twentieth year, the Danube Music Festival is established as a prestigious event in the musical calendar, attracting musicians of the highest calibre. The festival explores the music of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Dvořák, and Mahler are all represented, along with a number of less familiar names. There is also a sprinkling of French, German and Italian composers to broaden the experience.

A rare intensity of musical communication The concerts are private, being accessible exclusively to the 140 participants who take a package which includes accommodation, all meals, lectures and much else besides. The size of the audience in combination with the relatively small capacity of the venues leads to an informality and intimacy, which engenders a rare intensity of musical communication. Musicians love playing for this festival. Not only are the venues an inspiring change from modern concert halls, but the audiences are among the best in the world – attentive, knowledgeable, appreciative. This brochure was designed inhouse by Jo Murray. The text was written and edited by Martin Randall, Fiona Urquhart and Samantha Walls. Photos of Martin Randall, Tim Blanning and Richard Wigmore were taken by Bill Knight, www.knightsight.co.uk.

Travelling in comfort To this exceptional artistic and intellectual experience is added a further pleasure: the comfort and convenience of a first-class river cruiser which is both hotel and principal means of travel. The MS Amadeus Brilliant is one of the more comfortable cruisers on the waterways of Europe, and we have chartered it exclusively for this festival. This enables you to attend all the concerts and see some of the finest scenery and townscape in the region without having to change hotels or drive long distances. In many ways, however, this venture is far removed from the usual cruising routine: there is little regimentation, no obligatory seating plan, no on-board entertainment – and no piped music. More time is spent ashore than is conventional but there is also plenty of time to relax on board the ship.

The walking alternative For up to twenty-two of the audience there is the option of guided walks through some of the most ravishing scenery of the Danube valley. The walking party stays in hotels rather than on the ship, attends six of the eight concerts and is provided with its own lecturer, Dr Michael Downs. See pages 13–14 for details. Front cover illustration: the Danube at Persenbeug (not visited on this festival), early 20th-century etching by Luigi Kasimir; this page: Durnstein, 20th-century reproduction of a 17th-century engraving by Matthäus Merian (1593–1650).


The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

The Programme

Passau, steel engraving c. 1840 from The Danube: Its History, Scenery & Topography.

Day 1, Friday 16 August Travelling to Passau

Option 3: Fly from Manchester to Munich at 11.00am. Drive from Munich Airport to the ship at Passau, a journey of under two hours. (LH 2501, departing Manchester 11.00am, arriving Munich 2.00pm.)

Flights from the UK. We are offering a choice of three scheduled Lufthansa flights to Munich, from Manchester or London.

Option 4 (‘No flights’): Making your own arrangements. You can choose not to take any of these flights and to make your own arrangements for joining at Passau, boarding the ship between 4.00pm and 6.00pm. You are welcome to join one of the group transfers from Munich Airport. There is a price reduction for this ‘no-flights’ option of £160 per person.

Please choose one flight option only. If you choose flight Option 1 for the outbound flight from London Heathrow to Munich, you also return to London on the Option 1 flight. If you choose flight Option 2, you return on the Option 2 flight, and so on.

The ship, MS Amadeus Brilliant, is ready for boarding from 4.00pm. Afternoon tea is available.

Option 1: Fly from London Heathrow to Munich at 9.35am. Break the journey to Passau with lunch at Landshut, a former capital of Bavaria. There are two hours here, and it should be possible to see the main street with its Renaissance and Baroque house fronts, the great Gothic church of St Martin or the precociously Italianate Renaissance ducal palace. (LH 2471, departing London 9.35am, arriving Munich 12.25pm.)

Piled up on promontories at the confluence of three rivers, the Bavarian city of Passau is dominated by a great Baroque cathedral and crammed with unspoilt streetscape and historic buildings. It was one of the most important episcopal seats in Central Europe and served as a refuge for the Habsburg court in times of danger.

Option 2: Fly from London Heathrow to Munich at 11.10am. Drive directly from Munich Airport to the ship at Passau, a journey of under two hours. (LH 2473, departing London 11.10am, arriving Munich 2.00pm.) M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L

After sailing at c. 6.30pm there are introductory talks, a reception and dinner.

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Day 2, Saturday 17 August Grein, Melk Moor at Grein, a charming little town squeezed between the Danube and the hills with a sixteenth-century Schloss rising to one side. It is a short walk from the ship to the main square where the tiny municipal theatre lies hidden within the town hall. Constructed in 1791 – the year of The Magic Flute – it is the oldest working theatre in Austria.

Concert 1: Grein, Stadttheater Chamber Baroque for the Imperial Court

Above: Capella Savaria. Left: Austrian Baroque Company.

Austrian Baroque Company Michael Oman (director, recorder)

The Austrian Baroque Company, under the dynamic leadership of recorder-player Michael Oman, has taken the early music world by storm since their founding in 2001. As well as bringing vigour and historically informed playing to their performances, they attempt to emulate Baroque practice by giving due place to improvisation. This programme, performed by five instrumentalists in various permutations, includes works by composers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries who were either born in the Austrian crown lands or who were lured from Italy by the munificent patronage of the Habsburgs. Among those in the former category are Johann Heinrich Schmelzer (1620–1680), Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber (1644–1704) and Johann Jakob Froberger (1616–1667). The Italians include Francesco Turini (c.1589–1656) and Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741), who died in the imperial capital.

Kyrie and Gloria were performed in St Peter’s Abbey, Salzburg, with Constanze taking one of the solo soprano parts, on the last evening the composer ever spent in his place of birth. The first half of the concert has yet to be decided. Founded in 1981, Capella Savaria is the oldest periodinstrument ensemble in Hungary. (‘Savaria’ is the Latin form of Szombathely, their city of origin.) Outstanding for the vigour and verve as well as the stylistic authenticity of their playing, they have performed in most countries in Europe as well as in the Americas, and have recorded over 60 CDs. Their regular collaborator, the choir Capella Cantorum, is of equal excellence.

Sail downstream after the concert and moor at Melk. Dramatically situated on an outcrop rising above the Danube, Melk Abbey is one of the most brilliant creations of the Age of Baroque. A sequence comprising ceremonial courts, guest apartments, hall and library culminates in a church of unsurpassed decorative richness. At 5.10pm there is a concert in the lavishly frescoed Kolomanisaal, a second-floor hall not normally accessible to visitors.

Return to the ship and sail downstream overnight to Vienna-Nussdorf. Melk Abbey, wood engraving c. 1890.

Concert 2: Melk Abbey, Kolomanisaal Mozart at Melk Capella Savaria Capella Cantorum Ákos Paulik (conductor)

The late-afternoon programme includes the C minor Mass, a uniquely elaborate setting that reflects Mozart’s studies of Bach and Handel. Probably composed to celebrate his recent marriage to Constanze, it remained a magnificent torso. The Te l e p h o n e : 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5

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The Programme Day 3, Sunday 18 August Vienna

There is time to explore the city and an art gallery or two – the Kunsthistorisches Museum should not be missed –, either independently or with a guided tour. Converge for the 5.00pm concert at the Palais Ferstel, a beautiful, opulent neo-mediaeval building of the 1860s. It formerly accommodated the stock exchange and a bank, and still houses offices, shops and the famous Café Central.

Principal seat of the Habsburgs for over six hundred years, Vienna became capital of a vast agglomeration of territories that encompassed much of Central and Eastern Europe. The fabric of the city is a glorious mix of great and small, of the imperiously magnificent and the charmingly unpretentious, and it remains one of the world’s greatest centres of art, architecture and music.

Concert 3: Vienna, Palais Ferstel Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven for orchestra Austro-Hungarian Haydn Philharmonic Adam Fischer (conductor) Rainer Honeck (leader, violin)

The Österreiches-Ungarisches Haydn Philharmonie was founded by Adam Fischer in 1987 to bring together outstanding musicians from both countries. They have recorded Haydn’s complete symphonies and toured widely, acquiring an international reputation as one of the most spirited and sensitive interpreters of the Viennese classics. Despite being in demand around the world, and a busy summer schedule at Bayreuth, Adam Fischer continues a very special relationship with the orchestra he founded and will conduct this performance.

Above: The Austro-Hungarian Haydn Philharmonic.

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Two violin concerto movements by Mozart, the Rondo in B-flat (K.261) and the Adagio in E (K.269), and a Haydn symphony form the first half, with Beethoven’s First Symphony in the second half. Return to the ship at Vienna-Nussdorf where it is moored until the early hours.

Day 4, Monday 19 August Dürnstein, Atzenbrugg Arrive around breakfast time at Dürnstein, perhaps the loveliest little town on the river. The ruins of a castle in which Richard the Lionheart was imprisoned cling to a steep hill behind, while a gorgeous Baroque abbey church perches on the waterfront. There are a couple of hours here for wandering around before sailing back downstream through the Wachau and the Weinviertel, the wine-growing regions which are among the most beautiful stretches of the Danube valley.

©Benjamin Ealovega.

Disembark at Tulln and drive to the village of Atzenbrugg. Here is a modest manor house once tenanted by the uncle of one of Schubert’s circle, Franz von Schober, whither Schubert came with friends in the early 1820s. Entertainments were contrived which came to be known as ‘Schubertiades’ – music was played, songs sung, poems read, drinks drunk, jolly japes perpetrated.

Concert 4: Schloss Atzenbrugg Songs of travel by Schubert Roderick Williams (baritone) Susie Allan (piano)

Inspired by the nature of this festival, Roddy Williams has selected songs which concern travel or rivers or both. All the settings are by Schubert, while the poets include Goethe, Schiller and the composer’s friend, Johann Mayhofer.

Left to right: Roderick Williams and Susie Allan.

Williams has a flourishing career in opera, from Baroque to contemporary, but has enjoyed particular success for Mozart roles. His recitals have taken him to Wigmore Hall and many European festivals, and he has recorded English song with Iain Burnside and Susie Allan, a much sought-after vocal accompanist.

Fitness for the Festival

Wood-framed, Viennese and dating to 1864, the piano at Schloss Atzenbrugg produces a sound with which Schubert would have been familiar. The hall seats fewer than a hundred, so the audience splits and the hour-long recital is performed twice.

This festival is not really suitable for wheelchair users but please speak to us if you would like to discuss this.

Quite a lot of walking is necessary to reach the concert venues and to get around the towns visited. The ship does not have a lift, nor do most of the venues. Participants need to be averagely fit, sure-footed and able to manage everyday walking and stairclimbing without difficulty.

Illustrations. Left: Vienna, Palais Ferstel, wood engraving 1890. Top: ‘An Old Song’, engraving from The Illustrated London News, 1872.

Continue sailing downstream in the evening and moor at Hainburg.

Te l e p h o n e : 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5

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The Programme Day 5, Tuesday 20 August Schloss Hof, Bratislava

Schloss Hof was enlarged by Lukas von Hildebrandt, the great architect of the early eighteenth century, as a grand hunting lodge for Prince Eugene of Savoy, the most distinguished soldier ever to have served the Habsburgs. It was later occupied by members of the imperial family. A major programme of restoration in the last twenty years has rescued the house and gardens from near dereliction. The ballroom, beautifully decorated in Louis XVI style, is a fine setting for this programme of wind music.

Wake up beside Hainburg, a picturesque town downstream of Vienna where Haydn spent some of his boyhood. North of the Danube and bounded to the east by hills marking the Slovakian border, the Marchfeld plain remains strikingly rural despite being close to two capitals, Vienna and Bratislava. For centuries this was a militarised frontier zone before becoming favoured as hunting territory by the Empire’s magnates from the nearby imperial court.

Concert 5: Schloss Hof, Festsaal Quintets for wind Quintett Wien Hansgeorg Schmeiser (leader, flute)

Quintett Wien.

Wind music was much more popular and prevalent in the Austrian lands in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries than present meagre representation in concert halls suggests. Quintett Wien, which consists of five of Vienna’s finest wind players, has for twenty years been a passionate advocate of this forgotten repertoire through performances and recordings of liveliness, intelligence and consummate musicianship. The classic line-up of flute, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon has been well served by Middle-European composers, and the concert includes pieces by Franz Danzi (1763–1826), Alexander von Zemlinsky (1871–1942) and Jenö Takacs (1902–2005), Schloss Hof, steel engraving c. 1840.

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together with an arrangement of the quadrille from Die Fledermaus by Johann Strauss II (1825–99). But in one of the few exceptions to the Austro-Hungarian music rule, there is the glorious Quintet in G minor by the great French flautist Paul Taffanel (1844–1908). Sail during lunch downstream to Bratislava (formerly Pressburg). Now capital of Slovakia, it was for three hundred years capital of the Habsburg rump of Hungary while Ottoman Turks occupied most of the country. Its compact historic centre is a delight, one of the loveliest along the Danube, a dense mesh of unspoilt streets, squares and well restored façades. The concert takes place in the two-storey Mirror Hall in the Primatial Palace, formerly the seat of the Archbishop of Hungary, now the Town Hall. When completed in 1781 it was the grandest building in Bratislava after the castle.

Concert 6: Bratislava, Primatial Palace String Quartets by Haydn, Dvořák & Schubert The Wihan Quartet

Formed in 1985, and continuing to this day with its original four members, the Wihan Quartet is widely acknowledged as one of the great chamber ensembles in the world today. They enjoy particular popularity in Britain. While deserving their particular reputation for interpretation of their native Czech heritage, they are equally brilliant with a wide range of Classical, Romantic and modern works.

Bratislava, mid-20th-century woodcut.

More about the concerts Private events. These concerts are planned and administered by Martin Randall Travel. The audience, no more than 140, consists exclusively of those who have booked the full festival package.

The programme this evening consists of Haydn’s String Quartet Op.54 No.1, Dvořák’s ‘Cypresses’ B.152 and Schubert’s incomparable ‘Death and the Maiden’ D.810.

Seating. Specific seats are not reserved. You sit where you want.

Moor overnight at Bratislava. ©Sussie Ahlburg.

Acoustics. This festival is more concerned with authenticity and ambience than acoustical perfection. While some of the venues have excellent acoustics, others have idiosyncrasies not found in modern concert halls. Changes. Musicians fall ill, venues require restoration, rivers flood (or run dry): there are many unforeseeable circumstances which could necessitate changes to the programme. We ask you to be understanding should they occur. Floods and droughts. We cannot rule out changes to the programme arising from exceptionally high or low water levels on the Danube, either of which may bring river traffic to a halt. These might necessitate more travel by coach or the loss of a concert, though we would always try to minimise the impact on the itinerary.

The Wihan Quartet.

Te l e p h o n e : 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5

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The Programme ©Nikolaus Karlinsky.

Above: Angelika Kirchschlager. Right: Linz, engraving c. 1880 from Pictures from the German Fatherland.

Day 6, Wednesday 21 August Schloss Eckartsau

Day 7, Thursday 22 August Linz

Return to Hainburg at the start of the day and drive again into the Marchfeld for a concert at another great country house. Built in the early eighteenth century, Schloss Eckartsau was enlarged for Archduke Franz Ferdinand (he of the Sarajevo assassination in 1914), one of the most prolific hunters of all time. In the winter of 1918–19 the Schloss became the last Austrian residence of the last Emperor of Austria.

Towards the end of the morning moor at Linz, historic capital of Upper Austria. Around the huge market square, only yards away from the mooring, is grouped a picturesque maze of streets, passages and historic buildings. The concert venue is the Palais Kaufmännischer Verein, which was built in the 1890s with a suite of lavishly decorated halls for assorted gatherings and celebrations. The Picture Hall is a finde-siècle creation smeared with gilded neo-Baroque motifs and ennobled with fine history paintings.

Even the glorious Baroque saloon of Schloss Eckartsau, festooned with frescoed gods and classical ornament, seems suffused with melancholy and memory of the end of things.

Concert 8: Linz, Palais Kaufmännischer Verein String Finale

Concert 7: Schloss Eckartsau, Festsaal Lieder by Schubert, Brahms and Mahler

The Mozart Chamber Ensemble Wolfgang Redik (director)

Angelika Kirchschlager (mezzo-soprano) Robert Lehrbaumer (piano)

The Mozart Chamber Ensemble was founded in 2010 by its artistic director, Wolfgang Redik (formerly of the Vienna Piano Trio), to perform chamber repertoire from string quartets to smaller symphonies. Members are leading musicians from Middle Europe, soloists, chamber musicians and section leaders of well known orchestras. There are fifteen players this afternoon.

Austria’s Angelika Kirchschlager is one of the greatest singers in the world today, enchanting both opera and concert audiences around the world with her lustrous and expressive voice and her alluring stage presence. Her programme includes some of the best known Lieder by Franz Schubert (1797–1828), from his first masterpiece Gretchen am Spinnrade to one of his last, Der Lindenbaum. Likewise Brahms is represented by a range of his output (Sandmännchen, Mein Mädel hat einen Rosenmund). The recital finishes with three songs from Mahler’s Des Knaben Wunderhorn.

The programme consists of Mozart’s String Quintet in G minor K.516; three pieces from Alban Berg’s ‘Lyric Suite’, arranged for string ensemble by Berg himself; Schubert’s ‘Rosamunde’ Quartet D.804, and, not Austrian but wonderfully apposite, Mendelssohn’s delightful early Violin Concerto in D minor, with Wolfgang Redik as soloist.

There follows a leisurely afternoon on the ship while sailing upstream, passing Vienna and the Kahlenberg heights and reaching the Wachau towards dusk. M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L

Sail upstream overnight from Linz to Passau, with a reception and dinner against a backdrop of river and wooded hills. 10

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The Speakers

Day 8, Friday 23 August Passau, Munich

Richard Wigmore. Music writer, lecturer and broadcaster for BBC Radio 3. Richard writes for The Daily Telegraph, BBC Music Magazine and Gramophone and gives classes in Lied history and interpretation at Birkbeck College, London. He read French and German at Cambridge and later studied Music at the Guildhall. His publications include Schubert: the complete song texts and Pocket Guide to Haydn.

Option 1. Those who flew from Heathrow at 9.35am join a return flight (LH 2476) which is scheduled to arrive into London Heathrow at 2.20pm. Coaches take you directly from Passau to Munich Airport.

©Bill Knight 2012.

The ship moors at Passau and coaches leave for Munich city centre and the airport between 8.30 and 9.30am.

Option 2. Those who flew from Heathrow at 11.10am join a return flight (LH 2480) which is scheduled to arrive into London Heathrow at 7.30pm. Coaches take you first to the centre of Munich, where you have about four hours of free time, before continuing to the airport.

Option 4. Those who have made their own flight arrangements are welcome to join one of the transfers to Munich or the airport.

©Bill Knight 2012.

Option 3. Those flying to Manchester have two hours in the centre of Munich before being taken to the airport. The flight (LH 2502) is due to arrive into Manchester International airport at 4.45pm.

Professor Tim Blanning. Emeritus Professor of Modern European History at the University of Cambridge, Fellow of Sidney Sussex College and Fellow of the British Academy. Among his many books are a study of Emperor Joseph II, the award-winning The Culture of Power and the Power of Culture, the best-selling The Pursuit of Glory: Europe 1648-1815, and the much-translated The Triumph of Music in the Modern World. His most recent book is The Romantic Revolution.

Pre-festival tours. Those who flew out with Salzburg Summer or Art in Munich join the Option 1 return flight (see above).

Britain’s leading provider of cultural holidays

‘Le Duo Champêtre’, 18th-century engraving after Antoine Watteau (1684–1721).

At Martin Randall Travel we aim to provide the best planned, best led and altogether the most fulfilling and enjoyable cultural tours available. Within the UK and Europe, the Middle East and India, we offer an unsurpassed range of events focusing primarily on art, architecture and music, and also on archaeology, history and gastronomy. MRT has for over two decades led the cultural tours market through incessant innovation and improvement, setting the benchmarks for itinerary planning, operational systems and service standards. There are two kinds of holiday: All-inclusive music festivals began with the Danube in 1994, since when they have spread from St Petersburg to Seville and from Newcastle to Naples. The audiences number between forty and three hundred. Tours for small groups, all accompanied by an expert lecturer, have twenty-two participants or fewer. Commencing in 1988, there are now around two hundred a year in nearly forty countries.

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The Ship The MS Amadeus Brilliant is one of the more comfortable cruisers on the waterways of Europe. The multinational crew is dedicated to the highest standards of service. With a minimum floor area of 15m2, the cabins are reasonably spacious by the standards of river cruisers. All have windows to the outside and are equipped with the facilities one would expect of a first-class hotel including shower, w.c., individually adjustable air-conditioning, writing desk, telephone, TV, hairdrier and safe. Special attention has been paid to noise insulation to ensure quiet, even when under way. In layout and furnishings all of the cabins are identical apart from the suites, the significant differences being the size of windows and height above water level (higher cabins enjoy marginally better views and fewer stairs). Those on the top two decks (‘Mozart’ and ‘Strauss’) are the most desirable, with the former having floor to ceiling windows (177 x 211 cm) on the outer wall which slide open, and the latter having only slightly smaller windows (145 x 211 cm), which also slide open.

Also on the ‘Mozart deck’ are nine suites measuring approximately 22m2 which have armchairs and table, a bath and minibar in addition to the standard cabin facilities. The suites have comparable windows to those in other ‘Mozart deck’ cabins, but specifications vary. Please contact us for details. Cabins on the lowest (‘Haydn’) deck have smaller windows (35 x 153 cm) that do not open. There are no single cabins, but we are allocating some two-bed cabins for single occupancy. More cabins may become available for single use closer to departure but at a higher supplement – see the prices on the adjacent page. The public areas on the uppermost (‘Mozart’) deck include the lounge and bar, and a library area. The restaurant is located on the middle (‘Strauss’) deck, and can seat everyone at a single sitting. The sun deck has a tented area for shade. Information about the ship is available at www.lueftner-cruises.com.

Above, top to bottom: a cabin on the Haydn deck; a cabin on the Mozart deck; a suite on the Mozart deck.

Floorplan, cabin:

Floorplan, suite:

Key to cabin floorplan: 1 bed; 2 television; 3 toilet; 4 wash basin; 5 shower; 6 cabinet; 7 telephone; 8 writing desk; 9 french balcony (Mozart and Strauss decks only); 10 chair. Key to suite floorplan: 1 bed; 2 flatscreen television; 3 toilet; 4 wash basin; 5 shower; 6 stool; 7 cabinet; 8 telephone; 9 desk; 10 french balcony; 11 chair; 12 table.

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The Package, Prices

The Walking Party

Prices Haydn Deck (lowest) £2,810 per person sharing a cabin £3,370 or £3,650 for single occupancy* Strauss Deck (middle) £3,430 per person sharing a cabin £4,110 or £4,460 for single occupancy* Mozart Deck (top) £3,740 per person sharing a cabin £4,490 or £4,870 for single occupancy* Suites (Mozart Deck) £4,300 per person sharing a cabin * The higher price applies when the initial allocation of cabins for single occupancy has sold out.

No-flights option: if you do not want one of the festival flights, subtract £160 from these prices. Deposit: £300 per person.

The Festival Package The price includes: Admission to all eight concerts (six for the walking party) and daily lectures. Accommodation on a first-class river cruiser for seven nights, or in hotels for the walking party. Flights between the UK and Munich for those on the ship, or London and Vienna for the walking party. There is a price reduction if you do not use these. All meals, from dinner on the first day to breakfast on the last, with wine, and interval drinks. For the walkers, six dinners and four lunches are included. Coach travel between the airport and ship or hotel and to the concert venues (when not reached on foot). All tips, taxes and admission charges. Practical and historical information and a detailed programme booklet. The assistance of an experienced team of festival staff.

15–22 August 2013 (mz 651) 8 days • £2,840 Lecturer: Dr Michael Downes This variant on the festival package includes six concerts and five country walks. The Austrian stretch of the Danube valley is, for much of its length, of considerable beauty, with much variety of landscape – cultivated lowlands, forested peaks, open alluvial plains, vineclad hillsides, upland pastures, and, of course, the mighty river meandering towards the Black Sea. There are pine and fir and larch, but broadleaves predominate – beech, birch, oak, poplar. Though hardly classifiable as strenuous, this tour should only be considered by those who are used to regular country walking with some uphill content. There are hills, and a few fairly steep climbs for short stretches, but no mountains, and most of the routes are along gently undulating paths. The durations are between one and two-and-a-half hours. Fuller details of the concerts are given on pages 5–10.

Illustration: a view over the Danube, engraving c. 1850. Te l e p h o n e : 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5

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Itinerary Day 1: London to Vienna. Fly at c. 10.00am from London Heathrow to Vienna and drive to Melk, a delightful little town on the Danube nestling under the mighty abbey. First of three nights there. Day 2: Grein, Melk. Drive along the Danube before turning into the hills to start the first walk (2.5 hours). Begin among upland pastures and farmland before descending through woods of pine, beech and birch to the sound of tumbling streams. Catch glimpses of the Danube and then of the little town of Grein, our destination. Return by coach to Melk for a leisurely afternoon with time to visit the abbey, one of the greatest of Baroque buildings in Central Europe. Day 3: Grein, Melk. Drive back to Grein for a tour of the private apartments in the Schloss. Morning concert in the little 1791 theatre with the Austrian Baroque Company (details on page 5). The afternoon woodland walk is from Felbring to Emmersdorf (c. 2 hours) through landscapes of beech and pine, with vistas across the Danube Valley. Early evening concert at Melk Abbey with Capella Savaria (details on page 5).

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The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

The Walking Party Day 4: Dürnstein, Vienna. Drive downstream to Dürnstein, the prettiest little town on the Danube, a compact group of mediaeval, Renaissance and Baroque buildings set amidst the finest wineproducing area in Austria. A morning walk (2.5 hours) follows a small road which climbs into the vine-clad hills overlooking the Danube and dips periodically into shaded gullies, with butterflies, abundant wildflowers and red-roofed villages in the valley below. Drive to Vienna for an evening concert with the AustroHungarian Haydn Philharmonic in the Palais Ferstel (details on page 6). First of four nights in Vienna. Day 5: Vienna, Atzenbrugg. Free morning in Vienna with the option of a tour with a local guide. In the afternoon, drive to Schloss Atzenbrugg for a Lieder recital with Roderick Williams and Susie Allan (details on page 7). Day 6: Schloss Hof. Drive to the Marchfeld, the plane northeast of Vienna. On a wooded rise sits the substantial 18th-century hunting lodge of Schloss Hof. There is a mid-morning concert with Quintett Wien (details on page 8) and time to visit the Schloss and attendant buildings. Afternoon walk (1 hour) across the open, intensively cultivated landscape, the flatness broken by copses and poplar avenues and, to the east, hills which mark the border with Slovakia.

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Day 7: Eckartsau, Vienna. Drive to Schloss Eckartsau for a morning recital with Angelika Kirchschlager and Robert Lehrbaumer (details on page 10). Drive back towards Vienna and up the Leopoldsberg, a high hill from where there are fine views over the capital and the Danube valley. Descend through beech woods, vineyards and salubrious ivy-clad suburbs (c. 11/2 hours). In the attractive wine-producing village of Heiligenstadt, visit the apartment where Beethoven lived (and wrote the ‘Heiligenstadt Testament’). Day 8: Vienna. Some free time in Vienna before travelling by coach to Vienna Airport. Return to Heathrow at c. 4.30pm.

Lecturer Dr Michael Downes has been Director of Music at St Andrews University since 2008. He is a reviewer for the Times Literary Supplement, and frequently lectures on music and opera for organisations including the Royal Opera House. Since moving to Scotland, he has established St Andrews Opera and has become the musical director of the St Andrews Chorus.

6 private concerts; accommodation as described below; breakfasts, 4 lunches and 6 dinners, with wine, water, coffee; admission charges to museums; all tips; all taxes; the services of the lecturer and tour manager. Single supplement £290. Price without flights £2,620. Hotels. Melk (3 nights): a family-run 4-star hotel in the centre of the town, fairly simple but adequately comfortable. Vienna (4 nights): a 5-star hotel in a historic building. All rooms are well equipped, most have a bath and the location is excellent. How strenuous? This is a walking tour: it is essential for participants to be in good physical condition and to be used to country walking with uphill content. There are a few moderately steep climbs for short stretches, but no walk is more than 5 miles or 2.5 hours. Except on one occasion, there is the opportunity to return to the hotel to freshen up before every concert or dinner. Small group: the tour will operate with between 10 and 22 participants. Melk Abbey, engraving c. 1830/40.

Practicalities Price £2,840 (deposit: £300). This includes: air travel (economy class) on scheduled British Airways flights (Airbus A321); travel by coach for transfers and excursions;

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The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

Pre-festival tour: Salzburg Summer 10–16 August 2013 (mz 646) 7 days • £4,220 Lecturer: Professor Jan Smaczny Salzburg’s Summer Festival continues to provide the highest standards of performance with a healthy mix of timeless values and cutting-edge ideas. After somewhat turbulent times, it has emerged in the last decade with its reputation undimmed, even enhanced, the controversial innovations and artistic policies having served to renew and revitalise an institution which could so easily have slipped into complacent decline. As ever, the difficulty in planning a tour has been to select a programme from a superabundance of enticements. We have settled on five consecutive days of great musical richness. The artists are among the world’s top performers and include the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Els Sistema: Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional Infantil, the Vienna State Opera Choir, Jonas Kaufmann and Emily Magee. Conductors include Sir Simon Rattle, Christian Thielemann, Daniele Gatti, Antonio Pappano, Philippe Jordan and Riccardo Muti. All this in one of the loveliest cities in Europe. Salzburg is crammed between a fast-flowing river and steep-sided hills, with domes and towers and a formidable castle – the largest in Central Europe – rising above a wonderfully picturesque streetscape. A virtually independent city-state until the nineteenth century, it was ruled by Prince-Archbishops many of whom were lavish patrons of architecture and music. There are daily talks on the music and a gentle programme of walks and drives to see the best of the art, architecture and landscape in the vicinity. But there is also plenty of free time to relax and gather energies for the performances. The prevalence of afternoon performances means that three of the evenings are without music, allowing for a leisurely dinner and an early night. Concert and opera tickets will not be confirmed until February 2013.

Illustration: from The Foreign Tour of Brown, Jones & Robinson, 1904. Te l e p h o n e : 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5

an altarpiece by Michael Pacher (1481). Concert performance of Rienzi (Wagner) at the Felsenreitschule with the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra, Phillipe Jordan (conductor), Christopher Ventris (Cola Rienzi), Emily Magee (Irene) and Georg Zeppenfeld (Steffano Colonna). Day 6. In the morning visit Schloss Hellbrunn, Renaissance retreat of the Prince-Archbishops of Salzburg with one of the earliest historic gardens in Europe. The afternoon is free. Dinner at a famous old restaurant before a concert at the Grosses Festspielhaus: Verdi’s Requiem with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Riccardo Muti (conductor), Vienna State Opera Choir, Krassimira Stoyanova (soprano), Elīna Garanča (mezzo soprano), Piotr Beczala (tenor), Dmitry Belosselskiy (bass).

Itinerary Day 1. Fly at c. 9.30am from London Heathrow to Munich. Drive through Bavaria to Austria and Salzburg (180km). An afternoon introductory walk includes a visit to the Mozart family home, now an excellent museum, and the eighteenthcentury Mirabell Gardens.

Day 7. Drive by coach to Passau and join The Danube Music Festival.

Day 14 (day 8 of the festival: transfer from Passau to Munich Airport and arrive at London Heathrow at c. 2.20pm.

Day 2. The morning starts with a lecture followed by a concert at the Felsenreitschule: El Sistema: Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional Infantil: Gershwin, Cuban Overture; Ginastera, Danzas de Estancia; Mahler, Symphony No.1. Lunch and some free time before the evening concert at the Großes Festspielhaus: Vienna Philharmonic, Christian Thielemann (conductor): Bruckner, Symphony No.5.

Lecturer

Day 3. Morning walk with a local guide through the historic centre. Some free time, opportunity for further exploration of the Archbishop’s Palace or the art galleries. Opera at the Felsenreitschule: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (Wagner) with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Daniele Gatti (conductor), Michael Volle (Hans Sachs), Roberto Saccà (Walther von Stolzing) and Anna Gabler (Eva). Day 4. Visit the Neue Residenz which houses the excellently refurbished city museum and see some of the other historic buildings in the heart of the city. Opera at the Grosses Festspielhaus: Don Carlo (Verdi) with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Antonio Pappano (conductor), Matti Salminen (Filippo II), Jonas Kaufmann (Don Carlo) and Anja Harteros (Elisabetta di Valois). Day 5. Drive to St Gilgen, Mozart’s mother’s home village, and cross the lake by boat to St Wolfgang, a delightful village with a pilgrimage church housing

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Professor Jan Smaczny. Hamilton Harty Chair of Music at Queen’s University, Belfast, and an authority on Czech music. Author, broadcaster and journalist, he has published books on the Prague Provisional Theatre, Dvořák’s Cello Concerto and music in 19th-century Ireland.

Practicalities Price: £4,220 (deposit £400). This includes: tickets to six music performances costing c. £1,370; private coach travel for transfers and excursions; accommodation as described below; breakfasts, 1 light lunch, 2 three-course lunches and 4 dinners with wine, water, coffee; all admissions; all tips; all taxes; the services of the lecturer. Flights are charged as part of the festival package. Single supplement £380. Hotel: a comfortable 4-star, a short walk from the Mirabell Gardens and the Mozarteum. All the other venues are about 35 minutes away on foot. Rooms are modern, public areas more traditional. Dinners are at the hotel and in restaurants elsewhere. How strenuous? Quite a lot of walking. Average coach travel per day: 40 miles. Small group: 10–22 participants.

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The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

Pre-festival tour: Art in Munich Munich, Marienplatz and cathedral towers, lithograph after Samuel Prout, 1839.

12–16 August 2013 (mz 649) 5 days • £1,400 Lecturer: Tom Abbott The allure of the cityscape, the abundance of cultural activity, the relatively relaxed lifestyle and generally amenable ambience make it the most sought-after place in which to live and work in Germany. The seat of the Wittelsbachs, who ruled Bavaria from 1255 until 1918 as Counts, then Dukes, as Electors from 1620 and finally in the 19th century as Kings, Munich became one of the best-endowed places in Europe artistically and architecturally. The accompanying lecturer, Tom Abbott, is a cultural historian with a wide range of knowledge and a deep understanding of contemporary Germany.

Itinerary Day 1. Fly at c. 11.00am from London Heathrow to Munich. An afternoon walk passes through the core of the historic city. See the vast Gothic cathedral, the pioneering Baroque Church of the Theatines and the 19th-century city hall. Day 2. The morning is spent in the Residenz, rambling palace of the Wittelsbach dynasty, Dukes, Electors and Kings of Bavaria, with sumptuous M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L

interiors of the highest art-historical importance from Renaissance to Romantic, and a marvellous Rococo theatre. The Königsplatz is a fine assembly of NeoClassical architecture including the Glyptothek, a museum of Greek and Roman sculpture. The Lenbachhaus has an outstanding collection of German Expressionist paintings (the Lenbachhaus is due to reopen in Spring 2013, making this visit subject to confirmation). Day 3. By coach along some of the principal streets and boulevards of the city to see architecture of the 19th and 20th centuries. Visit the Alte Pinakothek, one of the world’s greatest collections of Old Masters and the Neue Pinakothek, paintings from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. Some free time. Day 4. On the edge of Munich, Nymphenburg is one of the finest palace complexes of the 17th and 18th centuries, with main palace, park, gardens and pavilions. The delightful Amalienburg represents the apogee of secular Rococo interiors, and the carriage museum has sleighs made for King Ludwig II. Returning to the centre of Munich, visit the little Baroque church of St John Nepomuk created by the Asam brothers.

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Day 5. Transfer from Munich to Passau, to join The Danube Music Festival. Day 13 (final day of The Danube Music Festival). Transfer from Passau to Munich Airport and fly to London Heathrow, arriving at c. 2.20pm.

Lecturer Tom Abbott. Specialist in architectural history from the Baroque to the 20th century with a wide knowledge of the performing arts. Studied Psychology and Art History at Carleton College, Minnesota and at the Louvre School of Art History in Paris.

Practicalities Price: £1,400 (deposit £200). This includes: hotel accommodation; travel by private coach and metro; breakfasts and 3 dinners with wine, water, coffee; all admissions; all taxes; all tips; the services of the lecturer. Flights are charged as part of the festival package. Single supplement £60. Hotel: a friendly, family-run, centrallylocated hotel. How strenuous? Quite a lot of walking and standing around in galleries. Small group: 10–22 participants. b o o k o n l i n e a t w w w. m a r t i n r a n d a l l . c o m


The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

Booking Form TRAVELLERS’ NAMES

Give your name as you would like it to appear on documents issued to other participants. 1. 2.

ADDRESS for correspondence Postcode Telephone (home) Telephone (work) Mobile Fax E-mail Tick if you do NOT want to receive updates on our range of cultural tours and music festivals by email.

DECK & CABIN TYPE Tick your preferred option (see pages 12–13)

FESTIVAL FLIGHTS Haydn deck (lowest) Single occupancy Twin (beds separated) Twin (beds together)

Strauss deck (middle) Single occupancy Twin (beds separated) Twin (beds together)

Mozart deck (top) Single occupancy Twin (beds separated) Twin (beds together)

Mozart deck suite Twin (beds separated) Twin (beds together)

Tick your chosen option (details are on pages 4 & 11) Option 1 Option 2 Option 3. Option 4 (no flights)

If you are booking on one of the pre-festival tours, or on The Walking Party, you do not need to tick a flight option. PRE-FESTIVAL TOURS. Tick to add to your booking Salzburg Summer, 10–16 August (see page 15) Room type

Flights

Single occupancy

Group flights

Twin

No flights

Double

Art in Munich, 12–16 August (see page 16) THE WALKING PARTY, 15–22 August (pages 13–14) Room type

Flights

Single occupancy

Group flights

Twin

No flights

Double

Room type

Flights

Single occupancy

Group flights

Twin

No flights

Double


The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

Booking Form PASSPORT DETAILS. In block capitals please. Essential for airlines and in case of emergency during the festival. Traveller 1

Traveller 2

Title

Title

Surname

Surname

Forename(s)

Forename(s)

Date of birth (dd/mm/yy)

Date of birth (dd/mm/yy)

Passport number

Passport number

Place of birth

Place of birth

Place of issue

Place of issue

Nationality

Nationality

Date of issue (dd/mm/yy)

Date of issue (dd/mm/yy)

Date of expiry (dd/mm/yy)

Date of expiry (dd/mm/yy)

NEXT OF KIN or contact incase of emergency.

PAYMENT

Name

EITHER Deposit(s) at £300 per person for the festival, plus any pre-festival deposit(s) at £200 (Art in Munich) or £400 (Salzburg Summer) per person.

Relation to you

Total deposit:

Telephone

£

OR Full payment which is required within ten weeks of departure. Total: £

SPECIAL REQUESTS. Please let us know if you have any requests (for flight upgrades, connecting flights, etc.), or any dietary requirements.

EITHER by cheque. Please make cheques payable to Martin Randall Travel Ltd and write the festival code (mz 650) on the reverse. OR by credit or debit card. Visa/ Mastercard/ Amex Card number Start date

I have read and agree to the Booking Conditions on behalf of all listed on this form. Signed Date

Expiry date

OR by bank transfer. Please use your surname and the festival code (mz 650) as a reference and please allow for all bank charges. Tick if you have paid by bank transfer: Account name: Martin Randall Travel Ltd. Royal Bank of Scotland, Drummonds, 49 Charing Cross, London SW1A 2DX. Account number: 0019 6050. Sort code: 16-00-38 IBAN: GB71 RBOS 1600 3800 1960 50 Swift/BIC: RBOS GB2L

M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L Voysey House, Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4GF Telephone 020 8742 3355 Fax 020 8742 7766 info@martinrandall.co.uk www.martinrandall.com

Australia: telephone 1300 55 95 95 New Zealand: telephone 0800 877 622 anz@martinrandall.com.au

Canada: telephone 647 382 1644 canada@martinrandall.ca USA: telephone 1 800 988 6168

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The Danube Music Festival, 16–23 August 2013

Booking Details Making a booking 1. Provisional booking

2. Definite booking

3. Our confirmation

We recommend that you contact us first to ascertain that your preferred deck and cabin type is still available. You can make a provisional booking which we will hold for one week (longer if necessary) pending receipt of your completed Booking Form and deposit.

Fill in the Booking Form and send it to us with the deposit. It is important that you read the Booking Conditions at this stage, and that you sign the Booking Form. Full payment is required if you are booking within ten weeks of the festival.

Upon receipt of your Booking Form and deposit we send you confirmation of your booking. After this your deposit is nonreturnable except in the special circumstances mentioned in the Booking Conditions.

Passports and visas. Participants must have passports, valid for at least six months beyond the date of the festival. No visas are required for the countries visited during the festival (Austria, Germany, Slovakia) for UK or other EU citizens, or for citizens of the USA, Canada, Australia or New Zealand. Nationals of other countries should ascertain whether visas are required in their case, and obtain them if they are.

ensure that everything you booked is listed on it. For more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate go to: www.atol.org.uk/ATOLcertificate

If you cancel. If you have to cancel your participation in the festival or a pre-festival tour, there would be a charge which varies according to the period of notice you give. Up to 57 days before departure the deposit only is forfeited. Thereafter a percentage of the total cost will be due:

In the event of our insolvency, protection is provided for non-flight packages commencing in and returning to the UK and other nonflight packages excluding pre-arranged travel to and from your destination.

Booking Conditions Please read these.

You need to sign your assent to these booking conditions on the booking form.

Our promises to you.

We aim to be fair, reasonable and sympathetic in all our dealings with clients, and to act always with integrity. We will meet all our legal and regulatory responsibilities, often going beyond the minimum obligations. We aim to provide full and accurate information about our tours and festivals. If there are changes, we will tell you promptly. If something does go wrong, we will try to put it right. Our overriding aim is to ensure that every client is satisfied with our services.

All we ask of you.

from 56 to 29 days: from 28 to 15 days: from 14 to 3 days: within 48 hours:

Specific terms.

We take as the day of cancellation that on which we receive written confirmation of cancellation.

We ask that you read the information we send to you. Our contract with you. From the time we receive your signed booking form and initial payment, a contract exists between you and Martin Randall Travel Ltd. Eligibility. We reserve the right to refuse to accept a booking without necessarily giving a reason. It is essential to be able to cope with the walking and the steps required to get to the concert venues. See ‘Fitness’ on page 7. There is no age limit for the festival, though we cannot accept bookings on either of the tours preceding the festival or on ‘The Walking Party’ from those who would be 81 or over at the time of departure. Insurance. It is a requirement of booking that you have adequate holiday insurance. Cover for medical treatment, repatriation, loss of property and cancellation charges must be included. Insurance can be obtained from most insurance companies, banks, travel agencies and (in the UK) many retail outlets including Post Offices.

40% 60% 80% 100%

If we cancel the festival or tour. We might decide to cancel the festival or tour if at any time up to eight weeks before there were insufficient bookings for it to be viable. We would refund everything you had paid to us. We might also cancel if hostilities, civil unrest, natural disaster or other circumstances amounting to force majeure affect the region. Safety and security. If the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office advises against travel to places visited on the festival or tour, we would cancel or adjust the itinerary to avoid the risky area. In the event of cancellation before the festival or tour commenced we would give you a full refund. Consumer protection ATOL. All the flights and flight-inclusive holidays in this brochure are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. When you make your first payment you will be supplied with an ATOL Certificate. Please check to

ABTOT. As a member of the Association of Bonded Travel Organisers Trust Limited (ABTOT), Martin Randall Travel has provided a bond to meet the requirements of the Package Travel, Package Holidays and Package Tours Regulations 1992.

In the above circumstances, if you have not yet travelled you may claim a refund, or if you have already travelled, you may claim repatriation to the starting point of your nonflight package. The limits of our liabilities. As principal, we accept responsibility for all ingredients of the festival or tour, except those in which the principle of force majeure prevails. Our obligations and responsibilities are also limited where international conventions apply in respect of air, sea or rail carriers, including the Warsaw Convention and its various updates. If we make changes. Circumstances might arise which prevent us from operating the festival or tour exactly as advertised. We would try to devise a satisfactory alternative, but if the change represents a significant loss to the festival or tour we would offer compensation. If you decide to cancel because the alternative we offer is not acceptable we would give a full refund. English Law. These conditions form part of your contract with Martin Randall Travel Ltd and are governed by English law. All proceedings shall be within the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.


The Danube Music Festival 16–23 August 2013

Angelika Kirchschlager & Robert Lehrbaumer

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Austrian Baroque Company

Quintett Wien

The Wihan Quartet

Capella Savaria & Capella Cantorum

Austro-Hungarian Haydn Philharmonic

Voysey House, Barley Mow Passage, London, United Kingdom W4 4GF Telephone 020 8742 3355 Fax 020 8742 7766 info@martinrandall.co.uk Australia: Martin Randall Marketing, PO Box 537, Toowong, Queensland 4066 Telephone 1300 55 95 95 Fax 07 3377 0142 anz@martinrandall.com.au

Roderick Williams & Susie Allan

The Mozart Chamber Ensemble

Talks by Richard Wigmore & Tim Blanning

New Zealand: Telephone 0800 877 622 Canada: Telephone 647 382 1644 Fax 416 925 2670 canada@martinrandall.ca USA: Telephone 1 800 988 6168

www.martinrandall.com

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The Danube Music Festival (16–23 August 2013)